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Sample records for groups c9 control

  1. Genetic Polymorphism of CYP2C9 among Sistani Ethnic Group in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) is involved in metabolism of many important drugs and its genotype variations is thought to affect drug efficacy and the treatment process. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of CYP2C9 allele and genotypic variants in Sistani ethnic group, living in Gorgan, ...

  2. The upgraded control and instrumentation system of C9 irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulpa, A.; Parvu, C.; Valeca, S. C.; Ancuta, M.; Ana, E.

    2016-01-01

    C9 Capsule is an irradiation device of TRIGA SSR, which was designed for nuclear fuel cycling testing. It simulates the load follow-up by the power reactor, i.e. CANDU 700MW operating with variable load. The irradiation tests in the power cycling conditions were conceived for complete characterization of the fuel behaviour. The irradiation conditions are similar to those found in nuclear power plant when it is operated in load following mode. The power cycling tests are performed by using an under flux moving system. The paper presents the upgraded control and instrumentation system of the ''9C irradiation device, designed and manufactured in order to enhance the performance of this system for better surveillance and processing of the acquired experimental data. (authors)

  3. Control and safety systems for TRIGA irradiation facilities C5 and C9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talpalariu Cornel Talpalariu Jeni Crucean Mircea Matei Corina

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Institute for Nuclear Research conducted research for designing and manufacturing of microprocessor equipment for some irradiation facilities operating by the TRIGA reactor. This equipment has accumulated a wide operating time allowing the conclusions referring to reliability, ergonomics, and design of the operating facilities. Based upon these studies a new program was initiated for the design and manufacturing of a modern equipment with improved reliability and flexibility performances. The system provides the user with a multitude of options, numerical and analog interfaces, keyboard and high reliability local display. The main functional components of the system are: - 8 PID full options regulating loops; - 8 safety analog channels having 4 preset trips; - watch dog restart and fault tolerant facilities; - 8 high precision analog with an input of 0 - 15 mV from thermocouple; - 8 computer controlled power supplies of 220 V, 1 kWA; - alphanumeric display and keyboard; - fault tolerant analog scanner. A real improvement of the system is the future remote control computer, a PC AT Pentium working like a system controller, real time data acquisition, and operator's adviser. This new facility allows the operator to set the trips or to control remotely all the power supply and step-by-step positioner of irradiation device. Software design for acquisition and data processing provides modern techniques for operator interfacing, representation recording and protection of test results. Software implementation keeps a special organization supported by a real time executive that is the best method to achieve the performance required. Following this objective, the software structure consists of: 1. Tasks as follows: - testing parameters setup; - data processing routines; - engineering and electrical conversion; - numerical / graphical data representation; - test results recording routines and data base management. 2. Drivers as follows: - A/I and D

  4. Pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in healthy controls with wild-type phenotype for CYP2C9 shows metabolism variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martín-De Saro

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: This data indicate that CYP2C9 is not the only enzyme responsible of the metabolism of diclofenac, so it is important to analyze other cytochromes and their variants potentially involved in the metabolism of this drug.

  5. Update of the Picker C9 irradiator control system of the gamma II room of the secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon S, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Picker C9 irradiator is responsible for the calibration of different radiological equipment and the control system that maintains it in operation is designed in the graphical programming software LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench), being its major advantages: the different types of communication, easy interconnection with other software and the recognition of different hardware devices, among others. Operation of the irradiator control system is performed with the NI-Usb-6008 (DAQ) data acquisition module of the National Instruments Company. The purpose of this work is to update the routines that make the Picker C9 control system of the gamma II room of the secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration, using the graphic programming software LabVIEW, as well as to configure the new acquisition hardware of data that is implemented to control the Picker C9 irradiator system and ensure its operation. (Author)

  6. Update of the Picker C9 irradiator control system of the gamma II room of the secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration; Actualizacion del sistema de control del irradiador Picker C9 de la sala gamma II del laboratorio secundario de calibracion dosimetrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon S, L. E.

    2016-07-01

    The Picker C9 irradiator is responsible for the calibration of different radiological equipment and the control system that maintains it in operation is designed in the graphical programming software LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench), being its major advantages: the different types of communication, easy interconnection with other software and the recognition of different hardware devices, among others. Operation of the irradiator control system is performed with the NI-Usb-6008 (DAQ) data acquisition module of the National Instruments Company. The purpose of this work is to update the routines that make the Picker C9 control system of the gamma II room of the secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration, using the graphic programming software LabVIEW, as well as to configure the new acquisition hardware of data that is implemented to control the Picker C9 irradiator system and ensure its operation. (Author)

  7. Structural and functional brain signatures of C9orf72 in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Ferraro, Pilar M; Riva, Nilo; Spinelli, Edoardo Gioele; Domi, Teuta; Carrera, Paola; Copetti, Massimiliano; Falzone, Yuri; Ferrari, Maurizio; Lunetta, Christian; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Quattrini, Angelo; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) motor neuron disease (MND) relative to disease severity-matched sporadic MND cases. We enrolled 19 C9orf72 and 67 disease severity-matched sporadic MND patients, and 22 controls. Sporadic cases were grouped in patients with: no cognitive/behavioral deficits (sporadic-motor); same patterns of cognitive/behavioral impairment as C9orf72 cases (sporadic-cognitive); shorter disease duration versus other sporadic groups (sporadic-early). C9orf72 patients showed cerebellar and thalamic atrophy versus all sporadic cases. All MND patients showed motor, frontal, and temporoparietal cortical thinning and motor and extramotor white matter damage versus controls, independent of genotype and presence of cognitive impairment. Compared with sporadic-early, C9orf72 patients revealed an occipital cortical thinning. C9orf72 patients had enhanced visual network functional connectivity versus sporadic-motor and sporadic-early cases. Structural cerebellar and thalamic damage and posterior cortical alterations are the brain magnetic resonance imaging signatures of C9orf72 MND. Frontotemporal cortical and widespread white matter involvement are likely to be an effect of the disease evolution rather than a C9orf72 marker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Allele frequency distribution of CYP2C9 2 and CYP2C9 3 polymorphisms in six Mexican populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelán-Martínez, Osvaldo D; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos; Sandoval-García, Emmanuel; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; González-Ibarra, Miriam; Solano-Solano, Gloria; Gómez-Díaz, Rita A; Parra, Esteban J; Cruz, Miguel; Valladares-Salgado, Adán

    2013-07-10

    Allele frequency differences of functional CYP2C9 polymorphisms are responsible for some of the variation in drug response observed in human populations. The most relevant CYP2C9 functional variants are CYP2C9*2 (rs1799853) and CYP2C9 3 (rs1057910). These polymorphisms show variation in allele frequencies among different population groups. The present study aimed to analyze these polymorphisms in 947 Mexican-Mestizo from Mexico City and 483 individuals from five indigenous Mexican populations: Nahua, Teenek, Tarahumara, Purepecha and Huichol. The CYP2C9*2 allele frequencies in the Mestizo, Nahua and Teenek populations were 0.051, 0.007 and 0.005, respectively. As for CYP2C9 3, the allelic frequencies in the Mestizo, Nahua and Teenek populations were 0.04, 0.005 and 0.005, respectively. The CYP2C9 2 and CYP2C9 3 alleles were not observed in the Tarahumara, Purepecha and Huichol populations. These findings are in agreement with previous studies reporting very low allele frequencies for these polymorphisms in American Indigenous populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. SU-C-9A-02: Structured Noise Index as An Automated Quality Control for Nuclear Medicine: A Two Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J; Christianson, O; Samei, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Flood-field uniformity evaluation is an essential element in the assessment of nuclear medicine (NM) gamma cameras. It serves as the central element of the quality control (QC) program, acquired and analyzed on a daily basis prior to clinical imaging. Uniformity images are traditionally analyzed using pixel value-based metrics which often fail to capture subtle structure and patterns caused by changes in gamma camera performance requiring additional visual inspection which is subjective and time demanding. The goal of this project was to develop and implement a robust QC metrology for NM that is effective in identifying non-uniformity issues, reporting issues in a timely manner for efficient correction prior to clinical involvement, all incorporated into an automated effortless workflow, and to characterize the program over a two year period. Methods: A new quantitative uniformity analysis metric was developed based on 2D noise power spectrum metrology and confirmed based on expert observer visual analysis. The metric, termed Structured Noise Index (SNI) was then integrated into an automated program to analyze, archive, and report on daily NM QC uniformity images. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated over a period of 2 years. Results: The SNI metric successfully identified visually apparent non-uniformities overlooked by the pixel valuebased analysis methods. Implementation of the program has resulted in nonuniformity identification in about 12% of daily flood images. In addition, due to the vigilance of staff response, the percentage of days exceeding trigger value shows a decline over time. Conclusion: The SNI provides a robust quantification of the NM performance of gamma camera uniformity. It operates seamlessly across a fleet of multiple camera models. The automated process provides effective workflow within the NM spectra between physicist, technologist, and clinical engineer. The reliability of this process has made it the preferred

  10. The metabolic signature of C9ORF72-related ALS: FDG PET comparison with nonmutated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cistaro, Angelina; Fania, Piercarlo; Pagani, Marco; Montuschi, Anna; Moglia, Cristina; Canosa, Antonio; Calvo, Andrea; Lopiano, Leonardo; Restagno, Gabriella; Brunetti, Maura; Traynor, Bryan J.; Nobili, Flavio; Carrara, Giovanna; Valentini, M.C.; Chio, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene, located on chromosome 9p21 has been demonstrated to be the commonest cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to account for 5 to 10 % of apparently sporadic ALS. Relatively little is known about the brain metabolism profile of patients carrying the expansion. Our aim was to identify the [ 18 F]FDG PET profile in ALS patients with the C9ORF72 expansion (C9ORF72-ALS). Fifteen C9ORF72-ALS patients were compared with 12 patients with ALS and comorbid frontotemporal dementia (FTD) without the C9ORF72 expansion (ALS-FTD) and 30 cognitively normal patients with ALS without mutations of ALS-related genes (sALS). The three groups were then cross-matched to 40 neurologically normal controls. All patients underwent FDG PET within 4 months of diagnosis. The C9ORF72-ALS patients compared with the sALS patients showed significant hypometabolism in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, insula, caudate and thalamus, the left frontal and superior temporal cortex, and hypermetabolism in the midbrain, bilateral occipital cortex, globus pallidus and left inferior temporal cortex. The ALS-FTD patients compared with the sALS patients showed more limited hypometabolic areas, including the orbitofrontal, prefrontal, anterior cingulate and insular cortex, and hypermetabolic areas, including the bilateral occipital cortex, the left precentral and postcentral cortex and superior temporal gyrus. The C9ORF72-ALS patients compared with the ALS-FTD patients showed hypometabolism in the left temporal cortex. ALS patients with the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion had a more widespread central nervous system involvement than ALS patients without genetic mutations, with or without comorbid FTD, consistent with their more severe clinical picture. (orig.)

  11. The metabolic signature of C9ORF72-related ALS: FDG PET comparison with nonmutated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cistaro, Angelina; Fania, Piercarlo [Positron Emission Tomography Center IRMET S.p.A, Torino (Italy); Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Rome (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Montuschi, Anna; Moglia, Cristina; Canosa, Antonio [University of Torino, ' Rita Levi Montalcini' Department of Neuroscience, Torino (Italy); Calvo, Andrea; Lopiano, Leonardo [University of Torino, ' Rita Levi Montalcini' Department of Neuroscience, Torino (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of Turin, Turin (Italy); Restagno, Gabriella; Brunetti, Maura [Azienda Ospedaliera Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Molecular Genetics Unit, Department of Clinical Pathology, Torino (Italy); Traynor, Bryan J. [National Institute on Ageing, National Institutes of Health, Neuromuscular Diseases Research Unit, Laboratory of Neurogenetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Nobili, Flavio [University of Genova, Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Neurosciences, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Genova (Italy); Carrara, Giovanna; Valentini, M.C. [Azienda Ospedaliera Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Department of Neuroradiology, Torino (Italy); Chio, Adriano [University of Torino, ' Rita Levi Montalcini' Department of Neuroscience, Torino (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of Turin, Turin (Italy); ALS Center, ' Rita Levi Montalcini' Department of Neuroscience, Torino (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Recently, a GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene, located on chromosome 9p21 has been demonstrated to be the commonest cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to account for 5 to 10 % of apparently sporadic ALS. Relatively little is known about the brain metabolism profile of patients carrying the expansion. Our aim was to identify the [{sup 18}F]FDG PET profile in ALS patients with the C9ORF72 expansion (C9ORF72-ALS). Fifteen C9ORF72-ALS patients were compared with 12 patients with ALS and comorbid frontotemporal dementia (FTD) without the C9ORF72 expansion (ALS-FTD) and 30 cognitively normal patients with ALS without mutations of ALS-related genes (sALS). The three groups were then cross-matched to 40 neurologically normal controls. All patients underwent FDG PET within 4 months of diagnosis. The C9ORF72-ALS patients compared with the sALS patients showed significant hypometabolism in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, insula, caudate and thalamus, the left frontal and superior temporal cortex, and hypermetabolism in the midbrain, bilateral occipital cortex, globus pallidus and left inferior temporal cortex. The ALS-FTD patients compared with the sALS patients showed more limited hypometabolic areas, including the orbitofrontal, prefrontal, anterior cingulate and insular cortex, and hypermetabolic areas, including the bilateral occipital cortex, the left precentral and postcentral cortex and superior temporal gyrus. The C9ORF72-ALS patients compared with the ALS-FTD patients showed hypometabolism in the left temporal cortex. ALS patients with the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion had a more widespread central nervous system involvement than ALS patients without genetic mutations, with or without comorbid FTD, consistent with their more severe clinical picture. (orig.)

  12. Coordinated Control of Vehicle Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    .... There are three main objectives: (1) to develop a theoretical paradigm for formalizing the concepts of a group, a team, and control of groups, with specified tasks such as exploring, mapping, searching, and transporting objects; (2...

  13. The novel protein C9orf116 promotes rat liver cell line BRL-3A proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Zhang

    Full Text Available Our previous study has proved that the chromosome 9 open reading frame 116 (C9orf116 (NM_001106564.1 was significantly up-regulated in the proliferation phase of liver regeneration. To study its possible physiological function, we analyzed the effect of C9orf116 on BRL-3A cells via over-expression and interference technique. MTT results showed that the cell viability of the interference group was significantly lower than the control group at 48h after transfection (P<0.05, whereas it was significantly higher in the over-expression group (P<0.05. The flow cytometry results showed that C9orf116 knockdown or over-expression had little effect on BRL-3A cell apoptosis. However, the number of cells in division phase (G2/M was significantly reduced in the interference group (P<0.05, but significantly increased in the over-expression group (P<0.01. Furthermore, the expressions of cell proliferation-related genes CCNA2, CCND1 and MYC both at mRNA and protein levels were down-regulated in the interference group and up-regulated in the over-expression group. Therefore, we concluded that C9orf116 may promote cell proliferation by modulating cell cycle transition and the expression of key genes CCNA2, CCND1 and MYC in BRL-3A cells.

  14. Hidden Costs of Control in Social Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Wiederhold, Simon; Riener, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of social identity in reactions to control. We propose a simple principal-agent model with control that incorporates the existence of social groups. Our laboratory experiment shows that, in contrast to no-group agents, agents in social groups (i) perform better; (ii) expect less control; (iii) do not reciprocate when facing less control than expected; (iv) decrease their performance substantially when actual control exceeds their expectation. Hidden costs of c...

  15. CYP2C9 genotypes and the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam in Brazilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna-Jorge, Rosane; Perini, Jamila A; Rondinelli, Edson; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2004-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9, the product of the polymorphic gene CYP2C9, provides the major catabolic pathway for several anti-inflammatory drugs, including tenoxicam. Our objectives were (1) to determine the frequency of 2 common CYP2C9 variant alleles (*2 and *3) in the Brazilian population and (2) to evaluate the effects of these polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods were used to identify CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 in 331 healthy Brazilians, classified as white (n = 136), black (n = 77), or intermediate (n = 118). A validated HPLC procedure was used for measuring the plasma concentrations of tenoxicam, after single oral doses of 20 mg, administered to 21 individuals with CYP2C9*1/*1 (n = 12), CYP2C9*1/*2 (n = 4), or CYP2C9*1/*3 genotypes (n = 5), confirmed by deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used for fitting the plasma concentration versus time data, and the individual model descriptive parameters were used to simulate the plasma tenoxicam concentrations during repeated dosing for 7 consecutive days. The frequencies of CYP2C9*1, CYP2C9*2, and CYP2C9*3 in the study population were 0.849, 0.086, and 0.065, respectively. The distribution of CYP2C9 alleles differed across the Brazilian color groups (P = .016), with the frequencies of the variant alleles being 2.5 to 3 times lower in black Brazilians than in white Brazilians (P = .003). After a single dose of tenoxicam, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to infinity and the oral clearance of tenoxicam were 190 +/- 48 microg x mL(-1) x h and 113 +/- 30 mL x h(-1), respectively, in wild-type homozygous subjects (CYP2C9*1/*1), as compared with 261 +/- 14 microg x mL(-1) x h (P = .013) and 77 +/- 4 mL x h(-1) (P = .036), respectively, in CYP2C9*1/*2 heterozygous subjects and 335 +/- 126 microg x mL(-1) x h (P = .003) and 67 +/- 23 mL x h(-1) (P = .008) in CYP2C9

  16. CYP2C9 polymorphism in patients with epilepsy: genotypic frequency analyzes andphenytoin adverse reactions correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Twardowschy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: CYP2C9 is a major enzyme in human drug metabolism and the polymorphism observed in the corresponding gene may affect therapeutic outcome during treatment. The distribution of variant CYP2C9 alleles and prevalence of phenytoin adverse reactions were hereby investigated in a population of patients diagnosed with epilepsy. METHOD: Allele-specific PCR analysis was carried out in order to determine frequencies of the two most common variant alleles, CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 in genomic DNA isolated from 100 epileptic patients. We also analyzed the frequency of phenytoin adverse reactions among those different genotypes groups. The data was presented as mean±standard deviation. RESULTS: The mean age at enrollment was 39.6±10.3 years (range, 17-72 years and duration of epilepsy was 26.5±11.9 years (range 3-48 years. The mean age at epilepsy onset was 13.1±12.4 years (range, 1 month-62 years. Frequencies of CYP2C9*1 (84%, CYP2C9*2 (9% and CYP2C9*3 (7% were similar to other published reports. Phenytoin adverse reactions were usually mild and occurred in 15% patients, without correlation with the CYP2C9 polymorphism (p=0.34. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an overall similar distribution of the CYP2C9 alleles in a population of patients diagnosed with epilepsy in the South of Brazil, compared to other samples. This sample of phenytoin users showed no drug related adverse reactions and CYP2C9 allele type correlation. The role of CYP2C9 polymorphism influence on phenytoin adverse reaction remains to be determined since some literature evidence and our data found negative results.

  17. C9orf72 mutation is rare in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson's disease and essential tremor in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eJiao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available GGGGCC repeat expansions in the C9orf72 gene have been identified as a major contributing factor in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. Given the overlapping of clinical phenotypes and pathological characteristics between these two diseases and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and essential tremor (ET, we speculated regarding whether C9orf72 repeat expansions also play a major role in these three diseases. Using the repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction method, we screened for C9orf72 in three groups of patients with PD (n=911, AD (n=279, and ET (n=152 in the Chinese Han population. There were no pathogenic repeats (>30 repeats detected in either the patients or controls (n=314, which indicated that the pathogenic expansions of C9orf72 might be rare in these three diseases. However, the analysis of the association between the number of repeats (p=0.001, short/intermediate genotype (short: <7 repeats; intermediate: ≥7 repeats (odds ratio 1.37 [1.05, 1.79], intermediate/intermediate genotype (Odds ratio 2.03 [1.17, 3.54] and PD risks indicated that intermediate repeat alleles could act as contributors to PD. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal the correlation between C9orf72 and Chinese PD, AD or ET patients. Additionally, the results of this study suggest the novel idea that the intermediate repeat allele in C9orf72 is most likely a risk factor for PD.

  18. Correlations of CYP2C9*3/CYP2D6*10/CYP3A5*3 gene polymorphisms with efficacy of etanercept treatment for patients with ankylosing spondylitis: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan

    2017-03-01

    The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor etanercept has been proven to be effective in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), while genetic polymorphism may affect drug metabolism or drug receptor, resulting in interindividual variability in drug disposition and efficacy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlations between CYP2C9*3/CYP2D6*10/CYP3A5*3 gene polymorphisms and the efficacy of etanercept treatment for patients with AS. From March 2012 to June 2015, 312 AS patients (174 males and 138 females, mean age: 35.2 ± 5.83 years) from 18 to 56 years old were enrolled in this study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was applied to detect the allele and genotype frequencies of CYP2C93, CYP2D610, and CYP3A53 gene polymorphisms. The joint swelling score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level of AS patients were compared before and after 24-week etanercept treatment. Assessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) and bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) scores were recorded to assess the efficacy of etanercept treatment. The AS patients with wild-type 1/1 and heterozygous 1/3 genotypes of CYP2C93 polymorphism accounted for 93.59% and 6.41%, respectively, without 3/3 genotype. The AS patients with wild-type CC, heterozygous CT, and mutation homozygous TT genotypes of CYP2D610 polymorphism accounted for 19.23%, 39.10%, and 41.67%, respectively. The AS patients with wild-type 1/1, heterozygous 1/3, and mutation homozygous 3/3 genotypes of CYP3A53 polymorphism accounted for 7.69%, 36.22%, and 56.09%, respectively. After 24-week treatment, AS patients with wild-type 1/1 genotype of CYP2C93, CC genotype of CYP2D610, and 3/3 genotype of CYP3A53 polymorphisms had lower joint swelling score, ESR, and CRP level. The joint swelling score, ESR, and CRP levels were significantly lower in the patients with CC genotype of CYP2D610 polymorphism than in CT and

  19. Common polymorphisms in CYP2C9, subclinical atherosclerosis and risk of ischemic vascular disease in 52 000 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, D.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) enzymes metabolize warfarin and arachidonic acid. We hypothesized that the CYP2C9*2 (rs. 1799853) and CYP2C9*3 (rs. 1057910) polymorphisms with decreased enzyme activity affect risk of subclinical atherosclerosis (reduced ankle brachial index and increased C-reactive ......Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) enzymes metabolize warfarin and arachidonic acid. We hypothesized that the CYP2C9*2 (rs. 1799853) and CYP2C9*3 (rs. 1057910) polymorphisms with decreased enzyme activity affect risk of subclinical atherosclerosis (reduced ankle brachial index and increased C...... of follow-up; the Copenhagen General Population Study, a cross-sectional study including 21 629 participants; and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study, a case-control study including 5082 cases and 14 904 controls. CYP2C9 carriers versus noncarriers did not associate with subclinical atherosclerosis......% power. In conclusion, in three independent studies totaling more than 52 000 individuals, we found no association between CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis, ischemic vascular disease or death after ischemic heart disease. The Pharmacogenomics Journal (2009) 9...

  20. Predicting drug metabolism by cytochrome P450 2C9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Olsen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    By the use of knowledge gained through modeling of drug metabolism mediated by the cytochrome P450 2D6 and 3A4 isoforms, we constructed a 2D-based model for site-of-metabolism prediction for the cytochrome P450 2C9 isoform. The similarities and differences between the models for the 2C9 and 2D6...

  1. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF CYTOCHROMES P450 2C9 AND 2C19 IN SLOVENIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Herman

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9 and 2C19 (CYP2C19 participate in metabolism of many clinically important drugs. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes are described which may affect drug treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies of polymorphic CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 alleles in Slovenian population in order to estimate the proportion of the population that might experience adverse drug reaction.Methods. The polymorphism of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 was analysed by a genotyping technique, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by restriction enzyme analysis. DNA samples from 129 unrelated healthy subjects were obtained from the Blood Transfusion Centre of Slovenia and University Children’s Hospital in Ljubljana.Results. In the analysed group of samples one-third of individuals carried at least one of the defective CYP2C9 alleles while among them 3.2% of individuals had both alleles affected. The frequencies of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 were 0.122 and 0.063, respectively. Almost one-third of Slovenian individuals analysed carried at least one of the CYP2C19 polymorphic allele. The frequencies of CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 were 0.159 and 0.004, respectively.Conclusions. The results of our study indicate that approximately one-third of the patients from Slovenian population may require either adjustments of dose or increased monitoring when initiating treatment with CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 substrates having a narrow therapeutic index. High risk of adverse drug reaction may be expected in 1–3% of eventual patients.

  2. Network degeneration and dysfunction in presymptomatic C9ORF72 expansion carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzee E. Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 are the most common known genetic cause of familial and sporadic frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous work has shown that patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia due to C9ORF72 show salience and sensorimotor network disruptions comparable to those seen in sporadic behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, but it remains unknown how early in the lifespan these and other changes in brain structure and function arise. To gain insights into this question, we compared 15 presymptomatic carriers (age 43.7 ± 10.2 years, nine females to matched healthy controls. We used voxel-based morphometry to assess gray matter, diffusion tensor imaging to interrogate white matter tracts, and task-free functional MRI to probe the salience, sensorimotor, default mode, and medial pulvinar thalamus-seeded networks. We further used a retrospective chart review to ascertain psychiatric histories in carriers and their non-carrier family members. Carriers showed normal cognition and behavior despite gray matter volume and brain connectivity deficits that were apparent as early as the fourth decade of life. Gray matter volume deficits were topographically similar though less severe than those in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia due to C9ORF72, with major foci in cingulate, insula, thalamus, and striatum. Reduced white matter integrity was found in the corpus callosum, cingulum bundles, corticospinal tracts, uncinate fasciculi and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. Intrinsic connectivity deficits were detected in all four networks but most prominent in salience and medial pulvinar thalamus-seeded networks. Carrier and control groups showed comparable relationships between imaging metrics and age, suggesting that deficits emerge during early adulthood. Carriers and non-carrier family members had comparable lifetime histories of psychiatric symptoms. Taken

  3. The Challenge of Recruiting Control Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2011-01-01

      Recruitment of a large and reliable control group is a challenge in psychological survey based research. The effect of recruitment styles and age on response-rate, data quality, and individual differences were investigated in a control group for a postal survey of elderly bereaved people....... This study was a direct reaction to the first recruitment attempt that had a 10% response rate. This study consisted of four groups of randomly selected elderly married people (65-81 years) receiving a postal questionnaire measuring depression, social support, coping style, adult attachment, life...... satisfaction, and personality factors. All groups were exposed to a set of general initiatives (customized introduction letter with university letterhead; self-addressed, prepaid envelope included; personally directed letter signed by the researcher; an assurance of confidentiality). Three groups were exposed...

  4. Potential explanations for control group benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda O; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer L; Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J; Zuber, Jeffrey K; Kennedy, Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Estimating effectiveness of clinical interventions depends on detecting differences between the responses of intervention and control groups. The outcome, intervention, and moderating factors all may influence the between group change. The absence of a clinically or statistically meaningful difference may also result from control group improvement due to nonspecific factors such as participants' perception of attention, positive regard, expectations, desire to please, and therapeutic alliance with the care provider. We examined perceived benefit and sources of benefit for control caregivers who participated in the CONNECT randomized controlled trial of a dementia caregiving intervention. After the final scheduled data collection in CONNECT, control group participants were asked whether they believed they benefited from study participation. Those who reported benefit were asked to describe the benefit received. Data were analyzed qualitatively. Of 60 available control caregivers, 82% reported a perceived benefit from study participation in five areas: getting information about dementia and caregiving; having someone to talk to and feeling supported; receiving understanding and validation of feelings; knowledge that others were in similar situations; and perceived appreciation of own abilities. Control caregivers who reported benefit were less burdened and depressed and spent less time on duty at baseline than those who did not report benefit. From caregivers' responses, we have identified the assessment battery, both content and time spent in data collection, as a possible mechanism of action for benefit. Study limitations include the better baseline characteristics of the control caregivers who reported benefit, the sample size of benefit control caregivers, the possibility of perceptions of benefit being a function of social desirability, and the lack of a similar question about benefit being asked of intervention caregivers. These findings suggest that the

  5. Control groups in recent septic shock trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter B; Jakob, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    % the proportion of patients with elevated lactate values. Five studies (21 %) provided data to estimate the proportion of septic shock patients fulfilling the Sepsis-3 definition. The mean data completeness score was 19 out of 36 (range 8-32). Of 18 predefined control group characteristics, a mean of 8 (range 2...

  6. 78 FR 46851 - Controlled Group Regulation Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... Controlled Group Regulation Examples AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking and notice of public hearing. SUMMARY: This document proposes revisions to examples... include a series of examples, two of which reproduce, nearly verbatim, examples contained in the 1942...

  7. Top-down control in contour grouping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Volberg

    Full Text Available Human observers tend to group oriented line segments into full contours if they follow the Gestalt rule of 'good continuation'. It is commonly assumed that contour grouping emerges automatically in early visual cortex. In contrast, recent work in animal models suggests that contour grouping requires learning and thus involves top-down control from higher brain structures. Here we explore mechanisms of top-down control in perceptual grouping by investigating synchronicity within EEG oscillations. Human participants saw two micro-Gabor arrays in a random order, with the task to indicate whether the first (S1 or the second stimulus (S2 contained a contour of collinearly aligned elements. Contour compared to non-contour S1 produced a larger posterior post-stimulus beta power (15-21 Hz. Contour S2 was associated with a pre-stimulus decrease in posterior alpha power (11-12 Hz and in fronto-posterior theta (4-5 Hz phase couplings, but not with a post-stimulus increase in beta power. The results indicate that subjects used prior knowledge from S1 processing for S2 contour grouping. Expanding previous work on theta oscillations, we propose that long-range theta synchrony shapes neural responses to perceptual groupings regulating lateral inhibition in early visual cortex.

  8. Export Control in the AREVA Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero, S.

    2013-01-01

    After the Second World War the nuclear technology was mostly considered inappropriate for the export. It remains strictly regulated today, but the development of the civil applications urged states to facilitate the peaceful uses while establishing a strict control in the domains of the internal security and the nuclear proliferation. AREVA decided to set up an Export Control program applied to all the products and in all the countries where the group operates. AREVA can export products or make transfer of technology considered as sensitive for the non-proliferation and the risks linked to the terrorism. This sensitiveness results from the nature of the products or from the country of destination and in certain cases both of them. AREVA has set up an Export Control program and an interactive e-learning training within the Group to make exports of sensitive products, raw materials and technologies more secure. The subject is rather complex, the regulations are constantly evolving, and becoming familiar with them is necessarily a gradual process, but it must be made in-depth, hence the idea of regular training sessions. The implementation of the Export Control in the AREVA Group declines in four fundamental stages: -) Policy and procedure; -) Appointment of Export Control Officers (ECO); -) Training; and -) Audit and Self Assessment. The training program is composed by the following elements: Ethics (Value Charter) of the Group, Non-proliferation, international regulations and more particularly those that are applicable in Europe (Germany and France) and in the United States. Particular attention is devoted to the Export Control practice in China, Japan and India. (A.C.)

  9. Influence of admixture components on CYP2C9*2 allele frequency in eight indigenous populations from Northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Macías, M; Lazalde-Ramos, B P; Galaviz-Hernández, C; Rangel-Villalobos, H; Salazar-Flores, J; Martínez-Sevilla, V M; Martínez-Fierro, M L; Dorado, P; Wong, M L; Licinio, J; LLerena, A

    2013-12-01

    We previously documented the lowest frequency of CYP2C9*2 in Mexican indigenous Tepehuanos followed by Mestizos and Mexican-Americans populations, suggesting a negative correlation between the CYP2C9*2 frequency and the degree of Asian ancestry in indigenous Americans. We determined the influence of ethnic admixture components on the CYP2C9 allele distribution in 505 Amerindian from eight indigenous populations through genotyping CYP2C9*2, *3 and *6 alleles by real-time PCR and molecular evaluation of ancestry. The frequencies for CYP2C9*2 were 0.026 in Seris and 0.057 in Mayos, being higher than in Asians (PHuicholes (0.033) and Coras (0.037), with East Asians having lower frequencies than the former three groups (P<0.001). CYP2C9*6 was not found. The frequency of CYP2C9*2 was lower in Amerindians than in European populations, and higher than their Asian ancestors. The presence of this allele in ethnic groups in Mexico can be explained by European admixture.

  10. High allele frequency of CYP2C9*3 (rs1057910) in a Negrito's subtribe population in Malaysia; Aboriginal people of Jahai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosdi, Rasmaizatul Akma; Mohd Yusoff, Narazah; Ismail, Rusli; Soo Choon, Tan; Saleem, Mohamed; Musa, Nurfadhlina; Yusoff, Surini

    2016-09-01

    CYP2C9 gene polymorphisms modulate inter-individual variations in the human body's responses to various endogenous and exogenous drug substrates. To date, little is known about the CYP2C9 gene polymorphisms among the aboriginal populations of the world, including those in Malaysia. To characterise and compare the CYP2C9 polymorphisms (CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, CYP2C9*4 and CYP2C9*5) between one of Malaysia's aboriginal populations, Jahai, with the national major ethnic, Malay. To also compare the allele frequencies from these two populations with available data of other aboriginal populations around the world. The extracted DNA of 155 Jahais and 183 Malays was genotyped for CYP2C9 polymorphisms using a nested multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction technique. The results were confirmed by DNA direct sequencing. Genotyping results revealed that CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*4 and CYP2C9*5 were absent in Jahais, while only the latter two were absent in Malays. The CYP2C9*3 allelic frequency in Jahais was 36.2%, making them the most frequent carriers of the allele thus far reported in any ethnic group from Southeast Asia. The high frequency of CYP2C9*3 and the absence of CYP2C9*2 in Jahais suggest that genetic drift may be occurring in this ethnic group. This is the first study to determine the CYP2C9 polymorphisms in an aboriginal population in Malaysia.

  11. Metabolism of 7-ethoxycoumarin, flavanone and steroids by cytochrome P450 2C9 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Tomohide; Nakano, Ryosuke; Kanamaru, Kengo; Takenaka, Shinji; Uno, Yuichi; Imaishi, Hiromasa

    2017-11-01

    CYP2C9 is a human microsomal cytochrome P450c (CYP). Much of the variation in CYP2C9 levels and activity can be attributed to polymorphisms of this gene. Wild-type CYP2C9 and mutants were coexpressed with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in Escherichia coli. The hydroxylase activities toward 7-ethoxycoumarin, flavanone and steroids were examined. Six CYP2C9 variants showed Soret peaks (450 nm) typical of P450 in reduced CO-difference spectra. CYP2C9.38 had the highest 7-ethoxycoumarin de-ethylase activity. All the CYP2C9 variants showed lower flavanone 6-hydroxylation activities than CYP2C9.1 (the wild-type). CYP2C9.38 showed higher activities in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation, progesterone 6β-/16α-hydroxylation, estrone 11α-hydroxylation and estradiol 6α-hydroxylation than CYP2C9.1. CYP2C9.40 showed higher testosterone 17-oxidase activity than CYP2C9.1; CYP2C9.8 showed higher estrone 16α-hydroxylase activity and CYP2C9.12 showed higher estrone 11α-hydroxylase activity. CYP2C9.9 and CYP2C9.10 showed similar activities to CYP2C9.1. These results indicate that the substrate specificity of CYP2C9.9 and CYP2C9.10 was not changed, but CYP2C9.8, CYP2C9.12 and CYP2C9.40 showed different substrate specificity toward steroids compared with CYP2C9.1; and especially CYP2C9.38 displayed diverse substrate specificities towards 7-ethoxycoumarin and steroids. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Influence of endogenous plasmids on phenotypes of Pantoea vagans strain C9-1 associated with epiphytic fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea vagans strain C9-1 is an effective biological control agent for fire blight of pear and apple. C9-1 carries three circular plasmids: pPag1 (168 kb), pPag2 (166 kb), and pPag3 (530 kb). Of these, pPag3, a member of the large Pantoea plasmid family, was proposed to contribute to epiphytic fitn...

  13. C9orf72-related disorders: expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases represent a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions primarily involving dementia, motor neuron disease and movement disorders. They are mostly related to different pathophysiological processes, notably in family forms in which the clinical and genetic heterogeneity are lush. In the last decade, much knowledge has been acumulated about the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases, making it essential in cases of motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia the repeat expansions of C9orf72 gene. This review analyzes the main clinical, radiological and genetic aspects of the phenotypes related to the hexanucleotide repeat expansions (GGGGCC of C9orf72 gene. Future studies will aim to further characterize the neuropsychological, imaging and pathological aspects of the extra-motor features of motor neuron disease, and will help to provide a new classification system that is both clinically and biologically relevant.

  14. Summary of Research 1995, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups (Command, Control & Communications Academic Group, Electronic Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic Group and Undersea Warfare Academic Group)

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Academic Groups

    1995-01-01

    The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. This report contains information of research projects in the four interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control & Communications Academic Group, Electronic Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic Group and Undersea Warfare Academic Group, which were carried out under funding of the Naval Postgraduate School Research...

  15. Striving for group agency: threat to personal control increases the attractiveness of agentic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollberg, Janine; Fritsche, Immo; Bäcker, Anna

    2015-01-01

    When their sense of personal control is threatened people try to restore perceived control through the social self. We propose that it is the perceived agency of ingroups that provides the self with a sense of control. In three experiments, we for the first time tested the hypothesis that threat to personal control increases the attractiveness of being part or joining those groups that are perceived as coherent entities engaging in coordinated group goal pursuit (agentic groups) but not of those groups whose agency is perceived to be low. Consistent with this hypothesis we found in Study 1 (N = 93) that threat to personal control increased ingroup identification only with task groups, but not with less agentic types of ingroups that were made salient simultaneously. Furthermore, personal control threat increased a sense of collective control and support within the task group, mediated through task-group identification (indirect effects). Turning to groups people are not (yet) part of, Study 2 (N = 47) showed that personal control threat increased relative attractiveness ratings of small groups as possible future ingroups only when the relative agency of small groups was perceived to be high. Perceived group homogeneity or social power did not moderate the effect. Study 3 (N = 78) replicated the moderating role of perceived group agency for attractiveness ratings of entitative groups, whereas perceived group status did not moderate the effect. These findings extend previous research on group-based control, showing that perceived agency accounts for group-based responses to threatened control. PMID:26074832

  16. Synthesis of C-9-14C-1,8-dihydroxy-3-carboxyanthraquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Witte, P.; Lemli, J.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of C-9- 14 C-rhein is reported using 14 CO 2 as a 14 C-source. After preparing 14 C-1, 8-dimethoxy-3-methylanthraquinone by a condensation reaction, the product is demethylated and the 3-methyl group converted to the corresponding 3-carboxy group. The radio-active yield of the total synthesis, starting with 1 Ci 14 CO 2 is 6,9% (6, 9 mCi); 352 mg 14 rhein is produced with a specific activity of 55,7 mCi/mmol. (author)

  17. ATNX2 is not a regulatory gene in Italian ALS patients with C9ORF72 GGGGCC expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Mora, Gabriele; Sabatelli, Mario; Caponnetto, Claudia; Lunetta, Christian; Traynor, Bryan J.; Johnson, Janel O.; Nalls, Mike A.; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Borghero, Giuseppe; Trojsi, Francesca; La Bella, Vincenzo; Volanti, Paolo; Simone, Isabella; Salvi, Fabrizio; Logullo, Francesco O.; Riva, Nilo; Carrera, Paola; Giannini, Fabio; Mandrioli, Jessica; Tanel, Raffaella; Capasso, Margherita; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Battistini, Stefania; Murru, Maria Rita; Origone, Paola; Zollino, Marcella; Penco, Silvana; Mazzini, Letizia; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Restagno, Gabriella; Brunetti, Maura; Barberis, Marco; Conforti, Francesca L.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications that both familial ALS and sporadic ALS phenotype and prognosis are partly regulated by genetic and environmental factors, supporting the theory that ALS is a multifactorial disease. The aim of this paper was to assess the role of ATXN2 intermediate length repeats in a large series of Italian and Sardinian ALS patients and controls carrying a pathogenetic C9ORF72 GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat. A total of 1972 ALS cases were identified through the database of the Italian ALS Genetic consortium (ITALSGEN), a collaborative effort including 18 ALS centers throughout Italy. The study population included: (1) 276 Italian and 57 Sardinian ALS cases who carried the C9ORF72 expansion; (2) 1340 Italian and 299 Sardinian ALS cases not carrying the C9ORF72 expansion. A total of healthy 1043 controls were also assessed. Most Italian and Sardinian cases and controls were homozygous for 22/22 or 23/23 repeats or heterozygous for 22/23 repeats of the ATXN2 gene. ATXN2 intermediate length repeats alleles (≥28) were detected in 3 (0.6%) Italian ALS cases carrying the C9ORF72 expansion, in none of the Sardinian ALS cases carrying the expansion, in 60 (4.3%) Italian cases not carrying the expansion, and in 6 (2.0%) Sardinian ALS cases without C9ORF72 expansion. Intermediate length repeat alleles were found in 12 (1.5%) Italian controls and 1 (0.84%) Sardinian controls. Therefore, ALS patients with C9ORF72 expansion showed a lower frequency of ATXN2 polyQ intermediate length repeats than both controls (Italian cases, p=0.137; Sardinian cases, p=0.0001) and ALS patients without C9ORF72 expansion (Italian cases, p=0.005; Sardinian cases, p=0.178). In our large study on Italian and Sardinian ALS patients with C9ORF72 GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion, compared to age-, gender- and ethnic-matched controls, ATXN2 polyQ intermediate length does not represent a modifier of ALS risk, differently from non-C9ORF72 mutated patients. PMID:26733254

  18. CYP2C9 polymorphism in five autochthonous population of the same geographic area (Spanish Pyrenees).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borobia, Alberto M; López-Parra, Ana María; Tabarés, Beatriz; Ramirez, Elena; Baeza, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Carcas, Antonio J

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the frequency of CYP2C9 polymorphisms in a cohort of Caucasians (Spanish Pyrenees), previously classified in autochthonous populations. Blood samples from 154 anonymous volunteer donors were collected. All the individuals were autochthonous to their respective populations (four grandparents born in the region): 23 from Valle de Arán (Lérida), 29 from Alto Urgel (Lérida), 32 from La Cerdaña (Gerona), 30 from Jacetania (Huesca) and 40 from Cinco Villas (Navarra). The analyses for allelic mutation, CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3, were identified with Taqman Allelic Discrimination kits. No statistical differences were found when allelic frequencies in the five autochthonous populations were compared. Frequency distribution of genotypic classes (wt/wt, wt/mut and mut/mut) in Alto Urgel was different from that in La Cerdaña, Cinco Villas and Jacetania samples. Comparison of Pyrenean and other European populations through exact test revealed significant differences in the distribution of genotypic classes: Alto Urgel, Barcelona, and Croatia yielded the highest significant differences. According to the exact test these populations were pooled in four groups. This classification produced a statistically significant percentage of variation explained by differences among groups (1.94%, P= 0.036), but not by differences among populations within groups (P=0.914), although most of the percentage of variance is explained by differences within populations (97.46%, P<0.001). This study increases the evidence of intra-population genotypic variability and highlights the significant genotypic heterogeneity when different autochthonous populations are considered, despite no clear differences in allelic frequencies do exist.

  19. Repetitive element transcripts are elevated in the brain of C9orf72 ALS/FTLD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudencio, Mercedes; Gonzales, Patrick K; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Daughrity, Lillian M; Song, Yuping; Ebbert, Mark T W; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Jansen-West, Karen; Baker, Matthew C; DeTure, Michael; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard; Link, Christopher D

    2017-09-01

    Significant transcriptome alterations are detected in the brain of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including carriers of the C9orf72 repeat expansion and C9orf72-negative sporadic cases. Recently, the expression of repetitive element transcripts has been associated with toxicity and, while increased repetitive element expression has been observed in several neurodegenerative diseases, little is known about their contribution to ALS. To assess whether aberrant expression of repetitive element sequences are observed in ALS, we analysed RNA sequencing data from C9orf72-positive and sporadic ALS cases, as well as healthy controls. Transcripts from multiple classes and subclasses of repetitive elements (LINEs, endogenous retroviruses, DNA transposons, simple repeats, etc.) were significantly increased in the frontal cortex of C9orf72 ALS patients. A large collection of patient samples, representing both C9orf72 positive and negative ALS, ALS/FTLD, and FTLD cases, was used to validate the levels of several repetitive element transcripts. These analyses confirmed that repetitive element expression was significantly increased in C9orf72-positive compared to C9orf72-negative or control cases. While previous studies suggest an important link between TDP-43 and repetitive element biology, our data indicate that TDP-43 pathology alone is insufficient to account for the observed changes in repetitive elements in ALS/FTLD. Instead, we found that repetitive element expression positively correlated with RNA polymerase II activity in postmortem brain, and pharmacologic modulation of RNA polymerase II activity altered repetitive element expression in vitro. We conclude that increased RNA polymerase II activity in ALS/FTLD may lead to increased repetitive element transcript expression, a novel pathological feature of ALS/FTLD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Effect of CYP2C9*3 gene polymorphism on lipid-lowering efficacy of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the frequency of gene CYP2C9*3 in Chinese populations, and to analyze the impact of CYP2C9*3 genetic polymorphism on the cholesterol-lowering effect of fluvastatin in a Chinese hyperlipidemic population. Methods: CYP2C9 genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction - restriction ...

  1. The Prevalence of CYP2C8, 2C9, 2J2, and soluble epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms in African Americans with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisbach, Albert W; Japa, Shanker; Sigel, Aster; Parenti, Melissa B; Hess, Arthur E; Srinouanprachanh, Sengkeo L; Rettie, Allan E; Kim, Helen; Farin, Federico M; Hamm, L Lee; Lertora, Juan J L

    2005-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase pathway produces arachidonic acid metabolites that are vasoactive, that affect renal sodium handling, and that have been proposed to play a mechanistic role in hypertension. Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in CYP2C8, 2C9, 2J2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) have been identified, many of which have altered functional activity in vitro. We performed a case-control study to determine the prevalence of epoxygenase-related SNP in African American individuals and to evaluate whether these SNP are associated with increased risk of hypertension. Normotensive African American individuals (N = 107) and African American patients with hypertension (N = 108) were recruited. DNA was extracted from a venous blood sample and genotyped for CYP2C8*2,*3, CYP2C9*2-*5,*8,*11, CYP2J2 *2-*7, L50L, R49S, V113M, N124S, sEH R287Q, and sEH 403Rins variant alleles by allelic discrimination using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genotype and allele frequencies were calculated and associations with hypertension were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age and sex. No association was found between any of the variant alleles and hypertension. We did find that only the CYP2C8*3and CYP2C9*2 alleles were in strong linkage disequilibrium in both the hypertensive and healthy African American groups, a finding that was reported previously in healthy individuals of white ethnicity. These results suggest that these epoxygenase-related SNP are not associated with increased risk of hypertension in the African American population. There was significant linkage disequilibrium between CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9*2 alleles that was not associated with hypertension.

  2. Nutritional environment influences transcription of a pantocin A biosynthesis gene in Pantoea vagans strain C9-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The histidine-reversible antibiotic pantocin A is produced by Pantoea vagans strain C9-1 and Pantoea agglomerans strains Eh252, EH318 and P10c and contributes significantly to efficacy of biological control of fire blight of pear and apple flowers caused by Erwinia amylovora. Antibiosis by pantocin ...

  3. Child Cancer Control. Report on a Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This World Health Organization (WHO) report on the proceedings of a Working Group on Child Cancer Control was prepared by the WHO Regional Office for Europe. The working group met in Prague in April 1977 and was comprised of representatives from 14 European countries. Its task was to review existing methods of child cancer control, the efficacy of…

  4. 78 FR 68779 - Controlled Group Regulation Examples; Hearing Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG-114122-12] RIN 1545-BK96 Controlled Group Regulation Examples; Hearing Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury... controlled group rules related to regulated investment companies. DATES: The public hearing originally...

  5. VKORC1-1639G>A, CYP2C9, EPHX1691A>G genotype, body weight, and age are important predictors for warfarin maintenance doses in patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qiang; Kong, Yan; Schneede, Jörn; Xiao, Ying-Bin; Chen, Lin; Zhong, Qian-Jin; Wang, Xue-Feng; Hao, Jia; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Jing-Jin

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the contribution of genetic polymorphisms of vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 gene VKORC1-1639G>A, cytochrome P450 2C9 gene (CYP2C9), EPHXI, and clinical factors to warfarin sensitivity in southwest Chinese Han patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses. A total of 127 patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses who have been followed up at our department during the past 23 years were enrolled in this study and compared to a control group that consisted of 133 randomly selected healthy blood donors. These Chinese patients met stable warfarin dosage requirements and had reached the target international normalized ratio (INR) of 1.5-2.0. PCR and direct sequencing were carried out to identify the polymorphisms of VKORC1-1639G>A (rs9923231), CYP2C9*3 (rs1057910), CYP2C9 IVS3-65G>C (rs9332127), and EPHX1691A>G (rs4653436). In addition, total and free (non-protein-bound) warfarin concentrations were analyzed. There were great interindividual differences in warfarin maintenance dosage (ranging from 0.6 to 8.4 mg/day) among the 127 patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses. VKORC1-1639G>A, CYP2C9, EPHX1691A>G polymorphism, body weight, and age were found to affect the dose demands. Multiple linear regression models incorporating genetic polymorphisms of VKORC1, CYP2C9, EPHX1691A>G, and the nongenetic factors of age and body weight were developed, and explained up to 76.8% of the total variation (adjusted R (2) of 0.743) in warfarin maintenance doses in southwest Chinese patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses.

  6. Intrinsic Optimal Control for Mechanical Systems on Lie Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic infinite horizon optimal control problem of mechanical systems on Lie group is investigated. The geometric optimal control problem is built on the intrinsic coordinate-free model, which is provided with Levi-Civita connection. In order to obtain an analytical solution of the optimal problem in the geometric viewpoint, a simplified nominal system on Lie group with an extra feedback loop is presented. With geodesic distance and Riemann metric on Lie group integrated into the cost function, a dynamic programming approach is employed and an analytical solution of the optimal problem on Lie group is obtained via the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. For a special case on SO(3, the intrinsic optimal control method is used for a quadrotor rotation control problem and simulation results are provided to show the control performance.

  7. TH-C-9A-01: Lean Tools and Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangaraj, D; Chan, K; Boddu, S; Pawlicki, T; Dieterich, S

    2014-01-01

    Lean thinking has revolutionized the manufacturing industry. Toyota has pioneered and leveraged this aspect of Lean thinking. Application of Lean thinking and Lean Six Sigma techniques into Healthcare and in particular in Radiation Oncology has its merits and challenges. To improve quality, safety and patient satisfaction with available resources or reducing cost in terms of time, staff and resources is demands of today's healthcare. Radiation oncology treatment involves many processes and steps, identifying and removing the non-value added steps in a process can significantly improve the efficiency. Real projects undertaken in radiation oncology department in cutting down the procedure time for MRI guided brachytherapy to 40% less using lean thinking will be narrated. Simple Lean tools and techniques such as Gemba walk, visual control, daily huddles, standard work, value stream mapping, error-proofing, etc. can be applied with existing resources and how that improved the operation in a Radiation Oncology department's two year experience will be discussed. Lean thinking focuses on identifying and solving the root-cause of a problem by asking “Why” and not “Who” and this requires a culture change of no blame. Role of leadership in building lean culture, employee empowerment and trains and develops lean thinkers will be presented. Why Lean initiatives fail and how to implement lean successfully in your clinic will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Concepts of lean management or lean thinking. Lean tools and techniques applied in Radiation Oncology. Implement no blame culture and focus on system and processes. Leadership role in implementing lean culture. Challenges for Lean thinking in healthcare

  8. TH-C-9A-01: Lean Tools and Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, D [Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, TX (United States); Chan, K [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Boddu, S [Temple, TX (United States); Pawlicki, T [UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Dieterich, S [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Lean thinking has revolutionized the manufacturing industry. Toyota has pioneered and leveraged this aspect of Lean thinking. Application of Lean thinking and Lean Six Sigma techniques into Healthcare and in particular in Radiation Oncology has its merits and challenges. To improve quality, safety and patient satisfaction with available resources or reducing cost in terms of time, staff and resources is demands of today's healthcare. Radiation oncology treatment involves many processes and steps, identifying and removing the non-value added steps in a process can significantly improve the efficiency. Real projects undertaken in radiation oncology department in cutting down the procedure time for MRI guided brachytherapy to 40% less using lean thinking will be narrated. Simple Lean tools and techniques such as Gemba walk, visual control, daily huddles, standard work, value stream mapping, error-proofing, etc. can be applied with existing resources and how that improved the operation in a Radiation Oncology department's two year experience will be discussed. Lean thinking focuses on identifying and solving the root-cause of a problem by asking “Why” and not “Who” and this requires a culture change of no blame. Role of leadership in building lean culture, employee empowerment and trains and develops lean thinkers will be presented. Why Lean initiatives fail and how to implement lean successfully in your clinic will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Concepts of lean management or lean thinking. Lean tools and techniques applied in Radiation Oncology. Implement no blame culture and focus on system and processes. Leadership role in implementing lean culture. Challenges for Lean thinking in healthcare.

  9. Systematic review of control groups in nutrition education intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wu, FanFan; Spaccarotella, Kim; Quick, Virginia; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Zhang, Yingting

    2017-07-11

    Well-designed research trials are critical for determining the efficacy and effectiveness of nutrition education interventions. To determine whether behavioral and/or cognition changes can be attributed to an intervention, the experimental design must include a control or comparison condition against which outcomes from the experimental group can be compared. Despite the impact different types of control groups can have on study outcomes, the treatment provided to participants in the control condition has received limited attention in the literature. A systematic review of control groups in nutrition education interventions was conducted to better understand how control conditions are described in peer-reviewed journal articles compared with experimental conditions. To be included in the systematic review, articles had to be indexed in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, WoS, and/or ERIC and report primary research findings of controlled nutrition education intervention trials conducted in the United States with free-living consumer populations and published in English between January 2005 and December 2015. Key elements extracted during data collection included treatment provided to the experimental and control groups (e.g., overall intervention content, tailoring methods, delivery mode, format, duration, setting, and session descriptions, and procedures for standardizing, fidelity of implementation, and blinding); rationale for control group type selected; sample size and attrition; and theoretical foundation. The search yielded 43 publications; about one-third of these had an inactive control condition, which is considered a weak study design. Nearly two-thirds of reviewed studies had an active control condition considered a stronger research design; however, many failed to report one or more key elements of the intervention, especially for the control condition. None of the experimental and control group treatments were sufficiently detailed to permit replication of the

  10. Synthesis of Control Algorithm for a Leaderheaded UAVs Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Samodov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a defense sphere uses unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs. UAVs have several advantages over manned aircrafts such as small size, reduced combat losses of personnel, etc. In addition, in threat environment, it is necessary to arrange both bringing together distant from each other UAVs in a group and their undetected in radar fields compact flying in terms of the joint flight security.However, the task to control a UAVs group is much more difficult than to control a single UAV, since it is necessary not only to control the aircraft, but also take into account the relative position of objects in the group.To solve this problem two ways are possible: using a network exchange between members of the group on the "everyone with everyone" principle and organizing the leader-headed flight.The aim of the article is to develop and study a possible option of the UAVs group control with arranging a leader-headed flight to provide the undetected in radar fields compact flying in terms of the joint flight security.The article develops a universal algorithm to control leader-headed group, based on a new modification of the statistical theory of optimal control. It studies effectiveness of the algorithm. While solving this task, a flight of seven UAVs was simulated in the horizontal plane in a rectangular coordinate system. Control time, linear errors of desired alignment of UAV, and control errors with respect to angular coordinates are used as measures of merit.The study results of the algorithm to control a leader-headed group of UAVs confirmed that it is possible to fulfill tasks of flying free-of-collision group of UAVs with essentially reduced computational costs.

  11. C9ORF72 Repeat Expansion in Australian and Spanish Frontotemporal Dementia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson-Stone, Carol; Hallupp, Marianne; Loy, Clement T.; Thompson, Elizabeth M.; Haan, Eric; Sue, Carolyn M.; Panegyres, Peter K.; Razquin, Cristina; Seijo-Mart?nez, Manuel; Rene, Ramon; Gascon, Jordi; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Schmoll, Birgit; Volk, Alexander E.; Brooks, William S.

    2013-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has been established as a common cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the minimum repeat number necessary for disease pathogenesis is not known. The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in two FTD patient collections (one Australian and one Spanish, combined n = 190), to examine C9ORF72 expansion allele length in a subset of FTD patients, and to examine C9ORF72 allele length in 'non-expansion...

  12. Management systems, control and motivation methods used at enterprises groups

    OpenAIRE

    Leugaudaitė, Dalia

    2017-01-01

    MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS, CONTROL AND MOTIVATION METHODS USED AT ENTERPRISES GROUPS 69 pages, 3 tables, 25 pictures, 39 literature references. The aim of the Master's paper is to determine the implementation impact of the motivation and controlling methods to achieve efficiency in management systems. As a result of the scientific literature analysis, the advantages and disadvantages of the management systems were selected. These statements were used for the primary survey of the initial group of co...

  13. Interdependent, Dependent, and Independent Group Contingencies for Controlling Disruptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, Frank M.; Gresham, Gwenyth N.

    1982-01-01

    Three group-oriented contingency systems (interdependent, dependent, and independent) were compared to evaluate each system's effectiveness in controlling the disruptive behavior of a self-contained classroom of 12 educable mentally retarded elementary-aged children. Interdependent and dependent group contingency systems were more effective than…

  14. Influence of CYP2C9 and COX-2 Genetic Polymorphisms on Clinical Efficacy of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yi, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Hai-Lin

    2017-04-12

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of CYP2C9 and COX-2 genetic polymorphisms with therapeutic efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 130 AS inpatients and outpatients in the Arthritis and Rheumatism Department of Peking University First Hospital and 106 healthy people getting routine check-ups between September 2013 and July 2014. CYP2C9 and COX-2 genetic polymorphisms were detected by PCR-RFLP. All AS patients underwent medical treatment and 12-week follow-up treatment. Score differences of BASDAI, ASAS20, ASAS50, and ASAS70 for AS patients with different genotypes before and after treatment were compared. RESULTS In terms of COX-2-1290A/G and -1195G/A gene polymorphism genotype and allele frequency, the case group and control group were obviously different (all P0.05). AS patients had improved BASDAI, ASAS20, ASAS50, and ASAS70 scores after they received NSAID treatment (all Ptreatment of AS and COX-2 gene -1290A/G and -1195G/A polymorphism were associated (all P0.05). CONCLUSIONS COX-2-1290A/G and -1195G/A polymorphism may increase AS risk and they both can be considered as biological indicators for prediction of efficacy of NSAIDs in treatment of AS.

  15. 26 CFR 1.514(c)-2 - Permitted allocations under section 514(c)(9)(E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ordinarily causes the partnership's income to fail the exception provided by section 514(c)(9)(A) only for... gain chargeback provision. (iv) The partnership fails to satisfy the fractions rule on a prospective...) Application of section 514(c)(9)(E), relating to debt-financed real property held by partnerships. (1) In...

  16. Effect of CYP2C9 *3 gene polymorphism on lipid-lowering efficacy of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of CYP2C9 *3 gene polymorphism on lipid-lowering efficacy of fluvastatin in a Chinese hyperlipidemic population. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... and to analyze the impact of CYP2C9*3 genetic polymorphism on the cholesterol-lowering effect of fluvastatin in a Chinese hyperlipidemic population.

  17. 40 CFR 721.2088 - Carboxylic acids, (C6-C9) branched and linear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... linear. 721.2088 Section 721.2088 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2088 Carboxylic acids, (C6-C9) branched and linear. (a) Chemical... as carboxylic acids, (C6-C9) branched and linear (PMNs P-93-313, 314, 315, and 316) are subject to...

  18. Control groups in recent septic shock trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Jakob, Stephan M; Wilkman, Erika; Perner, Anders; Takala, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. We searched for original articles presenting randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics, and mortality outcomes, and calculated a data completeness score to provide an overall view of quality of reporting. A total of 24 RCTs were included (mean n = 287 patients and 71 % of eligible patients were randomized). Of the 24 studies, 14 (58 %) presented baseline data on vasopressors and 58 % the proportion of patients with elevated lactate values. Five studies (21 %) provided data to estimate the proportion of septic shock patients fulfilling the Sepsis-3 definition. The mean data completeness score was 19 out of 36 (range 8-32). Of 18 predefined control group characteristics, a mean of 8 (range 2-17) were reported. Only 2 (8 %) trials provided adequate data to confirm that their control group treatment represented usual care. Recent trials in septic shock provide inadequate data on the control group treatment and hemodynamic values. We propose a standardized trial dataset to be created and validated, comprising characteristics of patient population, interventions administered, hemodynamic values achieved, surrogate organ dysfunction, and mortality outcomes, to allow better analysis and interpretation of future trial results.

  19. The DNA damage response (DDR) is induced by the C9orf72 repeat expansion in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farg, Manal A; Konopka, Anna; Soo, Kai Ying; Ito, Daisuke; Atkin, Julie D

    2017-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. Hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansions in a non-coding region of C9orf72 are the major cause of familial ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) worldwide. The C9orf72 repeat expansion undergoes repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation to produce five dipeptide repeat proteins (DRPs), including poly(GR) and poly(PR). Whilst it remains unclear how mutations in C9orf72 lead to neurodegeneration in ALS/FTD, dysfunction to the nucleolus and R loop formation are implicated as pathogenic mechanisms. These events can damage DNA and hence genome integrity. Cells activate the DNA damage response (DDR) with the aim of repairing this damage. However, if the damage cannot be repaired, apoptosis is triggered. In lumbar motor neurons from C9orf72-positive ALS patients, we demonstrate significant up-regulation of markers of the DDR compared to controls: phosphorylated histone 2AX (γ-H2AX), phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), cleaved poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and tumour suppressor p53-binding protein (53BP1). Similarly, significant up-regulation of γ-H2AX and p-ATM was detected in neuronal cells expressing poly(GR)100 and poly(PR)100 compared to controls, revealing that DNA damage is triggered by the DRPs. Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a histone chaperone induced during the DDR, which interacts with APE1 to enhance DNA repair. We also demonstrate that more NPM1 precipitates with APE1 in C9orf72 patients compared to controls. Furthermore, overexpression of NPM1 inhibits apoptosis in cells expressing poly(GR)100 and poly(PR)100. This study therefore demonstrates that DNA damage is activated by the C9orf72 repeat expansion in ALS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Quality control for a group of pyrophosphate-Sn kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, M.; Gamboa, R.; Hernandez, I.; Leyva, R.; Turino, D.

    1994-01-01

    The quality control for a group of Pyrophosphate-Sn kits for labeling with 99 m Tc is carry out at the Isotope Center. A general discussion takes place about the instrumental techniques for the determination of the kit constituent such as ligands, Sn(II), water, etc, as well as the control table for the evaluation of the warranty time. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs

  1. 137Cs levels in three control groups of Finnish people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Suomela, M.

    1980-01-01

    Whole-body counter measurements of three different control groups were performed in order to monitor changes in radioactivity levels in Finnish people. The groups were from Helsinki and from the areas around the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants. The Helsinki group was measured with scanning-type, four-crystal, whole-body counter in an iron room, and the Loviisa and Olkiluoto groups with a mobile, shadow-shield, whole-body counter. The mean value of the 137 Cs/K ratio of the Helsinki control group in 1979 was 26 pCi/g (0.97 Bq/g), the same value as in 1978. The corresponding ratio for the Loviisa group was 25 pCi/g (0.93 Bq/g) as opposed to 30 pCi/g (1.10 Bq/g) in 1978, and for the Olkiluoto group 25 pCi/g (0.93 Bq/g) as opposed to 28 pCi/g (1.04 Bq/g) in 1978. (author)

  2. Coordination of baseload power plant group control with static reactive power compensator control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Szczerba

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive power sources in power system nodes: generators and static reactive power compensators, are controlled by control systems. Generators – by generator node group controllers, compensators – by voltage controllers. The paper presents issues of these control systems’ coordination and proposals for its implementation.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of quercetin treatment on CYP2C9 enzyme activity of diclofenac in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedada, Satish Kumar; Neerati, Prasad

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of present study was to evaluate the effect of quercetin on pharmacokinetics of diclofenac sodium (DIC) in healthy volunteers. The open-label, 2 period, sequential study was conducted in 12 healthy volunteers. DIC 100 mg was administered during control and after quercetin phases. Quercetin 500 mg was administered twice daily for 10 days during quercetin phase. Treatment with quercetin significantly enhanced maximum plasma concentration (C max ) , area under the curve (AUC 0-∞ ), and half life, while significantly decreased elimination rate constant (k el ) and apparent oral clearance (CL/F) of DIC compared with control. On the other hand, C max and AUC 0-∞ of 4-hydroxydiclofenac (4-OHDIC) were decreased after quercetin treatment. In addition, geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals for C max and AUC 0-∞ of DIC and 4-OHDIC were both out of the no-effect limits of 0.80-1.25, which indicates a significant pharmacokinetic interaction between quercetin and DIC. Furthermore, quercetin treatment significantly decreased metabolic ratios of C max and AUC 0-∞ suggesting that reduced formation of DIC to 4-OHDIC. The results suggest that quercetin might have inhibited CYP2C9-mediated metabolism of DIC. Accordingly, caution should be taken when quercetin is used in combination with therapeutic drugs metabolized by CYP2C9, and dose adjustment of CYP2C9 substrates may be necessary. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS...

  5. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users, both government...

  6. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Air Force... the Federal Register on October 24, 2013 Vol. 78 No. 206. This new meeting notice is to inform GPS...

  7. 26 CFR 1.382-8 - Controlled groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.382-8 Controlled groups. (a) Introduction. This section... corporations on a change date so that the same value is not included more than once in computing the... described in section 382(h)(6)(B). (c) Computation of value. For purposes of computing the limitation under...

  8. Associations between HLA class I and cytochrome P450 2C9 genetic polymorphisms and phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions in a Thai population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra; Prabmeechai, Napat; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Kongpan, Thachanan; Konyoung, Parinya; Chumworathayi, Pansu; Tiamkao, Somsak; Khunarkornsiri, Usanee; Kulkantrakorn, Kongkiat; Saksit, Niwat; Nakkam, Nontaya; Satapornpong, Patompong; Vannaprasaht, Suda; Sangviroon, Alisara; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Wichukchinda, Nuanjun; Rerkpattanapipat, Ticha; Tassaneeyakul, Wongwiwat

    2016-05-01

    Phenytoin is one of the most common causative drugs of several types of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Genetic polymorphisms of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and cytochromes P450 (CYP) have been proposed as key elements for the susceptibility to phenytoin-related SCAR in certain ethnicities. This study investigated the associations between the genetic polymorphisms of HLA class I and CYP2C9 and phenytoin-related SCAR in a Thai population. Sixty phenytoin-related SCAR (i.e. 39 SJS/TEN and 21 DRESS) and 92 phenytoin-tolerant patients were enrolled in the study. The genotypes of HLA class I and CYP2C9 were determined. Six HLA alleles including HLA-A*33:03, HLA-B*38:02, HLA-B*51:01, HLA-B*56:02, HLA-B*58:01, and HLA-C*14:02 were significantly associated with phenytoin-related SJS/TEN, whereas only the HLA-B*51:01 was significantly associated with phenytoin-related DRESS. The odds ratios of phenytoin-related SJS/TEN in the patients who carried one of these alleles ranged from 4- to 10-fold. The frequencies of patients who carried the HLA-B*15:02 in the SJS/TEN (12.82%) or the DRESS (9.52%) groups were not significantly different from that of the controls (14.13%). The higher risk of phenytoin-related SJS/TEN was observed in the patients with CYP2C9*3 (odds ratio=4.30, 95% confidence interval=1.41-13.09, Pcaused by phenytoin was significantly associated with the HLA-B*15:02. The CYP2C9*3 variant was significantly associated with phenytoin-related SJS/TEN, but not DRESS. Certain alleles of HLA, particularly HLA-B*56:02, were significantly associated with phenytoin-related SCAR in the study population.

  9. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial of group psychoeducation versus group support in the maintenance of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-didactically delivered curriculum based group psychoeducation has been shown to be more effective than both group support in a specialist mood disorder centre in Spain (with effects lasting up to five years, and treatment as usual in Australia. It is unclear whether the specific content and form of group psychoeducation is effective or the chance to meet and work collaboratively with other peers. The main objective of this trial is to determine whether curriculum based group psychoeducation is more clinically and cost effective than unstructured peer group support. Methods/design Single blind two centre cluster randomised controlled trial of 21 sessions group psychoeducation versus 21 sessions group peer support in adults with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder, not in current episode but relapsed in the previous two years. Individual randomisation is to either group at each site. The groups are carefully matched for the number and type of therapists, length and frequency of the interventions and overall aim of the groups but differ in content and style of delivery. The primary outcome is time to next bipolar episode with measures of the therapeutic process, barriers and drivers to the effective delivery of the interventions and economic analysis. Follow up is for 96 weeks after randomisation. Discussion The trial has features of both an efficacy and an effectiveness trial design. For generalisability in England it is set in routine public mental health practice with a high degree of expert patient involvement. Trial Registration ISRCTN62761948 Funding National Institute for Health Research, England.

  10. Followup Audit of the European Theater C-9A Aircraft Flying Hour Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    The audit objective was to review the flying hour program to determine the flying hours required, considering a redefined mission for the C-9A aircraft and the flying hours necessary to meet air crew...

  11. Controllability of linear vector fields on Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, V.; Tirao, J.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper, we shall deal with a linear control system Σ defined on a Lie group G with Lie algebra g. The dynamic of Σ is determined by the drift vector field which is an element in the normalizer of g in the Lie algebra of all smooth vector field on G and by the control vectors which are elements in g considered as left-invariant vector fields. We characterize the normalizer of g identifying vector fields on G with C ∞ -functions defined on G into g. For this class of control systems we study algebraic conditions for the controllability problem. Indeed, we prove that if the drift vector field has a singularity then the Lie algebra rank condition is necessary for the controllability property, but in general this condition does not determine this property. On the other hand, we show that the rank (ad-rank) condition is sufficient for the controllability of Σ. In particular, we extend the fundamental Kalman's theorem when G is an Abelian connected Lie group. Our work is related with a paper of L. Markus and we also improve his results. (author). 7 refs

  12. Function of 38 variants CYP2C9 polymorphism on ketamine metabolism in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiang; Fang, Ping; Bao, Su-Su; Lin, Dan; Cai, Jian-Ping; Hu, Guo-Xin

    2017-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 proteins (CYP 450) is the most important enzyme system of drug phase I metabolism in liver. In previous reports, reduced efficiency or increased risk of adverse events can be affected by primary sequence mutation in CYP450. To investigate the effect of gene polymorphism on the metabolism of ketamine in vitro, including the new alleles: 2C9*58, *59 and *60. Incubation system which was contained insect microsome, b5, NADPH and 1M PBS incubated 10 μM-1000 μM ketamine in 37 °C for 40 min concentration of norketamine was analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system (UPLC-MS/MS). Catalytic activity of thirty-eight CYP2C9 alleles on ketamine metabolism to norketamine was surveyed. Compared with 2C9*1, three alleles (2C9*40, *49 and *51) was demonstrated dramatically increased intrinsic clearance (1.2-fold-3.75-fold); four subtypes (2C9*27, *31, *41 and *56) exhibited no significantly change on enzyme activity. The resting 31 alleles expressed different degrees of reduction compared with wild type. The result of research warns that attention should be more paid on individual who carry on the special 2C9 alleles under the situation of administrating ketamine. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Strategies to control morphology in hybrid group III-V/group IV heterostructure nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillerich, Karla; Dick, Kimberly A; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Reuter, Mark C; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances M

    2013-03-13

    By combining in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy measurements, we examine the factors that control the morphology of "hybrid" nanowires that include group III-V and group IV materials. We focus on one materials pair, GaP/Si, for which we use a wide range of growth parameters. We show through video imaging that nanowire morphology depends on growth conditions, but that a general pattern emerges where either single kinks or inclined defects form some distance after the heterointerface. We show that pure Si nanowires can be made to exhibit the same kinks and defects by changing their droplet volume. From this we derive a model where droplet geometry drives growth morphology and discuss optimization strategies. We finally discuss morphology control for material pairs where the second material kinks immediately at the heterointerface and show that an interlayer between segments can enable the growth of unkinked hybrid nanowires.

  14. Facial exercises for facial rejuvenation: a control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Marie-Camille; Van den Brande, Helen; Boone, Barbara; Van Borsel, John

    2013-01-01

    Facial exercises are a noninvasive alternative to medical approaches to facial rejuvenation. Logopedists could be involved in providing these exercises. Little research has been conducted, however, on the effectiveness of exercises for facial rejuvenation. This study assessed the effectiveness of 4 exercises purportedly reducing wrinkles and sagging of the facial skin. A control group study was conducted with 18 participants, 9 of whom (the experimental group) underwent daily training for 7 weeks. Pictures taken before and after 7 weeks of 5 facial areas (forehead, nasolabial folds, area above the upper lip, jawline and area under the chin) were evaluated by a panel of laypersons. In addition, the participants of the experimental group evaluated their own pictures. Evaluation included the pairwise presentation of pictures before and after 7 weeks and scoring of the same pictures by means of visual analogue scales in a random presentation. Only one significant difference was found between the control and experimental group. In the experimental group, the picture after therapy of the upper lip was more frequently chosen to be the younger-looking one by the panel. It cannot be concluded that facial exercises are effective. More systematic research is needed. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion [Fusion Working Group (FWG)] was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project

  16. Heterogenic control groups in randomized, controlled, analgesic trials of total hip- and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Anders P; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B

    2017-11-17

    Postoperative analgesic interventions are often tested adjunct to basic non- opioid analgesics in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Consequently, treatment in control groups, and assay sensitivity, differs between trials. We hypothesized that postoperative opioid requirements and pain intensities varies between different control groups in analgesic trials. Control groups from RCTs investigating analgesic interventions after total hip and knee arthroplasty were categorized based on standardized basic analgesic treatment. Morphine consumption 0-24h postoperatively, and resting pain scores at 6 and 24 hours for subgroups of basic treatments, were compared with ANOVA. In an additional analysis, we compared pain and opioid requirements in trials where NSAID was administered as an intervention with trial where NSAID was administered in a control group. We included 171 RCTs employing 28 different control groups with large variability in pain scores and opioid requirements. Four types of control groups (comprising 78 trials) were eligi- ble for subgroup comparisons. These subgroups received: 'opioid', 'NSAID+opioid', 'acetamino- phen+opioid', or 'NSAID+acetaminophen+opioid'. Morphine consumption and pain scores varied substantially between these groups, with no consistent superior efficacy in any subgroup. Addi- tionally, trials administering NSAID as an intervention demonstrated lower pain scores and opioid requirements than trials where NSAID was administered in a control group. Analgesic treatment in RCT control groups varies considerably. Control groups receiving various combinations of opioid, NSAID and acetaminophen did not differ consistently in pain and opioid requirements. Pain and opioid requirements were lower in trials administering NSAID as an intervention compared with trials administering NSAID in a control group.

  17. [Mutual Help Groups: diabetes and hypertension control strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqueda, Agustín Lara; Calderón, Arturo Aroch; Jiménez, Rosa Aurora; Guzmán, Mario Arceo; Monroy, Oscar Velázquez

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the accomplishment of the treatment basic goals of every person with diabetes type 2 that attend the Mutual Help Groups (GAM) of the Mexican Ministry of Health (SS). This transversal comparative study was carried out in 15 Mexican states, through the accomplishment reports of the treatment basic goals of the GAM integrants by June of 2001, compared to the reported figures by the Health Information System for Open Population (SISPA), Ministry of Health on the same date. The studied variables are: age, sex, blood glucose, blood pressure, body mass index, physical activity and pharmacological treatment. The treatment basic goals accomplishment for 6, 958 people with diabetes was evaluated, all of them attended the Ministry of Health GAMs, in 15 of the 32 Mexican states including the Federal District. When comparing frequencies of patients with diabetes controlled by the GAM and the SISPA, a differential was appreciated, being observed a tendency that showed that people in the GAM were much more controlled; when analyzing with the test Student "t" the differences were even more significant (p diabetics group had a higher risk of being uncontrolled, in relation to the group of non-obese diabetics (OR 1.8, CI: 1.06,1.32; p diabetics presented 1.56 times higher risk of being uncontrolled, that those in the diabetes group that carried out physical activity (CI: 1.37,1.78; p diabetes or hypertension and their relatives play an active role in treatment development accomplishment, as well as in the disease prevention and control. Unlike to that reported in the SISPA, the highest benefits of control, are achieved in people with diabetes or hypertension who attend the GAM.

  18. From deception trials to control reagents - The introduction of the control group about a century ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehue, T

    This is the story of the remarkable psychologist John E. Coover, who, in the early 1900s, was the first to advocate the comparison of experimental and control ol groups as a methodological necessity. Moreover, the author raises the issue of why control groups were launched about a century ago, and

  19. Patterned wafer geometry grouping for improved overlay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Woo, Jaeson; Park, Junbeom; Song, Changrock; Anis, Fatima; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Jeon, Sanghuck; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Heo, Hoyoung; Smith, Mark D.; Robinson, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Process-induced overlay errors from outside the litho cell have become a significant contributor to the overlay error budget including non-uniform wafer stress. Previous studies have shown the correlation between process-induced stress and overlay and the opportunity for improvement in process control, including the use of patterned wafer geometry (PWG) metrology to reduce stress-induced overlay signatures. Key challenges of volume semiconductor manufacturing are how to improve not only the magnitude of these signatures, but also the wafer to wafer variability. This work involves a novel technique of using PWG metrology to provide improved litho-control by wafer-level grouping based on incoming process induced overlay, relevant for both 3D NAND and DRAM. Examples shown in this study are from 19 nm DRAM manufacturing.

  20. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoa, D V A; Wimmers, K

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future.

  1. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. A. Khoa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS, Duroc (DU, Berlin miniature pig (BMP, German Landrace (LR, Pietrain (PIE, and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig. Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK. Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9 as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future.

  2. Association of CYP2C9*3 with phenytoin-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Liu, W; Zhou, W

    2017-12-23

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous adverse reactions that can be induced by phenytoin (PHT). CYP2C9*3 is the key enzyme in PHT metabolism. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the association between CYP2C9*3 and PHT-induced SJS/TEN. An extensive search was performed in multiple databases, including the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, OVID and EBSCO. Studies exploring the relationship between CYP2C9*3 and PHT-induced SJS and TEN were included. Odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for dichotomous data. Data analysis was performed using Review Manager (version 5.3). Four studies, with 117 PHT-induced SJS/TEN cases and 338 matched controls (PHT-tolerant patients) or 4231 population controls (general population), were identified. SJS and TEN were found to be significantly associated with the CYP2C9*3 allele, comparing both matched controls (OR, 8.93; 95% CI, 2.63-30.36; P = .0005) with substantial heterogeneity (I 2  = 46%) and population controls (OR, 8.88; 95% CI, 5.01-15.74; P < .00001). A significant association between CYP2C9*3 and PHT-induced SJS/TEN was identified, especially in a Thai population. CYP2C9*3 is thus a credible predictive genetic marker of PHT-induced SJS/TEN. Further multicenter studies and large prospective observational studies are, however, still required to determine the influence of CYP2C*3 on blood levels of PHT and its metabolites, and their association with SJS/TEN. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The in-vitro effect of complementary and alternative medicines on cytochrome P450 2C9 activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiman, Kim D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357798902; Goey, Andrew K L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315030135; Huijbregts, Tomy J; Maas-Bakker, Roel F; Beijnen, Jos H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919570; Schellens, Jan H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073926272; Meijerman, Irma|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/187559295

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to establish the inhibitory effects of 14 commonly used complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) on the metabolism of cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates 7-methoxy-4-trifluoromethyl coumarine (MFC) and tolbutamide. CYP2C9 is important for the metabolism

  4. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-6 - Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations; benefits includible in gross income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; benefits includible in gross income. 1.501(c)(9)-6 Section 1.501(c)(9)-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(9)-6 Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations; benefits includible in gross income...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1267 - Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1267 Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1; exemption from the... Pantoea agglomerans strain C9-1 when used on apples and pears. [71 FR 24596, Apr. 26, 2006] ...

  6. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-1 - Voluntary employees' beneficiary associations, in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(9)-1..., accident, or other benefits to its members or their dependents or designated beneficiaries, and substantially all of its operations are in furtherance of providing such benefits, and (d) No part of the net...

  7. Screening for the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in a greek frontotemporal dementia cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartanou, Chrisoula; Karadima, Georgia; Koutsis, Georgios; Breza, Marianthi; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Paraskevas, George P; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Panas, Marios

    2018-02-01

    The C9orf72 repeat expansion is a common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in European populations. A previous study has reported a high frequency of the expansion in Greek ALS. However, no data have been reported on the frequency of the expansion in Greek FTD. Currently, we investigated the frequency of the C9orfF72 expansion in a well-characterized cohort of 64 Greek FTD patients. We detected the C9orf72 repeat expansion in 9.3% of cases. Overall, 27.7% of familial and 2.2% of sporadic cases were expansion-positive. Five out of 6 cases had a diagnosis of behavioral variant FTD. All expansion-positive cases had fairly typical FTD presentations. Clinical features included motor neuron disease, Parkinsonism and hallucinations. We conclude that the overall frequency of C9orf72-positive cases in Greek FTD is high, comparable to Greek ALS, similar to some Western European, but significantly higher than some Mediterranean FTD populations.

  8. Corticobasal and ataxia syndromes widen the spectrum of C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Sg; Duno, M; Batbayli, M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 was reported as the cause of chromosome 9p21-linked frontotemporal dementia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FTD-ALS). We here report the prevalence of the expansion in a hospital-based cohort and associated clinical...

  9. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(9)-1 - Amortization of bond discount or premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distributor or transferor corporation for the purpose of determining the amount of any income or deduction.... For purposes of applying section 381(c)(9), the term bonds of a distributor or transferor corporation...) applies, the acquiring corporation assumes liability for the payment of bonds of a distributor or...

  10. Gene-specific mitochondria dysfunctions in human TARDBP and C9ORF72 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesto, Elisa; Colombrita, Claudia; Gumina, Valentina; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Dusi, Sabrina; Doretti, Alberto; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Invernizzi, Federica; Moggio, Maurizio; Tiranti, Valeria; Silani, Vincenzo; Ratti, Antonia

    2016-05-05

    Dysregulation of RNA metabolism represents an important pathogenetic mechanism in both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) due to the involvement of the DNA/RNA-binding proteins TDP-43 and FUS and, more recently, of C9ORF72. A potential link between dysregulation of RNA metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction is recently emerged in TDP-43 disease models. To further investigate the possible relationship between these two pathogenetic mechanisms in ALS/FTD, we studied mitochondria functionality in human mutant TARDBP(p.A382T) and C9ORF72 fibroblasts grown in galactose medium to induce a switch from a glycolytic to an oxidative metabolism. In this condition we observed significant changes in mitochondria morphology and ultrastructure in both mutant cells with a fragmented mitochondria network particularly evident in TARDBP(p.A382T) fibroblasts. From analysis of the mitochondrial functionality, a decrease of mitochondria membrane potential with no alterations in oxygen consumption rate emerged in TARDBP fibroblasts. Conversely, an increased oxygen consumption and mitochondria hyperpolarization were observed in C9ORF72 fibroblasts in association to increased ROS and ATP content. We found evidence of autophagy/mitophagy in dynamic equilibrium with the biogenesis of novel mitochondria, particularly in mutant C9ORF72 fibroblasts where an increase of mitochondrial DNA content and mass, and of PGC1-α protein was observed. Our imaging and biochemical data show that wild-type and mutant TDP-43 proteins do not localize at mitochondria so that the molecular mechanisms responsible for such mitochondria impairment remain to be further elucidated. For the first time our findings assess a link between C9ORF72 and mitochondria dysfunction and indicate that mitochondria functionality is affected in TARDBP and C9ORF72 fibroblasts with gene-specific features in oxidative conditions. As in neuronal metabolism mitochondria are actively used for ATP

  11. Infrared Spectra of Protonated Quinoline (1-C_9H_7NH^{+}) in Solid Para-Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chih-Yu; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2017-06-01

    Large protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (H^{+}PAH) and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (H^{+}PANH) have been proposed as possible carriers of unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands from galactic objects. The nitrogen atom in H^{+}PANH is expected to induce a blue shift of the C=C stretching band near 6.2 μm so that their emission bands might agree with the UIR band better than those of H^{+}PAH. In this work, we report the IR spectrum of protonated quinoline and its neutral species measured upon electron bombardment during deposition of a mixture of quinoline and para-hydrogen at 3.2 K. New features were assigned to 1-C_9H_7NH^{+} and 1-C_9H_7NH, indicating that the protonation and hydrogenation occur at the N-atom site. The intensities of features of 1-C_9H_7NH^{+} diminished when the matrix was maintained in darkness for 10 h, whereas those of 1-C_9H_7NH increased. Spectral assignments were made according to comparison of experimental results with anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers and IR intensities calculated with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. Although agreement between the observed spectrum of 1-C_9H_7NH^{+} and the UIR emission bands is unsatisfactory, presumably because of the small size of quinoline, we did observe C=C stretching bands at 1641.4, 1598.4, 1562.0 \\wn, blue-shifted from those at 1618.7, 1580.8, 1510.0 \\wn of the corresponding protonated PAH (C_{10}H_{9}^{+}), pointing to the direction of the UIR bands.

  12. Polarity Control in Group-III Nitrides beyond Pragmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Stefan; Stolyarchuk, Natalia; Markurt, Toni; Kirste, Ronny; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Collazo, Ramón; Courville, Aimeric; Di Felice, Rosa; Sitar, Zlatko; Vennéguès, Philippe; Albrecht, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the polarity of polar semiconductors on nonpolar substrates offers a wealth of device concepts in the form of heteropolar junctions. A key to realize such structures is an appropriate buffer-layer design that, in the past, has been developed by empiricism. GaN or ZnO on sapphire are prominent examples for that. Understanding the basic processes that mediate polarity, however, is still an unsolved problem. In this work, we study the structure of buffer layers for group-III nitrides on sapphire by transmission electron microscopy as an example. We show that it is the conversion of the sapphire surface into a rhombohedral aluminum-oxynitride layer that converts the initial N-polar surface to Al polarity. With the various AlxOyNz phases of the pseudobinary Al2O3 -AlN system and their tolerance against intrinsic defects, typical for oxides, a smooth transition between the octahedrally coordinated Al in the sapphire and the tetrahedrally coordinated Al in AlN becomes feasible. Based on these results, we discuss the consequences for achieving either polarity and shed light on widely applied concepts in the field of group-III nitrides like nitridation and low-temperature buffer layers.

  13. Forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans suggests F57A10.2 and acp-4 as suppressors of C9ORF72 related phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIN WANG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An abnormally expanded GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 is the most frequent causal mutation associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. Both gain-of-function (gf and loss-of-function (lf mechanisms have been involved in C9ORF72 related ALS FTLD. The gf mechanism of C9ORF72 has been studied in various animal models but not in C. elegans. In the present study, we described mutant C9ORF72 modeling in C. elegans and report the finding of two suppressor genes.We made transgenes containing 9 or 29 repeats of GGGGCC in C9ORF72, driven by either the hsp-16 promoters or the unc 119 promoter.Transgenic worms were made to carry such transgenes.Phenotypic analysis of those animals revealed that Phsp 16::(G4C229::GFP transgenic animals (EAB 135 displayed severe paralysis by the second day of adulthood, followed by lethality, which phenotypes were less severe in Phsp 16::(G4C29::GFP transgenic animals (EAB242,and absent in control strains expressing empty vectors. Suppressor genes of this locomotor phenotype were pursued by introducing mutations with ethyl methanesulfonate in EAB135, screening mutant strains that moved faster than EAB135 by a food-ring assay, identifying mutations by whole-genome sequencing and testing the underlying mechanism of the suppressor genes either by employing RNA interference studies or C. elegans genetics. Three mutant strains, EAB164, EAB165 and EAB167, were identified. Eight suppressor genes carrying nonsense canonical splicing site mutations were confirmed, among which a nonsense mutation of F57A10.2 VAMP was found in all three mutant strains, and a nonsense mutation of acp-4 ACP2 was only found in EAB164. Knock down out of those two genes in EAB135 animals by feeding RNAi introducing a known acp-4 null allele phenocopied the suppression of the C9ORF72 variant related movement defect in the mutant strains. Translational conformation in a mammalian system is required, but our worm data

  14. The in-vitro effect of complementary and alternative medicines on cytochrome P450 2C9 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooiman, Kim D; Goey, Andrew K L; Huijbregts, Tomy J; Maas-Bakker, Roel F; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Meijerman, Irma

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the inhibitory effects of 14 commonly used complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) on the metabolism of cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates 7-methoxy-4-trifluoromethyl coumarine (MFC) and tolbutamide. CYP2C9 is important for the metabolism of numerous drugs and inhibition of this enzyme by CAM could result in elevated plasma levels of drugs that are CYP2C9 substrates. Especially for anticancer drugs, which have a narrow therapeutic window, small changes in their plasma levels could easily result in clinically relevant toxicities. The effects of CAM on CYP2C9-mediated metabolism of MFC were assessed in Supersomes, using the fluorometric CYP2C9 inhibition assay. In human liver microsomes (HLM) the inhibition of CYP2C9-mediated metabolism of tolbutamide was determined, using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results indicated milk thistle as the most potent CYP2C9 inhibitor. For milk thistle, silybin (main constituent of milk thistle) was mainly responsible for the inhibition of CY2C9. Milk thistle and green tea were confirmed as potent inhibitors of CYP2C9-mediated metabolism of multiple substrates in vitro. Clinical studies with milk thistle are recommended to establish the clinical relevance of the demonstrated CYP2C9 inhibition. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Microglia and C9orf72 in neuroinflammation and ALS and frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Deepti; Baloh, Robert H

    2017-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder that is characterized by loss of motor neurons and shows clinical, pathological, and genetic overlap with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Activated microglia are a universal feature of ALS/FTD pathology; however, their role in disease pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. The recent discovery that ORF 72 on chromosome 9 (C9orf72), the gene most commonly mutated in ALS/FTD, has an important role in myeloid cells opened the possibility that altered microglial function plays an active role in disease. This Review highlights the contribution of microglia to ALS/FTD pathogenesis, discusses the connection between autoimmunity and ALS/FTD, and explores the possibility that C9orf72 and other ALS/FTD genes may have a "dual effect" on both neuronal and myeloid cell function that could explain a shared propensity for altered systemic immunity and neurodegeneration.

  16. Aromatically C6- and C9-Substituted Phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazole Blue Fluorophores: Structure-Property Relationship and Electroluminescent Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Yuan, Yi; Xiong, Yuan; Rogach, Andrey L; Tong, Qing-Xiao; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2017-08-09

    In this study, a series of aromatically substituted phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazole (PI) fluorophores at C6 and C9 (no. 6 and 9 carbon atoms) have been synthesized and systematically characterized by theoretical, thermal, photophysical, electrochemical, and electroluminescent (EL) studies. C6 and C9 modifications have positive influences on the thermal properties of the new materials. Theoretical calculations suggest that the C6 and the C9 positions of PI are electronically different. Theoretical and experimental evidences of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) between two identical moieties attaching to the C6 and the C9 positions are observed. Photophysical properties of the fluorophores are greatly influenced by size and conjugation extent of the substituents as well as linking steric hindrance. It is found that the C6 and C9 positions afford moderate conjugated extension compared to the C2 modification. Moreover, ICT characteristics of the new fluorophores increase as the size of the substituted aromatic group, and are partially influenced by steric hindrance, with the anthracene and the pyrene derivatives having the strongest ICT excited properties. EL performances of the fluorophores were evaluated as host emitters or dopants in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). Most of the devices showed significantly improved efficiencies compared to the OLED using the nonmodified emitter. Among all the devices, a 5 wt % TPI-Py doped device exhibited excellent performances with an external quantum efficiency >5% at 1000 cd/m 2 and a deep-blue color index of (0.155, 0.065), which are comparable to the most advanced deep-blue devices. Our study can give useful information for designing C6/C9-modificated PI fluorophores and provide an efficient approach for constructing high-performance deep-blue OLEDs.

  17. Synaptic dysfunction and altered excitability in C9ORF72 ALS/FTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Alexander; Sattler, Rita

    2018-02-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by a progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in fatal paralysis due to denervation of the muscle. Due to genetic, pathological and symptomatic overlap, ALS is now considered a spectrum disease together with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), the second most common cause of dementia in individuals under the age of 65. Interestingly, in both diseases, there is a large prevalence of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that are mutated and considered disease-causing, or whose dysfunction contribute to disease pathogenesis. The most common shared genetic mutation in ALS/FTD is a hexanucleuotide repeat expansion within intron 1 of C9ORF72 (C9). Three potentially overlapping, putative toxic mechanisms have been proposed: loss of function due to haploinsufficient expression of the C9ORF72 mRNA, gain of function of the repeat RNA aggregates, or RNA foci, and repeat-associated non-ATG-initiated translation (RAN) of the repeat RNA into toxic dipeptide repeats (DPRs). Regardless of the causative mechanism, disease symptoms are ultimately caused by a failure of neurotransmission in three regions: the brain, the spinal cord, and the neuromuscular junction. Here, we review C9 ALS/FTD-associated synaptic dysfunction and aberrant neuronal excitability in these three key regions, focusing on changes in morphology and synapse formation, excitability, and excitotoxicity in patients, animal models, and in vitro models. We compare these deficits to those seen in other forms of ALS and FTD in search of shared pathways, and discuss the potential targeting of synaptic dysfunctions for therapeutic intervention in ALS and FTD patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effect of C6 to C9 alkenals on aflatoxin production in corn, cottonseed, and peanuts.

    OpenAIRE

    Zeringue, H J

    1991-01-01

    The effect on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus flavus-inoculated corn, cottonseed, and peanuts in static culture in the presence of gaseous phase C6 to C9 alkenals was investigated. Aflatoxin B1 production was stimulated in corn at the lowest alkenal concentration (1-microliters level) tested. Aflatoxin B1 was completely eliminated at the highest alkenal concentrations (20-microliters level) tested in both treated corn and cottonseed cultures.

  19. Loss of C9orf72 Enhances Autophagic Activity via Deregulated mTOR and TFEB Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Ugolino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia is a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. Here we report a study of the C9orf72 protein by examining the consequences of loss of C9orf72 functions. Deletion of one or both alleles of the C9orf72 gene in mice causes age-dependent lethality phenotypes. We demonstrate that C9orf72 regulates nutrient sensing as the loss of C9orf72 decreases phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate S6K1. The transcription factor EB (TFEB, a master regulator of lysosomal and autophagy genes, which is negatively regulated by mTOR, is substantially up-regulated in C9orf72 loss-of-function animal and cellular models. Consistent with reduced mTOR activity and increased TFEB levels, loss of C9orf72 enhances autophagic flux, suggesting that C9orf72 is a negative regulator of autophagy. We identified a protein complex consisting of C9orf72 and SMCR8, both of which are homologous to DENN-like proteins. The depletion of C9orf72 or SMCR8 leads to significant down-regulation of each other's protein level. Loss of SMCR8 alters mTOR signaling and autophagy. These results demonstrate that the C9orf72-SMCR8 protein complex functions in the regulation of metabolism and provide evidence that loss of C9orf72 function may contribute to the pathogenesis of relevant diseases.

  20. Quality control procedures for equipment: The EORTC radiotherapy group experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garavaglia, G.; Mijnheer, B.

    1997-01-01

    The QA program of the Radiotherapy Co-operative Group of the EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) has included quality control procedures for equipment from its starting date in 1982. During on-site visits carded out by a team of radiotherapists and physicists the following equipment checks and measurements were performed: mechanical and beam alignment checks of simulator and therapy units; measurements of the dose homogeneity for X-ray and electron beams; intercomparison of ionization chambers; measurements of the depth dose distribution at several depths; absorbed dose determination in specific points in water for several combinations of field sizes and accessories, for photon and electron beams. In addition calculations of treatment time and monitor units were carried out for reference cases and the relevant beam data from all machines in use were collected. In order to provide a follow-up of the on-site visits, a mailed TLD program was then established in 1986. The program has been very successful, the centers are eager to participate since it constitutes an independent check of the measurements performed by the local physicists. It also allows to detect dosimetric problems in centers not yet included in the site visit program. To date, all participating centers have been monitored by mailed TLD, several more than once. This has led to the decision of stopping the site visits unless large deviations cannot be resolved by a second TLD mailing. The Radiation Physics Department of the Goeteborg, University Hospital has been the main partner in this QA effort. Since 1993 the mailed TLD program continues in co-operation with the Institut Gustave Roussy in Villejuif. Besides water phantom measurements on the beam axis, the IGR, in collaboration with the Radiation Physics Center in Houston, is planning a procedure to check off-axis doses by means of a TLD-loaded multi-purpose phantom. (author)

  1. Comparison of Natural Drainage Group and Negative Drainage Groups after Total Thyroidectomy: Prospective Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung Hoon; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Shim, Hyun Seok; Lee, Sang Ha; Lee, Ho Joong; Won, Seong Jun; Son, Hee Young; Kim, Rock Bum

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare a negative pressure drain with a natural drain in order to determine whether a negative pressure drainage tube causes an increase in the drainage volume. Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) were enrolled in the study between March 2010 and August 2010 at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. The patients were prospectively and randomly assigned to two groups, a negative pressure drainage group (n=32) and natural drainage group (n=30). Every 3 hours, the volume of drainage was checked in the two groups until the tube was removed. Results The amount of drainage during the first 24 hours postoperatively was 41.68±3.93 mL in the negative drain group and 25.3±2.68 mL in the natural drain group (pdrainage at postoperative day 3 was not statistically different between the two groups. In addition, the vocal cord palsy and temporary and permanent hypocalcemia were not different between the two groups. Conclusion These results indicate that a negative pressure drain may increase the amount of drainage during the first 24-48 hours postoperatively. Therefore, it is not necessary to place a closed suction drain when only a total thyroidectomy is done. PMID:23225820

  2. First report of warfarin dose requirements in patients possessing the CYP2C9*12 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Travis J; Kidd, Robert S; Richard, Craig A H; Ha, Ngoc-Han; Witcher, Preston; Tran, Linda V; Barbour, April; Tuck, Matthew; McIntosh, Samantha D; Douglas, Jacqueline N; Harralson, Arthur F

    2013-09-23

    Warfarin is the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant in North America and Europe. It is administered as a racemate, but S-warfarin is principally responsible for its anticoagulant activity. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 is the enzyme primarily responsible for the metabolism of S-warfarin. Numerous variant alleles of CYP2C9 have been identified. The CYP2C9*12 (rs9332239) allele harbors a P489S substitution in CYP2C9 which has been shown to result in a 40% decline in catalytic activity in vitro. Four Caucasian patients with a low mean weekly warfarin dose (MWWD) were genotyped for CYP2C9, VKORC1 and APOE variant alleles. None of the four patients carried the common CYP2C9 variant alleles (*2, *3, *5, *6, *7, *8, *9, *11, *13) despite a relatively low MWWD (23.4±7.94 mg) compared to 208 patients carrying the CYP29C9*1 genotype (32.2±12.65 mg). Given that CYP2C9*12 confers decreased in vitro activity to the enzyme, we investigated whether these patients carried this allele. All four patients were CYP2C9*12 CT heterozygotes. Individual comparisons with patients possessing the same VKORC1 and APOE genotypes also demonstrated lower dose requirements in the patients that possessed CYP2C9*12 allele. There are no reports of the clinical impact of rs9332239 on CYP2C9 substrates. This is the first report of patients with the rare CYP2C9*12 genotype and lower warfarin dose requirements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 40 CFR 721.3130 - Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3130 Sulfuric acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts. (a) Chemical... acid, mono-C9-11-alkyl esters, sodium salts (PMN P-01-149; CAS No. 84501-49-5) is subject to reporting...

  4. Substitution of Two Active-Site Residues Alters C9-Hydroxylation in a Class II Diterpene Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafu, Sibongile; Fischer, Emil; Addison, J Bennett; Riberio Barbosana, Isabel; Zerbe, Philipp

    2016-12-14

    Diterpenes form a vast and diverse class of natural products of both ecological and economic importance. Class II diterpene synthase (diTPS) enzymes control the committed biosynthetic reactions underlying diterpene chemical diversity. Homology modelling with site-directed mutagenesis identified two active-site residues in the horehound (Marrubium vulgare) class II diTPS peregrinol diphosphate synthase (MvCPS1); residue substitutions abolished the unique MvCPS1-catalysed water-capture reaction at C9 and redirected enzyme activity toward formation of an alternative product, halima-5(10),13-dienyl diphosphate. These findings contributed new insight into the steric interactions that govern diTPS-catalysed regiospecific oxygenation reactions and highlight the feasibility of diTPS engineering to provide a broader spectrum of bioactive diterpene natural products. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus...

  6. C9.A/14 steelwork joints de poutres par plaque frontale : assemblages par gousset

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Les Tables de résistances ultimes des assemblages boulonnés par plaque frontale et par gousset, complétées par une description des modèles de calcul et des exemples d’application, ont pour but de faciliter la tâche de l'ingénieur et du constructeur. Cette première partie C9.A/14 contient les chapitres suivants: - Joints de poutres par plaque frontale en acier S235 et S355 - Assemblages par gousset en acier S235 et S355 Les Tables contiennent des données relatives à la géométrie ainsi que les valeurs de calcul correspondantes des résistances ultimes des assemblages ; elles remplacent le chapitre « Assemblages par plaques frontales et boulons HR » des anciennes Tables C9.1 de 1983 / 2002. Le calcul de ces assemblages par plaque frontale est basé sur les hypothèses du modèle de la méthode des composants décrite dans la norme SN EN 1993-1-8. Les vérifications sont effectuées selon la norme SIA 263:2013. Les assemblages par gousset remplacent les assemblages par double cornière, (telle...

  7. Searching for Grendel: origin and global spread of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliner, Hannah A; Mann, David M; Traynor, Bryan J

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances are uncovering more and more of the genetic architecture underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative condition that affects ~6,000 Americans annually. Chief among these was the discovery that a large repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is responsible for an unprecedented portion of familial and sporadic ALS cases. Much has been published on how this expansion disrupts neuronal homeostasis and how gene-based therapy might be an effective treatment in the future. Nevertheless, it is instructive to look back at the origins of this important mutation. In this opinion piece, we attempt to answer three key questions concerning C9ORF72. First, how many times did the expansion occur throughout human history? Second, how old is the expansion? And finally and perhaps most importantly, how did the expansion spread throughout Europe? We speculate that the expansion occurred only once in the past, that this event took place in the Finnish population and that the Vikings and their descendants were responsible for disseminating this mutation throughout the rest of the continent.

  8. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F e =F g +1 and F g >0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity

  9. Substrate Proton to Heme Distances in CYP2C9 Allelic Variants and Alterations by the Heterotropic Activator, Dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Matthew A.; Gannett, Peter M.; Aguilar, Jarrett; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2008-01-01

    CYP2C9 polymorphisms result in reduced enzyme catalytic activity and greater activation by effector molecules as compared to wild type protein, with the mechanism(s) for these changes in activity not fully elucidated. Through T1 NMR and spectral binding analyses, mechanism(s) for these differences in behavior of the variant proteins (CYP2C9.2, CYP2C9.3 and CYP2C9.5) as compared to CYP2C9.1 were assessed. Neither altered binding affinity nor substrate (flurbiprofen) proton to heme-iron distances differed substantially among the four enzymes. Co-incubation with dapsone resulted in reduced substrate proton to heme-iron distances for all enzymes, providing at least a partial mechanism for the activation of CYP2C9 variants by dapsone. In summary, neither altered binding affinity nor substrate orientation appear to be major factors in the reduced catalytic activity noted in the CYP2C9 variants, but dapsone co-incubation caused similar changes in substrate proton to heme-iron distances suggesting at least partial common mechanisms in the activation of the CYP2C9 forms. PMID:18485885

  10. Addition of H-phosphonates to quinine-derived carbonyl compounds. An unexpected C9 phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement and tandem intramolecular piperidine elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Łukasz Górecki; Artur Mucha; Paweł Kafarski

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Abramov reaction, a base-catalyzed nucleophilic addition of dialkyl H-phosphonates (phosphites) to carbonyl compounds, was performed with oxidized quinine derivatives as the substrates. Homologous aldehydes obtained from the vinyl group reacted in a typical way which led to α-hydroxyphosphonates, first reported compounds containing a direct P–C bond between the quinine carbon skeleton and a phosphorus atom. For the C9 ketones a phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement, associated with ...

  11. Pest Control Section Biochemical Group, Progress Report 1982-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Reserch efforts in the Pest Control Section, BARC, a continuator of insect sterilization and pest control section of the erstwhile Biology and Agriculture Division, were continued to develop integrated management practices for the control of important insect pests of agricultural and medical importance. Insect pests chosen are, ubiquitous potato tuberworm, a serious pest of potatoes, cotton bollworms with particular reference to spotted bollworms and a mosquito (Culex fatigans), a vector of filariasis. Keeping these insects as targets, research activities have been concentrated in the fields of biological control with parasities, pathogens and sterile insects, sex pheromones and insect plant interaction with a view to integrate pest management programme. Besides, the research activity also encompasses investigations of basic nature in the fields of insect sex pheromones, insect pathology and insect plant interaction. Studies on insect pheromones relate to the modifying influence of abiotic and biotic factors of the environment on pheromone production and perception and the possibility of insect developing resistance to pheromones. Studies in the field of insect plant interaction are directed towards identifying weak links in the insect plant relationship with a view to exploit them for developing control. Basic studies in the field of insect pathology relate to isolation and identification of entomopathogens, source of their pathogenecity, improvement in their virulence and formulation of cheaper and potent microbial insecticides. This report pertains to the period 1982-86. (Orig.). 11 tables, 5 figures

  12. Hypovitaminosis D according to psychiatric diagnosis groups: A study with control group

    OpenAIRE

    Derya Güliz Mert

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYObjective: One of the risk factor for different psychiatric disorders has been indicated as hypovitaminosis D. The present study aimed to compare 25 (OH) D level between 4 different types of psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety disorder) and healthy controls, and to assess the risk factors of hypovitaminosis D in psychiatric inpatients.Method: This retrospective study included 974 individuals [depression (n=553), bipolar disorder (n=135), schiz...

  13. Chemerin C9 peptide induces receptor internalization through a clathrin-independent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun-xian; Liao, Dan; Zhang, Shuo; Cheng, Ni; He, Hui-qiong; Ye, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The chemerin receptor CMKLR1 is one type of G protein-coupled receptors abundant in monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages, which plays a key role in the entry of a subset of immunodeficiency viruses including HIV/SIV into lymphocytes and macrophages. The aim of this work was to investigate how CMKLR1 was internalized and whether its internalization affected cell signaling in vitro. Methods: Rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells, HEK 293 cells, and HeLa cells were used. CMKLR1 internalization was visualized by confocal microscopy imaging or using a FACScan flow cytometer. Six potential phosphorylation sites (Ser337, Ser343, Thr352, Ser344, Ser347, and Ser350) in CMKLR1 were substituted with alanine using site-directed mutagenesis. Heterologous expression of wild type and mutant CMKLR1 allowed for functional characterization of endocytosis, Ca2+ flux and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Results: Chemerin and the chemerin-derived nonapeptide (C9) induced dose-dependent loss of cell surface CMKLR1-GFP fusion protein and increased its intracellular accumulation in HEK 293 cells and RBL-2H3 cells stably expressing CMKLR1. Up to 90% of CMKLR1 was internalized after treatment with C9 (1 μmol/L). By using different agents, it was demonstrated that clathrin-independent mechanism was involved in CMKLR1 internalization. Mutations in Ser343 for G protein-coupled receptor kinase phosphorylation and in Ser347 for PKC phosphorylation abrogated CMKLR1 internalization. Loss of CMKLR1 internalization partially enhanced the receptor signaling, as shown by increased Ca2+ flux and a shorter latency to peak level of ERK phosphorylation. Conclusion: CMKLR1 internalization occurs in a clathrin-independent manner, which negatively regulated the receptor-mediated Ca2+ flux and ERK phosphorylation. PMID:24658352

  14. CYP2C9 genotype does not affect risk of tobacco-related cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Bojesen, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    tolbutamide and warfarin, while this has not been investigated for PAHs. We hypothesised that these two variants in the CYP2C9 gene influence risk of tobacco-related cancer. Methods: In a prospective study of the general population (n = 10 392) with 60 years of follow-up, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we...... associated two variants of CYP2C9 (CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3) with risk of tobacco-related cancer and all cancer. All results were re-tested in a cross-sectional study of the general population (n = 36 856), the Copenhagen General Population Study. Results: We found no association between any of the CYP2C9...... genotypes and risk of tobacco-related cancer, individual tobacco-related cancers, or all cancer. For the combined carriers (any CYP2C9*2 or CYP2C9*3 heterozygotes or homozygotes) vs. non-carriers we had 90% statistical power to exclude measures of relative risks below/above 0.8/1.2 and 0...

  15. A C9ORF72/SMCR8-containing complex regulates ULK1 and plays a dual role in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Liang, Chen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Lai, Fan; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Chen, Jian-Fu

    2016-09-01

    The intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) is a prevalent genetic abnormality identified in both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Smith-Magenis syndrome chromosomal region candidate gene 8 (SMCR8) is a protein with unclear functions. We report that C9ORF72 is a component of a multiprotein complex containing SMCR8, WDR41, and ATG101 (an important regulator of autophagy). The C9ORF72 complex displays guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity and acts as a guanosine diphosphate-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDP-GTP) exchange factor (GEF) for RAB39B. We created Smcr8 knockout mice and found that Smcr8 mutant cells exhibit impaired autophagy induction, which is similarly observed in C9orf72 knockdown cells. Mechanistically, SMCR8/C9ORF72 interacts with the key autophagy initiation ULK1 complex and regulates expression and activity of ULK1. The complex has an additional role in regulating later stages of autophagy. Whereas autophagic flux is enhanced in C9orf72 knockdown cells, depletion of Smcr8 results in a reduced flux with an abnormal expression of lysosomal enzymes. Thus, C9ORF72 and SMCR8 have similar functions in modulating autophagy induction by regulating ULK1 and play distinct roles in regulating autophagic flux.

  16. Atrophy in the Thalamus But Not Cerebellum Is Specific for C9orf72 FTD and ALS Patients – An Atlas-Based Volumetric MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Schönecker

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neuropathology of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS due to a C9orf72 mutation is characterized by two distinct types of characteristic protein depositions containing either TDP-43 or so-called dipeptide repeat proteins that extend beyond frontal and temporal regions. Thalamus and cerebellum seem to be preferentially affected by the dipeptide repeat pathology unique to C9orf72 mutation carriers.Objective: This study aimed to determine if mutation carriers showed an enhanced degree of thalamic and cerebellar atrophy compared to sporadic patients or healthy controls.Methods: Atlas-based volumetry was performed in 13 affected C9orf72 FTD, ALS and FTD/ALS patients, 45 sporadic FTD and FTD/ALS patients and 19 healthy controls. Volumes and laterality indices showing significant differences between mutation carriers and sporadic patients were subjected to binary logistic regression to determine the best predictor of mutation carrier status.Results: Compared to sporadic patients, mutation carriers showed a significant volume reduction of the thalamus, which was most striking in the occipital, temporal and prefrontal subregion of the thalamus. Disease severity measured by mini mental status examination (MMSE and FTD modified Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Sum of Boxes (FTD-CDR-SOB significantly correlated with volume reduction in the aforementioned thalamic subregions. No significant atrophy of cerebellar regions could be detected. A logistic regression model using the volume of the prefrontal and the laterality index of the occipital subregion of the thalamus as predictor variables resulted in an area under the curve (AUC of 0.88 while a model using overall thalamic volume still resulted in an AUC of 0.82.Conclusion: Our data show that thalamic atrophy in C9orf72 mutation carriers goes beyond the expected atrophy in the prefrontal and temporal subregion and is in good agreement with the

  17. A C9ORF72/SMCR8-containing complex regulates ULK1 and plays a dual role in autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Mei; Liang, Chen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Lai, Fan; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Chen, Jian-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) is a prevalent genetic abnormality identified in both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Smith-Magenis syndrome chromosomal region candidate gene 8 (SMCR8) is a protein with unclear functions. We report that C9ORF72 is a component of a multiprotein complex containing SMCR8, WDR41, and ATG101 (an important regulator of autophagy). The C9ORF72 complex displays ...

  18. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  19. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Group Recreational Activity for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This "preliminary" randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive…

  20. Comparing Treatment and Control Groups on Multiple Outcomes: Robust Procedures for Testing a Directional Alternative Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M.; Deering, Kathleen N.; Fouladi, Rachel T.; Manivong, Phongsack

    2009-01-01

    This study considers the problem of testing the difference between treatment and control groups on m [greater than or equal to] 2 measures when it is assumed a priori that the treatment group will perform better than the control group on all measures. Two procedures are investigated that do not rest on the assumptions of covariance homogeneity or…

  1. Cytochrome P450 2C9 Type II Binding Studies on Quinoline-4-carboxamide Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chi-Chi; Cape, Jonathan L.; Rushmore, Tom; Crouch, Gregory J.; Jones, Jeffrey P.

    2009-01-01

    CYP2C9 is a significant P450 protein responsible for drug metabolism. With the increased use of heterocyclic compounds in drug design, a rapid and efficient pre-drug screening of these potential type II binding compounds is essential to avoid adverse drug reactions. To understand binding modes, we use quinoline-4-carboxamide analogs to study the factors that determine the structure-activity relationships. The results of this study suggest that the more accessible pyridine with the nitrogen para to the linkage can coordinate directly with the ferric heme iron, but this is not seen for the meta or ortho isomers. The π-cation interaction of the naphthalene moiety and Arg 108 residue may also assist in stabilizing substrate binding within the active-site cavity. The type II substrate binding affinity is determined by the combination of steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobicity factors; meanwhile, it is enhanced by the strength of lone pair electrons coordination with the heme iron. PMID:19053752

  2. Constructional apraxia in frontotemporal dementia associated with the C9orf72 mutation: broadening the clinical and neuropsychological phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Cannas, Antonino; Di Stefano, Francesca; Ruiu, Elisa; Murru, Maria R; Corongiu, Daniela; Cuccu, Stefania; Tranquilli, Stefania; Sardu, Claudia; Marrosu, Maria G; Chiò, Adriano; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    In our study we analysed clinical and neuropsychological data in a cohort of 57 Sardinian patients with FTD (55 apparently unrelated and two belonging to the same family), who underwent genetic screening for the C9orf72 mutation. Eight out of 56 patients were found positive for the C9orf72 mutation representing 14% of the entire cohort and 31.6% of the familial cases (6/19). C9orf72 mutated patients differed from the other FTD cases of the cohort for a younger age of onset, higher frequency of familial history for FTD and higher prevalence of delusional psychotic symptoms and hallucinations. In the neuropsychological assessment, C9orf72 mutated patients differed from non-mutated for the high frequency of visuospatial dysfunction regarding constructional apraxia (p = 0.02). In conclusion, our study confirms that Sardinian FTD patients have peculiar genetic characteristics and that C9orf72 mutated patients have a distinctive clinical and neuropsychological profile that could help differentiate them from other FTD patients. In our cohort we found that constructional apraxia, rarely reported in FTD, can properly discriminate between C9orf72 mutated and non-mutated patients and contribute to broaden the neuropsychological profile in frontotemporal dementia associated with this mutation.

  3. The accuracy of warfarin dosage based on VKORC1 and CYP2C9 phenotypes in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustinus Wijaya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of warfarin dosage based on VKORC1 and CYP2C9 genotype in Chinese population.Methods: Blood samples were taken from 37 patients. We compared the warfarin dosage obtained from genotype (according to www.warfarindosing.org and treatment dosage with international normalized ratio (INR value within 2.0-3.0.Results: The majority of Chinese people in our study are VKORC1 homozygous AA (89.2%, rarely VKORC1 heterozygous AG and we cannot find a patient with homozygous GG. For CYP2C9 genotype, most patients have the wildtype variants (CYP2C9*2 CC and CYP2C9*3 AA. The warfarin dosage for patients with VKORC1 AA and CYP2C9*3 AC is lower than for patients with other genotype variants.Conclusion: There is no significant difference between pharmacogenetic algorithm (www.warfarindosing.org and our treatment dosage. Our conclusion is that the pharmacogenetic algorithm is accurate to predict the warfarin dose. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:108-12Keywords: CYP2C9, pharmacogenetic algorithm, VKORC1, warfarin

  4. C9orf72’s interaction with Rab GTPases - modulation of membrane traffic and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor Luen Tang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in an intron of Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD. While functional haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 resulting from the mutation may play a role in ALS/FTD, the actual cellular role of the protein has been unclear. Recent findings have now shown that C9orf72 physically and functionally interacts with multiple members of the Rab small GTPases family, consequently exerting important influences on cellular membrane traffic and the process of autophagy. Loss of C9orf72 impairs endocytosis in neuronal cell lines, and attenuated autophagosome formation. Interestingly, C9orf72 could influence autophagy both as part of a Guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF complex, or as a Rab effector that facilitates transport of the Unc-51-like Autophagy Activating Kinase 1 (Ulk1 autophagy initiation complex. The cellular function of C9orf72 is discussed in the light of these recent findings

  5. Roentgenographic findings in hyaline membrane disease treated with exogenous surfactant: comparison with control group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Chae Ha; Lim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Sook; Byen, Ju Nam; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul

    1997-01-01

    To compare, with the use of chest radiographic findings, improvement and complications in newborns treated with exogenous surfactant for hyaline membrane disease (HMD), and an untreated control group. Thirty-six patients with HMD were randomly assigned to a control group (n=18) or surfactant treated group (n=18). As part of an initial evaluation of their pulmonary status, we then performed a retrospective statistical analysis of chest radiographic findings obtained in exogenous surfactant treated and untreated infants within the first 90 minutes of life. Subsequent examinations were performed at less than 24 hours of age. Chest radiograph before treatment showed no significant differences between the two groups, but significant improvement was noted in the surfactant treated group, in contrast to the control group. The most common chest radiographic finding after surfactant administration was uniform (n=15) or disproportionate (n=2) improvement of pulmonary aeration. Patent ductus arteriosus developed in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Air leak occurred in three cases in the treated group and in five cases in the control group. In one treated patient pulmonary hemorrhage developed and intracranial hemorrhage occurred in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia was developed in 6 cases of treated group and 3 cases of control group. A chest radiograph is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of improvement and complications of HMD in infants treated with surfactant

  6. Involvement of Consumer Groups in Tobacco Control: Russia and Belarus Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Yanin

    2017-05-01

    5. Cooperation of consumer organizations from Russia (KONFOP and Belarus (Belarus Consumer Society, launched to promote best Tobacco Control practices, according to FCTC provisions, is a success story of involvement of consumer groups in Tobacco Control.

  7. Demanda por grupos, psicologia e controle Group demand, psychology and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahão de Oliveira Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo traz uma reflexão sobre uma capacitação para o trabalho grupal, destinado às equipes das UBSs (Unidades Básica de Saúde do SUS (Sistema Único de Saúde e agentes comunitários de saúde de um município do interior do Estado de São Paulo. Trata-se de analisar o pedido explicitado pela equipe, de mostrar a reflexão a respeito desse pedido, as circunstâncias dos problemas colocados, a experiência dos vários trabalhadores da equipe e a escuta do que se passa do lado da população. Parar para ouvir os parceiros do trabalho e refletir sobre a intervenção fez a equipe trabalhar sua sensibilidade diante das questões da população, do que vem a ser saúde e poder assumir outra postura que não seja a de servir ao controle da população e trabalhar para a construção da sociedade de controle.This article brings a reflection about a training for group work developed with UBSs (Basic Units of Health technical staff from SUS (Unified System of Health and agents of health from a county in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The procedure involves: (1 to analyze the explicit demand form the crew, (2 to show a reflection about this demand, (3 to show the context of the problems, (4 to consider the experience of workers on the crew, and (5 to listen to what happens from population's standpoint. Stop listening to the job partners and reflecting about the intervention made the crew work.

  8. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusion Working Group (FWG)) was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project.

  9. Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for FTD/ALS Caused by the C9orf72 Repeat Expansion: A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive and lethal disease of motor neuron degeneration, leading to paralysis of voluntary muscles and death by respiratory failure within five years of onset. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is characterised by degeneration of frontal and temporal lobes, leading to changes in personality, behaviour, and language, culminating in death within 5–10 years. Both of these diseases form a clinical, pathological, and genetic continuum of diseases, and this link has become clearer recently with the discovery of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene that causes the FTD/ALS spectrum, that is, c9FTD/ALS. Two basic mechanisms have been proposed as being potentially responsible for c9FTD/ALS: loss-of-function of the protein encoded by this gene (associated with aberrant DNA methylation and gain of function through the formation of RNA foci or protein aggregates. These diseases currently lack any cure or effective treatment. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs are modified nucleic acids that are able to silence targeted mRNAs or perform splice modulation, and the fact that they have proved efficient in repeat expansion diseases including myotonic dystrophy type 1 makes them ideal candidates for c9FTD/ALS therapy. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms and challenges for developing oligonucleotide-based therapy for c9FTD/ALS.

  10. C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions are a frequent cause of Huntington disease phenocopies in the Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Kartanou, Chrisoula; Kladi, Athina; Panas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 has been identified as the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia in many populations, including the Greek. Recently, C9ORF72 expansions were reported as the most common genetic cause of Huntington disease (HD) phenocopies in a UK population. In the present study, we screened a selected cohort of 40 Greek patients with HD phenocopies for C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions using repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction. We identified 2 patients (5%) with pathologic expansions. The first patient had chorea, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, cognitive impairment, and a positive family history, fulfilling the strictest criteria for HD phenocopy. The second patient was sporadic and had parkinsonism, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive impairment, corresponding to a broader definition of HD phenocopy. These findings identify C9ORF72 expansions as a frequent cause of HD phenocopies in the Greek population, confirming recent findings in other populations and supporting proposed diagnostic testing for C9ORF72 expansions in patients with HD-like syndromes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic characterization and comparison of the CYP2C9 variability of the Orang Asli in Malaysia with 12 populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Lay Kek; Subramaniam, Vinothini; Tuan Abdu Aziz, Tuan Azlin; Lee, Lian Shien; Ismail, Mohamed Izwan; Yu, Choo Yee; Ang, Geik Yong; James Johari, Richard; Ismet, Rose Iszati; Sahak, Noor Saadah; Ahmad, Aminuddin; Rahman, Thuhairah Abdul; Nor Ghazali, Fadzilah Mohd; Shaari, SyahrulAzlin; Omar, Mustaffa; Ismail, Adzrool Idzwan; Md Isa, Kamarudzaman; Salleh, Hood; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a systematic characterization of CYP2C9 variants in 61 Orang Asli and 96 Singaporean Malays using the whole genome sequences data and compared the variants with the other 11 HapMap populations. The frequency of rs1057910 (CYP2C9*3) is the highest in the Orang Asli compared to other populations. Three alleles with clinical implication were detected in the Orang Asli while 2 were found in the Singaporean Malays. Large numbers of the Orang Asli are predicted to have reduced metabolic capacity and therefore they would require a lower dose of drugs which are metabolized by CYP2C9. They are also at increased risks of adverse effects and therapeutic failures. A large number of CYP2C9 variants in the Orang Asli were not in the Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium which could be due to small sample size or mutations that disrupt the equilibrium of allele frequencies. In conclusion, different polymorphism patterns, allele frequencies, genotype frequencies and LD blocks are observed between the Orang Asli, the Singaporean Malays and the other populations. The study provided new information on the genetic polymorphism of CYP2C9 which is important for the implementation of precision medicine for the Orang Asli. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Addition of H-phosphonates to quinine-derived carbonyl compounds. An unexpected C9 phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement and tandem intramolecular piperidine elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecki, Łukasz; Mucha, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Abramov reaction, a base-catalyzed nucleophilic addition of dialkyl H-phosphonates (phosphites) to carbonyl compounds, was performed with oxidized quinine derivatives as the substrates. Homologous aldehydes obtained from the vinyl group reacted in a typical way which led to α-hydroxyphosphonates, first reported compounds containing a direct P–C bond between the quinine carbon skeleton and a phosphorus atom. For the C9 ketones a phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement, associated with a tandem elimination of the piperidine fragment, was evidenced. PMID:24778744

  13. Novel C-9, 9'-O-acyl esters of (-)-carinol as free-radical scavengers and xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitors: synthesis and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Tatipaka, Hari Babu; Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Tiwari, Ashok K; Rao, Janaswamy Madhusudana; Babu, Katragadda Suresh

    2013-02-01

    New compounds with hydrophyllic esters of (-)-carinol were synthesized and evaluated as xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitors and antioxidants. Aliphatic esterfication of C-9,9'-OH groups of (-)-carinol resulted in lowering antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. However certain aromatic acyl esters considerably improved the xathine oxidase inhibition. Aromatic esterification with electron withdrawing substitutions would preferred for improvement in XOD inhibition while retaining radical scavenging activity, electron withdrawing substitution led to the loss of free radical scavenging property and neutral substituents decrease the enzyme inhibitory potential.

  14. Addition of H-phosphonates to quinine-derived carbonyl compounds. An unexpected C9 phosphonate-phosphate rearrangement and tandem intramolecular piperidine elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecki, Lukasz; Mucha, Artur; Kafarski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The Abramov reaction, a base-catalyzed nucleophilic addition of dialkyl H-phosphonates (phosphites) to carbonyl compounds, was performed with oxidized quinine derivatives as the substrates. Homologous aldehydes obtained from the vinyl group reacted in a typical way which led to α-hydroxyphosphonates, first reported compounds containing a direct P-C bond between the quinine carbon skeleton and a phosphorus atom. For the C9 ketones a phosphonate-phosphate rearrangement, associated with a tandem elimination of the piperidine fragment, was evidenced.

  15. Addition of H-phosphonates to quinine-derived carbonyl compounds. An unexpected C9 phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement and tandem intramolecular piperidine elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Górecki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Abramov reaction, a base-catalyzed nucleophilic addition of dialkyl H-phosphonates (phosphites to carbonyl compounds, was performed with oxidized quinine derivatives as the substrates. Homologous aldehydes obtained from the vinyl group reacted in a typical way which led to α-hydroxyphosphonates, first reported compounds containing a direct P–C bond between the quinine carbon skeleton and a phosphorus atom. For the C9 ketones a phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement, associated with a tandem elimination of the piperidine fragment, was evidenced.

  16. Definite behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia with C9ORF72 expansions despite positive Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, David; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Deramecourt, Vincent; Pariente, Jeremie; Auriacombe, Sophie; Le Ber, Isabelle; Schraen, Suzanna; Pasquier, Florence; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Hexanucleotide expansion repeats in the C9ORF72 gene are a major cause of familial and, to a lesser extent, sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and FTLD-ALS. To examine whether C9ORF72 expansions could be involved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), we genotyped the hexanucleotide repeat region in a large cohort of 114 EOAD patients who all had positive AD cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. We found hexanucleotide expansion repeats of the C9ORF72 gene in 3 out of 114 patients (2.6%). We raise several hypotheses to explain our results and discuss the current status of AD CSF biomarkers in the dementia diagnostic algorithm.

  17. Distribution of ABO and Rh Blood Groups in Patients With Keratoconus: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderan, Mohammad; Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Shoar, Saeed; Kamaleddin, Mohammad Amin; Naderan, Morteza; Rezagholizadeh, Farzaneh; Zolfaghari, Masoome; Pahlevani, Rozhin

    2015-07-01

    Association of keratoconus (KC) with genetic predisposition and environmental factors has been well documented. However, no single study has investigated the possible relationship between ABO and Rh blood groups and KC. A case-control study was designed in a university hospital enrolling 214 patients with KC in the case group and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects in the control group. Primary characteristics, ABO blood group, and Rh factors were compared between the two groups. Topographic findings of KC eyes and the severity of the diseases were investigated according to the distribution of the blood groups. Blood group O and Rh(+) phenotype were most frequent in both groups. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of ABO blood groups or Rh factors. Mean keratometery (K), central corneal thickness, thinnest corneal thickness, flat K, steep K, sphere and cylinder, spherical equivalent, and uncorrected visual acuity were all similar between ABO blood groups and Rh(+) and Rh(-) groups. However, the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) had the highest value in AB blood group (0.35 ± 0.22 logMAR, P=0.005). Moreover, the blood group AB revealed the highest frequency for grade 3 KC, followed by grades 1, 2, and 4 (P=0.003). We observed no significant excess of any particular blood group among KC cases compared with healthy subjects. Except BCVA, none of the keratometric or topographic findings was significantly different between blood groups.

  18. FORMATION CONTROL OF MULTIPLE UNICYCLE-TYPE ROBOTS USING LIE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwei Dong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the formation control of a multi-robots system is investigated. The proposed control law, based on Lie group theory, is applied to control the formation of a group of unicycle-type robots. The communication topology is supposed to be a rooted directed acyclic graph and fixed. Some numerical simulations using Matlab are made to validate our results.

  19. Association of CYP2C9, CYP2A6, ACSM2A, and CPT1A gene polymorphisms with adverse effects of valproic acid in Chinese patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Wang, Ping; Yang, Li-Ping; Pan, Jing; Yang, Xue; Ma, Hong-Ying

    2017-05-01

    To explore the influence of CYP2C9, CYP2A6, ACSM2A, CPT1A gene polymorphisms on valproic acid (VPA) and its role in metabolism-related liver dysfunction in order to guide the clinical safety and rational use of VPA. One hundred two patients taking sodium valproate oral solution were genotyped. To assess the genotypes of relevant genes, the CYP2C9 gene was directly sequenced; for polymorphism classification, multiple Long-PCR electrophoresis was conducted for CYP2A6; and imLDR method was used for ACSM2A and CPT1A. GC-MS-SIM was used to determine the levels of VPA and 2-propyl-4-pentenoic acid (4-ene-VPA) in human plasma simultaneously. CYP2C9 mutations had a significant impact on 4-ene-VPA concentration, in patients with wild-type CYP2C9 (CYP2C9*1), which has a greater capacity for VPA metabolism than the mutant type (CYP2C9*3), liver dysfunction was substantially higher. Patients with an ACSM2A polymorphism had higher levels of ALT and AST compared with wild-type (p0.05). Among different CYP2A6 and CPT1A genotype groups, there was no significant correlation in the levels of VPA, 4-ene-VPA, ALT, AST or TB (p>0.05). The content of 4-ene-VPA had no direct correlation with the incidence of liver dysfunction. Early detection of CYP2C9 gene polymorphisms may help to predict or prevent liver dysfunction caused by VPA. While the concentration of 4-ene-VPA was not suitable as an early warning index, the results provide clear theoretical guidance for the rational and safe clinical use of VPA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 8353 - Positioning Systems Directorate Will Be Hosting an Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Positioning Systems Directorate Will Be Hosting an Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) Meeting for Document ICD-GPS-870 AGENCY: Interface Control... informs the public that the Global Positioning Systems Directorate will be hosting an Interface Control...

  1. Two-group Current-equivalent Parameters for Control Rod Cells. Autocode Programme CRCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norinder, O.; Nyman, K.

    1962-06-15

    In two-group neutron diffusion calculations there is mostly necessary to describe the influence of control rods by equivalent homogeneous two-group parameters in regions about the control rods. The problem is solved for a control rod in a medium characterized by two-group parameters. The property of fast and thermal neutr. on current equivalence is selected to obtain equivalent two-group parameters for a homogeneous cell with the same radius as the control rod cell. For the parameters determined one obtains the same fast and thermal neutron current into the rod cell and the equivalent cell independent of the fast and thermal flux amplitudes on the cell boundaries. The equivalent parameters are obtained as a solution of a system of transcendental equations. A Ferranti Mercury Autocode performing the solution is described. Calculated equivalent parameters for control rods in a heavy water lattice are given for some representative cases.

  2. Radioimmunoassay of serum group I and group II pepsinogens in normal controls and patients with various disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, M.; Miki, K.; Hayashi, R.; Niwa, H.; Oka, H.; Furihata, C.; Matsushima, T.; Kageyama, T.; Takahashi, K.

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human group I pepsinogens (PgI) in serum was developed, using PgI purified from gastric mucosa. The sensitivity (0.7 μg/l) and reproducibility of the assay were satisfactory for clinical use. In normal controls total serum pepsinogen (T-Pg) level was 58.9 +- 31.7 μg/l (mean +- SD) (PgI, 43.6 +- 25.0 μg/l; PgII, 15.3 +- 11.1 μg/l). Peptic ulcer cases had elevated T-Pg levels (gastric ulcer, gastroduodenal ulcer and duodenal ulcer, in increasing order of magnitude). T-Pg levels were not useful for diagnosis of peptic ulcer because of a large overlap with normal controls. T-Pg levels were low in patients with gastric polyp and in aged subjects. In these groups, the decrease of PgI was more marked than that of PgII. (Auth.)

  3. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia across age groups: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiołek, Anna; Gierus, Jacek; Koweszko, Tytus; Szulc, Agata

    2016-02-24

    The potential dynamics of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia is discussed in the literature of the field. Recent publications suggest modest changes in level of cognitive impairment after first psychotic episode. Present article attempts to explore cognitive differences between patients and controls across age groups and differences between age groups in clinical group. One hundred and twenty-eight hospitalized patients with schizophrenia (64 women and 64 men) and 68 individuals from the control group (32 women and 32 men) aged 18-55 years were examined. The patients were divided into age groups (18-25, 26-35, 36-45, 46-55). Both groups were examined using Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Rey Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, Trail Making Test (A and B), Stroop Test, verbal fluency test and Wechsler digit span. Patients with schizophrenia obtained significantly lower scores versus the control group in regard to all the measured cognitive functions (Mann-Whitney U; p age groups, however, statistically important impairment in executive functions (WCST) were present only in "older" groups. Patients with schizophrenia obtained less favourable results than the control group in all age groups. Deficits regarding executive functions do not seem to be at a significant level among the youngest group, whereas they are more noticeable in the group of 46-55-year-olds. Executive functions are significantly lowered in the group aged 36-45 in comparison to the "younger" groups. The level of cognitive functions shows a mild exacerbation in connection with age, whereas cognitive rigidity proved to be related to the number of years spent without hospital treatment.

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia is not associated with C9ORF72 repeat expansions in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T T; Svenstrup, K; Duno, M

    2014-01-01

    ) in C9ORF72 have been found to cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and FTD with motor neuron disease. Owing to the overlapping phenotypes among HSP, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and FTD with motor neuron disease along with shared pathological findings, we hypothesized...

  5. CYP2C9 Genotypes Modify Benzodiazepine-Related Fall Risk: Original Results From Three Studies With Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, Annelies C.; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Broer, Linda; Swart, Karin M. A.; Enneman, Anke W.; van Dijk, Suzanne C.; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P.; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L.; Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; van Gelder, Teun; de Vries, Oscar J.; Lips, Paul; Deeg, Dorly J. H.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Hofman, Albert; Witkamp, Renger F.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; van der Velde, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether the CYP2C9*2 and *3 variants modify benzodiazepine-related fall risk. Three prospective studies; the Rotterdam Study, B-PROOF, and LASA. Community-dwelling individuals living in or near five Dutch cities. There were 11,485 participants aged ≥55 years. Fall incidents were

  6. Identification of cytochrome P450 2D6 and 2C9 substrates and inhibitors by QSAR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsdóttir, Svava Ósk; Ringsted, Tine; Nikolov, Nikolai G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents four new QSAR models for CYP2C9 and CYP2D6 substrate recognition and inhibitor identification based on human clinical data. The models were used to screen a large data set of environmental chemicals for CYP activity, and to analyze the frequency of CYP activity among these com......This paper presents four new QSAR models for CYP2C9 and CYP2D6 substrate recognition and inhibitor identification based on human clinical data. The models were used to screen a large data set of environmental chemicals for CYP activity, and to analyze the frequency of CYP activity among...... these compounds. A large fraction of these chemicals were found to be CYP active, and thus potentially capable of affecting human physiology. 20% of the compounds within applicability domain of the models were predicted to be CYP2C9 substrates, and 17% to be inhibitors. The corresponding numbers for CYP2D6 were 9......% and 21%. Where the majority of CYP2C9 active compounds were predicted to be both a substrate and an inhibitor at the same time, the CYP2D6 active compounds were primarily predicted to be only inhibitors. It was demonstrated that the models could identify compound classes with a high occurrence...

  7. Pharmacogenetic relevance of the CYP2C9*3 allele in a tenoxicam bioequivalence study performed on Spaniards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, A M; Novalbos, J; Zapater, P; Moreu, R; López-Rodríguez, R; Rodríguez, V; Abad-Santos, F; Horga, J F

    2009-01-01

    We performed a study to quantify CYP2C9 and CYP2C8 alleles influence on the variability observed in tenoxicam pharmacokinetic (PK) and implication in a bioequivalence study design performed on Spaniards. Eighteen healthy volunteers were included in an open, randomized, crossover, phase I bioequivalence study. Significant increases were found in CYP2C9*3 alleles vs. *1 and *2 in AUC(0-infinity) (median (min-max)): 256 (230-516) vs. 150 (100-268) and 169 (124-197) microg h/mL (p<0.01) and half-life time (t1/2) 102 (79-36) vs. 56 (45-94) and 64 (60-80)h (p<0.01). Non-significant differences were observed in C(max) 1.9 (1.8-2.9) vs. 2.4 (1.7-3.4), 2.5 (1.6-2.9) microg/mL or in according to CYP2C8 alleles presence. CYP2C9*3 allele is associated to a longer elimination time of tenoxicam. PK parameters calculated in bioequivalence studies (AUC(0-infinity), t1/2) may be influenced by the presence of CYP2C9*3 allele resulting in a high variability. Thus, bioequivalence studies of tenoxicam formulations should be designed considering genotype profile.

  8. Values of Kp Indices, Ap Indices, Cp Indices, C9 Indices, Sunspot Number, and 10.7 cm Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data file consists of Kp indices, Ap indices, Cp indices, C9 indices, sunspot number, and 10.7 cm flux. The most often requested parameter of this file are the...

  9. TMEM106B is a genetic modifier of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallagher, M.D.; Suh, E.R.; Grossman, M.; Elman, L.; McCluskey, L.; van Swieten, J.C.; Al-Sarraj, S.; Neumann, M.; Gelpi, E.; Ghetti, B.; Rohrer, J.D.; Halliday, G.; Van Broeckhoven, C.; Seilhean, D.; Shaw, P.J.; Frosch, M.P.; Alafuzoff, I.; Antonell, A.; Bogdanovic, N.; Brooks, W.; Cairns, N.J.; Cooper-Knock, J.; Cotman, C.; Cras, P.; Cruts, M.; de Deyn, P.P.; deCarli, C.; Dobson-Stone, C.; Engelborghs, S.; Fox, N.; Galasko, D.; Gearing, M.; Gijselinck, I.; Grafman, J.; Hartikainen, P.; Hatanpaa, K.J.; Highley, J.R.; Hodges, J.; Hulette, C.; Ince, P.G.; Jin, L.W.; Kirby, J.; Kofler, J.; Kril, J.; Kwok, J.B.J.; Levey, A.; Lieberman, A.; Llado, A.; Martin, J.J.; Masliah, E.; McDermott, C.J.; McKee, A.; McLean, C.; Mead, S.; Miller, C.A.; Miller, J.; Munoz, D.G.; Murrell, J.; Paulson, H.; Piguet, O.; Rossor, M.; Sanchez-Valle, R.; Sano, M.; Schneider, J.; Silbert, L.C.; Spina, S.; van der Zee, J.; Van Langenhove, T.; Warren, J.; Wharton, S.B.; White, C.L.; Woltjer, R.L.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Lee, V.M.Y.; Van Deerlin, V.; Chen-Plotkin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) have recently been linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and may be the most common genetic cause of both neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic variants at TMEM106B

  10. Adverse events in a newborn on valproate therapy due to loss-of-function mutations in CYP2C9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased risk of valproate-induced toxicity has been reported in children, particularly in those younger than 2 years of age. Significant variations in valproate pharmacokinetics and shifts in the metabolic pathways towards CYP2C9-dependent metabolism seem to play some role in the age-related differences in the incidence of adverse events. We present the case of a premature patient with moderate hemorrhage in the subependymal region (grade II — intraventricular hemorrhage without ventricular dilatation, several myoclonic episodes in her right upper arm (series of jerks lasting milliseconds, and epileptiform abnormalities on the EEG (localized spike-and-wave in the left frontal region with preserved background activity who was treated with valproate. Serious side effects, consisting of bone marrow depression, hyperammonemia, and serum alkaline phosphatase elevation, were observed seventeen days after the beginning of valproate therapy. The toxic symptoms were likely the consequence of a reduced ability to metabolize valproate. The patient was demonstrated to carry two loss-of-function mutations in CYP2C9 (CYP2C9*3/*3 resulting in exaggerated blood concentrations of valproate. The present case highlights the importance of assaying inborn errors in CYP2C9 gene in pediatric patients to avoid valproate-evoked serious side effects.

  11. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease phenotype related to C9ORF72 repeat expansions: contribution of the neuropsychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Mariam; Beaufils, Émilie; Viola, Ursule-Catherine; Vourc'h, Patrick; Hommet, Caroline; Mondon, Karl

    2013-08-29

    Expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeats in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene was recently identified as being responsible for over 40% of the cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, in various extrapyramidal syndromes including supranuclear gaze palsy and corticobasal degeneration, and in addition, has been found to be a rare genetic cause of isolated Parkinsonism. To our knowledge, there is no published data concerning the neuropsychological evaluation of patients diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease related with C9ORF72 repeat expansions. We report the results of the comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation in a newly described case in the literature (the sixth) of a patient presenting isolated idiopathic Parkinson's disease associated with C9ORF72 repeat expansions.The decrease in the patient's prefrontal functions resulted in a slight decrease in global efficiency. These abnormalities did not appear to be different, with respect to the deficit observed and the intensity of the cognitive impairment, from those classically observed in cases of sporadic idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Our patient also exhibited a significant impairment in visual gnosis. If confirmed in other patients, visuoperceptive deficits in idiopathic Parkinson's disease could represent a red flag that should prompt the clinician to perform addition diagnostic procedures. A thorough neuropsychological assessment may prove to be useful for detecting idiopathic Parkinson's disease in patients who are suspected of having repeat abnormalities of C9ORF72 expansions.

  12. The influence of NSAIDs on coumarin sensitivity in patients with CYP2C9 polymorphism after total hip replacement surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinema, M.J.; Jong, P.H. de; Salden, H.J.; Wijnen, M.H.W.A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of NSAIDs on the international normalized ratio (INR) in patients with cytochrome P450 (CYP)-2C9 enzyme variants starting acenocoumarol (an oral coumarin) therapy during the first 7 days after total hip replacement surgery. METHODS: In this prospective study, an

  13. The influence of NSAIDs on coumarin sensitivity in patients with CYP2C9 polymorphism after total hip replacement surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinema, Maarten J.; de Jong, Petra H.; Salden, Har J. M.; van Wijnen, Merel; van der Meer, Jan; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of NSAIDs on the international normalized ratio (INR) in patients with cytochrome P450 (CYP)-2C9 enzyme variants starting acenocoumarol (an oral coumarin) therapy during the first 7 days after total hip replacement surgery. Methods: In this prospective study, an

  14. CYP2C9 Genotypes Modify Benzodiazepine-Related Fall Risk: Original Results From Three Studies With Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Annelies C; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Broer, Linda; Swart, Karin M A; Enneman, Anke W; van Dijk, Suzanne C; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L; Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; van Schoor, Natasja M; Zillikens, M Carola; van Gelder, Teun; de Vries, Oscar J; Lips, Paul; Deeg, Dorly J H; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Hofman, Albert; Witkamp, Renger F; Uitterlinden, André G; Stricker, Bruno H; van der Velde, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether the CYP2C9*2 and *3 variants modify benzodiazepine-related fall risk. Three prospective studies; the Rotterdam Study, B-PROOF, and LASA. Community-dwelling individuals living in or near five Dutch cities. There were 11,485 participants aged ≥55 years. Fall incidents were recorded prospectively. Benzodiazepine use was determined using pharmacy dispensing records or interviews. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age and sex were applied to determine the association between benzodiazepine use and fall risk stratified for CYP2C9 genotype and comparing benzodiazepine users to nonusers. The results of the three studies were combined applying meta-analysis. Within benzodiazepine users, the association between genotypes and fall risk was also assessed. Three thousand seven hundred five participants (32%) encountered a fall during 91,996 follow-up years, and 4% to 15% (depending on the study population) used benzodiazepines. CYP2C9 variants had frequencies of 13% for the *2 allele and 6% for the *3 allele. Compared to nonusers, current benzodiazepine use was associated with an 18% to 36% increased fall risk across studies with a combined hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13; 1.40). CYP2C9*2 or *3 allele variants modified benzodiazepine-related fall risk. Compared to nonusers, those carrying a CYP2C9*2 or *3 allele and using benzodiazepines had a 45% increased fall risk (HR, 1.45 95% CI, 1.21; 1.73), whereas CYP2C9*1 homozygotes using benzodiazepines had no increased fall risk (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.90; 1.45). Within benzodiazepine users, having a CYP2C9*2 or *3 allele was associated with an increased fall risk (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.06; 1.72). Additionally, we observed an allele dose effect; heterozygous allele carriers had a fall risk of (HR = 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05; 1.61), and homozygous allele carriers of (HR = 1.91 95% CI, 1.23; 2.96). CYP2C9*2 and *3 allele variants modify benzodiazepine-related fall risk. Those

  15. Analysis of postural control and muscular performance in young and elderly women in different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Matheus M; Reis, Júlia G; Carvalho, Regiane L; Tanaka, Erika H; Hyppolito, Miguel A; Abreu, Daniela C C

    2015-01-01

    muscle strength and power are two factors affecting balance. The impact of muscle strength and power on postural control has not been fully explored among different age strata over sixty. the aim of the present study was to assess the muscle strength and power of elderly women in different age groups and determine their correlation with postural control. eighty women were divided into four groups: the young 18-30 age group (n=20); the 60-64 age group (n=20); the 65-69 age group (n=20); and the 70-74 age group (n=20). The participants underwent maximum strength (one repetition maximum or 1-RM) and muscle power tests to assess the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 40%, 70%, and 90% 1-RM intensity. The time required by participants to recover their balance after disturbing their base of support was also assessed. the elderly women in the 60-64, 65-69, and 70-74 age groups exhibited similar muscle strength, power, and postural control (p>0.05); however, these values were lower than those of the young group (pstrength and power and the postural control performance (pelderly women aged 60 to 74 years exhibited similar abilities to generate strength and power with their lower limbs, and this ability could be one factor that explains the similar postural control shown by these women.

  16. SITUATIONAL CONTROL OF HOT BLAST STOVES GROUP BASED ON DECISION TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Kobysh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper was developed the control system of group of hot blast stoves, which operates on the basis of the packing heating control subsystem and subsystem of forecasting of modes duration in the hot blast stoves APCS of iron smelting in a blast furnace. With the use of multi-criteria optimization methods, implemented the adjustment of control system conduct, which takes into account the current production situation that has arisen in the course of the heating packing of each hot blast stove group. Developed a situation recognition algorithm and the choice of scenarios of control based on a decision tree.

  17. Glycemic control, compliance, and satisfaction for diabetic gravidas in centering group care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Jelin, Angie C; Iqbal, Sara N; Belna, Sarah L; Fries, Melissa H; Patel, Misbah; Desale, Sameer; Ramsey, Patrick S

    2017-05-01

    To determine if diabetic gravidas enrolled in Centering® group care have improved glycemic control compared to those attending standard prenatal care. To compare compliance and patient satisfaction between the groups. We conducted a prospective cohort study of diabetics enrolled in centering group care from October 2013 to December 2015. Glycemic control, compliance and patient satisfaction (five-point Likert scale) were evaluated. Student's t-test, Chi-Square and mixed effects model were used to compare outcomes. We compared 20 patients in centering to 28 standard prenatal care controls. Mean fasting blood sugar was lower with centering group care (91.0 versus 105.5 mg/dL, p =0.017). There was no difference in change in fasting blood sugar over time between the two groups (p = 0.458). The percentage of time patients brought their blood glucose logs did not differ between the centering group and standard prenatal care (70.7 versus 73.9%, p = 0.973). Women in centering group care had better patient satisfaction scores for "ability to be seen by a physician" (5 versus 4, p = 0.041) and "time in waiting room" (5 versus 4, p =0.001). Fasting blood sugar was lower for patients in centering group care. Change in blood sugar over time did not differ between groups. Diabetic gravidas enrolled in centering group care report improved patient satisfaction.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group-Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0726 TITLE: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group-Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI PRINCIPAL...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group-Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI 5b. GRANT...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Impairments in new learning and memory (NLM

  19. Characterization of drug-metabolizing enzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Japan) (table 2). This defect was noticed in different ethnic groups at a similar and relatively high frequency, implying that those mutations were relatively old and occurred before the Black, Asian and Caucasian racial ..... Jamil Jaoua, founder and former Head of the English unit at the Sfax Faculty of Science for having ...

  20. Characterization of drug-metabolizing enzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We believe that this is the first work that reports these variants among those populations. The cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) are a subfamily of hemoproteins, playing a critical role in the metabolism of many drugs. Several genetic polymorphisms which depend on ethnic groups can alter CYP activity and then affect the.

  1. Quasi-Experiments in Schools: The Case for Historical Cohort Control Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara M. Walser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is increased emphasis on using experimental and quasi-experimental methods to evaluate educational programs; however, educational evaluators and school leaders are often faced with challenges when implementing such designs in educational settings. Use of a historical cohort control group design provides a viable option for conducting quasi-experiments in school-based outcome evaluation. A cohort is a successive group that goes through some experience together, such as a grade level or a training program. A historical cohort comparison group is a cohort group selected from pre-treatment archival data and matched to a subsequent cohort currently receiving a treatment. Although prone to the same threats to study validity as any quasi-experiment, issues related to selection, history, and maturation can be particularly challenging. However, use of a historical cohort control group can reduce noncomparability of treatment and control conditions through local, focal matching. In addition, a historical cohort control group design can alleviate concerns about denying program access to students in order to form a control group, minimize resource requirements and disruption to school routines, and make use of archival data schools and school districts collect and find meaningful.

  2. Pharmacokinetic interactions between glimepiride and rosuvastatin in healthy Korean subjects: does the SLCO1B1 or CYP2C9 genetic polymorphism affect these drug interactions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim CO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Choon Ok Kim,1 Eun Sil Oh,2 Hohyun Kim,3 Min Soo Park1,4 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Medicine and Regulatory Sciences, College of Medicine and Pharmacy, Yonsei University, Incheon, 3Korea Medicine Research Institute, Inc., Seongnam, 4Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Abstract: To improve cardiovascular outcomes, dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes needs to be treated. Thus, these patients are likely to take glimepiride and rosuvastatin concomitantly. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic (PK interactions between these two drugs in healthy males and to explore the effect of SLCO1B1 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms on their interactions in two randomized, open-label crossover studies. Glimepiride was studied in part 1 and rosuvastatin in part 2. Twenty-four participants were randomly assigned to each part. All subjects (n=24 completed part 1, and 22 subjects completed part 2. A total of 38 subjects among the participants of the PK interaction studies were enrolled in the genotype study to analyze their SLCO1B1 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms retrospectively (n=22 in part 1, n=16 in part 2. Comparison of the PK and safety of each drug alone with those of the drugs in combination showed that both glimepiride and rosuvastatin did not interact with each other and had tolerable safety profiles in all subjects. However, with regard to glimepiride PK, the SLCO1B1 521TC group had a significantly higher maximum plasma concentration (Cmax,ss and area under the plasma concentration–time curve during the dose interval at steady state (AUCt,ss for glimepiride in combination with rosuvastatin than those for glimepiride alone. However, other significant effects of the SLCO1B1 or CYP2C9 polymorphism on the interaction between the two drugs were not observed. In conclusion, there were no significant PK

  3. Comparison of folic acid levels in schizophrenic patients and control groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthy, C. C.; Amin, M. M.; Effendy, E.

    2018-03-01

    Folic acid deficiency is a risk factor for schizophrenia through epidemiology, biochemistry and gene-related studies. Compared with healthy people, schizophrenic patients may have high homocysteine plasma values and homocysteine or low levels of folic acid, which seems to correlate with extrapyramidal motor symptoms caused by neuroleptic therapy and with symptoms of schizophrenia. In this present study, we focus on the difference of folic acid level between schizophrenic patient and control group. The study sample consisted of schizophrenic patients and 14 people in the control group and performed blood sampling to obtain the results of folic acid levels. The folic acid level in both groups was within normal range, but the schizophrenic patient group had lower mean folic acid values of 5.00 ng/ml (sb 1.66), compared with the control group with mean folic acid values of 10.75 ng/ml (sb 4.33). there was the group of the control group had a higher value of folic acid than the schizophrenic group.

  4. Improving Student Confidence in Using Group Work Standards: A Controlled Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Wong, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This is a replication of a study that examined the effects of teaching foundation competencies in group work to social work students and assessed their self-confidence in applying these skills. This study improves on the first by utilizing a controlled design. Method: Twenty-six master of social work students were taught group work…

  5. Control of individual daily growth in group-housed pigs using feeding stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, P.J.L.

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis, it was examined whether it is possible to control individual daily growth and carcass composition in group-housed pigs using feeding stations. A forelegs weighing system to estimate the daily individual body weight (BW) of group-housed pigs was developed and validated. In two

  6. Effect of an orientation group for patients with chronic heart failure: randomized controlled trial 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Cristina Silva; Pereira, Juliana de Melo Vellozo; Figueiredo, Lyvia da Silva; Scofano, Bruna dos Santos; Flores, Paula Vanessa Peclat; Cavalcanti, Ana Carla Dantas

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of the orientation group on therapeutic adherence and self-care among patients with chronic heart failure. Method: Randomized controlled trial with 27 patients with chronic heart failure. The intervention group received nursing consultations and participated in group meetings with the multi-professional team. The control group only received nursing consultations in a period of four months. Questionnaires validated for use in Brazil were applied in the beginning and in the end of the study to assess self-care outcomes and adherence to treatment. Categorical variables were expressed through frequency and percentage distributions and the continuous variables through mean and standard deviation. The comparison between the initial and final scores of the intervention and control groups was done through the Student’s t-test. Results: The mean adherence in the intervention group was 13.9 ± 3.6 before the study and 4.8 ± 2.3 after the study. In the control group it was 14.2 ± 3.4 before the study and 14.7 ± 3.5 after the study. The self-care confidence score was lower after the intervention (p=0.01). Conclusion: The orientation group does not improve adherence to treatment and self-care management and maintenance and it may reduce confidence in self-care. Registry REBEC RBR-7r9f2m. PMID:29319747

  7. Functional Group Analysis for Diesel-like Mixing-Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Blendstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; McCormick, Robert L.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Fioroni, Gina; George, Anthe; Albrecht, Karl O.

    2016-12-30

    This report addresses the suitability of hydrocarbon and oxygenate functional groups for use as a diesel-like fuel blending component in an advanced, mixing-controlled, compression ignition combustion engine. The functional groups are chosen from those that could be derived from a biomass feedstock, and represent a full range of chemistries. This first systematic analysis of functional groups will be of value to all who are pursuing new bio-blendstocks for diesel-like fuels.

  8. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young DKW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel KW Young,1 Timothy CY Kwok,2 Petrus YN Ng1 1Department of Social Work, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Purpose: Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Research methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. Results: At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59% of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48 to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18, which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, P<0.05, while the control group’s participants did not show any significant change. Conclusion: This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants. Keywords: support group, mild dementia, Chinese, depression

  9. Comparison of two control groups for estimation of oral cholera vaccine effectiveness using a case-control study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Molly F; Jerome, J Gregory; Matias, Wilfredo R; Ternier, Ralph; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Harris, Jason B; Ivers, Louise C

    2017-10-13

    Case-control studies to quantify oral cholera vaccine effectiveness (VE) often rely on neighbors without diarrhea as community controls. Test-negative controls can be easily recruited and may minimize bias due to differential health-seeking behavior and recall. We compared VE estimates derived from community and test-negative controls and conducted bias-indicator analyses to assess potential bias with community controls. From October 2012 through November 2016, patients with acute watery diarrhea were recruited from cholera treatment centers in rural Haiti. Cholera cases had a positive stool culture. Non-cholera diarrhea cases (test-negative controls and non-cholera diarrhea cases for bias-indicator analyses) had a negative culture and rapid test. Up to four community controls were matched to diarrhea cases by age group, time, and neighborhood. Primary analyses included 181 cholera cases, 157 non-cholera diarrhea cases, 716 VE community controls and 625 bias-indicator community controls. VE for self-reported vaccination with two doses was consistent across the two control groups, with statistically significant VE estimates ranging from 72 to 74%. Sensitivity analyses revealed similar, though somewhat attenuated estimates for self-reported two dose VE. Bias-indicator estimates were consistently less than one, with VE estimates ranging from 19 to 43%, some of which were statistically significant. OCV estimates from case-control analyses using community and test-negative controls were similar. While bias-indicator analyses suggested possible over-estimation of VE estimates using community controls, test-negative analyses suggested this bias, if present, was minimal. Test-negative controls can be a valid low-cost and time-efficient alternative to community controls for OCV effectiveness estimation and may be especially relevant in emergency situations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The Effects of H2S on the Activities of CYP2B6, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP2C19 and CYP2C9 in Vivo in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianqin Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a colorless, flammable, extremely hazardous gas with a “rotten egg” smell. The human body produces small amounts of H2S and uses it as a signaling molecule. The cocktail method was used to evaluate the influence of H2S on the activities of CYP450 in rats, which were reflected by the changes of pharmacokinetic parameters of five specific probe drugs: bupropion, metroprolol, midazolam, omeprazole and tolbutamide, respectively. The rats were randomly divided into two groups, control group and H2S group. The H2S group rats were given 5 mg/kg NaHS by oral administration once a day for seven days. The mixture of five probes was given to rats through oral administration and the blood samples were obtained at a series of time-points through the caudal vein. The concentrations of probe drugs in rat plasma were measured by LC-MS. In comparing the H2S group with the control group, there was a statistically pharmacokinetics difference for midazolam and tolbutamide; the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC was decreased for midazolam (p < 0.05 and increased for tolbutamide (p < 0.05; while there was no statistical pharmacokinetics difference for bupropion, metroprolol and omeprazole. H2S could not influence the activities of CYP2B6, CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 in rats, while H2S could induce the activity of CYP3A4 and inhibit the activity of CYP2C9 in rats.

  11. Formation Control and Velocity Tracking for a Group of Nonholonomic Wheeled Robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Ewoud; van der Schaft, Arjan J.; Scherpen, Jacquelien M. A.

    This technical note presents an integrated approach for formation control and velocity tracking of a group of non-holonomic wheeled robots. The solution is defined within the port-Hamiltonian framework, providing a clear interpretation of the results. The controller consists of a local nonlinear

  12. Control algorithms along relative equilibria of underactuated Lagrangian systems on Lie groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Nikolaj; Bullo, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    We present novel algorithms to control underactuated mechanical systems. For a class of invariant systems on Lie groups, we design iterative small-amplitude control forces to accelerate along, decelerate along, and stabilize relative equilibria. The technical approach is based upon a perturbation...

  13. Control Algorithms Along Relative Equilibria of Underactuated Lagrangian Systems on Lie Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Nikolaj; Bullo, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present novel algorithms to control underactuated mechanical systems. For a class of invariant systems on Lie groups, we design iterative small-amplitude control forces to accelerate along, decelerate along, and stabilize relative equilibria. The technical approach is based upon a perturbation...

  14. Impact of pharmacokinetic (CYP2C9) and pharmacodynamic (VKORC1, F7, GGCX, CALU, EPHX1) gene variants on the initiation and maintenance phases of phenprocoumon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxembourg, Baete; Schneider, Katharina; Sittinger, Katja; Toennes, Stefan W; Seifried, Erhard; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Oldenburg, Johannes; Geisen, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Compared to warfarin, little is known about the effect of pharmacogenomics on the inter-individual variability of phenprocoumon therapy. In a retrospective cohort study, we investigated the impact of VKORC1 c.-1639G>A; CYP2C9*2 , CYP2C9*3 ; GGCX c.214+597G>A; CALU c.*4A>G; EPHX1 c.337T>C; F7 c.-402G>A, and F7 c.-401G>T on the initiation (n=54) and maintenance phases (n=91) of phenprocoumon therapy. We assessed the following outcome parameters: time to stable international normalised ratio (INR), time to first supra-therapeutic INR, time out of INR range, probability of over-anticoagulation, number of anticoagulation clinic visits. During the initiation phase, homozygotes for the VKORC1 c.-1639 A and G alleles achieved stable INRs later (pF7 gene variants did not affect outcome parameters of the initiation phase and none of the genotypes had an impact on maintenance phase parameters. Compared to the VKORC1 genotype, early INR values were less informative in the prediction of outcome parameters such as time to stable INR and time above the INR range. Our study is limited by the retrospective study design with no standardised protocol in a usual care setting. Therefore, our findings should be validated in a larger, controlled prospective study.

  15. Interference control in working memory: comparing groups of children with atypical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Paola; Ferrari, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to test whether working memory deficits in children at risk of Learning Disabilities (LD) and/or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be attributed to deficits in interference control, thereby implicating prefrontal systems. Two groups of children known for showing poor working memory (i.e., children with poor comprehension and children with ADHD) were compared to a group of children with specific reading decoding problems (i.e., having severe problems in phonological rather than working memory) and to a control group. All children were tested with a verbal working memory task. Interference control of irrelevant items was examined by a lexical decision task presented immediately after the final recall in about half the trials, selected at random. The interference control measure was therefore directly related to working memory performance. Results confirmed deficient working memory performance in poor comprehenders and children at risk of ADHD + LD. More interestingly, this working memory deficit was associated with greater activation of irrelevant information than in the control group. Poor decoders showed more efficient interference control, in contrast to poor comprehenders and ADHD + LD children. These results indicated that interfering items were still highly accessible to working memory in children who fail the working memory task. In turn, these findings strengthen and clarify the role of interference control, one of the most critical prefrontal functions, in working memory.

  16. Structural basis and enzymatic mechanism of the biosynthesis of C9- from C10-monoterpenoid indole alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuqing; Hill, Marco; Wang, Meitian; Panjikar, Santosh; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Cutting carbons: The three-dimensional structure of polyneuridine aldehyde esterase (PNAE) gives insight into the enzymatic mechanism of the biosynthesis of C(9)- from C(10)-monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (see scheme). PNAE is a very substrate-specific serine esterase. It harbors the catalytic triad S87-D216-H244, and is a new member of the alpha/beta-fold hydrolase superfamily. Its novel function leads to the diversification of alkaloid structures.

  17. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Dipeptide Repeat Proteins Linked to C9orf72-ALS/FTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Westergard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common genetic change underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. RNA transcripts containing these expansions undergo repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN-T to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs. DPRs are found as aggregates throughout the CNS of C9orf72-ALS/FTD patients, and some cause degeneration when expressed in vitro in neuronal cultures and in vivo in animal models. The spread of characteristic disease-related proteins drives the progression of pathology in many neurodegenerative diseases. While DPR toxic mechanisms continue to be investigated, the potential for DPRs to spread has yet to be determined. Using different experimental cell culture platforms, including spinal motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from C9orf72-ALS patients, we found evidence for cell-to-cell spreading of DPRs via exosome-dependent and exosome-independent pathways, which may be relevant to disease.

  18. Analysis of postural control and muscular performance in young and elderly women in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus M. Gomes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: muscle strength and power are two factors affecting balance. The impact of muscle strength and power on postural control has not been fully explored among different age strata over sixty. OBJECTIVES: the aim of the present study was to assess the muscle strength and power of elderly women in different age groups and determine their correlation with postural control. METHOD: eighty women were divided into four groups: the young 18-30 age group (n=20; the 60-64 age group (n=20; the 65-69 age group (n=20; and the 70-74 age group (n=20. The participants underwent maximum strength (one repetition maximum or 1-RM and muscle power tests to assess the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 40%, 70%, and 90% 1-RM intensity. The time required by participants to recover their balance after disturbing their base of support was also assessed. RESULTS: the elderly women in the 60-64, 65-69, and 70-74 age groups exhibited similar muscle strength, power, and postural control (p>0.05; however, these values were lower than those of the young group (p<0.05 as expected. There was a correlation between muscle strength and power and the postural control performance (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: despite the age difference, elderly women aged 60 to 74 years exhibited similar abilities to generate strength and power with their lower limbs, and this ability could be one factor that explains the similar postural control shown by these women.

  19. Positive and Negative Perfectionism in Migrainus Patients Compaired with Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Afshar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: The positive and negative effects of perfectionism on human cognition, affection and behavior have been emphasized. Perfectionism has been conceptualized as a multidimensional construct, with both adaptive and maladaptive aspects, which is one of the common personality traits that cause lifelong stress in human and results in anxiety, depression and physical and mental distress.The aim of this study was to assess the positive and negative perfectionism in migrainus patients in comparison with control group. Materials & Methods: This is an analytical (Case-control study which was performed on 91 migraine patients and 88 healthy individuals. The pqtients and controls completed a standard 40 item questionnaire for perfectionism – PANPS (20 for positive and 20 for negative perfectionism . The patients in both groups were matched for gender and age. Mean of positive and negative perfectionism scores for two groups was statistically analysed using SPSS software. Results: Mean positive perfectionism score was 83.47±8.5 for migraine group and 65.47±7.54 for control group (p=0.0001. The difference between two groups was significant. Mean of negative perfectionism score was 74.12±10.6 for migraine group and 51.79±7.8 for control group(p=0.0001. Conclusion: The results show that migraine patients have higher mean of perfectionism scores than healthy individuals. Based on this study and other clinical experiences more attention to psychotherapy is necessary for better management of migraine and recognition of personality profile in migraine patient helps to reduce patient’s complaints.

  20. IMPACTS OF GROUP-BASED SIGNAL CONTROL POLICY ON DRIVER BEHAVIOR AND INTERSECTION SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshuang TANG

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the typical stage-based policy commonly applied in Japan, the group-based control (often called movement-based in the traffic control industry in Japan refers to such a control pattern that the controller is capable of separately allocating time to each signal group instead of stage based on traffic demand. In order to investigate its applicability at signalized intersections in Japan, an intersection located in Yokkaichi City of Mie Prefecture was selected as an experimental application site by the Japan Universal Traffic Management Society (UTMS. Based on the data collected at the intersection before and after implementing the group-based control policy respectively, this study evaluated the impacts of such a policy on driver behavior and intersection safety. To specify those impacts, a few models utilizing cycle-based data were first developed to interpret the occurrence probability and rate of red-light-running (RLR. Furthermore, analyses were performed on the yellow-entry time (Ye of the last cleared vehicle and post encroachment time (PET during the phase switching. Conclusions supported that the group-based control policy, along with certain other factors, directly or indirectly influenced the RLR behavior of through and right-turn traffics. Meanwhile, it has potential safety benefits as well, indicated by the declined Ye and increased PET values.

  1. Meteorological Support Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG) Instrumentation, Data Format, and Networks Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James; Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of instrumentation discussed at the Meteorological Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG), a reference for data formats currently used by members of the group, a summary of proposed formats for future use by the group, an overview of the data networks of the group's members. This document will be updated as new systems are introduced, old systems are retired, and when the MSICWG community necessitates a change to the formats. The MSICWG consists of personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the United States Air Force (USAF) 45th Space Wing and Weather Squadron. The purpose of the group is to coordinate the distribution of weather related data to support NASA space launch related activities.

  2. Effect of self-consistency group intervention for adolescents with schizophrenia: An inpatient randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Pan; Zeng, Hongling; Yang, Bingxiang

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the efficacy of structural group therapy on the self-consistency and congruence of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Sixty inpatient adolescents with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). The intervention group was provided with a 12-session structural group therapy program for six weeks (1 h, two times per week), while the control group participated in a handicraft group. All patients were assessed with the Self-Consistency and Congruence Scale (SCCS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at pretest, posttest, three-month and one-year follow-up. The results were analyzed using t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. The two groups had no significant difference at the pre-test of outcome measures (p > 0.05). Significant differences existed between the two groups in ego-dystonic, self-flexibility, SCCS scores, positive syndrome, general psychopathology and PANSS scores after the intervention (p < 0.05). At the three-month follow-up, ego-dystonic, self-flexibility and PANSS scores were also found to be significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). But the outcome measures were not significantly different between the two groups at the one-year follow-up. Structural group therapy in a mental health setting had a positive effect on improving self-consistency and congruence, positive symptoms and general psychopathology of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tuberculosis control in big cities and urban risk groups in the European Union: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hest, N A; Aldridge, R W; de Vries, G; Sandgren, A; Hauer, B; Hayward, A; Arrazola de Oñate, W; Haas, W; Codecasa, L R; Caylà, J A; Story, A; Antoine, D; Gori, A; Quabeck, L; Jonsson, J; Wanlin, M; Orcau, Å; Rodes, A; Dedicoat, M; Antoun, F; van Deutekom, H; Keizer, St; Abubakar, I

    2014-03-06

    In low-incidence countries in the European Union (EU), tuberculosis (TB) is concentrated in big cities, especially among certain urban high-risk groups including immigrants from TB high-incidence countries, homeless people, and those with a history of drug and alcohol misuse. Elimination of TB in European big cities requires control measures focused on multiple layers of the urban population. The particular complexities of major EU metropolises, for example high population density and social structure, create specific opportunities for transmission, but also enable targeted TB control interventions, not efficient in the general population, to be effective or cost effective. Lessons can be learnt from across the EU and this consensus statement on TB control in big cities and urban risk groups was prepared by a working group representing various EU big cities, brought together on the initiative of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. The consensus statement describes general and specific social, educational, operational, organisational, legal and monitoring TB control interventions in EU big cities, as well as providing recommendations for big city TB control, based upon a conceptual TB transmission and control model.

  4. Life expectancy for the University of Utah beagle colony and selection of a control group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, D.R.; Stevens, W.; Bruenger, F.W.; Woodbury, L.; Stover, B.J.; Smith, J.M.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the internal-emitters toxicity program at the University of Utah Radiobiology Laboratory, each experimental group carries its own specific control cohort, which is the same size as most of the individual experimental cohorts. Variations in average lifetime are observed among individual control cohorts. This may be due to external causes, genetic variances such as the occurrence of epileptic syndromes, or changes such as those that result from improved medical core or husbandry. The Stover-Eyring method was used to eliminate from control and experimental cohorts those dogs with specific diseases such as epilepsy - dogs that were at risk for too short a time for a later pathological response to occur. By the use of conventional statistical techniques, it ws shown to be reasonable to pool individual control cohorts into a much larger selected cohort that provided greater precision in the estimate of control survival and thus a more sensitive basis for the estimation of the relative life shortening in the experimental groups. The analysis suggested that control groups could be combined, and a control population of 114 beagles was proposed. Their average lifespan was 4926 +- 849 days, and the time when half the animals had died was 5000 days. 3 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  5. MO-C-9A-01: Effective Medical Physics Educational Activities: Models and Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprawls, P

    2014-01-01

    Medical physics is learned in a combination of activities including classroom sessions, individual study, small-group collaborative problem solving, and direct experience in the laboratory or clinical environment. Each type of learning activity is characterized by its effectiveness in producing the desired knowledge for the learner and the cost in terms of resources and human effort required providing it. While learning and teaching is a human activity, modern technology provides a variety of tools that can be used to enhance human performance. The class or conference room is the common setting for educational sessions in both academic institutions and continuing education conferences and programs such as those sponsored by the AAPM. A major value of a class/conference room program is efficiency by bringing a group of learners together to share in a common learning experience under the guidance of one or more experienced learning facilitators (lecturers or presenters). A major challenge is that the class/conference room is separated from the real world of medical physics. The design of an educational activity needs to take into consideration the desired outcomes with respect to what the learners should be able to do. The distinction is that of being able to apply the knowledge to perform specific physics functions rather than just knowing and being able to recall facts, and perhaps do well on written examinations. These are different types of knowledge structures within the human brain and distinctly different learning activities to develop each. Much of medical physics education, especially at the post-graduate and continuing education level, is for the purpose of enhancing the ability of physicists and other related professionals to perform applied procedures and tasks and requires specific types of knowledge.In this session we will analyze various learning activity models, the values and limitations of each, and how they can be used in medical physics education

  6. MO-C-9A-01: Effective Medical Physics Educational Activities: Models and Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprawls, P [Sprawls Educational Foundation, Montreat, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Medical physics is learned in a combination of activities including classroom sessions, individual study, small-group collaborative problem solving, and direct experience in the laboratory or clinical environment. Each type of learning activity is characterized by its effectiveness in producing the desired knowledge for the learner and the cost in terms of resources and human effort required providing it. While learning and teaching is a human activity, modern technology provides a variety of tools that can be used to enhance human performance. The class or conference room is the common setting for educational sessions in both academic institutions and continuing education conferences and programs such as those sponsored by the AAPM. A major value of a class/conference room program is efficiency by bringing a group of learners together to share in a common learning experience under the guidance of one or more experienced learning facilitators (lecturers or presenters). A major challenge is that the class/conference room is separated from the real world of medical physics. The design of an educational activity needs to take into consideration the desired outcomes with respect to what the learners should be able to do. The distinction is that of being able to apply the knowledge to perform specific physics functions rather than just knowing and being able to recall facts, and perhaps do well on written examinations. These are different types of knowledge structures within the human brain and distinctly different learning activities to develop each. Much of medical physics education, especially at the post-graduate and continuing education level, is for the purpose of enhancing the ability of physicists and other related professionals to perform applied procedures and tasks and requires specific types of knowledge.In this session we will analyze various learning activity models, the values and limitations of each, and how they can be used in medical physics education

  7. Group cognitive-behavioral therapy in insomnia: a cross-sectional case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongjing; Ji, Yutian; Xu, You; Tang, Guangzheng; Yu, Zhenghe; Xu, Lianlian; Shen, Chanchan; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) might meet the considerable treatment demand of insomnia, but its effectiveness needs to be addressed. This study recruited 27 insomnia patients treated with 16-weeks of zolpidem (zolpidem group), 26 patients treated with 4-weeks of zolpidem and also treated with 12-weeks of GCBT (GCBT group), and 31 healthy control volunteers. Before treatment and 16 weeks after intervention, participants were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaires (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 [PHQ-15]), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-16 (DBAS-16), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Compared to the zolpidem and healthy control groups, the scale scores of PHQ-9, PHQ-15, DBAS-16 and PSQI were significantly reduced after intervention in the GCBT group. Regarding the score changes, there were correlations between PSQI, DBAS-16, PHQ-9, and PHQ-15 scales in the zolpidem group, but there were limited correlations between PSQI and some DBAS-16 scales in the GCBT group. Our results indicate that GCBT is effective to treat insomnia by improving sleep quality and reducing emotional and somatic disturbances; thus, the study supports the advocacy of applying group psychotherapy to the disorder.

  8. Diabetes Support Groups Improve Patient’s Compliance and Control Blood Glucose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamrotul Izzah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing information is not enough to improve diabetic patient’s compliance and achieve goals of therapy. Patient’s good awareness as well as emotional and social supports from family and community may play an important role to improve their compliance and clinical outcomes. Therefore, diabetes support groups were developed and each support group consisted of two pharmacists, two nurses, diabetic patients and their family members. A total of 70 type 2 diabetic patient’s were enrolled and randomized into support group 1 and support group 2. Patients in the group 1 received information leaflets only, while patient in the group 2 received pharmacist counselling and information leaflets at each meeting. Patient’s awareness of diabetes and compliance with medications were assessed by a short questionnaire at baseline and final follow-up. Blood glucose and cholesterol levels were also evaluated in both groups. At the end of study, the overall patient’s awareness and compliance improved by 61.5%. The random and fasting blood glucose levels decreased over than 30% in the group 2 and around 14% in the group 1. This study reveals that collaboration between health care professionals and community in the diabetes support group might help diabetic patients to increase their knowledge and compliance with the diabetes therapy as well as glycaemic control.

  9. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present here a novel experimental set-up that is able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of piezoelectric crystal microbalances (PCMs). The PCM sensors have already been used for space measurements, such as for the detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In Earth atmospherics applications, PCMs can be also used to obtain some physical-chemical processes concerning the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in atmospheric environments. The experimental set-up has been developed and tested on dicarboxylic acids. In this work, a temperature-controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC recondensed onto the PCM quartz crystal, allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of adipic acid, i.e. ΔHsub : 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1, and azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1. The results obtained show an accuracy of 1 % for succinic, adipic, and azelaic acid and within 5 % for oxalic acid and are in very good agreement with previous works (within 6 % for adipic, succinic, and oxalic acid and within 11 % or larger for azelaic acid).

  10. The BWR core simulator COSIMA with 2 group nodal flux expansion and control rod history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.

    1989-08-01

    The boiling water simulator NOTAM has been modified and improved in several aspects: - The ''1 1/2'' energy group TRILUX nodal flux solution method has been exchanged with a 2 group modal expansion method. - Control rod ''history'' has been introduced. - Precalculated instrument factors have been introduced. The paper describes these improvements, which were considered sufficiently large to justify a new name to the programme: COSIMA. (author)

  11. Command and Control of Guerrilla Groups in the Philippines, 1941-1945

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Command and Control of Guerrilla Groups in the Philippines , 1941-1945 A Monograph by MAJ Thomas R. Nypaver Texas Army National Guard...Groups in the Philippines , 1941-1945 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) MAJ Thomas R...primary and secondary sources to examine guerrilla operations during the period from the Japanese invasion of the Philippines on December 8, 1941

  12. Comparison of serum lead level in oral opium addicts with healthy control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hossein; Sayadi, Ahmad Reza; Tashakori, Mahnaz; Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Soltanpoor, Narges; Sadeghi, Hossein; Aghaee-Afshar, Mahmood

    2009-11-01

    Drug abuse and its consequences are major health problems in Middle-East countries such as Iran. Salesmen and smugglers may add lead to opium during the process of opium preparation to increase the weight of opium for more profit. Several reports have found lead poisoning symptoms in opium addicted patients and there are many nonspecific symptoms mimicking lead poisoning in opium addicted patients. As far as the literature review is concerned, there is no comparative study about blood lead level (BLL) in addicted patients with healthy controls. Therefore, it seems evaluation of blood lead level in opium addicted patients to be important. In this study, the BLL of forty-four subjects in two patient and control groups was evaluated. The patient group (22 subjects) was comprised of patients who used oral opium. Control group (22 subjects) was matched with the patient group for age and sex, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria with a mean age of 38.8+/-6.7. For blood lead assay, 3 mL of whole blood was obtained from both groups by venipuncture and BLL was assessed immediately using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The BLL in patient group had a range of 7.2 to 69.9 g/dL with a mean of 21.9+/-13.2. In the healthy control group, BLL was between 4.1 to 17.4 g/dL with a mean of 8.6+/-3.5. The mean difference of both groups (t=4.56) was statistically significant (Popium ingested (r=0.65, Popium ingestion in the patient group. It would be concluded that opium addicts have an elevated BLL compared to healthy controls. Therefore, screening of blood lead concentration is helpful for opium addicted people especially with non-specific symptoms. In this regard, a similar investigation with a larger sample size of opium addicted patients (including both oral and inhaled) and a control group is suggested to confirm the findings of this research.

  13. Weight Control in Adolescents: Focus Groups With Korean Adolescents and Their Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sun-Mi; Yeo, Ji-Young; Hwang, Ji-Hye; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lim, Jiyoung; Kwon, Insook

    This qualitative descriptive study sought to identify perceptions about and status of weight control in adolescents from the perspective of adolescents and their teachers. Focus groups were used with six separate groups, 20 adolescents divided into four groups and 14 teachers divided into two groups. The qualitative data were analyzed using a thematic analysis in NVivo 11.0. Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative studies (COREQ) were followed. We extracted three themes and 12 sub-themes with 52 meaningful codes. Both adolescents and teachers stated that perceptions about weight control in adolescents were overly weighted toward management of one's appearance. The adolescents reported an increase in weight gained during adolescence, especially after entering high school, and they noted a lack of participation in physical activities and the presence of unhealthy dietary behaviors. However, adolescents perceived excessive weight gain during adolescence as natural, as long as they studied hard. Their teachers and parents were also permissive about weight gain resulted from study. The participants suggested that a weight control program for adolescents should be conducted in schools and should include every student in order to avoid discrimination. In addition, teacher involvement was emphasized to promote participation of adolescents in a school program. Our findings indicate that adolescents, especially those in a society emphasizing academics, need to practice healthy weight control behaviors. A school-based weight control program involving teachers and peers would be suitable and should be provided to all students regardless of weight classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intervention for children with word-finding difficulties: a parallel group randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Wendy; Hughes, Lucy Mari; Masterson, Jackie; Thomas, Michael; Fedor, Anna; Roncoli, Silvia; Fern-Pollak, Liory; Shepherd, Donna-Lynn; Howard, David; Shobbrook, Kate; Kapikian, Anna

    2017-07-31

    The study investigated the outcome of a word-web intervention for children diagnosed with word-finding difficulties (WFDs). Twenty children age 6-8 years with WFDs confirmed by a discrepancy between comprehension and production on the Test of Word Finding-2, were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 11) and waiting control (n = 9) groups. The intervention group had six sessions of intervention which used word-webs and targeted children's meta-cognitive awareness and word-retrieval. On the treated experimental set (n = 25 items) the intervention group gained on average four times as many items as the waiting control group (d = 2.30). There were also gains on personally chosen items for the intervention group. There was little change on untreated items for either group. The study is the first randomised control trial to demonstrate an effect of word-finding therapy with children with language difficulties in mainstream school. The improvement in word-finding for treated items was obtained following a clinically realistic intervention in terms of approach, intensity and duration.

  15. Toxoplasma Infection in Schizophrenia Patients: A Comparative Study with Control Group

    OpenAIRE

    Alipour, A; Shojaee, S; Mohebali, M; Tehranidoost, M; Abdi Masoleh, F; Keshavarz, H

    2011-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a serious, chronic, and often debilitating neuropsychiatric disor­der. Its causes are still poorly understood. Besides genetic and non-genetic (environmental) fac­tors are thought to be important as the cause of the structural and functional deficits that character­ize schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare Toxoplasma gondii infection between schizo­phrenia patients and non-schizophrenia individuals as control group.Methods: A case-control study was designed i...

  16. The influence of family control on decisions regarding the specialization and diversification of business groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Hernández-Trasobares

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the impact of family control on decisions regarding the specialization and diversification of large business groups whose parent companies are listed on Spanish stock exchanges. Using a sample of ninety-nine companies, having identified the companies that constitute the business group, and using both binary logistic models and the Heckman two-step method to eliminate selection bias, the results show how the familial nature of the parent company favours specialization and reduces the level of the business group's diversification. In addition, we see that there are differences among family groups with respect to the concentration of their holdings in that a higher level of concentration increases the level of diversification in the family business group.

  17. ROLES OF INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES IN AN EMERGING COUNTRY: CONTROL AND COORDINATION IN FAMILY BUSINESS GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Ataay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maman (1999 proposed that, in countries in which business groups are dominant forms for organizing economic activities, the interlocking directorate is a managerial tool that can be prioritized to control and coordinate activities of their affiliated firms within the same groups and align their business objectives. This organizational connection appears to be an intentional strategy on the part of the groups‟ headquarters. In order to study the interlocking ties in Turkish family business groups (FBG, this study focused on interlocking directorates among listed firms in Turkey. The findings of preliminary study reveal that almost all of the interlocking ties were within the business groups (BG in our sample. This is the result of assignment of familyaffiliated and/or professional inside directors to the various boards of companies in the BG. We also found that compare to vertical ties; business groups are using more horizontal interlocking connections to bond their affiliated companies together.

  18. Report of the Advisory Group Meeting on Genetic Methods of Insect Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Despite the availability of a range of modern pest control techniques, insects remain a major cause of production losses in agriculture and contribute significantly to diseases of man and livestock. The increasing incidence of pesticide resistance, and concerns over the environmental impact of residues, have highlighted the need for improved technologies. As a result, genetic methods of pest control, including the use of irradiation sterilized insects, have become of increasing importance. It is therefore essential that the Joint FAO/IAEA Division continues to promote the development and application of this method of pest control. The advisory group concluded that the opportunities for genetic control might be widened by the application of new techniques, particularly recombinant DNA technology. The scope for integration of genetic control methods with other control measures, and ist use as a temporary suppressive measure on an area-wide basis was also recognized. Examples are given from representative groups of insect pests to illustrate how these concepts can be applied. The advisory group regarded the Seibersdorf laboratory as a unique facility for the conduct of tactical research related to mass-rearing and release procedures for major pests such as medfly and tsetse spp. Associated research on genetic sexing of medfly, diet recycling and the development of more environmentally acceptable alternatives for pre-release suppression of medfly were considered to be important research projects. The advisory group concluded that the laboratory should continue to remain a centre of excellence for mass-rearing technologies for medfly and tsetse spp., and for training scientists and technicians from developing countries. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division currently plays a major co-ordinating and supportive role for those areas of international research which impinge on genetic control. The advisory group believes that the Joint FAO/IAEA Division should maintain its initiative

  19. Earliest Deadline Control of a Group of Heat Pumps with a Single Energy Source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, J.; van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop and investigate the optimal control of a group of 104 heat pumps and a central Combined Heat and Power unit (CHP). The heat pumps supply space heating and domestic hot water to households. Each house has a buffer for domestic hot water and a floor heating system for space

  20. Policy based traffic light control – Balancing weights of user groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Wismans, Luc Johannes Josephus; Tutert, Bas

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of policy-based target groups, we developed a prioritization strategy for traffic streams and applied it with the adaptive urban traffic control (UTC) ImFlow. Our main aim was to gain understanding of the possibilities of a policy driven prioritization in an urban context. We conclude

  1. Using group technology to plan data processing in computer-aided control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaitsev, KS

    For the computer-aided control system of an enterprise, consideration was given to the methods of task grouping on the basis of Q-analysis. The methods and algorithms can be used to improve the procedure of task allocation to the general resources of a corporate network.

  2. A comparison of dysfunctional attitudes in substance abusers and control group and its psychological outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    This research was carried out to assess the role of dysfunctional attitudes, outcomes of psychology in substance abuse behaviors of subject were referred to addiction treatment center in the city of Bandar Abbas, and to compare the with the control group. Methods: This is a retrospective study in which 100 subject substance abusers were compared with 100 subject s of control group who were selected using convenience sampling and were also demographically matched. Data were gathered using a demographic questionnaire, clinical interview, dysfunctional attitudes scale (DAS, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS. The data were analyzed via descriptive statistic method, T- Test and chi-square and variance analysis. Findings: Findings indicated that in comparison with control group, subject of substance abusers had experienced more stress, anxiety, depression, had shown a cognitively more percent of them dysfunctional attitudes in comparison with control group. Results: The results suggested that the dysfunctional attitudes could be as a Vulnerability Factor that increase abuse of substance consequently use of cognitive therapy could be helpful and effective in prevention and treatment of the addicts.

  3. LA SPECTROSCOPIE DE MASSE PAR IONISATION CHIMIQUE AVEC LA DIETHYLAMINE COMME GAZ REACTANT DES IRIDOIDES GLUCOSIDIQUES DE TYPE C-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H SAADI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail s’intéresse à l’étude de la spectrométrie de masse par ionisation chimique de quelques composés des iridoïdes glucosidiques de type C-9 extraits des plantes de l’espèce Euplantago en utilisant la diéthylamine comme gaz réactant. Nous avons appliqué la même technique que précédemment à deux d’entre eux se trouvant en abondance dans ce type de plantes, après leur acétylation.

  4. LA SPECTROSCOPIE DE MASSE PAR IONISATION CHIMIQUE AVEC LA DIETHYLAMINE COMME GAZ REACTANT DES IRIDOIDES GLUCOSIDIQUES DE TYPE C-9

    OpenAIRE

    H SAADI; Dj ZEGHOUGH; S.S POPOV

    2000-01-01

    Ce travail s’intéresse à l’étude de la spectrométrie de masse par ionisation chimique de quelques composés des iridoïdes glucosidiques de type C-9 extraits des plantes de l’espèce Euplantago en utilisant la diéthylamine comme gaz réactant. Nous avons appliqué la même technique que précédemment à deux d’entre eux se trouvant en abondance dans ce type de plantes, après leur acétylation.

  5. Quantitative dermatoglyphic asymmetry: a comparative study between schizophrenic patients and control groups of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, B; Sengupta, M

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative Fluctuating (FA) and Directional asymmetry (DA) of dermatoglyphics on digito-palmar complex were analyzed in a group of 111 patients (males: 61, females: 50) with schizophrenia (SZ), and compared to an ethnically matched phenotypically healthy control (males: 60, females: 60) through MANOVA, ANOVA and canonical Discriminant analyses. With few exceptions, asymmetries are higher among patients, and this is more prominent in FA than DA. Statistically significant differences were observed between patient and control groups, especially in males. In both sexes, FA of combined dermatoglyphic traits (e.g. total finger ridge count, total palmar pattern ridge count) are found to be a strong discriminator between the two groups with a correct classification of over 83% probability.

  6. Decision Making and Finite-Time Motion Control for a Group of Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Liu, Shirong; Xie, Xiaogao; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the problem of odor source localization by designing and analyzing a decision-control system (DCS) for a group of robots. In the decision level, concentration magnitude information and wind information detected by robots are used to predict a probable position of the odor source. Specifically, the idea of particle swarm optimization is introduced to give a probable position of the odor source in terms of concentration magnitude information. Moreover, an observation model of the position of the odor source is built according to wind information, and a Kalman filter is used to estimate the position of the odor source, which is combined with the position obtained by using concentration magnitude information in order to make a decision on the position of the odor source. In the control level, two types of the finite-time motion control algorithms are designed; one is a finite-time parallel motion control algorithm, while the other is a finite-time circular motion control algorithm. Precisely, a nonlinear finite-time consensus algorithm is first proposed, and a Lyapunov approach is used to analyze the finite-time convergence of the proposed consensus algorithm. Then, on the basis of the proposed finite-time consensus algorithm, a finite-time parallel motion control algorithm, which can control the group of robots to trace the plume and move toward the probable position of odor source, is derived. Next, a finite-time circular motion control algorithm, which can enable the robot group to circle the probable position of the odor source in order to search for odor clues, is also developed. Finally, the performance capabilities of the proposed DCS are illustrated through the problem of odor source localization.

  7. Group cognitive–behavioral therapy in insomnia: a cross-sectional case-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao H

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hongjing Mao,1,* Yutian Ji,2,* You Xu,1 Guangzheng Tang,1 Zhenghe Yu,1 Lianlian Xu,1 Chanchan Shen,2 Wei Wang1,2 1Department of Psychosomatic Disorders, The Seventh People’s Hospital, Mental Health Center, 2Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Group cognitive–behavioral therapy (GCBT might meet the considerable treatment demand of insomnia, but its effectiveness needs to be addressed.Participants: This study recruited 27 insomnia patients treated with 16-weeks of zolpidem (zolpidem group, 26 patients treated with 4-weeks of zolpidem and also treated with 12-weeks of GCBT (GCBT group, and 31 healthy control volunteers.Methods: Before treatment and 16 weeks after intervention, participants were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaires (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 [PHQ-15], the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-16 (DBAS-16, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI.Results: Compared to the zolpidem and healthy control groups, the scale scores of PHQ-9, PHQ-15, DBAS-16 and PSQI were significantly reduced after intervention in the GCBT group. Regarding the score changes, there were correlations between PSQI, DBAS-16, PHQ-9, and PHQ-15 scales in the zolpidem group, but there were limited correlations between PSQI and some DBAS-16 scales in the GCBT group.Conclusion: Our results indicate that GCBT is effective to treat insomnia by improving sleep quality and reducing emotional and somatic disturbances; thus, the study supports the advocacy of applying group psychotherapy to the disorder. Keywords: cognitive–behavioral therapy, group psychotherapy, insomnia 

  8. Standard versus prosocial online support groups for distressed breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golant Mitch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet can increase access to psychosocial care for breast cancer survivors through online support groups. This study will test a novel prosocial online group that emphasizes both opportunities for getting and giving help. Based on the helper therapy principle, it is hypothesized that the addition of structured helping opportunities and coaching on how to help others online will increase the psychological benefits of a standard online group. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled trial with pretest and posttest. Non-metastatic breast cancer survivors with elevated psychological distress will be randomized to either a standard facilitated online group or to a prosocial facilitated online group, which combines online exchanges of support with structured helping opportunities (blogging, breast cancer outreach and coaching on how best to give support to others. Validated and reliable measures will be administered to women approximately one month before and after the interventions. Self-esteem, positive affect, and sense of belonging will be tested as potential mediators of the primary outcomes of depressive/anxious symptoms and sense of purpose in life. Discussion This study will test an innovative approach to maximizing the psychological benefits of cancer online support groups. The theory-based prosocial online support group intervention model is sustainable, because it can be implemented by private non-profit or other organizations, such as cancer centers, which mostly offer face-to-face support groups with limited patient reach. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01396174

  9. Variation of phytoplankton functional groups modulated by hydraulic controls in Hongze Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Hao, Daping; Doblin, Martina A; Ren, Ying; Wei, Jielin; Feng, Yawei

    2015-11-01

    Hongze Lake is a large, shallow, polymictic, eutrophic lake in the eastern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in this lake were investigated from March 2011 to February 2013, and a comparison was made between the eastern, western, and northern regions. The lake shows strong fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and regular hydraulic controls. By application of the phytoplankton functional group approach, this study aims to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics and analyze their influencing factors. Altogether, 18 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, encompassing 187 species. In order to seek the best variable describing the phytoplankton functional group distribution, 14 of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Due to the turbid condition of the lake, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of low light. The predominant functional groups in the annual succession were D (Cyclotella spp. and Synedra acus), T (Planctonema lauterbornii), P (Fragilaria crotonensis), X1 (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa), C (Cyclotella meneghiniana and Cyclotella ocellata), and Y (Cryptomonas erosa). An opposite relationship between water level and the biomass of predominant groups was observed in the present study. Water level fluctuations, caused by monsoonal climate and artificial drawdown, were significant factors influencing phytoplankton succession in Hongze Lake, since they alter the hydrological conditions and influence light and nutrient availability. The clearly demonstrated factors, which significantly influence phytoplankton dynamics in Hongze Lake, will help government manage the large shallow lakes with frequent water level fluctuations.

  10. Evaluation of vasomotor reactivity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients and its comparison with the control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuropsychiatric abnormalities are among the most common manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. They have been proposed to be associated with impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity (VMR is a hemodynamic parameter effective in the autoregulation of CBF. The aim of the present study is to determine and compare the VMR of women with stable SLE and normal women. Materials and Methods: According to the study criteria 60 women in each group entered the study. VMR was evaluated with Transcranial Doppler (TCD at rest and after one minute of breath holding. Results: There was no significant difference in the mean of age between two groups (31.76 ± 7.50 years in the SLE group versus 32.43 ± 4.55 years in the control group, P value: 0.64. The mean duration of SLE in the case group was 5.40 ± 3.60 years. The means of the Breath-Holding Index (BHI in the SLE and control groups were 0.842 ± 0.72% and 0.815 ± 0.26%, respectively, which was not significantly different (P value: 0.82. Conclusion: This study indicates that the VMR of women with stable SLE is not significantly different from the age- and sex-matched normal population. However, further investigations on patients with longer SLE duration and more neuropsychological abnormality rates are suggested.

  11. Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: a randomised controlled trial (MATISSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M J; Killaspy, H; Barnes, T R; Barrett, B; Byford, S; Clayton, K; Dinsmore, J; Floyd, S; Hoadley, A; Johnson, T; Kalaitzaki, E; King, M; Leurent, B; Maratos, A; O'Neill, F A; Osborn, D; Patterson, S; Soteriou, T; Tyrer, P; Waller, D

    2012-01-01

    To examine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of referral to group art therapy plus standard care, compared with referral to an activity group plus standard care and standard care alone, among people with schizophrenia. A three-arm, parallel group, single-blind, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomised via an independent and remote telephone randomisation service using permuted blocks, stratified by study centre. Study participants were recruited from secondary care mental health and social services in four UK centres. Potential participants were aged 18 years or over, had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, confirmed by an examination of case notes, and provided written informed consent. We excluded those who were unable to speak sufficient English to complete the baseline assessment, those with severe cognitive impairment and those already receiving arts therapy. Group art therapy was delivered by registered art therapists according to nationally agreed standards. Groups had up to eight members, lasted for 90 minutes and ran for 12 months. Members were given access to a range of art materials and encouraged to use these to express themselves freely. Activity groups were designed to control for the non-specific effects of group art therapy. Group facilitators offered various activities and encouraged participants to collectively select those they wanted to pursue. Standard care involved follow-up from secondary care mental health services and the option of referral to other services, except arts therapies, as required. Our co-primary outcomes were global functioning (measured using the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale - GAF) and mental health symptoms (measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale - PANSS) at 24 months. The main secondary outcomes were level of group attendance, social functioning, well-being, health-related quality of life, service utilisation and other costs measured 12 and 24 months

  12. Group hypnosis vs. relaxation for smoking cessation in adults: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the popularity of hypnotherapy for smoking cessation, the efficacy of this method is unclear. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of a single-session of group hypnotherapy for smoking cessation compared to relaxation in Swiss adult smokers. Methods This was a cluster-randomised, parallel-group, controlled trial. A single session of hypnosis or relaxation for smoking cessation was delivered to groups of smokers (median size = 11). Participants were 223 smokers consuming ≥ 5 cigarettes per day, willing to quit and not using cessation aids (47.1% females, M = 37.5 years [SD = 11.8], 86.1% Swiss). Nicotine withdrawal, smoking abstinence self-efficacy, and adverse reactions were assessed at a 2-week follow-up. The main outcome, self-reported 30-day point prevalence of smoking abstinence, was assessed at a 6-month follow up. Abstinence was validated through salivary analysis. Secondary outcomes included number of cigarettes smoked per day, smoking abstinence self-efficacy, and nicotine withdrawal. Results At the 6-month follow up, 14.7% in the hypnosis group and 17.8% in the relaxation group were abstinent. The intervention had no effect on smoking status (p = .73) or on the number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = .56). Smoking abstinence self-efficacy did not differ between the interventions (p = .14) at the 2-week follow-up, but non-smokers in the hypnosis group experienced reduced withdrawal (p = .02). Both interventions produced few adverse reactions (p = .81). Conclusions A single session of group hypnotherapy does not appear to be more effective for smoking cessation than a group relaxation session. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN72839675. PMID:24365274

  13. Group hypnosis vs. relaxation for smoking cessation in adults: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Spillmann, Maria; Haug, Severin; Schaub, Michael P

    2013-12-23

    Despite the popularity of hypnotherapy for smoking cessation, the efficacy of this method is unclear. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of a single-session of group hypnotherapy for smoking cessation compared to relaxation in Swiss adult smokers. This was a cluster-randomised, parallel-group, controlled trial. A single session of hypnosis or relaxation for smoking cessation was delivered to groups of smokers (median size = 11). Participants were 223 smokers consuming ≥ 5 cigarettes per day, willing to quit and not using cessation aids (47.1% females, M = 37.5 years [SD = 11.8], 86.1% Swiss). Nicotine withdrawal, smoking abstinence self-efficacy, and adverse reactions were assessed at a 2-week follow-up. The main outcome, self-reported 30-day point prevalence of smoking abstinence, was assessed at a 6-month follow up. Abstinence was validated through salivary analysis. Secondary outcomes included number of cigarettes smoked per day, smoking abstinence self-efficacy, and nicotine withdrawal. At the 6-month follow up, 14.7% in the hypnosis group and 17.8% in the relaxation group were abstinent. The intervention had no effect on smoking status (p = .73) or on the number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = .56). Smoking abstinence self-efficacy did not differ between the interventions (p = .14) at the 2-week follow-up, but non-smokers in the hypnosis group experienced reduced withdrawal (p = .02). Both interventions produced few adverse reactions (p = .81). A single session of group hypnotherapy does not appear to be more effective for smoking cessation than a group relaxation session. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN72839675.

  14. A common control group - optimising the experiment design to maximise sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Bate

    Full Text Available Methods for choosing an appropriate sample size in animal experiments have received much attention in the statistical and biological literature. Due to ethical constraints the number of animals used is always reduced where possible. However, as the number of animals decreases so the risk of obtaining inconclusive results increases. By using a more efficient experimental design we can, for a given number of animals, reduce this risk. In this paper two popular cases are considered, where planned comparisons are made to compare treatments back to control and when researchers plan to make all pairwise comparisons. By using theoretical and empirical techniques we show that for studies where all pairwise comparisons are made the traditional balanced design, as suggested in the literature, maximises sensitivity. For studies that involve planned comparisons of the treatment groups back to the control group, which are inherently more sensitive due to the reduced multiple testing burden, the sensitivity is maximised by increasing the number of animals in the control group while decreasing the number in the treated groups.

  15. A common control group - optimising the experiment design to maximise sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Simon; Karp, Natasha A

    2014-01-01

    Methods for choosing an appropriate sample size in animal experiments have received much attention in the statistical and biological literature. Due to ethical constraints the number of animals used is always reduced where possible. However, as the number of animals decreases so the risk of obtaining inconclusive results increases. By using a more efficient experimental design we can, for a given number of animals, reduce this risk. In this paper two popular cases are considered, where planned comparisons are made to compare treatments back to control and when researchers plan to make all pairwise comparisons. By using theoretical and empirical techniques we show that for studies where all pairwise comparisons are made the traditional balanced design, as suggested in the literature, maximises sensitivity. For studies that involve planned comparisons of the treatment groups back to the control group, which are inherently more sensitive due to the reduced multiple testing burden, the sensitivity is maximised by increasing the number of animals in the control group while decreasing the number in the treated groups.

  16. Earliest Deadline Control of a Group of Heat Pumps with a Single Energy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Fink

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop and investigate the optimal control of a group of 104 heat pumps and a central Combined Heat and Power unit (CHP. The heat pumps supply space heating and domestic hot water to households. Each house has a buffer for domestic hot water and a floor heating system for space heating. Electricity for the heat pumps is generated by a central CHP unit, which also provides thermal energy to a district heating system. The paper reviews recent smart grid control approaches for central and distributed levels. An online algorithm is described based on the earliest deadline first theory that can be used on the aggregator level to control the CHP and to give signals to the heat pump controllers if they should start or should wait. The central controller requires only a limited amount of privacy-insensitive information from the heat pump controllers about their deadlines, which the heat pump controllers calculate for themselves by model predictions. In this way, a robust heat pump and CHP control is obtained, which is able to minimize energy demand and results in the desired thermal comfort for the households. The simulations demonstrate fast computation times due to minor computational and communication overheads.

  17. Improving insomnia in primary care patients: A randomized controlled trial of nurse-led group treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Christina; Hetta, Jerker; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Westman, Jeanette

    2017-07-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem, and most people who seek help for insomnia consult primary care. In primary care, insomnia treatment typically consists of hypnotic drugs, although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is the recommended treatment. However, such treatment is currently available to few primary care patients. To evaluate the effects of a group treatment program for insomnia led by nurses in primary care. were the Insomnia Severity Index, a 2-week sleep diary, and a questionnaire on frequency of hypnotic drug use. A randomized controlled trial with pre- and post-treatment assessment and a 1-year post-treatment follow-up of the intervention group. Routine primary health care; 7 primary care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. Patients consulting primary care for insomnia were assessed for eligibility. To be included, patients had to have insomnia disorder and be 18 years or older. Patients were excluded if they if they worked night shifts or had severe untreated somatic and/or mental illness, bipolar disorder, or untreated sleep disorder other than insomnia. One-hundred and sixty-five patients 20 to 90 years were included. Most were women, and many had co-existing somatic and/or mental health problems. The post-treatment dropout rate was 20%. The intervention was a nurse-led group treatment for insomnia based on the techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. The nurses had 2days of training in how to deliver the program. Ninety patients were randomized to the intervention and 75 to the control group (treatment as usual). Data from 82 in the intervention and 71 in the control group were analyzed in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. Fifty-four of the 72 in the intervention group who participated in the group treatment program were followed up after 1year. Mean Insomnia Severity Index score decreased significantly from 18.4 to 10.7 after group treatment but remained unchanged after treatment as usual (17.0 to 16.6). The effect

  18. Effects of pharmaceutical counselling on antimicrobial use in surgical wards: intervention study with historical control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Eva; Weber, Alexandra; Lohmann, Stefanie; Vetter-Kerkhoff, Cornelia; Strobl, Ralf; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of pharmaceutical consulting on the quality of antimicrobial use in a surgical hospital department in a prospective controlled intervention study. Patients receiving pharmaceutical intervention (intervention group, IG, n = 317) were compared with a historical control group (control group, CG, n = 321). During the control period, antimicrobial use was monitored without intervention. During the subsequent intervention period, a clinical pharmacist reviewed the prescriptions and gave advice on medication. Intervention reduced the length of antimicrobial courses (IG = 10 days, CG = 11 days, incidence rate ratio for i.v. versus o.p. = 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 0.93) and shortened i.v. administration (IG = 8 days, CG = 10 days, hazard rate = 1.76 in favour of switch from i.v. to p.o., 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 2.52). Intervention also helped to avoid useless combination therapy and reduced total costs for antimicrobials. A clinical pharmacist who reviews prescriptions can promote an increase in efficiency, for example, by shortening the course of treatment. Counselling by ward-based clinical pharmacists was shown to be effective to streamline antimicrobial therapy in surgical units and to increase drug safety. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effectiveness of an emotion regulation group training for adolescents--a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppert, H Marieke; Giesen-Bloo, Josephine; van Gemert, Tonny G; Wiersema, Herman M; Minderaa, Ruud B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Nauta, Maaike H

    2009-01-01

    Emotion Regulation Training (ERT) was developed for adolescents with symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. ERT is an adaptation of the Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS) programme. This paper describes the background of the programme, and gives an outline of the treatment programme. The effectiveness of ERT was examined in a randomized controlled pilot study with 43 youth (aged 14-19 years) in five mental health centres in the Netherlands. Subjects were assessed before and after random assignment to ERT plus treatment as usual (TAU) (n = 23) or to TAU alone (n = 20). Outcome measures included assessment of BPD symptoms, locus of control, and internalizing and externalizing behaviour. Both groups showed equal reductions in BPD symptoms over time. The group receiving ERT plus TAU (and not the TAU-only group) had a significant increase in internal locus of control: ERT participants reported more sense of control over their own mood swings, and attributed changes in mood swings not only to external factors. The study was complicated by a high attrition. The implications of the findings are discussed, including the difficulties inherent in treating and researching an adolescent population, and the need for researchers to develop age-appropriate assessments.

  20. Relevance of the ancestry for the variability of the Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 polymorphisms in a multiethnic Costa Rican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes-Garro, Carolina; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Jiménez-Arce, Gerardo; Naranjo, María-Eugenia G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Fariñas, Humberto; Barrantes, Ramiro; Llerena, Adrián

    2016-09-01

    CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 metabolize around 40% of drugs and their genes vary across populations. The Costa Rican population has a trihybrid ancestry and its key geographic location turns it into a suitable scenario to evaluate interethnic differences across populations. This study aims to describe the diversity of CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 polymorphisms in Costa Rican populations in the context of their ancestry. A total of 448 healthy individuals were included in the study: Bribri (n= 47), Cabécar (n= 27), Maleku (n= 16), Guaymí (n= 30), Huetar (n= 48), Chorotega (n= 41), Admixed/Mestizos from the Central Valley/Guanacaste (n= 189), and Afro-Caribbeans (n= 50) from Limón. CYP2C9 (alleles *2, *3, *6) and CYP2C19 (*2, *3, *4, *5, *17) genotypes were determined by Real-Time PCR. African, European and Native American ancestry were inferred using 87 ancestry informative markers. The frequency of the decreased activity allele CYP2C9*2 is lower in the self-reported Amerindian groups compared to the admixed population, and the highest frequencies of CYP2C19*2 (null activity) and the CYP2C19*17 (increased activity) were found in the self-reported Afro-Caribbean population. Moreover, a frequency of 0.7 % CYP2C9 gPMs in the Admixed population and a variable frequency of CYP2C19 gUMs (0.0-32.6 %, more prevalent in Afro-Caribbeans) in Costa Rican populations, was found. Finally, the following alleles were positively correlated with genomic African ancestry and negatively correlated with genomic Native American ancestry: CYP2D6*5 (null activity), CYP2D6*17 (decreased activity), CYP2D6*29 (decreased activity) and CYP2C19*17 (increased activity). No correlation for CYP2C9 polymorphisms and genomic ancestry was found. Further studies assessing the CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 sequence in these populations, preferentially by sequencing these genes, are warranted.

  1. Closing plenary summary of working group 4 instrumentation and controls for ERL2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, D.; Obina, T.

    2011-10-16

    Working group 4 was charged with presentations and discussions on instrumentation and controls with regards to Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). There were 4 sessions spanning 3.5 hours in which 7 talks were delivered, the first being an invited plenary presentation. The time allotted for each talk was limited to 20-25 minutes in order to allow 5-10 minutes for discussion. Most of the talks were held in joint session with working group 5 (Unwanted Beam Loss). This format was effective for the purpose of this workshop. A final series of discussion sessions were also held with working group 5. Summary of the working group 4 activities, presented in the closing plenary session. We had a plenary presentation on operational performance, experience, and future plans at the existing ERL injector prototype at Cornell. This included instrumentation data, controls system configurations, as well as description of future needs. This was followed by four talks from KEK and RIKEN/SPring-8 that described electron beam instrumentation already in use or under development that can be applied to ERL facilities. The final talks described the ERLs under construction at KEK and BNL. The format of having joint sessions with working group 5 was beneficial as there were a significant number of common topics and concerns with regards to the causes of beam loss, instrumentation hardware, and techniques used to measure and analyze beam loss.

  2. International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation: Recent activities and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossilov, A.

    1992-01-01

    The IWG-NPPCI working group exists to consider developments, disseminate and exchange experience in all aspects of instrumentation, control and information technology relevant to the safety and economics of NPP design and operation. The main topics dealt with are: nuclear instrumentation, control systems, protection systems, early failure detection and diagnosis, use of computer technology in NPP operation, instrumentation for accidental situation, operator support systems, man-machine interface. The main objectives of the IWG-NPPCI are: to assist the IAEA to provide the Member States with information and recommendations on technical aspects of the NPP control and instrumentation with the aim to assure reliable functions; to promote and exchange of information on national programs, new developments and experience from operating NPPs, and to stimulate the coordination of research on NPP control and instrumentation

  3. Cyclophosphamide treatment-induced leukopenia rates in ANCA-associated vasculitis are influenced by variant CYP450 2C9 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Jan Henrik; Bremer, Jan Phillip; Moosig, Frank; Holle, Julia Ulrike; Lamprecht, Peter; Wieczorek, Stefan; Haenisch, Sierk; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2016-03-01

    Correlation of outcomes of cyclophosphamide (CP) therapy in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with genotype polymorphisms in prodrug activating cytochrome P450 enzyme genes CYP2C9 and CYP2C19. One hundred and ninety six patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis treated with CP, either as intravenous pulse or as daily oral medication, were included. Genotypes of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 were correlated with clinical outcomes (leukopenia, infection, urotoxicity and treatment response). Sixty five (33.2%) patients had variant CYP2C9 and 55 (28.1%) had variant CYP2C19 genotype. In patients bearing variant CYP2C9, leukopenia was documented significantly more frequent than in carriers of wild-type CYP2C9 (55.4 vs 37.4%; odds ratio: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.14-3.80; p = 0.017). The impact of the CYP2C9 genotype was stronger in patients treated with oral CP (69.6 vs 45.6%; odds ratio: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.27-5.89; p = 0.009), but was not present in patients treated with intravenous pulsed CP. We observed less refractory disease courses in patients with variant CYP2C9, not reaching statistical significance. Patients with variant CYP2C9 are at increased risk for cyclophosphamide-induced leukopenia but may have a better chance to respond to treatment.

  4. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  5. Teaching Emotional Intelligence: A Control Group Study of a Brief Educational Intervention for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Gorgas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional Intelligence (EI is defined as an ability to perceive another’s emotional state combined with an ability to modify one’s own. Physicians with this ability are at a distinct advantage, both in fostering teams and in making sound decisions. Studies have shown that higher physician EI’s are associated with lower incidence of burn-out, longer careers, more positive patient-physician interactions, increased empathy, and improved communication skills. We explored the potential for EI to be learned as a skill (as opposed to being an innate ability through a brief educational intervention with emergency medicine (EM residents. Methods: This study was conducted at a large urban EM residency program. Residents were randomized to either EI intervention or control groups. The intervention was a two-hour session focused on improving the skill of social perspective taking (SPT, a skill related to social awareness. Due to time limitations, we used a 10-item sample of the Hay 360 Emotional Competence Inventory to measure EI at three time points for the training group: before (pre and after (post training, and at six-months post training (follow up; and at two time points for the control group: pre- and follow up. The preliminary analysis was a four-way analysis of variance with one repeated measure: Group x Gender x Program Year over Time. We also completed post-hoc tests. Results: Thirty-three EM residents participated in the study (33 of 36, 92%, 19 in the EI intervention group and 14 in the control group. We found a significant interaction effect between Group and Time (p<0.05. Post-hoc tests revealed a significant increase in EI scores from Time 1 to 3 for the EI intervention group (62.6% to 74.2%, but no statistical change was observed for the controls (66.8% to 66.1%, p=0.77. We observed no main effects involving gender or level of training. Conclusion: Our brief EI training showed a delayed but statistically significant

  6. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) efficiently removes aggregating species of dipeptides produced in C9ORF72-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofani, Riccardo; Crippa, Valeria; Vezzoli, Giulia; Rusmini, Paola; Galbiati, Mariarita; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Ferrari, Veronica; Tedesco, Barbara; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two neurodegenerative diseases in which similar pathogenic mechanisms are involved. Both diseases associate to the high propensity of specific misfolded proteins, like TDP-43 or FUS, to mislocalize and aggregate. This is partly due to their intrinsic biophysical properties and partly as a consequence of failure of the neuronal protein quality control (PQC) system. Several familial ALS/FTD cases are linked to an expansion of a repeated G4C2 hexanucleotide sequence present in the C9ORF72 gene. The G4C2, which localizes in an untranslated region of the C9ORF72 transcript, drives an unconventional repeat-associated ATG-independent translation. This leads to the synthesis of five different dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs), which are not "classical" misfolded proteins, but generate aberrant aggregation-prone unfolded conformations poorly removed by the PQC system. The DPRs accumulate into p62/SQSTM1 and ubiquitin positive inclusions. Here, we analyzed the biochemical behavior of the five DPRs in immortalized motoneurons. Our data suggest that while the DPRs are mainly processed via autophagy, this system is unable to fully clear their aggregated forms, and thus they tend to accumulate in basal conditions. Overexpression of the small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8), which facilitates the autophagy-mediated disposal of a large variety of classical misfolded aggregation-prone proteins, significantly decreased the accumulation of most DPR insoluble species. Thus, the induction of HSPB8 might represent a valid approach to decrease DPR-mediated toxicity and maintain motoneuron viability.

  7. Comparison of stability limits in men with traumatic transtibial amputation and a nonamputee control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero-Sánchez, Alberto; Molina-Rueda, Francisco; Alguacil-Diego, Isabel M; Cano-de la Cuerda, Roberto; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Currently, knowledge is lacking about whether subjects with traumatic unilateral transtibial amputation (UTA) have a compromised ability to voluntarily move their center of gravity (COG) to positions within the limits of stability. To analyze the ability to voluntarily move the COG to positions within the limits of stability in a sample of subjects with traumatic UTA. Observational, case-control study. University department. Ten men with traumatic UTA and 10 control subjects without amputation. Computerized dynamic posturography SMART EquiTEST System version 8.0 was used for measuring stability limits in both groups. The Limits of Stability test was used to assess the participants' ability to voluntarily sway to various locations in space (8 predetermined target positions). End point excursion achieved statistically significant differences in the prosthetic (P = .02) and backward (P = .03) directions in the subjects with UTA. A statistically significant decrease was observed in the maximum excursion to backward direction (P = .05) in the subjects with UTA. Directional control only reached statistically significant differences in the prosthetic backward direction (P = .05) compared with the control group. Movement velocity was statistically significantly lower in the subjects with UTA toward prosthetic (P = .03), backward (P = .05), sound (P = .01), and sound forward (P = .03) directions in relation to the control group. Persons with traumatic UTA have a reduced ability to move their COG within stability limits (restricted displacement, inadequate directional control, and reduced velocity). These findings should be considered when developing rehabilitation programs for these persons. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disappointment and adherence among parents of newborns allocated to the control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinich Petersen, Sandra; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When a child participates in a clinical trial, informed consent has to be given by the parents. Parental motives for participation are complex, but the hope of getting a new and better treatment for the child is important. We wondered how parents react when their child is allocated to....... A generalized version might be applicable across randomized controlled trials at large. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Calmette study is registered in EudraCT (https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/) with trial number 2010-021979-85....... to the control group of a randomized controlled trial, and how it will affect their future engagement in the trial. METHODS: We included parents of newborns randomized to the control arm in the Danish Calmette study at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen. The Calmette study is a randomized clinical trial investigating...... to the control group was developed based on the participants' different positions along two continuities from 'Our participation in trial is not important' to 'Our participation in trial is important', and 'Vaccine not important to us' to 'Vaccine important to us'. Four very disappointed families had thought...

  9. Predictors of Glycemic Control in Adolescents of Various Age Groups With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shu-Li; Lo, Fu-Sung; Lee, Yann-Jinn; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the predictors of glycemic control in adolescents of various age groups with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is crucial for nurses to cultivate developmental-specific interventions to improve glycemic control in this age group. However, research has rarely addressed this issue, particularly in the context of Asian populations. We explored the predictive influence of demographic characteristics, self-care behaviors, family conflict, and parental involvement on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels 6 months after the baseline measurement in adolescents of various age groups with T1D in Taiwan. A prospective survey design was applied. At baseline, adolescents with T1D completed a self-care behavior scale. Parents or guardians finished scales of parental involvement and family conflict. The HbA1C levels 6 months after baseline measurement were collected from medical records. Two hundred ten adolescent-parent/guardian pairs were enrolled as participants. Multiple stepwise regressions examined the significant predictors of HbA1C levels 6 months after the baseline measurement in the three adolescent age groups: 10-12, 13-15, and 16-18 years. Family conflict was a significant predictor of HbA1C level within the 10-12 years of age group 6 months after the baseline measurement. Self-care behaviors were a significant predictor of HbA1C level within the 13-15 years of age group 6 months after the baseline measurement. Being female and self-care behaviors were each significant predictors of HbA1C level in the 16-18 years of age group 6 months after the baseline measurement. Nurses should design specific interventions to improve glycemic control in adolescents of various age groups with T1D that are tailored to their developmental needs. For adolescents with T1D aged 10-12 years, nurses should actively assess family conflict and provide necessary interventions. For adolescents with T1D aged 13-18 years, nurses should exert special efforts to improve their self

  10. Cytochrome P450 1B1 and 2C9 genotypes and risk of ischemic vascular disease, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize present knowledge of genetic variation in cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) and 2C9 (CYP2C9) genes and risk of tobacco-related cancer, female cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ischemic vascular disease. The CYP1B1 and CYP2C9 enzymes metabolize...... polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in tobacco smoke and thereby generate disease-causing metabolites suggested to be important in tobacco-related diseases. Furthermore, CYP1B1 also metabolizes estrogen while CYP2C9 metabolizes arachidonic acid, both creating metabolites potentially important in risk...... between genetic variation in CYP1B1 and CYP2C9 and risk of disease with considerable statistical power rebutted the hypotheses that these genetic variants affect risk of tobacco-related cancer, female cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ischemic vascular disease....

  11. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  12. Synthetic control of spectroscopic and photophysical properties of triarylborane derivatives having peripheral electron-donating groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akitaka; Kawanishi, Kazuyoshi; Sakuda, Eri; Kitamura, Noboru

    2014-04-01

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of triarylborane derivatives were controlled by the nature of the triarylborane core (trixylyl- or trianthrylborane) and peripheral electron-donating groups (N,N-diphenylamino or 9H-carbazolyl groups). The triarylborane derivatives with and without the electron-donating groups showed intramolecular charge-transfer absorption/fluorescence transitions between the π orbital of the aryl group (π(aryl)) and the vacant p orbital on the boron atom (p(B), π(aryl)-p(B) CT), and the fluorescence color was tunable from blue to red by the combination of peripheral electron-donating groups and a triarylborane core. Detailed electrochemical, spectroscopic, and photophysical studies of the derivatives, including solvent dependences of the spectroscopic and photophysical properties, demonstrated that the HOMO and LUMO of each derivative were determined primarily by the nature of the peripheral electron-donating group and the triarylborane core, respectively. The effects of solvent polarity on the fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of the derivatives were also tunable by the choice of the triarylborane core. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The selection and use of control groups in epidemiologic studies of radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.; Friedenreich, C.M.; Howe, P.D.

    1990-09-01

    Current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer are based on epidemiologic studies of humans exposed to high doses of radiation. A critical feature of such studies is the selection of an appropriate control group. This report presents a detailed examination of the principles underlying the selection and use of control groups in such epidemiologic studies. It is concluded that the cohort study is the preferred design, because of the rarity of exposure to high levels of radiation in the general population and because the cohort design is less susceptible to bias. This report also assesses potential bias in current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer due to inappropriate choice and use of control groups. Detailed summaries are presented for those epidemiologic studies on which the BEIR IV risk estimates are based. It is concluded that confounding is by far the major potential concern. Bias is probably negligible in risk estimates for breast cancer. For lung cancer, risk estimates may be underestimated by about 30 percent for males and 10 percent for females due to confounding of smoking and radiation exposure. For leukemia and cancers of the thyroid and bone, the absence of established non-radiation risk factors with a high prevalence in the population under study suggests that there is unlikely to be any substantial confounding radiation risk estimates. Finally, lifetime excess mortality risks have been estimated for several of the cancers of interest following exposure to radiation based on Canadian age-, sex- and cause-specific mortality rates. It is concluded that errors in measurement exposure, uncertainty in extrapolating the results of high dose studies to low doses and low dose rates, and sampling variation in the epidemiologic studies contribute far more to uncertainty in current risk estimates than do any biases in the epidemiologic studies introduced by inappropriate selection and use of control groups. (161 refs., 19 tabs.)

  14. Event-based control strategy for consensus of a group of VTOL-UAVs

    OpenAIRE

    Vega-Alonzo, A.; Guerrero Castellanos, Jose Fermi; Durand, Sylvain; Marchand, Nicolas; Maya-Rueda, S. E.; Mino-Aguilar, G.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the development of a collaborative event-based control applied to the problem of consensus and formation of a group of VTOL-UAVs (Vertical Takeoff and Landing, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles). Each VTOL-UAV decides, based on the difference of its current state (linear position and velocity) and its latest broadcast state, when it has to send a new value to its neighbors. The asymptotic convergence to average consensus or desired formation is depicted via ...

  15. Consultants' Group Meeting on Tsetse Genetics in Relation to Tsetse/Trypanosomiasis Control/Eradication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The FAO and IAEA have long recognized the need for methods for insect and pest control based upon approaches other than simply the widespread use of insecticides. Through the past several years the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has expended a considerable amount of effort in the development of a SIT programme applicable to tsetse. Such programmes have proved to be a highly successful component of the integrated control of tsetse flies. However, the pilot programmes undertaken to date have been applied to areas of limited size and future integrated control programmes for tsetse must cover much larger regions. The Consultants' Group was cognisant of the continued need for improvements in the cost effectiveness in the mass production of tsetse, particularly for SIT programmes. The Consultants' Goup recognized also that FAO/IAEA plays an important leadership role in the development of new technologies for the control of insect pest populations, and in the transfer of such technologies to assist in the improvement of agricultural production, particularly in developing countries. In addition to research on the development of methods for insect control (emphasizing application of the Sterile Insect Technique), the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has established and implemented five 'Co-ordinated Research Programmes' on tsetse and has, from time to time, convened groups of consultants to discuss and make recommendations on specific subjects. At least two such meetings (in July 1975 and November 1987) focused on genetic methods of insect control. The recent, rapid developments in molecular biology have stimulated interest in the application of genetic techniques to the problem of tsetse and trypanosomiasis control in Africa.

  16. Group of UAVs Moving on Smooth Control Law with Fixed Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Pavlovich Kucherov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper considered the movement of multi-agent system that consists of several UAVs that carry out monitoring ground surface. The multi-agent system includes a lead agent and several agents-members of the group. The motion of this system occurs along a trajectory, which is determined by the initial conditions, its mathematical model and obstacles on the route. Only the leader of the group knows the ultimate goal of the movement. The motion of this structure is considered in the potential field, which determined the forces of attraction and repulsion and created control signals by measuring the distances to the nearest neighbors. This allows the UAV group to consider an aggregate that has some size and to describe its motion the system of differential equations of second-order. As UAV selected Quadrotor. In this investigation, the stability conditions of such motion are considered, and simulation of approach is proposed.

  17. Coronary angiography findings in lung injured patients with sulfur mustard compared to a control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karbasi-Afshar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: We evaluated the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD in Sulfur mustard (SM exposed veterans. We also evaluated the relationship between exposure to SM and angiography findings and compared angiography findings of SM exposed individuals with unexposed ones after two decades from the time of exposure to SM. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was conducted on 200 consecutive patients (100 SM exposed vs. 100 unexposed undergoing angiographic assessments due to CAD. Results: The coronary angiography findings between two groups were significantly different ( P < 0.001. Ninety two (92% patients in SM exposed group and 82 (82% in unexposed group had abnormal findings in their coronary arteries ( P = 0.031. Conclusions: The incidence of CAD and angiographic changes were significantly increased with exposure to SM. Further studies on cardiovascular effects of SM are needed.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of group Stepping Stones Triple P: a mixed-disability trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Gemma; Sofronoff, Kate; Sanders, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    Stepping Stones Triple P (SSTP) is a parenting program designed for families of a child with a disability. The current study involved a randomized controlled trial of Group Stepping Stones Triple P (GSSTP) for a mixed-disability group. Participants were 52 families of children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, or an intellectual disability. The results demonstrated significant improvements in parent-reported child behavior, parenting styles, parental satisfaction, and conflict about parenting. Results among participants were similar despite children's differing impairments. The intervention effect was maintained at 6-month follow-up. The results indicate that GSSTP is a promising intervention for a mixed-disability group. Limitations of the study, along with areas for future research, are also discussed. © FPI, Inc.

  19. Is There a Relation between ABO Blood Groups and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Pemphigoid? A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Toosi, Parviz; Azimi, Somayyeh; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Montazami, Ali; Rafieian, Nasrin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Relationship between blood groups and dermatologic diseases remains controversial and was not yet fully elucidated nor explained clearly. The aim of this study was to examine if any relation exists between different types of pemphigoid diseases and ABO blood group. Methods. In this case-control study, 159 pemphigoid patients and 152 healthy matched-controls were evaluated. All blood group (including Rh status) data for the study was obtained from the hospital medical records. Statistical comparisons were completed with chi-square test and logistic regression. Results. Blood group "O" was found in 32.9% of patients and 38.2% of control group. Blood group "A" was found among 30.8% of patients and 34.2% of control group, while group "B" was reported in 27.4% of cases and 21.1% of controls and "AB" was identified among 8.9% of patients and 6.6% of control group. 84.9% of patients were Rh positive, while in the control group 86.2% of patients were Rh positive. No significant differences were found regarding ABO blood groups (P = 0.46) or Rh (P = 0.76) between pemphigoid patients and control group. Also, older females had the higher risk of developing bullous pemphigoid. Conclusion. We found no relationship between ABO blood groups and pemphigoid disease.

  20. Is There a Relation between ABO Blood Groups and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Pemphigoid? A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Bakhtiari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Relationship between blood groups and dermatologic diseases remains controversial and was not yet fully elucidated nor explained clearly. The aim of this study was to examine if any relation exists between different types of pemphigoid diseases and ABO blood group. Methods. In this case-control study, 159 pemphigoid patients and 152 healthy matched-controls were evaluated. All blood group (including Rh status data for the study was obtained from the hospital medical records. Statistical comparisons were completed with chi-square test and logistic regression. Results. Blood group “O” was found in 32.9% of patients and 38.2% of control group. Blood group “A” was found among 30.8% of patients and 34.2% of control group, while group “B” was reported in 27.4% of cases and 21.1% of controls and “AB” was identified among 8.9% of patients and 6.6% of control group. 84.9% of patients were Rh positive, while in the control group 86.2% of patients were Rh positive. No significant differences were found regarding ABO blood groups (P=0.46 or Rh (P=0.76 between pemphigoid patients and control group. Also, older females had the higher risk of developing bullous pemphigoid. Conclusion. We found no relationship between ABO blood groups and pemphigoid disease.

  1. Pilot randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy group skills training for ADHD among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Andrew P; McMahon, Robert J; Moran, Lyndsey R; Peterson, A Paige; Dreessen, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    ADHD affects between 2% and 8% of college students and is associated with broad functional impairment. No prior randomized controlled trials with this population have been published. The present study is a pilot randomized controlled trial evaluating dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) group skills training adapted for college students with ADHD. Thirty-three undergraduates with ADHD between ages 18 and 24 were randomized to receive either DBT group skills training or skills handouts during an 8-week intervention phase. ADHD symptoms, executive functioning (EF), and related outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Participants receiving DBT group skills training showed greater treatment response rates (59-65% vs. 19-25%) and clinical recovery rates (53-59% vs. 6-13%) on ADHD symptoms and EF, and greater improvements in quality of life. DBT group skills training may be efficacious, acceptable, and feasible for treating ADHD among college students. A larger randomized trial is needed for further evaluation. © 2014 SAGE Publications.

  2. Sedimentological and Stratigraphic Controls on Natural Fracture Distribution in Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Hariri, Mustafa; Abdullatif, Osman; Makkawi, Mohammed; Korvin, Gabor

    2016-04-01

    The Cambro-Permian Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia, is the main groundwater aquifer in Wadi Al-Dawasir and Najran areas. In addition, it has a reservoir potentiality for oil and natural gas in Rub' Al-Khali Basin. Wajid Group divided into four formations, ascending Dibsiyah, Sanamah, Khussyayan and Juwayl. They are mainly sandstone and exposed in an area extend from Wadi Al-Dawasir southward to Najran city and deposited within fluvial, shallow marine and glacial environments. This study aims to investigate the sedimentological and stratigraphic controls on the distribution of natural fractures within Wajid Group outcrops. A scanline sampling method was used to study the natural fracture network within Wajid Group outcrops, where the natural fractures were measured and characterized in 12 locations. Four regional natural fracture sets were observed with mean strikes of 050o, 075o, 345o, and 320o. Seven lithofacies characterized the Wajid Group at these locations and include fine-grained sandstone, coarse to pebbly sandstone, cross-bedded sandstone, massive sandstone, bioturbated sandstone, conglomerate sandstone, and conglomerate lithofacies. We found that the fine-grained and small scale cross-bedded sandstones lithofacies are characterized by high fracture intensity. In contrast, the coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate lithofacies have low fracture intensity. Therefore, the relative fracture intensity and spacing of natural fractures within Wajid Group in the subsurface can be predicted by using the lithofacies and their depositional environments. In terms of stratigraphy, we found that the bed thickness and the stratigraphic architecture are the main controls on fractures intensity. The outcomes of this study can help to understand and predict the natural fracture distribution within the subsurface fractured sandstone hosting groundwater and hydrocarbon in Wajid and Rub' Al-Khali Basins. Hence, the finding of this study might help to explore and develop the

  3. Creating groups with similar expected behavioural response in randomized controlled trials: a fuzzy cognitive map approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giabbanelli, Philippe J; Crutzen, Rik

    2014-12-12

    Controlling bias is key to successful randomized controlled trials for behaviour change. Bias can be generated at multiple points during a study, for example, when participants are allocated to different groups. Several methods of allocations exist to randomly distribute participants over the groups such that their prognostic factors (e.g., socio-demographic variables) are similar, in an effort to keep participants' outcomes comparable at baseline. Since it is challenging to create such groups when all prognostic factors are taken together, these factors are often balanced in isolation or only the ones deemed most relevant are balanced. However, the complex interactions among prognostic factors may lead to a poor estimate of behaviour, causing unbalanced groups at baseline, which may introduce accidental bias. We present a novel computational approach for allocating participants to different groups. Our approach automatically uses participants' experiences to model (the interactions among) their prognostic factors and infer how their behaviour is expected to change under a given intervention. Participants are then allocated based on their inferred behaviour rather than on selected prognostic factors. In order to assess the potential of our approach, we collected two datasets regarding the behaviour of participants (n = 430 and n = 187). The potential of the approach on larger sample sizes was examined using synthetic data. All three datasets highlighted that our approach could lead to groups with similar expected behavioural changes. The computational approach proposed here can complement existing statistical approaches when behaviours involve numerous complex relationships, and quantitative data is not readily available to model these relationships. The software implementing our approach and commonly used alternatives is provided at no charge to assist practitioners in the design of their own studies and to compare participants' allocations.

  4. The Method of Optimization of Hydropower Plant Performance for Use in Group Active Power Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glazyrin G.V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimization of hydropower plant performance is considered in this paper. A new method of calculation of optimal load-sharing is proposed. The method is based on application of incremental water flow curves representing relationship between the per unit increase of water flow and active power. The optimal load-sharing is obtained by solving the nonlinear equation governing the balance of total active power and the station power set point with the same specific increase of water flow for all turbines. Unlike traditional optimization techniques, the solution of the equation is obtained without taking into account unit safe operating zones. Instead, if calculated active power of a unit violates the permissible power range, load-sharing is recalculated for the remaining generating units. Thus, optimal load-sharing algorithm suitable for digital control systems is developed. The proposed algorithm is implemented in group active power controller in Novosibirsk hydropower plant. An analysis of operation of group active power controller proves that the application of the proposed method allows obtaining optimal load-sharing at each control step with sufficient precision.

  5. Self-concept and self-esteem after acquired brain injury: a control group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie; Kelly, Amber; Couchman, Grace

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the multidimensional self-concept, global self-esteem and psychological adjustment of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) as compared with healthy controls. Group comparison on self-report questionnaires. Forty-one individuals who had sustained a TBI were compared with an age- and gender-matched sample of 41 trauma-free control participants on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (second edition) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS). Participants with TBI rated significantly lower mean levels of global self-esteem and self-concept on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale and Tennessee Self Concept Scale than the control group. Survivors of TBI rated themselves more poorly on a range of self-dimensions, including social, family, academic/work and personal self-concept compared to controls. They also reported higher mean levels of depression and anxiety on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Overall self-concept was most strongly associated with depressive symptoms and anxiety. Self-concept may be lowered following TBI and is associated with negative emotional consequences. Clinicians may improve the emotional adjustment of survivors of TBI by considering particular dimensions of self-concept for intervention focus.

  6. Active placebo control groups of pharmacological interventions were rarely used but merited serious consideration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Solgaard; Bielefeldt, Andreas Ørsted; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2017-01-01

    identified and analyzed 25 methods publications with substantial comments. The main argument for active placebo was to reduce risk of unblinding; the main argument against was the risk of unintended therapeutic effect. Conclusion Pharmacological active placebo control interventions are rarely used......Objectives Active placebos are control interventions that mimic the side effects of the experimental interventions in randomized trials and are sometimes used to reduce the risk of unblinding. We wanted to assess how often randomized clinical drug trials use active placebo control groups......; to provide a catalog, and a characterization, of such trials; and to analyze methodological arguments for and against the use of active placebo. Study Design and Setting An overview consisting of three thematically linked substudies. In an observational substudy, we assessed the prevalence of active placebo...

  7. The Interaction Between Control Rods as Estimated by Second-Order One-Group Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Rolf

    1966-10-15

    The interaction effect between control rods is an important problem for the reactivity control of a reactor. The approach of second order one-group perturbation theory is shown to be attractive due to its simplicity. Formulas are derived for the fully inserted control rods in a bare reactor. For a single rod we introduce a correction parameter b, which with good approximation is proportional to the strength of the absorber. For two and more rods we introduce an interaction function g(r{sub ij}), which is assumed to depend only on the distance r{sub ij} between the rods. The theoretical expressions are correlated with the results of several experiments in R0, ZEBRA and the Aagesta reactor, as well as with more sophisticated calculations. The approximate formulas are found to give quite good agreement with exact values, but in the case of about 8 or more rods higher-order effects are likely to be important.

  8. The Interaction Between Control Rods as Estimated by Second-Order One-Group Perturbation Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Rolf

    1966-10-01

    The interaction effect between control rods is an important problem for the reactivity control of a reactor. The approach of second order one-group perturbation theory is shown to be attractive due to its simplicity. Formulas are derived for the fully inserted control rods in a bare reactor. For a single rod we introduce a correction parameter b, which with good approximation is proportional to the strength of the absorber. For two and more rods we introduce an interaction function g(r ij ), which is assumed to depend only on the distance r ij between the rods. The theoretical expressions are correlated with the results of several experiments in R0, ZEBRA and the Aagesta reactor, as well as with more sophisticated calculations. The approximate formulas are found to give quite good agreement with exact values, but in the case of about 8 or more rods higher-order effects are likely to be important

  9. Multiple regression analyses in artificial-grammar learning: the importance of control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Anja; Kinder, Annette; Lachnit, Harald

    2009-03-01

    In artificial-grammar learning, it is crucial to ensure that above-chance performance in the test stage is due to learning in the training stage but not due to judgemental biases. Here we argue that multiple regression analysis can be successfully combined with the use of control groups to assess whether participants were able to transfer knowledge acquired during training when making judgements about test stimuli. We compared the regression weights of judgements in a transfer condition (training and test strings were constructed by the same grammar but with different letters) with those in a control condition. Predictors were identical in both conditions-judgements of control participants were treated as if they were based on knowledge gained in a standard training stage. The results of this experiment as well as reanalyses of a former study support the usefulness of our approach.

  10. Design and realization experience of Advanced Control Rod Group and Individual Control System (GIC) for VVER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, V.; Novy, L.; Janour, J.; Ris, M.; Zidek, P.

    1997-01-01

    During the reactor refueling outage of unit 1 of the South Ukrainian nuclear power plant in mid-1996, full replacement of the reactor's group and individual control (GIC) system was performed. The main functions of the GIC system are briefly characterized. The structure of the advanced GIC system is described and shown by means of a diagram. The criteria used in deciding on the upgrading strategy are discussed in some detail. The implementation of the replacement is also dealt with, as is the testing and commissioning of the system. (A.K.)

  11. Body image distortion, perfectionism and eating disorder symptoms in risk group of female ballet dancers and models and in control group of female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoletić, Emina; Duraković-Belko, Elvira

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this research was to examine differences among two groups of girls, models and ballerinas (with risk factors - experimental group) and young students (control group), in body image preception, body mass index, neurotic perfectionism, body - image distortion and simptoms of eating disorders. The research was conducted with 91 participants divided in two groups, control group - 55 students at University of Sarajevo and experimental group - 13 professional ballerinas, 23 professional models. During this research work we used several measuring instruments: Body mass index; Body Mass Index - Silhouette Matching Test; Neurotic Perfectionism Questioner; Eating Disorders Inventory. In this study statistically significant differences occur between these two groups of girls which are related to body - image perception and objective position on the body mass index chart. All 91 participants saw themselves as obese. Statistically significant differences occur in body - image distortion and simptoms of eating disorders in the experimental group, they have high scores on body - image distortion, on eating disorders inventory and neurotic perfectionism simptoms. Based on th results in this study, we may conclude that there are groups of people who have risk factors for developing some kind of eating disorder, so it would be desirable to create a preventive intervention for young ballerinas and models, but also for those people who coach them, trainers, instructors and managers. For other population groups with risky behavior such as young children, a prevention plan and modifications of cultural influences on people's opinion of body image are extremely important.

  12. Serum folate levels after UVA exposure: a two-group parallel randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altmeyer Peter

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photodegradation of certain vitamins such as riboflavins, carotinoids, tocopherol, and folate has been well-documented. Previous observations suggest that ultraviolet (UV radiation may cause folate deficiency. This is of great importance since folate deficiency is also known to be linked with the development of neural tube defects. To investigate the influence of UVA radiation on serum folate levels in vivo, we conducted a two-group randomised controlled trial on healthy subjects. Material and methods Twenty-four healthy volunteers with skin type II were enrolled into the study. Eight volunteers of the study population were randomly assigned to the control group. UVA irradiation was administered with an air-conditioned sunbed. Blood samples were taken from all volunteers at baseline (T1, 30 min after the first UVA exposure (T2, and at the end of the study 24 h after the sixth UV exposure (T3. The volunteers had two UVA exposures weekly within three weeks (cumulative UVA dose: 96 J/cm2. Volunteers of the control group had no UVA exposures. Serum folate was analysed with an automated immunoassay system. Results At all times of blood collection the differences between serum folate levels were insignificant (P > 0.05, except of the non-exposed controls at T2 (P 0.05. Conclusions Our data suggest that both single and serial UVA exposures do not significantly influence serum folate levels of healthy subjects. Therefore, neural tube defects claimed to occur after periconceptual UVA exposure are probably not due to UVA induced folate deficiency.

  13. Laser polarization dependent and magnetically control of group velocity in a dielectric medium doped with nanodiamond nitrogen vacancy centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Rahimpour Soleimani, H., E-mail: Rahimpour@guilan.ac.ir

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, group velocity control of Gaussian beam in a dielectric medium doped with nanodiamond nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers under optical excitation is discussed. The shape of transmitted and reflected pulses from dielectric can be tuned by changing the intensity of magnetic field and polarization of the control beam. The effect of intensity of control beam on group velocity is also investigated.

  14. Evaluation of periodontal condition of menopause women with osteoporosis and osteopenia and comparison with control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorsand A.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Several risk factors directly affect the development of periodontal diseases. Also some systemic diseases act indirectly as predisposing and aggrevating factors. Osteoporosis is one of these factors and one of its main causes is lack of physical activity in postmenopause period. The incidence of osteoporosis is increasing in our country. The goal of this study was to evaluate the periodontal condition of women with osteoporosis and osteopenia referred to bone densitometric division of Loghman hospital in 2003 and compare to control group. Materials and Methods: In this case control study based on BMD (Bone Mineral Density measurement of back and thigh using DEXA method, 60 patients referred to bone densitometric division of Loghman hospital, were randomly selected. Cases were divided into three groups, 20 with osteoporosis, 20 with osteopenia and 20 normal cases. Periodontal indices consisting of plaque index (PI, tooth loss (TL, gingival recession (GR, probing pocket depth (PPD and papilla bleeding index (PBI were evaluated by clinical and radiographic examination. Data were analyzed by Kruskall Wallis and Dunn tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: PBI, PI and TL were significantly higher in osteoporotic group than osteopenic and normal group. PPD was not different in the three groups. Due to the low prevalence of recession in our study, this parameter was not included in the statistical analysis. Conclusion: It seems that osteoporosis does not increase the incidence of periodontal diseases because it affects bone quality rather than quantity. In osteoporosis calcium deficiency and increasing age lead to decreased physical activity and ultimately affect the patient's oral hygiene performance. Thus, periodontal manifestations are presented as gingival bleeding and gingivitis.

  15. A comparative study of Dermatoglyphic patterns in patients with myocardial infarction and control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalali F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is the most important cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The knowledge of major risk factos can be useful in prevention of CAD. There is no known major risk factof in many patients with myocardial infarction (MI. the dermatoglyphic pattern in patients with myocardial infarction is an interesting matter and little information is available about this relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate the relation between the dermatoglyphic pattern as indication of genetic susceptibility in the incidence of myocardial infarction.We conducted a multi-center cross-sectional study of 900 patients with diagnosis of myocardial infarction admitted or refereed to six hospitals in three large cities in the north of Iran. The control group consisted of 900 subjects who were selected form those who were referred to police information system at the time when cases had been diagnosed. The dermatoglyphic pattern of finger lines was determined using classic categorization by supervision of experts in Identification Diagnosis Administration office. For each subject 10 fingerprints had been derived. Overall, 9000 fingerprints for cases and 9000 fingerprints for control group were obtained for cases and 9000 fingerprints for control group were obtained for analysis. The findings show that 55.3% of cases were male and 44.7% were female and 70.6% of patients had, Q-wave and 29.6% had non-Q wave MI. in patients group, the distribution of dermatoglyphic pattern was 7.2% arch type, 46.8% loop type, and 46% whorl type of fingerprints. In contrast, in the control group, there were 3.7%, 50.7% and 45.5% respectively. The odds ratio (OR of arch type vs whorl type was 1.89 (P<0.0001 and odds ratio of loop type vs whorl type was 1.23 (P<0.0001. This result shows a statistical significant increase in the rate of arch type fingerprints in patients with MI roughly two times. Also, in subgroup analysis, the percentage of arch type

  16. Development of risk-based nanomaterial groups for occupational exposure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuempel, E. D.; Castranova, V.; Geraci, C. L.; Schulte, P. A.

    2012-09-01

    Given the almost limitless variety of nanomaterials, it will be virtually impossible to assess the possible occupational health hazard of each nanomaterial individually. The development of science-based hazard and risk categories for nanomaterials is needed for decision-making about exposure control practices in the workplace. A possible strategy would be to select representative (benchmark) materials from various mode of action (MOA) classes, evaluate the hazard and develop risk estimates, and then apply a systematic comparison of new nanomaterials with the benchmark materials in the same MOA class. Poorly soluble particles are used here as an example to illustrate quantitative risk assessment methods for possible benchmark particles and occupational exposure control groups, given mode of action and relative toxicity. Linking such benchmark particles to specific exposure control bands would facilitate the translation of health hazard and quantitative risk information to the development of effective exposure control practices in the workplace. A key challenge is obtaining sufficient dose-response data, based on standard testing, to systematically evaluate the nanomaterials' physical-chemical factors influencing their biological activity. Categorization processes involve both science-based analyses and default assumptions in the absence of substance-specific information. Utilizing data and information from related materials may facilitate initial determinations of exposure control systems for nanomaterials.

  17. Development of risk-based nanomaterial groups for occupational exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuempel, E. D.; Castranova, V.; Geraci, C. L.; Schulte, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Given the almost limitless variety of nanomaterials, it will be virtually impossible to assess the possible occupational health hazard of each nanomaterial individually. The development of science-based hazard and risk categories for nanomaterials is needed for decision-making about exposure control practices in the workplace. A possible strategy would be to select representative (benchmark) materials from various mode of action (MOA) classes, evaluate the hazard and develop risk estimates, and then apply a systematic comparison of new nanomaterials with the benchmark materials in the same MOA class. Poorly soluble particles are used here as an example to illustrate quantitative risk assessment methods for possible benchmark particles and occupational exposure control groups, given mode of action and relative toxicity. Linking such benchmark particles to specific exposure control bands would facilitate the translation of health hazard and quantitative risk information to the development of effective exposure control practices in the workplace. A key challenge is obtaining sufficient dose–response data, based on standard testing, to systematically evaluate the nanomaterials’ physical–chemical factors influencing their biological activity. Categorization processes involve both science-based analyses and default assumptions in the absence of substance-specific information. Utilizing data and information from related materials may facilitate initial determinations of exposure control systems for nanomaterials.

  18. Rehabilitative online education versus internet discussion group for hearing aid users: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorén, Elisabet; Svensson, Monica; Törnqvist, Anna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Lunner, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    By using the Internet in the audiological rehabilitation process, it might be possible in a cost-effective way to include additional rehabilitation components by informing and guiding hearing aid users about such topics as communication strategies, hearing tactics, and how to handle hearing aids. To evaluate the effectiveness of an online education program for adult experienced hearing aid users including professional guidance by an audiologist and compare it with the effects of participation in an online discussion forum without any professional contact. A randomized controlled study with two groups of participants. Repeated measures at prestudy, immediate follow-up, and a 6 mo follow-up. Fifty-nine experienced hearing aid users participated in the study, ranging in age from 24 to 84 yr (mean 63.5 yr). The intervention group (N = 29) underwent a five-week rehabilitative online education in which activities for each week included information, tasks, and assignments, and contact with a professional audiologist was included. The participants in the control group (N = 30) were referred to an online discussion forum without any audiologist contact. A set of questionnaires administered online were used as outcome measures: (1) Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, (2) International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, (3) Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life, and (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Significant improvements measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly were found in both groups of participants, and the effects were maintained at the 6 mo follow-up. The results on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale showed that the participants in the intervention group showed reduced symptoms of depression immediately/6 mo after the intervention. At the 6 mo follow-up participants in the control group reported fewer symptoms of anxiety than they did before the intervention started. This study provides preliminary evidence that the

  19. Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of a Novel Dissonance-Based Group Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Butryn, Meghan; Menke, Katharine S.; Marti, C. Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conduct a pilot trial of a new dissonance-based group eating disorder treatment designed to be a cost-effective front-line transdiagnostic treatment that could be more widely disseminated than extant individual or family treatments that are more expensive and difficult to deliver. Method Young women with a DSM-5 eating disorder (N = 72) were randomized to an 8-week dissonance-based Body Acceptance Therapy group treatment or a usual care control condition, completing diagnostic interviews and questionnaires at pre, post, and 2-month follow-up. Results Intent-to-treat analyses revealed that intervention participants showed greater reductions in outcomes than usual care controls in a multivariate multilevel model (χ2[6] = 34.1, p dissonance regarding perpetuating the thin ideal (d = .65) and negative affect (d = .55). Midway through this pilot we refined engagement procedures, which was associated with increased effect sizes (e.g., the d for eating disorder symptoms increased from .51 to 2.30). Conclusions This new group treatment produced large reductions in eating disorder symptoms, which is encouraging because it requires about 1/20th the therapist time necessary for extant individual and family treatments, and has the potential to provide a cost-effective and efficacious approach to reaching the majority of individuals with eating disorders who do not presently received treatment. PMID:25577189

  20. Design of IP Camera Access Control Protocol by Utilizing Hierarchical Group Key

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Unlike CCTV, security video surveillance devices, which we have generally known about, IP cameras which are connected to a network either with or without wire, provide monitoring services through a built-in web-server. Due to the fact that IP cameras can use a network such as the Internet, multiple IP cameras can be installed at a long distance and each IP camera can utilize the function of a web server individually. Even though IP cameras have this kind of advantage, it has difficulties in access control management and weakness in user certification, too. Particularly, because the market of IP cameras did not begin to be realized a long while ago, systems which are systematized from the perspective of security have not been built up yet. Additionally, it contains severe weaknesses in terms of access authority to the IP camera web server, certification of users, and certification of IP cameras which are newly installed within a network, etc. This research grouped IP cameras hierarchically to manage them systematically, and provided access control and data confidentiality between groups by utilizing group keys. In addition, IP cameras and users are certified by using PKI-based certification, and weak points of security such as confidentiality and integrity, etc., are improved by encrypting passwords. Thus, this research presents specific protocols of the entire process and proved through experiments that this method can be actually applied.

  1. The Personality Profile of Tinnitus Sufferers and a Nontinnitus Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Mithila; O'Keeffe, Mary G; Searchfield, Grant D

    2017-04-01

    Chronic tinnitus (phantom perception of sound) significantly disrupts quality of life in 15-20% of those who experience it. Understanding how certain personality traits impact tinnitus perception and distress can be beneficial for the development of interventions to improve the lives of tinnitus sufferers. Four key self-reported personality traits (social closeness, stress reaction, alienation, and self-control) were identified from previous research as being associated with tinnitus. These were compared between tinnitus and age-, gender-, and hearing level-matched nontinnitus controls to see whether underlying profile differences exist, and if personality traits levels correlate with various tinnitus characteristics assessed in typical clinical questionnaires. A Web-based personality survey was administered comprising of self-control, stress reaction, alienation, and social closeness subscale questions of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Hearing Handicap Inventory-Screening Version, TFI, and the Tinnitus Case History Questionnaire. A total of 154 participants with tinnitus (81 males, 73 females, mean age = 62.6 yr) and 61 control (32 males, 29 females, mean age = 59.62 yr) participants were recruited via e-mail invitations to a tinnitus research clinic database, poster, and social media Web site advertising. Statistical analysis was conducted using parametric statistics and IBM SPSS ® Version 22 software. Tinnitus sufferers displayed higher levels of stress reaction, lower social closeness, lower self-control, and higher alienation than the control group (p Case History Questionnaire (p study exhibited a consistent association with tinnitus perception and distress, and differentiated tinnitus sufferers from nontinnitus control. Some of the traits also correlated significantly with certain characteristics measured in tinnitus history questionnaires. Personality traits are described in relation to "maladaptive" residuals under the Adaptation

  2. A Multistage Control Mechanism for Group-Based Machine-Type Communications in an LTE System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chien Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When machine-type communication (MTC devices perform the long-term evolution (LTE attach procedure without bit rate limitations, they may produce congestion in the core network. To prevent this congestion, the LTE standard suggests using group-based policing to regulate the maximum bit rate of all traffic generated by a group of MTC devices. However, previous studies on the access point name-aggregate maximum bit rate based on group-based policing are relatively limited. This study proposes a multistage control (MSC mechanism to process the operations of maximum bit rate allocation based on resource-use information. For performance evaluation, this study uses a Markov chain with to analyze MTC application in a 3GPP network. Traffic flow simulations in an LTE system indicate that the MSC mechanism is an effective bandwidth allocation method in an LTE system with MTC devices. Experimental results show that the MSC mechanism achieves a throughput 22.5% higher than that of the LTE standard model using the group-based policing, and it achieves a lower delay time and greater long-term fairness as well.

  3. A national study of the psychological impact of bank robbery with a randomized control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark

    of bank employees exposed to robbery (response rate: 73.6 %). Several related factors were also investigated including prior traumatic exposure, anxiety, and general traumatic symptoms. The results were compared to a randomized control group of bank employees never exposed to robbery (N= 303......Despite, numerous annual bank robberies worldwide, research on the psychological sequelae of bank robberies is limited. We studied the prevalence of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) (N = 458) and the prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (n = 378) in a Danish national questionnaire survey...... but surprisingly significantly higher than the follow-up robbery group. The results are discussed in relation to existing research and the effect of other factors such as prior traumatic exposure. In conclusion bank robberies are a traumatizing event for the employees, especially when disregarding avoidance...

  4. Group behavioral activation for patients with severe obesity and binge eating disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsson, Sven; Parling, Thomas; Ghaderi, Ata

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether behavioral activation (BA) is an efficacious treatment for decreasing eating disorder symptoms in patients with obesity and binge eating disorder (BED). Ninety-six patients with severe obesity and BED were randomized to either 10 sessions of group BA or wait-list control. The study was conducted at an obesity clinic in a regular hospital setting. The treatment improved some aspects of disordered eating and had a positive effect on depressive symptoms but there was no significant difference between the groups regarding binge eating and most other symptoms. Improved mood but lack of effect on binge eating suggests that dysfunctional eating (including BED) is maintained by other mechanisms than low activation and negative mood. However, future studies need to investigate whether effects of BA on binge eating might emerge later than at post-assessment, as in interpersonal psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Can sharing experiences in groups reduce the burden of living with diabetes, regardless of glycaemic control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Christensen, Mette; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hommel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    included patients with Type 1 diabetes aged = 21 years, having been diagnosed = 1 year earlier. Primary outcome was diabetes-related distress (using the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale). Secondary outcomes were psychological distress and depressive symptoms (Symptom Check List -90-R/Global Severity Index....... Conclusions Support groups are able to reduce diabetes-related and psychological distress 1 year after the intervention for patients with both good and poor glycaemic control displaying high levels of distress. Although patients with severely high levels of diabetes-related distress might need more extensive......Aims To test whether patients with Type 1 diabetes would join support groups and benefit by improving psychosocial functioning, regardless of their HbA1c levels. Methods A pre-post test with follow-up after 6 and 12 months was conducted as a concurrent mixed-method study. The convenience sample...

  6. Can sharing experiences in groups reduce the burden of living with diabetes, regardless of glycaemic control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Christensen, Mette; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hommel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    included patients with Type 1 diabetes aged ≥ 21 years, having been diagnosed ≥ 1 year earlier. Primary outcome was diabetes-related distress (using the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale). Secondary outcomes were psychological distress and depressive symptoms (Symptom Check List -90-R/Global Severity Index....... Conclusions Support groups are able to reduce diabetes-related and psychological distress 1 year after the intervention for patients with both good and poor glycaemic control displaying high levels of distress. Although patients with severely high levels of diabetes-related distress might need more extensive......Aims To test whether patients with Type 1 diabetes would join support groups and benefit by improving psychosocial functioning, regardless of their HbA1c levels. Methods A pre-post test with follow-up after 6 and 12 months was conducted as a concurrent mixed-method study. The convenience sample...

  7. Digital Instrumentation and Control working group (DICWG) - MDEP DICWG Programme Plan 2012 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-02-01

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) Digital Instrumentation and Controls Working Group (DICWG) was approved by MDEP's Policy Group in March 2008 and meets approximately 3 times a year. All MDEP members and the IAEA are invited to participate in this working group's activities. The DICWG's main objectives are as follows: - to document common positions in the DI and C safety systems design areas; - to harmonise and converge national codes, standards and regulatory requirements and practices in this area while recognising the sovereign rights and responsibilities of national regulators in carrying out their safety reviews of new reactor designs (see the DICWG programme plan for more details of the group's work). The DICWG interacts regularly with the following organisations: - IEC (International Electro-technical Commission) Subcommittee 45A, Instrumentation and Control of Nuclear Facilities; - IEEE (Institute of Electric and Electronics Engineers); - other organisations involved in the design of digital I and C safety systems for nuclear power plants. The DICWG reports its status to the MDEP Steering Technical Committee at the latter's thrice annual meetings. This document presents the 2012 and 2013 programme plan and its products: the Generic Common Position DICWG-02 on Software Tools; the Generic Common Position DICWG-03 on Verification and Validation throughout the Life Cycle of Safety Systems Using Digital Computers; the Generic Common Position DICWG-04 on Communication Independence; the Generic Common Position DICWG-05 on Treatment of Hardware Description Language (HDL) Programmed Devices for Use in Nuclear Safety Systems; the Generic Common Position DICWG-06 on Simplicity in Design; the Generic Common Position DICWG-08 on Impact of Cyber Security Features on Digital I and C Safety Systems

  8. Distributed Model Predictive Control over Multiple Groups of Vehicles in Highway Intelligent Space for Large Scale System

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Xiaofeng; Gao Feng; Xu Guoyan; Ding Nenggen; Cai Yao; Liu Jian Xing

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the three time warning distances for solving the large scale system of multiple groups of vehicles safety driving characteristics towards highway tunnel environment based on distributed model prediction control approach. Generally speaking, the system includes two parts. First, multiple vehicles are divided into multiple groups. Meanwhile, the distributed model predictive control approach is proposed to calculate the information framework of each group. Each group of optimi...

  9. Randomized controlled trial of traditional Chinese medicine (acupuncture and tuina) in cerebral palsy: part 1--any increase in seizure in integrated acupuncture and rehabilitation group versus rehabilitation group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Li-Ping; Han, Tong-Li; Zheng, Hua; Caspi, Opher; Wong, Virginia; Su, Yani; Shen, Kun-Ling

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to observe for any change in baseline seizure frequency with acupuncture in children with cerebral palsy. A randomized controlled study was conducted: Group I consisted of integrated acupuncture, tuina, and rehabilitation (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and hydrotherapy) for 12 weeks; and Group II consisted of rehabilitation (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and hydrotherapy) for 12 weeks. After a washout period of 4 weeks, Group II then received acupuncture and tuina for 12 weeks. Each subject received 5 daily acupuncture sessions per week for 12 weeks (total = 60 sessions). All children were assessed for any change in seizure frequency during treatment. One hundred and sixteen (116) children were recruited and randomized into Group I (N = 58) and Group II (N = 58). Thirty-three (33) children withdrew (9 from Group I and 24 from Group II). Of the remaining 83 children, Group I consisted of 49 and Group II of 34 children. For baseline, 5 children (6%; 5/83) had seizures. During phase 1 (12 weeks) of integrative treatment and subsequent 4-week follow-up, 3 children in Group I had seizures. Among those 3 children with seizures, 1 child with prior history of recurrent febrile seizure had 3 more recurrent febrile seizures during acupuncture treatment and 2 children without any prior history of seizures had new-onset seizures (1 with 3 recurrent febrile seizures and 1 with afebrile seizure). For Group I, 2 children with epilepsy had no increase in seizure frequency during acupuncture treatment. For Group II during the phase 2 acupuncture period, none had increase in seizure frequency. In both groups, 4 of 5 children (80%; 2 in Group I and 2 in Group II) with seizures had no increase in seizure frequency during acupuncture treatment and follow-up. The risk of increasing seizure is not increased with acupuncture treatment for cerebral palsy.

  10. Real-time event-based formation control of a group of VTOL-UAVs

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero Castellanos, Jose Fermi; Vega-Alonzo, A.; Marchand, Nicolas; Durand, Sylvain; Linares-Flores, J.; Mino-Aguilar, G.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the development of a collaborative event-based control applied to the problem of formation of a group of VTOL-UAVs (Vertical Takeoff and Landing, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles). Each VTOL-UAV decides, based on the difference of its current state (linear position and velocity) and its latest broadcast state, when it has to send a new value to its neighbours. The asymptotic convergence to average consensus or desired formation is depicted via a real-time i...

  11. Positive experience in introduction of functional group control at NPPs. What are the future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, O.M.; Antonyuk, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Experience in introduction of functional group control (FGC) on the basis of the ULU2-computer at the Rovno-3 NPP unit is generalized. A list of additional improvements realized during subsystems RY (steam generator blowing through) and TZ (special waste water system) introduction in the NPP reactor compartment is given. Reguirements to equipment, FGC actuating mechanisms, technological part of the design, necessary for FGC realization, are formulated. FGC relieves NPP operator of routine operations, reduces his fatigue and increases sharply the technological discipline. Rigorous standardization of designs and equipment and centralized management are reguired for FGC introduction at the operating NPPs

  12. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  13. Control of Wave Propagation and Effect of Kerr Nonlinearity on Group Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazrat, Ali; Iftikhar, Ahmed; Ziauddin

    2013-01-01

    We use four-level atomic system and control the wave propagation via forbidden decay rate. The Raman gain process becomes dominant on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) medium by increasing the forbidden decay rate via increasing the number of atoms [G.S. Agarwal and T.N. Dey, Phys. Rev. A 74 (2006) 043805 and K. Harada, T. Kanbashi, and M. Mitsunaga, Phys. Rev. A 73 (2006) 013803]. The behavior of wave propagation is dramatically changed from normal (subluminal) to anomalous (superluminal) dispersion by increasing the forbidden decay rate. The system can also give a control over the group velocity of the light propagating through the medium via Kerr field. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  14. Power and Type I Error Control for Univariate Comparisons in Multivariate Two-Group Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frane, Andrew V

    2015-01-01

    Simulations were conducted to evaluate the statistical power and Type I error control provided by several multiple-comparisons procedures in two-group designs. Stepwise Bonferroni-based procedures, which are known to control the familywise Type I error rate, tended to be more powerful than other methods but did not control the per-family Type I error rate (PFER). It is proposed that more attention should be given to the PFER, particularly with regard to these procedures. Only two methods controlled the PFER: the classical Bonferroni procedure and a modified version of MANOVA-protection. Which of these two procedures was more powerful depended on multiple factors that this article describes in detail and illustrates graphically. It is concluded that which multiple-comparisons procedure is preferable depends on the number of outcome variables, the importance of the PFER, the necessity of confidence intervals, and the extent to which significance in multiple variables is more valuable than significance in one variable.

  15. Safety Evaluation Report related to Hydrogen Control Owners Group assessment of Mark 3 containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.Y.; Kudrick, J.A.

    1990-10-01

    Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Section 50.44 Standards for Combustible Gas Control System in Light-Water-Cooled Power Reactors,'' requires that systems be provided to control hydrogen concentration in the containment atmosphere following an accident to ensure that containment integrity is maintained. The purpose of this report is to provide regulatory guidance to licensees with Mark III containments with regard to demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 50.44, Section (c)(3)(vi) and (c)(3)(vii). In this report, the staff provides its evaluation of the generic methodology proposed by the Hydrogen Control Owners Group. This generic methodology is documented in Topical Report HGN-112-NP, Generic Hydrogen Control Information for BWR/6 Mark III Containments.'' In addition, the staff has recommended that the vulnerability to interruption of power to the hydrogen igniters be evaluated further on a plant-specific basis as part of the individual plant examination of the plants with Mark III containments. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Comparison of thyroid function tests in alopecia totalis and universalis with control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Seirafi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alopecia areata (AA is a common cause of noncicatricial alopecia that occurs as a patchy, confluent or diffuse pattern. Exact etiologic factor of AA not yet recognized. Among many hypothesis, relationship between AA and autoimmune disease, especially thyroid disorders, was more interesting. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of thyroid test disorders in the patients with alopecia totalis and universalis in comparison with normal population.Methods: We analyzed medical records of 100 patients, including 44 male and 56 female in Tehran Razi Hospital from 1388 to 1389. The mean age was 24.1 years. Patients having totalis and universalis form of AA considered as case group while 100 normal person (42 male and 58 female with mean age of 26.1 who had not any form of AA considered as control group. Both groups had not any sign of thyroid disease at clinical examination according to their available medical records. Collected data were analyzed statistically in SPSS software 17th version. Results: In the majority of patients (54% the disease was manifested in the first two decades of life. History of atopia was seen in 9.8% of patient. Presence of the similar disease in first-degree family members was seen in 14.3% of patients. Abnormal T3, T4 and TSH were significantly higher in case group. Abnormal T3 uptake was higher in case group but not statistically significant. Conclusion: Paraclinical thyroid disorders were significantly higher in the alopecia areata patients than in normal population. There was no significant association between the age, sex and duration of disease and presence thyroid dysfunction.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and inhibition of cyclooxygenases 1 and 2: no relationship to the CYP2C9 genetic polymorphism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheiner, Julia; Meineke, Ingolf; Steinbach, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Roots, Ivar; Brockmöller, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    Aims The cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2C9 catalyses the 4′-hydroxylation of the nonsteroidal analgesic drug diclofenac in humans. We studied the influences of the known amino acid variants, CYP2C9*2 (Arg144Cys) and CYP2C9*3 (Ile359Leu), on diclofenac pharmacokinetics after a 50-mg oral dose of diclofenac in healthy volunteers. As a surrogate marker of diclofenac activity, the ex vivo formation of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2, which reflects COX-2 and COX-1 activity, was measured. Methods Genotyping was performed in 516 healthy volunteers to obtain 20 participants with all allelic combinations of the two CYP2C9 variants Arg144Cys (*2) and Ile359Leu (*3). Diclofenac and 4′-hydroxydiclofenac were quantified in plasma by reversed phase h.p.l.c. after oral intake of 50 mg diclofenac. Concentrations of thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured by immunoassays. Results There was no evidence of impaired metabolism of oral diclofenac in heterozygous and homozygous carriers of the CYP2C9 alleles *2 and *3 compared with the wild type (mean CL/F (95% CI) 20.5 (11, 30) l h−1 for *1/*1, 29.9 (19, 40) l h−1 for *1/*2, 30.0 (4, 56) l h−1 for *2/*2, 22.6 (12, 33) l h−1 for *1/*3, 23.5 (11, 37) l h−1 for *3/*3 and 37.3 (−15, 89) l h−1 in *2/*3). Furthermore, plasma concentrations of the metabolite 4′-hydroxydiclofenac were not lower in carriers of the CYP2C9 low-activity alleles *2 and *3 compared with carriers of the CYP2C9*1/*1 genotype. Marked diclofenac mediated inhibition of COX-1- and COX-2 activity was detected in all individuals independent of CYP2C9 genotype. Conclusions Polymorphisms of the CYP2C9 gene had no discernible effect on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of diclofenac. The question of whether enzymes other than CYP2C9 play a major role in diclofenac 4′-hydroxylation in vivo or whether 4′-hydroxylation is not a rate-limiting step in diclofenac elimination in vivo, or whether the effect of the CYP2C9

  18. Differentiation of African components of ancestry to stratify groups in a case-control study of a Brazilian urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbiger, Vivian N; Hirata, Mario H; Luchessi, Andre D; Genvigir, Fabiana D V; Cerda, Alvaro; Rodrigues, Alice C; Willrich, Maria A V; Arazi, Simone S; Dorea, Egidio L; Bernik, Marcia M S; Faludi, Andre A; Bertolami, Marcelo C; Santos, Carla; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio; Freire, Ana; Lareu, Maria Victoria; Phillips, Christopher; Porras-Hurtado, Liliana; Fondevila, Manuel; Hirata, Rosario D C

    2012-06-01

    Balancing the subject composition of case and control groups to create homogenous ancestries between each group is essential for medical association studies. We explored the applicability of single-tube 34-plex ancestry informative markers (AIM) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to estimate the African Component of Ancestry (ACA) to design a future case-control association study of a Brazilian urban sample. One hundred eighty individuals (107 case group; 73 control group) self-described as white, brown-intermediate or black were selected. The proportions of the relative contribution of a variable number of ancestral population components were similar between case and control groups. Moreover, the case and control groups demonstrated similar distributions for ACA 0.50 categories. Notably a high number of outlier values (23 samples) were observed among individuals with ACA population. This can be achieved using a straight forward multiplexed AIM-SNPs assay of highly discriminatory ancestry markers.

  19. Control of lymphatic filariasis in a hunter-gatherer group in Madang Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockarie, M J; Jenkins, C; Blakie, W M; Lagog, M; Alpers, M P

    2000-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) has been successfully administered to millions of people in established villages and towns, but little or no information exists on the use of this drug to control lymphatic filariasis in isolated seminomadic groups. We have studied the impact of biannual single-dose mass treatment to control filariasis in the Hagahai, an isolated hunter-gatherer, shifting horticulturist group in the fringe highlands of Papua New Guinea. Despite low treatment coverage, 6 mass treatment rounds significantly reduced the overall prevalence of infection with Wuchereria bancrofti, by antigen detection assay, from 55% before treatment to 34% after treatment. Obstructive filarial disease in the form of elephantiasis or hydrocele was not observed among the indigenous population. Anopheles species accounted for 91% of human-biting mosquitoes collected in the area. A total of 1126 mosquitoes were caught and dissected individually but none was infected with third-stage larvae (L3). Our findings support the phenomenon of facilitation, which predicts that Anopheles-transmitted lymphatic filariasis can be interrupted by mass chemotherapy alone in areas of low vector density and low transmission intensity as observed in the Hagahai.

  20. Evaluation of Psychopathology and Quality of Life in Patients with Anogenital Wart Compared to Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Nahidi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anogenital warts (AGW are one of the most common venereal diseases. Psychosocial complications and quality of life (QoL of AGW patients have been considered only in recent years. Herein, the QoL and psychopathology in patients with AGW are evaluated. In total, 37 AGW patients and 37 healthy controls were recruited in the present cross-sectional study. All participants were provided with the symptom checklist 90-R (SCL-90-R and short-form (SF-36 questionnaires. All analyses were performed using the SPSS software, version 16.0.1 for Windows. QoL was not significantly different between the study groups (P=0.12. The data showed that mental health, general health, and social functioning were significantly decreased in AGW patients (P<0.05. In addition, AGW patients were significantly more depressed and anxious than the control group (P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively. AGW has adverse effects on psychological and QoL elements of the infected individuals. Psychological factors should be carefully considered when treating a patient with the HPV virus; hence, referral to a psychiatrist seems mandatory in these cases.

  1. Randomized controlled pilot trial of a novel dissonance-based group treatment for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Butryn, Meghan; Menke, Katharine S; Marti, C Nathan

    2015-02-01

    The authors conducted a pilot trial of a new dissonance-based group eating disorder treatment designed to be a cost-effective front-line transdiagnostic treatment that could be more widely disseminated than extant individual or family treatments that are more expensive and difficult to deliver. Young women with a DSM-5 eating disorder (N = 72) were randomized to an 8-week dissonance-based Counter Attitudinal Therapy group treatment or a usual care control condition, completing diagnostic interviews and questionnaires at pre, post, and 2-month follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed that intervention participants showed greater reductions in outcomes than usual care controls in a multivariate multilevel model (χ(2)[6] = 34.1, p effects for thin-ideal internalization (d = .79), body dissatisfaction (d = 1.14), and blinded interview-assessed eating disorder symptoms (d = .95), and medium effects for dissonance regarding perpetuating the thin ideal (d = .65) and negative affect (d = .55). Midway through this pilot we refined engagement procedures, which was associated with increased effect sizes (e.g., the d for eating disorder symptoms increased from .51 to 2.30). This new group treatment produced large reductions in eating disorder symptoms, which is encouraging because it requires about 1/20th the therapist time necessary for extant individual and family treatments, and has the potential to provide a cost-effective and efficacious approach to reaching the majority of individuals with eating disorders who do not presently received treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of a brief versus standard group parenting program for toddler aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Lucy A; Hunt, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Physical aggression (PA) in the toddler years is common and developmentally normal, however, longitudinal research shows that frequent PA is highly stable and associated with long-term negative outcomes. Significant research has demonstrated the efficacy of parenting interventions for reducing externalizing behavior in children yet their typical length may overburden families, leading to low participation rates and high attrition rates. To increase the reach of parenting interventions and impact on the prevalence of externalizing behavior problems, brief interventions are needed. This RCT compared a standard (8 session) group Triple P to a brief (3 session) discussion group and a waitlist control for reducing toddler PA, dysfunctional parenting and related aspects of parent functioning. Sixty-nine self-referred families of toddlers with PA were randomized to the respective conditions. At post-assessment, families in the standard intervention had significantly lower levels of observed child aversive behavior, mother reports of PA and dysfunctional parenting, and higher levels of mother- and partner-rated behavioral self-efficacy than the waitlist control. Families in the standard intervention also had significantly lower levels mother-rated dysfunctional parenting than the brief intervention, and the brief intervention had significantly lower levels of mother-rated dysfunctional parenting than waitlist. There were no significant group differences at post-assessment for measures of parental negative affect or satisfaction with the partner relationship. By 6 month follow-up, families in the brief and standard intervention did not differ significantly on any measure. The implications of the findings to delivery of brief parenting interventions are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 43:291-303, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Water solubility of selected C9-C18 alkanes using a slow-stir technique: Comparison to structure - property models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letinski, Daniel J; Parkerton, Thomas F; Redman, Aaron D; Connelly, Martin J; Peterson, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous solubility is a fundamental physical-chemical substance property that strongly influences the distribution, fate and effects of chemicals upon release into the environment. Experimental water solubility was determined for 18 selected C9-C18 normal, branched and cyclic alkanes. A slow-stir technique was applied to obviate emulsion formation, which historically has resulted in significant overestimation of the aqueous solubility of such hydrophobic liquid compounds. Sensitive GC-MS based methods coupled with contemporary sample extraction techniques were employed to enable reproducible analysis of low parts-per billion aqueous concentrations. Water solubility measurements for most of the compounds investigated, are reported for the first time expanding available data for branched and cyclic alkanes. Measured water solubilities spanned four orders of magnitude ranging from 0.3 μg/L to 250 μg/L. Good agreement was observed for selected alkanes tested in this work and reported in earlier literature demonstrating the robustness of the slow-stir water solubility technique. Comparisons of measured alkane water solubilities were also made with those predicted by commonly used quantitative structure-property relationship models (e.g. SPARC, EPIWIN, ACD/Labs). Correlations are also presented between alkane measured water solubilities and molecular size parameters (e.g. molar volume, solvent accessible molar volume) affirming a mechanistic description of empirical aqueous solubility results and prediction previously reported for a more limited set of alkanes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of single-nucleotide polymorphisms as internal controls in prenatal diagnosis of fetal blood groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doescher, Andrea; Petershofen, Eduard K; Wagner, Franz F; Schunter, Markus; Müller, Thomas H

    2013-02-01

    Determination of fetal blood groups in maternal plasma samples critically depends on adequate amplification of fetal DNA. We evaluated the routine inclusion of 52 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as internal reference in our polymerase chain reaction (PCR) settings to obtain a positive internal control for fetal DNA. DNA from 223 plasma samples of pregnant women was screened for RHD Exons 3, 4, 5, and 7 in a multiplex PCR including 52 SNPs divided into four primer pools. Amplicons were analyzed by single-base extension and the GeneScan method in a genetic analyzer. Results of D screening were compared to standard RHD genotyping of amniotic fluid or real-time PCR of fetal DNA from maternal plasma. The vast majority of all samples (97.8%) demonstrated differences in maternal and fetal SNP patterns when tested with four primer pools. These differences were not observed in less than 2.2% of the samples most probably due to an extraction failure for adequate amounts of fetal DNA. Comparison of the fetal genotypes with independent results did not reveal a single false-negative case among samples (n = 42) with positive internal control and negative fetal RHD typing. Coamplification of 52 SNPs with RHD-specific sequences for fetal blood group determination introduces a valid positive control for the amplification of fetal DNA to avoid false-negative results. This new approach does not require a paternal blood sample. It may also be applicable to other assays for fetal genotyping in maternal blood samples. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. Mindfulness Training Improves Attentional Task Performance in Incarcerated Youth: A Group Randomized Controlled Intervention Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle R Leonard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness training (CBT/MT on attentional task performance in incarcerated adolescents. Attention is a cognitive system necessary for managing cognitive demands and regulating emotions. Yet persistent and intensive demands, such as those experienced during high-stress intervals like incarceration and the events leading to incarceration, may deplete attention resulting in cognitive failures, emotional disturbances, and impulsive behavior. We hypothesized that CBT/MT may mitigate these deleterious effects of high stress and protect against degradation in attention over the high-stress interval of incarceration. Using a group randomized controlled trial design, we randomly assigned dormitories of incarcerated youth, ages 16 to 18, to a CBT/MT intervention (youth n = 147 or an active control intervention (youth n = 117. Both arms received approximately 750 minutes of intervention in a small-group setting over a 3-5 week period. Youth in the CBT/MT arm also logged the amount of out-of-session time spent practicing MT exercises. The Attention Network Test was used to index attentional task performance at baseline and 4 months post-baseline. Overall, task performance degraded over time in all participants. The magnitude of performance degradation was significantly less in the CBT/MT vs. control arm. Further, within the CBT/MT arm, performance degraded over time in those with no outside-of-class practice time, but remained stable over time in those who practiced mindfulness exercises outside of the session meetings. Thus, these findings suggest that sufficient CBT/MT practice may protect against functional attentional impairments associated with high-stress intervals. Keywords: adolescent development, incarcerated adolescents, detained adolescents, stress, attention, mindfulness meditation.

  6. Elevator Group Supervisory Control System Using Genetic Network Programming with Macro Nodes and Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Yu, Lu; Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Markon, Sandor

    Elevator Group Supervisory Control System (EGSCS) is a very large scale stochastic dynamic optimization problem. Due to its vast state space, significant uncertainty and numerous resource constraints such as finite car capacities and registered hall/car calls, it is hard to manage EGSCS using conventional control methods. Recently, many solutions for EGSCS using Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies have been reported. Genetic Network Programming (GNP), which is proposed as a new evolutionary computation method several years ago, is also proved to be efficient when applied to EGSCS problem. In this paper, we propose an extended algorithm for EGSCS by introducing Reinforcement Learning (RL) into GNP framework, and an improvement of the EGSCS' performances is expected since the efficiency of GNP with RL has been clarified in some other studies like tile-world problem. Simulation tests using traffic flows in a typical office building have been made, and the results show an actual improvement of the EGSCS' performances comparing to the algorithms using original GNP and conventional control methods. Furthermore, as a further study, an importance weight optimization algorithm is employed based on GNP with RL and its efficiency is also verified with the better performances.

  7. Analysis of KIR gene frequencies and HLA class I genotypes in breast cancer and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobim, Maria Regina; Jobim, Mariana; Salim, Patrícia H; Portela, Pâmela; Jobim, Luiz Fernando; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Bittelbrunn, Ana Cristina; Menke, Carlos Henrique; Biazús, Jorge Villanova; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the main cause of cancer-related death among women, with a 0.5% increase in incidence per year. Natural killer cells (NK) are part of the innate immune system recognizing class I HLA molecules on target cells through their membrane receptors, called killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between the KIR genes and HLA alleles in patients with breast cancer and healthy controls. Two hundred thirty patients with breast cancer and 272 healthy controls were typed for HLA class I and KIR genes by PCR-SSO. When both groups were compared, the presence of inhibitory KIR2DL2 receptors was significantly higher in breast cancer patients than in healthy controls. No significant differences were found for HLA-C2 and HLA-Bw4. However, a higher frequency of HLA-C1 in breast cancer patients was observed. These findings suggest a potential role for the KIR gene system in breast cancer. Further studies to confirm this observation are warranted. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A controlled trial of active versus passive learning strategies in a large group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidet, Paul; Morgan, Robert O; O'Malley, Kimberly; Moran, Betty Jeanne; Richards, Boyd F

    2004-01-01

    To compare the effects of active and didactic teaching strategies on learning- and process-oriented outcomes. Controlled trial. After-hours residents' teaching session. Family and Community Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics residents at two academic medical institutions. We randomly assigned residents to two groups. One group received a didactic lecture on effective use of diagnostic tests; during this session, the teacher spent a full hour delivering content. The other group received the same content in a session structured to foster resident-to-resident interactions. In the latter session, the teacher spent only 30 minutes directly delivering content to residents. We measured residents' knowledge about and attitudes toward the session content before, immediately after, and one month after each session. We measured residents' perceptions of engagement and session value immediately after each session. We employed blinded observers who used a structured instrument to observe residents' activities during each session. Both teaching methods led to improvements in residents' scores on both knowledge and attitude assessments. The amount of improvement was not statistically different between groups. Residents in the active learning session perceived themselves, and were observed to be, more engaged with the session content and each other than residents in the didactic session. Residents in the didactic session perceived greater educational value from the session compared to residents in the active session. We reduced the amount of time spent in teacher-driven content delivery by 50 percent and covered the same amount of content with no detrimental effects on knowledge acquisition or attitude enhancement. Teaching strategies that foster learner-to-learner interactions will lead to more active engagement among learners, however, these learners may value the session less. Further research is needed to explore learner perceptions of the teaching process and other

  9. Alcohol Habits in Patients with Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain: Comparison with a Matched Control Group from the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin Bronner, Kerstin Birgitta; Wennberg, Peter; Kallmen, Hakan; Schult, Marie-Louise Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to describe alcohol habits in patients with chronic pain compared with those in a matched control group from the general Swedish population. In total, 100 consecutive patients enrolled were matched against 100 individuals in a control group on the basis of age and sex. Alcohol habits were measured using the Alcohol Use…

  10. Experience with multiple control groups in a large population-based case-control study on genetic and environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomp, E R; Van Stralen, K J; Le Cessie, S; Vandenbroucke, J P; Rosendaal, F R; Doggen, C J M

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the analytic and practical considerations in a large case-control study that had two control groups; the first control group consisting of partners of patients and the second obtained by random digit dialling (RDD). As an example of the evaluation of a general lifestyle factor, we present body mass index (BMI). Both control groups had lower BMIs than the patients. The distribution in the partner controls was closer to that of the patients, likely due to similar lifestyles. A statistical approach was used to pool the results of both analyses, wherein partners were analyzed with a matched analysis, while RDDs were analyzed without matching. Even with a matched analysis, the odds ratio with partner controls remained closer to unity than with RDD controls, which is probably due to unmeasured confounders in the comparison with the random controls as well as intermediary factors. However, when studying injuries as a risk factor, the odds ratio remained higher with partner control subjects than with RRD control subjects, even after taking the matching into account. Finally we used factor V Leiden as an example of a genetic risk factor. The frequencies of factor V Leiden were identical in both control groups, indicating that for the analyses of this genetic risk factor the two control groups could be combined in a single unmatched analysis. In conclusion, the effect measures with the two control groups were in the same direction, and of the same order of magnitude. Moreover, it was not always the same control group that produced the higher or lower estimates, and a matched analysis did not remedy the differences. Our experience with the intricacies of dealing with two control groups may be useful to others when thinking about an optimal research design or the best statistical approach.

  11. Experience with multiple control groups in a large population-based case–control study on genetic and environmental risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomp, E. R.; Van Stralen, K. J.; Le Cessie, S.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; Doggen, C. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the analytic and practical considerations in a large case–control study that had two control groups; the first control group consisting of partners of patients and the second obtained by random digit dialling (RDD). As an example of the evaluation of a general lifestyle factor, we present body mass index (BMI). Both control groups had lower BMIs than the patients. The distribution in the partner controls was closer to that of the patients, likely due to similar lifestyles. A statistical approach was used to pool the results of both analyses, wherein partners were analyzed with a matched analysis, while RDDs were analyzed without matching. Even with a matched analysis, the odds ratio with partner controls remained closer to unity than with RDD controls, which is probably due to unmeasured confounders in the comparison with the random controls as well as intermediary factors. However, when studying injuries as a risk factor, the odds ratio remained higher with partner control subjects than with RRD control subjects, even after taking the matching into account. Finally we used factor V Leiden as an example of a genetic risk factor. The frequencies of factor V Leiden were identical in both control groups, indicating that for the analyses of this genetic risk factor the two control groups could be combined in a single unmatched analysis. In conclusion, the effect measures with the two control groups were in the same direction, and of the same order of magnitude. Moreover, it was not always the same control group that produced the higher or lower estimates, and a matched analysis did not remedy the differences. Our experience with the intricacies of dealing with two control groups may be useful to others when thinking about an optimal research design or the best statistical approach. PMID:20549310

  12. A randomised controlled trial of caseload midwifery care: M@NGO (Midwives @ New Group practice Options)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Australia has an enviable record of safety for women in childbirth. There is nevertheless growing concern at the increasing level of intervention and consequent morbidity amongst childbearing women. Not only do interventions impact on the cost of services, they carry with them the potential for serious morbidities for mother and infant. Models of midwifery have proliferated in an attempt to offer women less fragmented hospital care. One of these models that is gaining widespread consumer, disciplinary and political support is caseload midwifery care. Caseload midwives manage the care of approximately 35-40 a year within a small Midwifery Group Practice (usually 4-6 midwives who plan their on call and leave within the Group Practice.) We propose to compare the outcomes and costs of caseload midwifery care compared to standard or routine hospital care through a randomised controlled trial. Methods/design A two-arm RCT design will be used. Women will be recruited from tertiary women's hospitals in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Women allocated to the caseload intervention will receive care from a named caseload midwife within a Midwifery Group Practice. Control women will be allocated to standard or routine hospital care. Women allocated to standard care will receive their care from hospital rostered midwives, public hospital obstetric care and community based general medical practitioner care. All midwives will collaborate with obstetricians and other health professionals as necessary according to the woman's needs. Discussion Data will be collected at recruitment, 36 weeks antenatally, six weeks and six months postpartum by web based or postal survey. With 750 women or more in each of the intervention and control arms the study is powered (based on 80% power; alpha 0.05) to detect a difference in caesarean section rates of 29.4 to 22.9%; instrumental birth rates from 11.0% to 6.8%; and rates of admission to neonatal intensive care of all neonates from 9

  13. Covalently-controlled properties by design in group IV graphane analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shishi; Arguilla, Maxx Q; Cultrara, Nicholas D; Goldberger, Joshua E

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The isolation of graphene has sparked a renaissance in the study of two-dimensional materials. This led to the discovery of new and unique phenomena such as extremely high carrier mobility, thermal conductivity, and mechanical strength not observed in the parent 3D structure. While the emergence of these phenomena has spurred widespread interest in graphene, the paradox between the high-mobility Fermi-Dirac electronic structure and the need for a sizable band gap has challenged its application in traditional semiconductor devices. While graphene is a fascinating and promising material, the limitation of its electronic structure has inspired researchers to explore other 2D materials beyond graphene. In this Account, we summarize our recent work on a new family of two-dimensional materials based on sp(3)-hybridized group IV elements. Ligand-terminated Si, Ge, and Sn graphane analogues are an emerging and unique class of two-dimensional materials that offer the potential to tailor the structure, stability, and properties. Compared with bulk Si and Ge, a direct and larger band gap is apparent in group IV graphane analogues depending on the surface ligand. These materials can be synthesized in gram-scale quantities and in thin films via the topotactic deintercalation of layered Zintl phase precursors. Few layers and single layers can be isolated via manual exfoliation and deintercalation of epitaxially grown Zintl phases on Si/Ge substrates. The presence of a fourth bond on the surface of the layers allows various surface ligand termination with different organic functional groups achieved via conventional soft chemical routes. In these single-atom thick materials, the electronic structure can be systematically controlled by varying the identities of the main group elements and by attaching different surface terminating ligands. In contrast to transition metal dichalcogenides, the weaker interlayer interaction allows the direct band gap single layer

  14. Dietary food groups intake and cooking methods associations with pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Zeinab; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Zinab, Hassan Eini; Farrokhzad, Solmaz; Rahimi, Roya; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2015-05-01

    The role of dietary habits in the etiology of pancreatic cancer (PC) has not yet been well elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of the frequency of different food groups' intake and their cooking methods with PC risk based on a well-designed case-control study. A case-control study including 307 PC patients and 322 controls referred to four tertiary endosonography centers was conducted from January 2011 to January 2014 to compare the frequency intake of different food items and their cooking methods between cases and controls. After adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, years of education, diabetes and alcohol history, smoking status, and opium use, a significant direct relationship was observed between PC risk and intake frequency (time/week) of bread (OR = 1.50; 95 % CI 1.05-2.13; p-value 0.024), rice (OR = 2.10; 95 % CI 1.15-3.82; p for trend 0.034), and red meat (OR = 2.25; 95 % CI 1.22-4.14; p for trend 0.033) (time/day), when comparing the highest category of intake frequency with the lowest, while increasing frequency of fish consumption was associated with a lower risk of PC (OR = 0.93; 95 % CI0.59-1.47; p for trend 0.009). Increasing consumption of barbecuing red meat and deep fried vegetables was associated with 67 % and 70 % increased risk of PC (p-value 0.025 and 0.006, respectively). Our results indicate that increased frequency of intake of bread, rice, and red meat (especially barbecued) and deep fried vegetables can aggregate PC risk, while increased frequency of fish consumption can protect against PC. However, more studies are still needed.

  15. [Comparative study of some clinical and laboratory indicators in a group of patients using wells as source of drinking water and a control group using safe water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, L; Ciochină, D A

    2011-01-01

    In time, well water, as a source of drinking and coking water, with physical-chemical, bacteriological, and biological indicators suggestive of alteration in water potability, determines complex, sometimes irreversible, metabolic disorders. Sixty individuals residing in a rural community were divided into 2 groups: study group -30 subjects using well water, and control group--30 subjects using safe water. For the study group the selection criteria were: age, sex, use of well water as drinking and cooking water, history suggestive of chronic poisoning (pregnancy course, birth weight, susceptibility to infectious agents, and current chronic diseases). In the study group, gestosis, prematurity, and altered body mass index are more frequent as compared to the subjects in the control group. The identified laboratory changes indicate moderate anemia, hepatic cytolysis, dyslipidemia, presence of nitrites in urine, and positive urine cultures. Long-term use of water with mineral constituents in excess, absent, or inadequate, the direct biological and chemical water pollution, or most frequently the indirect pollution through the soil determine, in time, complex, sometimes irreversible, metabolic disorders.

  16. Worksite Environmental Interventions for Obesity Prevention and Control: Evidence from Group Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Isabel Diana; Becerra, Adan; Chin, Nancy P

    2014-06-01

    Worksites provide multiple advantages to prevent and treat obesity and to test environmental interventions to tackle its multiple causal factors. We present a literature review of group-randomized and non-randomized trials that tested worksite environmental, multiple component interventions for obesity prevention and control paying particular attention to the conduct of formative research prior to intervention development. The evidence on environmental interventions on measures of obesity appears to be strong since most of the studies have a low (4/8) and unclear (2/8) risk of bias. Among the studies reviewed whose potential risk of bias was low, the magnitude of the effect was modest and sometimes in the unexpected direction. None of the four studies describing an explicit formative research stage with clear integration of findings into the intervention was able to demonstrate an effect on the main outcome of interest. We present alternative explanation for the findings and recommendations for future research.

  17. A national study of the psychological impact of bank robbery with a randomzed control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite, numerous annual bank robberies worldwide, research in the psychological sequelae of bank robberies is limited. Thus, research needs to investigate the prevalence of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in bank employees, whilst comparing how bank...... also investigated several other forms of psychological sequelae and related factors in bank robbery victim for instance prior traumatic experience, anxiety symptoms, and general traumatic symptoms. The results were compared to a randomized control group of bank employees never exposed to bank robbery...... such as prior traumatic exposure. A preliminary conclusion is that a bank robbery is a traumatizing event for employees, especially when disregarding the avoidance symptoms. This seems to be particularly pertinent in relation to the acute phrase following the bank robbery....

  18. Immobilization induces changes in presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    Neural plasticity occurs throughout adult life in response to maturation, use and disuse. Recent studies have documented that H-reflex amplitudes increase following a period of immobilization. To elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the increase in H-reflex size following immobilization we...... immobilized the left foot and ankle joint for 2 weeks in 12 able-bodied subjects. Disynaptic reciprocal inhibition of soleus (SOL) motoneurones and presynaptic control of SOL group Ia afferents was measured before and after the immobilization as well as following 2 weeks of recovery. Following immobilization...... inhibition of SOL Ia afferents and taken together suggest that GABAergic presynaptic inhibition of the SOL Ia afferents is decreased following 2 weeks of immobilization. The depression of the SOL H-reflex when evoked at intervals shorter than 10 s (homosynaptic post-activation depression) also decreased...

  19. Does chess instruction improve mathematical problem-solving ability? Two experimental studies with an active control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Giovanni; Gobet, Fernand

    2017-12-01

    It has been proposed that playing chess enables children to improve their ability in mathematics. These claims have been recently evaluated in a meta-analysis (Sala & Gobet, 2016, Educational Research Review, 18, 46-57), which indicated a significant effect in favor of the groups playing chess. However, the meta-analysis also showed that most of the reviewed studies used a poor experimental design (in particular, they lacked an active control group). We ran two experiments that used a three-group design including both an active and a passive control group, with a focus on mathematical ability. In the first experiment (N = 233), a group of third and fourth graders was taught chess for 25 hours and tested on mathematical problem-solving tasks. Participants also filled in a questionnaire assessing their meta-cognitive ability for mathematics problems. The group playing chess was compared to an active control group (playing checkers) and a passive control group. The three groups showed no statistically significant difference in mathematical problem-solving or metacognitive abilities in the posttest. The second experiment (N = 52) broadly used the same design, but the Oriental game of Go replaced checkers in the active control group. While the chess-treated group and the passive control group slightly outperformed the active control group with mathematical problem solving, the differences were not statistically significant. No differences were found with respect to metacognitive ability. These results suggest that the effects (if any) of chess instruction, when rigorously tested, are modest and that such interventions should not replace the traditional curriculum in mathematics.

  20. Placebo versus Best-Available-Therapy Control Group in Clinical Trials for Pharmacologic Therapies: Which Is Better?

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    There are valid scientific and ethical considerations for using a control group in a clinical trial. Placebo-controlled trials are justifiable when they are supported by sound methodologic consideration and when their use does not expose research participants to excessive risk of harm. Consideration should be given to “best available therapy” control groups in the evaluation of a new therapy or intervention over an existing therapy. Investigators should keep in mind that one should not sacrif...

  1. Traditional microscopy instruction versus process-oriented virtual microscopy instruction: a naturalistic experiment with control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Laura; Nivala, Markus; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Björk, Pasi; Säljö, Roger

    2011-03-30

    Virtual microscopy is being introduced in medical education as an approach for learning how to interpret information in microscopic specimens. It is, however, far from evident how to incorporate its use into existing teaching practice. The aim of the study was to explore the consequences of introducing virtual microscopy tasks into an undergraduate pathology course in an attempt to render the instruction more process-oriented. The research questions were: 1) How is virtual microscopy perceived by students? 2) Does work on virtual microscopy tasks contribute to improvement in performance in microscopic pathology in comparison with attending assistant-led demonstrations only? During a one-week period, an experimental group completed three sets of virtual microscopy homework assignments in addition to attending demonstrations. A control group attended the demonstrations only. Performance in microscopic pathology was measured by a pre-test and a post-test. Student perceptions of regular instruction and virtual microscopy were collected one month later by administering the Inventory of Intrinsic Motivation and open-ended questions. The students voiced an appreciation for virtual microscopy for the purposes of the course and for self-study. As for learning gains, the results indicated that learning was speeded up in a subgroup of students consisting of conscientious high achievers. The enriched instruction model may be suited as such for elective courses following the basic course. However, the instructional model needs further development to be suited for basic courses.

  2. Subjective quality of life of outpatients with diabetes: comparison with family caregivers' impressions and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadalla, Abdel W; Ohaeri, Jude U; Tawfiq, Adel M; Al-Awadi, Shafika A

    2006-05-01

    There is a paucity of studies on comparison of quality of life (QOL) of type-1 and type-2 diabetes patients, and the impact of family caregivers' impressions on the QOL of patients. To assess the subjective QOL of Sudanese diabetics using the WHOQOL-Bref, compared with a general population sample; examine caregiver-patient concordance; and assess the variables that impact on QOL. The responses of 105 outpatients with type-1 diabetes and 136 with type-2 diabetes were compared with their family caregivers' impressions and 139 general population subjects. Patients were predominantly dissatisfied with their life circumstances. Type-1 diabetics had significantly lowest QOL scores, while the control group had highest scores. Having additional medical problems; having diminished sexual desire; and being young, unemployed and single were associated with poor QOL, but illness duration was not. Type-2 diabetics had lesser concordance with caregivers. The only predictor of patients' QOL was the caregivers' impression of patients' QOL. Caregivers' impression of patients' QOL impacted on outcome. Caregiver education is, therefore, important. The factors associated with QOL indicate a group that needs focused attention. The good QOL for type-2 and nonsignificance of illness duration encourage therapeutic optimism.

  3. Influence of VKORC1 and CYP2C9 Polymorphisms on Daily Acenocoumarol Dose Requirement in South Indian Patients With Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, S R; Bharath, G; Manjunath, C N; Christopher, Rita

    2017-10-01

    Chronic rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients who undergo valve replacement with mechanical valves require lifelong anticoagulation. Acenocoumarol, a vitamin K antagonist has a narrow therapeutic range and wide inter-individual variability. Our aim was to investigate the influence of polymorphisms of VKORC1 and CYP2C9 genes on the mean daily dose requirement of acenocoumarol. 205 chronic RHD patients, with mechanical heart valves and on acenocoumarol therapy, were recruited. Genotyping for VKORC1 (-1639G>A and 1173C>T) and CYP2C9 (*2 & *3 alleles) polymorphisms was done by PCR-RFLP. There was complete linkage disequilibrium between VKORC1 polymorphisms (r 2 = 0.98, D' = 1.0, LOD = 74.02). VKORC1 genotype distribution for GG/CC, GA/CT, and AA/TT were 57.6%, 36.1%, and 6.3%, respectively. CYP2C9 genotype distribution for *1/*1, *1/*3, *1/*2, *2/*2, and *2/*3 were 78.5%, 14.1%, 6.3%, 0.5%, and 0.5%, respectively. Patients with a wild type of both VKORC1 (-1639GG and 1173CC) and CYP2C9 gene variants required higher acenocoumarol dose compared to those with mutant genotype ( P = 0.023 and P = 0.008 respectively). On combined genotype analysis, patients having a combination of wild type of VKORC1 with wild type of CYP2C9 (44.4%) required higher daily dose compared to patients bearing heterozygous VKORC1 (-1639GA & 1173CT) with wild type of CYP2C9 (30.2%, P = 0.008). Presence of a mutant allele of VKORC1 (-1639A & 1173T) and CYP2C9 genes increased the odds of requiring a lower mean dosage of acenocoumarol. Studying the combination of genotypes in RHD patients could predict acenocoumarol dose requirement more accurately.

  4. Food groups and the risk of colorectal cancer: results from a Jordanian case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Mweis, Suhad S; Tayyem, Reema F; Shehadah, Ihab; Bawadi, Hiba A; Agraib, Lana M; Bani-Hani, Kamal E; Al-Jaberi, Tareq; Al-Nusairr, Majed

    2015-07-01

    The role of diet in colorectal cancer (CRC) in Jordan has not been studied previously. This study aimed at examining the association between food groups (including grains, fruits, vegetables, milk, and meat and legumes) and CRC risk in Jordan. We compared intakes of the different food groups among CRC patients (n=167) and matched controls (n=240) by age, sex, occupation, and marital status. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of quartiles of intakes of the different food groups with CRC risk. In addition, the association of selected food items with CRC risk was examined. Odds ratios (ORs) for the fourth versus the first quartile of intake were 2.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-6.08] for grains, 1.66 (95% CI: 0.81-3.40) for vegetables, 0.55 (95% CI: 0.26-1.16) for fruits, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.46-1.97) for milk, and 1.43 (95% CI: 0.68-2.98) for meat and legumes. In a comparison of the highest with the lowest weekly frequency of consumption, there was a direct association between the risk of CRC and the frequency of consumption of chicken (OR=2.52, 95% CI: 1.33-4.77). An increase in risk was observed with increased consumption of white bread (OR=3.13, 95% CI: 1.18-9.25), whereas consumption of whole bread was associated with a decreased risk for CRC (OR=0.32, 95% CI: 0.12-0.84). Our results support a role of diet in CRC. Direct associations were found for grains, white bread, and chicken, whereas an inverse relation was reported for whole bread.

  5. Emerging new applications of nucleonic control systems in industry. Report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    This TECDOC presents a comprehensive review of the current status and future prospects of nucleonic gauge methodology and technology applied as nucleonic control systems (NCS) to a broad spectrum of industrial engineering processes. It presents the results of the IAEA's Advisory Group Meeting on Emerging New Applications of Nucleonic Control Systems in Industry, which was convened to discuss and evaluate the present 'state-of-the-art' of this field. The TECDOC provides fundamental information on the principles of nucleonic gauges, their design, safe operation and applications. This covers both the more traditional and well established applications and methods as well as trends on emerging applications of new nucleonic gauges in modem industry. A specific review is presented of nucleonic gauge methodology and technology as applied in international priority industrial sectors such as the petroleum industry, mining and mineral ore processing, material construction and environment. This information on nucleonic gauges, including the most relevant recent achievements and developments, effectively enhances and often replaces the existing related publications, many of which have lost their relevance. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the thirteen individual country reports included in this TECDOC

  6. Schistosomiasis Sustained Control Program in Ethnic Groups Around Ninefescha (Eastern Senegal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, Monique; Dioukhane, Elhadji M; Ndao, Babacar; Diedhiou, Kemo; Diawara, Lamine; Talla, Idrissa; Vernet, Charlotte; Bessin, François; Barbier, Dominique; Dewavrin, Patrick; Klotz, Francis; Georges, Pierre

    2016-09-07

    Schistosomiasis is the second most significant parasitic disease in children in several African countries. For this purpose, the "Programme National de Lutte contre les Bilharzioses" (PNLB) was developed in partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO) to control this disease in Senegal. However, geographic isolation of Bedik ethnic groups challenged implementation of the key elements of the schistosomiasis program in eastern Senegal, and therefore, a hospital was established in Ninefescha to improve access to health care as well as laboratory support for this population. The program we have implemented from 2008 in partnership with the PNLB/WHO involved campaigns to 1) evaluate schistosomiasis prevalence in children of 53 villages around Ninefescha hospital, 2) perform a mass drug administration following the protocol established by the PNLB in school-aged children, 3) monitor annual prevalence, 4) implement health education campaigns, and 5) oversee the building of latrines. This campaign led to a drop in schistosomiasis prevalence but highlighted that sustainable schistosomiasis control by praziquantel treatment, awareness of the use of latrines, and inhabitants' voluntary commitment to the program are crucial to improve Schistosoma elimination. Moreover, this study revealed that preschool-aged children, for whom praziquantel was not recommended until 2014 in Senegal, constituted a significant reservoir for the parasite. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. ABO blood group is a risk factor for coronary artery disease in patients with poor blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bingyang; Wu, Naqiong; Zhu, Chenggang; Gao, Ying; Guo, Yuanlin; Qing, Ping; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Yao; Dong, Qian; Li, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    Few studies had examined the role of ABO blood groups on CAD in hypertensive patients with different blood pressure (BP) controls. A total of 2708 patients with primary hypertension (HTN) were consecutively enrolled and underwent coronary angiography (CAG) due to angina-like chest pain. The severity of coronary artery stenosis was assessed by Gensini score (GS). Patients were divided into two groups due to results of CAG: HTN with CAD (n = 2185) and HTN without CAD (n = 523). Poor BP control was defined as systolic BP (SBP) ≥ mean in the study. Multivariable regression analysis was used to determine the potential impact of ABO blood groups on risk of the presence and severity of CAD. Compared to HTN without CAD group, the percentage of A blood group was statistically higher and O blood group was significantly lower in HTN with CAD group. Moreover, percentage of the angiography-proven CAD was higher in A blood group than that in non-A blood group (p < 0.05). After adjusting for confounding factors, A blood group was independently associated with CAD (odds ratio (OR): 1.422; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.017-1.987; p = 0.039) and GS (β = 0.055, p = 0.046) in patients with poor BP control. A blood group was an independent risk factor for the presence and severity of CAD in hypertensive patients with poor BP control.

  8. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-Esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ae-Na; Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents), Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers) and Rosenberg Self-...

  9. The Comparison of Sagittal Spinopelvic Parameters between Young Adult Patients with L5 Spondylolysis and Age-Matched Control Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Min; Choi, Ha Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare spinopelvic parameters in young adult patients with spondylolysis to those in age-matched patients without spondylolysis and investigate the clinical impact of sagittal spinopelvic parameters in patients with L5 spondylolysis. Methods From 2009 to 2012, a total of 198 young adult male patients with spondylolysis were identified. Eighty age-matched patients without spondylolysis were also selected. Standing lateral films that included both hip joints were obtained for each subject. Pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis angle, sacral inclination, lumbosacral angle, and sacral table angle were measured in both groups. A comparative study of the spinopelvic parameters of these two groups was performed using SPSS 15.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Among the aforementioned spinopelvic parameters, PI, SS and STA were significantly different between patients with spondylolysis and those without spondylolysis. PI and SS were higher in the spondylolysis group than in the control group, but STA was lower in the spondylolysis group than in the control group. Conclusion PI and SS were higher in the spondylolysis group than in the control group, but STA was lower in the spondylolysis group than in the control group. Patients with spondylolysis have low STA at birth, which remains constant during growth; a low STA translates into high SS. As a result, PI is also increased in accordance with SS. Therefore, we suggest that STA is an important etiologic factor in young adult patients with L5 spondylolysis. PMID:24278649

  10. ABO blood group and esophageal carcinoma risk: from a case-control study in Chinese population to meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Xiaopeng; Wei, Min; Lin, Tianlong; Zhang, Yixin; Jiang, Songqi; Wang, Qiang; Cao, Ziang; Shi, Minxin

    2014-10-01

    The association between ABO blood group and the risk of esophageal carcinoma (EC) in previously published studies is uncertain and conflicting. The aim of the current study was to determine the correlation of ABO blood group with EC risk via a case-control study and meta-analysis. We performed a population-based case-control study of 3,595 cases and 41,788 controls in Chinese population to evaluate the association between ABO blood group and EC risk. Then, a comprehensive meta-analysis combining our original data and previously published data was conducted to clearly discern the real relationship. The strength of association was measured by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In our case-control study, the risk of EC in blood group B was significantly higher than that in non-B groups (A, O, and AB) (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.09-1.21). Compared with non-O groups (A, B, and AB), individuals with blood group O demonstrated a reduced risk of EC (OR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.85-0.94). The meta-analysis also indicated that blood group B was associated with significantly higher EC risk (OR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.10-1.31), and people with blood group O had a decreased EC risk (OR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.90-0.99). Neither the case-control study nor the meta-analysis produced any significant association of blood group A or AB with EC risk. Results from our case-control study and the followed meta-analysis confirmed that there was an increased risk of EC in blood group B individuals, whereas a decreased risk of EC was observed in blood group O individuals.

  11. Efficacy of the Group Music and Imagery method (GrpMI) for women suffering from fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2018-01-01

    the efficacy of Group Music and Imagery (GrpMI), including relaxation, music listening and spontaneous imagery, for subjective psychological wellbeing, functional capacity and health, pain perception, anxiety and depression in women with FM. Methods: Fifty-six women aged 35 to 65 (M = 51.3) diagnosed with FM...... groups found a significant increase in psychological wellbeing and a reduction in the rest of the variables, whereas the control groups only showed decreases in trait anxiety and trait depression. No significant differences were observed in the control groups at the follow-up, while the experimental...... groups maintained the positive effects concerning the impact of FM on functional capacity and health, present pain intensity, trait anxiety and trait depression. Inter-group analyses found in the experimental groups significantly higher scores for psychological wellbeing and lower scores for state...

  12. Interdependent and Independent Group Contingencies with Immediate and Delayed Reinforcement for Controlling Classroom Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Pamela Lynne; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the use of interdependent group contingency for on-task and disruptive behavior along with independent group contingency for disruptive behavior to prevent children from spoiling group reinforcement. Results demonstrated that the combination of group contingency systems and immediate and delayed consequences were effective in reducing…

  13. Intensive Versus Distributed Aphasia Therapy: A Nonrandomized, Parallel-Group, Dosage-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Jade; Copland, David; McKinnon, Eril; Burfein, Penni; O'Brien, Kate; Farrell, Anna; Rodriguez, Amy D

    2015-08-01

    Most studies comparing different levels of aphasia treatment intensity have not controlled the dosage of therapy provided. Consequently, the true effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation remains unknown. Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy is an intensive, comprehensive aphasia program. We investigated the efficacy of a dosage-controlled trial of Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy, when delivered in an intensive versus distributed therapy schedule, on communication outcomes in participants with chronic aphasia. Thirty-four adults with chronic, poststroke aphasia were recruited to participate in an intensive (n=16; 16 hours per week; 3 weeks) versus distributed (n=18; 6 hours per week; 8 weeks) therapy program. Treatment included 48 hours of impairment, functional, computer, and group-based aphasia therapy. Distributed therapy resulted in significantly greater improvements on the Boston Naming Test when compared with intensive therapy immediately post therapy (P=0.04) and at 1-month follow-up (P=0.002). We found comparable gains on measures of participants' communicative effectiveness, communication confidence, and communication-related quality of life for the intensive and distributed treatment conditions at post-therapy and 1-month follow-up. Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy resulted in superior clinical outcomes on measures of language impairment when delivered in a distributed versus intensive schedule. The therapy progam had a positive effect on participants' functional communication and communication-related quality of life, regardless of treatment intensity. These findings contribute to our understanding of the effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation and have important clinical implications for service delivery models. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-C-9:1 Main Process Sewer Collection Line, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-06-11

    The 100-C-9:1 main process sewer pipeline, also known as the twin box culvert, was a dual reinforced process sewer that collected process effluent from the 183-C and 190-C water treatment facilities, discharging at the 132-C-2 Outfall. For remedial action purposes, the 100-C-9:1 waste site was subdivided into northern and southern sections. The 100-C-9:1 subsite has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  15. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ae-Na; Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents), Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers) and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control.

  16. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-Esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae-Na Choi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents, Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control.

  17. Variations in foot posture and mobility between individuals with patellofemoral pain and those in a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPoil, Thomas G; Warren, Meghan; Vicenzino, Bill; Cornwall, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    We sought to determine whether foot posture and foot mobility were increased in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome compared with individuals in a control group. A nested case-control design was used with two controls matched to each patient by sex and age (±1 year). Participants included 43 individuals with a history of unilateral or bilateral patellofemoral pain syndrome and 86 participants in a control group. Data collected included height, weight, and five different measures of foot height and width in weightbearing and nonweightbearing that have been previously shown to have high levels of reliability. Individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome were found to be four times more likely (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.45-11.32) to have a larger-than-normal difference between nonweightbearing and weightbearing arch height compared with those in the control group. The mean values for difference in arch height and foot mobility magnitude were also statistically significant between the patient and control groups. Foot posture, as determined using the arch height ratio, was not significant between groups (odds ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-2.61). Although foot posture may not be different between individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls, foot mobility assessed using difference in arch height and foot mobility magnitude is different between the two groups.

  18. Research Group Introduction : Mechanical Control Engineering Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, Shibaura Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    内村, 裕

    Mechanical Control Engineering Laboratory focuses on the control theory and implementation for the robotic applications. The research themes include network based tele-operation, mobile robots control for network relay, autonomous outdoor mobile robot and biped robot.

  19. Alcohol prevention at sporting events: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbeej, Natalie; Elgán, Tobias H; Jalling, Camilla; Gripenberg, Johanna

    2016-06-06

    Alcohol intoxication and overserving of alcohol at sporting events are of great concern, given the relationships between alcohol consumption, public disturbances, and violence. During recent years this matter has been on the agenda for Swedish policymakers, authorities and key stakeholders, with demands that actions be taken. There is promising potential for utilizing an environmental approach to alcohol prevention as a strategy to reduce the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at sporting events. Examples of prevention strategies may be community mobilization, Responsible Beverage Service training, policy work, and improved controls and sanctions. This paper describes the design of a quasi-experimental control group study to examine the effects of a multi-component community-based alcohol intervention at matches in the Swedish Premier Football League. A baseline assessment was conducted during 2015 and at least two follow-up assessments will be conducted in 2016 and 2017. The two largest cities in Sweden are included in the study, with Stockholm as the intervention area and Gothenburg as the control area. The setting is Licensed Premises (LP) inside and outside Swedish football arenas, in addition to arena entrances. Spectators are randomly selected and invited to participate in the study by providing a breath alcohol sample as a proxy for Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). Actors are hired and trained by an expert panel to act out a standardized scene of severe pseudo-intoxication. Four types of cross-sectional data are generated: (i) BAC levels among ≥ 4 200 spectators, frequency of alcohol service to pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to purchase alcohol at LP (ii) outside the arenas (≥200 attempts) and (iii) inside the arenas (≥ 200 attempts), and (iv) frequency of security staff interventions towards pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to enter the arenas (≥ 200 attempts). There is an urgent need nationally and internationally to

  20. Food groups and renal cell carcinoma: results from a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Suzanne M Dolwick; Theis, Ryan P; Burr, Deborah; Benardot, Dan; Siddiqui, Tariq; Asal, Nabih R

    2009-04-01

    The role of diet in renal cell carcinoma risk has been inconclusive. This study uses an integrative approach to assess the role of food groups and food items in renal cell carcinoma risk. A case-control study was conducted from 2003-2006. Incident cases (n=335) were identified from hospital records and the Florida cancer registry, and population controls (n=337) frequency matched by age (+/-5 years), sex, and race were identified through random-digit dialing. Eating habits were assessed through the use of the 70-item Block food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and tests for trends were calculated using logistic regression, controlled for age, sex, race, income, body mass index, and pack-years of smoking. Decreased renal cell carcinoma risk was observed among the total sample and for men for vegetable consumption (all subjects: OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35, 0.88; men: OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25, 0.96) but not for fruit consumption. Tomato consumption decreased renal cell carcinoma risk for the total population and for men (all subjects: OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.31, 0.81; men: OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.24, 0.95). Increased risk of renal cell carcinoma was observed among all subjects and among women with increased consumption of red meat (all subjects: OR 4.43, 95% CI 2.02, 9.75; women: OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.60, 5.79). White bread consumption increased renal cell carcinoma risk among women only (OR 3.05, 95% CI 1.50, 6.20), as did total dairy consumption (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.21, 4.60). The protective role of vegetables and the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma with meat consumption are supported. The protective role of fruits is not. Novel findings include the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma with white bread and white potato consumption and the decreased risk of renal cell carcinoma with tomato consumption.

  1. CYP2C9 and VKORC1 in therapeutic dosing and safety of acenocoumarol treatment: implication for clinical practice in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, Reka; Sipeky, Csilla; Nagy, Lajos; Balogh, Sandor; Melegh, Bela

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the contribution of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 to acenocoumarol (AC) dose variability, bleeding events in Hungary. The study recruited 117 patients on long-term AC therapy (INR 2-3), and 510 healthy individuals to model the findings. Patients were genotyped for alleles proved to affect lower AC overdose CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, VKORC1*2. Additionally, we tested VKORC1*3, VKORC1*4 to examine their effect in patients with higher AC requirements. Most impact on dose reduction is accountable for CYP2C9*2/*3 (59%) and for VKORC1*2/*2 (45.5%), and on dose increase for newly evaluated VKORC1*3/*4 (22.5%) diplotypes. VKORC1*3 and *4 alleles seem to balance the dose-reducing effect of VKORC1*2 allele. Being a carrier of combination of VKORC1*2 and CYP2C9*2,*3 polymorphisms, rather than of one of these SNPs, is associated with higher risk of over-anticoagulation (up to 34.3%) in long-term AC treatment. The pharmacogenetic dosing algorithm involving VKORC1, CYP2C9 diplotypes and age explains 30.4% of AC dosing variability (p<6.10×10 -9 ). Correlation between the studied diplotypes and bleeding events could not be revealed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. CYP2C9 genotype vs. metabolic phenotype for individual drug dosing--a correlation analysis using flurbiprofen as probe drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vogl

    Full Text Available Currently, genotyping of patients for polymorphic enzymes responsible for metabolic elimination is considered a possibility to adjust drug dose levels. For a patient to profit from this procedure, the interindividual differences in drug metabolism within one genotype should be smaller than those between different genotypes. We studied a large cohort of healthy young adults (283 subjects, correlating their CYP2C9 genotype to a simple phenotyping metric, using flurbiprofen as probe drug. Genotyping was conducted for CYP2C9*1, *2, *3. The urinary metabolic ratio MR (concentration of CYP2C9-dependent metabolite divided by concentration of flurbiprofen determined two hours after flurbiprofen (8.75 mg administration served as phenotyping metric. Linear statistical models correlating genotype and phenotype provided highly significant allele-specific MR estimates of 0.596 for the wild type allele CYP2C9*1, 0.405 for CYP2C9*2 (68 % of wild type, and 0.113 for CYP2C9*3 (19 % of wild type. If these estimates were used for flurbiprofen dose adjustment, taking 100 % for genotype *1/*1, an average reduction to 84 %, 60 %, 68 %, 43 %, and 19 % would result for genotype *1/*2, *1/*3, *2/*2, *2/*3, and *3/*3, respectively. Due to the large individual variation within genotypes with coefficients of variation ≥ 20 % and supposing the normal distribution, one in three individuals would be out of the average optimum dose by more than 20 %, one in 20 would be 40 % off. Whether this problem also applies to other CYPs and other drugs has to be investigated case by case. Our data for the given example, however, puts the benefit of individual drug dosing to question, if it is exclusively based on genotype.

  3. Case-control study of pneumonia patients with Streptococcus anginosus group bacteria in their sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Jun; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Haranaga, Shusaku; Kinjo, Takeshi; Hagihara, Mao; Kato, Hideo; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Yamagishi, Yuka; Fujita, Jiro; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, Streptococcus anginosus group (SAG) bacteria are becoming increasingly recognized as important pneumonia-causing pathogens. Although several small studies have been reported, the features of SAG pneumonia remain unclear, because the identification of SAG from sputum cultures is not routinely performed in most microbiology laboratories. The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics of SAG pneumonia. This was a retrospective case-control study utilizing data obtained in our hospital between September 2009 and June 2016. We investigated 31 patients with SAG pneumonia (PWP), and also assessed the difference between the 31 PWP and 37 patients without pneumonia (PWOP) in whose sputum SAG was detected. Seventy-one percent of the patients were men and the median age was 78 years in the PWP. Univariate analysis indicated that the PWP were significantly more often a bed-ridden (p pneumonia (NHCAP) was the more common type of pneumonia (54.8%). S. anginosus was detected significantly more frequently in sputum cultures of PWP than PWOP (p bacteria. SAG should be recognized as important causative pathogens of pneumonia, particularly among elderly patients with underlying disease associated with aspiration. NHCAP was the more common type of SAG pneumonia in this study. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Geiser, William; Heintz, Philip; Goldman, Lee; Jerjian, Khachig; Martin, Melissa; Peck, Donald; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Ranger, Nicole; Yorkston, John

    2015-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography

  5. Comparison of Masking Level Difference in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Healthy Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghrat Faghihzadeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a neurological disorder that involves central nervous system. Studies have showed that multiple sclerosis affects behavioral central auditory tests, such as masking release or masking level difference (MLD. The purpose of this study is to compare the masking level difference between multiple sclerosis patients and normal subjects.Methods: This cross sectional and non-interventional study was conducted on 32 multiple sclerosis patients aged between 20-50 years and 32 controls matched for age and gender in Faculty of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. masking level difference test was performed on each subject.Results: The mean masking level difference in the two groups was significantly different (p<0.01 however, gender did not prove to play a role in this difference.Conclusion: As part of the multiple sclerosis diagnosis panel, masking level difference test is an efficient modality for evaluation of hearing impairment and monitoring of rehabilitation progress.

  6. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  7. Control of Chain Walking by Weak Neighbouring Group Interac-tions in Unsymmetric Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2017-12-20

    A combined theoretical and experimental study shows how weak attractive interactions of a neighbouring group can strongly promote chain walking and chain transfer. This accounts for the previously observed very different micro-structures obtained in ethylene polymerization by [κ2-N,O-{(2,6-(3\\',5\\'-R2C6H3)2C6H3-N=C(H)-(3,5-X,Y2-2-O-C6H2)}]NiCH3(pyridine)], namely hyperbranched oligomers for remote substituents R = CH3 versus. high molecular weight polyethylene for R = CF3. From a full mechanistic consideration the alkyl olefin complex with the growing chain cis to the salicylaldiminato oxygen donor is identified as the key species. Alternative to ethylene chain growth by insertion in this species, decoordination of the monomer to form a cis ß-agostic complex provides an entry into branching and chain transfer pathways. This release of monomer is promoted and made competitive by a weak η2-coordination of the distal aryl rings to the metal center, operative only for the case of sufficiently electron rich aryls. This concept for controlling chain walking is underlined by catalysts with other weakly coordinating furane and thio-phene motifs, which afford highly branched oligomers with > 120 branches per 1000 carbon atoms.

  8. Non-controlling interests, financial performance and the equity of groups. An empirical study of groups listed on the Warsaw Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Ignatowski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to (a analyze IFRS requirements for the recognition and presentation of non-controlling (minority interests in consolidated financial statements in relation to theoretical concepts of consolidation of financial statements, and (b assess the share and importance of non-controlling inter-ests in financial performance and the equity of the groups of companies in practice.For the purpose of the article, selected scientific methods have been used, including: descriptive and analytical ones (for analyzing the theoretical concepts and IFRS requirements, critical analysis, especial-ly used for the literature review, and for the assessment of practice: primary empirical research methods, and quantitative methods, including descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests and correlation analysis. The empirical material collected was used to verify several hypotheses related to non-controlling interests of the groups whose parents are registered in Poland and whose securities are traded on a regulated, Polish capital market (Warsaw Stock Exchange. The empirical evidence is that non-controlling interests represent a very small part of group’s equity (taking the mean of about 3.5%, but the median below 1% and obviously, they are significantly lower than the share of majority interests. Their deviation among the different classes of companies (big, small and banks is negligible. Slightly higher is the share of minority interests in the group’s net profit and total comprehensive income. However, no significant difference is to be found between the shares of non-controlling interests in the group’s equity, net profit and total comprehensive income. Overall, shares of majority (minority interests in a group’s income are in line with their shares in the group’s equity. The hypothesis on comparable returns on non-controlling and majority interests (in terms of ROE cannot be rejected if both net profit and losses are considered

  9. Non-controlling interests, financial performance and the equity of groups. An empirical study of groups listed on the Warsaw Stock Exchange 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Ignatowski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to (a analyze IFRS requirements for the recognition and presentation of non-controlling (minority interests in consolidated financial statements in relation to theoretical concepts of consolidation of financial statements, and (b assess the share and importance of non-controlling inter-ests in financial performance and the equity of the groups of companies in practice. For the purpose of the article, selected scientific methods have been used, including: descriptive and analytical ones (for analyzing the theoretical concepts and IFRS requirements, critical analysis, especial-ly used for the literature review, and for the assessment of practice: primary empirical research methods, and quantitative methods, including descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests and correlation analysis. The empirical material collected was used to verify several hypotheses related to non-controlling interests of the groups whose parents are registered in Poland and whose securities are traded on a regulated, Polish capital market (Warsaw Stock Exchange. The empirical evidence is that non-controlling interests represent a very small part of group’s equity (taking the mean of about 3.5%, but the median below 1% and obviously, they are significantly lower than the share of majority interests. Their deviation among the different classes of companies (big, small and banks is negligible. Slightly higher is the share of minority interests in the group’s net profit and total comprehensive income. However, no significant difference is to be found between the shares of non-controlling interests in the group’s equity, net profit and total comprehensive income. Overall, shares of majority (minority interests in a group’s income are in line with their shares in the group’s equity. The hypothesis on comparable returns on non-controlling and majority interests (in terms of ROE cannot be rejected if both net profit and losses are considered

  10. Randomized controlled trial of group cognitive behavioral therapy compared to a discussion group for co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrich, V M; Rapee, R M; Kangas, M; Perini, S

    2016-03-01

    Co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults is associated with worse physical and mental health outcomes and poorer response to psychological and pharmacological treatments in older adults. However, there is a paucity of research focused on testing the efficacy of the co-morbid treatment of anxiety and depression in older adults using psychological interventions. Accordingly, the primary objective of the current study was to test the effects of a group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating co-morbid anxiety and depression in a sample of older age adults. A total of 133 community-dwelling participants aged ⩾60 years (mean age = 67.35, s.d. = 5.44, male = 59) with both an anxiety disorder and unipolar mood disorder, as assessed on the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS), were randomly allocated to an 11-week CBT group or discussion group. Participants with Mini-Mental State Examination scores Anxiety Inventory and Geriatric Depression Scale. Both conditions resulted in significant improvements over time on all diagnostic, symptom and wellbeing measures. Significant group × time interaction effects emerged at post-treatment only for diagnostic severity of the primary disorder, mean severity of all anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and all disorders, and recovery rates on primary disorder. Group CBT produced faster and sustained improvements in anxiety and depression on diagnostic severity and recovery rates compared to an active control in older adults.

  11. [Case-control studies of the relevant factors among Ningxia Hui and Han prostate cancer groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiazhao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Bo, Ruting; Dong, Ying; Li, Peng; Yang, Wenjun

    2014-12-01

    To explore the relationship between the relevant factors and prostate cancer among Hui and Han populations. The study involved 267 prostate cancer patients as cases (214 cases from Han population and 53 cases from Hui population) and 534 prostatic hyperplasia patients as controls (428 cases from Han population and 106 cases from Hui population). All the patients were collected from the General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University during January of 2007 to September of 2013. The level of fasting blood glucose (FBG), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), total prostate specific antigen (T-PSA), free prostate specific antigen (F-PSA) and free/total prostate specific antigen (F/T-PSA) were collected from the clinical medical records of the patients. Data were analyzed by the conditional logistic regression method, and attributable risk proportion(ARP) was calculated. In Hui population, the risk of prostate cancer for drinkers was 20.48 times higher than the non-drinkers (35.8% (19/53) to 5.7% (6/106), OR = 20.48, 95% CI: 4.95-84.66). The high level of F-PSA significantly increased the risk of prostate cancer for Hui group (83.0% (44/53) to 55.7% (59/106), OR = 4.27, 95%CI: 1.18-15.43). In contrast, the high TG level decreased the risk of prostate cancer for Hui group (18.9% (10/53) to 20.8% (22/106), OR = 0.24, 95% CI: 0.07-0.83). In Han population, the risk of prostate cancer for smokers was 1.89 times higher than the non-smokers (55.1% (118/214) to 39.7% (170/428), OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.28-2.78). Either high level of T-PSA or F-PSA increased the risk of prostate cancer for Han group (86.4% (185/214) to 53.7% (230/428),OR = 2.34, 95%CI:1.22-4.52;85.5% (183/214) to 56.1% (240/428), OR = 2.43, 95% CI:1.29-4.59). However, the high TG level or high ratio of F/T-PSA decreased the risk of prostate cancer (15.4% (33/214) to 18.7% (80/428), OR = 0.59, 95% CI:0.36-0.98; 53.3% (114/214) to 73.4% (314/428), OR = 0.53, 95% CI:0.36-0.78). The APRs of drinking and high level

  12. Taperin (c9orf75, a mutated gene in nonsyndromic deafness, encodes a vertebrate specific, nuclear localized protein phosphatase one alpha (PP1α docking protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Ferrar

    2012-02-01

    The promiscuous activity of protein phosphatase one (PP1 is controlled in the cell by associated proteins termed regulatory or targeting subunits. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches we demonstrate that the autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss gene, taperin (C9orf75, encodes a protein that preferentially docks the alpha isoform of PP1. Taperin associates with PP1 through a classic ‘RVxF’ motif and suppresses the general phosphatase activity of the enzyme. The steady-state localization of taperin is predominantly nuclear, however we demonstrate here that the protein can shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and that it is found complexed to PP1 in both of these cellular compartments. Although originally identified as a hearing loss gene, Western blot analyses with taperin-specific antibodies revealed that the protein is widely expressed across mammalian tissues as multiple splice variants. Taperin is a recent proteome addition appearing during the vertebrate lineage with the PP1 binding site embedded within the most conserved region of the protein. Taperin also shares an ancestral relationship with the cytosolic actin binding protein phostensin, another PP1 interacting partner. Quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Culture (SILAC-based mass spectrometry was employed to uncover additional taperin binding partners, and revealed an interaction with the DNA damage response proteins Ku70, Ku80, PARP and topoisomerases I and IIα. Consistent with this, we demonstrate the active recruitment of taperin to sites of DNA damage. This makes taperin a new addition to the family of PP1 targeting subunits involved in the DNA damage repair pathway.

  13. Induced abortion on demand and birth rate in Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group in Finnmark, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Norum

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this study was to analyze the birth and induced abortion on demand (IAD rate among women in Sami-speaking communities and a control group in Finnmark County, Norway. Methods. The 6 northern municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (study group were matched with a control group of 9 municipalities. Population data (numbers, sex and age were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data on birth rate and IAD during the time period 1999–2009 were derived from the Medical Birth Registry (MBR of Norway. Data on number of women in fertile age (15–44 years were obtained from Statistics Norway. Between 2001 and 2008, this age group was reduced by 12% (Sami and 23% (controls, respectively. Results. Finnmark County has a high IAD rate and 1 in 4 pregnancies (spontaneous abortions excluded ended in IAD in the study and control groups. The total fertility rate per woman was 1.94 and 1.87 births, respectively. There was no difference between groups with regard to the IAD/birth ratio (P=0.94 or general fertility rate GFR (P=0.82. Conclusions. Women in the Sami-majority area and a control group in Finnmark County experienced a similar frequency of IAD and fertility rate.

  14. Induced abortion on demand and birth rate in Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group in Finnmark, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Svee, Tove E; Heyd, Anca; Nieder, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the birth and induced abortion on demand (IAD) rate among women in Sami-speaking communities and a control group in Finnmark County, Norway. The 6 northern municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (study group) were matched with a control group of 9 municipalities. Population data (numbers, sex and age) were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data on birth rate and IAD during the time period 1999-2009 were derived from the Medical Birth Registry (MBR) of Norway. Data on number of women in fertile age (15-44 years) were obtained from Statistics Norway. Between 2001 and 2008, this age group was reduced by 12% (Sami) and 23% (controls), respectively. Finnmark County has a high IAD rate and 1 in 4 pregnancies (spontaneous abortions excluded) ended in IAD in the study and control groups. The total fertility rate per woman was 1.94 and 1.87 births, respectively. There was no difference between groups with regard to the IAD/birth ratio (P=0.94) or general fertility rate GFR (P=0.82). Women in the Sami-majority area and a control group in Finnmark County experienced a similar frequency of IAD and fertility rate.

  15. Power Analysis for a Proposed Group Randomized Control Trial (GRCT) on the Road to Mental Readiness (R2MP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials ( CONSORT ) for cluster (group) randomized control trials (3). Conducting a power analysis also sets...DG, Group C. Consort 2010 statement: extension to cluster randomised trials. Bmj. 2012;345:e5661. [4] Button KS, Ioannidis JP, Mokrysz C, Nosek BA

  16. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Treatments for Academic Procrastination: A Randomized Controlled Group Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Shi; Ran, Li-Wen; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Chen, Yu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), compared with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), in alleviating academic procrastination. Method: A total of 60 (53.3% male) undergraduates suffering from academic procrastination were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (ACT and CBT) and a control group.…

  17. Do Individual Online Motivational Interviewing Chat Sessions Enhance Weight Loss in a Group Online Weight Control Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Delia Smith; Harvey, Jean R.; Krukowski, Rebecca A.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; Priest, Jeffrey; Ashikaga, Takamaru

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether the addition of online MI chats to a web-based, group behavioral obesity treatment program augments weight loss outcomes relative to the web-based online weight control program alone. Methods Healthy individuals (N=398, 24% minority) with overweight/obesity were randomized to a 36-session group internet behavioral weight control treatment (BT) or the same group internet treatment plus 6 individual MI chat sessions (BT+MI). Both conditions received weekly synchronous online chat group sessions for 6 months followed by 12 monthly group chats. Participants in both groups received identical behavioral lessons and individualized therapist feedback on progress toward meeting exercise and calorie goals. BT+MI also received 6 individual MI sessions delivered by a separate MI counselor via web chat. Weight loss was measured at 6- and 18-months. Results There were no significant differences in weight loss between BT (−5.5±6.0 kg) and BT+MI (−5.1±6.3 kg) at 6-months or at 18-months (−3.3±7.1 kg vs −3.5±7.7 for BT and BT+MI, respectively). Attendance at group chats did not differ between groups, nor did self–monitoring patterns, suggesting comparable engagement in the weight control program in both conditions. Conclusions Online MI chat sessions are not a viable strategy to enhance web-based weight control treatment outcomes. PMID:27616628

  18. A randomised controlled trial of carer-focussed multi-family group psychoeducation in bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madigan, K

    2012-05-01

    In a RCT of family psychoeducation, 47 carers of 34 patients were allocated to one of three groups; Multifamily Group Psychoeducation, Solution Focussed Group Therapy or Treatment as Usual. Carers in both the MFGP intervention and the SFGP arm demonstrated greater knowledge and reduction in burden than those in the TAU arm.

  19. The impact of group music therapy on depression and cognition in elderly persons with dementia: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsin; Yang, Chyn-Yng; Lin, Yu; Ou, Keng-Liang; Lee, Tso-Ying; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effectiveness of group music therapy for improving depression and delaying the deterioration of cognitive functions in elderly persons with dementia. The study had a prospective, parallel-group design with permuted-block randomization. Older persons with dementia (N = 104) were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. The experimental group received 12 sessions of group music therapy (two 30-min sessions per week for 6 weeks), and the control group received usual care. Data were collected 4 times: (1) 1 week before the intervention, (2) the 6th session of the intervention, (3) the 12th session of the intervention, and (4) 1 month after the final session. Group music therapy reduced depression in persons with dementia. Improvements in depression occurred immediately after music therapy and were apparent throughout the course of therapy. The cortisol level did not significantly decrease after the group music therapy. Cognitive function significantly improved slightly at the 6th session, the 12th session, and 1 month after the sessions ended; in particular, short-term recall function improved. The group music therapy intervention had the greatest impact in subjects with mild and moderate dementia. The group music intervention is a noninvasive and inexpensive therapy that appeared to reduce elders' depression. It also delayed the deterioration of cognitive functions, particularly short-term recall function. Group music therapy may be an appropriate intervention among elderly persons with mild and moderate dementia.

  20. Headache : The placebo effects in the control groups in randomized clinical trials; An analysis of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Femke M.; Voogt-Bode, Annieke; Passchier, Jan; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the effects in the placebo and "no treatment" arms in trials with headache patients. Method: This is a secondary analysis of randomized controlled trials from 8 systematic reviews and selected trials with a "no treatment" or placebo control group.

  1. Pediatric emergency medicine asynchronous e-learning: a multicenter randomized controlled Solomon four-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Todd P; Pham, Phung K; Sobolewski, Brad; Doughty, Cara B; Jamal, Nazreen; Kwan, Karen Y; Little, Kim; Brenkert, Timothy E; Mathison, David J

    2014-08-01

    Asynchronous e-learning allows for targeted teaching, particularly advantageous when bedside and didactic education is insufficient. An asynchronous e-learning curriculum has not been studied across multiple centers in the context of a clinical rotation. We hypothesize that an asynchronous e-learning curriculum during the pediatric emergency medicine (EM) rotation improves medical knowledge among residents and students across multiple participating centers. Trainees on pediatric EM rotations at four large pediatric centers from 2012 to 2013 were randomized in a Solomon four-group design. The experimental arms received an asynchronous e-learning curriculum consisting of nine Web-based, interactive, peer-reviewed Flash/HTML5 modules. Postrotation testing and in-training examination (ITE) scores quantified improvements in knowledge. A 2 × 2 analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tested interaction and main effects, and Pearson's correlation tested associations between module usage, scores, and ITE scores. A total of 256 of 458 participants completed all study elements; 104 had access to asynchronous e-learning modules, and 152 were controls who used the current education standards. No pretest sensitization was found (p = 0.75). Use of asynchronous e-learning modules was associated with an improvement in posttest scores (p e-learning is an effective educational tool to improve knowledge in a clinical rotation. Web-based asynchronous e-learning is a promising modality to standardize education among multiple institutions with common curricula, particularly in clinical rotations where scheduling difficulties, seasonality, and variable experiences limit in-hospital learning. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. Two group A streptococcal peptide pheromones act through opposing Rgg regulators to control biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Chang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS is an important human commensal that occasionally causes localized infections and less frequently causes severe invasive disease with high mortality rates. How GAS regulates expression of factors used to colonize the host and avoid immune responses remains poorly understood. Intercellular communication is an important means by which bacteria coordinate gene expression to defend against host assaults and competing bacteria, yet no conserved cell-to-cell signaling system has been elucidated in GAS. Encoded within the GAS genome are four rgg-like genes, two of which (rgg2 and rgg3 have no previously described function. We tested the hypothesis that rgg2 or rgg3 rely on extracellular peptides to control target-gene regulation. We found that Rgg2 and Rgg3 together tightly regulate two linked genes encoding new peptide pheromones. Rgg2 activates transcription of and is required for full induction of the pheromone genes, while Rgg3 plays an antagonistic role and represses pheromone expression. The active pheromone signals, termed SHP2 and SHP3, are short and hydrophobic (DI[I/L]IIVGG, and, though highly similar in sequence, their ability to disrupt Rgg3-DNA complexes were observed to be different, indicating that specificity and differential activation of promoters are characteristics of the Rgg2/3 regulatory circuit. SHP-pheromone signaling requires an intact oligopeptide permease (opp and a metalloprotease (eep, supporting the model that pro-peptides are secreted, processed to the mature form, and subsequently imported to the cytoplasm to interact directly with the Rgg receptors. At least one consequence of pheromone stimulation of the Rgg2/3 pathway is increased biogenesis of biofilms, which counteracts negative regulation of biofilms by RopB (Rgg1. These data provide the first demonstration that Rgg-dependent quorum sensing functions in GAS and substantiate the role that Rggs play as peptide

  3. The Association of Combined GSTM1 and CYP2C9 Genotype Status with the Occurrence of Hemorrhagic Cystitis in Pediatric Patients Receiving Myeloablative Conditioning Regimen Prior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakradhara Rao S. Uppugunduri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC is one of the complications of busulfan-cyclophosphamide (BU-CY conditioning regimen during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in children. Identifying children at high risk of developing HC in a HSCT setting could facilitate the evaluation and implementation of effective prophylactic measures. In this retrospective analysis genotyping of selected candidate gene variants was performed in 72 children and plasma Sulfolane (Su, water soluble metabolite of BU levels were measured in 39 children following treatment with BU-CY regimen. The cytotoxic effects of Su and acrolein (Ac, water soluble metabolite of CY were tested on human urothelial cells (HUCs. The effect of Su was also tested on cytochrome P 450 (CYP function in HepaRG hepatic cells. Cumulative incidences of HC before day 30 post HSCT were estimated using Kaplan–Meier curves and log-rank test was used to compare the difference between groups in a univariate analysis. Multivariate Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Multivariate analysis included co-variables that were significantly associated with HC in a univariate analysis. Cumulative incidence of HC was 15.3%. In the univariate analysis, HC incidence was significantly (p < 0.05 higher in children older than 10 years (28.6 vs. 6.8% or in children with higher Su levels (>40 vs. <11% or in carriers of both functional GSTM1 and CYP2C9 (33.3 vs. 6.3% compared to the other group. In a multivariate analysis, combined GSTM1 and CYP2C9 genotype status was associated with HC occurrence with a hazards ratio of 4.8 (95% CI: 1.3–18.4; p = 0.02. Ac was found to be toxic to HUC cells at lower concentrations (33 μM, Su was not toxic to HUC cells at concentrations below 1 mM and did not affect CYP function in HepaRG cells. Our observations suggest that pre-emptive genotyping of CYP2C9 and GSTM1 may aid in selection of more effective prophylaxis to

  4. Cognitive and clinical characteristics of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis carrying a C9orf72 repeat expansion: a population-based cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2012-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motor neurons, associated with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in about 14% of incident cases. We assessed the frequency of the recently identified C9orf72 repeat expansion in familial and apparently sporadic cases of ALS and characterised the cognitive and clinical phenotype of patients with this expansion.

  5. iTRAQ based investigation of plasma proteins in HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients - C9 and KLK are related to HIV/HBV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Li; Wu, Ao; Zhang, Yujiao; Jia, Xiaofang; Yin, Lin; Lu, Hongzhou; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, and rapid progression of hepatic and immunodeficiency diseases has been observed in coinfected individuals. Our main objective was to investigate the molecular mechanism of HIV/HBV coinfections. We selected HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients with and without Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). Low abundance proteins enriched using a multiple affinity removal system (MARS) were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) kits and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The differential proteins were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) database. A total of 41 differential proteins were found in HIV/HBV coinfected patients as compared to HIV mono-infected patients with or without HAART treatment, including 7 common HBV-regulated proteins. The proteins involved in complement and coagulation pathways were significantly enriched, including plasma kallikrein (KLK) and complement component C9 (C9). C9 and KLK were verified to be down-regulated in HIV/HBV coinfected patients through ELISA analysis. The present iTRAQ based proteomic analyses identified 7 proteins that are related to HIV/HBV coinfection. HBV might influence hepatic and immune functions by deregulating complement and coagulation pathways. C9 and KLK could potentially be used as targets for the treatment of HIV/HBV coinfections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Efficacy of piroxicam for postoperative pain after lower third molar surgery associated with CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Adriana Maria; Zupelari-Gonçalves, Paulo; Dionísio, Thiago José; Brozoski, Daniel Thomas; Faria, Flávio Augusto; Santos, Carlos Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs), predominantly CYP2C8 and CYP2C9. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible association of polymorphisms in the CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9 genes with the clinical efficacy of oral piroxicam (20 mg daily for 4 days) after lower third molar surgeries with regard to postoperative pain, swelling, trismus, adverse reactions, need for rescue medication and the volunteer's overall satisfaction. For this purpose, 102 volunteers were genotyped for CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms. Briefly, genomic DNA was isolated from saliva collected from volunteers subjected to invasive lower third molar surgeries, and the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. An equal amount of piroxicam sufficiently managed postoperative pain and inflammatory symptoms, with visual analog pain scores typically <40 mm for all genotypes investigated. Furthermore, only two out of 102 volunteers heterozygous for CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9*3 reported adverse side effects. In general, slow metabolizers of piroxicam, who were volunteers with mutant alleles, were indifferent from normal metabolizers with the wild-type alleles and therefore did not require specialized piroxicam doses to manage postoperative pain and inflammation.

  7. Sequence variations in C9orf72 downstream of the hexanucleotide repeat region and its effect on repeat-primed PCR interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordin, Angelica; Akimoto, Chizuru; Wuolikainen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    A large GGGGCC-repeat expansion mutation (HREM) in C9orf72 is the most common known cause of ALS and FTD in European populations. Sequence variations immediately downstream of the HREM region have previously been observed and have been suggested to be one reason for difficulties in interpreting R...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(9)-1 - Railroad industry; services performed by an employee or an employee representative under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(c)(9)-1... include any company by reason of its being engaged in the mining of coal, the supplying of coal to an...

  9. Role of CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and EPHX Polymorphism in the Pharmacokinetic of Phenytoin: A Study on Uruguayan Caucasian Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Natalia; Maldonado, Cecilia; Uría, Manuel; González, Raquel; Ibarra, Manuel; Alvariza, Silvana; Carozzi, Antonella; Azambuja, Carlos; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta

    2017-08-18

    Phenytoin (PHT) oxidative route leads to its main metabolite p-hydroxyphenytoin (p-HPPH), by means of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19. Formation of p-HPPH proceeds via a reactive arene-oxide intermediate. This intermediate can also be converted into PHT dihydrodiol by microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX). The three enzymes are polymorphically expressed and the genetic variants are responsible for changes in the enzyme activity. In order to evaluate the effect that these polymorphisms have on PHT metabolism, PHT and p-HPPH plasma concentrations were measured and the genotype for the three enzymes was assessed in 50 Uruguayan epileptic patients. 30% of the patients were intermediate and 2% were poor metabolizers for CYP2C9, while 20% were intermediate metabolizers for CYP2C19. 44%, 10%, and 46% of subjects had intermediate, increased and decreased activities of EPHX respectively. CYP2C9 was confirmed to be the main responsible enzyme for PHT biotransformation. CYP2C19 seemed to be preponderant in p-HPPH oxidative metabolism. Apart from being responsible for the production of the dihydrodiol metabolite, EPHX also seemed to contribute to pHPPH formation when its activity is low. PHT might be recovered with a decreased activity of EPHX regardless the activity of CYP2C9.

  10. The C9ORF72 expansion mutation is a common cause of ALS+/-FTD in Europe and has a single founder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Bradley N.; Newhouse, Stephen; Shatunov, Aleksey; Vance, Caroline; Topp, Simon; Johnson, Lauren; Miller, Jack; Lee, Younbok; Troakes, Claire; Scott, Kirsten M.; Jones, Ashley; Gray, Ian; Wright, Jamie; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Rogelj, Boris; Powell, John; Lupton, Michelle; Lovestone, Simon; Sapp, Peter C.; Weber, Markus; Nestor, Peter J.; Schelhaas, Helenius J.; ten Asbroek, A. A.; Silani, Vincenzo; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Ticozzi, Nicola; van den Berg, Leonard; Veldink, Jan; van Damme, Phillip; Robberecht, Wim; Shaw, Pamela J.; Kirby, Janine; Pall, Hardev; Morrison, Karen E.; Morris, Alex; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; de Jong, J. M. B. Vianney; Baas, Frank; Andersen, Peter M.; Landers, John; Brown, Robert H.; Weale, Michael E.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    A massive hexanucleotide repeat expansion mutation (HREM) in C9ORF72 has recently been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here we describe the frequency, origin and stability of this mutation in ALS+/-FTD from five European cohorts (total n=1347).

  11. WMS-III Logical Memory performance after a two-week delay in temporal lobe epilepsy and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian D

    2006-11-01

    Conventional memory assessment may fail to identify memory dysfunction that is characterized by intact recall for a relatively brief period but rapid forgetting thereafter. This study assessed immediate memory and retention after 30-minute and two-week delays in a control group (n = 25) and a group of individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, n = 25). For raw free recall, thematic unit, and recognition memory scores from the Wechsler Memory Scale-3rd ed. (WMS-III) Logical Memory (LM) subtest, there were no group x trial interactions and the TLE group performed significantly worse than the controls on all trials. At the individual level, none of the patients (0%) demonstrated isolated free recall impairment at the two-week delay when raw scores were analyzed, and one patient (4%) but also five controls (20%) did so when percent retention scores were examined. In summary, TLE patients did not demonstrate disproportionate forgetting over two weeks on a widely used story memory test.

  12. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, M.; Brinkman, S.A.; Beatty, A.; Maika, A.; Satriawan, E.; de Ree, J.; Hasan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program

  13. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, M.P.; Brinkman, S.A.; Beatty, A.; Maika, A.; Satriawan, E.; de Ree, J.; Hasan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program

  14. Can group-based reassuring information alter low back pain behavior? A cluster-randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Pernille; Indahl, Aage; Andersen, Lars L

    2017-01-01

    -randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Publically employed workers (n = 505) from 11 Danish municipality centers were randomized at center-level (cluster) to either intervention (two 1-hour group-based talks at the workplace) or control. The talks provided reassuring information together with a simple non......, number of healthcare visits, bothersomeness, restricted activity, use of pain medication, and sadness/depression. RESULTS: There was no between-group difference in the development of LBP during follow-up. Cumulative logistic regression analyses showed no between-group difference on days of cutting down...... activities, but increased odds for more days of work participation in the intervention group (OR = 1.83 95% CI: 1.08-3.12). Furthermore, the intervention group was more likely to report: higher work ability, reduced visits to healthcare professionals, lower bothersomeness, lower levels of sadness...

  15. Pharmacogenetic evaluation of ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in teratogenicity of anti-epileptic drugs in women with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Pregnancy in women with epilepsy (WWE who are on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs has two- to three-fold increased risk of fetal malformations. AEDs are mostly metabolized by Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and Cyp3A4 and transported by ABCB1. Patients on AED therapy can have folate deficiency. We hypothesize that the polymorphisms in ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR might result in differential expression resulting in differential drug transport, drug metabolism and folate metabolism, which in turn may contribute to the teratogenic impact of AEDs. Materials and Methods: The ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and MTHFR polymorphisms were genotyped for their role in teratogenic potential and the nature of teratogenecity in response to AED treatment in WWE. The allelic, genotypic associations were tested in 266 WWE comprising of 143 WWE who had given birth to babies with WWE-malformation (WWE-M and 123 WWE who had normal offsprings (WWE-N. Results: In WWE-M, CC genotype of Ex07 + 139C/T was overrepresented (P = 0.0032 whereas the poor metabolizer allele FNx012 and FNx012 FNx012 genotype of CYP2C219 was significantly higher in comparison to WWE-N group (P = 0.007 and P = 0.005, respectively. All these observations were independent of the nature of malformation (cardiac vs. non cardiac malformations. Conclusion: Our study indicates the possibility that ABCB1 and Cyp2C19 may play a pivotal role in the AED induced teratogenesis, which is independent of nature of malformation. This is one of the first reports indicating the pharmacogenetic role of Cyp2C19 and ABCB1 in teratogenesis of AED in pregnant WWE.

  16. How protein recognizes ladder-like polycyclic ethers. Interactions between ciguatoxin (CTX3C) fragments and its specific antibody 10C9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Mihoko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Inoue, Masayuki; Hirama, Masahiro; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2008-07-11

    Ciguatoxins are a family of marine toxins composed of transfused polycyclic ethers. It has not yet been clarified at the atomic level on the pathogenic mechanism of these toxins or the interaction between a polycyclic ether compounds and a protein. Using the crystal structures of anti-ciguatoxin antibody 10C9 Fab in ligand-free form and in complexes with ABCD-ring (CTX3C-ABCD) and ABCDE-ring (CTX3C-ABCDE) fragments of the antigen CTX3C at resolutions of 2.6, 2.4, and 2.3 angstroms, respectively, we elucidated the mechanism of the interaction between the polycyclic ethers and the antibody. 10C9 Fab has an extraordinarily large and deep binding pocket at the center of the variable region, where CTX3C-ABCD or CTX3C-ABCDE binds longitudinally in the pocket via hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. Upon antigen-antibody complexation, 10C9 Fab adjusts to the antigen fragments by means of rotational motion in the variable region. In addition, the antigen fragment lacking the E-ring induces a large motion in the constant region. Consequently, the thermostability of 10C9 Fab is enhanced by 10 degrees C upon complexation with CTX3C-ABCDE but not with CTX3C-ABCD. The crystal structures presented in this study also show that 10C9 Fab recoginition of CTX3C antigens requires molecular rearrangements over the entire antibody structure. These results further expand the fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which ladder-like polycyclic ethers are recognized and may be useful for the design of novel therapeutic agents by antibodies, marine toxins, or new diagnostic reagents for the detection and targeting of members of the polycyclic ether family.

  17. Efficacy of piroxicam for postoperative pain after lower third molar surgery associated with CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvo AM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Maria Calvo, Paulo Zupelari-Gonçalves, Thiago José Dionísio, Daniel Thomas Brozoski, Flávio Augusto Faria, Carlos Ferreira Santos Department of Biological Sciences, Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Objective: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs, predominantly CYP2C8 and CYP2C9. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible association of polymorphisms in the CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9 genes with the clinical efficacy of oral piroxicam (20 mg daily for 4 days after lower third molar surgeries with regard to postoperative pain, swelling, trismus, adverse reactions, need for rescue medication and the volunteer’s overall satisfaction. Materials and methods: For this purpose, 102 volunteers were genotyped for CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms. Briefly, genomic DNA was isolated from saliva collected from volunteers subjected to invasive lower third molar surgeries, and the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. Results: An equal amount of piroxicam sufficiently managed postoperative pain and inflammatory symptoms, with visual analog pain scores typically <40 mm for all genotypes investigated. Furthermore, only two out of 102 volunteers heterozygous for CYP2C8*3 and CYP2C9*3 reported adverse side effects. Conclusion: In general, slow metabolizers of piroxicam, who were volunteers with mutant alleles, were indifferent from normal metabolizers with the wild-type alleles and therefore did not require specialized piroxicam doses to manage postoperative pain and inflammation. Keywords: piroxicam, lower third molar surgery, P450, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, pharmacogenetics 

  18. Moderating Effect of Negative Peer Group Climate on the Relation Between Men's Locus of Control and Aggression Toward Intimate Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Megan R; Lisco, Claire G; Parrott, Dominic J; Tharp, Andra T

    2016-03-01

    The present study sought to examine the interactive effects of an external locus of control and interaction in a negative peer group climate on men's perpetration of physical aggression and infliction of injury toward their female intimate partners. Participants were 206 heterosexual males recruited from the metro-Atlanta community who completed self-report measures of external locus of control, involvement in a negative peer group climate, and physical aggression and infliction of injury against intimate partners during the past 12 months. Negative peer group climate was conceptualized as a peer group that displays behavior which may instigate aggressive norms, attitudes, and behaviors. Results indicated that men with an external locus of control were more likely to perpetrate physical aggression toward and inflict injury on their intimate partners if they reported high, but not low, involvement in a negative peer group climate. These results extend current research suggesting external locus of control as a risk factor for intimate partner aggression by highlighting the impact of negative peer groups. Implications and future intervention research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Article I: Prevention and education regarding rabies in human beings. National Working Group on Rabies Prevention and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, C A; Olson, J G; Clark, C J

    1999-11-01

    Substantial changes in the epizootic characteristics of rabies have transpired in the United States during the past 50 years. Traditional veterinary practices and public health recommendations have effectively controlled rabies in dogs and prevented associated human fatalities; however, they have been unable to adequately address the problem of rabies in wildlife. Attributable in part to a renewed focus on emerging infectious diseases, a conference was held at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1993 to begin discussion focused on the reemergence of rabies and to formulate new suggestions for prevention and control of rabies in the United States. Three major working groups were formed from a national committee of professionals representing a broad array of biomedical disciplines. These groups concentrated on prevention of rabies in human beings, education, laboratory diagnosis of rabies, and rabies control in animals. The groups described the perceived minimum requirements to promote prevention and control of rabies in the United States into the next century. The following article describes the needs and recommendations identified by the prevention and education working group. Two other articles, scheduled for the Nov 15 and Dec 1, 1999 issues of JAVMA, will relay the needs and recommendations of the working groups on laboratory diagnosis of rabies and rabies in wildlife.

  20. Tenth meeting of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation, Vienna, 3-5 March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The meeting of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI) was organized in order to summarize operating experience of NPP control systems, gain a general overview of activities in development of modern control systems and receive recommendations on the further directions and particular measures within the Agency's programme. The papers and discussions mostly dealt with practical experience and described actual problems encountered. Emphasis was placed on the technical, industrial and economic aspects of the introduction of modern, highly automated control systems and on the improvement of plant availability and safety. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 20 presentations of the meeting

  1. Effectiveness of preventive support groups for children of mentally ill or addicted parents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, Floor; Hosman, Clemens M H; van Doesum, Karin T M; Janssens, Jan M A M

    2014-06-01

    In various countries preventive support groups are offered to children of mentally ill and/or addicted parents to reduce the risk that they will develop problems themselves. This study assessed the effectiveness of Dutch support groups for children aged 8-12 years old in terms of reducing negative cognitions; improving social support, competence, and parent-child interaction (direct intervention goals); and reducing emotional and behavioural problems (ultimate intervention aim). Children from 254 families were randomly assigned to the intervention or a control condition. Parents and children completed questionnaires at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Emotional and behavioural problems of intervention group children were also assessed 1 year after the start. Univariate analyses of variance showed that children in the intervention group experienced a greater decrease in negative cognitions and sought more social support, immediately after participation and 3 months later, as compared to control group children. They also remained stable in their feelings of social acceptance (competence aspect) immediately after the intervention, whereas these feelings declined in control group children. The intervention and control groups both improved over time in terms of cognitions, competence, parent-child interaction and emotional and behavioural problem scores. Additional improvement in terms of problem scores was found in the intervention group 1 year after baseline. Further enhancement of effectiveness requires re-consideration of the support group goals; it should be studied whether the goals reflect the most important and influential risk and protective factors for this specific population. Besides, effects should be studied over a longer period.

  2. Testing postural control among various osteoporotic patient groups : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Maartje H.; van der Jagt-Willems, Hanna C.; van Campen, Jos P. C. M.; Lems, Willem F.; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Osteoporosis can cause vertebral fractures, which might lead to a flexed posture, impaired postural control and consequently increased fall risk. Therefore, the aim of the present review was to examine whether postural control of patients with osteoporosis, vertebral fractures, thoracic

  3. Anger-Control Group Counseling for Women Recovering from Alcohol or Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Two experimental conditions, a manualized cognitive-behavioral anger-control treatment incorporating empowerment strategies and a relapse-prevention treatment without the anger-control component, were compared to assess their impact on levels of trait anger and attributional styles of women recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Participants…

  4. Characteristics of control group participants who increased their physical activity in a cluster-randomized lifestyle intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Lauren A; Reeves, Marina M; Fjeldsoe, Brianna S; Eakin, Elizabeth G

    2011-01-11

    Meaningful improvement in physical activity among control group participants in lifestyle intervention trials is not an uncommon finding, and may be partly explained by participant characteristics. This study investigated which baseline demographic, health and behavioural characteristics were predictive of successful improvement in physical activity in usual care group participants recruited into a telephone-delivered physical activity and diet intervention trial, and descriptively compared these characteristics with those that were predictive of improvement among intervention group participants. Data come from the Logan Healthy Living Program, a primary care-based, cluster-randomized controlled trial of a physical activity and diet intervention. Multivariable logistic regression models examined variables predictive of an improvement of at least 60 minutes per week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity among usual care (n = 166) and intervention group (n = 175) participants. Baseline variables predictive of a meaningful change in physical activity were different for the usual care and intervention groups. Being retired and completing secondary school (but no further education) were predictive of physical activity improvement for usual care group participants, whereas only baseline level of physical activity was predictive of improvement for intervention group participants. Higher body mass index and being unmarried may also be predictors of physical activity improvement for usual care participants. This is the first study to examine differences in predictors of physical activity improvement between intervention group and control group participants enrolled in a physical activity intervention trial. While further empirical research is necessary to confirm findings, results suggest that participants with certain socio-demographic characteristics may respond favourably to minimal intensity interventions akin to the treatment delivered to participants in

  5. Characteristics of control group participants who increased their physical activity in a cluster-randomized lifestyle intervention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fjeldsoe Brianna S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meaningful improvement in physical activity among control group participants in lifestyle intervention trials is not an uncommon finding, and may be partly explained by participant characteristics. This study investigated which baseline demographic, health and behavioural characteristics were predictive of successful improvement in physical activity in usual care group participants recruited into a telephone-delivered physical activity and diet intervention trial, and descriptively compared these characteristics with those that were predictive of improvement among intervention group participants. Methods Data come from the Logan Healthy Living Program, a primary care-based, cluster-randomized controlled trial of a physical activity and diet intervention. Multivariable logistic regression models examined variables predictive of an improvement of at least 60 minutes per week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity among usual care (n = 166 and intervention group (n = 175 participants. Results Baseline variables predictive of a meaningful change in physical activity were different for the usual care and intervention groups. Being retired and completing secondary school (but no further education were predictive of physical activity improvement for usual care group participants, whereas only baseline level of physical activity was predictive of improvement for intervention group participants. Higher body mass index and being unmarried may also be predictors of physical activity improvement for usual care participants. Conclusion This is the first study to examine differences in predictors of physical activity improvement between intervention group and control group participants enrolled in a physical activity intervention trial. While further empirical research is necessary to confirm findings, results suggest that participants with certain socio-demographic characteristics may respond favourably to minimal intensity

  6. Micro-credit, women's groups, control of own money: HIV-related negotiation among partnered Dominican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Kim; Kerrigan, Deanna; Sweat, Michael

    2008-05-01

    A sample of 356 members of women's groups, aged 18-49, in the Dominican Republic were interviewed by trained female interviewers. Data among 273 partnered women were analyzed. The dependent variable, a measure of HIV-related negotiation, was examined for associations with control of own money, level of women's group participation, and ever having received a loan through a micro-credit program. Findings suggest control of own money to be significantly associated with HIV-related negotiation. Ever having received a loan and level of women's group participation, however, were not significantly associated with HIV-related negotiation. Empowerment measured as control of own money may influence HIV protective behavior among partnered women in this setting.

  7. Conducting Cancer Control and Survivorship Research via Cooperative Groups: A Report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra

    2011-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if in...

  8. Relationship of locus of control, psychological distress, and trauma exposure in groups impacted by intense political conflict in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Vasiliki; Gadallah, Mohsen; Leon, Gloria R; Massou, Efthalia; Prodromitis, Gerasimos; Skembris, Angelos; Levett, Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    Social and political instability have become common situations in many parts of the world. Exposure to different types of traumatic circumstances may differentially affect psychological status. The aim of this study was to compare the relationship between personal perceptions of control over the events happening in one's life and psychological distress in two groups who experienced physical trauma but differed as to whether the trauma was a result of political upheaval and violence. Views on the extent to which the state was interested in the individual were also assessed. The sample consisted of 120 patients who were injured in the Cairo epicenter and 120 matched controls from the greater Cairo area whose injuries were from other causes. The Brown Locus of Control Scale and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL 90-R) were administered approximately three months after the January 2011 start of the demonstrations and subsequent overthrow of the government. The groups did not differ on locus of control. For both groups, externality was associated with greater distress, suggesting a relationship between perceived helplessness in controlling one's life and distress. The Cairo group scored significantly higher than the control group on the SCL 90-R Global Severity Index (GSI) and Positive Symptom Total (PST). Perceptions of state interest in the population were low; overall, 78% viewed the state as having little or no interest in them. Discussion The relationship between exposure intensity and psychological distress is examined. In addition, differences in findings in populations experiencing political chaos compared with other types of disasters are considered. Beliefs regarding personal control over one's life circumstances are more closely associated with psychological distress than the circumstances in which the trauma occurred.

  9. The effectiveness of an online support group for members of the community with depression: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Griffiths

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internet support groups (ISGs are popular, particularly among people with depression, but there is little high quality evidence concerning their effectiveness. AIM: The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an ISG for reducing depressive symptoms among community members when used alone and in combination with an automated Internet-based psychotherapy training program. METHOD: Volunteers with elevated psychological distress were identified using a community-based screening postal survey. Participants were randomised to one of four 12-week conditions: depression Internet Support Group (ISG, automated depression Internet Training Program (ITP, combination of the two (ITP+ISG, or a control website with delayed access to e-couch at 6 months. Assessments were conducted at baseline, post-intervention, 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: There was no change in depressive symptoms relative to control after 3 months of exposure to the ISG. However, both the ISG alone and the combined ISG+ITP group showed significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms at 6 and 12 months follow-up than the control group. The ITP program was effective relative to control at post-intervention but not at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: ISGs for depression are promising and warrant further empirical investigation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN65657330.

  10. Perceived Family Climate and Self-Esteem in Adolescents With ADHD: A Study With a Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Halit Necmi; Eray, Şafak; Vural, Ayşe Pınar; Kocael, Ömer

    2017-04-01

    In this study, our objective is to assess the perception of family environments by adolescents with ADHD based on perceived expressed emotion (EE) and the self-esteem of the adolescents. Uludag University Medical Faculty Hospital completed this study with 41 adolescents with ADHD and 35 control group participants who were matched based on age and gender. The total scores of perceived EE, described as a lack of emotional support, irritability, and intrusiveness, were significantly higher in ADHD group than in the control group. The group with ADHD also showed significantly lower self-esteem. There was a negative correlation between self-esteem scores and total perceived EE scores in the ADHD group and the control group. This study showed that the adolescents with ADHD perceive less emotional support and higher levels of intrusiveness, with patients also describing their families as more irritating. Other results in this study show that adolescents with less emotional support possess lower self-esteem, as do adolescents with more irritable parents.

  11. Comparison of 24-hour cardiovascular and autonomic function in paraplegia, tetraplegia, and control groups: Implications for cardiovascular risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Radulovic, M.; Handrakis, John P.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Jensen, A. Marley; Kirshblum, Steve; Bauman, William A.; Wecht, Jill Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Fluctuations in 24-hour cardiovascular hemodynamics, specifically heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), are thought to reflect autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) represent a model of ANS dysfunction, which may affect 24-hour hemodynamics and predispose these individuals to increased cardiovascular disease risk. Objective To determine 24-hour cardiovascular and ANS function among individuals with tetraplegia (n = 20; TETRA: C4–C8), high paraplegia (n = 10; HP: T2–T5), low paraplegia (n = 9; LP: T7–T12), and non-SCI controls (n = 10). Twenty-four-hour ANS function was assessed by time domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV); the standard deviation of the 5-minute average R–R intervals (SDANN; milliseconds/ms), and the root-mean square of the standard deviation of the R–R intervals (rMSSD; ms). Subjects wore 24-hour ambulatory monitors to record HR, HRV, and BP. Mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly lower 24-hour BP in the tetraplegic group; however, BP did not differ between the HP, LP, and control groups. Mixed ANOVA suggested significantly elevated 24-hour HR in the HP and LP groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.05); daytime HR was higher in both paraplegic groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.01) and nighttime HR was significantly elevated in the LP group compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.01). Twenty-four-hour SDANN was significantly increased in the HP group compared to the LP and TETRA groups (P < 0.05) and rMSSD was significantly lower in the LP compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Elevated 24-hour HR in persons with paraplegia, in concert with altered HRV dynamics, may impart significant adverse cardiovascular consequences, which are currently unappreciated. PMID:21903013

  12. BCL9 and C9orf5 are associated with negative symptoms in schizophrenia: meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Xu

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a chronic and debilitating psychiatric condition affecting slightly more than 1% of the population worldwide and it is a multifactorial disorder with a high degree of heritability (80% based on family and twin studies. Increasing lines of evidence suggest intermediate phenotypes/endophenotypes are more associated with causes of the disease and are less genetically complex than the broader disease spectrum. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are attractive intermediate phenotypes based on their clinical and treatment response features. Therefore, our objective was to identify genetic variants underlying the negative symptoms of schizophrenia by analyzing two genome-wide association (GWA data sets consisting of a total of 1,774 European-American patients and 2,726 controls. Logistic regression analysis of negative symptoms as a binary trait (adjusted for age and sex was performed using PLINK. For meta-analysis of two datasets, the fixed-effect model in PLINK was applied. Through meta-analysis we identified 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with negative symptoms with p<5×10(-5. Especially we detected five SNPs in the first two genes/loci strongly associated with negative symptoms of schizophrenia (P(meta-analysis<6.22×10(-6, which included three SNPs in the BCL9 gene: rs583583 showed the strongest association at a P(meta-analysis of 6.00×10(-7 and two SNPs in the C9orf5 (the top SNP is rs643410 with a p = 1.29 ×10(-6. Through meta-analysis, we identified several additional negative symptoms associated genes (ST3GAL1, RNF144, CTNNA3 and ZNF385D. This is the first report of the common variants influencing negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These results provide direct evidence of using of negative symptoms as an intermediate phenotype to dissect the complex genetics of schizophrenia. However, additional studies are warranted to examine the underlying mechanisms of these disease-associated SNPs in these genes.

  13. Assessing handwriting intervention effectiveness in elementary school students: a two-group controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Tsu-Hsin; Roston, Karen Laurie; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hinojosa, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of two approaches used in elementary schools to improve children's handwriting. Participants were 72 New York City public school students from the first and second grades. A nonequivalent pretest-posttest group design was used in which students engaged in handwriting activities using two approaches: intensive handwriting practice and visual-perceptual-motor activities. Handwriting speed, legibility, and visual-motor skills were examined after a 12-wk Handwriting Club using multivariate analysis of variance. The results showed that students in the intensive handwriting practice group demonstrated significant improvements in handwriting legibility compared with students in the visual-perceptual-motor activity group. No significant effects in handwriting speed and visual-motor skills were found between the students in intensive handwriting practice group and the students in visual-perceptual-motor activities group. The Handwriting Club model is a natural intervention that fits easily into existing school curriculums and can be an effective short-term intervention (response to intervention Tier II). Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  14. Comparison of 24-hour cardiovascular and autonomic function in paraplegia, tetraplegia, and control groups: implications for cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Radulovic, M; Handrakis, John P; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M; Jensen, A Marley; Kirshblum, Steve; Bauman, William A; Wecht, Jill Maria

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations in 24-hour cardiovascular hemodynamics, specifically heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), are thought to reflect autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) represent a model of ANS dysfunction, which may affect 24-hour hemodynamics and predispose these individuals to increased cardiovascular disease risk. To determine 24-hour cardiovascular and ANS function among individuals with tetraplegia (n=20; TETRA: C4-C8), high paraplegia (n=10; HP: T2-T5), low paraplegia (n=9; LP: T7-T12), and non-SCI controls (n=10). Twenty-four-hour ANS function was assessed by time domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV); the standard deviation of the 5-minute average R-R intervals (SDANN; milliseconds/ms), and the root-mean square of the standard deviation of the R-R intervals (rMSSD; ms). Subjects wore 24-hour ambulatory monitors to record HR, HRV, and BP. Mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly lower 24-hour BP in the tetraplegic group; however, BP did not differ between the HP, LP, and control groups. Mixed ANOVA suggested significantly elevated 24-hour HR in the HP and LP groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (Pcontrol groups (Pcontrol groups (P<0.01). Twenty-four-hour SDANN was significantly increased in the HP group compared to the LP and TETRA groups (P<0.05) and rMSSD was significantly lower in the LP compared to the other three groups (P<0.05). Elevated 24-hour HR in persons with paraplegia, in concert with altered HRV dynamics, may impart significant adverse cardiovascular consequences, which are currently unappreciated.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of a manual-based psychosocial group intervention for young people with epilepsy [PIE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, Liam; Broome, Helen; Wilson, Margaret; Grant, Cathy; Young, David; Baker, Gus; Balloo, Selina; Bruce, Susan; Campbell, Jo; Concannon, Bernie; Conway, Nadia; Cook, Lisa; Davis, Cheryl; Downey, Bruce; Evans, Jon; Flower, Diane; Garlovsky, Jack; Kearney, Shauna; Lewis, Susan; Stephens, Victoria; Turton, Stuart; Wright, Ingram

    2017-07-01

    We conducted an exploratory RCT to examine feasibility and preliminary efficacy for a manual-based psychosocial group intervention aimed at improving epilepsy knowledge, self-management skills, and quality of life in young people with epilepsy. Eighty-three participants (33:50m/f; age range 12-17years) were randomized to either the treatment or control group in seven tertiary paediatric neuroscience centres in the UK, using a wait-list control design. Participants were excluded if they reported suicidal ideation and/or scored above the cut off on mental health screening measures, or if they had a learning disability or other neurological disorder. The intervention consisted of six weekly 2-hour sessions using guided discussion, group exercises and role-plays facilitated by an epilepsy nurse and a clinical psychologist. At three month follow up the treatment group (n=40) was compared with a wait-list control group (n=43) on a range of standardized measures. There was a significant increase in epilepsy knowledge in the treatment group (p=0.02). Participants receiving the intervention were also significantly more confident in speaking to others about their epilepsy (p=0.04). Quality of life measures did not show significant change. Participants reported the greatest value of attending the group was: Learning about their epilepsy (46%); Learning to cope with difficult feelings (29%); and Meeting others with epilepsy (22%). Caregiver and facilitator feedback was positive, and 92% of participants would recommend the group to others. This brief psychosocial group intervention was effective in increasing participants' knowledge of epilepsy and improved confidence in discussing their epilepsy with others. We discuss the qualitative feedback, feasibility, strengths and limitations of the PIE trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective polymerization catalysis: controlling the metal chain end group to prepare block copolyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqing; Romain, Charles; Williams, Charlotte K

    2015-09-30

    Selective catalysis is used to prepare block copolyesters by combining ring-opening polymerization of lactones and ring-opening copolymerization of epoxides/anhydrides. By using a dizinc complex with mixtures of up to three different monomers and controlling the chemistry of the Zn-O(polymer chain) it is possible to select for a particular polymerization route and thereby control the composition of block copolyesters.

  17. The challenges of control groups, placebos and blinding in clinical trials of dietary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudacher, Heidi M; Irving, Peter M; Lomer, Miranda C E; Whelan, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    High-quality placebo-controlled evidence for food, nutrient or dietary advice interventions is vital for verifying the role of diet in optimising health or for the management of disease. This could be argued to be especially important where the benefits of dietary intervention are coupled with potential risks such as compromising nutrient intake, particularly in the case of exclusion diets. The objective of the present paper is to explore the challenges associated with clinical trials in dietary research, review the types of controls used and present the advantages and disadvantages of each, including issues regarding placebos and blinding. Placebo-controlled trials in nutrient interventions are relatively straightforward, as in general placebos can be easily produced. However, the challenges associated with conducting placebo-controlled food interventions and dietary advice interventions are protean, and this has led to a paucity of placebo-controlled food and dietary advice trials compared with drug trials. This review appraises the types of controls used in dietary intervention trials and provides recommendations and nine essential criteria for the design and development of sham diets for use in studies evaluating the effect of dietary advice, along with practical guidance regarding their evaluation. The rationale for these criteria predominantly relate to avoiding altering the outcome of interest in those delivered the sham intervention in these types of studies, while not compromising blinding.

  18. Folate analogues altered in the C9-N10 bridge region. 10-Oxafolic acid and 10-oxaaminopterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M G; Campbell, P T

    1976-06-01

    The unambiguous synthesis of two folate analogues, in which the 10-amino group of folic acid was replaced with oxygen, is described. The synthetic sequence employed commercially available methyl p-hydroxybenzoate and n-(2,3-epoxypropyl)phthalimide as starting materials. The use of cesium bicarbonate as a coreactant in the nucleophilic displacement reaction between bromo ketone 3 and the nucleophile 4 was found to be unique in character. The aminoacetonyl oxime 7 obtained by the hydrazinolysis of 6 was used as a common intermediate for the synthesis of both compounds. The generality of the use of the TFA-HCL mixture to deprotect the carbonyl group of both 10 and 12 reductions involving sodium hydrosulfite in aqueous dmf were further substantiated by conversions of 11 and 13 to 14 and 15 quickly and efficiently without employing catalytic hydrogenations. Subsequent cyclizations, oxidations, and hydrolysis of these reduction products to the pteroate analogues 17 and 19 were carried out efficiently as described for the synthesis of the sulfur analogues. Activation of the carboxyl group of 19 by way of the mixed anhydride 22 and subsequent coupling to glutamic acid was carried out using the solid-phase coupling procedure. However, compound 17 required trifluoroacetylation to 20 prior to the coupling reaction due to solubility problems. Both 10-oxafolic acid (1) and 10-oxaaminopterin (2) showed potent antifolate activity when tested against two folate-requiring organisms. Compound 2 was a very powerful inhibitor of DCM-resistant lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase. The activity was comparable to that of methotrexate while the 4-hydroxy analogue did not show inhibition. 7,8-Dihydro-10-oxafolic acid failed to show any substrate activity to this enzyme and did not inhibit the enzymatic reaction when used with an equimolar concentration of the natural substrate.

  19. BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL BY DRUG GROUP IN THE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AND LIPID-LOWERING TREATMENT TO PREVENT HEART ATTACK TRIAL (ALLHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushma, William C.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Wright, Jackson T.; Preston, Richard A.; Davis, Barry R.; Basile, Jan N.; Whelton, Paul K.; Weiss, Robert J.; Bastien, Arnaud; Courtney, Donald L.; Hamilton, Bruce P.; Kirchner, Kent; Louis, Gail T.; Retta, Tamrat M.; Vidt, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control rates and number of antihypertensive medications were compared (average follow-up 4.9 years) by randomized groups: chlorthalidone, 12.5-25 mg/d (n=15,255), amlodipine 2.5-10 mg/d (n=9,048), or lisinopril 10-40 mg/d (n=9,054) in a randomized double-blind hypertension trial. Participants were hypertensives age t55 with additional cardiovascular risk factor(s), recruited from 623 centers. Additional agents from other classes were added as needed to achieve BP control. BP was reduced from 145/83 mmHg (27% control) to 134/76 mmHg (chlorthalidone, 68% control), 135/75 mmHg (amlodipine, 66% control), and 136/76 mmHg (lisinopril, 61% control) by 5 years; the mean number of drugs prescribed was 1.9, 2.0, and 2.1, respectively. Only 28% (chlorthalidone), 24% (amlodipine), and 24% (lisinopril) were controlled on monotherapy. A majority achieved BP control in each randomized group--a greater proportion with chlorthalidone. Over time, providers and patients should expect multidrug therapy to achieve BP<140/90 mmHg in a majority of patients. PMID:19090876

  20. Structural and energetic hot-spots for the interaction between a ladder-like polycyclic ether and the anti-ciguatoxin antibody 10C9Fab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Mihoko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Inoue, Masayuki; Hirama, Masahiro; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2011-03-01

    The mechanism by which anti-ciguatoxin antibody 10C9Fab recognizes a fragment of ciguatoxin CTX3C (CTX3C-ABCDE) was investigated by mutational analysis based on structural data. 10C9Fab has an extraordinarily large and deep antigen-binding pocket at the center of its variable region. We mutated several residues located at the antigen-binding pocket to Ala, and kinetic analysis of the interactions between the mutant proteins and the antigen fragment was performed. The results indicate that some residues associated with the rigid antigen-binding pocket are structural hot-spots and that L-N94 is an energetic hot-spot for association of the antibody with the antigen fragment CTX3C-ABCDE, suggesting the importance of structural complementarity and energetic hot-spot interactions for specific recognition of polycyclic ethers.

  1. A controlled early group intervention study for unaccompanied minors: Can Expressive Arts alleviate symptoms of trauma and enhance life satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer DeMott, Melinda A; Jakobsen, Marianne; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Heir, Trond

    2017-12-01

    This is the first controlled study of an expressive arts group intervention with unaccompanied minor asylum seeking children. The aim of the study was to examine whether such an intervention may alleviate symptoms of trauma and enhance life satisfaction and hope. One hundred forty five unaccompanied minor refugee boys with their stated age between 15 and 18 were allocated into a 10 session 5 weeks manualized expressive arts intervention (EXIT) or a life as usual (LAU) control group. The participants were assessed at onset and 4 times over a period of 25 months with a battery of instruments measuring post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), general psychological distress (HSCL-25A), current life satisfaction (CLS) and expected life satisfaction (ELS). The instruments were presented in the participants' native languages, using touch-screen laptops and the computer program Multilingual Computer Assisted Interview (MultiCASI). There were significant time by group interactions in favor of the EXIT group for PTSS and CLS. At the end of the follow up the EXIT group had higher life satisfaction and hope for the future than the LAU group. A manualized EXIT group intervention can have a beneficial effect on helping minor refugee boys to cope with symptoms of trauma, strengthen their life satisfaction and develop hope for the future. Our findings support previous studies showing that the arts may help people in reconstructing meaning and connection with others by focusing on resources and creativity. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Personalised normative feedback for preventing alcohol misuse in university students: Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T Moreira

    Full Text Available Young people tend to over-estimate peer group drinking levels. Personalised normative feedback (PNF aims to correct this misperception by providing information about personal drinking levels and patterns compared with norms in similar aged peer groups. PNF is intended to raise motivation for behaviour change and has been highlighted for alcohol misuse prevention by the British Government Behavioural Insight Team. The objective of the trial was to assess the effectiveness of PNF with college students for the prevention of alcohol misuse.Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial. 1751 students, from 22 British Universities, allocated to a PNF group, a normal control group, or a delayed measurement control group to allow assessment of any measurement effects. PNF was provided by email. Participants completed online questionnaires at baseline, 6- and 12-months (only 12-months for the delayed measurement controls. Drinking behaviour measures were (i alcohol disorders; (ii frequency; (iii typical quantity, (iv weekly consumption; (v alcohol-related problems; (vi perceived drinking norms; and (vii positive alcohol expectancies. Analyses focused on high-risk drinkers, as well as all students, because of research evidence for the prevention paradox in student drinkers.Follow-up rates were low, with only 50% and 40% responding at 6- and 12-months, respectively, though comparable to similar European studies. We found no evidence for any systematic attrition bias. Overall, statistical analyses with the high risk sub-sample, and for all students, showed no significant effects of the intervention, at either time-point, in a completed case analysis and a multiple imputation analysis.We found no evidence for the effectiveness of PNF for the prevention of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related problems in a UK student population.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN30784467.

  3. Group schema therapy versus group cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder with comorbid avoidant personality disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baljé, Astrid; Greeven, Anja; van Giezen, Anne; Korrelboom, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud; Spinhoven, Philip

    2016-10-08

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) with comorbid avoidant personality disorder (APD) has a high prevalence and is associated with serious psychosocial problems and high societal costs. When patients suffer from both SAD and APD, the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for personality disorders advise offering prolonged cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recently there is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of schema therapy (ST) for personality disorders such as borderline personality disorder and cluster C personality disorders. Since ST addresses underlying personality characteristics and maladaptive coping strategies developed in childhood, this treatment might be particularly effective for patients with SAD and comorbid APD. To our knowledge, there are no studies comparing CBT with ST in this particular group of patients. This superiority trial aims at comparing the effectiveness of these treatments. As an additional goal, predictors and underlying mechanisms of change will be explored. The design of the study is a multicentre two-group randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the treatment effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) will be compared to that of group schema therapy (GST) in a semi-open group format. A total of 128 patients aged 18-65 years old will be enrolled. Patients will receive 30 sessions of GCBT or GST during a period of approximately 9 months. Primary outcome measures are the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report (LSAS-SR) for social anxiety disorder and the newly developed Avoidant Personality Disorder Severity Index (AVPDSI) for avoidant personality disorder. Secondary outcome measures are the MINI section SAD, the SCID-II section APD, the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI-2), the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the Acceptance and Action

  4. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria eRuffini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: Heart Rate Variability (HRV indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS function. Objective: To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT on ANS activity through changes of High Frequency, a heart rate variability index indicating the parasympathetic activity, in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group.Methods: Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults, both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in 3 groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920.Main Outcomes Measures: HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 minutes.Results: OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency rate (p<0.001, and decrease of sympathetic activity, as revealed by Low Frequency rate (p<0.01; results also showed a reduction of Low Frequency/High Frequency ratio (p<0.001 and Detrended fluctuation scaling exponent (p<0.05. Conclusions: Findings suggested that OMT can influence ANS activity increasing parasympathetic function and decreasing sympathetic activity, compared to sham therapy and control group.

  5. Dicloxacillin induces CYP2C19, CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Graff, Magnus; Wong, Susan

    2018-01-01

    -time curve from 0-24h of omeprazole (CYP2C19) (geometric mean ratio (GMR) [95% confidence interval (CI)]: 0.33 [0.24-0.45]), tolbutamide (CYP2C9) (GMR [95% CI]: 0.73 [0.65-0.81]) and midazolam (CYP3A4) (GMR [95% CI]: 0.54 [0.41-0.72]). Additionally, other relevant pharmacokinetic parameters were affected...

  6. Effectiveness of a group diabetes education programme in underserved communities in South Africa: pragmatic cluster randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mash Bob

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is an important contributor to the burden of disease in South Africa and prevalence rates as high as 33% have been recorded in Cape Town. Previous studies show that quality of care and health outcomes are poor. The development of an effective education programme should impact on self-care, lifestyle change and adherence to medication; and lead to better control of diabetes, fewer complications and better quality of life. Methods Trial design: Pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial Participants: Type 2 diabetic patients attending 45 public sector community health centres in Cape Town Interventions: The intervention group will receive 4 sessions of group diabetes education delivered by a health promotion officer in a guiding style. The control group will receive usual care which consists of ad hoc advice during consultations and occasional educational talks in the waiting room. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the group diabetes education programme Outcomes: Primary outcomes: diabetes self-care activities, 5% weight loss, 1% reduction in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes: self-efficacy, locus of control, mean blood pressure, mean weight loss, mean waist circumference, mean HbA1c, mean total cholesterol, quality of life Randomisation: Computer generated random numbers Blinding: Patients, health promoters and research assistants could not be blinded to the health centre’s allocation Numbers randomized: Seventeen health centres (34 in total will be randomly assigned to either control or intervention groups. A sample size of 1360 patients in 34 clusters of 40 patients will give a power of 80% to detect the primary outcomes with 5% precision. Altogether 720 patients were recruited in the intervention arm and 850 in the control arm giving a total of 1570. Discussion The study will inform policy makers and managers of the district health system, particularly in low to middle income countries, if this programme can

  7. The relationship between age-stereotypes and health locus of control across adult age-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent-Cox, Kerry; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2015-01-01

    This study integrates healthy ageing and health psychology theories to explore the mechanisms underlying the relationship between health control expectancies and age-attitudes on the process of ageing well. Specifically, the aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between age-stereotypes and health locus of control. A population-based survey of 739 adults aged 20-97 years (mean = 57.3 years, SD = 13.66; 42% female) explored attitudes towards ageing and health attitudes. A path-analytical approach was used to investigate moderating effects of age and gender. Higher age-stereotype endorsement was associated with higher chance (β = 2.91, p controlling for age, gender, education and self-rated health. Significant age and gender interactions were found to influence the relationship between age-stereotypes and internal health locus of control. Our findings suggest that the relationship between age-stereotypes and health locus of control dimensions must be considered within the context of age and gender. The findings point to the importance of targeting health promotion and interventions through addressing negative age-attitudes.

  8. Motor skill learning in groups: Some proposals for applying implicit learning and self-controlled feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kamp, J.; Duivenvoorde, J.; Kok, M.G.M.; van Hilvoorde, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to researchers' current focus on individual motor skill learning, in institutional settings such as physical education and sports motor skill learning is often taught in groups. In these settings, there is not only the interaction between teacher and learner (analogous to research), but

  9. Light-Triggered Control of Plasmonic Refraction and Group Delay by Photochromic Molecular Switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Großmann, Malte; Klick, Alwin; Lemke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    An interface supporting plasmonic switching is prepared from a gold substrate coated with a polymerfilm doped with photochromic molecular switches. A reversible light-induced change in the surface plasmon polariton dispersion curve of the interface is experimentally demonstrated, evidencing rever...... complex functionalities based on surface plasmon refraction and group delay....

  10. The Civilian Irregular Defense Group: Behind the Decision to Change Operational Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    denounce these allegations.43 Additionally, the pre-emptive air strikes against the Cuban air force 42 Luis Aguilar, Operation Zapata : The “Ultrasensitive...strategic aim. 48 BIBLIOGRAPHY Aguilar, Luis . Operation Zapata : The “Ultrasensitive” Report and...Operation Switchback, Kennedy Administration, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Central Intelligence Agency, Bay of Pigs, Operation Zapata , Cuba Study Group

  11. COMPARISON BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP MATING OF AUSTROPOTAMOBIUS PALLIPESUNDER CONTROLLED CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁEZ-ROYUELA M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Individual mating was compared with mating in groups under laboratory conditions using 64 females and 32 males of white–clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes. Mating in groups took place at a density of 24 animals/m2 placed in two 1m2 fibreglass tanks (16 females and 8 males/tank. Individual pairing was made in net plastic cubic boxes of 0.25 × 0.25 m bottom surface placed in 1m2 fibreglass tanks (8 boxes/tank. Percentages of mating and spawning were similar in both treatments (100 and 93.7% in groups and 96.9 and 93.7% in individual pairing. However, pleopodal egg number and survival rate 78 days after spawning (phase VIII-IX of embryonic development were higher in females mated in groups (67 and 57.4% than those individually inseminated (26 and 25.9%. Possible causes of lower egg survival rate of individually mated females are discussed.

  12. The effectiveness of peer support groups in psychosis : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; van Busschbach, J. T.; van der Gaag, M.; Stant, A. D.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a (minimally) guided peer support group (GPSG) for people with psychosis on social network, social support, self-efficacy, self-esteem, and quality of life, and to evaluate the intervention and its economic consequences. Method: In a multi-center randomized

  13. Control of olefin geometry in macrocyclic ring-closing metathesis using a removable silyl group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yikai; Jimenez, Miguel; Hansen, Anders S; Raiber, Eun-Ang; Schreiber, Stuart L; Young, Damian W

    2011-06-22

    Introducing a silyl group at one of the internal olefin positions in diolefinic substrates results in E-selective olefin formation in macrocyclic ring-forming metathesis. The application of this method to a range of macrocyclic (E)-alkenylsiloxanes is described. Protodesilylation of alkenylsiloxane products yields novel Z-configured macrocycles.

  14. Family Trauma and Dysfunction in Sexually Abused Female Adolescent Psychiatric Control Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Differences in family trauma, stressors, and dysfunction among adolescent psychiatric inpatients grouped by sexual abuse self-reports were investigated. Family trauma/dysfunction was determined from a composite score derived from the Traumatic Antecedents Scale. The results indicated that sexually abused adolescents reported more family…

  15. Influence of controlled and uncontrolled interventions on Twitter in different target groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maanen, P.P. van; Aarts, O.; Boertjes, E.; Wijn, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the influence of interventions on Twitter users is studied. We define influence in a) number of participants, b) size of the audience, c) amount of activity, and d) reach. Influence is studied for four different target groups: a) politicians, b) journalists, c) employees and d) the

  16. Controlling the emission wavelength in group III-V semiconductor laser diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-12-29

    Methods are provided for modifying the emission wavelength of a semiconductor quantum well laser diode, e.g. by blue shifting the emission wavelength. The methods can be applied to a variety of semiconductor quantum well laser diodes, e.g. group III-V semiconductor quantum wells. The group III-V semiconductor can include AlSb, AlAs, Aln, AlP, BN, GaSb, GaAs, GaN, GaP, InSb, InAs, InN, and InP, and group III-V ternary semiconductors alloys such as AlxGai.xAs. The methods can results in a blue shifting of about 20 meV to 350 meV, which can be used for example to make group III-V semiconductor quantum well laser diodes with an emission that is orange or yellow. Methods of making semiconductor quantum well laser diodes and semiconductor quantum well laser diodes made therefrom are also provided.

  17. A cluster randomized controlled platform trial comparing group MEmory specificity training (MEST) to group psychoeducation and supportive counselling (PSC) in the treatment of recurrent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Hitchcock, Caitlin; Bevan, Anna; McKinnon, Anna; Gillard, Julia; Dahm, Theresa; Chadwick, Isobel; Panesar, Inderpal; Breakwell, Lauren; Mueller, Viola; Rodrigues, Evangeline; Rees, Catrin; Gormley, Siobhan; Schweizer, Susanne; Watson, Peter; Raes, Filip; Jobson, Laura; Dalgleish, Tim

    2018-06-01

    Impaired ability to recall specific autobiographical memories is characteristic of depression, which when reversed, may have therapeutic benefits. This cluster-randomized controlled pilot trial investigated efficacy and aspects of acceptability, and feasibility of MEmory Specificity Training (MEST) relative to Psychoeducation and Supportive Counselling (PSC) for Major Depressive Disorder (N = 62). A key aim of this study was to determine a range of effect size estimates to inform a later phase trial. Assessments were completed at baseline, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. The cognitive process outcome was memory specificity. The primary clinical outcome was symptoms on the Beck Depression Inventory-II at 3-month follow-up. The MEST group demonstrated greater improvement in memory specificity relative to PSC at post-intervention (d = 0.88) and follow-up (d = 0.74), relative to PSC. Both groups experienced a reduction in depressive symptoms at 3-month follow-up (d = 0.67). However, there was no support for a greater improvement in depressive symptoms at 3 months following MEST relative to PSC (d = -0.04). Although MEST generated changes on memory specificity and improved depressive symptoms, results provide no indication that MEST is superior to PSC in the resolution of self-reported depressive symptoms. Implications for later-phase definitive trials of MEST are discussed. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechntate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-07-05

    {sup 99}Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) varying from 9.5 x 10{sup 5} to 3.2 x 10{sup 3} mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K{sub d} remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10{sup 3} - 1.8 x 10{sup 3} mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO{sub 4}{sup -} can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing.

  19. Comparison of central hemodynamic parameters for young basketball athletes and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yahui; Fan, Xiaobing; Qi, Lin; Xu, Lisheng; Du, Chenglin

    2017-12-28

    Long-term exercise training may have negative effects on cardiovascular functions. Measurement and calculation of central hemodynamic parameters can comprehensively evaluate the cardiovascular functions. This study aims to compare the central hemodynamics between young basketball athletes and matched controls. Total 19 young long-term trained male basketball athletes and 17 matched male recreationally active controls participated. The central hemodynamic parameters such as central blood pressure, pulse pressure, heart rate (HR), augmentation index normalised to 75 bpm (AIx@HR75), augmentation index (AIx), ejection duration (ED), sub-endocardial viability ratio (SEVR) were measured, and total peripheral resistance (TPR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were calculated. Non-parameter tests and t-test were used to analyse the central hemodynamic parameters between athletes and controls. HR (56 ± 5 bpm versus 79 ± 9 bpm, p parameters analysis.

  20. In vitro assessment of CYP1A2 and 2C9 inhibition potential of Withania somnifera and Centella asiatica in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savai, Jay; Varghese, Alice; Pandita, Nancy; Chintamaneni, Meena

    2015-06-01

    Several herbal drugs and allopathic medicines when co-administered can lead to severe herb-drug interactions. Hence, this study was undertaken in order to assess the in vitro inhibition potential of Withania somnifera and Centella asiatica with cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and 2C9 enzyme using human liver microsomes. Inhibitory potential of crude extracts of both the medicinal plants along with their principal phytoconstituents were investigated using selective probe substrate technique. IC50, Ki values and mode of inhibition were determined. The results of the study revealed that W. somnifera showed no significant interaction with both the isoforms of CYP. However, ethanolic extract of C. asiatica significantly inhibited both CYP1A2 (IC50 value - 42.23±3.65 μg/mL/Ki value - 14.93±4.59 μg/mL) and 2C9 enzyme (IC50 value - 48.41±4.64 μg/mL/Ki value - 23.89±3.14 μg/mL) in a competitive manner. The flavonoids, quercetin and kaempferol showed potent (IC50 values less than 10 μM) inhibition of CYP1A2 activity with no significant inhibition of CYP2C9 enzyme. Thus, these findings of the study might be helpful for safe and effective use of C. asiatica in clinical practice. However, its in vivo interaction study in humans is still warranted.

  1. Antisense Proline-Arginine RAN dipeptides linked to C9ORF72-ALS/FTD form toxic nuclear aggregates that initiate in vitro and in vivo neuronal death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xinmei; Tan, Wenzhi; Westergard, Thomas; Krishnamurthy, Karthik; ShamamandriMarkandaiah, Shashirekha; Shi, Yingxiao; Lin, Shaoyu; Shneider, Neil A.; Monaghan, John; Pandey, Udai B.; Pasinelli, Piera; Ichida, Justin K.; Trotti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Expanded GGGGCC nucleotide repeats within the C9ORF72 gene are the most common genetic mutation associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Sense and antisense transcripts of these expansions are translated to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DRPs). We employed primary cortical and motor neuron cultures, live-cell imaging, and transgenic fly models and found that the arginine-rich dipeptides, in particular Proline-Arginine (PR), are potently neurotoxic. Factors that anticipated their neurotoxicity included aggregation in nucleoli, decreased number of processing bodies, and stress granules formation, implying global translational dysregulation as path accountable for toxicity. Nuclear PR aggregates were also found in human-induced motor neurons and postmortem spinal cord tissues from C9ORF72 ALS and ALS/FTD patients. Intronic G4C2 transcripts, but not loss of C9ORF72 protein, are also toxic to motor and cortical neurons. Interestingly, G4C2 transcript-mediated neurotoxicity synergizes with that of PR aggregates, suggesting convergence of mechanisms. PMID:25521377

  2. Characterization of the Biosynthetic Operon for the Antibacterial Peptide Herbicolin in Pantoea vagans Biocontrol Strain C9-1 and Incidence in Pantoea Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Tim; Lansdell, Theresa A.; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Ishimaru, Carol A.; Smits, Theo H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Pantoea vagans C9-1 is a biocontrol strain that produces at least two antibiotics inhibiting the growth of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease of pear and apple. One antibiotic, herbicolin I, was purified from culture filtrates of P. vagans C9-1 and determined to be 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine, also known as Nß-epoxysuccinamoyl-DAP-valine. A plasposon library was screened for mutants that had lost the ability to produce herbicolin I. It was shown that mutants had reduced biocontrol efficacy in immature pear assays. The biosynthetic gene cluster in P. vagans C9-1 was identified by sequencing the flanking regions of the plasposon insertion sites. The herbicolin I biosynthetic gene cluster consists of 10 coding sequences (CDS) and is located on the 166-kb plasmid pPag2. Sequence comparisons identified orthologous gene clusters in Pantoea agglomerans CU0119 and Serratia proteamaculans 568. A low incidence of detection of the biosynthetic cluster in a collection of 45 Pantoea spp. from biocontrol, environmental, and clinical origins showed that this is a rare trait among the tested strains. PMID:22504810

  3. Improved prognosis after using mild hypothermia to treat cardiorespiratory arrest due to a cardiac cause: comparison with a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón, Sergio; Cortés, Marcelino; Salto, María L; Benittez, Luiz C; Rubio, Rafael; Juárez, Miriam; López de Sá, Esteban; Bueno, Héctor; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández Avilés, Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Patients who survive a cardiac arrest have a poor short-term prognosis in terms of mortality and neurological function. The use of mild hypothermia has been investigated in only a few randomized studies, but appears to be effective for treating these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of this treatment on survival and neurological outcomes. We compared mild hypothermia and usual treatment in patients who had experienced a prolonged cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia and who showed signs of neurological damage. Patient were divided into two groups: a control group of 28 patients and a group of 41 patients who were treated with hypothermia. Patients were assessed at discharge and at 6 months. There was no significant difference between the two groups in baseline characteristics, including those of the cardiac arrest, or in the time to treatment. At discharge, neurological status was good in 18 patients (43.9%) in the hypothermia group but in only five (17.9%) in the control group (risk ratio=2.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.98; P=.029). At 6 months after discharge, neurological status was found to be good in 19 patients (46.3%) in the treatment group and six (21.4%) in the control group (risk ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-3.36; P=.038). The effect of hypothermia may have been affected by various confounding factors. Our findings demonstrate that hypothermic treatment after cardiac arrest prolonged by ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia helps improve the prognosis of anoxic encephalopathy.

  4. Optimal Control of a Wind Farm Group Using the WindEx System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kacejko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present achievements obtained in implementing the framework project N R01 0021 06 in the Power System Department of Lublin University of Technology. The result of the work was “A system of optimal wind farm power control in the conditions of limited transmission capabilities of power networks”, which one of two main modules is a state estimator. The featured wind farm control system was integrated with a SCADA dispatcher system WindEx using the WebSVC service.

  5. Optimal Control of a Wind Farm Group Using the WindEx System

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Kacejko; Michał Wydra; Robert Jędrychowski

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present achievements obtained in implementing the framework project N R01 0021 06 in the Power System Department of Lublin University of Technology. The result of the work was “A system of optimal wind farm power control in the conditions of limited transmission capabilities of power networks”, which one of two main modules is a state estimator. The featured wind farm control system was integrated with a SCADA dispatcher system WindEx using the WebSVC service.

  6. Prevention and Control Program for Cardiovascular Diseases in Turkish Population: PRE-CONTROL Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, Ömer; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ergene, Oktay; Arıcı, Mustafa; Derici, Ülver; Bakaç, Göksel; Güllü, Sevim; Sain Güven, Gülay

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death throughout the world. Despite its high prevalence, the atherosclerotic process can be slowed and its consequences markedly reduced by preventive measures. The lack of risk factor awareness is a major barrier. We aimed to assess total CV risk, determine the knowledge and awareness regarding CVD, and evaluate the effectiveness of education program in urban population of Turkey. A 24-item questionnaire was used to detect CV risk factors and the awareness of participants about CVD. The feedback data for the education program were collected by either questionnaires or individual interviews with participants. For comparison of total CVD risk in men and women in different age groups, a sample t test was used. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. The prevalence of hyperlipidemia was established to be 41.3%. Nearly one-quarter of the women and one-third of the men were smokers (p < 0.001). One-quarter of the responders had a history of hypertension (men: 21.5%, women: 18.6%), and one-tenth were diabetic. The high CV risk rate was more pronounced among men (p < 0.01) and those with low socioeconomic level (p < 0.01). Awareness regarding CV risk factors following the educational program increased from 6.6% to 12.7% for high blood pressure, from 3.9% to 9.2% for diabetes mellitus, and from 10.2% to 15.1% for elevated cholesterol levels. All the increases were statistically significant. The educational program significantly increased the awareness of CVD and risk factors. The prevalence of CV risk factors was higher in low socioeconomic level groups. The knowledge and awareness of the risk factors for CVD before the education program was very low in our study group. The awareness of CVD and risk factors significantly increased following our education programs. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Out of the group, out of control? The brain responds to social exclusion with changes in cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Marte; Jonas, Kai J

    2013-10-01

    The effects of social exclusion are far-reaching, both on an emotional and behavioral level. The present study investigates whether social exclusion also directly influences basic cognitive functions, specifically the ability to exert cognitive control. Participants were either excluded or included while playing an online game. To test whether exclusion altered cognitive control, we measured the electrophysiological responses to a Go/No Go task. In this task participants had to withhold a response (No Go) on a small number of trials while the predominant tendency was to make an overt (Go) response. Compared to Go trials the event-related potential evoked by No Go trials elicited an increased N2, reflecting the detection of the response conflict, followed by an increased P3, reflecting the inhibition of the predominant response. The N2 effect was larger for participants who had experienced exclusion, while the P3 effect was smaller. This indicates that exclusion leads to an increased ability to detect response conflicts, while at the same time exclusion decreases the neural processes that underlie the inhibition of unwanted behavior.

  8. Internet based self-help therapy versus waitlist control group for persons with anxiety disorders: A randomised feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten Munthe; Lindschou, Jane; Gluud, Christian

    ) FearFighter or B) waitlist control group. Participants are persons with a diagnosis of social phobia, agora phobia, phobia or panic disorder. The intervention with FearFighter is a nine step cognitive behavioural self-help therapy program delivered over the internet over nine weeks. Participants...

  9. Central model predictive control of a group of domestic heat pumps, case study for a small district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; Fink, J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Helfert, Markus; Krempels, Karl-Heinz; Donnellan, Brian; Klein, Cornel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate optimal control of a group of heat pumps. Each heat pump provides space heating and domestic hot water to a single household. Besides a heat pump, each house has a buffer for domestic hot water and a floor heating system for space heating. The paper describes models and

  10. Identity Development as a Buffer of Adolescent Risk Behaviors in the Context of Peer Group Pressure and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Tara M.; Ellis, Wendy E.; Wolfe, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined identity development as a moderator of the relation between peer group pressure and control and adolescents' engagement in risk behaviors. Participants (n = 1070; M[subscript age] = 15.45 years) completed a self-report measure of "identity exploration", the degree to which they have explored a variety of self-relevant values, beliefs…

  11. Disappointment and drop-out rate after being allocated to control group in a smoking cessation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindström, D; Sundberg-Petersson, I; Adami, J

    2010-01-01

    If a patient agrees to take part in a randomised trial it is reasonable to presume that the patient would prefer to be allocated into the intervention. This study's aim was to investigate how patients react after they have been randomised into control group....

  12. [Gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase in chronic polyarthritis. I. Comparison with a control group and relationship with alkaline phosphatase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, R

    1977-01-01

    Gamma-GT, alcaline phosphatase and other parameters of abnormal liver functions were estimated in 54 consecutive in-patients having active RA but without a previous history or clinical signs of liver disease, and compared with a matched control group, suffering from degenerative rheumatic disease. There was a slight to moderate elevation of gamma-GT in 40.4% of the RA-patients (mean value 27.2 IU/l) and in 32.1% (mean value 22.3 IU/l) of the control group, respectively. The difference was not significant. Abnormal values in the control group occurred mainly in patients with peri-arthropathia of the shoulder, before mobilisation under anaethetic (3 of 5) and - coxarthrosis before total hip replacement (4 of 12). Alkaline phosphatase was elevated in 25.9% of the RA-patients (mean value 41.3 +/- 21.9 IU/l) and in 14.8% of the control group (mean value 34.3 +/- 15.9 IU/l). The difference was significant. There was a correlation between gamma-GT and alcaline phosphatase in the RA-group (r = 0.549, p less than 0.001) but not in the control group (r = 0.102). Abnormal values found in the control group were mainly found among patients with osteoporosis, following fractures, and coxarthrosis. The frequency of abnormal results and the value of the means increased with raising disease activity. Two groups of 30 and 32 patients, respectively, were examined at intervals of 2 or 4 weeks over a period of 6-10 and 18 months, respectively, and showed temporary elevations os gamma-GT in 3/4 of all patients, of GOT in 2/3 of alcaline phosphatase in 1/2 and of GPT in 1/3. Compared with other parameters of liver disease gamma-GT did not react in a different but in a more sensitive way. In our opinion it is the most sensitive indicator of reactive changes of the liver in RA.

  13. Automation of pharmaceutical warehouse using groups robots with remote climate control and video surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuravska, I. M.; Popel, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complex solution for automation pharmaceutical warehouse, including the implementation of climate-control, video surveillance with remote access to video, robotics selection of medicine with the optimization of the robot motion. We describe all the elements of local area network (LAN) necessary to solve all these problems.

  14. Social Bonds, Early Trauma and Smoking: Evidence of the Group Specific Relevance of Control Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Rebecca; DeFronzo, James

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed data from 595 adults to evaluate potential effects of social bonds and childhood trauma on tobacco smoking. Although both control factors and childhood experiences affected smoking, religious belief and belief in importance of conforming to moral and social norms had more important and robust negative relationships to smoking than…

  15. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy and 1 year after delivery in primiparous women compared with a control group of nulliparous women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bent Brandt; Svare, Jens; Viktrup, Lars

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the impact of the first pregnancy and delivery on the prevalence and types of urinary incontinence during pregnancy and 1 year after delivery. METHODS: The study was a prospective cohort study with a control group. Primiparous women, who delivered in our department from June...... 2003 to July 2005, participated. The women filled out a questionnaire 2-3 days after the delivery and a new questionnaire after 1 year. The questionnaires comprised basic characteristics and symptoms of urinary incontinence. An attempted age-matched control group of nulliparous women was included......, and filled out similar questionnaires. Prevalences and types of urinary incontinence, and a combined severity- and bother-score (ICIQ-SF score) among the incontinent women, were calculated and compared. RESULTS: The two groups differed significantly in age and most basic characteristics. During pregnancy...

  16. The Effects of Peer-Controlled or Moderated Online Collaboration on Group Problem Solving and Related Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This study investigated the relative benefits of peer-controlled and moderated online collaboration during group problem solving. Thirty-five self-selected groups of four or five students were randomly assigned to the two conditions, which used the same online collaborative tool to solve twelve problem scenarios in an undergraduate statistics course. A score for the correctness of the solutions and a reasoning score were analyzed. A survey was administered to reveal differences in students' related attitudes. Three conclusions were reached: 1. Groups assigned to moderated forums displayed significantly higher reasoning scores than those in the peer-controlled condition, but the moderation did not affect correctness of solutions. 2. Students in the moderated forums reported being more likely to choose to use an optional online forum for future collaborations. 3. Students who reported having no difficulty during collaboration reported being more likely to choose to use an optional online forum in the future.

  17. Effects of Long-Term Speech-in-Noise Training in Air Traffic Controllers and High Frequency Suppression. A Control Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Zaballos, María Teresa; Ramos de Miguel, Ángel; Pérez Plasencia, Daniel; Zaballos González, María Luisa; Ramos Macías, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate 1) if air traffic controllers (ATC) perform better than non-air traffic controllers in an open-set speech-in-noise test because of their experience with radio communications, and 2) if high-frequency information (>8000 Hz) substantially improves speech-in-noise perception across populations. The control group comprised 28 normal-hearing subjects, and the target group comprised 48 ATCs aged between 19 and 55 years who were native Spanish speakers. The hearing -in-noise abilities of the two groups were characterized under two signal conditions: 1) speech tokens and white noise sampled at 44.1 kHz (unfiltered condition) and 2) speech tokens plus white noise, each passed through a 4th order Butterworth filter with 70 and 8000 Hz low and high cutoffs (filtered condition). These tests were performed at signal-to-noise ratios of +5, 0, and -5-dB SNR. The ATCs outperformed the control group in all conditions. The differences were statistically significant in all cases, and the largest difference was observed under the most difficult conditions (-5 dB SNR). Overall, scores were higher when high-frequency components were not suppressed for both groups, although statistically significant differences were not observed for the control group at 0 dB SNR. The results indicate that ATCs are more capable of identifying speech in noise. This may be due to the effect of their training. On the other hand, performance seems to decrease when the high frequency components of speech are removed, regardless of training.

  18. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393). © FPI, Inc.

  19. Group cognitive–behavioral therapy in insomnia: a cross-sectional case-controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Mao H; Ji Y; Xu Y; Tang G; Yu Z; Xu L; Shen C; Wang W

    2017-01-01

    Hongjing Mao,1,* Yutian Ji,2,* You Xu,1 Guangzheng Tang,1 Zhenghe Yu,1 Lianlian Xu,1 Chanchan Shen,2 Wei Wang1,2 1Department of Psychosomatic Disorders, The Seventh People’s Hospital, Mental Health Center, 2Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Group cognitive–behavioral therapy...

  20. Distributed Model Predictive Control over Multiple Groups of Vehicles in Highway Intelligent Space for Large Scale System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the three time warning distances for solving the large scale system of multiple groups of vehicles safety driving characteristics towards highway tunnel environment based on distributed model prediction control approach. Generally speaking, the system includes two parts. First, multiple vehicles are divided into multiple groups. Meanwhile, the distributed model predictive control approach is proposed to calculate the information framework of each group. Each group of optimization performance considers the local optimization and the neighboring subgroup of optimization characteristics, which could ensure the global optimization performance. Second, the three time warning distances are studied based on the basic principles used for highway intelligent space (HIS and the information framework concept is proposed according to the multiple groups of vehicles. The math model is built to avoid the chain avoidance of vehicles. The results demonstrate that the proposed highway intelligent space method could effectively ensure driving safety of multiple groups of vehicles under the environment of fog, rain, or snow.

  1. Inhibitory Effects of Eight Green Tea Catechins on Cytochrome P450 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Takashi; Fujisawa, Haruka; Nakamura, Ami; Takahashi, Natsuko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is a traditional beverage that has been enjoyed by the Japanese to this day. Recently, there has been an increase in the consumption of green tea beverage having high concentrations of catechins, such as (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG). Many people tend to ingest large amounts of catechins through the frequent consumption of green tea beverage, and this dietary habit may lead to unwanted interactions between the catechins in green tea and medicinal drug. The inhibitory effects of eight green tea catechins on drug metabolizing enzymes, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4, were investigated in human liver microsomes. Incubation was initiated by the addition of cocktail probe drugs that served as specific substrates for each CYP, and the resulting metabolites were analyzed by LC-MS. From a comparison of the fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of the eight green tea catechins, it was found that non-gallated catechins did not inhibit CYPs, whereas gallated catechins inhibited all CYPs except CYP2D6. Among them, CYP2C9 was most strongly inhibited by (-)-catechin-3-O-gallate (CG) (7.60 µM), and CYP1A2 was most strongly inhibited by EGCG (8.93 µM). Catechin gallate exhibited non-competitive inhibition of CYP2C9, and its Ki value was 9.76 ± 0.47µM. The present study is the first to report the inhibitory effect of CG on CYP2C9. In contrast, EGCG showed competitive inhibition of CYP1A2, and its Ki value was 14.3 ± 0.09 µM. Previous reports had predicted that plasma EGCG concentration reached 7.4 µM after ingesting green tea having high concentrations of catechins. That concentration of EGCG is equivalent to one-half to one-third of its Ki value for CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in this study. The ingestion of beverages containing large amounts of green tea catechins together with drugs that are metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 should be avoided. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For

  2. Multicomponent interdisciplinary group intervention for self-management of fibromyalgia: a mixed-methods randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bourgault

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the efficacy of the PASSAGE Program, a structured multicomponent interdisciplinary group intervention for the self-management of FMS.A mixed-methods randomized controlled trial (intervention (INT vs. waitlist (WL was conducted with patients suffering from FMS. Data were collected at baseline (T0, at the end of the intervention (T1, and 3 months later (T2. The primary outcome was change in pain intensity (0-10. Secondary outcomes were fibromyalgia severity, pain interference, sleep quality, pain coping strategies, depression, health-related quality of life, patient global impression of change (PGIC, and perceived pain relief. Qualitative group interviews with a subset of patients were also conducted. Complete data from T0 to T2 were available for 43 patients.The intervention had a statistically significant impact on the three PGIC measures. At the end of the PASSAGE Program, the percentages of patients who perceived overall improvement in their pain levels, functioning and quality of life were significantly higher in the INT Group (73%, 55%, 77% respectively than in the WL Group (8%, 12%, 20%. The same differences were observed 3 months post-intervention (Intervention group: 62%, 43%, 38% vs Waitlist Group: 13%, 13%, 9%. The proportion of patients who reported ≥ 50% pain relief was also significantly higher in the INT Group at the end of the intervention (36% vs 12% and 3 months post-intervention (33% vs 4%. Results of the qualitative analysis were in line with the quantitative findings regarding the efficacy of the intervention. The improvement, however, was not reflected in the primary outcome and other secondary outcome measures.The PASSAGE Program was effective in helping FMS patients gain a sense of control over their symptoms. We suggest including PGIC in future clinical trials on FMS as they appear to capture important aspects of the patients' experience.International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number

  3. Implementing structure and control over unofficial inventories in a multispecialty group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, M

    1994-02-01

    Materiel managers have been in control of most aspects of the supply chain except for the inventories of the end users, which account for 70 percent of the inventory supply dollars. When the Materials Manager at Lexington Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky, was approached by the Clinic's Chief Executive Officer to implement cost containment measures, the Materials Manager seized the opportunity to implement a six-step program aimed at controlling those supply dollars. Through requisition training, enforcing approval levels, limiting the number of requisitioners, and establishing par levels on floor inventories, the clinic's "unofficial" inventory supply dollars were reduced by 7 percent in the first 12 departments where the par levels were established. The program was hailed as a tremendous success and a positive experience for everyone, from nurses to warehouse clerks.

  4. [Effect of high altitude hypoxia on the activity and protein expression of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Yong-Nian; Yuan, Ming; Li, Yong-Ping; Yang, Ying-Zhong; Zhu, Jun-Bo

    2012-02-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of high altitude hypoxia on the activity and protein expression of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19. Rats from plain (P) and rats with acute middle altitude hypoxia (AMH), chronic middle altitude hypoxia (CMH), acute high altitude hypoxia (AHH) and chronic high altitude hypoxia (CHH) were administered orally phenytoin sodium (PHT) and omeprazole (OMZ) to evaluate the activity of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19, separately. The serum concentrations of PHT and metabolite 4'-hydroxyphenytoin (HPPH) at 12 h after treatment and the serum concentrations of OMZ and metabolite 5-hydroxy omeprazole (5-OHOMZ) at 3 h after treatment were determined by RP-HPLC. The activity of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 was evaluated by the ratio of HPPH to PHT and the ratio of 5-OHOMZ to OMZ, respectively. The protein expressions of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 were determined by ELISA method. The activities of CYP2C9 (HPPH/PHT) in P, AMH, CMH, AHH and CHH were 0.67 +/- 0.31, 0.75 +/- 0.29, 0.76 +/- 0.23, 0.79 +/- 0.31 and 0.75 +/- 0.18, respectively, and the activities of CYP2C19 (5-OHOMZ/OMZ) in P, AMH, CMH, AHH and CHH were 0.17 +/- 0.06, 0.20 +/- 0.10, 0.11 +/- 0.05, 0.37 +/- 0.13 and 0.19 +/- 0.05, respectively. The protein expressions of CYP2C9 in P, AMH, CMH, AHH and CHH were 4.20 +/- 1.27, 3.95 +/- 0.81, 3.93 +/- 1.11, 4.32 +/- 1.03 and 4.12 +/- 0.86 ng x g(-1), respectively, and the protein expressions of CYP2C19 in P, AMH, CMH, AHH and CHH were 3.91 +/- 1.82, 3.63 +/- 2.07, 2.55 +/- 0.85, 4.78 +/- 2.37 and 3.51 +/- 1.03 ng x g(-1), respectively. The activities and protein expressions of CYP2C9 in AMH, CMH, AHH and CHH were not significantly different with those of P. The protein expressions of CYP2C19 in AMH, CMH, AHH and CHH were not significantly different with those of P, but the activity of CYP2C19 in AHH was significantly higher than that of P. This study found significant changes in the activity of CYP2C19 under the special environment of acute high altitude hypoxia.

  5. Testing device for pipeline groups and control method for testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Shinji; Kajiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Tsuchida, Kenji; Tachibana, Yukio; Shigehiro, Katsuya; Mahara, Yoichi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a testing device main body disposed to a rail, a movable mechanism positioning from a reference point, a circumferential direction scanning mechanism, an axial direction scanning mechanism, a posture control mechanism, and a testing probe. Upon testing of pipelines, the detection device main body and auxiliary members are moved from a reference point previously set on a rail for numerical control toward pipelines to be tested in a state where the axial direction scanning mechanism and the testing probe are suspended in the axial direction. The testing is conducted by controlling the position of the testing probe in the axial direction of the pipeline by means of the axial direction scanning mechanism, and scanning the testing probe to the outer circumference of the pipeline along the circumferential track by way of the circumferential direction scanning mechanism. The device can be extremely reduced in the thickness, and can be moved with no interference with pipelines and other obstacles by remote operation even under such undesired condition as the pipelines being crowded, so that non-destructive testing can be conducted accurately. (N.H.)

  6. Performance and parasite control of different genetic groups of lambs finished in irrigated pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Fernandes Júnior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the following four genetic groups of hair sheep: Santa Inês (SI, Morada Nova (MN, Brazilian Somali (BS, and the F1 1/2Dorper x 1/2Morada Nova crossbreed on traits related to growth and parasitic infection. Thirty-three male lambs of the same age and of simple birth, under the same pre-weaning management conditions were used in the experiment. After weaning the animals were housed in a completely randomized design in paddocks made of Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania. Along the course of the research, the performance of the four groups of sheep was observed to be negatively affected by gastrointestinal parasites, but there was a genotype effect to the average daily weight gain (ADWG, where the SI and F1 genotypes presented higher values. The effects of genotype, time and genotype x time interaction were significant in weight and corporal score (CS measurements. The BS lambs had the highest CS values throughout the experiment despite not presenting greater weight gain when compared to the SI and F1 breeds. There were also significant effects of time and genotype x time interaction for packed cell volume (PCV and FAMACHA© score (FAM and only the time effect was significant in the total number of eggs per gram (EPG and total plasma protein (TPP. The MN lambs showed higher PCV values and unlike the other groups, presented a FAMACHA© score below 3 and PCV above 23% even having a higher EPG tendency, especially in the initial phase, indicating a possible higher resilience to infection caused by gastrointestinal parasites.

  7. Thiol groups controls on arsenite binding by organic matter: new experimental and modeling evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Pédrot, Mathieu; Marsac, Rémi; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-12-15

    Although it has been suggested that several mechanisms can describe the direct binding of As(III) to organic matter (OM), more recently, the thiol functional group of humic acid (HA) was shown to be an important potential binding site for As(III). Isotherm experiments on As(III) sorption to HAs, that have either been grafted with thiol or not, were thus conducted to investigate the preferential As(III) binding sites. There was a low level of binding of As(III) to HA, which was strongly dependent on the abundance of the thiols. Experimental datasets were used to develop a new model (the modified PHREEQC-Model VI), which defines HA as a group of discrete carboxylic, phenolic and thiol sites. Protonation/deprotonation constants were determined for each group of sites (pKA=4.28±0.03; ΔpKA=2.13±0.10; pKB=7.11±0.26; ΔpKB=3.52±0.49; pKS=5.82±0.052; ΔpKS=6.12±0.12 for the carboxylic, phenolic and thiols sites, respectively) from HAs that were either grafted with thiol or not. The pKS value corresponds to that of single thiol-containing organic ligands. Two binding models were tested: the Mono model, which considered that As(III) is bound to the HA thiol site as monodentate complexes, and the Tri model, which considered that As(III) is bound as tridentate complexes. A simulation of the available literature datasets was used to validate the Mono model, with logKMS=2.91±0.04, i.e. the monodentate hypothesis. This study highlighted the importance of thiol groups in OM reactivity and, notably, determined the As(III) concentration bound to OM (considering that Fe is lacking or at least negligible) and was used to develop a model that is able to determine the As(III) concentrations bound to OM. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The Potential for Genetic Control of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes. Report of a Consultants Group Meeting. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division Programme on the research and development of insect pest control methodology, emphasis has been placed on the basic and applied aspects of implementing the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Special emphasis has always been directed at the assembly of technological progress into workable systems that can be implemented in developing countries. The general intention is to solve problems associated with insect pests that have an adverse impact on public health and the production of food and fibre. For certain insects, SIT has proven to be a powerful method for control, but for a variety of reasons this technology has not been tried on an operational scale for most of the pest species of insects that exact a toll on the endeavors of humans. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division convened a Consultants Group Meeting to examine 'The Potential for Genetic Control of Malaria-Transmitting Mosquitoes', with emphasis to be placed on the SIT. A group of five scientists met, 26-30 April 1993, to examine the current status and the future potential of genetic control for malaria mosquitoes. In most of the tropical, developing countries, and to some extent in temperate regions of the world, Anopheles mosquitoes cause havoc by transmitting malaria, a dreaded disease that causes high mortality amongst children and diminishes productivity of adults. The importance of malaria as a deterrent to further economic growth in a large part of the world cannot be over-emphasized. Malaria is a severe problem because there are inadequacies in the technology available for control. As a result of the deliberations at the meeting, the consultants prepared a list of recommendations concerning the consensus opinions about the development of genetic control for malaria vector control. This report presents the findings and recommendations of the Consultants Group Meeting.

  9. The Effect of Single-Leg Stance on Dancer and Control Group Static Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilroy, Elisabeth A; Crabtree, Olivia M; Crosby, Brittany; Parker, Amanda; Barfield, William R

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic differences of static balance between female dancers (D) with at least seven years of dance experience and female non-dancers (ND) who were typical college students. Participants were tested in single-leg stance. Both the dominant leg (DL) and non-dominant leg (NDL) were tested with the participants shod (S) and barefoot (BF). Kinetic variables (vertical, medio-lateral [ML], antero-posterior [AP] maximum ground reaction forces (GRF), and center of pressure (COP) ML and AP) were measured by a Bertec force platform at 1000 Hz with participants S and BF. Each subject's stance was measured over 3 × 30-second intervals. No significant differences (p≥0.05) existed between groups for height, body mass, or age. Significant differences existed between groups for balance time, AP GRF in both BF and S conditions for both DL and NDL, and ML GRF in BF NDL and S DL and NDL conditions. D and ND in BF and S conditions with DL and NDL static stance demonstrate different AP and ML GRF when balancing over a 30-second time interval. Data may suggest that ND are more prone to lose their balance. Further investigation is warranted to understand whether individuals in the rehabilitative field and athletic populations can use dance therapy for injury prevention and rehabilitation.

  10. Wormlike micelles in poly(oxyethylene) surfactant solution: Growth control through hydrophilic-group size variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Toufiq; Aramaki, Kenji

    2008-11-01

    Viscoelastic micellar solutions are formed in poly(oxyethylene) cholesteryl ether (ChEO(m), m=15, 30) aqueous solutions on addition of tri(ethyleneglycol) mono n-dodecyl ether (C(12)EO(3)). The steady-shear and dynamic rheological behavior of the systems is characteristic of wormlike micellar solution. In either system, the plateau modulus (G(0)) and relaxation time (tau) are found to increase with increasing cosurfactant mixing fractions. The plateau modulus of the ChEO(30)-C(12)EO(3) system at the maximum viscosity region is found to be higher than that in the ChEO(15)-C(12)EO(3) system at the maximum viscosity region, whereas for the relaxation time the opposite relation is found. The maximum viscosities obtained in the two systems are of the same order of magnitude. In the ChEO(30)-C(12)EO(3) system, the maximum viscosity is obtained at a higher cosurfactant mixing fraction than that in the ChEO(15)-C(12)EO(3) system. It is concluded that decreasing the head-group size of the hydrophilic surfactant favors micellar growth. Monolaurin, another hydrophobic surfactant known to induce growth in some systems, is found to cause phase separation before significant micellar growth occurs in ChEO(m) solutions, although the effect of head-group size of ChEO(m) is found to be similar to the ChEO(m)-C(12)EO(3) systems.

  11. [Whooping cough in Spain. Current epidemiology, prevention and control strategies. Recommendations by the Pertussis Working Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Magda; Moreno-Pérez, David; Gil-de Miguel, Angel; González-Romo, Fernando; Moraga-Llop, Fernando A; Arístegui-Fernández, Javier; Goncé-Mellgren, Anna; Bayas, José M; Salleras-Sanmartí, Lluís

    2013-04-01

    A large increase of pertussis incidence has been observed in recent years in countries with high vaccination coverage. Outbreaks of pertussis are increasingly being reported. The age presentation has a bipolar distribution: infants younger 6months that have not initiated or completed a vaccination schedule, and adolescents and adults, due to the lost of natural or vaccine immunity over time. These epidemiological changes justify the need to adopt new vaccination strategies in order to protect young infants and to reduce pertussis incidence in all age groups. Adolescents and adults immunization must be a priority. In the first group, strategy is easy to implement, and with a very low additional cost (to replace dT vaccine by dTap one). Adult vaccination may be more difficult to implement; dT vaccine decennial booster should be replaced by dTap. The immunization of household contacts of newborn infants (cocooning) is the strategy that has a most important impact on infant pertussis. Recently, pregnant women vaccination (after 20weeks of gestation) has been recommended in some countries as the most effective way to protect the newborn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Under-represented students' engagement in secondary science learning: A non-equivalent control group design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann-Hamilton, Joy J.

    conducted. The reliability results prompted exploratory factory analyses, which resulted in two of the three subscale factors, cognitive and behavioral, being retained. One-within one-between subjects ANOVAs, independent samples t-test, and multiple linear regressions were also used to examine the impact of a multicultural science education, multimedia, and individual characteristics on students' engagement in science learning. Results. There were main effects found within subjects on posttest scores for the cognitive and behavioral subscales of student engagement. Both groups, using their respective versions of the multimedia science curriculum, reported increased engagement in science learning. There was also a statistical difference found for the experimental group at posttest on the measure of "online science was more interesting than school science." All five items unique to the posttest related to the multimedia variable were found to be significant predictors of cognitive and/or behavioral engagement. Conclusions. Engagement in science learning increased for both groups of participants; this finding is aligned with other significant research findings that more embracive and relevant pedagogies can potentially benefit all students. The significant difference found for the experimental group in relation to the multimedia usage was moderate and also may have reflected positive responses to other questions about the use of technology in science learning. As all five measures of multimedia usage were found to be significant predictors of student engagement in science learning, the indications were that: (a) technical difficulties did not impede engagement; (b) participants were better able to understand and visualize the physics concepts as they were presented in a variety of ways; (c) participants' abilities to use computers supported engagement; (d) participants in both groups found the online science curriculum more interesting compared to school science learning; and

  13. Comparative effectiveness of Pilates and yoga group exercise interventions for chronic mechanical neck pain: quasi-randomised parallel controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, K; Kava, K; Goldberg, A; Malek, M H; Talley, S A; Tutag-Lehr, V; Hildreth, J

    2016-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of Pilates and yoga group exercise interventions for individuals with chronic neck pain (CNP). Quasi-randomised parallel controlled study. Community, university and private practice settings in four locations. Fifty-six individuals with CNP scoring ≥3/10 on the numeric pain rating scale for >3 months (controls n=17, Pilates n=20, yoga n=19). Exercise participants completed 12 small-group sessions with modifications and progressions supervised by a physiotherapist. The primary outcome measure was the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Secondary outcomes were pain ratings, range of movement and postural measurements collected at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Follow-up was performed 6 weeks after completion of the exercise classes (Week 18). NDI decreased significantly in the Pilates {baseline: 11.1 [standard deviation (SD) 4.3] vs Week 12: 6.8 (SD 4.3); mean difference -4.3 (95% confidence interval -1.64 to -6.7); PPilates and yoga group exercise interventions with appropriate modifications and supervision were safe and equally effective for decreasing disability and pain compared with the control group for individuals with mild-to-moderate CNP. Physiotherapists may consider including these approaches in a plan of care. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01999283. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethnicity, goal striving and schizophrenia: a case-control study of three ethnic groups in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Rosemarie; Leff, Julian; Bhugra, Dinesh; Takei, Nori; Corridan, Bryan

    2004-12-01

    The need to achieve is common to all societies, and failure to do so may have a highly detrimental psychological impact. For those on the margins of mainstream society, especially migrants or descendants of migrants, the impact of failed or poor achievements may increase their vulnerability to mental illness. In a prospective study of schizophrenia in three ethnic groups (White, Indian and African-Caribbean) we studied the impact of goal striving and investigated whether the gap between the poor achievement and the high aspirations of members of some minority ethnic groups was potentially a factor contributing to the development of the illness. The patients and age- and sex-matched controls from their respective communities were asked to rate their perceived current levels of achievement and their past and future expectations in five domains--social standing, housing, education, employment and financial status on a 10-point scale. The control subjects from the three ethnic groups scored similarly in most areas, supporting the validity of inter-ethnic comparisons. The gap between achievement and expectations did not appear to cause high disappointment levels in any group, and in fact only in the domain of housing did the African-Caribbean patients assess their current achievement as being significantly lower than that of their matched controls. Poor housing conditions may be one of the risk factors contributing to the high incidence of schizophrenia in African-Caribbeans.

  15. Habit reversal training and educational group treatments for children with tourette syndrome: A preliminary randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Rachel; Edwards, Katie; King, John; Luzon, Olga; Evangeli, Michael; Stark, Daniel; McFarlane, Fiona; Heyman, Isobel; İnce, Başak; Kodric, Jana; Murphy, Tara

    2016-05-01

    Quality of life of children with Tourette Syndrome (TS) is impacted greatly by its symptoms and their social consequences. Habit Reversal Training (HRT) is effective but has not, until now, been empirically evaluated in groups. This randomised controlled trial evaluated feasibility and preliminary efficacy of eight HRT group sessions compared to eight Education group sessions. Thirty-three children aged 9-13 years with TS or Chronic Tic Disorder took part. Outcomes evaluated were tic severity and quality of life (QoL). Tic severity improvements were found in both groups. Motor tic severity (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale) showed greatest improvements in the HRT group. Both groups showed a strong tendency toward improvements in patient reported QoL. In conclusion, group-based treatments for TS are feasible and exposure to other children with tics did not increase tic expression. HRT led to greater reductions in tic severity than Education. Implications, such as cost-effectiveness of treatment delivery, are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Branched multifunctional polyether polyketals: variation of ketal group structure enables unprecedented control over polymer degradation in solution and within cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoi, Rajesh A; Narayanannair, Jayaprakash K; Hamilton, Jasmine L; Lai, Benjamin F L; Horte, Sonja; Kainthan, Rajesh K; Varghese, Jos P; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2012-09-12

    Multifunctional biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials incorporating specific degradable linkages that respond to various stimuli and with defined degradation profiles are critical to the advancement of targeted nanomedicine. Herein we report, for the first time, a new class of multifunctional dendritic polyether polyketals containing different ketal linkages in their backbone that exhibit unprecedented control over degradation in solution and within the cells. High-molecular-weight and highly compact poly(ketal hydroxyethers) (PKHEs) were synthesized from newly designed α-epoxy-ω-hydroxyl-functionalized AB(2)-type ketal monomers carrying structurally different ketal groups (both cyclic and acyclic) with good control over polymer properties by anionic ring-opening multibranching polymerization. Polymer functionalization with multiple azide and amine groups was achieved without degradation of the ketal group. The polymer degradation was controlled primarily by the differences in the structure and torsional strain of the substituted ketal groups in the main chain, while for polymers with linear (acyclic) ketal groups, the hydrophobicity of the polymer may play an additional role. This was supported by the log P values of the monomers and the hydrophobicity of the polymers determined by fluorescence spectroscopy using pyrene as the probe. A range of hydrolysis half-lives of the polymers at mild acidic pH values was achieved, from a few minutes to a few hundred days, directly correlating with the differences in ketal group structures. Confocal microscopy analyses demonstrated similar degradation profiles for PKHEs within live cells, as seen in solution and the delivery of fluorescent marker to the cytosol. The cell viability measured by MTS assay and blood compatibility determined by complement activation, platelet activation, and coagulation assays demonstrate that PKHEs and their degradation products are highly biocompatible. Taken together, these data

  17. Health-seeking behavior and transmission dynamics in the control of influenza infection among different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shu-Han; Chen, Szu-Chieh; Liao, Chung-Min

    2018-01-01

    It has been found that health-seeking behavior has a certain impact on influenza infection. However, behaviors with/without risk perception on the control of influenza transmission among age groups have not been well quantified. The purpose of this study was to assess to what extent, under scenarios of with/without control and preventive/protective behaviors, the age-specific network-driven risk perception influences influenza infection. A behavior-influenza model was used to estimate the spread rate of age-specific risk perception in response to an influenza outbreak. A network-based information model was used to assess the effect of network-driven risk perception information transmission on influenza infection. A probabilistic risk model was used to assess the infection risk effect of risk perception with a health behavior change. The age-specific overlapping percentage was estimated to be 40%-43%, 55%-60%, and 19%-35% for child, teenage and adult, and elderly age groups, respectively. Individuals perceive the preventive behavior to improve risk perception information transmission among teenage and adult and elderly age groups, but not in the child age group. The population with perceived health behaviors could not effectively decrease the percentage of infection risk in the child age group, whereas for the elderly age group, the percentage of decrease in infection risk was more significant, with a 97.5th percentile estimate of 97%. The present integrated behavior-infection model can help health authorities in communicating health messages for an intertwined belief network in which health-seeking behavior plays a key role in controlling influenza infection.

  18. High Performance Platinum Group Metal Free Membrane Electrode Assemblies through Control of Interfacial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States); Capuano, Christopher [Proton Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States); Atanassov, Plamen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mukerjee, Sanjeev [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Hickner, Michael [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-11-29

    The quantitative goal of this project was to produce a high-performance anion exchange membrane water electrolyzer (AEM-WE) completely free of platinum group metals (PGMs), which could operate for at least 500 hours with less than 50 microV/hour degradation, at 500 mA/cm2. To achieve this goal, work focused on the optimization of electrocatalyst conductivity, with dispersion and utilization in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) improved through refinement of deposition techniques. Critical factors were also explored with significant work undertaken by Northeastern University to further understand catalyst-membrane-ionomer interfaces and how they differ from liquid electrolyte. Water management and optimal cell operational parameters were established through the design, fabrication, and test of a new test station at Proton specific for AEM evaluation. Additionally, AEM material stability and robustness at high potentials and gas evolution conditions were advanced at Penn State.

  19. Peer Group Support on Self-Efficacy, Glicemic Control and Self Care Activities in Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ilkafah, Ilkafah; Kusnanto, Kusnanto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease with many complications. Self-efficacy is a psychosocial aspects refer to patient’s belief about their ability to do Diabetes managements. Self-efficacy can be enhanced by providing a mutual support from other Diabetic patients. This study aimed to analyze the influence of peer group support on self-efficacy, glicemic control and self-care activities of Diabetic patients. Method: This research was a pre-experimental with one-group pre-...

  20. Reducing Delusional Conviction Through a Cognitive-Based Group Training Game: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser eKhazaal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: Michael’s Game is a card game targeting the ability to generate alternative hypotheses to explain a given experience. The main objective was to evaluate the effect of MG on delusional conviction as measured by the primary study outcome: the change in scores on the conviction subscale of the Peters Delusions Inventory (PDI-21. Other variables of interest were the change in scores on the distress and preoccupation subscales of the PDI-21, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale, and belief flexibility assessed with the Maudsley Assessment of Delusions Schedule. Methods: We performed a parallel, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled superiority trial comparing treatment as usual plus participation in Michael’s Game (MG with treatment as usual plus being on a waiting list (TAU in a sample of adult outpatients with psychotic disorders and persistent positive psychotic symptoms at inclusion. Results: The 172 participants were randomised, with 86 included in each study arm. Assessments were performed at inclusion (T1: baseline, at 3 months (T2: post-treatment, and at 6 months after the second assessment (T3: follow-up. At T2, a positive treatment effect was observed on the primary outcome, the PDI-21 conviction subscale (p=0.005. At T3, a sustained effect was observed for the conviction subscale (p=0.002. Further effects were also observed at T3 on the PDI-21 distress (p=0.002 and preoccupation subscales (p=0.001, as well as on one of the MADS measures of belief flexibility (anything against the belief (p=0.001. Conclusions: The study demonstrated some significant beneficial effect of MG. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN37178153/Funding: Swiss National Science Foundation Grant 32003B-121038

  1. Association between ABO and Rh Blood Groups and Risk of Preeclampsia: A Case-Control Study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghasadeghi, Firoozeh; Saadat, Mostafa

    2017-04-15

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. There is a genetic component in the development of PE with estimated heritability around 0.47. Several studies have investigated the association between maternal ABO blood groups (OMIM 110300) and risk of PE, with contradictory results have emerged. Considering that there is no study in this filed from Iranian population, the present case-control study was carried out at Shiraz (south-west Iran). In this study 331 women; 121 pregnant with PE and 210 normotensive pregnant women were included. Using blood group O (for ABO blood groups) or Rh+ (for Rh blood groups) as a reference, odds ratios (ORs) and its 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of PE risk were estimated from logistic regression analysis. Although the A (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.39-1.17, P = 0.165), B (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.48-1.53, P = 0.615) and AB (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.37-3.45, P = 0.812) phenotypes showed lower risks compared with the O blood group, statistical analysis indicated that there was no significant association between ABO phenotypes and risk of PE. The frequency of Rh- phenotype was higher among PE patients compared with the control group. However, the association was not significant (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 0.69-4.65, P = 0.229). Adjusted ORs for age of participants and parity did not change the above-mentioned associations. Our present findings indicate that there is no association between ABO and Rh blood groups and risk of PE in Iranian population.

  2. Attention bias modification augments cognitive-behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Amit; Marom, Sofi; Yahalom, Naomi; Pine, Daniel S; Hermesh, Haggai; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-12-20

    Cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) is a first-line treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, since many patients remain symptomatic post-treatment, there is a need for augmenting procedures. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) examined the potential augmentation effect of attention bias modification (ABM) for CBGT. Fifty patients with SAD from three therapy groups were randomized to receive an 18-week standard CBGT with either ABM designed to shift attention away from threat (CBGT + ABM), or a placebo protocol not designed to modify threat-related attention (CBGT + placebo). Therapy groups took place in a large mental health center. Clinician and self-report measures of social anxiety and depression were acquired pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Attention bias was assessed at pre- and post-treatment. Patients randomized to the CBGT + ABM group, relative to those randomized to the CBGT + placebo group, showed greater reductions in clinician-rated SAD symptoms post-treatment, with effects maintained at 3-month follow-up. Group differences were not evident for self-report or attention-bias measures, with similar reductions in both groups. Finally, reduction in attention bias did not mediate the association between group and reduction in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Structured Interview (LSAS) scores. This is the first RCT to examine the possible augmenting effect of ABM added to group-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for adult SAD. Training patients' attention away from threat might augment the treatment response to standard CBGT in SAD, a possibility that could be further evaluated in large-scale RCTs.

  3. Doping Level of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes Controls the Grafting Density of Functional Groups for DNA Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švorc, Ĺubomír; Jambrec, Daliborka; Vojs, Marian; Barwe, Stefan; Clausmeyer, Jan; Michniak, Pavol; Marton, Marián; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-09-02

    The impact of different doping levels of boron-doped diamond on the surface functionalization was investigated by means of electrochemical reduction of aryldiazonium salts. The grafting efficiency of 4-nitrophenyl groups increased with the boron levels (B/C ratio from 0 to 20,000 ppm). Controlled grafting of nitrophenyldiazonium was used to adjust the amount of immobilized single-stranded DNA strands at the surface and further on the hybridization yield in dependence on the boron doping level. The grafted nitro functions were electrochemically reduced to the amine moieties. Subsequent functionalization with a succinic acid introduced carboxyl groups for subsequent binding of an amino-terminated DNA probe. DNA hybridization significantly depends on the probe density which is in turn dependent on the boron doping level. The proposed approach opens new insights for the design and control of doped diamond surface functionalization for the construction of DNA hybridization assays.

  4. A two-input sliding-mode controller for a planar arm actuated by four pneumatic muscle groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, John H; Quesada, Peter M

    2004-09-01

    Multiple-input sliding-mode techniques are applied to a planar arm actuated by four groups of pneumatic muscle (PM) actuators in opposing pair configuration. The control objective is end-effector tracking of a desired path in Cartesian space. The inputs to the system are commanded input pressure differentials for the two opposing PM groups. An existing model for the muscle is incorporated into the arm equations of motion to arrive at a two-input, two-output nonlinear model of the planar arm that is affine in the input and, therefore, suitable for sliding-mode techniques. Relationships between static input pressures are derived for suitable arm behavior in the absence of a control signal. Simulation studies are reported.

  5. Complex Dynamical Behaviors in a Predator-Prey System with Generalized Group Defense and Impulsive Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunyi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A predator-prey system with generalized group defense and impulsive control strategy is investigated. By using Floquet theorem and small amplitude perturbation skills, a local asymptotically stable prey-eradication periodic solution is obtained when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Otherwise, the system is permanent if the impulsive period is larger than the critical value. By using bifurcation theory, we show the existence and stability of positive periodic solution when the pest eradication lost its stability. Numerical examples show that the system considered has more complicated dynamics, including (1 high-order quasiperiodic and periodic oscillation, (2 period-doubling and halving bifurcation, (3 nonunique dynamics (meaning that several attractors coexist, and (4 chaos and attractor crisis. Further, the importance of the impulsive period, the released amount of mature predators and the degree of group defense effect are discussed. Finally, the biological implications of the results and the impulsive control strategy are discussed.

  6. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazeen H Jafar

    Full Text Available Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE and trained general practitioner (GP intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up.A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes.After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1-0.1] mm Hg compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04. Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl.The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still evident at 7- year follow-up. These

  7. The First Historically Reported Italian Family with FTD/ALS Teaches a Lesson on C9orf72 RE: Clinical Heterogeneity and Oligogenic Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoccaro, Maria Pia; Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Piras, Silvia; Casalena, Alfonsina; Oppi, Federico; Ambrosetto, Giovanni; Montagna, Pasquale; Liguori, Rocco; Parchi, Piero; Capellari, Sabina

    2018-01-01

    In 1969, Dazzi and Finizio reported the second observation of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) - amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) association in a large Italian kindred affected by an autosomal dominant form of ALS with high penetrance, frequent bulbar onset, and frequent cognitive decline. To expand the original characterization of this family and report the link with the C9orf72 repeat expansion (RE). We followed or reviewed the medical records of thirteen patients belonging to the original family and performed genetic analyses in four individuals. Eight patients presented with ALS, four with FTD, and one with schizophrenia. The C9orf72 RE was found in three patients but not in the healthy survivor. Additionally, we found a novel possible pathogenic variant in the ITM2B gene in one patient with a complex phenotype, associating movement disorders, psychiatric and cognitive features, deafness, and optic atrophy. The neuropathological examination of this patient did not show the classical features of ITM2B mutation related dementias suggesting that the putative pathogenic mechanism does not involve cellular mislocalization of the protein or the formation of amyloid plaques. We showed that the original Italian pedigree described with FTD/ALS carries the C9orf72 RE. Moreover, the finding of an additional mutation in another dementia causing gene in a patient with a more complex phenotype suggests a possible role of genetic modifiers in the disease. Together with other reports showing the coexistence of mutations in multiple ALS/FTD causative genes in the same family, our study supports an oligogenic etiology of ALS/FTD.

  8. Conducting cancer control and survivorship research via cooperative groups: a report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-05-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if interventions are well standardized. Some protocols are better suited to cooperative groups than are others, and there are advantages and disadvantages to conducting survivorship research within the cooperative group setting. Behavioral researchers currently involved in cooperative groups, as well as program staff within the NCI, can serve as sources of information for those wishing to pursue symptom management and survivorship studies within the clinical trial setting. The structure of the cooperative groups is currently changing, but going forward, survivorship is bound to be a topic of interest and one that perhaps may be more easily addressed using the proposed more centralized structure. ©2011 AACR.

  9. Polypropylene vs silicone Ahmed valve with adjunctive mitomycin C in paediatric age group: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Y; Awadein, A

    2013-06-01

    To compare the results of silicone and polypropylene Ahmed glaucoma valves (AGV) implanted during the first 10 years of life. A prospective study was performed on 50 eyes of 33 patients with paediatric glaucoma. Eyes were matched to either polypropylene or silicone AGV. In eyes with bilateral glaucoma, one eye was implanted with polypropylene and the other eye was implanted with silicone AGV. Fifty eyes of 33 children were reviewed. Twenty five eyes received a polypropylene valve, and 25 eyes received a silicone valve. Eyes implanted with silicone valves achieved a significantly lower intraocular pressure (IOP) compared with the polypropylene group at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively. The average survival time was significantly longer (P=0.001 by the log-rank test) for the silicone group than for the polypropylene group and the cumulative probability of survival by the log-rank test at the end of the second year was 80% (SE: 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 64-96%) in the silicone group and 56% (SE: 9.8, 95% CI: 40-90%) in the polypropylene group. The difference in the number of postoperative interventions and complications between both groups was statistically insignificant. Silicone AGVs can achieve better IOP control, and longer survival with less antiglaucoma drops compared with polypropylene valves in children younger than 10 years.

  10. A randomized, controlled, pilot study of dialectical behavior therapy skills in a psychoeducational group for individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Sheri; Jeffrey, Janet; Katz, Mark R

    2013-03-05

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) techniques have been shown to effectively treat borderline personality disorder, a condition also marked by prominent affective disturbances. The utility of DBT techniques in treating BD has been largely unexplored. The purpose of this research was to conduct a pilot study of a DBT-based psychoeducational group (BDG) in treating euthymic, depressed, or hypomanic Bipolar I or II patients. In this experiment, 26 adults with bipolar I or II were randomized to intervention or wait-list control groups and completed the Beck depression inventory II, mindfulness-based self-efficacy scale, and affective control scale at baseline and 12 weeks. The BDG intervention consisted of 12 weekly 90-min sessions which taught DBT skills, mindfulness techniques, and general BD psychoeducation. Using RM-ANOVA, subjects in BDG demonstrated a trend toward reduced depressive symptoms, and significant improvement in several MSES subscales indicating greater mindful awareness, and less fear toward and more control of emotional states (ACS). These findings were supported with a larger sample of patients who completed the BDG. Furthermore, group attendees had reduced emergency room visits and mental health related admissions in the six months following BDG. The small sample size in RCT affects power to detect between group differences. How well improvements after the12-week BDG were maintained is unknown. There is preliminary evidence that DBT skills reduce depressive symptoms, improve affective control, and improve mindfulness self-efficacy in BD. Its application warrants further evaluation in larger studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phase control of group velocity of light in an InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarzadeh, H; Ahmadi Sangachin, E; Seyyed Hossein Asadpour [Sama technical and vocational training College, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz branch, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-30

    By solving self-consistently Schrödinger–Poisson equations for a carrier in the conduction band of an InGaN/GaN quantum dot, a four-level quantum system is described. It is found that in the presence of terahertz signal radiation, the medium becomes phase dependent, which ensures the phase control of the group velocity of a weak probe pulse from slow to fast light. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. The control of superluminal group velocity in a system equivalent to the Y-type four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Luming; Guo Hong; Xiao Feng; Peng Xiang; Chen Xuzong

    2005-01-01

    We study a new way to control the superluminal group velocity of light pulse in hot atomic gases with the five-level atomic configuration. The model of an equivalent Y-type four-level is applied and shows that the light goes faster by using an additional incoherent pumping field. The experiment is performed and shows in good agreement with our theoretical predictions

  13. A cognitive behavioral based group intervention for children with a chronic illness and their parents: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuengel Carlo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coping with a chronic illness (CI challenges children's psychosocial functioning and wellbeing. Cognitive-behavioral intervention programs that focus on teaching the active use of coping strategies may prevent children with CI from developing psychosocial problems. Involvement of parents in the intervention program may enhance the use of learned coping strategies in daily life, especially on the long-term. The primary aim of the present study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral based group intervention (called 'Op Koers' 1 for children with CI and of a parallel intervention for their parents. A secondary objective is to investigate why and for whom this intervention works, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the intervention effect. Methods/design This study is a multicentre randomized controlled trial. Participants are children (8 to 18 years of age with a chronic illness, and their parents, recruited from seven participating hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants are randomly allocated to two intervention groups (the child intervention group and the child intervention combined with a parent program and a wait-list control group. Primary outcomes are child psychosocial functioning, wellbeing and child disease related coping skills. Secondary outcomes are child quality of life, child general coping skills, child self-perception, parental stress, quality of parent-child interaction, and parental perceived vulnerability. Outcomes are evaluated at baseline, after 6 weeks of treatment, and at a 6 and 12-month follow-up period. The analyses will be performed on the basis of an intention-to-treat population. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a group intervention improving psychosocial functioning in children with CI and their parents. If proven effective, the intervention will be implemented in clinical practice. Strengths and limitations of the study design are discussed

  14. Mammographic screening in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group. Are early outcome measures influenced by ethnicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Norum

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Female citizens of Sami (the indigenous people of Norway municipalities in northern Norway have a low risk of breast cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the attendance rate and outcome of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP in the Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group. Study design. A retrospective registry-based study. Methods. The 8 municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities (non-Sami. Population data were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data regarding invitations and outcome in the NBCSP during the period 2001–2010 was derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN. The NBCSP targets women aged 50–69 years. Rates and percentages were compared using chi-square test with a p-value<0.05 as statistical significant. Results. The attendance rate in the NBCSP was 78% in the Sami and 75% in the non-Sami population (p< 0.01. The recall rates were 2.4 and 3.3% in the Sami and non-Sami population, respectively (p<0.01. The rate of invasive screen detected cancer was not significantly lower in the Sami group (p=0.14. The percentage of all breast cancers detected in the NBCSP among the Sami (67% was lower compared with the non-Sami population (86%, p=0.06. Conclusion. Despite a lower risk of breast cancer, the Sami attended the NBCSP more frequently than the control group. The recall and cancer detection rate was lower among the Sami compared with the non-Sami group.

  15. 〈情報学科〉均衡型(C_9, C_14)-Foil デザイン

    OpenAIRE

    潮, 和彦

    2012-01-01

    In graph theory, the decomposition problem of graphs is a very important topic. Various type of decompositions of many graphs can be seen in the literature of graph theory. This paper gives balanced (C_9, C_14)-foil designs, balanced C_23-foil designs, balanced C_46-foil designs, balanced C_69-foil designs, balanced C_92-foil designs, balanced C_115-foil designs, balanced C_138-foil designs, balanced C_161-foil designs,balanced C_184-foil designs,balanced C207-foil designs, balanced C_230-fo...

  16. Molecular resonances in sub-Coulomb energy region (12C-12C, 12C-24Mg, 12C-9Be systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Kiyohiko; Shimomura, Susumu; Tanaka, Makoto; Murakami, Tetsuya; Fukada, Mamoru; Sakaguchi, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    Molecular resonance in sub-Coulomb energy region was studied on 12 C- 12 C, 12 C- 24 Mg and 12 C- 9 Be systems. The excitation functions and the angular distributions were measured on the reactions 12 C( 12 C, 8 Besub(g,s,)) 16 Osub(g,s,), 24 Mg( 12 C, α) 32 S and 9 Be ( 12 C, 8 Besub(g,s,)) 13 Csub(g,s,). Sub-Coulomb resonances were observed in all systems and the contribution of the 12 Csub(2nd)*(0 + , 7.65 MeV) state is proposed. (author)

  17. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-C-9:2 Sanitary Sewer Pipelines, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-07-11

    The 100-C-9:2 sanitary sewer pipelines include the feeder pipelines associated with the 1607-B8, the 1607-B9, the 1607-B10 and the 1607-B11 septic systems. Contaminated soil and piping from the feeder lines to the septic systems were removed and disposed of. The remaining soil in the excavations has been shown to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  18. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  19. Comparison of the Results of Tuberculin Skin Test in Patients with Behçet’s Disease and Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurşad Çifçi Aslan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Both the alterations in the immune system and the presence of pathergy reaction in patients with Behçet’s disease may lead to differences in the results of purified protein derivative (PPD test reaction in these patients and healthy people.Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with Behçet’s disease aged 19-44 years old were included in this study. None of these patients were using any systemic drug (except colchicum and had any immunosuppressive disease. All patients were under colchicum treatment and all had had BCG vaccination. Control group was formed by 27 volunteers aged 19-42 years who have applied to our dermatology outpatient clinic on the same dates and were diagnosed as tinea pedis. None of them were using any immunosuppressive drug and had any immunosuppressive disease. All of them also had had BCG vaccination. PPD test was performed to both control and patient groups.Results: The results of PPD test were found higher in the patients with Behçet’s disease compared to the control group. Active tuberculosis infection was not determined in any of the patients with increased PPD reaction.Conclusion: Increased PPD test results in patients with Behçet’s disease do not always imply tuberculosis infection and might be accepted as a false-positive result.

  20. Conformational control of cofactors in nature: The effect of methoxy group orientation on the electronic structure of ubisemiquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Almeida, Wagner B.; O'Malley, Patrick J.

    2018-03-01

    Ubiquinone is the key electron and proton transfer agent in biology. Its mechanism involves the formation of its intermediate one-electron reduced form, the ubisemiquinone radical. This is formed in a protein-bound form which permits the semiquinone to vary its electronic and redox properties. This can be achieved by hydrogen bonding acceptance by one or both oxygen atoms or as we now propose by restricted orientations for the methoxy groups of the headgroup. We show how the orientation of the two methoxy groups of the quinone headgroup affects the electronic structure of the semiquinone form and demonstrate a large dependence of the ubisemiquinone spin density distribution on the orientation each methoxy group takes with respect to the headgroup ring plane. This is shown to significantly modify associated hyperfine couplings which in turn needs to be accounted for in interpreting experimental values in vivo. The study uncovers the key potential role the methoxy group orientation can play in controlling the electronic structure and spin density of ubisemiquinone and provides an electronic-level insight into the variation in electron affinity and redox potential of ubiquinone as a function of the methoxy orientation. Taken together with the already known influence of cofactor conformation on heme and chlorophyll electronic structure, it reveals a more widespread role for cofactor conformational control of electronic structure and associated electron transfer in biology.

  1. Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff's suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification

  2. Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff`s suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of a group-based gaze training intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Wood

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to integrate a gaze training intervention (i.e., quiet eye training; QET that has been shown to improve the throwing and catching skill of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD, within an approach (i.e., group therapy that might alleviate the negative psychosocial impact of these motor skill deficits. Twenty-one children with DCD were split into either QET (8 male 3 female, mean age of 8.6 years (SD = 1.04 or technical training (TT groups (7 male 3 female, mean age of 8.6 years (SD = 1.84. The TT group were given movement-related instructions via video, relating to the throw and catch phases, while the QET group were also taught to fixate a target location on the wall prior to the throw (QE1 and to track the ball prior to the catch (QE2. Each group partook in a 4-week, group therapy intervention and measurements of QE duration and catching performance were taken before and after training, and at a 6-week delayed retention test. Parental feedback on psychosocial and motor skill outcomes was provided at delayed retention. Children improved their gaze control and catching coordination following QET, compared to TT. Mediation analysis showed that a longer QE aiming duration (QE1 predicted an earlier onset of tracking the ball prior to catching (QE2 which predicted catching success. Parents reported enhanced perceptions of their child's catching ability and general coordination in the QET group compared to the TT group. All parents reported improvements in their child's confidence, social skills and predilection for physical activity following the trial. The findings offer initial support for an intervention that practitioners could apply to address deficits in the motor and psychosocial skills of children with DCD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02904980.

  4. 76 FR 36356 - C9

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... hydrocarbons are products of the petroleum distillation and refining process. These substances are various fractions of aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons with specific boiling point ranges and flash points. Each of...

  5. Study of On-Ramp PI Controller Based on Dural Group QPSO with Different Well Centers Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO algorithm, dual-group QPSO with different well centers (DWC-QPSO algorithm, is proposed by constructing the master-slave subswarms. The new algorithm was applied in the parameter optimization of on-ramp traffic PI controller combining with nonlinear feedback theory. With the critical information contained in the searching space and results of the basic QPSO algorithm, this algorithm avoids the rapid disappearance of swarm diversity and enhances the global searching ability through collaboration between subswarms. Experiment results on an on-ramp traffic control simulation show that DWC-QPSO can be well applied in the study of on-ramp traffic PI controller and the comparison results illustrate that DWC-QPSO outperforms other evolutionary algorithms with enhancement in both adaptability and stability.

  6. Comparison of Childhood Traumatic Experience and Attachment Styles among Patients in Suicide Attempts with Drugs and the Healthy Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinay Onen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Early traumatic experiences and neglect can be related to negative emotional, cognitive and neurodevelopmental changes and can lead to a predisposition to several mental disorders, including suicidal behaviors. In this study we aimed to examine the attachment styles of suicide attempters using drugs and their early traumatic experiences, compared to healthy controls. Method: The study involved 76 people who had attempted suicide with drugs and 84 healthy controls who did not have any psychiatric disorder. In the evaluation we have used the following: a sociodemographic data form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Childhood Traumas Questionnaire (CTQ - 28 and Relationship Scales Questionnaire (RSQ with those who agreed to participate in the study. Results: Fearful attachment styles from the relation scale survey of those who attempted suicide were significantly higher than the control group (p [JCBPR 2017; 6(2.000: 51-58

  7. Active placebo control groups of pharmacological interventions were rarely used but merited serious consideration: a methodological overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob Solgaard; Bielefeldt, Andreas Ørsted; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2017-07-01

    Active placebos are control interventions that mimic the side effects of the experimental interventions in randomized trials and are sometimes used to reduce the risk of unblinding. We wanted to assess how often randomized clinical drug trials use active placebo control groups; to provide a catalog, and a characterization, of such trials; and to analyze methodological arguments for and against the use of active placebo. An overview consisting of three thematically linked substudies. In an observational substudy, we assessed the prevalence of active placebo groups based on a random sample of 200 PubMed indexed placebo-controlled randomized drug trials published in October 2013. In a systematic review, we identified and characterized trials with active placebo control groups irrespective of publication time. In a third substudy, we reviewed publications with substantial methodological comments on active placebo groups (searches in PubMed, The Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and HighWirePress). The prevalence of trials with active placebo groups published in 2013 was 1 out of 200 (95% confidence interval: 0-2), 0.5% (0-1%). We identified and characterized 89 randomized trials (published 1961-2014) using active placebos, for example, antihistamines, anticholinergic drugs, and sedatives. Such trials typically involved a crossover design, the experimental intervention had noticeable side effects, and the outcomes were patient-reported. The use of active placebos was clustered in specific research settings and did not appear to reflect consistently the side effect profile of the experimental intervention, for example, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were compared with active placebos in pain trials but not in depression trials. We identified and analyzed 25 methods publications with substantial comments. The main argument for active placebo was to reduce risk of unblinding; the main argument against was the risk of unintended therapeutic effect. Pharmacological

  8. Targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Claire; Bray, Emma P; Bryan, Stirling; Greenfield, Sheila M; Haque, M Sayeed; Hobbs, F D Richard; Jones, Miren I; Jowett, Sue; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Little, Paul; Mant, Jonathan; Penaloza, Cristina; Schwartz, Claire; Shackleford, Helen; Varghese, Jinu; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2013-03-23

    Self-monitoring of hypertension with self-titration of antihypertensives (self-management) results in lower systolic blood pressure for at least one year. However, few people in high risk groups have been evaluated to date and previous work suggests a smaller effect size in these groups. This trial therefore aims to assess the added value of self-management in high risk groups over and above usual care. The targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR) trial will be a pragmatic primary care based, unblinded, randomised controlled trial of self-management of blood pressure (BP) compared to usual care. Eligible patients will have a history of stroke, coronary heart disease, diabetes or chronic kidney disease and will be recruited from primary care. Participants will be individually randomised to either usual care or self-management. The primary outcome of the trial will be difference in office SBP between intervention and control groups at 12 months adjusted for baseline SBP and covariates. 540 patients will be sufficient to detect a difference in SBP between self-management and usual care of 5 mmHg with 90% power. Secondary outcomes will include self-efficacy, lifestyle behaviours, health-related quality of life and adverse events. An economic analysis will consider both within trial costs and a model extrapolating the results thereafter. A qualitative analysis will gain insights into patients' views, experiences and decision making processes. The results of the trial will be directly applicable to primary care in the UK. If successful, self-management of blood pressure in people with stroke and other high risk conditions would be applicable to many hundreds of thousands of individuals in the UK and beyond. ISRCTN87171227.

  9. The Effectiveness of a Group Triple P with Chinese Parents Who Have a Child with Developmental Disabilities: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Fan, Angel; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of Group Triple P, a Level 4 variant of the Triple P multilevel system of parenting support, with Chinese parents who had a preschool aged child with a developmental disability, using randomized controlled trial design. Participants (Intervention group: 42; Waitlist Control group: 39) completed measures on…

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 76 - Procedures and Methods for Estimating Costs of Nitrogen Oxides Controls Applied to Group 1, Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Costs of Nitrogen Oxides Controls Applied to Group 1, Boilers B Appendix B to Part 76 Protection of... of Nitrogen Oxides Controls Applied to Group 1, Boilers 1. Purpose and Applicability This technical... section 407 of the Act).” In developing the allowable NOX emissions limitations for Group 2 boilers...

  11. [Assessment of nociceptive suppression in laparoscopic postoperative status: prospective, randomized and comparative study with a control group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, A; Hernández-Favela, P; Zamora, R; Nava, E; Barroso, G; Kably, A

    2001-08-01

    In recent years endoscopic surgery has became a highly demanded procedure because it is an easy method for diagnosis and treatment in gynecological field. Post-operative pain is considered as a condition in the morbidity status. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nociceptive suppression in laparoscopic surgery. A prospective randomized trial was performed in order to evaluate this condition. A total of 45 patients were included. Three groups were randomized using two different anesthetics applied in the cult-de-sac and uterine-bladder union. Group A (n-15) received bupivacaine, group B (n = 15) ropivacaine and group C (control) saline solution was instilled. The pain was scored using the visual analog scale as same as blood pressure and heart rate in a 15 minute intervals in the recovery room. For study design there were no differences in age, weight, height and body mass index (EMI). The surgical and anesthetic times were similar among groups. However there were significant differences when pain was evaluated. For a less toxic effects and good preventive analgesia we recommend to use ropivacaine in the postoperative status.

  12. Examination of early group dynamics and treatment outcome in a randomized controlled trial of group cognitive behavior therapy for binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, Emily M; Durkin, Nora E; Crosby, Ross D; Berg, Kelly C; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether perceptions of group dynamics early in treatment predicted eating disorder outcomes in a sample of adults (N = 190) with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in a 15-session group cognitive behavior therapy (gCBT) treatment with differing levels of therapist involvement (therapist led, therapist assisted, and self-help). The group dynamic variables included the Engaged subscale of the Group Climate Questionnaire--Short Form and the Group Attitude Scale, measured at session 2 and session 6. Treatment outcome was assessed in terms of global eating disorder severity and frequency of binge eating at end of treatment, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Session 2 engagement and group attitudes were associated with improved outcome at 12-month follow-up. No other group dynamic variables were significantly associated with treatment outcome. Group dynamic variables did not differ by levels of therapist involvement. Results indicate that early engagement and attitudes may be predictive of improved eating disorder psychopathology at 12 month follow-up. However, the pattern of mostly insignificant findings indicates that in gCBT, group process variables may be less influential on outcomes relative to other treatment components. Additionally, participants were able to engage in group treatment regardless of level of therapist involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Specification of requirements for upgrades using digital instrument and control systems. Report prepared within the framework of the international working group on nuclear power plant control and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The need to develop good specifications of requirements for instrument and control (I and C) systems applies throughout the world and is becoming more and more important as more upgrades are planned. Better guidance on how to develop good requirements specifications would support safer, more effective and more economical refits and upgrades. The need for this was pointed out by the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI). This report is the result of a series of advisory and consultants meetings held by the IAEA in 1997 and 1998 in Vienna. The scope of the activities described covers a methodology for the determination of requirements and the development of the necessary specifications and plans needed through the life-cycle of digital instrumentation and control systems. It is restricted to technical aspects and indicates subjects which should be included in specifications and plans at different phases

  14. The effectiveness of a group self-management education course for adults with poorly controlled epilepsy, SMILE (UK): A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridsdale, Leone; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Robinson, Emily J; Noble, Adam J; Morgan, Myfanwy; Taylor, Stephanie J C; McCrone, Paul; Richardson, Mark P; Baker, Gus; Landau, Sabine; Goldstein, Laura H

    2018-04-16

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions affecting about 1% of adults. Up to 40% of people with epilepsy (PWE) report recurring seizures while on medication. And optimal functioning requires good self-management. Our objective was to evaluate a group self-management education courses for people with epilepsy and drug-resistant seizures by means of a multicenter, pragmatic, parallel group, randomized controlled trial. We recruited adults with epilepsy, having ≥2 seizures in the prior 12 months, from specialist clinics. Consenting participants were randomized 1:1 to a group course or treatment as usual. The primary outcome measure was quality of life 12 months after randomization using Quality of Life 31-P (QOLIE-31-P). Secondary outcome measures were seizure frequency and recency, psychological distress, impact and stigma of epilepsy, self-mastery, medication adherence, and adverse effects. Analysis of outcomes followed the intention-to-treat principle using mixed-effects regression models. We enrolled 404 participants (intervention: n = 205, control: n = 199) with 331 (82%) completing 12-month follow-up (intervention: n = 163, control: n = 168). Mean age was 41.7 years, ranging from 16 to 85, 54% were female and 75% were white. From the intervention arm, 73.7% attended all or some of the course. At 12-month follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences between trial arms in QOLIE-31-P (intervention mean: 67.4, standard deviation [SD]: 13.5; control mean: 69.5, SD 14.8) or in secondary outcome measures. This is the first pragmatic trial of group education for people with poorly controlled epilepsy. Recruitment, course attendance, and follow-up rates were higher than expected. The results show that the primary outcome and quality of life did not differ between the trial arms after 12 months. We found a high prevalence of felt-stigma and psychological distress in this group of people with drug-resistant seizures. To address this

  15. Effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention during the clinical practicum of nursing students: a parallel group randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandell-Laine, Camilla; Saarikoski, Mikko; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Salminen, Leena; Suomi, Reima; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a study protocol for a study evaluating the effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention to improve students' competence level, self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum has a vital role in promoting the learning of students. Despite an increasing interest in using mobile technologies to improve the clinical practicum of students, there is limited robust evidence regarding their effectiveness. A multicentre, parallel group, randomized, controlled, pragmatic, superiority trial. Second-year pre-registration nursing students who are beginning a clinical practicum will be recruited from one university of applied sciences. Eligible students will be randomly allocated to either a control group (engaging in standard cooperation) or an intervention group (engaging in mobile cooperation) for the 5-week the clinical practicum. The complex mobile cooperation intervention comprises of a mobile application-assisted, nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation and a training in the functions of the mobile application. The primary outcome is competence. The secondary outcomes include self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Moreover, a process evaluation will be undertaken. The ethical approval for this study was obtained in December 2014 and the study received funding in 2015. The results of this study will provide robust evidence on mobile cooperation during the clinical practicum, a research topic that has not been consistently studied to date. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Economic consequences of improved temperature forecasts: An experiment with the Florida citrus growers (control group results). [weather forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is being planned to show that frost and freeze prediction improvements are possible utilizing timely Synchronous Meteorological Satellite temperature measurements and that this information can affect Florida citrus grower operations and decisions. An economic experiment was carried out which will monitor citrus growers' decisions, actions, costs and losses, and meteorological forecasts and actual weather events and will establish the economic benefits of improved temperature forecasts. A summary is given of the economic experiment, the results obtained to date, and the work which still remains to be done. Specifically, the experiment design is described in detail as are the developed data collection methodology and procedures, sampling plan, data reduction techniques, cost and loss models, establishment of frost severity measures, data obtained from citrus growers, National Weather Service, and Federal Crop Insurance Corp., resulting protection costs and crop losses for the control group sample, extrapolation of results of control group to the Florida citrus industry and the method for normalization of these results to a normal or average frost season so that results may be compared with anticipated similar results from test group measurements.

  17. Nurse-led group c