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Sample records for group-employed low-wage workers-that

  1. Low-Wage Counties Face Locational Disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Robert; Cromartie, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Small populations and remoteness are the most salient features of low-wage counties. These locational attributes coincide with fewer high-wage jobs, yet low wages within industries define low-wage counties more than industry composition. Although adults in low-wage counties have less education and labor force participation overall, the role played…

  2. Workplace Education for Low-Wage Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrand, Amanda L.; Bassi, Laurie J.; McMurrer, Daniel P.

    The training being provided to low-wage workers, factors affecting the availability and effectiveness of such training, and training outcomes were examined. The major research activities were as follows: (1) identification of 192 employers that invested most heavily in training for low-wage workers; (2) telephone interviews with 40 of the 192…

  3. Low-Wage Work in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    not stay in low-wage jobs for long. Many go on to higher paying jobs, while a significant minority ends up relying temporarily on income support and benefits sustained by one of the highest tax rates in the world.  Low-Wage Work in Denmark provides an insightful look at the particularities of the Danish...... labor market and the lessons it holds for both the United States and the rest of Europe....

  4. Low-Wage Work in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    not stay in low-wage jobs for long. Many go on to higher paying jobs, while a significant minority ends up relying temporarily on income support and benefits sustained by one of the highest tax rates in the world.  Low-Wage Work in Denmark provides an insightful look at the particularities of the Danish...... with detailed case studies of five industries to explore why low-end jobs are so different in Denmark. Some jobs that are low-paying in the United States, including hotel maids and meat processors, though still demanding, are much more highly compensated in Denmark. And Danes, unlike American workers, do...

  5. Rural Low-Wage Employment Rises among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Robert; Parker, Timothy

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, the percentage of low-wage workers in rural areas was higher than in urban areas or in 1979. The share of women and minorities in low-wage work stabilized, but the share of White men increased. Low-wage work increased in higher-skilled occupations, and the share of college educated low-wage workers increased significantly since 1979. (TD)

  6. Low Wages as Occupational Health Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; De Vogli, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The history of occupational medicine has been characterized by ever-widening recognition of hazards, from fires in 1911 to asbestos in the 1960s, to job strain in the 1990s. In this essay, we argue for broadening the recognition further to include low wages. We first review possible mechanisms explaining the effects of wages on health or health behaviors. Mechanisms involve self-esteem, job satisfaction, deprivation, social rank, the "full" price of bad health, patience, and the ability to purchase health-producing goods and services. Second, we discuss empirical studies that rely on large, typically national, data sets and statistical models that use either instrumental variables or natural experiments and also account for other family income. Finally, we draw implications for laws governing minimum wages and labor unions.

  7. Low Wage Mobility in Denmark, Germany and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deding, Mette

    In this working paper, mobility out of low wage employment in Denmark, Germany, and the United States is studied. Data used for the analysis are the Danish Longitudinal Database – a representative sample of the Danish population, and the PSID-GSOEP Equivalent File Data. Mobility is analysed...... as the transition out of low wage in 1993 and 1995 respectively, conditional on low wage in 1992. The econometric model takes selection into low wage in 1992 into account, and results clearly state the importance. At the aggregate level, mobility patterns are similar in Denmark and Germany, while mobility...

  8. Are low wages risk factors for hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; Du, Juan

    2012-12-01

    Socio-economic status (SES) is strongly correlated with hypertension. But SES has several components, including income and correlations in cross-sectional data need not imply SES is a risk factor. This study investigates whether wages-the largest category within income-are risk factors. We analysed longitudinal, nationally representative US data from four waves (1999, 2001, 2003 and 2005) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The overall sample was restricted to employed persons age 25-65 years, n = 17 295. Separate subsamples were constructed of persons within two age groups (25-44 and 45-65 years) and genders. Hypertension incidence was self-reported based on physician diagnosis. Our study was prospective since data from three base years (1999, 2001, 2003) were used to predict newly diagnosed hypertension for three subsequent years (2001, 2003, 2005). In separate analyses, data from the first base year were used to predict time-to-reporting hypertension. Logistic regressions with random effects and Cox proportional hazards regressions were run. Negative and strongly statistically significant correlations between wages and hypertension were found both in logistic and Cox regressions, especially for subsamples containing the younger age group (25-44 years) and women. Correlations were stronger when three health variables-obesity, subjective measures of health and number of co-morbidities-were excluded from regressions. Doubling the wage was associated with 25-30% lower chances of hypertension for persons aged 25-44 years. The strongest evidence for low wages being risk factors for hypertension among working people were for women and persons aged 25-44 years.

  9. Intra-European labour migration and low-wage competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refslund, Bjarke; Thörnquist, Annette

    2016-01-01

    The article compares how low-wage competition and labour migration from EU11 Member States affect industrial relations and working conditions for natives and migrants in three sectors (transport, cleaning and agriculture) in Denmark and Sweden. The analysis shows how already vulnerable sectors...

  10. Low-Wage Maternal Employment and Parenting Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Aurora P.; Bentler, Peter M.; Franke, Todd M.

    2008-01-01

    This three-year longitudinal study investigated whether low-wage employment was associated with improved psychological and parenting outcomes in a sample of 178 single mothers who were employed and unemployed current and former welfare recipients both before and subsequent to the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity…

  11. Low wages in the retail industry in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van Klaveren, M.

    2010-01-01

    This Working Paper is basically a "source book", accounting the results of over five years of research into the retail industry and the sources used for that research. It originates from the Future of Work in Europe research project of the New York-based Russell Sage Foundation (RSF), in which the AIAS and STZ advies & onderzoek (consultancy & research) carried out the Dutch part, resulting in the monograph Low-Wage Work in the Netherlands (RSF, 2008). It also incorporates sources for the ret...

  12. Low-wage maternal employment and parenting style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Aurora P; Bentler, Peter M; Franke, Todd M

    2008-07-01

    This three-year longitudinal study investigated whether low-wage employment was associated with improved psychological and parenting outcomes in a sample of 178 single mothers who were employed and unemployed current and former welfare recipients both before and subsequent to the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. Participation in employment predicted fewer depressive symptoms and less negative parenting style over time. Employment at time 1 was associated with a reduced likelihood of receiving welfare in the interim between times 1 and 2, less financial strain at time 2, and (through these) a decrease in mothers' depressive symptoms at time 2. Fewer depressive symptoms at time 2, in turn, predicted less negative parenting style, net of the mothers' earlier demographic, mental health, and parenting characteristics. Mothers with higher education attainment were more likely to be employed (and to earn more) at both time points. Implications of these findings for welfare policies are discussed.

  13. A Different Class of Care: the Benefits Crisis and Low-Wage Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Trina

    When compared to other developed nations, the United States fares poorly with regard to benefits for workers. While the situation is grim for most U.S. workers, it is worse for low-wage workers. Data show a significant benefits gap between low-wage and high-wage in terms of flexible work arrangements (FWAs), paid leave, pensions, and employer-sponsored health-care insurance, among other things. This gap exists notwithstanding the fact that FWAs and employment benefits produce positive returns for employees, employers, and society in general. Despite these returns, this Article contends that employers will be loath to extend FWAs and greater employment benefits to low-wage workers due to (1) concerns about costs, (2) a surplus of low-wage workers in the labor market, (3) negative perceptions of the skill of low-wage workers and the value of low-wage work, (4) other class-based stereotypes and biases, and (5) structural impediments in some low-wage jobs. Given the decline of unions and limited legislative action to date, the Article maintains that low-wage workers are in a "different class of care" with little hope for meaningful change on the horizon.

  14. Earning While Learning: Maintaining Income While Upgrading Skills. Advancement for Low-Wage Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Heath

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on innovative workforce development efforts around the country, Jobs for the Future (JJF) publications, tool kits, and other resources respond to the challenges to advancement for low-wage workers. Occasional papers in the series Advancement for Low-Wage Workers seeks to elevate discussion of this issue within and outside the workforce…

  15. Investing in Low-Wage Workers: Lessons from Family Child Care in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Anne; Seavey, Dorie

    2006-01-01

    While child care is one of the fastest growing occupations in the country, most employment in this field is precarious and low-wage. Investing in Low-Wage Workers profiles the Day Care Justice Co-op, a group of largely Latina and African American women living and working in some of Rhode Island's poorest communities. Determined to improve family…

  16. The 'ugly twins': failed low-wage-country sourcing projects and their expensive replacements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, Philipp; Schiele, Holger; Werner, W.

    2012-01-01

    International sourcing and sourcing from low-wage countries remain topics of high priority for firms in industrialized countries. Lower factor costs, particularly in low-wage countries, have led to high expectations of savings from both managers and academics. All too often, scientific and

  17. Worksite Health Promotion for Low-Wage Workers: A Scoping Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehl, Emily; Shivaprakash, Namrata; Thatcher, Esther; Ornelas, India J; Kneipp, Shawn; Baron, Sherry L; Muramatsu, Naoko

    2018-02-01

    To determine: (1) What research has been done on health promotion interventions for low-wage workers and (2) what factors are associated with effective low-wage workers' health promotion programs. This review includes articles from PubMed and PsychINFO published in or before July 2016. Study Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria: The search yielded 130 unique articles, 35 met the inclusion criteria: (1) being conducted in the United States, (2) including an intervention or empirical data around health promotion among adult low-wage workers, and (3) measuring changes in low-wage worker health. Central features of the selected studies were extracted, including the theoretical foundation; study design; health promotion intervention content and delivery format; intervention-targeted outcomes; sample characteristics; and work, occupational, and industry characteristics. Consistent with a scoping review, we used a descriptive, content analysis approach to analyze extracted data. All authors agreed upon emergent themes and 2 authors independently coded data extracted from each article. The results suggest that the research on low-wage workers' health promotion is limited, but increasing, and that low-wage workers have limited access to and utilization of worksite health promotion programs. Workplace health promotion programs could have a positive effect on low-wage workers, but more work is needed to understand how to expand access, what drives participation, and which delivery mechanisms are most effective.

  18. Worksite Health Promotion for Low-wage Workers: A Scoping Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehl, Emily; Shivaprakash, Namrata; Thatcher, Esther; Ornelas, India J.; Kneipp, Shawn; Baron, Sherry L.; Muramatsu, Naoko

    2018-01-01

    Objective To determine: (1) What research has been done on health promotion interventions for low-wage workers and (2) What factors are associated with effective low-wage workers’ health promotion. Data Source This review includes articles from PubMed and PsychINFO published in or before July 2016 Study Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria The search yielded 130 unique articles, 35 met the inclusion criteria: (1) being conducted in the US, (2) including an intervention or empirical data around health promotion among adult low-wage workers, and (3) measuring changes in low-wage worker health. Data Extraction Central features of the selected studies were extracted, including the theoretical foundation, study design, health promotion intervention content and delivery format, intervention targeted outcomes, sample characteristics, and work, occupational, and industry characteristics. Data Analysis Consistent with a scoping review, we used a descriptive, content analysis approach to analyze extracted data. All authors agreed upon emergent themes and two authors independently coded data extracted from each article. Results The results suggest that the research on low-wage workers’ health promotion is limited, but increasing, and that low-wage workers have limited access to and utilization of worksite health promotion programs. Conclusions Workplace health promotion programs could have a positive effect on low-wage workers, but more work is needed to understand how to expand access, what drives participation and which delivery mechanisms are most effective. PMID:28893085

  19. Minimum wage hikes and the wage growth of low-wage workers

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna K Swaffield

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents difference-in-differences estimates of the impact of the British minimum wage on the wage growth of low-wage employees. Estimates of the probability of low-wage employees receiving positive wage growth have been significantly increased by the minimum wage upratings or hikes. However, whether the actual wage growth of these workers has been significantly raised or not depends crucially on the magnitude of the minimum wage hike considered. Findings are consistent with employ...

  20. Low wage after unemployment - the effect of changes in the UI system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolvig, Iben

    Low-wage jobs in Denmark are characterized by short durations and a relatively high mobility to higher wage positions, but also to unemployment. This fact might to some extent be attributed to the generous Danish UI system. The theoretical prediction for this relation is twofold. First, a generous...... UI system will increase reservation wages and thereby increase the effective minimum wage. This will exclude the least productive individuals from employment and thereby increase the lowest skill level among employed individuals. Hence, the Danish low-wage earners will tend to be better qualified...... and their duration as low-wage earners will therefore tend to be shorter. Second, the generous benefit system will allow the unemployed person to wait for better jobs, and likewise, force the employing firms to provide jobs with better prospects. By exploiting several tightening of the Danish UI system during...

  1. The Costs of Being a Child Care Teacher: Revisiting the Problem of Low Wages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Debra J.

    2006-01-01

    The demand for child care in the United States continues to grow, but child care workers' wages remain minimal. Using examples within New Jersey, the author demonstrates how low wages impact child care quality and are directly related to the effects of the competitive marketplace. Various historical, regulatory, and cultural contexts also…

  2. The Next Challenge: Advancement of Low-Skilled, Low-Wage Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jerry

    2004-01-01

    With the series "Advancement for Low-Wage Workers," Jobs for the Future seeks to elevate discussion of this critical issue within and outside the workforce field. These occasional papers address public policy and on-the-ground practice. "The Next Challenge," the series introduction, argues for placing not just employment, but also advancement at…

  3. Momentum Trumps Intention: Failed Intentions toward Higher Education of Low-Wage Working Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Francine M.; Ta, Phuong H.

    2015-01-01

    Two longitudinal studies examined the effects of explicit intention, as described in Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behavior, on preschool teachers' success in enrolling in college. In the first study, 88 low-wage female teachers and teachers' aides who represented 85 child care centers were surveyed about their intentions to pursue college…

  4. Getting Ahead: A Survey of Low-Wage Workers on Opportunities for Advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake Snell Perry & Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A nationwide sample of low-wage workers was conducted to ascertain their attitudes and experience regarding opportunities for advancement. Professional interviewers conducted telephone interviews with a random sample of 1,002 adults who work outside the home at least 30 hours per week and earn up to 200% of the federal poverty level. The…

  5. Philosophical and ethical perspectives on cardiovascular disease risk in low-wage workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Won Ju

    2011-01-01

    One of the overriding goals of Healthy People 2010 is to reduce the health disparities observed among Americans. Because workers in small businesses tend to have little or no access to health screening or preventive health education programs, they may be unaware of their unique risk factors and are thus more at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, occupational health nurses are more likely to be available in health programs to employees in large rather than small businesses. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how nursing values and philosophy might influence public health nurses' thinking about nursing science and ethical issues relating to the risk of CVD among low-wage workers. The following questions will guide the exploration of health disparities among low-wage workers: (a) What are the health disparities observed among low-wage workers with CVD risk? (b) What are the philosophical and ethical perspectives on the issues presented? (c) Based on these findings, how should limited resources be allocated? and (d) How does this affect nursing? These approaches will provide the foundation for developing a culturally sensitive ethical and philosophical perspective to prevent CVD and promote cardiovascular health among low-wage workers. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Do Workplace Literacy Programs Promote High Skills or Low Wages? Suggestions for Future Evaluations of Workplace Literacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Tony

    Workplace literacy programs can support the path toward either low wages or high skills. Instead of the "high skill" path, most U.S. companies follow the "low wage" path. Depending on who is involved, which program goals are selected, and what planning process is followed, a workplace literacy program can maintain outdated workplaces or foster…

  7. Contingency, Employment Intentions, and Retention of Vulnerable Low-Wage Workers: An Examination of Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S.; Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Marshall, Victor W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: While theories of job turnover generally assume a strong correlation between job satisfaction, intention, and retention, such models may be limited in explaining turnover of low-wage health care workers. Low-wage workers likely have a lower ability to act on their employment intentions or plans due to a lack of resources that…

  8. Survival of the Best Fit: Competition from Low Wage Countries and the (Uneven) Growth of US Manufacturing Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew B. Bernard; J. Bradford Jensen; Peter K. Schott

    2002-01-01

    We examine the relationship between import competition from low wage countries and the reallocation of US manufacturing from 1977 to 1997. Both employment and output growth are slower for plants that face higher levels of low wage import competition in their industry. As a result, US manufacturing is reallocated over time towards industries that are more capital and skill intensive. Differential growth is driven by a combination of increased plant failure rates and slower growth of surviving ...

  9. WP 100 - Low wages in the retail industry in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Maarten Klaveren

    2010-01-01

    This Working Paper is basically a “source book”, accounting the results of over five years of research into the retail industry and the sources used for that research. It originates from the Future of Work in Europe research project of the New York-based Russell Sage Foundation (RSF), in which the AIAS and STZ advies & onderzoek (consultancy & research) carried out the Dutch part, resulting in the monograph Low-Wage Work in the Netherlands (RSF, 2008). It also incorporates sources for the ret...

  10. Perspectives on workplace health promotion among employees in low-wage industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerback, Kristen; Hannon, Peggy A.; Harris, Jeffrey R.; Clegg-Thorp, Catherine; Kohn, Marlana; Parrish, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Study goals were to (a) understand the attitudes of employees in low-wage industries toward workplace health promotion, including views on appropriateness of employer involvement in employee health, and level of interest in workplace health promotion overall and in specific programs; and (b) determine the potential for extending workplace health promotion to spouses and partners of these employees. Approach Forty-two 60-90-minute interviews Setting Interviews were conducted with couples (married or living together) in the Seattle/King County metropolitan area of Washington State. Participants Forty-two couples with one or more members working in one of five low-wage industries: accommodation/food services, education, health care/social assistance, manufacturing, and retail trade. Method Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts using grounded theory to identify themes. Results Employees consider workplace health promotion both appropriate and desirable, and believe it benefits employers through increased productivity and morale. Most have little personal experience with it and doubt their employers would prioritize employee health. Employees are most interested in efforts focused on nutrition and physical activity. Both employees and their partners support extending workplace health promotion to include partners. Conclusion Employees and their partners are interested in workplace health promotion if it addresses behaviors they care about. Concern over employer involvement in their personal health decisions is minimal; instead, employees view employer interest in their health as a sign that they are valued. PMID:25162321

  11. Constituent attachment and voluntary turnover in low-wage/low-skill service work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Jill E; Tews, Michael J; Dachner, Alison M

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws on life stage theory, ethnographic research conducted in the service sector, and evidence for secondary segmentation within the low-wage/low-skill labor force to offer evidence that social bond development with coworkers can help reduce the high rate of turnover observed in low-wage/low-skill service work. Contrary to the belief that these employees will leave before social ties can develop, constituent attachment was found to be the only significant predictor of turnover in 2 samples of front-line service workers in a casual dining, national restaurant chain after controlling for other aspects of work that can create a sense of attachment to a job, and other job attitudes, such as satisfaction and commitment. However, the effect was dependent on developmental life stage. Constituent attachment reduced turnover among workers classified as emerging adults, whereas constituent attachment did little to affect turnover among nonemerging adults. Implications of the results are discussed with respect to the value of considering segmentation in future research on turnover in the service sector and the use of life stage theory for understanding the leaving behavior of workers in different stages of adulthood. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Perspectives on Workplace Health Promotion Among Employees in Low-Wage Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerback, Kristen; Hannon, Peggy A; Harris, Jeffrey R; Clegg-Thorp, Catherine; Kohn, Marlana; Parrish, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Study goals were to (1) understand the attitudes of employees in low-wage industries toward workplace health promotion, including views on appropriateness of employer involvement in employee health and level of interest in workplace health promotion overall and in specific programs, and (2) determine the potential for extending workplace health promotion to spouses and partners of these employees. The study used 42 interviews of 60 to 90 minutes. Interviews were conducted with couples (married or living together) in the Seattle/King County metropolitan area of Washington State. Study participants were forty-two couples with one or more members working in one of five low-wage industries: accommodation/food services, education, health care/social assistance, manufacturing, and retail trade. The study employed qualitative analysis of interview transcripts using grounded theory to identify themes. Employees consider workplace health promotion both appropriate and desirable and believe it benefits employers through increased productivity and morale. Most have little personal experience with it and doubt their employers would prioritize employee health. Employees are most interested in efforts focused on nutrition and physical activity. Both employees and their partners support extending workplace health promotion to include partners. Employees and their partners are interested in workplace health promotion if it addresses behaviors they care about. Concern over employer involvement in their personal health decisions is minimal; instead, employees view employer interest in their health as a sign that they are valued.

  13. Workplace health promotion implementation, readiness, and capacity among midsize employers in low-wage industries: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Peggy A; Garson, Gayle; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hammerback, Kristen; Sopher, Carrie J; Clegg-Thorp, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    To describe workplace health promotion (WHP) implementation, readiness, and capacity among midsize employers in low-wage industries in the United States. A cross-sectional survey of a national sample of midsize employers (100 to 4999 employees) representing five low-wage industries. Employers' WHP implementation for both employees and employees' spouses and partners was low. Readiness scales showed that employers believe WHP would benefit their employees and their companies, but they were less likely to believe that WHP was feasible for their companies. Employers' capacity to implement WHP was very low; nearly half the sample reported no capacity. Midsize employers in low-wage industries implement few WHP programs; their responses to readiness and capacity measures indicate that low capacity may be one of the principal barriers to WHP implementation.

  14. Managing cancer and employment: Decisions and strategies used by breast cancer survivors employed in low-wage jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Nichols, Helen M; Ko, Jungyai; Tracy, J Kathleen; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2017-01-01

    Advances in breast cancer screening and treatment have led to an overall 5-year survival rate of 90%. Many of these cancer cases are diagnosed in working women. Few studies have explicitly examined the cancer-work interface, as experienced by low-wage earning women with breast cancer. This study uses in-depth, semistructured interviews with 24 low-wage breast cancer survivors to identify employment decisions and factors that influenced or enabled these decisions, and examine the individual strategies and workplace supports used to manage the cancer-work interface among a subset of women (n = 13) who continued to work. Future research areas and clinical implications are discussed.

  15. Effect of Fresh Fruit Availability at Worksites on the Fruit and Vegetable Consumption of Low-Wage Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Desiree; Gonzaga, Gian; Sugerman, Sharon; Francis, Dona; Cook, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of fresh fruit availability at worksites on the fruit and vegetable consumption and related psychosocial determinants of low-wage employees. Design: A prospective, randomized block experimental design. Setting: Seven apparel manufacturing and 2 food processing worksites. Participants: A convenience sample of 391…

  16. A Profile of the Low-Wage Immigrant Workforce. Immigrant Families and Workers. Facts and Perspectives Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Randy; Fix, Michael; Passel, Jeffrey S.; Ost, Jason; Perez-Lopez, Dan

    Immigrants compose an increasingly large share of the U.S. labor force and growing share of low-wage workers. Immigrants' hourly wages are lower on average than those for natives. Immigrant workers are much more likely than native workers to drop out of high school. Three-fourths of all U.S. workers with less than a ninth grade education are…

  17. A New Approach to Low-Wage Workers and Employers. Launching the Work Advancement and Support Center Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jacquelyn; Kato, Linda Yuriko; Riccio, James A.; Blank, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Since 1998, federally funded One-Stop Service Centers around the country have focused primarily on assisting the unemployed into work. WASC tests a strategy that expands that mission by targeting people who are already working, but at low wages. Through career coaching, skills training, and better connections with employers - and led by a newly…

  18. Wising Up: How Government Can Partner with Business to Increase Skills and Advance Low-Wage Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Amy-Ellen; Martinson, Karin; Strawn, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This report examines one promising approach: state and local partnerships with business and industry to train low-wage workers and help them advance. For this analysis, the authors examined partnerships that: (1) Involve an investment of public funds and are managed by a public sector institution (business and industry also typically invest in…

  19. Laboring Below the Line: The New Ethnography of Poverty, Low-Wage Work, and Survival in the Global Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Frank, Ed.

    This document contains 15 papers on poverty, low-wage work, and survival in the global economy, with emphasis on the following topics: identity and the meaning of work; making decisions about work, family, and welfare; and paths toward change. The following papers are included: "Identity as a Weapon in the Moral Politics of Work and…

  20. Job satisfaction in a low-wage, low-status industry: The case of Danish food retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    This paper explains why job satisfaction is high among employees in Danish food retailing - a low-wage, low-status industry. We distinguish between three employee types (transitional workers, core employees and career-seekers) and identify factors such as divergent interests and ambitions to help...

  1. Patient-Provider Communication: Experiences of Low-Wage-Earning Breast Cancer Survivors in Managing Cancer and Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Helen M; Swanberg, Jennifer E; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2018-02-26

    In 2017, there will be more than 250,000 new diagnoses of invasive breast cancer; most cases will occur in working-age women. The goal of this qualitative study was to explore low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors' experiences communicating with their oncology team about cancer and employment issues. Twenty-four low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors in the USA were interviewed in 2012 using a structured interview protocol. Sociodemographic data, cancer history, and patient-provider communication experiences regarding the management of cancer and work were collected. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory strategy of constant comparative analysis. Low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors' experiences communicating with their oncology team about employment and cancer focused on three dimensions of patient-provider communication: extent, quality, and content. Over 70% of respondents reported no communication or only routine communication with their providers regarding work; three quarters of women reported poor or standard communication quality, and content of work-related communication covered scheduling issues, work absences, continuing to work during treatment, and financial concerns. Communication between oncology care teams and low-wage-earning cancer patients is critical to the successful management of treatment and work responsibilities given the vulnerable employment situation of these women. There is a need for education of oncology team members about how cancer and its treatment can impact employment for all workers, but especially for low-wage workers, thereby allowing the care team to address these issues proactively and help patients successfully manage both cancer treatment and work responsibilities.

  2. Psychosocial working conditions and well-being among immigrant and German low-wage workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Annekatrin

    2011-04-01

    Despite a steady increase of immigrant workers in Germany in the past decades, occupational health research has only peripherally addressed psychosocial working conditions and immigrant worker well-being. This study has two aims: (1) to investigate differences in psychosocial stressors and resources between immigrant and German low-wage workers, and (2) to examine group differences in their association with well-being using a structural equation modeling multiple group analysis approach. Eighty-nine immigrant and 146 German postmen of a German mail service company were surveyed. Results reveal more stressors in the social work environment for the immigrant workers than for their German coworkers but similar levels of task-related stressors in both groups. Stressors are more strongly associated with psychological distress among the German workers. In terms of resources, job control serves as a resource only among German workers, whereas supervisor and coworker support are more important for immigrant workers. These differences suggest that cultural factors, previous work experiences, and expectations influence the worker's experience of psychosocial working conditions and have a direct impact on worker health.

  3. African Immigrants in Low-Wage Direct Health Care: Motivations, Job Satisfaction, and Occupational Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington-Ward, Yolanda

    2017-06-01

    This study explores motivations, job satisfaction, and overall perceived occupational mobility for African immigrants working in low-wage direct health care occupations. The study uses qualitative semi-structured interviews with a sample of thirty African immigrant workers in the greater Pittsburgh metropolitan area. Results show that four major themes captured the motivations of interviewees for doing direct care work: passion for care work, quick money, easily obtained employment, and direct care work as a pathway to other health occupations. The majority of the interviewees were satisfied with their jobs, yet almost all of them saw their occupations as temporary or transitional employment. Most of the interviewees also saw their jobs as lacking occupational mobility. In light of the increased national demand for direct care workers, the growing numbers of immigrants in the direct care labor force, and the high turnover and low retention rates of direct care workers overall, the study suggests that more must be done to make direct care work attractive and rewarding for African immigrant workers.

  4. Costs and benefits of employment transportation for low-wage workers: an assessment of job access public transportation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakuriah Vonu, Piyushimita; Persky, Joseph; Soot, Siim; Sriraj, P S

    2013-04-01

    This paper focuses on an evaluation of public transportation-based employment transportation (ET) services to transport low-wage workers to jobs in the US. We make an attempt to capture a more comprehensive range of intended and unintended outcomes of ET services than those traditionally considered in the case of public transportation services. Using primary data from 23 locations across the country, we present a framework to evaluate how transportation improvements, in interaction with labor markets, can affect users' short-run economic welfare, users' long-run human capital accumulation and non-users' short-run economic welfare. These services were partially funded by a specialized program - the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program - which was consolidated into larger transit funding programs by recent legislation. In the sites examined, we found that low wage users benefited from self-reported increased access to jobs, improvements in earnings potential, as well as from savings in transport cost and time. Simulations show the potential of users to accrue long-term worklife benefits. At the same time, users may have accrued changes in leisure time as a result of transitioning from unemployment to employment, and generated a range of societal impacts on three classes of non-users: the general tax-paying public, the general commuting public in the service operating area and other low-wage workers in local labor markets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterizing the low wage immigrant workforce: a comparative analysis of the health disparities among selected occupations in Somerville, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkar, Bindu; Woodin, Mark A; Brugge, Doug; Hyatt, Raymond; Gute, David M

    2014-05-01

    This study estimates job-related risks among common low wage occupations (cleaning, construction, food service, cashier/baggers, and factory workers) held by predominantly Haitian, El Salvadorian, and Brazilian immigrants living or working in Somerville, Massachusetts. A community-based cross-sectional survey on immigrant occupational health was conducted between 2006 and 2009 and logistic regression was used to assess the job-related risks among the most common low wage occupations. Construction workers reported significantly higher health risks, and lower access to occupational health services than the other occupations. Compared to cashier/baggers, the reference population in this study, cleaners reported significantly lower access to health and safety and work training and no knowledge of workers' compensation. Factory workers reported significantly lower work training compared to cashier/baggers. Food service workers reported the least access to doctors compared to the other occupations. We found significant variability in risks among different low wage immigrant occupations. The type of occupation independently contributed to varying levels of risks among these jobs. We believe our findings to be conservative and recommend additional inquiry aimed at assuring the representativeness of our findings. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Determinants of turnover among low wage earners in long term care: the role of manager-employee relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael; Carsten, Melissa K; Ayers, Douglas J; Menachemi, Nir

    2018-02-27

    The demand for Long-Term Care (LTC) is steadily increasing as Baby Boomers age and enter retirement. High turnover rates among employees in LTC creates challenges for supervisors and administrators, and can negatively impact quality of care. This study examines manager-subordinate relationship quality using Leader-Member Exchange Theory (LMX) as an antecedent to turnover among low-wage earners in the LTC environment. Survey data measuring LMX, job satisfaction, and demographic information was collected at time 1, and turnover data was collected 18 months later at time 2. The results reveal that all four LMX dimensions were rated significantly different among subordinates who left versus those who stayed, however, only the LMX dimension of supervisor loyalty was a significant predictor of turnover among low wage earners. Our study adds a more nuanced view of the reasons low-wage employees turnover, and presents implications for clinical managers and LTC organizations more broadly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving low-wage, midsized employers' health promotion practices: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Peggy A; Harris, Jeffrey R; Sopher, Carrie J; Kuniyuki, Alan; Ghosh, Donetta L; Henderson, Shelly; Martin, Diane P; Weaver, Marcia R; Williams, Barbara; Albano, Denise L; Meischke, Hendrika; Diehr, Paula; Lichiello, Patricia; Hammerback, Kristen E; Parks, Malcolm R; Forehand, Mark

    2012-08-01

    The Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide) offers evidence-based intervention strategies to prevent chronic disease. The American Cancer Society (ACS) and the University of Washington Health Promotion Research Center co-developed ACS Workplace Solutions (WPS) to improve workplaces' implementation of Community Guide strategies. To test the effectiveness of WPS for midsized employers in low-wage industries. Two-arm RCT; workplaces were randomized to receive WPS during the study (intervention group) or at the end of the study (delayed control group). Forty-eight midsized employers (100-999 workers) in King County WA. WPS provides employers one-on-one consulting with an ACS interventionist via three meetings at the workplace. The interventionist recommends best practices to adopt based on the workplace's current practices, provides implementation toolkits for the best practices the employer chooses to adopt, conducts a follow-up visit at 6 months, and provides technical assistance. Employers' implementation of 16 best practices (in the categories of insurance benefits, health-related policies, programs, tracking, and health communications) at baseline (June 2007-June 2008) and 15-month follow-up (October 2008-December 2009). Data were analyzed in 2010-2011. Intervention employers demonstrated greater improvement from baseline than control employers in two of the five best-practice categories; implementing policies (baseline scores: 39% program, 43% control; follow-up scores: 49% program, 45% control; p=0.013) and communications (baseline scores: 42% program, 44% control; follow-up scores: 76% program, 55% control; p=0.007). Total best-practice implementation improvement did not differ between study groups (baseline scores: 32% intervention, 37% control; follow-up scores: 39% intervention, 42% control; p=0.328). WPS improved employers' health-related policies and communications but did not improve insurance benefits design, programs, or tracking. Many

  8. Worksite Influences on Obesogenic Behaviors in Low-Wage Workers in St Louis, Missouri, 2013–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorno, Galen; Kinghorn, Anna M.; Evanoff, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction More than one-third of US adults are obese. Workplace programs to reduce obesity and improve overall health are not available or accessible to all workers, particularly low-wage workers among whom obesity is more prevalent. The goal of the study was to identify modifiable workplace factors and behaviors associated with diet and exercise to inform future workplace interventions to improve health. Methods We distributed paper and online surveys to 2 groups of low-wage workers, hospital workers and retail sales workers, at the worksites. The surveys assessed obesity, obesogenic behaviors, workplace factors, and worker participation in workplace health programs (WHPs). Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted to examine workplace factors associated with obesogenic behaviors. Results A total of 529 surveys were completed (219 hospital workers and 310 retail workers). More than 40% of workers were obese and 27% were overweight. In general, workers had poor diets (frequent consumption of sugary and high-fat foods) and engaged in little physical activity (only 30.9% met recommended physical activity guidelines). Access to and participation in workplace health programs varied greatly between hospital and retail sales workers. We identified several modifiable workplace factors, such as food source and work schedule, that were associated with diet, exercise, or participation in workplace health programs. Conclusion This study illustrates the high prevalence of obesity and obesogenic behaviors workers in 2 low-wage groups. The differences between work groups indicated that each group had unique facilitators and barriers to healthy eating and exercise. An understanding of how socioeconomic, demographic, and work-related factors influence health will help to identify high-risk populations for intervention and to design interventions tailored and relevant to the target audiences. PMID:25950573

  9. Worksite influences on obesogenic behaviors in low-wage workers in St Louis, Missouri, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Jaime R; Pizzorno, Galen; Kinghorn, Anna M; Evanoff, Bradley A

    2015-05-07

    More than one-third of US adults are obese. Workplace programs to reduce obesity and improve overall health are not available or accessible to all workers, particularly low-wage workers among whom obesity is more prevalent. The goal of the study was to identify modifiable workplace factors and behaviors associated with diet and exercise to inform future workplace interventions to improve health. We distributed paper and online surveys to 2 groups of low-wage workers, hospital workers and retail sales workers, at the worksites. The surveys assessed obesity, obesogenic behaviors, workplace factors, and worker participation in workplace health programs (WHPs). Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted to examine workplace factors associated with obesogenic behaviors. A total of 529 surveys were completed (219 hospital workers and 310 retail workers). More than 40% of workers were obese and 27% were overweight. In general, workers had poor diets (frequent consumption of sugary and high-fat foods) and engaged in little physical activity (only 30.9% met recommended physical activity guidelines). Access to and participation in workplace health programs varied greatly between hospital and retail sales workers. We identified several modifiable workplace factors, such as food source and work schedule, that were associated with diet, exercise, or participation in workplace health programs. This study illustrates the high prevalence of obesity and obesogenic behaviors workers in 2 low-wage groups. The differences between work groups indicated that each group had unique facilitators and barriers to healthy eating and exercise. An understanding of how socioeconomic, demographic, and work-related factors influence health will help to identify high-risk populations for intervention and to design interventions tailored and relevant to the target audiences.

  10. Stakeholder perspectives on workplace health promotion: a qualitative study of midsized employers in low-wage industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Peggy A; Hammerback, Kristen; Garson, Gayle; Harris, Jeffrey R; Sopher, Carrie J

    2012-01-01

    Study goals were to (1) describe stakeholder perceptions of workplace health promotion (WHP) appropriateness, (2) describe barriers and facilitators to implementing WHP, (3) learn the extent to which WHP programs are offered to workers' spouses and partners and assess attitudes toward including partners in WHP programs, and (4) describe willingness to collaborate with nonprofit agencies to offer WHP. Five 1.5-hour focus groups. The focus groups were conducted with representatives of midsized (100-999 workers) workplaces in the Seattle metropolitan area, Washington state. Thirty-four human resources professionals in charge of WHP programs and policies from five low-wage industries: accommodation/food services, manufacturing, health care/social assistance, education, and retail trade. A semistructured discussion guide. Qualitative analysis of focus group transcripts using grounded theory to identify themes. Most participants viewed WHP as appropriate, but many expressed reservations about intruding in workers' personal lives. Barriers to implementing WHP included cost, time, logistical challenges, and unsupportive culture. Participants saw value in extending WHP programs to workers' partners, but were unsure how to do so. Most were willing to work with nonprofit agencies to offer WHP. Midsized, low-wage employers face significant barriers to implementing WHP; to reach these employers and their workers, nonprofit agencies and WHP vendors need to offer WHP programs that are inexpensive, turnkey, and easy to adapt.

  11. The US Labor Standards Enforcement System and Low-Wage Immigrants: Recommendations for Legislative and Administrative Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Kerwin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-wage immigrants in the United States, particularly the 8 million unauthorized workers, suffer from widespread labor standards violations.  Their protection represents a singular challenge for modestly-resourced federal and state regulators, particularly in an era of record immigration enforcement. Many employers hire the unauthorized, knowingly or unknowingly, because they cannot attract sufficient numbers of authorized workers. An enduring minority, however, prefer to employ unauthorized workers in order to suppress wages and working conditions and to gain an advantage over their competitors. Their business model depends on the exploitation of workers who are less likely to complain, organize or pursue other remedies for mistreatment. Exacerbating matters, the unauthorized work disproportionately in jobs to which certain labor standards do not apply, and they belong to labor unions at lower rates than the US workforce as a whole (Schmitt 2010. Employers, in turn, face intense competition and pressure to cut costs.  In addition, intensive immigration enforcement can make employees more vulnerable to retaliation for exercising their rights and less likely to challenge abuses (Cho and Smith 2013.   This paper analyzes labor standards enforcement in light of the challenges posed by bad-faith employers, the historically high population of low-wage immigrant laborers (particularly the unauthorized, and record spending on immigration enforcement. It draws from a comprehensive report titled Labor Standards Enforcement and Low-Wage Immigrants: Creating an Effective Enforcement System (Kerwin and McCabe 2011. The paper identifies gaps in protection in the legal and regulatory labor standards framework, with a particular focus on the US Department of Labor’s (DOL’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD which enforces the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA.[1] It argues that labor standards should be strengthened and enforcement resources bolstered. However

  12. A Promising Tool for Helping Vulnerable Workers? An Exploration of the Use of Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) to Help Low-Wage Workers on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andrew B.

    2005-01-01

    Employee assistance programs, or EAPs, are an employee benefit designed to help workers meet their work and family needs. However, questions have been raised about the design, utilization, and scale of services that EAPs make possible for low-wage workers. This article explores whether on college campuses an EAP benefit can simultaneously meet the…

  13. "They See Us As Machines:" The Experience of Recent Immigrant Women in the Low Wage Informal Labor Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkar, Bindu; Brugge, Doug; Gute, David M; Hyatt, Raymond R

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the organization of work and occupational health risk as elicited from recently immigrated women (n = 8) who have been in the US for less than three years and employed in informal work sectors such as cleaning and factory work in the greater Boston area in Massachusetts. Additional interviews (n = 8) with Community Key Informants with knowledge of this sector and representatives of temporary employment agencies in the area provides further context to the interviews conducted with recent immigrant women. These results were also compared with our immigrant occupational health survey, a large project that spawned this study. Responses from the study participants suggest health outcomes consistent with being a day-laborer scholarship, new immigrant women are especially at higher risk within these low wage informal work sectors. A difference in health experiences based on ethnicity and occupation was also observed. Low skilled temporary jobs are fashioned around meeting the job performance expectations of the employer; the worker's needs are hardly addressed, resulting in low work standards, little worker protection and poor health outcomes. The rising prevalence of non-standard employment or informal labor sector requires that policies or labor market legislation be revised to meet the needs presented by these marginalized workers.

  14. A Narrative Review of the Confluence of Breast Cancer and Low-wage Employment and Its Impact on Receipt of Guideline-recommended Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderpool, Robin C; Swanberg, Jennifer E; Chambers, Mara D

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer among women in the United States, costing the healthcare system, employers, and society billions of dollars each year. Despite improvements in screening and treatment, significant breast cancer treatment and survivorship disparities exist among various groups of women. One variable that has not been explored extensively as a possible contributor to breast cancer treatment disparities is employment. This is concerning, given the changing economic and employment trends in the United States favoring low-wage employment. Currently, one-quarter to one-third of all US workers are considered to be working poor, and women are disproportionally represented in this group. Characteristics of low-wage work-limited paid time off, minimal health benefits, schedule inflexibility, and economic insecurity-may become even more significant in the event of a breast cancer diagnosis. To date, there has been limited research into how job conditions inherent to low-wage work may influence working poor survivors' receipt of guideline-recommended breast cancer treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this narrative review was to critically examine the current literature to further our understanding of how employment context may impact treatment decisions and adherence-and therefore receipt of guideline-recommended care-among newly diagnosed, working poor breast cancer survivors. After undertaking a comprehensive review, we failed to identify any published literature that explicitly addressed low-wage employment and receipt of guideline-recommended breast cancer treatment. Four articles reported circumstances where women delayed, missed, or quit treatments due to work interference, or alternatively, developed strategies that allowed them to continue to work and obtain their breast cancer treatment concurrent with medical and economic challenges. An additional five articles, while focused on other cancer and employment outcomes, described the need for

  15. Enhancing workplace wellness efforts to reduce obesity: a qualitative study of low-wage workers in St Louis, Missouri, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Jaime R; Eyler, Amy A; Purnell, Jason Q; Kinghorn, Anna M; Herrick, Cynthia; Evanoff, Bradley A

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study was to examine workplace determinants of obesity and participation in employer-sponsored wellness programs among low-wage workers. We conducted key informant interviews and focus groups with 2 partner organizations: a health care employer and a union representing retail workers. Interviews and focus groups discussed worksite factors that support or constrain healthy eating and physical activity and barriers that reduce participation in workplace wellness programs. Focus group discussions were transcribed and coded to identify main themes related to healthy eating, physical activity, and workplace factors that affect health. Although the union informants recognized the need for workplace wellness programs, very few programs were offered because informants did not know how to reach their widespread and diverse membership. Informants from the health care organization described various programs available to employees but noted several barriers to effective implementation. Workers discussed how their job characteristics contributed to their weight; irregular schedules, shift work, short breaks, physical job demands, and food options at work were among the most commonly discussed contributors to poor eating and exercise behaviors. Workers also described several general factors such as motivation, time, money, and conflicting responsibilities. The workplace offers unique opportunities for obesity interventions that go beyond traditional approaches. Our results suggest that modifying the physical and social work environment by using participatory or integrated health and safety approaches may improve eating and physical activity behaviors. However, more research is needed about the methods best suited to the needs of low-wage workers.

  16. Introduction of a National Minimum Wage Reduced Depressive Symptoms in Low-Wage Workers: A Quasi-Natural Experiment in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Aaron; McKee, Martin; Mackenbach, Johan; Whitehead, Margaret; Stuckler, David

    2017-05-01

    Does increasing incomes improve health? In 1999, the UK government implemented minimum wage legislation, increasing hourly wages to at least £3.60. This policy experiment created intervention and control groups that can be used to assess the effects of increasing wages on health. Longitudinal data were taken from the British Household Panel Survey. We compared the health effects of higher wages on recipients of the minimum wage with otherwise similar persons who were likely unaffected because (1) their wages were between 100 and 110% of the eligibility threshold or (2) their firms did not increase wages to meet the threshold. We assessed the probability of mental ill health using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. We also assessed changes in smoking, blood pressure, as well as hearing ability (control condition). The intervention group, whose wages rose above the minimum wage, experienced lower probability of mental ill health compared with both control group 1 and control group 2. This improvement represents 0.37 of a standard deviation, comparable with the effect of antidepressants (0.39 of a standard deviation) on depressive symptoms. The intervention group experienced no change in blood pressure, hearing ability, or smoking. Increasing wages significantly improves mental health by reducing financial strain in low-wage workers. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Investigating the effect of the London living wage on the psychological wellbeing of low-wage service sector employees: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Ellen; Cummins, Steven; Wills, Jane

    2014-06-01

    Working poverty has become a major public health concern in recent times, and low-paid, insecure employment has been widely linked to poor psychological wellbeing. The London Living Wage (LLW) campaign aims to ensure employees receive adequate pay. The objective of this study is to investigate whether working for a LLW employer predicted higher levels of psychological wellbeing among low-wage service sector employees. Workplace interviews were conducted with 300 service sector employees in London; 173 of whom were in LLW workplaces. Positive psychological wellbeing was measured using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess whether working for a LLW employer was associated with greater psychological wellbeing, adjusting for hypothesised confounding and mediating factors. After adjustment, respondents working for LLW employers had wellbeing scores 3.9 units higher on average than those who did not (95% CI: 1.8, 6.0). These empirical results are complemented by methodological findings regarding the difficulties associated with accessing the study group. Those who worked for a LLW employer had significantly higher psychological wellbeing on average than those who did not. This was shown to be irrespective of any differences in the socioeconomic or demographic composition of these two groups. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Balancing work and family in the low-wage service sector: the role of legislated and collectively-bargained norms in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    This paper looks at the role of legislated norms of general application in shaping "family-friendly" workplaces and their interaction with collectively-bargained standards in the retail service sector and more specifically, in a single unionized retail sector in Quebec, Canada. The methodology used is traditional legal research methodology: analysis of laws, collective agreements and case law. The principal norms examined concern parental and family leave, working time and disparities between different employment statuses. A series of legislative provisions have been adopted in Quebec over the last 30 years whose objectives are the improvement of family-related leave and the reduction of working time. Unions have also negotiated provisions in collective agreements with these same goals. In the low-wage retail sector studied, the working time standards negotiated between the unions and the employers reflect the characteristics of the sector, most notably extended opening hours, seven days a week. Predictability of hours also varies according to employment status. Such issues as family-unfriendly working time arrangements (last-minute scheduling, asocial hours, etc.) and the need for flexibility in family-related leave are insufficiently taken into account by the legislated and bargained provisions. A fine analysis and comprehension of existing formal regulation, be it legislated or collectively-bargained, is required to fully understand workers' experiences with work-family balance and to identify the gaps between formal norms and the needs expressed by workers with respect to work-family balance.

  19. Honey bee workers that are pollen stressed as larvae become poor foragers and waggle dancers as adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailey N Scofield

    Full Text Available The negative effects on adult behavior of juvenile undernourishment are well documented in vertebrates, but relatively poorly understood in invertebrates. We examined the effects of larval nutritional stress on the foraging and recruitment behavior of an economically important model invertebrate, the honey bee (Apis mellifera. Pollen, which supplies essential nutrients to developing workers, can become limited in colonies because of seasonal dearths, loss of foraging habitat, or intensive management. However, the functional consequences of being reared by pollen-stressed nestmates remain unclear, despite growing concern that poor nutrition interacts with other stressors to exacerbate colony decline. We manipulated nurse bees' access to pollen and then assessed differences in weight, longevity, foraging activity, and waggle-dance behavior of the workers that they reared (who were co-fostered as adults. Pollen stress during larval development had far-reaching physical and behavioral effects on adult workers. Workers reared in pollen-stressed colonies were lighter and shorter lived than nestmates reared with adequate access to pollen. Proportionally fewer stressed workers were observed foraging and those who did forage started foraging sooner, foraged for fewer days, and were more likely to die after only a single day of foraging. Pollen-stressed workers were also less likely to waggle dance than their unstressed counterparts and, if they danced, the information they conveyed about the location of food was less precise. These performance deficits may escalate if long-term pollen limitation prevents stressed foragers from providing sufficiently for developing workers. Furthermore, the effects of brief pollen shortages reported here mirror the effects of other environmental stressors that limit worker access to nutrients, suggesting the likelihood of their synergistic interaction. Honey bees often experience the level of stress that we created, thus

  20. Frequency of satisfaction and dissatisfaction with practice among rural-based, group-employed physicians and non-physician practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddimba, Anthony C; Scribani, Melissa; Krupa, Nicole; May, John J; Jenkins, Paul

    2016-10-22

    being in the lowest quintile of dissatisfaction; heavier workload and greater intolerance of uncertainty reduced that likelihood. Practitioner demographics and most practice unit characteristics did not manifest any independent effect. Mutable factors, such as workload, work meaningfulness, relational needs, uncertainty/ambiguity tolerance, and risk-taking attitudes displayed the strongest association with practitioner satisfaction/dissatisfaction, independent of demographics and practice unit characteristics. Organizational efforts should be dedicated to a redesign of group-employment models, including more equitable division of clinical labor, building supportive peer networks, and uncertainty/risk tolerance coaching, to improve the quality of work life among rural practitioners.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT WORK-LOADING APPLIED TO THE WORKERS THAT WORK PRODUCING OF SHIRT TO THE SEAM FAULT RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Önder YÜCEL

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Human efficiency is of big importance in the clothing industry. So as to provide high quality and productivity stabilized work –loading must be given to the workers that work in the cloth production lines. In addition to it, the kind of work must be paid attention in the studies to be done on stabilized work-loading. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of different work-loading to the seam fault rates. For this purpose, four different work-loading had been applied to the workers and determined seam faults on the clothes had been recorded. As a result of this study, seam fault rates in the different work-loading had been evaluated.

  2. Low wages in the retail industry in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, M.

    2010-01-01

    This Working Paper is basically a "source book", accounting the results of over five years of research into the retail industry and the sources used for that research. It originates from the Future of Work in Europe research project of the New York-based Russell Sage Foundation (RSF), in which the

  3. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government.

  4. Low Wage Workers in Today's Economy: Strategies for Productivity and Opportunity. Draft Policy Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs for the Future, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    In the United States today, too many hardworking people are unable to earn enough through work to support their families. Policymakers can help change this situation by taking the following steps: (1) keep work central; (2) promote family-supporting work; (3) invest in education and work skills; (4) make it easier for individuals to stay employed…

  5. Reasons for Low Part-Time Employment in Eastern Europe – Any Role for Low Wages?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerly Krillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Eastern European countries are characterized by high wage inequalities and a relatively low proportion of labour force being employed on a part-time basis, yet there seem not be so far made any studies on the part time pay penalty. In this article we analyse whether there are any differences in the average wages of part-time and full-time employed in Estonia, a small Eastern European catching up economy. We use Estonian Labour Force Survey data from years 1997-2007; the part time wage gap is estimated by using Oaxaca-Blinder wage decompositions and propensity score matching. The results are quite different for males and females. For females the raw wage gap is in favour of part-timers. After taking into account various worker characteristics, the wage gap becomes even larger. For males the full-time raw premium exists, but it is to a large extent explained by the different labour market characteristics.

  6. Are Women Asking for Low Wages? Gender Differences in Wage Bargaining Strategies and Ensuing Bargaining Success

    OpenAIRE

    Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    Men and women’s labor market outcomes differ along pay, promotion and competitiveness. This paper contributes by uncovering results in a related unexplored field using unique data on individual wage bargaining. We find striking gender differences. Women, like men, also bargain, but they submit lower wage bids and are offered lower wages than men. The adjusted gender wage gap is lower with postedwage jobs than with individual bargaining, although less is ascribable to the term associated with ...

  7. Statistical Analysis and History of Low-Wage Work in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    The Danish economy offers a dose of American labor market flexibility inside a European welfare state. The Danish government allows employers a relatively high level of freedom to dismiss workers, but also provides generous unemployment insurance. Widespread union coverage and an active system of...... labor market and the lessons it holds for both the United States and the rest of Europe....

  8. "Just Having a Job": Career Advancement for Low-Wage Workers with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Lauren; Hirano, Kara A.; McCarthy, Colleen; Alverson, Charlotte Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined career development and early employment experiences for four young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Researchers used a multiple-method, multiple case-study longitudinal design to explore career development within the context of family systems, high school and transition programs, adult services, and…

  9. Labour Market Developments, Non-standard Employment and Low Wages in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leschke, Janine

    2014-01-01

    In terms of basic labour market developments and outcomes Germany is faring comparatively well. Indeed, against the European trend, Germany saw employment rates increasing and unemployment decreasing during the economic crisis. But since the deregulatory Hartz reforms of the early and mid-2000s...

  10. Statistical Analysis and History of Low-Wage Work in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    The Danish economy offers a dose of American labor market flexibility inside a European welfare state. The Danish government allows employers a relatively high level of freedom to dismiss workers, but also provides generous unemployment insurance. Widespread union coverage and an active system of...

  11. Fossil record of stem groups employed in evaluating the chronogram of insects (Arthropoda: Hexapoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-hui; Engel, Michael S.; Rafael, José A.; Wu, Hao-yang; Rédei, Dávid; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiao-guang; Bu, Wen-jun

    2016-01-01

    Insecta s. str. (=Ectognatha), comprise the largest and most diversified group of living organisms, accounting for roughly half of the biodiversity on Earth. Understanding insect relationships and the specific time intervals for their episodes of radiation and extinction are critical to any comprehensive perspective on evolutionary events. Although some deeper nodes have been resolved congruently, the complete evolution of insects has remained obscure due to the lack of direct fossil evidence. Besides, various evolutionary phases of insects and the corresponding driving forces of diversification remain to be recognized. In this study, a comprehensive sample of all insect orders was used to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and estimate deep divergences. The phylogenetic relationships of insect orders were congruently recovered by Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses. A complete timescale of divergences based on an uncorrelated log-normal relaxed clock model was established among all lineages of winged insects. The inferred timescale for various nodes are congruent with major historical events including the increase of atmospheric oxygen in the Late Silurian and earliest Devonian, the radiation of vascular plants in the Devonian, and with the available fossil record of the stem groups to various insect lineages in the Devonian and Carboniferous. PMID:27958352

  12. Study of Minority Group Employment in the Federal Government, November 30, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report is intended primarily for use by those who manage the Federal civilian work force. It is hoped, however, that it will prove useful to those without managerial responsibility who are concerned with the nature of and changes in the composition and structure of the Federal work force. The statistical data and analyses presented herein are…

  13. Retention and Advancement in the Retail Industry: A Career Ladder Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Heath J.

    Retailing is the largest industry in the United States, employing roughly 18 percent of the total labor force. However, high turnover resulting from low wages in entry-level positions and the perceptions of retail workers that job security is far from certain and that advancement potential is limited have resulted in low levels of employee…

  14. Introduction of a National Minimum Wage Reduced Depressive Symptoms in Low-Wage Workers: A Quasi-Natural Experiment in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Reeves (Aaron); M. McKee (Martin); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); M. Whitehead (Margaret); D. Stuckler (David)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDoes increasing incomes improve health? In 1999, the UK government implemented minimum wage legislation, increasing hourly wages to at least £3.60. This policy experiment created intervention and control groups that can be used to assess the effects of increasing wages on health.

  15. Helping Low-Wage Workers Persist in Education Programs: Lessons from Research on Welfare Training Programs and Two Promising Community College Strategies. MDRC Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn

    2008-01-01

    Employment has long been held to be an important deterrent against poverty, and work is a core component of a range of federal efforts to improve the economic well-being of low-income families. However, recent trends in earnings and research both confirm that work alone is not sufficient to prevent poverty. While there is compelling evidence that…

  16. Physical workload, work intensification, and prevalence of pain in low wage workers: results from a participatory research project with hotel room cleaners in Las Vegas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Niklas; Scherzer, Teresa; Rugulies, Reiner

    2005-11-01

    Occupational injury rates among hotel workers exceed the national service sector average. This study assesses the prevalence of back and neck pain, and its associations with physical workload, ergonomic problems, and increasing work demands. Nine hundred forty-one unionized hotel room cleaners completed a survey about health and working conditions. Associations between job demands and pain were determined by logistic regression models adjusting for individual characteristics, cumulative work demands, care-taking responsibilities at home, and psychosocial job factors. The 1-month prevalence of severe bodily pain was 47% in general, 43% for neck, 59% for upper back, and 63% for low back pain. Workers in the highest exposure quartiles for physical workload and ergonomic problems were between 3.24 and 5.42 times more likely to report severe pain than workers in the lowest quartile. Adjusted odds ratios for work intensification ranged from 1.74 (upper back) to 2.33 (neck). Most room cleaners experience severe back or neck pain. Severe pain showed strong associations with physical workload, work intensification, and ergonomic problems.

  17. A Narrative Review of the Confluence of Breast Cancer and Low-wage Employment and Its Impact on Receipt of Guideline-recommended Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderpool, Robin C.; Swanberg, Jennifer E.; Chambers, Mara D.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer among women in the United States, costing the healthcare system, employers, and society billions of dollars each year. Despite improvements in screening and treatment, significant breast cancer treatment and survivorship disparities exist among various groups of women. One variable that has not been explored extensively as a possible contributor to breast cancer treatment disparities is employment. This is concerning, given the changing economic an...

  18. The work-related stressors and coping strategies of group-employed rural health care practitioners: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbrouck, Melinda A; Waddimba, Anthony C

    2017-10-01

    Escalating demands on practitioners, stagnating/dwindling resources, and diminishing autonomy have heightened patient-care work-related stress. Using qualitative content/thematic analysis of responses to open-ended survey questions, plus spontaneous comments, we sought to identify rural clinicians' subjective perceptions of their workplace stressors and typical adaptive/coping strategies. Within a hybrid inductive-deductive approach, we framed empirical themes (derived by consensus, corroborated with text segments, and extant literature) into theory-based coding templates by which we analyzed the data. Of 308 (65.1% of) recipients completing questionnaires, 290 (94%) answered open-ended questions and/or provided comments. Categorizing stressors by socio-ecology, they cited four themes: Organizational, practitioner/staff-related, patient-related, and third party-induced stressors. Organizational stressors were referenced most conspicuously. How respondents described their coping fitted the Stress, Appraisal and Coping. [Lazarus and Folkman (1984): New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, Inc] model. Emotion-focused were referenced more than problem-focused approaches. Themes scarcely differed by demographics, except for marital status. Findings highlight needs for resilience coaching, rekindling work meaningfulness, mentorship in work-home balance/limit-setting, supportive peer networks, and deeper teamwork. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Working men : Bangladeshi migrants in the global labour force

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I illustrate that Bangladeshi male migrants are now part of a vast pool of inexpensive and mobile workers that are maintained as such because of powerful structures of inequality that require the extraction of their labour at both the global and local scale. These low-waged migrants’ occupy particular positions in Singapore’s segmented labour market – a point which remains the backdrop of my argument. Drawing upon migrants’ own narratives, I examine how Bangladeshi men make sen...

  20. Employment effects of minimum wages

    OpenAIRE

    Neumark, David

    2014-01-01

    The potential benefits of higher minimum wages come from the higher wages for affected workers, some of whom are in low-income families. The potential downside is that a higher minimum wage may discourage employers from using the low-wage, low-skill workers that minimum wages are intended to help. Research findings are not unanimous, but evidence from many countries suggests that minimum wages reduce the jobs available to low-skill workers.

  1. Law No.13.192 workers that execute radiological services it state included in the advantage of the laws 9.940 and 9744 to civil or militaries employers belonging to Ministry of National Defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The civil and military officials that lend services in dependences of the Ministry of National Defense in the tasks of radiological services were applied in the compute to be carried out the legal norms referred to effects of their retirement [es

  2. The Effect of Minimum Wages on Youth Employment in Canada: A Panel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Terence

    2003-01-01

    Canadian panel data 1988-90 were used to compare estimates of minimum-wage effects based on a low-wage/high-worker sample and a low-wage-only sample. Minimum-wage effect for the latter is nearly zero. Different results for low-wage subgroups suggest a significant effect for those with longer low-wage histories. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  3. From living wage to living hours – the Nordic version of the working poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The development of service economies in the Western world has led to a debate on the quality of new service jobs as many are low-wage jobs with poor working conditions and career opportunities. Although the incidence of low-wage service work is somewhat lower in the Nordic countries than elsewhere...... in low-wage service work in the private sector of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The concept of living hours is used to explain developments in low-wage service jobs that are not explained by the concept of a living wage. On the basis of cross-sectional data from the European Labour Force Survey...

  4. How the Food Processing Industry Is Diversifying Rural Minnesota. JSRI Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, Katherine; Leitner, Helga

    The diversification of rural Minnesota is largely the result of the restructuring of the food processing industry and its recruitment of low-wage laborers. The relocation and expansion of food processing plants into rural areas of Minnesota creates a demand for low-wage labor that can not be met locally. Food processing businesses attract…

  5. Instructional Design in Job Skills Training for Welfare Recipients and Displaced Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Arline; Storberg-Walker, Julia

    2006-01-01

    Scully-Russ (2005) described the low-wage labor market issue and the tendency in academic literature to view the problem as "fixing" the skills of low wageworkers. However, the article does not address instructional design issues surrounding low-wage employee training interventions. This manuscript attempts to discover the key factors surrounding…

  6. 75 FR 53129 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Inflation Adjustment of Acquisition-Related Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... contractors pay very low wages and benefits, work quality can suffer and the Government may bear hidden costs because of the need to provide income assistance to low income families. The threshold for subcontracting...

  7. Determinants of Condom Use among Selected Migrant Commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    among migrant men and women in selected commercial farms in two provinces of South Africa. The study analysed 943 ... employers and supervisors and their low-wage employees. ... The current study addresses two gaps in the literature.

  8. Income Distribution and Inequality in Lesotho: The Case of Lorenz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With particular reference to Lesotho, the gap between the rich and the poor has ... of positions (low demand) will result in a low wage for that job since ... gender, race, diversity of preferences, culture, development patterns (as explained.

  9. "Importing Equality or Exporting Jobs?: Competition and Gender Wage and Employment Differentials in U.S. Manufacturing"

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru Kongar

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of increased import competition on gender wage and employment differentials in U.S. manufacturing over the period from 1976 to 1993. Increased import competition is expected to decrease the relative demand for workers in low-wage production occupations and the relative demand for women workers, given the high female share in these occupations. The findings support this hypothesis. Disproportionate job losses for women in low-wage production occupations was a...

  10. Expected and Achieved Outcomes of Reshoring: A Swedish Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vestin, Alexander; Sequeira Frank, Movin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Over the last couple of decades, globalization has impacted market competition. This results in that companies heavily offshore to low-wage countries to enhance its competitiveness through lower costs. Offshoring constitutes relocation of manufacturing activities to other existing manufacturing sites in foreign countries. In recent years, low-wage countries have grown and developed. Studies show that low cost environments are increasing in cost, eliminating the benefits of offshoring...

  11. The Nordic version of working poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    The development of service economies in the Western world has led to a debate on the quality of new service jobs as many are low-wage jobs with poor working conditions and career opportunities (Westergaard-Nielsen 2008; Gautié & Schmitt 2009; Kalleberg 2011). Empirical and theoretical work has...... from the European Labour Force Survey it is examined how low wage service work has developed in the private sector in the three countries since 2000 and which segments that can be identified. Data is drawn from the last quarter of 2000 (before the economic boom), 2007 (before the financial crisis....../restaurants, as the majority of low-wage private service workers in Denmark, Norway and Sweden work in these sectors (Bosch & Lehndorff 2005). We compare developments in the three countries to identify similar and different segments that have emerged over the past 15 years. Finally, the paper discusses findings in relation...

  12. The impact on advanced economies of north-south trade in manufacturing and services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rowthorn

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Many types of production are being transferred from the rich economies of the North to the poorer economies of the South. Such changes began in manufacturing but are now spreading to services. This paper provides estimates of their past and future impact on employment in the North. About 5 million manufacturing jobs have been lost over the past decade because of trade with low-wage economies. A similar number of service jobs may be lost to low-wage economies over the next decade. Although small compared to total employment, such losses may seriously harm certain localities or types of worker.

  13. From living wage to living hours – the Nordic version of the working poor

    OpenAIRE

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The development of service economies in the Western world has led to a debate on the quality of new service jobs as many are low-wage jobs with poor working conditions and career opportunities. Although the incidence of low-wage service work is somewhat lower in the Nordic countries than elsewhere in Europe, it is increasingly addressed and debated. Employees find it hard to make a living from their job and to work the working hours requested, whereas employers find it hard to attract and ret...

  14. Who Benefits from a Minimum Wage Increase?

    OpenAIRE

    John W. Lopresti; Kevin J. Mumford

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how a minimum wage increase affects the wages of low-wage workers. Most studies assume that there is a simple mechanical increase in the wage for workers earning a wage between the old and the new minimum wage, with some studies allowing for spillovers to workers with wages just above this range. Rather than assume that the wages of these workers would have remained constant, this paper estimates how a minimum wage increase impacts a low-wage worker's wage...

  15. On-the-job Training: Differences by Race and Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Saul D.

    1981-01-01

    A recent national survey suggests that women and Blacks receive less on-the-job training and training opportunities in their jobs than White males. This is especially true of young Black men. The factor of low wage does not seem to play a large part in this discrepancy. (CT)

  16. Career Advancement and Work Support Services on the Job: Implementing the Fort Worth Work Advancement and Support Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Caroline; Seith, David

    2011-01-01

    The Work Advancement and Support Center (WASC) program in Fort Worth was part of a demonstration that is testing innovative strategies to help increase the income of low-wage workers, who make up a large segment of the U.S. workforce. The program offered services to help workers stabilize their employment, improve their skills, and increase their…

  17. Career Advancement and Work Support Services on the Job: Implementing the Fort Worth Work Advancement and Support Center Program. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Caroline; Seith, David

    2011-01-01

    The Work Advancement and Support Center (WASC) program in Fort Worth was part of a demonstration that is testing innovative strategies to help increase the income of low-wage workers, who make up a large segment of the U.S. workforce. The program offered services to help workers stabilize their employment, improve their skills, and increase their…

  18. An Exploration of the Impact of Critical Math Literacies and Alternative Schooling Spaces on the Identity Development of High School-Aged Black Males in South Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Clarence La Mont

    2009-01-01

    Urban schools, for many African American students, have effectively become a space for the perpetuation of modern slavery. Large numbers of students, particularly Black males, are being funneled without choice into low-wage labor sectors, military service, underground economies and, eventually, prisons or worse. Key work by math education…

  19. Social Welfare in Rural Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shucksmith, Mark; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Literature review on social exclusion and disadvantage in rural Europe suggests that rural poverty arises from unemployment, low wages, and, most significantly, inadequate income in old age. Discusses difficulties in identifying rural incidence of exclusion and disadvantage, as well as the need for such research in light of major ongoing social…

  20. Unravelling the Complex Motivations behind China’s FDI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Zhang

    We empirically investigate the factors that drive China's outward FDI using dynamic panel methods for 27 countries from 1995 to 2002. Based on the literature review we test three hypotheses: comparative advantages in low wage countries, vertical integration towards resource and human capital

  1. Competitive Manufacturing: New Strategies for Regional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Stuart A.

    In the past, economic development in the rural United States, particularly in the rural South, relied principally on the attractiveness of a low-wage work force to mass-production manufacturing industries. Now however, the viability of the traditional mass-production economy's organizational structure and operating procedures has been eroded by…

  2. Escaping low pay: do male labour market entrants stand a chance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlopoulos, D.; Fouarge, D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent and the human-capital determinants of low-wage mobility for labour market entrants in the UK and Germany. Design/methodology/approach – Using panel data for the UK (BHPS) and Germany (GSOEP), a competing-risks duration model is applied

  3. Search Results | Page 4 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-03-02

    Mar 2, 2018 ... Development INCLUSIVE GROWTH WOMEN'S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT EMPLOYMENT GROWTH Gender ... "survival strategies” to provide supplemental income that makes up for precarious and low wages. ... However, they can also be sources of inequality and social exclusion in the absence of ...

  4. "Being Grown": How Adolescent Girls with Disabilities Narrate Self-Determination and Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Across the United States young women with disabilities are experiencing economic and educational disadvantages. Although post-school outcomes have shown improvement, young women continue to experience high unemployment rates, low wages, and high rates of poverty. In this study, I explore the experiences of four teenage girls who have been labeled…

  5. Den fejlslagne kampagne for økonomisk demokrati som faktor i Arbejderbevægelsens politiske udvikling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toubøl, Jonas; Gielfeldt, Jonas Kylov

    2013-01-01

    . The campaign was relative successful in targeting the wage earners by framing ED as both a realisation of these two major goals of the labour movement as well as being a practical and efficient answer to unemployment, low wages, lack of influence on workplace policies etc. Despite the relative success...

  6. "More Justice": The Role of Organized Labor in Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John S.; Terriquez, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the potential role of low-wage service sector unions in engaging in equity-minded school reform. The members of many such unions are parents of children attending poorly resourced public schools. In seeking to address the interests of their members, labor unions can draw upon resources, organizing strategies, and political…

  7. Evidence-Based Secondary Transition Practices for Enhancing School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; White, James; Richter, Sharon; Walker, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 28% of students with disabilities do not complete high school (National Longitudinal Transition Study-2, 2005). This increases the likelihood that these students will experience low wages, high rates of incarceration, and limited access to postsecondary education. This article reviews evidence-based secondary transition practices…

  8. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Arce, Francisco; Constant, Louay; Loughran, David S.; Karoly, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research show that high school dropouts are more likely than graduates to commit crimes, abuse drugs and alcohol, have children out of wedlock, earn low wages, be unemployed, and suffer from poor health. The ChalleNGe program, currently operating in 27 states, is a residential program coupled with post-residential mentoring that seeks…

  9. Technologies for the Fast Set-Up of Automated Assembly Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Norbert; Ude, Ales; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2014-01-01

    of so called few-of-a-kind production. Therefore, most production of this kind is done manually and thus often performed in low-wage countries. In the IntellAct project, we have developed a set of methods which facilitate the set-up of a complex automatic assembly process, and here we present our work...

  10. Post-accession migration in construction and trade union responses in Denmark, Norway and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldring, Line; Fitzgerald, Ian; Arnholtz, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The article compares trade union responses in Denmark, Norway and the UK to the arrival of construction workers from the new EU member states. Organizing has been seen as a crucial means to avoid low-wage competition and social dumping. We analyse how the unions developed strategies for recruiting...

  11. Agricultural trade and employment in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrey, Ron; Plunt, Cecilia; Jensen, Hans Grinsted

    more than a million jobs over the past four decades, the paper highlights its continuing role as an employment creator in rural areas, albeit mainly in low-wage occupations. As for its principal analytical contribution, this paper considers future trade liberalisation in the agricultural sector. Using...

  12. Marginal Returns: Re-Thinking Mobility and Educational Benefit in Contexts of Chronic Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    As a result of chronic poverty many people in South Asia experience poor quality schooling, interrupted schooling, or no schooling at all. People affected by poverty face multiple constraints on wellbeing, which typically include informal employment, low wages and poor health. In such contexts the benefits and, more specifically, the…

  13. 76 FR 3451 - Wage Methodology for the Temporary Non-agricultural Employment H-2B Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... unemployment rates among specific groups of vulnerable low-wage workers: Youth, Hispanics, and African... be interested in the work, but if the wages are set too low U.S. labor will not be interested. This... supported the Department's decision to eliminate wage tiers, noting that the use of skill level wages in low...

  14. The Old Normal: Casualization and Contingency in Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Timothy Reese

    2015-01-01

    American higher education is in the midst of a staffing crisis. More than three quarters of faculty members work off the tenure track, often with no job security, low wages, and few prospects for advancement. While the contingent labor force is diversified--including highly qualified but part-time laborers piecing together positions at multiple…

  15. Global Production: The Case of Offshore Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørbjerg, Jacob; Havn, Erling; Bansler, Jørgen P.

    1997-01-01

    of software is no exception.In this paper, we present a newly started research project on offshore program-ming, that is the practice of sending software development “offshore,” to India or other low wage areas. The project focuses on the organisation of offshore program-ming and, particularly, on the role...

  16. 76 FR 26805 - Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ..., and hospices in low-wage index areas are unfairly advantaged. The commenter felt that our not wage... Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 418 Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012... [CMS-1355-P] RIN 0938-AQ31 Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012 AGENCY: Centers...

  17. 76 FR 66087 - Request for Comments Under Executive Order 12898

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... workplaces are safe and healthy; helping workers who are in low-wage jobs or out of the labor market find a... environmental effects of their programs, policies, and activities on minority and low-income populations. In... on minority and low-income populations and federally-recognized Indian tribes. The Department views...

  18. Foreign Investment Boosts Rural Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasmeier, Amy; Glickman, Norman

    1990-01-01

    Through 1987, 10 percent of foreign investment was in nonmetro counties; 44 percent of this was in the South; and 38 percent of nonmetro foreign investment created new jobs (versus 17 percent in metro areas). Foreign investors chose nonmetro areas with low wages, lack of unionization history, good transportation access, and government incentives.…

  19. International trade and employment: trade partner country effects on jobs and wages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortanier, F.N.; Jaarsma, M.; Korvorst, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent academic research has consistently identified trading firms - both exporters and importers - to be larger, and to pay higher wages than their non-trading counterparts. However, not all trade is equal: imports from low-wage countries may destroy employment, particularly among low-skilled

  20. Exploring the Literature on Relationships between Gender Roles, Intimate Partner Violence, Occupational Status, and Organizational Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwesiga, Eileen; Bell, Myrtle P.; Pattie, Marshall; Moe, Angela M.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of intimate partner violence (IPV) and work have been primarily conducted with women in low-wage low-status (LWLS) positions, as much of this research has focused on poverty, welfare, and homelessness. Although women in LWLS positions represent a large percentage of working women in the United States, it is also important to investigate…

  1. Poverty and the Power of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolaro, John D.; Eschbach, Elizabeth

    According to the authors, the real conditions of poverty and homelessness in America remain obscure. The homeless, contrary to popular belief, are not homeless by choice. 25% of the homeless are employed full-time in low-wage jobs, 25% are war veterans of one kind or another, and 25% are emotionally disturbed. According to the Rand Corporation,…

  2. The negative effect of child labour on academic performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of the research on child abuse and academic performance of children who participate in it as a routine scholars and people have defined child labour in several ways. In a nutshell it is the exploitation of children, premature assumption of adult roles on the part of children; working long hours for low wages in the ...

  3. The Origins of Forced Labor in the Witwatersrand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeti, Moitsadi

    1986-01-01

    Gold mining brought a forced labor system to Witwatersrand, South Africa, in the 1880s as African laborers were rounded up from the hinterland and delivered to the mines. The system produced low wages, high mortality, and the loss of chances for upward mobility. Forced labor persists today in South African mines. (VM)

  4. Tackling precarious work in public supply chains: A comparison of local government procurement policies in Denmark, Germany and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaehrling, Karen; Johnson, Mathew; Larsen, Trine Pernille

    2018-01-01

    Through a cross-national comparative study of local government “best practice cases” of socially responsible procurement in Denmark, Germany and the UK, this article critically examines the role of labour clauses in addressing issues of low wages and precarious work in public supply chains...

  5. The Association between Natural Amenities, Rural Population Growth, and Long-Term Residents' Economic Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Lori M; Boardman, Jason D.; Saint Onge, Jarron M.

    2005-01-01

    Population growth in rural areas characterized by high levels of natural amenities has recently received substantial research attention. A noted concern with amenity-driven rural population growth is its potential to raise local costs-of-living while yielding only low-wage service sector employment for long-term residents. The work presented here…

  6. The Impact of Differential Payroll Tax Subsidies on Minimum Wage Employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P Kramarz (Piotr); Th. Philippon

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we study the impact of changes of total labor costs on employment of low-wage workers in France in a period, 1990 to 1998, that saw sudden and large changes in these costs. We use longitudinal data from the French Labor Force survey (? enqu?te emploi ?) in order to

  7. Women's Work in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, D. Radha; Ravindran, M.

    1983-01-01

    The proportion of women in paid employment in India is very low, and working women tend to be concentrated in low-wage, low-status, unskilled jobs, especially in agriculture. Even for the few women working in the modern sector, discrimination is pervasive, and change seems unlikely to occur soon. (IS)

  8. Theory of multinationals' choice of technique and locational decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Meza, D.

    1979-01-01

    A neoclassical explanation is presented of the failure of multinational corporations (MNCs) to adapt their technology in low-wage countries. MNCs are found to employ more labor-intensive techniques and pay lower wages than companies serving only domestic markets if transport and tariff costs are present. Product locational decisions are also analyzed. 6 references.

  9. Maquiladoras, Women's Work, and Unemployment in Northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Uses Marxist/feminist concepts to explain employment patterns among female workers in multinational maquiladoras (assembly plants) in northern Mexico. Concludes that maquiladoras have not alleviated regional unemployment for either sex, but have created a docile low-wage work force that includes a pool of surplus labor. Contains 48 references. (SV)

  10. Escaping low pay: Do male labour market entrants stand a chance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlopoulos, Dimitris; Fouarge, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent and the human-capital determinants of low-wage mobility for labour market entrants in the UK and Germany. Design/methodology/approach – Using panel data for the UK (BHPS) and Germany (GSOEP), a competing-risks duration model is applied

  11. The Wage Gap and Comparable Worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James P.

    The typical working woman is thought to make 60% of a man's wage, despite increased job skills. Facts prove this perception incorrect. Lack of progress is an artifact of changing labor market characteristics associated with the rapid growth in the numbers of women in the labor market. Low skills, low wage female entrants tend to hold down the…

  12. Balancing Environmental Performance with Sales Functionalities in Packaging for Consumer Electronic Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, R.; Boks, C.; Stevels, A.

    2006-01-01

    Two major changes are currently taking place in the world of Consumer Electronics. They are, first, the relocation of production to low-wage countries, in particularly China. This results in longer distribution distances, which lead to a higher relative importance of this phase in the entire life

  13. Spatial Mismatch: A Third Generation Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, J. Vincent

    1999-01-01

    The spatial mismatch argument hypothesizes that racial discrimination in the housing market, together with the suburbanization of low skilled jobs, contributes significantly to the high unemployment and/or low wages of inner city minority workers. Surveys recent spatial mismatch literature and discusses policy alternatives, focusing on areas…

  14. Globalisation and Labour Utilisation in Nigeria: Evidence from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2007-12-05

    Dec 5, 2007 ... the firms in the industry is determined solely by the dictates of ... L'étude examine l'impact de la mondialisation sur l'utilisation de la .... globalisation has been the most influential in government policy .... social, and has economic implications for both the individual worker ..... with the payment of low wages.

  15. Environmental Protection: Can We Afford It

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    losing ground to Japan, Germany, and the Asian Tigers . Closer to home, Mexico, with its abundant work force, low wages, and slack environmental enforce...pollution (such as respiratory cancer, chronic bronchitis, pneumonia, emphysema, asthma , and the common cold) to be about $2 billion.Y In a 1991 report

  16. Harvesting in the Dark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Douglas R.

    1978-01-01

    Migrant mushroom workers suffer from poor housing and living conditions, low wages, poor health, unsafe working conditions, abuse from crew leaders, and isolation. Farm work advocates feel these abuses will continue without laws guaranteeing access to the camps, minimum standards for camp conditions, and the outlawing or strict regulation of crew…

  17. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers…

  18. GED® Collapse: Ohio Needs Launch Pads, Not Barricades. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The number of people attempting and passing the GED has plummeted. The Ohio economy is tough on low-wage workers with limited formal education. Without a high school diploma, it is virtually impossible to get a family-supporting job. But the GED has become a barricade, blocking Ohio workers from career goals, instead of a launching pad. Employers…

  19. Healthcare. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary highlights several findings about healthcare. These are: (1) Healthcare is 18 percent of the U.S. economy, twice as high as in other countries; (2) There are two labor markets in healthcare: high-skill, high-wage professional and technical jobs and low-skill, low-wage support jobs; (3) Demand for postsecondary education in…

  20. Global Neo-Liberalism, Global Ecological Modernization, and a Swine CAFO in Rural Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenna, Leland L.; Mitev, Georgi V.

    2009-01-01

    Rural and development sociology studies have tended to credit globalization with low-wage, extractive, environmentally destructive outcomes. Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been treated as a local manifestation of the destructive tendencies of globalization. However, recent scholarship on globalization suggests that…

  1. BETTER HEALTH FOR MIGRANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    THIS ISSUE OF "FLORIDA HEALTH NOTES" DISCUSSES FLORIDA'S MIGRANTS AND THE MIGRANT HEALTH SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND THE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ARE DISCUSSED--THEIR HOUSING AND SANITATION FACILITIES, THEIR LONG WORKING HOURS AND LOW WAGES, THEIR SUMMER MIGRATION PATTERNS, THEIR HEALTH…

  2. Optimal Taxation with On-the-Job Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jesper; Moen, Espen R.; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    We study the optimal taxation of labor income in the presence of search frictions. Heterogeneous workers undertake costly search off- and on-the-job in order to locate more productive jobs that pay higher wages. More productive workers search harder, resulting in equilibrium sorting where low......-type workers are overrepresented in low-wage jobs while high-type workers are overrepresented in high-wage jobs. Absent taxes, worker search effort is efficient, because the social and private gains from search coincide. The optimal tax system balance efficiency and equity concerns at the margin. Equity...... concerns make it desirable to levy low taxes on (or indeed, subsidize) low-wage jobs including unemployment, and levy high taxes on high-wage jobs. Efficiency concerns limit how much taxes an optimal tax system levy on high-paid jobs, as high taxes distort the workers' incentives to search. The model...

  3. Premium growth and its effect on employer-sponsored insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistnes, Jessica; Selden, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    We use variation in premium inflation and general inflation across geographic areas to identify the effects of downward nominal wage rigidity on employers' health insurance decisions. Using employer level data from the 2000 to 2005 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component, we examine the effect of premium growth on the likelihood that an employer offers insurance, eligibility rates among employees, continuous measures of employee premium contributions for both single and family coverage, and deductibles. We find that small, low-wage employers are less likely to offer health insurance in response to increased premium inflation, and if they do offer coverage they increase employee contributions and deductible levels. In contrast, larger, low-wage employers maintain their offers of coverage, but reduce eligibility for such coverage. They also increase employee contributions for single and family coverage, but not deductibles. Among high-wage employers, all but the largest increase deductibles in response to cost pressures.

  4. [Migration expectations among nursing students in Mexico City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Martínez, Yetzi; Nigenda, Gustavo; Galárraga, Omar; Ruiz-Larios, José Arturo

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the factors associated with the expectations to migrate abroad among nursing students in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a non-random sample of 420 students. A logistic regression model was estimated. A total of 69% of the informants expressed their intention to move abroad, to look for employment (65%) and/or to continue their studies (26%). Of those, 50% would choose Canada as their destination, followed by Spain and the United States. The variables associated with migration expectations were: age, income, having relatives abroad, and perception of poor labor conditions and low wages in Mexico. Results are consistent with international literature. Low wages, poor labor conditions and the limited possibilities for professional development in Mexico are factors that contribute to generate migration expectations among nursing students. Additionally, optimistic perceptions about the job market and the labor demand in more developed countries heighten expectations to migrate.

  5. Low-socioeconomic status workers: their health risks and how to reach them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeffrey R; Huang, Yi; Hannon, Peggy A; Williams, Barbara

    2011-02-01

    To help workplace health promotion practitioners reach low-socioeconomic status workers at high risk for chronic diseases. We describe low-socioeconomic status workers' diseases, health status, demographics, risk behaviors, and workplaces, using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Workers with household annual incomes less than $35,000, or a high school education or less, report more chronic diseases and lower health status. They tend to be younger, nonwhite, and have much higher levels of smoking and missed cholesterol screening. They are concentrated in the smallest and largest workplaces and in three low-wage industries that employ one-quarter of the population. To decrease chronic diseases among low-socioeconomic status workers, we need to focus workplace health promotion programs on workers in low-wage industries and small workplaces.

  6. Trade, Labor, Legitimacy

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between international trade and labor standards is one of several controversial issues facing the WTO. Proponents of a trade-labor link argue that labor is a human rights issue and that trade sanctions represent a critical tool in the effort to improve international working conditions. Opponents argue that a link between trade and labor would open the door to protectionist measures that would target low wage countries and harm the very workers the policy is intended to help. ...

  7. Labour recruitment practices and its class implications: comparing workers in Singapore’s segmented labour market

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on labour migration by considering the class commonalities and differences as refracted through gender that are embedded within recruitment practices of different workers. Recent writings on the recruitment of labour migrants often distinguish between low-waged and middle-income workers without clearly addressing the the linkages between recruitment practices of both. By adopting a comparative framework between Bangladeshi male migrants and transnation...

  8. The rise of precarious employment in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, David; Biegert, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Long considered the classic coordinated market economy featuring employment security and relatively little employment precarity, the German labor market has undergone profound changes in recent decades. We assess the evidence for a rise in precarious employment in Germany from 1984 to 2013. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) through the Luxembourg Income Study, we examine low-wage employment, working poverty, and temporary employment. We also analyze changes in the demogra...

  9. Do Employment Subsidies Work? Evidence from Regionally Targeted Subsidies in Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daysal, N. Meltem; Betcherman, Gordon; Pages, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the effects on registered employment and number of registered establishments of two employment subsidy schemes in Turkey. We implement a difference-in-differences methodology to construct appropriate counterfactuals for the covered provinces. Our findings suggest that both subs...... than boosting total employment and economic activity. This supports the theory that in countries with weak enforcement institutions, high labor taxes on low-wage workers may lead to substantial incentives for firms and workers to operate informally....

  10. The unequal distribution of unequal pay - An empirical analysis of the gender wage gap in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Dorothe Bonjour; Michael Gerfin

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the distribution of the gender wage gap. Using microdata for Switzerland we estimate conditional wage distribution functions and find that the total wage gap and its discrimination component are not constant over the range of wages. At low wages an overproportional part of the wage gap is due to discrimination. In a further analysis of specific individuals we examine the wage gap at different quantiles and propose a new measure to assess equal earnings opportunities. ...

  11. Outsourcing, Unemployment and Welfare Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Keuschnigg; Evelyn Ribi

    2007-01-01

    Outsourcing of labor intensive activities challenges the welfare state and undermines the protection of low-skilled workers. The stylized facts are that profits are concentrated among the high-skilled, involuntary unemployment is mostly among the low-skilled, and private unemployment insurance is missing. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of redistribution and insurance policies when heterogeneous firms can outsource labor intensive components to low-wage economies. The main results are: ...

  12. Up and Down the Multinational Corporations’ Global Labor Supply chains: Making Remedies that Work in China

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Ronald C.

    2017-01-01

    Today, multinational and domestic corporations in many industries are no longer self-contained vertical structures with permanent staff, but increasingly are horizontal organizations with fissured employment characteristics using outsourcing, franchising, and subcontracting with contractors and chains of subcontractors. Too often, the workers of the subcontractors suffer the consequences of the subcontractors’ cost cutting measures, work in unfavorable conditions, and have low wages and few b...

  13. Competition and the Location of Overseas Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Swenson

    2006-01-01

    How does international competition affect overseas outsourcing? While it is commonly believed that international competition enables firms to desert high cost countries in favor of low wage locations, the frequency of such responses may be reduced if the movement of outsourcing activities involves sunk costs. To put these factors in perspective, I study the production decisions of participants in the U.S. overseas assembly program (OAP). A number of interesting regularities emerge. First, the...

  14. The industrial resurgence of Southern California? Advanced ground transportation equipment manufacturing and local economic develoment

    OpenAIRE

    A J Scott; D Bergman

    1995-01-01

    Southern California is in a deeply rooted process of economic restructuring. Much of the region's manufacturing base is made up of two groups of industries: a declining aerospace - defense sector, and a low-wage, low-skill sweatshop sector. What are the prospects for creating a growing manufacturing base focused on high-wage, high-skill industries? In this paper we examine the opportunities presented by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's S183 billion thirty-year ca...

  15. Debt bondage and the tricks of capital

    OpenAIRE

    Guérin, Isabelle; Venkatasubramanian, G.; Kumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Migrant labourers, free from rural bondage, are now bonded to other sources of debt, contracted from the agro-industry or construction sectors. The flows of migration in the brick-making and sugar cane sectors in Tamil Nadu, where bondage coexists with many public welfare schemes, illustrate the persistence and renewal of this phenomenon. The welfare schemes play the role of a safety net, but also contribute to low wages, and impunity on the part of employers. Alliances between capital and th...

  16. Outsourcing, occupational restructuring, and employee well-being: Is there a silver lining?

    OpenAIRE

    Petri, Böckerman; Mika, Maliranta

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between outsourcing and various aspects of employee well-being by devoting special attention to the role of occupational restructuring as a conveying mechanism. Using linked employer-employee data, we find that offshoring involves job destruction, especially when the destination is a low-wage country. In such circumstances, staying employees' job satisfaction is reduced. However, the relationship between outsourcing and employee well-being is not entirely ...

  17. Chapter 5. The contradictions of self-enterprising migrant worker subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Tinajero, Sandra Paola

    2014-01-01

    Migrant agricultural and care workers share similar conditions of work and social positions in the receiving labor market. The construction of their shared condition as low-wage laborers involves parallel processes of subject formation (or subjectification) and identity construction. The study of migration as a process of subject formation is not new. Here it serves to articulate the subject level of analysis to respond to the question about what the parallel experiences of migrant farm and c...

  18. Advancing Immigrant Worker Rights through Labor-Community Coalition: Comparative Case Studies of the CLEAN Carwash Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mindy Minyi

    2017-01-01

    Since 2008, a coalition known as the CLEAN Carwash Campaign has been organizing car wash workers in Los Angeles. How did CLEAN manage the divergent interests of its coalition members and strategize? What is it about CLEAN that led the labor-community coalition to achieve gains for carwasheros when conventional wisdom dictates that low wage immigrant workers were too vulnerable to be unionized? Given the dearth of empirical research into how social movement coalitions strategize and how campai...

  19. Gender wage differentials in China's urban labour market

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Meiyan; Cai, Fang

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes and decomposes wage differences between female and male workers. The results indicate that females receive low wages because of unequal pay within sectors, and that the wage gap caused by the difference in sectoral attainment is small. The results also reveal that a lion’s share of the wage differential between females and males is attributable to discrimination rather than to the human capital difference between the genders. Eliminating discriminations against females wi...

  20. Hemmed In: Legal Mobilization in in the Los Angeles Anti-Sweatshop Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Scott L

    2009-01-01

    The field of labor organizing -- once a site of progressive disenchantment with law -- has now become a crucial locus of law's resurgence. There is mounting evidence that legal innovation is contributing to a new dynamism within the labor movement as immigrant worker centers, community-labor coalitions, and other grassroots alliances creatively use law to mobilize low-wage workers. These efforts suggest that a reorientation is under way within the labor movement, with activists adopting a leg...

  1. The German Political Economy Between Deregulation and Re-regulation: Party Discourses on Minimum Wage Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Dostal, Jörg Michael

    2012-01-01

    In the German political economy of the early 21st century, labor market policymaking has shifted toward deregulation and liberalization. In particular, the so-called Hartz labor market reforms of the Social Democratic Party and Green Party government, introduced in 2002 and 2003, pushed for employment growth in low-wage and deregulated employment sectors. This article focuses on one of the key debates triggered by Germany’s labor market deregulation after 2002, namely whethe...

  2. Corruption in Kyrgyzstan

    OpenAIRE

    KARYMSHAKOV, Kamalbek; ABDYKAPAROV, Yzat

    2008-01-01

    This paper proceeding from the results of recent empirical studies and theoretical arguments on corruption in economic literature attempts to show the factors causing corruption and focuses on some facts of its consequences inKyrgyzstan. Literature on corruption defines main causes of corruption as: 1) Excessive regulatory burden; 2) Weak juridical system; 3) Level of political competition and democracy; 4) Sociological factors; 5) Low wages in public sector Results of application of regressi...

  3. Occupational gender composition and wages in Canada, 1987-1988

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Baker; Nicole M. Fortin

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between occupational gender composition and wages is the basis of pay equity/comparable worth legislation. A number of previous studies have examined this relationship in US data, identifying some of the determinants of low wages in ``female jobs'' well as important limitations of public policy in this area. There is little evidence, however, from other jurisdictions. This omission is particularly disturbing in the case of Canada, which now has some of the most extensive pay ...

  4. Does increasing the minimum wage reduce poverty in developing countries?

    OpenAIRE

    Gindling, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    Do minimum wage policies reduce poverty in developing countries? It depends. Raising the minimum wage could increase or decrease poverty, depending on labor market characteristics. Minimum wages target formal sector workers—a minority of workers in most developing countries—many of whom do not live in poor households. Whether raising minimum wages reduces poverty depends not only on whether formal sector workers lose jobs as a result, but also on whether low-wage workers live in poor househol...

  5. Perjanjian-perjanjian Pekerjaan Dua Negara (Indonesiamalaysia) Dilihat Dari Sejarah, Politik Dan Pemerintahan (Indonesia-Malaysia)

    OpenAIRE

    Marianata, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Basically, to state an employment agreement is considered valid or not it's obliged to pay attention to the provisions of article 1320 of the Civil Code. The provisions of the employment agreement at least benefit workers as stipulated in the labor legislation, company regulations, or collective agreements. A revised agreement between the governments of Malaysia and Indonesia provide some benefits for migrant domestic workers but failed to provide some degree of protection related to low wage...

  6. The Medicaid personal care services program: implications for social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, J S; Palley, H A

    1991-05-01

    Results of a survey of Medicaid personal care programs in 15 states and the District of Columbia in 1987 show that these programs suffer from many problems. Low wages and slow payment make recruitment and retention of qualified workers difficult. Other problems include lack of coordination among agencies, lack of adequate standards for training or supervision of workers, unequal access to programs, and inequities among states. Implications for social workers are discussed.

  7. The impact of the UK National Minimum Wage on mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kronenberg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite an emerging literature, there is still sparse and mixed evidence on the wider societal benefits of Minimum Wage policies, including their effects on mental health. Furthermore, causal evidence on the relationship between earnings and mental health is limited. We focus on low-wage earners, who are at higher risk of psychological distress, and exploit the quasi-experiment provided by the introduction of the UK National Minimum Wage (NMW to identify the causal impact of wage increases on mental health. We employ difference-in-differences models and find that the introduction of the UK NMW had no effect on mental health. Our estimates do not appear to support earlier findings which indicate that minimum wages affect mental health of low-wage earners. A series of robustness checks accounting for measurement error, as well as treatment and control group composition, confirm our main results. Overall, our findings suggest that policies aimed at improving the mental health of low-wage earners should either consider the non-wage characteristics of employment or potentially larger wage increases.

  8. The impact of the UK National Minimum Wage on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Christoph; Jacobs, Rowena; Zucchelli, Eugenio

    2017-12-01

    Despite an emerging literature, there is still sparse and mixed evidence on the wider societal benefits of Minimum Wage policies, including their effects on mental health. Furthermore, causal evidence on the relationship between earnings and mental health is limited. We focus on low-wage earners, who are at higher risk of psychological distress, and exploit the quasi-experiment provided by the introduction of the UK National Minimum Wage (NMW) to identify the causal impact of wage increases on mental health. We employ difference-in-differences models and find that the introduction of the UK NMW had no effect on mental health. Our estimates do not appear to support earlier findings which indicate that minimum wages affect mental health of low-wage earners. A series of robustness checks accounting for measurement error, as well as treatment and control group composition, confirm our main results. Overall, our findings suggest that policies aimed at improving the mental health of low-wage earners should either consider the non-wage characteristics of employment or potentially larger wage increases.

  9. Do Minimum Wages in Latin America and the Caribbean Matter? Evidence from 19 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai; Cunningham, Wendy

    of if and how minimum wages affect wage distributions in LAC countries. Although there is no single minimum wage institution in the LAC region, we find regional trends. Minimum wages affect the wage distribution in both the formal and, especially, the informal sector, both at the minimum wage and at multiples...... of the minimum. The minimum does not uniformly benefit low-wage workers: in countries where the minimum wage is relatively low compared to mean wages, the minimum wage affects the more disadvantaged segments of the labor force, namely informal sector workers, women, young and older workers, and the low skilled...

  10. Estimating the effects of wages on obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, DaeHwan; Leigh, John Paul

    2010-05-01

    To estimate the effects of wages on obesity and body mass. Data on household heads, aged 20 to 65 years, with full-time jobs, were drawn from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for 2003 to 2007. The Panel Study of Income Dynamics is a nationally representative sample. Instrumental variables (IV) for wages were created using knowledge of computer software and state legal minimum wages. Least squares (linear regression) with corrected standard errors were used to estimate the equations. Statistical tests revealed both instruments were strong and tests for over-identifying restrictions were favorable. Wages were found to be predictive (P low wages increase obesity prevalence and body mass.

  11. Age, wage, and job placement: older women's experiences entering the retail sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Miller, Ellen G; Lambert, Susan J; Henly, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    Older women seeking employment often find opportunities limited to low-wage jobs, such as those in retail. We report findings about job placement and starting wages for hourly workers hired at a women's apparel retailer from August 2006 to December 2009. We examine competing hypotheses regarding the role of age in explaining women's job placement and starting wages. Although newly hired women age 55+ earn higher wages and are placed in higher-quality jobs than the youngest women (ages 18-22), they are less likely to be placed in better-quality jobs than their midlife counterparts. Overall, wage differences are largely explained by job quality.

  12. Institutional dynamic of the call center industry in Denmark and France

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole H.; Beraud, Mathieu; Colin, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    The call centre development is substantially increasing in the most part of industrialized countries. Coming to the fore and seeking for staff, this sector is still looking for benchmarks, especially in terms of employment. Currently it can be said that the sector is under construction since its ...... to the specific micro and meso dynamic of this emerging industry. We base on a part of the first results obtained in a research on low wage initiated by the Russell Rage Foundation. More precisely we use the results from sectoral survey....

  13. The home health workforce: a distinction between worker categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robyn; Sutton, Janet P; Bryant, Natasha; Adams, Annelise; Squillace, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The demand for home health aides is expected to rise, despite concerns about the sustainability of this workforce. Home health workers receive low wages and little training and have high turnover. It is difficult to recruit and retain workers to improve clinical outcomes. This study presents national estimates to examine how home health workers and the subgroup of workers differ in terms of sociodemographic characteristics, compensation, benefits, satisfaction, and retention. Hospice aides fare better than other categories of workers and are less likely to leave their job. Policymakers should consider strategies to increase the quality and stability of this workforce.

  14. The views of low-income employees regarding mandated comprehensive employee benefits for the sake of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikes, Katherin A; Hull, Sara C; Danis, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Socioeconomic factors stand in the way of good health for low-income populations. We suggest that employee benefits might serve as a means of improving the health of low-wage earners. We convened groups of low-income earners to design hypothetical employee benefit packages. Qualitative analysis of group discussions regarding state-mandated benefits indicated that participants were interested in a great variety of benefits, beyond health care, that address socioeconomic determinants of health. Long-term financial and educational investments were of particular value. These results may facilitate the design of employee benefits that promote the health of low-income workers.

  15. Is there a Causal Effect of High School Math on Labor Market Outcomes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Juanna Schrøter; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    Outsourcing of jobs to low-wage countries has increased the focus onthe accumulation of skills - such as Math skills - in high-wage countries.In this paper, we exploit a high school pilot scheme to identify the causaleffect of advanced high school Math on labor market outcomes. The pilotscheme...... reduced the costs of choosing advanced Math because it allowedfor at more flexible combination of Math with other courses. We findclear evidence of a causal relationship between Math and earnings for thestudents who are induced to choose Math after being exposed to the pilotscheme. The effect partly stems...

  16. Germany's socio-economic model and the Euro crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Dauderstädt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Germany's socio-economic model, the "social market economy", was established in West Germany after World War II and extended to the unified Germany in 1990. During a prolonged recession after the adoption of the Euro in 1998, major reforms (Agenda 2010 were introduced which many consider as the key of Germany's recent success. The reforms had mixed results: employment increased but has consisted to a large extent of precarious low-wage jobs. Growth depended on export surpluses based on an internal real devaluation (low unit labour costs which make Germany vulnerable to global recessions as in 2009. Overall inequality increased substantially.

  17. [International migration and income redistribution: a trade-theoretic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, N; Meckl, J

    1995-05-01

    "We analyze the income-redistribution effects of international migration in the host and source country in a general equilibrium framework. The well-known result that marginal migration leaves the welfare of nonmigrants unaffected is discussed in more detail with regard to shifts in national income distributions. With endogenous goods' prices the consequences for the income distribution are in general ambiguous--we show possibilities for an estimation of their magnitude. As long as wage disparities determine the direction of migration it increases world efficiency. However, redistributive policies may generate migration towards the low-wage country." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  18. WP 54 - Temporary agency work in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kea Tijdens; Maarten Klaveren; Marc Meer; Marieke Essen; Hester Houwing

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the result of a study on temp agency workers and on the role that temp agency work played in company’s staffing strategies and on industry and national regulations regarding temp agencies and temp agency work. It was conducted in2004-2006, as part of a larger project on low wage work in the Netherlands, which was part of a five country study for the Russell Sage Foundation, USA. In order to provide a background for understanding temporary agency work, recent developments in and ...

  19. Haynes, Ray oral history interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Interviewee: Haynes, Ray; Interviewer: Walliser, Andrea; Interviewer: Bauder, Ken; Principal Investigator: Hall, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Ray Haynes is a former president of the BC Federation of Labour. As a young man Haynes worked at Hudson’s Bay Company Wholesale, a division of the Hudson’s Bay Company, where he reported earning a low wage and working in poor conditions. He then worked at Canadian White Pine sawmill where he learned about labour and other social issues from union members who were communist, Leninist, and Trotskyist. He worked at White Pine for only 18 months even though he was earning a high wage. Haynes told...

  20. Making working in retailing interesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Buck, Nuka; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about how five retail chains in the Danish grocery industry attempt to make low-wage, low-status store-level retail jobs as checkout operators and sales assistants interesting from the perspective of both retailers and employees. Following analysis of the social and institutional...... and make store-level retail jobs interesting to them. Although retailers mainly focus their attention on career seekers, we find that working in retailing is interesting for all employee types because the retailers are currently able to meet their respective motivations and aspirations. Nevertheless, we...

  1. Trends in China’s gender employment and pay gap: estimating gender pay gaps with employment selection

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Wei; Li, Bo

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the United States and European countries, China has witnessed a widening gender pay gap in the past two decades. Nevertheless, the size of the gender pay gap could still be underestimated as a result of not accounting for the low-wage women who have dropped out of the labor force. As shown by a large and representative set of household survey data in China, since the 1980s the female employment rate has been falling and the gap between male and female employment rates has been ...

  2. Women Labor Market: Gender Pay Gap and Its Determinants / Trh práce žen: Gender pay gap a jeho determinanty [available in Czech only

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Mysíková

    2007-01-01

    This study is concerned with decomposing the gender pay gap in the Czech Republic. It aims not only to compare male and female wage-equations but also to uncover the gender pay gap structure. The decision of many women not to participate in the labor market can be influenced by potentially low wages. Their entry into the labor market could increase the gender pay gap in large measure. The advantage of this study is that it uses a selection method to estimate the male and female wage equations...

  3. Community campaigns, supply chains, and protecting the health and well-being of workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Michael; Sokas, Rosemary K

    2009-11-01

    The growth of contingent work (also known as precarious employment), the informal sector, and business practices that diffuse employer responsibility for worker health and safety (such as outsourcing and the development of extended national and international contracting networks [supply chains]) pose a serious threat to occupational health and safety that disproportionately affects low-wage, ethnic minority, and immigrant workers. Drawing on cases from the United States and Australia, we examine the role that community-based campaigns can play in meeting these challenges, including several successful campaigns that incorporate supply chain regulation.

  4. Telecommuters: the stay-at-home work force of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, P.F.

    1983-06-01

    The spread of teleworkers who commute via telecommunications from their home offices will depend, despite the energy-saving and tax advantages of self-employment, on how fast the social climate accepts teleworking, whether software can be made friendlier, and whether legal issues of database networks are resolved. The societal changes associated with home offices can be either a positive reemphasis on the home or a negative electronic sweatshop and a way to export office work to low-wage areas. The author, who sees a gradual adoption of teleworking while these technological, societal, and marketing barriers are dealt with, develops a scenario for an information society of the future. (DCK)

  5. The Views of Low-Income Employees Regarding Mandated Comprehensive Employee Benefits for the Sake of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikes, Katherin A.; Hull, Sara C.; Dams, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic factors stand in the way of good health for low-income populations. We suggest that employee benefits might serve as a means of improving the health of low-wage earners. We convened groups of low-income earners to design hypothetical employee benefit packages. Qualitative analysis of group discussions regarding state-mandated benefits indicated that participants were interested in a great variety of benefits, beyond health care, that address socioeconomic determinants of health. Long-term financial and educational investments were of particular value. These results may facilitate the design of employee benefits that promote the health of low-income workers. PMID:20391255

  6. The Effect of the Minimum Wage on the Fast Food Industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence F. Katz; Alan B. Krueger

    1992-01-01

    Using data from a longitudinal survey of fast food restaurants in Texas, the authors examine the impact of recent changes in the federal minimum wage on a low-wage labor market The authors draw four main conclusions. First, the survey results indicate that less than 5 percent of fast food restaurants use the new youth subminimum wage even though the vast majority paid a starting wage below the new hourly minimum wage immediately before the new minimum went into effect. Second, although some r...

  7. Comparing earnings profiles in urban areas of an LDC: rural-to-urban migrants vs. native workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijverberg, W P; Zeager, L A

    1994-12-01

    "We use Tanzanian data to test a recently proposed hypothesis that rural-to-urban migrants have an incentive to supply greater work effort than native urban workers, because of the migrants' positive probability of returning to the low-wage rural areas. We treat the choice between public- and private-sector employment as endogenous and, for theoretical and empirical reasons, distinguish migrants with access to rural land from those without access. Our results show that migrants in both sectors face lower initial wage offers than native urban workers. But, the wage gap is eliminated within a decade or less, and thereafter, migrants surpass the wage offers of native workers." excerpt

  8. The benefits divide: health care purchasing in retail versus other sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, James; Temin, Peter; Zaman, Saminaz

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the first to compare health care purchasing in the retail versus other sectors of the Fortune 500. Employing millions of low-wage workers, the retail sector is the largest employer of uninsured workers in the economy. We found that retail companies are using the same competitive bidding process that other companies use to obtain a given level of coverage for the lowest possible cost. However, they are more price oriented than other Fortune 500 companies are. The most striking disparity lies in the nearly fivefold difference in offer rates for health care coverage. This shows that the economy's bifurcation in health benefits extends even to the nation's largest companies.

  9. Mobility for care workers: job changes and wages for nurse aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Vanesa; Dill, Janette S; Cohen, Philip N

    2012-12-01

    The long-term care industry in the United States faces serious recruitment and retention problems among nurse aides. At the same time, these low-wage workers may feel trapped in poorly-paid jobs from which they would do well to leave. Despite this tension, not enough is known about how workers fare when they leave (or stay in) such care work. Using longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation for the years 1996-2003, we examine the relationship between different job and occupational mobility patterns and wage outcomes for nurse aides, focusing on which job transitions offer better opportunities to earn higher wages and on whether job transition patterns differ by race. Our results confirm high turnover among nurse aides, with 73 percent of the sample working in occupations other than nurse aide at some point during the survey time frame. About half of respondents that transition out of nurse aide work move into higher-paying occupations, although the percentage of transitions to higher paying occupations drops to 35 percent when nurse aides that become RNs are excluded. Among black workers especially, wage penalties for moving into other jobs in the low-wage labor market appear to be rather small, likely a factor in high turnover among nurse aides. The findings illustrate the importance of occupation-specific mobility trajectories and their outcomes for different groups of workers, and for understanding the constrained decisions these workers make. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence of workers compensation indemnity claims across socio-demographic and job characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Leigh, J Paul

    2011-10-01

    We hypothesized that low socioeconomic status, employer-provided health insurance, low wages, and overtime were predictors of reporting workers compensation indemnity claims. We also tested for gender and race disparities. Responses from 17,190 (person-years) Americans participating in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, 1997-2005, were analyzed with logistic regressions. The dependent variable indicated whether the subject collected benefits from a claim. Odds ratios for men and African-Americans were relatively large and strongly significant predictors of claims; significance for Hispanics was moderate and confounded by education. Odds ratios for variables measuring education were the largest for all statistically significant covariates. Neither low wages nor employer-provided health insurance was a consistent predictor. Due to confounding from the "not salaried" variable, overtime was not a consistently significant predictor. Few studies use nationally representative longitudinal data to consider which demographic and job characteristics predict reporting workers compensation indemnity cases. This study did and tested some common hypotheses about predictors. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. "We don't do it for the money" … The scale and reasons of poverty-pay among frontline long-term care workers in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Shereen

    2017-11-01

    Demographic trends escalate the demands for formal long-term care (LTC) in the majority of the developed world. The LTC workforce is characterised by its very low wages, the actual scale of which is less well known. This article investigates the scale of poverty-pay in the feminised LTC sector and attempts to understand the perceived reasons behind persisting low wages in the sector. The analysis makes use of large national workforce pay data and a longitudinal survey of care workers, as well as interviews with key stakeholders in the sector. The analysis suggests that there are at least between 10 and 13% of care workers who are effectively being paid under the National Minimum Wage in England. Thematic qualitative analysis of 300 interviews with employers, care workers and service users highlight three key explanatory factors of low pay: the intrinsic nature of LTC work, the value of caring for older people, and marketisation and outsourcing of services. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A federal tax credit to encourage employers to offer health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J A; Wicks, E K

    2001-01-01

    Many firms that employ low-wage workers cannot afford to offer an employee health plan, and many of the uninsured work for such firms. This article makes the case for an employer tax credit, administered by the Internal Revenue Service, as a way to extend health coverage to uninsured workers and their families. The permanent, fixed-dollar, refundable credit would be available to all low-wage employers (those with average wages of $10 per hour and less), including those already offering coverage. The credit would be graduated depending on average wage: the maximum credit would equal 50% of the cost of a standard benefit package; the minimum would equal 30% of the package. It also would vary by family size and could be used to cover part-time and temporary workers. Participating employers would be required to pay at least 50% of the health insurance premium, proof of which would be shown on firms' tax returns. The paper provides justification for this approach. It closes with a discussion of strengths and weaknesses of this approach and alternative design features.

  13. Obesity/Overweight and the Role of Working Conditions: A Qualitative, Participatory Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Suzanne; Champagne, Nicole; Abreu, Marlene; Goldstein-Gelb, Marcy; Montano, Mirna; Lopez, Isabel; Arevalo, Jonny; Bruce, Suezanne; Punnett, Laura

    2018-01-01

    The rising U.S. prevalence of obesity has generated significant concern and demonstrates striking socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities. Most interventions target individual behaviors, sometimes in combination with improving the physical environment in the community but rarely involving modifications of the work environment. With 3.6 million workers earning at or below the federal minimum wage, it is imperative to understand the impact of working conditions on health and weight for lower income workers. To investigate this question, a university–community partnership created a participatory research team and conducted eight focus groups, in English and Spanish, with people holding low-wage jobs in various industries. Analysis of transcripts identified four themes: physically demanding work (illnesses, injuries, leisure-time physical activity), psychosocial work stressors (high demands, low control, low social support, poor treatment), food environment at work (available food choices, kitchen equipment), and time pressure (scheduling, having multiple jobs and responsibilities). Physical and psychosocial features of work were identified as important antecedents for overweight. In particular, nontraditional work shifts and inflexible schedules limited participants’ ability to adhere to public health recommendations for diet and physical activity. Workplace programs to address obesity in low-wage workers must include the effect of working conditions as a fundamental starting point. PMID:26333770

  14. THE POINT OF VIEW OF POOR PEOPLE WORKING IN INFORMAL SECTOR ON POVERTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonul ICLI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the poor with a lower income than poverty line though hired to be paid constitute the majority of the whole population in many countries, they have not been researched sufficiently. Working poor people can not reach the sufficient level of income to meet their expenses as a result of familial circumstances like insufficient education, divorce, excessiveness of the number of children, loss of a spouse as well as working for low wage due to the labour market. This research is supposed to be about poor people working as wage earners in informal sector in Denizli. 100 apartment doorkeepers, 100 house cleaners and 100 baby sitters have been included into the research as its samples. This research is concerned with the point of view about poverty of working poor people, their strategies of coping with poverty and their social relations

  15. Network effects across the earnings distribution: payoffs to visible and invisible job finding assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This study makes three critical contributions to the "Do Contacts Matter?" debate. First, the widely reported null relationship between informal job searching and wages is shown to be mostly the artifact of a coding error and sample selection restrictions. Second, previous analyses examined only active informal job searching without fully considering the benefits derived from unsolicited network assistance (the "invisible hand of social capital") - thereby underestimating the network effect. Third, wage returns to networks are examined across the earnings distribution. Longitudinal data from the NLSY reveal significant wage returns for network-based job finding over formal job searching, especially for individuals who were informally recruited into their jobs (non-searchers). Fixed effects quantile regression analyses show that contacts generate wage premiums among middle and high wage jobs, but not low wage jobs. These findings challenge conventional wisdom on contact effects and advance understanding of how social networks affect wage attainment and inequality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spin masters how the media ignored the real news and helped reelect Barack Obama

    CERN Document Server

    Freddoso, David

    2013-01-01

    The biggest story of the election was how the media ignored the biggest story of the election.Amid all the breathless coverage of a non-existent War on Women, there was little or no coverage of Obama's war on the economy?how, for instance, part-time work is replacing full-time work; how low-wage jobs are replacing high-wage ones; how for Americans between the ages of 25 and 54 there are fewer jobs today than there were when the recession officially ended in 2009, and fewer, in fact, than at any time since mid-1997.The downsizing of the American economy wasn't the only stor

  17. Greek women and broken nerves in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunk, P

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, I examine the importance of class, ethnicity and gender in the causation and meaning of somatization for Greek women in Montreal. I argue that nevra--a form of psychosocial distress experienced by many of the women--is a phenomenon of the poor working conditions, low wages and gender relations in the Greek community. Data is based on interviews with 100 Greek families in Montreal and 45 patients in two different clinical settings. Comparing results with material on nervios and nerves from Latin America and the United States, I concur with Low (1985) that nerves should be viewed as a 'culturally-interpreted symptom' rather than a 'culture bound syndrome'. It is further suggested that the importance of social and material conditions and gender relations in mediating the cultural interpretation must be stressed. Failure to do so often results in the medicalization of nevra and the creation of a chronic sick role for the patient.

  18. Globalization and climate change challenges the Arctic communities adaptability and increases vulnerability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Kåre

    2011-01-01

    Globalization and climate change challenges the Arctic communities adaptability and increases vulnerability Kåre Hendriksen, PhD student, Aalborg University, Denmark The previous isolation of the Arctic will change as a wide range of areas increasingly are integrated into the globalized world....... Coinciding climate changes cause an easier access for worldwide market as well as for the extraction of coastal oil and mineral resources. In an attempt to optimize the fishing fleet by economic measures it is centralized to larger units, and the exports of unprocessed fish and shellfish to low wage...... in contemporary developments leaving them with a feeling of being powerless. The consequences of contemporary policies and the problems arising will be illustrated through examples from traditional hunting and fishing districts in Greenland....

  19. Labour market regulation in Denmark during and beyond the economic crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jens; Rasmussen, Erling Juel

    Since the 1950s, Denmark has developed an economy, a social welfare system and an inclusive labour market which have been admired by overseas commentators (Smith, 2011, Auer 2000, Ganssmann 2000). In the process, it has transformed itself from a relatively low wage country to a high-wage, high...... policy ‘soul-searching’ and adverse economic and social changes. The so-called ‘Danish Model’ of employment relations and its ‘flexicurity’ approach has been heralded by many commentators for its ability to being adaptive and creating win-win economic, social and labour market outcomes (Auer, 2000; Due...... that the ‘Danish Model’ have been relatively successful in the last couple of decades, there have been frequent warnings that the end may be nigh for the ‘Danish Model’ (see Auer, 2009; Smith, 2011). A similar warning is the basic message of this article though in light of the remarkable Danish ability to re...

  20. The agropecuarian sector in Los Lagos region, and the paradigm "Chile power food": challenges for a national agrarian policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ríos Núñez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The restructuring of the economic model in Chile in the mid- seventies hit all productive fields and the agropecuarian sector was no exception. Thus started the beginning of the "Agricultural export Age" that fostered productive guidelines with clear competitive advantages in international markets. The Chilean agricultural paradigm has been characterized by functioning on the basis of low wages, availability of labor and favorable exchange rate. In 2006, under this scenario, the public policy called "Chile Power Food 2020" was implemented, which seeks to reinforce the above formula. This initiative considers growth strategies which make bimodal agrarian structure, present in the country, invisible. To the above an added aggravating factor is that territories (such as Los Lagos Region in southern Chile with traditional productive orientations (specifically cattle have clearly vulnerable positions, especially in those producer groups which are characterized by different rationales to run business

  1. The Mandate System for the Belgian Public Prosecution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno BROUCKER

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The law of 22 December 1998 introduced the mandate system for the heads of the Public Prosecution offices, which were appointed permanent before that. Theoretically, such a system needs to enhance, within the organization, effectiveness, efficiency, responsabilisation, and goal-orientation. However, the mandate system within the Belgian Public Prosecution was introduced prematurely, for dubious reasons and in a precipitate manner. In the current situation, the position of the mandate holder is uncertain, with a bounded autonomy and a low wage increase. Moreover, it remains impossible to intervene in the policy of appointed heads of office (during their mandate, the efficiency and effectiveness is only increased in some prosecution offices and a contract containing actual management responsibilities is absent. In sum: there is a large gap between the theoretical principles of mandate systems and the way it is introduced in the Belgian Public Prosecution.

  2. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders Rosenstand

    We build a three-country model of international trade in final goods and intermediate inputs and study the relation between four different types of trade liberalisation and vertical integration. Firms are heterogeneous with respect to both productivity and factor (headquarter) intensity. Final......-good producers face decisions on exporting, vertical integration of intermediate-input production, and whether the intermediate-input production should be offshored to a low-wage country. We find that the fractions of final-good producers that pursue either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting are all...... increasing when intermediate-input trade or final-goods trade is liberalised. Finally, we provide guidance for testing the open-economy property rights theory of the firm using firm-level data and surprisingly show that the relationship between factor (headquarter) intensity and the likelihood of vertical...

  3. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders

    We build a three-country model of international trade in final goods and intermediate inputs and study the relation between different types of trade liberalisation and vertical integration. Firms are heterogeneous with respect to both productivity and factor intensity as observed in data. Final......-good producers face decisions on exporting, vertical integration of intermediate-input production, and whether the intermediate-input production should be offshored to a low-wage country. We find that the fractions of final-good producers that pursue either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting are all...... increasing when intermediate-input or final-goods trade is liberalised and when the fixed cost of vertical integration is reduced. At the same time, one observes firms that shift away from either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting. Further, we provide guidance for testing the open...

  4. The feasibility of underground coal gasification in developing countries with abundant coal reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakay, P.; Van Den Panhuyzen, W.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of underground coal gasification is evaluated on the basis of a case study for India. India has immense coal reserves at relatively shallow depths compared to Europe, has low wages, an urgent need to expand its power capacity, a strongly rising energy demand and has shown interest in underground coal gasification. Three scenarios including the cases of continued, declining and a strong economic growth were considered. Model calculations allow to compare the cost of the electric power generated by the combustion of the gas produced by underground coal gasification with the cost of the power produced by classic thermal power plants in India for -the reference year 2000. (A.S.) 4 figs. 1 tab

  5. Residential Location, Job Location, and Wages: Theory and Empirics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    -to-job transition without changing workplace location. However, workers making a job-to-job transition which makes the workplace location closer to the residence experiences a wage drop. Furthermore, low wage workers and workers with high transportation costs are more likely to make job-to-job transitions, but also......I develop a stylized partial on-the-job equilibrium search model which incorporate a spatial dimension. Workers reside on a circle and can move at a cost. Each point on the circle has a wage distribution. Implications about wages and job mobility are drawn from the model and tested on Danish...... matched employer-employee data. The model predictions hold true. I find that workers working farther away from their residence earn higher wages. When a worker is making a job-to-job transition where he changes workplace location he experiences a higher wage change than a worker making a job...

  6. Entrepreneurship, Job Creation, and Wage Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Schjerning, Bertel; Sørensen, Anders

    This paper analyses the importance of entrepreneurs for job creation and wage growth. Relying on unique data that cover all establishments, firms and individuals in the Danish private sector, we are able to distil a number of different subsets from the total set of new establishments - subsets wh...... are to a large extent low-wage jobs, as they are not found to contribute to the growth in average wages.......This paper analyses the importance of entrepreneurs for job creation and wage growth. Relying on unique data that cover all establishments, firms and individuals in the Danish private sector, we are able to distil a number of different subsets from the total set of new establishments - subsets...

  7. Entrepreneurship, job creation and wage growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Schjerning, Bertel; Sørensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

      This paper analyses the importance of entrepreneurs for job creation and wage growth. Relying on unique data that cover all establishments, firms and individuals in the Danish private sector, we are able to distil a number of different subsets from the total set of new establishments - subsets ...... are to a large extent low-wage jobs, as they are not found to contribute to the growth in average wages.......  This paper analyses the importance of entrepreneurs for job creation and wage growth. Relying on unique data that cover all establishments, firms and individuals in the Danish private sector, we are able to distil a number of different subsets from the total set of new establishments - subsets...

  8. Collectors of survival: the “living material” in the scene of garbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio de Souza Moraes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to discuss the identity of the garbage collector in the present time, and analyze what led this person to engage in such activity. Thus, we carried out an essentially qualitative methodology (based on field observations and interviews with 10 collectors that could provide the knowledge concerning their life story and garbage collection. Results indicate that these workers are mostly men, with low level of education, age group between 40 and 81 years, with former devaluated and depreciated occupations and no informal economic activities. In this in case, one cannot ignore the inherent factors to the activity: low wages, precarious working conditions, and factors generated from it (health problems, competition, solidarity, prejudice, discrimination that mark the itineraries that these actors of the garbage collection explore.

  9. The Danish fabricated metal industry:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the knowledge on innovation processes in low- and medium-low-tech industries. Today, industries characterised as high-tech are perceived to be central to economic development, as the research intensity shields them from competition from low-wage countries....... This is less the case for low-tech industries, but their economic importance continues to be large, however. It is thus interesting to analyse how they manage to remain competitive. The analysis focuses on a case study of the fabricated metal industry by identifying the innovation strategies followed by firms...... located in a part of Jutland, where this industry has experienced growth. It is found that the ability to create tailor-made solutions is central to the competitiveness of these medium-low-tech firms. Knowledge is thus highly important, yet in different ways than for high-tech industries. This illustrates...

  10. Housework, children, and women's wages across racial-ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Heather Macpherson

    2014-07-01

    Motherhood affects women's household labor and paid employment, but little previous research has explored the extent to which hours of housework may explain per child wage penalties or differences in such penalties across racial-ethnic groups. In this paper, I use longitudinal Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) data to examine how variations in household labor affect the motherhood penalty for White, Black, and Hispanic women. In doing so, I first assess how children affect hours of household labor across these groups and then explore the extent to which this household labor mediates the relationship between children and wages for these women. I find that household labor explains a portion of the motherhood penalty for White women, who experience the most dramatic increases in household labor with additional children. Black and Hispanic women experience slight increases in housework with additional children, but neither children nor housework affects their already low wages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Do higher salaries lower physician migration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Edward N

    2014-08-01

    It is believed that low wages are an important reason why doctors and nurses in developing countries migrate, and this has led to a call for higher wages for health professionals in developing countries. In this paper, we provide some of the first estimates of the impact of raising health workers' salaries on migration. Using aggregate panel data on the stock of foreign doctors in 16 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries, we explore the effect of a wage increase programme in Ghana on physician migration. We find evidence that 6 years after the implementation of this programme, the foreign stock of Ghanaian doctors abroad had fallen by approximately 10% relative to the estimated counterfactual. This result should be interpreted with caution, however, given the sensitivity of the results to changes in model specification. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  12. Determinants of longer job tenure among home care aides: what makes some stay on the job while others leave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Sandra S; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Wardamasky, Sara; Ashley, Alison

    2014-03-01

    An inadequate supply of direct care workers and a high turnover rate in the workforce has resulted in a "care gap" in our long-term care system. As people are increasingly choosing community-based care, retention of home care workers is particularly important. The mixed-method study described herein explored determinants of longer job tenure for home care aides (n = 261). Study participants were followed for 18 months, completing two mail surveys and one telephone interview each. Predictors of longer job tenure included older age, living rurally, lower physical function, higher wages, a greater sense of autonomy on the job, and less frequent feelings of personal accomplishment. Thematic analysis of telephone interviews revealed long-term stayers to be less concerned about low wages and inconsistent hours than those who left their jobs within a year; both groups of workers reported high levels of job satisfaction. Policy implications of study findings are discussed.

  13. The impacts of the expansion of fruit farming businesses In the Commune of Llay Llay, Aconcagua Valley, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gonzalez Cid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The commune of Llay Llay is characterized by the existence of a regional economy structured around fruit farming businesses. The operations of these enterprises have not had a beneficial impact on the area. Rather has been confronted by a dual predicament: temporary work and low wages. As well, the environment is threatened as the agricultural frontier extends into the foothills of the nearby mountain ranges. In addition, there is evidence of increased land concentration and control of water on the part of the agribusinesses, to the detriment of the livelihoods of small producers.  The loss of land and water is the other face of a peasant proletarization process that is ultimately functional to the agribusinesses needs for financial and human resources

  14. Child Labour Use in a Small Developing Country: Is it Luxury, Distributional or Substitution Axiom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Reddy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Child labour use in developing countries has been increasing over the years. In general, it’s characterized by low wages and long hours of work under dangerous, hazardous, unhealthy and unhygienic conditions, which could lead to poor physical and mental development. It deprives a child of education and natural development. In this paper, we examined the use of child labour in Fiji. The study utilized primary data collected using a structured survey to examine the determinants of child labour. The results from this study demonstrate that the variables such as household size, household income, and the gender of children significantly affect child labour supply. Furthermore, absence of adults from households is also a causal factor contributing towards child labour. Using these results, we make a case for “luxury” and “substitution” axioms for Fiji’s Child labour market.

  15. Dimensions of support among abused women in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yragui, Nanette L; Mankowski, Eric S; Perrin, Nancy A; Glass, Nancy E

    2012-03-01

    The authors draw on social support theory to examine supervisor support match (support wanted and received), support mismatch (support not wanted and received) and work outcomes for abused low-wage working women, and to determine if supervisor support match and mismatch are more strongly associated with work outcomes than global supervisor support Face-to-face interviews were conducted with a community sample of abused, employed women who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) in the past year (N = 163). Using hierarchical regression, we found, after accounting for global supervisor support; a higher level of supervisor support match was associated with greater job satisfaction, fewer job reprimands and less job termination. Findings from the study inform theories of social support and have practical implications for workplace interventions for IPV.

  16. Obstacles for physical education teachers in public schools: an unsustainable situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Osborne

    Full Text Available Abstract The study aimed to identify difficulties and aspirations of physical education teachers at public schools in Niterói, inspired by UNESCO's quality physical education goal. An action research containing quantitative and qualitative data was conducted. Thirty-five physical education teachers completed a questionnaire and seven teachers were interviewed. The results indicated that the major difficulties faced were low wages, precarious infrastructure and lack of materials. Physical education is devalued, the space allocated is inadequate, and it is treated as mere recreation. Teachers criticized the lack of commitment of some colleagues who work without planning. They also complained about undisciplined students and lack of interest from their families. They aspire to self-improvement, infrastructure improvements, and more support from school and families. Teachers who do not educate and lack of support from school and government are an unsustainable reality. A synergy of efforts should be implemented, based on a systems view.

  17. Challenges in critical care services in Sub-Saharan Africa: perspectives from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, U V

    2009-01-01

    Critical care services in Nigeria and other West African countries had been hampered by economic reversals resulting in low wages, manpower flight overseas, government apathy towards funding of hospitals, and endemic corruption. Since then things have somewhat improved with the government's willingness to invest more in healthcare, and clampdown on resource diversion in some countries like Nigeria. Due to the health needs of these countries, including funding and preventive medicine, it may take a long time to reach reasonably high standards. Things are better than they were several years ago and that gives cause for optimism, especially with the debt cancellation by Western nations for most countries in the region. Since most of the earlier studies have been done by visiting doctors, mainly outside the West African subregion, this paper seeks to present a view of the challenges faced by providers of critical care services in the region, so that people do not have to rely on anecdotal evidence for future references.

  18. Choosing the Gorkha- at the crossroads of class and ethnicity in the Darjeeling hills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Mona

    2013-01-01

    The Darjeeling hills in northern West Bengal, India are being demanded as a homeland for the Gorkha community living in India. While the origin of Darjeeling is steeped in the imperial legacy of the British Raj, the Gorkha, a colonial construct is ironically used as a means to challenge...... the contemporary political regression and neo-colonisation of Darjeeling. Although the Gorkha identity is deemed as representative of the Nepali community residing in India, it acquires special meaning and importance in the Darjeeling hills, where majority of the people suffer low wages, unemployment......, underdevelopment and poverty. In spite of a large working force in the tea estates, economic underdevelopment and political disempowerment is voiced through the assertion of ethnic rather than a class-based identity. Through an examination of the interaction between class and ethnicity, the Gorkha identity...

  19. THE MAIN DIRECTIONS OF INNOVATION AND INVESTMENT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ZAKARPAT REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Stegura

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper consider of the long-term innovation strategy, on the groung of which a small business can be devolopped. Also the paper deals with main ways of activization of investment and innovation activity in Zakarpat region. The advantages is purely an innovative model of growth and source of inexhaustible resource which performs human creativity, initiative, entrepreneurship, knowledge and intelligence. At present in Ukraine is dominated by elements of the model of absolute advantage and commodity -export, while the foundations of an innovative model of economic development at the stage of formation. Insufficiently involved is the potential of science , business, intellectual, and low wages. Addressing these issues is the foundation of small business through the implementation of innovative strategies.

  20. DMOs and Rural Tourism: A Stakeholder Analysis the Case of Tucker County, West Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Arbogast

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rural destination management organizations (DMOs are faced with considerable challenges as they attempt to promote economic prosperity through tourism. This study sought to identify rural destination management challenges in Tucker County, West Virginia; identify the roles and activities of the destinations DMOs in addressing these challenges; and develop a perceived destination management framework. DMO challenges include maintaining authenticity and sense of place; economic diversification; seasonality, low wage jobs, and lack of employees; connecting resorts to small businesses and communities; and establishing a common vision, identity, and coordination of activities. While the majority of tourism literature calls for DMOs to play a dual marketing and management role, this paper makes an important contribution by identifying the need for a Convention and Visitors Bureau and a separate organization with a specific mission to sustainably develop and manage tourism and coordinate activities of the stakeholder network.

  1. Comparative analysis of tomato value chain competitiveness in selected areas of Malawi and Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Mango

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses tomato value chain performance in Malawi and Mozambique using data collected from a market study commissioned by the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture as part of a regional research on conservation agriculture in maize-based farming systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. The results show that Malawi has a slightly higher competitive advantage in the production of tomato compared to Mozambique. Malawi’s relative competitiveness in tomato is mainly due to slightly higher productivity and the cost advantage in labor (low wages and irrigation costs. The paper proposes policy implications aimed at raising the productivity and trade competitiveness of tomato, as this will ensure the overall productivity of the maize-based smallholder farming systems in the two countries.

  2. CSC9000T A Toll Bell to“Sweat Shops”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Deing a member of WTO doesn’t only mean having better opportunities in business,but also being responsible for the total welfare for the whole world. Chinese government expressed the Chinese care to environmental issues since 1992 Rio Earth Summit,and more than 150 NGOs are also mushrooming out of China,however CSR(Corporate Social Responsibility)is still something new to most companies in China. Environmental pollutions,factories of"sweatshops",low-wages, underaged workers,unsafe working conditions...After the crazy economic growth in 1990s,the Chinese enterprises,more or less,have begun to realize that an enterprise should be something more than a gold digger.Talking about social responsibilities,it seems textile industry needs a good thinking about the issue,since it offers jobs to 19.5 million employees.

  3. Dualization as destiny?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marx, Paul; Starke, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Germany is widely seen as a “dualized” economy driven by a powerful and stable “insider” coalition in the manufacturing sectors. In this article, that picture is challenged. An examination of the political economy of the outsider-friendly 2014 Minimum Wage Act, using public opinion data, document...... analysis, and qualitative interviews, shows how earlier dualizing reforms led to unintended negative feedback effects: First, public opinion reacted negatively to increasing inequality in the years preceding the introduction of the minimum wage. Second, a remarkable shift is found among trade unions toward...... support of a minimum wage, even in manufacturing. Although the threat of low-wage competition and flexibilization did play a role, trade union solidarity was at least as important. Those endogenous dynamics came together in a self-undermining process unfolding over a relatively short period of time...

  4. Achieving equal pay for comparable worth through arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, S C

    1982-01-01

    Traditional "women's jobs" often pay relatively low wages because of the effects of institutionalized stereotypes concerning women and their role in the work place. One way of dealing with sex discrimination that results in job segregation is to narrow the existing wage differential between "men's jobs" and "women's jobs." Where the jobs are dissimilar on their face, this narrowing of pay differences involves implementing the concept of "equal pay for jobs of comparable worth." Some time in the future, far-reaching, perhaps even industrywide, reductions in male-female pay differentials may be achieved by pursuing legal remedies based on equal pay for comparable worth. However, as the author demonstrates, immediate, albeit more limited, relief for sex-based pay inequities found in specific work places can be obtained by implementing equal pay for jobs of comparable worth through the collective bargaining and arbitration processes.

  5. Innovation, regional development and relations between high- and low-tech industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis; Winther, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The current European policy agenda strongly accentuates the importance of research and development (R&D) as a driver of economic growth. The basic assumption is that high European wage levels make it unlikely that less research-intensive parts of the economy can withstand competition from low......-wage countries with increasingly skilled labour forces. Thus, the inferior growth of the European Union (EU) in the 1990s compared with the USA has been explained by the latter’s higher rate of R&D investments. The paper challenges this rather simplistic view of innovation and examines the regional consequences...... of such policies. EU growth has caught up with that of the USA during recent years and low-tech industries continue to have considerable economic importance in Europe in terms of jobs and value added, especially outside the main growth regions, but also in the major urban regions. Empirical evidence from Denmark...

  6. Occupational Stress Among Home Healthcare Workers: Integrating Worker and Agency-Level Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeckler, Jeanette M

    2018-02-01

    Home healthcare work is physically and emotionally exhausting. In addition, home healthcare workers frequently work under precarious work arrangements for low wages and in poor work conditions. Little is known about how sources of job strain for home healthcare workers might be reduced. This research examines the occupational stressors among paid home care workers by analyzing home healthcare agency characteristics and individual home healthcare workers' experiences in upstate New York agencies (n = 9). The study augments existing theoretical models and describes new sources of stress arising from the nature of agency-based caregiving. Results feature the analysis of both agency executives' (n = 20) and home healthcare workers' narratives (n = 25) to make the agency's inner workings more transparent. Agency structures and culture are implicated in the lack of progress to address home care workers' health problems. Policy change should focus on compensation, healthier work conditions, and training requirements.

  7. Psychosocial work environment and depressive symptoms among US workers: comparing working poor and working non-poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Swanberg, Jennifer E

    2009-08-01

    The psychosocial work environment has been associated with mental health outcomes; however, little research has examined this relationship for low-wage workers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between psychosocial job characteristics and depressive symptoms for US workers using an expanded model of job quality. Data were from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, a nationally representative study of wage and salaried workers in the US. Working poor was defined as households earning working poor employees, job insecurity was the single significant correlate of depressive symptoms after controlling for other demographic and work environment variables. For working non-poor employees, high psychological demands and low supervisor and coworker support were associated with depressive symptoms. Findings suggest all jobs do not equally affect employees' depressive symptoms. Implications for research that may improve the mental health of the working poor in the US are presented.

  8. Establishing a benchmarking for fish farming - profitability, productivity and energy efficiency of German, Danish and Turkish rainbow trout grow-out systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasner, Tobias; Brinker, Alexander; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The promotion of Blue Growth in aquaculture requires an understanding of the economic drivers influencing the sector at farm level, but the collection of reliable and comparable data at this level is time-consuming and expensive. This study suggests an alternative strategy for qualitative sampling...... of freshwater trout farms in Germany, Denmark and Turkey, using a combination of existing data, group discussions and interviews with trout farmers, consultants and researchers. Nine 'typical' trout farming models are described, focusing on profitability, productivity and energy efficiency and allowing in......-depth comparative economic analyses of different production systems at farm level, across regions. Our results show that the majority of the farms investigated have been profitable. Turkish farms benefit from competitive advantages due to low wages, low capital investment and favourable climate conditions. Large...

  9. Day labor and occupational health: time to take a closer look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The term "day labor" refers to work performed by individuals who are hired on a temporary basis, often for one day at a time. This type of employment has increased in North America as informal work arrangements and immigration have increased. Research on the occupational health of day laborers is minimal. The objectives of this article are to review the current literature pertaining to occupational health in day laborers, and to characterize the issues that affect this population's access to occupational health services. Surveys of day laborers and other immigrant, low-wage workers show that they are at elevated risk for occupational injury and are often unable to access medical care when injured on the job. Reasons include workers' reluctance to complain about unsafe work conditions, inadequate safety training, and lack of incentive for employers to reduce workplace injuries. More research is needed to better characterize the occupational health of this population.

  10. Education of Radiation Oncologists. Chapter 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, E.; Leer, J.W.; Haffty, B.

    2017-01-01

    The availability of trained staff in adequate numbers is one of the main obstacles to the development of modern radiotherapy in developing countries. While radiation oncologists practising in affluent environments may not be aware of this reality, limited number of positions, low wages, limited access to sources of evidence and ‘brain drain’ are common in countries with limited resources. Epidemiological predictions of an increase in the crude incidence of cancer that will affect predominantly developing countries represent an alarming situation in which the countries that will face the steepest increase are those most poorly prepared to cope with it. Modern cancer radiotherapy is characterized by team work in which different professionals have different roles and responsibilities. The radiation oncologist is the physician who has been trained to participate in diagnosis, staging, prescription of the radiotherapy dose and patient follow-up.

  11. Women and changes in the Chilean economy: some questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiaroski, M S

    1996-10-01

    The author argues that a new development model that encourages greater participation of women in the work force in domestic piecework, temporary work, and subcontracting may further lead to the exploitation of women in Chile. The importance of women in economic development in Chile should be based on building skills, providing support child care services, reorienting women's education, and tax incentives. Chile over the past decade has achieved relatively stable economic growth and increased employment of women. During 1990-93 the growth of women in the work force increased at a rate of 16.8%, while men's presence increased by only 9.8%. The Chilean economy is based on a sophisticated modern sector and a labor-intensive informal sector. The Chilean model of development relies on cheap, flexible labor and a government approval of this model. Increased participation of women in the labor force is usually perceived as increased economic empowerment. A 1994 Oxfam study found that women were being forced into the labor market due to declines in family income and low wages. 46% of men and women received wages that did not cover basic necessities. The Chilean labor market is gender-stratified. Men are paid better than women for the same work. Men are in more permanent positions. Labor laws are either inadequate or violated, particularly for hours of work and overtime pay and conditions of employment and benefits. Traditional female jobs are those that rely on women's natural attributes. These unskilled attributes are rewarded with low wages. Little opportunity is provided for upgrading skills or acquiring new skills. Some women turn down advancement because of a lack of role models. Women have little opportunity to develop their self-image as workers. Poor self-images affect women's work attitudes and motivation. Some firms use competition between women to boost production. Chilean women remain in subordinate roles.

  12. Community Interagency Connections for Immigrant Worker Health Interventions, King County, Washington State, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chin; Petrescu-Prahova, Miruna

    2016-06-02

    Cross-sector community partnerships are a potentially powerful strategy to address population health problems, including health disparities. US immigrants - commonly employed in low-wage jobs that pose high risks to their health - experience such disparities because of hazardous exposures in the workplace. Hazardous exposures contribute to chronic health problems and complicate disease management. Moreover, prevention strategies such as worksite wellness programs are not effective for low-wage immigrant groups. The purpose of this article was to describe an innovative application of social network analysis to characterize interagency connections and knowledge needed to design and deliver a comprehensive community-based chronic disease prevention program for immigrant workers. Using iterative sample expansion, we identified 42 agencies representing diverse community sectors (service agencies, faith-based organizations, unions, nonprofits, government agencies) pertinent to the health of Chinese immigrant workers. To capture data on shared information, resources, and services as well as organizational characteristics, we jointly interviewed 2 representatives from each agency. We used social network analysis to describe interagency network structure and the positions of agencies within the networks. Agency interconnections were established primarily for information sharing. In the overall interagency network, a few service-oriented agencies held central or gatekeeper positions. Strong interconnectedness occurred predominately across service, public, and nonprofit sectors. The Chinese and Pan-Asian service sectors showed the strongest interconnectedness. Network analysis yields critical understanding of community structural links and assets needed to inform decisions about actual and potential community collaborations. Alternative intervention strategies may be needed to address health disparities among immigrant workers.

  13. O urnabo - uma experiência em comum: os bairros de periferia e a ação das associações de bairro em campina grande

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Santos-Gareis Da Guia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The quarters in the periphery generally are situated in hilly localities; in the principal streets and avenues are found the best residences and business houses (stores. The structural services are very deficient in this quarters. The maintenance generally is bad and there aren’t big stores. The commerce is replaced by little shops and similars. These little stores normally sell unique pieces and the people buy all days bread and milk, furthermore other basic products of nutrition. In the quarters of the periphery normally are living families with small wage, in their little space of living they have a way of life similar and they find themselves in front of calamities similars with a restrict family budget and an unsatisfactory situation of the quarter. The poverty, the illiteralism, the undernourishment, the unemployment, low wages and the very bad residence conditions, which characterise the community living in the periphery quarters, represent at least the conditions of life of this population The social conditions of the inhabitants of these periphery quarters and also the bad infra-structure of these quarters had been and are the motivation to organise the population in Associations of the Quarter. As a principal purpose these associations will improve the conditions of life and habitation of the population of these quarters This paper is trying to analyse the mutual characteristics of the periphery quarter inhabitants of Brazilian cities. This way the paper will study the organisation of the inhabitants by means of the Associations of the Quarter, which are created as a response of the fight of the population with low wage.

  14. Is American business working for the poor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, M J; Ellwood, D T

    1991-01-01

    At first glance, poverty seems to have little to do with business. When most people--managers included--think about poverty, they assume that people are poor because they are isolated from the mainstream economy, not productive participants in it. But according to Harvard University professors Mary Jo Bane and David Ellwood, this is a misleading image of the true face of poverty in the United States today. Most poor adults--and a full 90% of poor children--live in families where work is the norm, not the exception. Poor people often work or want to work. But at the low-wage end of the American economy, having a job is no guarantee of avoiding poverty. Poverty is a business issue, then, because the American poor are part of the American work force. And this poses a problem for managers. In a more competitive and fast-changing economic environment, the performance of companies increasingly depends on the capabilities of their employees. In response to this human-resource challenge, more and more managers are embracing the language of "empowerment". And yet how can low-wage employees believe empowerment when their experience of work is, quite literally, impoverishment? It is unlikely that American companies can create the work force of the future with the poverty policies of the past. Fortunately, there are some simple policy mechanisms that can assist the working poor without putting an undue burden on business. Enacting them, however, requires managers to see poverty policy as one part of a national human-resource strategy that links the strategic concerns of companies to a broad social agenda.

  15. EnviroAtlas - Employment Activity in the Conterminous U.S. Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service includes maps that illustrate job activity in each census block group. Employment diversity, employment density, and proximity of...

  16. Evaluation of haematological, hepatic and renal functions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Method: Twenty-five tanker drivers' and fifteen control subjects were randomly selected based on the selection criteria ... These free radicals subsequently bond with ..... workers that are always over worked with long duration.

  17. Simplified Clinical Tools and Educational Outreach for Health Workers

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The training will focus on mid-level healthcare workers, that is, nurses, medical ... Registered Trustees of the Research for Equity and Community Health ... Call for new OWSD Fellowships for Early Career Women Scientists now open.

  18. Numerical simulation of wind wave surface profiles with tuned phase spectra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    It is known that the phases of the individual harmonic components in a linear narrow band wave spectrum are uniformly random. It has been suggested by some workers that some sort of phase coupling and `locking' between the different spectral...

  19. Believe Me, You are (not) that Bad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Jimenez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of incentive schemes incorporating status classes on workers’ performance. I focus on performance comparisons between similarly skilled workers that belong to different status classes. A theoretical framework predicts that, under certain conditions, low ability workers

  20. 19 CFR 206.13 - Who may file a petition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS RELATING TO GLOBAL AND BILATERAL SAFEGUARD ACTIONS, MARKET DISRUPTION, TRADE DIVERSION, AND REVIEW OF... recognized union, or group of workers, that is representative of a domestic industry producing an article...

  1. Seasonal Variation in Serum Ascorbic Acid and Serum Lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We are also concerned with the adaptation of baboons. (Papio ursinus) and monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) to captivity, since thousands of these animals are captured annually in ..... workers that in order to obtain normal values, it is best.

  2. Should I stay or should I go? The impact of working time and wages on retention in the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Stephanie; de Vries, Daniel H; Tijdens, Kea G

    2014-04-23

    Turnover in the health workforce is a concern as it is costly and detrimental to organizational performance and quality of care. Most studies have focused on the influence of individual and organizational factors on an employee's intention to quit. Inspired by the observation that providing care is based on the duration of practices, tasks and processes (issues of time) rather than exchange values (wages), this paper focuses on the influence of working-time characteristics and wages on an employee's intention to stay. Using data from the WageIndicator web survey (N = 5,323), three logistic regression models were used to estimate health care employee's intention to stay for Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands. The first model includes working-time characteristics controlling for a set of sociodemographic variables, job categories, promotion and organization-related characteristics. The second model tests the impact of wage-related characteristics. The third model includes both working-time- and wage-related aspects. Model 1 reveals that working-time-related factors significantly affect intention to stay across all countries. In particular, working part-time hours, overtime and a long commuting time decrease the intention to stay with the same employer. The analysis also shows that job dissatisfaction is a strong predictor for the intention to leave, next to being a woman, being moderately or well educated, and being promoted in the current organization. In Model 2, wage-related characteristics demonstrate that employees with a low wage or low wage satisfaction are less likely to express an intention to stay. The effect of wage satisfaction is not surprising; it confirms that besides a high wage, wage satisfaction is essential. When considering all factors in Model 3, all effects remain significant, indicating that attention to working and commuting times can complement attention to wages and wage satisfaction to increase employees' intention to stay. These

  3. Expectativas de migración internacional en estudiantes de enfermería en México, Distrito Federal Migration expectations among nursing students in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yetzi Rosales-Martínez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analizar los factores asociados con la expectativa de migrar al extranjero en estudiantes de licenciatura en enfermería de escuelas públicas en México, Distrito Federal. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio transversal con una muestra no probabilística de 420 estudiantes. Se construyó un modelo logístico multivariado. RESULTADOS: El 69% de los informantes expresó la intención de migrar para trabajar (65% o estudiar (26%. El 50% elegiría como destino Canadá, seguido de España y Estados Unidos. Las variables asociadas con la expectativa de migrar fueron: edad, ingreso, tener familiares en el extranjero y percibir malas condiciones laborales/salarios en México. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados concuerdan con la literatura internacional. Los bajos salarios, malas condiciones laborales y escasas posibilidades de desarrollarse profesionalmente en México contribuyen a generar la expectativa de migrar en la población de estudio. Adicionalmente, la percepción optimista de los estudiantes sobre el mercado extranjero y la demanda laboral de países desarrollados coadyuvan a enfatizar dicho fenómeno.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the factors associated with the expectations to migrate abroad among nursing students in Mexico City. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with a non-random sample of 420 students. A logistic regression model was estimated. RESULTS: A total of 69% of the informants expressed their intention to move abroad, to look for employment (65% and/or to continue their studies (26%. Of those, 50% would choose Canada as their destination, followed by Spain and the United States. The variables associated with migration expectations were: age, income, having relatives abroad, and perception of poor labor conditions and low wages in Mexico. CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with international literature. Low wages, poor labor conditions and the limited possibilities for professional development in

  4. Emerging from the tragedies in Bangladesh: a challenge to voluntarism in the global economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Björn Skorpen

    2015-02-01

    Under the regime of private company or multi-stakeholder voluntary codes of conduct and industry social auditing, workers have absorbed low wages and unsafe and abusive conditions; labor leaders and union members have become the targets of both government and factory harassment and violence; and trade union power has waned. Nowhere have these private systems of codes and audits so clearly failed to protect workers as in Bangladesh's apparel industry. However, international labor groups and Bangladeshi unions have succeeded in mounting a challenge to voluntarism in the global economy, persuading more than 180 companies to make a binding and enforceable commitment to workers' safety in an agreement with 12 unions. The extent to which this Bangladesh Accord will be able to influence the entrenched global regime of voluntary codes and weak trade unions remains an open question. But if the Accord can make progress in Bangladesh, it can help to inspire similar efforts in other countries and in other industries. © 2015 SAGE Publications.

  5. Work–Life Integration and Workplace Rights for Domestic Workers in Support to Elderly Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our article shows that there is a real challenge in balancing work and family for employees working in support services in domestic work for elderly persons; their workplace rights on this issue are quite limited, and they depend largely on managers’ understanding and support. Given their difficult working conditions, these workers actually find quite a challenge in trying to reconcile work and family. Our article is based on a qualitative research mobilizing 33 semi-structured interviews with employees of the home care sector in the field of the social economy mainly but also in the private sector. We first present the concept of work–family and personal life, then the area of home care and domestic work for the elderly. Then, we present the particular challenges observed in reconciling work and family life, where possible by comparing men and women. The results highlight two major sources of differentiation: age and single parenthood. Those who are older highlight the fact that children have grown up, and they have (finally some time for themselves, even if their working conditions are difficult (broken schedules, etc.. In contrast, single women live a much more difficult situation concerning work–family, partly because of the lack of workplace rights on this issue and because of the poor working conditions for many (broken hours of work, low wages, difficult working conditions. We conclude with some recommendations, including the Right to request, which appears to be the best option, although it would need some further analysis.

  6. Development and Pilot Test of the Workplace Readiness Questionnaire, a Theory-Based Instrument to Measure Small Workplaces' Readiness to Implement Wellness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Peggy A; Helfrich, Christian D; Chan, K Gary; Allen, Claire L; Hammerback, Kristen; Kohn, Marlana J; Parrish, Amanda T; Weiner, Bryan J; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2017-01-01

    To develop a theory-based questionnaire to assess readiness for change in small workplaces adopting wellness programs. In developing our scale, we first tested items via "think-aloud" interviews. We tested the revised items in a cross-sectional quantitative telephone survey. The study setting comprised small workplaces (20-250 employees) in low-wage industries. Decision-makers representing small workplaces in King County, Washington (think-aloud interviews, n = 9), and the United States (telephone survey, n = 201) served as study subjects. We generated items for each construct in Weiner's theory of organizational readiness for change. We also measured workplace characteristics and current implementation of workplace wellness programs. We assessed reliability by coefficient alpha for each of the readiness questionnaire subscales. We tested the association of all subscales with employers' current implementation of wellness policies, programs, and communications, and conducted a path analysis to test the associations in the theory of organizational readiness to change. Each of the readiness subscales exhibited acceptable internal reliability (coefficient alpha range, .75-.88) and was positively associated with wellness program implementation ( p < .05). The path analysis was consistent with the theory of organizational readiness to change, except change efficacy did not predict change-related effort. We developed a new questionnaire to assess small workplaces' readiness to adopt and implement evidence-based wellness programs. Our findings also provide empirical validation of Weiner's theory of readiness for change.

  7. Precarización Ocupacional por Género en Zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Toluca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Baca Tavira

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the structure and dynamics of the market of work of the ZMCT, starting from the changes in the work force and the structure of the occupations. It emphasizes on the sectoral composition of the employment and the tendencies of precarización of the work differentials among goods. The decade of the ninety and the current one, they show important changes in this sense. The apparent improvement in the work market interms of a moderate reduction of the open unemployment, he/she has gone accompanied by a displacement of the employment of the sectors producing of goods to ward the services, with an important growth of informal, precarious activities, of low wages. The analysis of the data, gives bill of the characteristics of the work market in this city, besides detecting some features sociodemográficos of the workers, putting particular attention in the phenomenon of the woman’s insert in the economic and growing activity of occupational precarización

  8. [Analyzing the attributes of surgeons and working environment required for a successful career path and work-life balance: results of a survey administered to doctors working at Kyoto University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Kae; Tanabe, Tomoko; Hisamoto, Norio; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2012-05-01

    We conducted a survey in March 2010 of all physicians at Kyoto University Hospital on working environments, levels of satisfaction, and level of exhaustion. A comparison of surgeons with other physicians showed tendencies among surgeons toward longer working hours and lower income. The findings indicated that surgeons experienced satisfaction from teamwork with fellow physicians, opportunities to manage interesting cases, and patient gratitude. Surgeons tended to have low fatigue level and were satisfied with their working environments, despite their low wages and long working hours. Although surgical treatment is currently built upon the feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction of individual surgeons, there is always a limit to his/her psychological strength. Indeed, the number of young surgeons is not increasing. In the future, efforts must be taken to prevent the departure of currently practicing surgeons. Consideration must also be given to reducing nonsurgical duties by increasing the numbers of medical staff, and making work conditions more appealing to young surgeons by guaranteeing income and prohibiting long working hours, particularly consecutive working hours.

  9. Ethical Issues in Corpus Linguistics And Annotation: Pay Per Hit Does Not Affect Effective Hourly Rate For Linguistic Resource Development On Amazon Mechanical Turk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, K Bretonnel; Fort, Karën; Adda, Gilles; Zhou, Sophia; Farri, Dimeji

    2016-05-01

    Ethical issues reported with paid crowdsourcing include unfairly low wages. It is assumed that such issues are under the control of the task requester. Can one control the amount that a worker earns by controlling the amount that one pays? 412 linguistic data development tasks were submitted to Amazon Mechanical Turk. The pay per HIT was manipulated through a range of values. We examined the relationship between the pay that is offered per HIT and the effective pay rate. There is no such relationship. Paying more per HIT does not cause workers to earn more: the higher the pay per HIT, the more time workers spend on them ( R = 0.92). So, the effective hourly rate stays roughly the same. The finding has clear implications for language resource builders who want to behave ethically: other means must be found in order to compensate workers fairly. The findings of this paper should not be taken as an endorsement of unfairly low pay rates for crowdsourcing workers. Rather, the intention is to point out that additional measures, such as pre-calculating and communicating to the workers an average hourly, rather than per-task, rate must be found in order to ensure an ethical rate of pay.

  10. Employer-sponsored health insurance: down but not out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christanson, Jon B; Tu, Ha T; Samuel, Divya R

    2011-10-01

    Rising costs and the lingering fallout from the great recession are altering the calculus of employer approaches to offering health benefits, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2010 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Employers responded to the economic downturn by continuing to shift health care costs to employees, with the trend more pronounced in small, mid-sized and low-wage firms. At the same time, employers and health plans are dissatisfied and frustrated with their inability to influence medical cost trends by controlling utilization or negotiating more-favorable provider contracts. In an alternative attempt to control costs, employers increasingly are turning to wellness programs, although the payoff remains unclear. Employer uncertainty about how national reform will affect their health benefits programs suggests they are likely to continue their current course in the near term. Looking toward 2014 when many reform provisions take effect, employer responses likely will vary across communities, reflecting differences in state approaches to reform implementation, such as insurance exchange design, and local labor market conditions.

  11. Work process of nursing professors 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Giordano, Denisse; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the work process of nursing professors. Method: descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, developed with a focus on critical epidemiology, carried out at a School of Nursing in Chile. The research subjects consist of 17 nursing professors, with whom individual semi-structured interviews were carried out and nine participated in a focus group. The Ethics Committee approved this study. Results: 88.2% were female, mean age of 42 years, 47% were married, 94% were Chilean, average length of service in the institution of 2.8 years, and 23.5% had a master’s degree. Regarding the work process, the students were the work object, the tools used were the knowledge and the experience as a nurse, and the work environment was considered good. Regarding the form of work organization, 76% have a 44-hour workweek, the wage was considered inadequate and the workload was higher than foreseen in the contract. The dialectic of the nursing work process is evidenced, demonstrating the contradiction between the low wages and labor overload and the narratives reporting a good work environment, personal fulfillment and transcendence that goes far beyond work. Conclusions: the work process allows describing the work components of the nursing professors, which are consistent with the results of the literature and show the dialectic of the nursing work process. PMID:29211193

  12. Inward Greenfield FDI and Patterns of Job Polarization

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    Sara Amoroso

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented growth in foreign direct investment in the last few decades has caused drastic changes in the labor markets of the host countries. The major part of FDI takes place in low-tech industries, where the wages and skills are low, or in high-tech, where they offer a wage premium for the highly skilled workers. This mechanism may increase the polarization of employment into high-wage and low-wage jobs, at the expense of middle-skill jobs. This paper looks at the effects of two types of FDI inflows, namely foreign investment in high-skill and low-skill activities, on job polarization. We match data on greenfield FDI aggregated by country and sector with data on employment by occupational skill to investigate the extent to which different types of greenfield FDI are responsible for skill polarization. Our results show that low-skill foreign investment shifts employment from high- to medium- and low-skill jobs, while skill-intensive FDI generally leads to skill upgrading. Only FDI in information and communication technology (ICT is associated with job polarization, but only when accounting for the plurality of job polarization patterns across European sectors.

  13. Reflections on International Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Penelope Ann

    2017-01-01

    The author, a former university faculty member who taught English to speakers of other languages and now a nursing home resident, shares her observations about how English language proficiency, culture, and religious differences affect her care. She provides examples of communication challenges that can be annoying or cause harm, her coping strategies, and reasons many certified nursing assistants might never be fully fluent in English. She explains how international certified nursing assistants can benefit residents because of skills developed by family-centered care in their countries of origin. She also discusses related issues-the importance of being culturally competent about U.S. culture. She points out how religiousness not only affects residents but is a buffer for staff against the stress of physically and emotionally demanding low-wage work. Overall, the author likes receiving care from individuals from other countries, finding reward in comparing how her personal struggle with illness and paralysis resonates with the trauma of migration and how learning firsthand about varying beliefs and attitudes clarifies her identity and place in world history.

  14. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    Nursing assistants (NAs) make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious), or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical), literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed). More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation. PMID:28534859

  15. Causes of Low-Skilled Workers’ Performance in Construction Projects

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    Alhaji Ali Zannah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Skilled workers’ performance is one of the crucial aspects of labour productivity that requires proper attention for effective projects delivery in the construction industry. The level of skilled workers’ low performance has been seen to be a major factor which contributes toward inefficient construction projects productivity. Therefore, the objective of this research is to identify the causes of low-skilled workers’ performance in construction projects in the Nigeria. The objective was achieved through a structured quantitative method of questionnaire distributed to 150 respondents that comprise of active stakeholders in the Nigerian construction industry. 111 responses representing 74 % were retrieved. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and analysis of variance (ANOVA. The finding shows that; low wages of skilled, lack of sufficient skill acquisition centres and lack of incentive schemes for skilled workers were the most significant causes of low-skilled workers’ performance in the Nigerian construction industry. The homogenous analysis indicates that there are significant differences in perception of respondents on few variables whereas majority of respondents have similarities in most of the variables. The research findings indicate the need for stakeholders in the Nigerian construction industry to provide incentives and motivate skilled workers, provide training and retraining, conducive working condition, supply of quality materials and equipment, and proper site management in order improve low-skilled workers’ performance in Nigerian construction industry towards optimal performance.

  16. Crisis in our hospital kitchens: ancillary staffing levels during an outbreak of food poisoning in a long stay hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, A M; Whitty, P M

    1990-02-10

    An investigation into an outbreak of food poisoning caused by Clostridium perfringens showed evidence of poor food handling by catering staff. The reasons behind this were explored by interviewing catering staff, analysing shifts and rotas, and looking at staff vacancies. Morale was low because of staff shortages resulting from a long term recruitment problem. In consequence staff were working double shifts and often for weeks on end without a day off. The reasons for the recruitment problem included the difficulty of recruiting semiskilled labour from a middle class area, low wages, lack of management support, and the poor image of the hospital as a place of work. Similar factors affect the recruitment and retention of ancillary staff nationally. The NHS has a poor record as an employer of ancillary staff, paying lower wages than other organisations for equivalent posts. Competitive tendering has further worsened the position of ancillary staff, with the result that good quality of care and service has often not been achieved. The NHS Review, with its emphasis on quality of care, makes no mention of ancillary staff. Yet high standards of ancillary provision are essential if further outbreaks of food poisoning in hospitals are to be prevented.

  17. High mobile phone ownership, but low internet and email usage among pregnant, HIV-infected women attending antenatal care in Johannesburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Kate; Schwartz, Sheree R.; Van Rie, Annelies; Bassett, Jean; Vermund, Sten H.; Pettifor, Audrey E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We investigated mobile phone usage amongst HIV-positive pregnant women attending antenatal services in a primary care clinic in Johannesburg (n=50). We conducted a semi-structured interview and asked them about their mobile phone, Internet and email use. The median age of the women was 28 years, 36% had moved one or more times in the past year, and most were employed or recently employed, albeit earning low wages. Nearly all women (94%) reported that they did not share their phone and 76% of the SIM cards were registered to the woman herself. The median time with the current phone was one year (range 1 month–6 years) and the median time with the current phone number was three years (range 1 month–13 years). Even though 42% of the participants were from outside South Africa, they all had mobile phone numbers local to South Africa. About one-third of respondents reported Internet use (30%) and about one-fifth reported using email (18%). Overall, 20% accessed the Internet and 10% accessed email on their mobile phone. Mobile phone interventions are feasible amongst HIV-positive pregnant women and may be useful in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Email and Internet-based interventions may not yet be appropriate. PMID:25586808

  18. Skill Content of Intra-European Trade Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeddies, Goetz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the international division of labor has expanded rapidly in the wake of European integration. In this context, especially Western European high-wage countries should have specialized on (human-capital intensively manufactured goods and should have increasingly sourced labor-intensively manufactured goods, especially parts and components, from Eastern European low wage countries. Since this should be beneficial for the high-skilled and harmful to the lower-qualified workforce in high-wage countries, the opening up of Eastern Europe is often considered as a vital reason for increasing unemployment of the lower-qualified in Western Europe. This paper addresses this issue by analyzing the skill content of Western European countries’ bilateral trade using input-output techniques in order to evaluate possible effects of international trade on labor demand. Thereby, differences in factor inputs and production technologies have been considered, allowing for vertical product differentiation. In this case, skill content of bilateral exports and imports partially differs substantially, especially in bilateral trade between Western and Eastern European countries. According to the results, East-West trade should be harmful particularly to the medium-skilled in Western European countries.

  19. Explaining the relation between precarious employment and mental well-being. A qualitative study among temporary agency workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Kim; Hardonk, Stefan; De Cuyper, Nele; Vanroelen, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    From an employee-perspective, temporary agency employment can be considered in two ways. According to the first perspective, agency jobs are associated with job characteristics that adversely affect mental well-being: job insecurity, low wages, a lack of benefits, little training, poorer prospects for the future, high working time flexibility, minimal trade union representation and problematic triadic employment relations. The other perspective underlines that flexibility, learning opportunities and freedom in agency employment enable workers to build the career of their choice, which may positively affect mental well-being. This article aims at interpreting and explaining these conflicting perspectives. In particular, we discuss the role of coping resources (control, support, trust and equity) in the stress pathway between characteristics of temporary agency employment and mental well-being. Semi-structured interviews with 12 Belgian temporary agency workers were conducted and analysed from a phenomenological perspective. The results reveal mainly how a lack of coping resources plays a key role in how (precarious) characteristics of temporary agency employment affect employees' mental well-being. This study illustrates the earlier assumed stress pathway between precarious employment and mental well-being, in which coping resources play an intermediary as well as a moderating role.

  20. Artists and Multiple Job Holding—Breadwinning Work as Mediating Between Bohemian and Entrepreneurial Identities and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Lindström

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Artists are known to manage low income and work insecurity by holding multiple jobs. Through an analysis of interview data, this study explores the narratives of 20 visual artists in Sweden regarding breadwinning work. Positive and negative experiences of such work are analyzed in relation to the artists’ work behavior and identity as either ‘bohemian’ or ‘entrepreneurial.’ Breadwinning work may be seen by artists as either enabling autonomy from the market or hindering the construction of a professional identity, depending on these behaviors/identities. However, conditions such as low wage, temporary contracts, and low control over work hours ultimately decides artist’s experiences of breadwinning work. This article adds to the existing knowledge on artistic labour markets by highlighting the role of multiple job holding in mediating between an understanding of the bohemian art for art’s sake artist role and the entrepreneurial role of the artist. NB: The endnotes 7 and 8 have switched places, where endnote 7 should belong to the text of endnote 8 and vice versa

  1. [Economic restructuring and impacts on health and mental distress: the case of a state-owned bank in Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz Sérgio; Pinheiro, Tarcísio Márcio Magalhães; Sakurai, Emília

    2007-12-01

    Restructuring of the Brazilian financial sector was consolidated through the combination of mass lay-offs, automation, and outsourcing, in addition to business re-engineering with leveling of hierarchical echelons, labor casualization, and multi-function jobs. In order to comply and deal with the new demands, bank employees had to increase their schooling, become multi-functional and expert sales attendants, and submit to substandard conditions in the workplace, increased workload, overtime, and low wages. The purpose of the current study was to examine the restructuring process in a state-owned bank in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, and its impacts on workers' health. The study also analyzes absenteeism rates from 1998 to 2003, when there was an increase in diseases such as repetitive stress injury (RSI)/work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMD) and mental/behavioral disorders, accounting for 56% and 19% of sick leaves. The process has continued to the present, with a restrictive recruitment policy. Further study is needed to confirm the results.

  2. Remote monitoring of instrumented structures using the Internet information superhighway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhr, Peter L.; Huston, Dryver R.; Ambrose, Timothy P.

    1994-09-01

    The requirements of sensor monitoring associated with instrumented civil structures poses potential logistical constraints on manpower, training, and costs. The need for frequent or even continuous data monitoring places potentially severe constraints on overall system performance given real-world factors such as available manpower, geographic separation of the instrumented structures, and data archiving as well as the training and cost issues. While the pool of available low wage, moderate skill workers available to the authors is sizable (undergraduate engineering students), the level of performance of such workers is quite variable leading to data acquisition integrity and continuity issues - matters that are not acceptable in the practical field implementation of such developed systems. In the case of acquiring data from the numerous sensors within the civil structures which the authors have instrumented (e.g., a multistory building, roadway/railway bridges, and a hydroelectric dam), we have found that many of these concerns may be alleviated through the use of an automated data acquisition system which archives the acquired information in an electronic location remotely accessible through the Internet global computer network. It is therefore a possible for the data monitoring to be performed at a remote location with the only requirements for data acquisition being Internet accessibility. A description of the developed scheme is presented as well as guiding philosophies.

  3. MOVIMENTO DE MULHERES E FEMINISTAS E SUA AÇÃO ANTICAPITALISTA NO BRASIL E MARANHÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Feminism action in Brazil which has as mark the seventies, when this movement spread through several Brazilian states, bringing to society the perspective of women, to build a society without gender relations, in which women could share equal spaces of power and have their rights respected. In this context, this article shows that, although the fight over the last forty years has contributed to major changes, it is still observed the almost exclusive responsibility of women with the housework. Shows that, there is still exclusion in politics, when studies indicate a presence of only 13% of women in Brazilian legislative, exclusion that is also observed in secondary jobs and low wages, which demonstrates that, capitalism articulates with the patriarchate in order to devalue women workforce, imputing undervalued and underpaid positions. This fact reflects the sexual division of labor that created divisions between productive and reproductive work, segregating women in jobs that reinforce gender relations and their exclusion from public life.

  4. Impact of mothers' employment on infant feeding and care: a qualitative study of the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manisha; Ariana, Proochista; Webster, Premila

    2014-04-02

    To explore the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) using focus group discussions (FGDs) to understand the impact of mothers' employment on infant feeding and care. The effects of mothers' employment on nutritional status of children could be variable. It could lead to increased household income, but could also compromise child care and feeding. The study was undertaken in the Dungarpur district of Rajasthan, India. Mothers of infants employment compromises infant feeding and care', 'caregivers' inability to substitute mothers' care', 'compromises related to childcare and feeding outweigh benefits from MGNREGA' and 'employment as disempowering'. Mothers felt that the comprises to infant care and feeding due to long hours of work, lack of alternative adequate care arrangements, low wages and delayed payments outweighed the benefits from the scheme. This study provides an account of the trade-off between mothers' employment and child care. It provides an understanding of the household power relationships, societal and cultural factors that modulate the effects of mothers' employment. From the perspective of mothers, it helps to understand the benefits and problems related to providing employment to women with infants in the MGNREGA scheme and make a case to pursue policy changes to improve their working conditions.

  5. Impact of mothers’ employment on infant feeding and care: a qualitative study of the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manisha; Ariana, Proochista; Webster, Premila

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) using focus group discussions (FGDs) to understand the impact of mothers’ employment on infant feeding and care. The effects of mothers’ employment on nutritional status of children could be variable. It could lead to increased household income, but could also compromise child care and feeding. Setting The study was undertaken in the Dungarpur district of Rajasthan, India. Participants Mothers of infants employment compromises infant feeding and care’, ‘caregivers’ inability to substitute mothers’ care’, ‘compromises related to childcare and feeding outweigh benefits from MGNREGA’ and ‘employment as disempowering’. Mothers felt that the comprises to infant care and feeding due to long hours of work, lack of alternative adequate care arrangements, low wages and delayed payments outweighed the benefits from the scheme. Conclusions This study provides an account of the trade-off between mothers’ employment and child care. It provides an understanding of the household power relationships, societal and cultural factors that modulate the effects of mothers’ employment. From the perspective of mothers, it helps to understand the benefits and problems related to providing employment to women with infants in the MGNREGA scheme and make a case to pursue policy changes to improve their working conditions. PMID:24694624

  6. Eliminating child labour in Malawi: a British American Tobacco corporate responsibility project to sidestep tobacco labour exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otañez, M G; Muggli, M E; Hurt, R D; Glantz, S A

    2006-06-01

    To examine British American Tobacco and other tobacco industry support of the Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco Growing Foundation. Analyses of internal tobacco industry documents and ethnographic data. British American Tobacco co-founded the Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco Growing Foundation (ECLT) in October 2000 and launched its pilot project in Malawi. ECLT's initial projects were budgeted at US2.3 million dollars over four years. Labour unions and leaf dealers, through ECLT funds, have undertook modest efforts such as building schools, planting trees, and constructing shallow wells to address the use of child labour in tobacco farming. In stark contrast, the tobacco companies receive nearly US40 million dollars over four years in economic benefit through the use of unpaid child labour in Malawi during the same time. BAT's efforts to combat child labour in Malawi through ECLT was developed to support the company's "corporate social responsibility agenda" rather than accepting responsibility for taking meaningful steps to eradicate child labour in the Malawi tobacco sector. In Malawi, transnational tobacco companies are using child labour projects to enhance corporate reputations and distract public attention from how they profit from low wages and cheap tobacco.

  7. Identifying Discrimination at Work: The Use of Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pager, Devah; Western, Bruce

    2012-06-01

    Antidiscrimination law offers protection to workers who have been treated unfairly on the basis of their race, gender, religion, or national origin. In order for these protections to be invoked, however, potential plaintiffs must be aware of and able to document discriminatory treatment. Given the subtlety of contemporary forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to identify discrimination when it has taken place. The methodology of field experiments offers one approach to measuring and detecting hiring discrimination, providing direct observation of discrimination in real-world settings. In this article, we discuss the findings of two recent field experiments measuring racial discrimination in low wage labor markets. This research provides several relevant findings for researchers and those interested in civil rights enforcement: (1) it produces estimates of the rate of discrimination at the point of hire; (2) it yields evidence about the interactions associated with discrimination (many of which reveal the subtlety with which contemporary discrimination is practiced); and (3) it provides a vehicle for both research on and enforcement of antidiscrimination law.

  8. The Impact of a City-Level Minimum-Wage Policy on Supermarket Food Prices in Seattle-King County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Jennifer J; Buszkiewicz, James; Tang, Wesley; Aggarwal, Anju; Long, Mark; Vigdor, Jacob; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-09-09

    Background : Many states and localities throughout the U.S. have adopted higher minimum wages. Higher labor costs among low-wage food system workers could result in higher food prices. Methods : Using a market basket of 106 foods, food prices were collected at affected chain supermarket stores in Seattle and same-chain unaffected stores in King County (n = 12 total, six per location). Prices were collected at 1 month pre- (March 2015) and 1-month post-policy enactment (May 2015), then again 1-year post-policy enactment (May 2016). Unpaired t-tests were used to detect price differences by location at fixed time while paired t-tests were used to detect price difference across time with fixed store chain. A multi-level, linear differences-in-differences model, was used to detect the changes in the average market basket item food prices over time across regions, overall and by food group. Results : There were no significant differences in overall market basket or item-level costs at one-month (-$0.01, SE = 0.05, p = 0.884) or one-year post-policy enactment (-$0.02, SE = 0.08, p = 0.772). No significant increases were observed by food group. Conclusions : There is no evidence of change in supermarket food prices by market basket or increase in prices by food group in response to the implementation of Seattle's minimum wage ordinance.

  9. Classification of Region’s Municipalities by Structure and Level of Incomes and Consumer Spending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Yakovlevich Fokin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a classification of region’s municipalities that differ according to two criteria – the structure and level of incomes, and the level of consumer spending. The author investigated the combination of income sources (wages, pensions and unemployment benefits that form in the aggregate the amount of disposable money income of the people who live in the administrative-territorial units of Perm Krai. The author also analyzed the influence of people’s incomes on retail trade turnover in the region’s municipalities. The data were collected, grouped and analyzed; they show that the level of people’s income in large and medium cities, which are industrial centers, exceeds considerably the values of these indicators registered in rural municipalities, single-industry settlements and depressed areas. The reason for this lies in low wages of working population, a large proportion of retirees and the unemployed in the rural areas, single-industry settlements and depressed areas. The article defines nine types of territorial entities in the region that differ in level and structure of income and consumer spending in the municipalities. The author concludes that the territorial differentiation of municipal formations influences the formation of stratified population groups distinguished by the level of income and consumption. The solution to this problem requires joint efforts by the regional administration and municipal authorities to develop management actions with regard to specific features of each municipality

  10. Reasons for job separations in a cohort of workers with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Judith A; Burke-Miller, Jane K

    2015-01-01

    We explored the relative effects of adverse working conditions, job satisfaction, wages, worker characteristics, and local labor markets in explaining voluntary job separations (quits) among employed workers with psychiatric disabilities. Data come from the Employment Intervention Demonstration Program in which 2,086 jobs were ended by 892 workers during a 24 mo observation period. Stepped multivariable logistic regression analysis examined the effect of variables on the likelihood of quitting. Over half (59%) of all job separations were voluntary while 41% were involuntary, including firings (17%), temporary job endings (14%), and layoffs (10%). In multivariable analysis, workers were more likely to quit positions at which they were employed for 20 h/wk or less, those with which they were dissatisfied, low-wage jobs, non-temporary positions, and jobs in the structural (construction) occupations. Voluntary separation was less likely for older workers, members of racial and ethnic minority groups, and those residing in regions with lower unemployment rates. Patterns of job separations for workers with psychiatric disabilities mirrored some findings regarding job leaving in the general labor force but contradicted others. Job separation antecedents reflect the concentration of jobs for workers with psychiatric disabilities in the secondary labor market, characterized by low-salaried, temporary, and part-time employment.

  11. The Expanded Public Works Programme: Perspectives of direct beneficiaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondli S. Hlatshwayo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Scholarship on the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP in South Africa tends to focus on quantitative evaluation to measure the progress made in the implementation of EPWP projects. The number of employment opportunities created by EPWP, demographic profiling, skills acquired by beneficiaries and training opportunities related to the Programme form the basis of typical statistical evaluations of it, but exclude comment by the workers who participate in its projects. Based on primary sources, including in-depth interviews, newspaper reports and internet sources, this article seeks to provide a qualitative review of the EPWP from the perspective of the beneficiaries of municipal EPWP projects. Various South African government sectors hire EPWP workers to provide local services such as cleaning and maintaining infrastructure, but the employment of these workers can still be regarded as precarious, in the sense that they have no job security, earn low wages and have no benefits such as medical aid or pension fund. The interviewees indicated that, although they appreciate the temporary employment opportunities provided by the EPWP, they also experience health and safety risks and lack the advantages of organised labour groupings. Their main disadvantage, however, is that they cannot access permanent employment, which offers better wages and concomitant benefits.

  12. The Latest Books on Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elia Zaru

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The latest books published on globalization raise interesting issues which reflect upon the very complexity of the process we are facing. In The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization Richard Baldwin proposes a history of globalization divided into two stages. As Baldwin argues, the process of globalization has to be divided into “old” and “new” age. The “old” globalization took place between 1820 and 1990. It was characterized by the “great divergence”, that is by the centralization of world income in today’s wealthy nations. However, since 1990 the sharing of world income has plummeted to where it was in 1900. According to Baldwin, this reversal of fortune is a symptom of a shift in the globalization process. The “new” globalization, driven by information technology, has combined high tech with low wages, and lead simultaneously to the industrialization of developing nations and deindustrialization of developed ones. This is the “great convergence”: in the “new” globalization rich and developing nations are alike and they face equal global challenges.

  13. Labor Migration from Ukraine to the EU: an Analysis of Characteristics and Consequences

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    Bezrukova Nataliya V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at analyzing characteristics of labor migration from Ukraine to the European Union and evaluating the possible consequences of this process, as well as determining the future development trends in terms of emigration from Ukraine. The main directions of labor migration from Ukraine have been examined. An estimation of the volume of labor migration has been provided. Data about the socio-demographic characteristics of migrants have been presented. It is specified that the process of emigration has both positive and negative consequences for our country. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of employment settings of migrants in the Member States of the European Union. The main causes of emigration from Ukraine, among which both unemployment and low wages, have been allocated. The authors prove that the average monthly salary of Ukrainian migrants in the EU Member States is much higher than in Ukraine. On the basis of the carried out study has been concluded that labor migration from Ukraine to the EU has important socio-economic importance to our State. At the same time, signing of the Association agreement between Ukraine, on the one hand, and the European Union, the European Atomic Energy Community and their Member States, on the other hand, as well as introduction of a visa-free regime, will contribute to an increase in the number of labor migrants.

  14. Problems and social policy priorities sustainable development of rural territories (on the Republic Komi example

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    Vitaliy Nikolaevich Lazhentsev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the concept of term «sustainable development» of rural areas. Social problems of rural development of the republic of Komi are identified. An intra-rural typology creation is performed. An increasing differentiation in the development of rural areas is concluded. Rural settlements in the republic are characterized by low population density and a rare network of settlements. Low level and quality of rural life (low rural incomes, poor living conditions and high unemployment and better living conditions in urban areas adversely affect migration processes of the village. Characteristic features of modern rural labour market are: inconsistency of supply and demand of labour in vocational and qualification angle, seasonality of production and temporary nature of the proposed work, low wages, low competitiveness of the youth labour market, high level of registered unemployment and even higher — of unregistered. Analytical material allowed the authors to determine the direction of social policy for sustainable development of rural areas according to the conditions of the North.

  15. Strategies for reducing emissions and depositions in Central and Eastern European countries: The case of the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Harmelen, T.; De Kruijk, H.; Stoffer, A.; Maly, M.

    1995-06-01

    A detailed case study on developments and reduction of acidifying SO 2 and NO x emissions from the energy system was conducted for the Czech Republic. Scenarios and the Energy Flow Optimization Model - Environment (EFOM-ENV) of the European Union (DG 12) were applied for the first time in the Czech Republic and were similar to those that were used in the other European country studies in preparation of the Second Sulphur Protocol. Czech SO 2 emissions can be reduced at low marginal costs, but at high total national costs compared with e.g. the Netherlands. The main reasons for this are the high sulphur content of (brown) coal, that has a high share in national energy consumption, a relatively high energy intensity, low wages, and the fact that most Western countries already have reduced their SO 2 emissions in the past. Marginal NO x emission reduction costs are similar to those of Western countries and national total NO x reduction costs are relatively high. In contrast with fuel switching, retrofitting of existing technologies is an attractive SO 2 and NO x reduction option in the short term. High interest and discount rates due to capital scarcity increases emissions and emission reduction costs. Therefore, short term involvement of Western investors could lead to European cost-effective emission reduction. 17 figs., 5 tabs., 2 appendices, 20 refs

  16. Labor market in Serbia: 1990-2005

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    Stojanović Božo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Key problems in transitions in Serbia can be analyzed through the processes happening at the labor market. Labor market in Serbia is divided on the formal and informal one ("gray". The basic problem is mass unemployment. The unemployment in Serbia is not frictional unemployment resulting from decisions of workers to change their jobs. This kind of unemployment is considered normal at all labor markets. Since it is not frictional, unemployment in Serbia is not short-term one. This unemployment is by its nature structural and therefore long-term. Structural unemployment always arises as a result of the illadapted structure of labor supply and demand. There is a particularly high level of long-term unemployment among young people who practically do not have any work experience. The only realistic solution for mass unemployment and low wages in the Serbian economy is increasing of productivity and overall economic efficiency. Stimulating entrepreneurship and opening of new companies to absorb an enormous number of unemployed is the central issue of the economic reform. Instead of short-term passive measures, the state should adopt active measures aimed at stimulating of entrepreneurship and creating of new jobs.

  17. Reducing hazardous cleaning product use: a collaborative effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechter, Elise; Azaroff, Lenore S; López, Isabel; Goldstein-Gelb, Marcy

    2009-01-01

    Workplace hazards affecting vulnerable populations of low-wage and immigrant workers present a special challenge to the practice of occupational health. Unions, Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health (COSH) groups, and other organizations have developed worker-led approaches to promoting safety. Public health practitioners can provide support for these efforts. This article describes a successful multiyear project led by immigrant cleaning workers with their union, the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 615, and with support from the Massachusetts COSH (MassCOSH) to address exposure to hazardous chemicals. After the union had identified key issues and built a strategy, the union and MassCOSH invited staff from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Occupational Health Surveillance Program (OHSP) to provide technical information about health effects and preventive measures. Results included eliminating the most hazardous chemicals, reducing the number of products used, banning mixing products, and improving safety training. OHSP's history of public health practice regarding cleaning products enabled staff to respond promptly. MassCOSH's staff expertise and commitment to immigrant workers allowed it to play a vital role.

  18. The Quality of Life of High-Skilled Employees in Hungary. The Experts' Opinion

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    CRISTINA LEOVARIDIS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide an overview of the working conditions of high-skilled employees in Hungary, by resorting to comparisons with the other Central and Eastern European countries, based on research carried out by the author during a three-month placement (August 1st-October 31st 2011 at the Institute of Sociology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. This work combines several sources and methods for gathering information: theoretical documentation, secondary analysis of data, in-depth interviews with some experts in the field. The study results indicate the presence, for the knowledge workers in Hungary, of some common problems of this category of employees in all former communist countries, such as number of working hours per week more than EU average, low rate of participation in training, problems health such as stress, depression, heart disease etc., employees' complaints related to overworking associated with low wages in the public sector and with rigid hierarchy, lack of work-life balance, standards imposed by the parent company etc. in some multinational firms; cases of good practice appear at the micro level, mainly in Scandinavian capital firms or in companies in the IT sector.

  19. Why income inequality is so high in Serbia: Empirical evidence and a measurement of the key factors

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    Krstić Gorana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the extent and evolution of income inequality in Serbia and examine factors that may have contributed to the high and rising inequality. Specifically, using data from the 2013 Survey of Income and Living Conditions, we focus on two issues: the effect of the quantity and quality of household members’ employment on the earnings of low-wage workers, and the role of taxes and social transfers in redistributing income from the betteroff to the poor. The results suggest that income inequality, measured by the Gini coefficient, has significantly increased in Serbia over the period of economic crisis, reaching 38.7 in 2013. The examined causes of such a high inequality are the high rate of low work intensity of household members and the high proportion of people working in non-standard forms of employment (i.e., part-time, temporary, and self-employment arrangements, mostly in the informal sector. In addition, the low coverage of social transfers, particularly monetary social assistance and child benefits, and the very low level of progressivity of the Serbian personal tax system explain the relatively modest - by international standards - redistributive role of direct taxes and social transfers.

  20. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-05-19

    Nursing assistants (NAs) make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious), or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical), literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed). More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation.

  1. Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnMarie Lee Walton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nursing assistants (NAs make up a large share of the healthcare provider workforce and their numbers are expected to grow. NAs are predominantly women who earn a low wage and report financial, work, and family demands. Working as a NA is hazardous; this manuscript specifically examines the biological/infectious, chemical, enviromechanical, physical and psychosocial hazards that appear in the literature to date. A focused search strategy was used to review literature about hazards that fell into each of the five aforementioned domains. While some hazards that were documented were clear, such as exposure to influenza because of close contact with patients (biological/infectious, or exposure to hazardous drugs (chemical, literature was limited. The majority of the literature we reviewed fell into the domain of psychosocial hazards and centered on stress from workplace organization issues (such as mandatory overtime, lack of managerial support, and feeling rushed. More research is needed to understand which hazards NAs identify as most concerning and tailored interventions are needed for risk mitigation.

  2. Does Raising the Early Retirement Age Increase Employment of Older Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubli, Stefan; Zweimüller, Josef

    2013-12-01

    Two pension reforms in Austria increased the early retirement age (ERA) from 60 to 62 for men and from 55 to 58.25 for women. We find that raising the ERA increased employment by 9.75 percentage points among affected men and by 11 percentage points among affected women. The reforms had large spillover effects on the unemployment insurance program but negligible effects on disability insurance claims. Specifically, unemployment increased by 12.5 percentage points among men and by 11.8 percentage points among women. The employment response was largest among high-wage and healthy workers, while low-wage and less healthy workers either continued to retire early via disability benefits or bridged the gap to the ERA via unemployment benefits. Taking spillover effects and additional tax revenues into account, we find that for a typical birth-year cohort a one year increase in the ERA resulted in a reduction of net government expenditures of 107 million euros for men and of 122 million euros for women.

  3. Leadership Development Experiences of Women Leaders in State-Owned Enterprises in Indonesia

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    Yuliana Dewi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Similar to many other countries in the world, Indonesia has been experiencing the increasing num- ber of women workers participation both in formal and informal sectors. While in formal sector the number of female employees has increased from around 10 millions in 2008 to nearly 13 mil- lions in 2011; in informal sector the figure is even doubled: more than 28 millions in 2008 to more than 30 millions in 2011. However to date, women workers are associated with low-skilled, low- wage workers who work in precarious working environment. Women are seldom hold managerial position both in public and private sector. The proportion of women in Indonesia who sit in the board of directors is only 6% from the entire women workers. Thus, this research aims to explore their development experience along the way. In order to obtain initial information, interviews with nine women managers from State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs were conducted. SOEs were chosen for convenience reason. The research indicates the low ratio number of women in SOEs management team although there is an optimism that the number would increase. Key point discovered in this research is that development experience is mainly done by the participants own initiatives whereas organisational supports are found very limited. This findings will be further explored and confirmed by involving more women managers from various sectors.

  4. The balancing act: exploring stigma, economic need and disclosure among male sex workers in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closson, Elizabeth F; Colby, Donn J; Nguyen, Thi; Cohen, Samuel S; Biello, Katie; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    In Vietnam, there is an emerging HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). Male sex workers engage in high-risk sexual behaviours that make them particularly vulnerable to HIV infection. In 2010, 23 MSM in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) who recently received payment for sex with another man completed in-depth qualitative interviews exploring motivations for sex work, patterns of sex work disclosure and experiences of social stigma. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and translated into English and analysed using a qualitative descriptive approach. Low wages, unstable employment and family remittances were motivating factors for MSM in HCMC to sell sex. Participants described experiences of enacted and felt social stigma related to their involvement in sex work. In response, they utilised stigma management techniques aimed at concealment of involvement in sex work. Such strategies restricted sexual communication with non-paying sex partners and potentially limited their ability to seek social support from family and friends. Departing from decontextualized depictions of sex work disclosure, our findings describe how decisions to reveal involvement in sex work are shaped by social and structural factors such as social stigma, techniques to minimise exposure to stigma, economic imperatives and familial responsibilities.

  5. Labor migration, externalities and ethics: theorizing the meso-level determinants of HIV vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jennifer S

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses labor migration as an example of how focusing on the meso-level highlights the social processes through which structural factors produce HIV risk. Situating that argument in relation to existing work on economic organization and HIV risk as well as research on labor migration and HIV vulnerabilities, the paper demonstrates how analyzing the processes through which labor migration creates vulnerability can shift attention away from the proximate behavioral determinants of HIV risk and toward the community and policy levels. Further, it presents the concepts of externalities and the ethics of consumption, which underline how both producers and consumers benefit from low-waged migrant labor, and thus are responsible for the externalization of HIV risk characteristic of supply chains that rely on migrant labor. These concepts point to strategies through which researchers and advocates could press the public and private sectors to improve the conditions in which migrants live and work, with implications for HIV as well as other health outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Health Behaviors and Overweight in Nursing Home Employees: Contribution of Workplace Stressors and Implications for Worksite Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Helena; Gore, Rebecca J; Boyer, Jon; Nobrega, Suzanne; Punnett, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Many worksite health promotion programs ignore the potential influence of working conditions on unhealthy behaviors. A study of nursing home employees (56% nursing aides) utilized a standardized questionnaire. We analyzed the cross-sectional associations between workplace stressors and obesity, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity. Of 1506 respondents, 20% reported exposure to three or more workplace stressors (physical or organizational), such as lifting heavy loads, low decision latitude, low coworker support, regular night work, and physical assault. For each outcome, the prevalence ratio was between 1.5 and 2 for respondents with four or five job stressors. Individuals under age 40 had stronger associations between workplace stressors and smoking and obesity. Workplace stressors were strongly associated with smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity, even among the lowest-status workers. Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers. Although this study is cross-sectional, it has other strengths, including the broad range of work stressors studied. Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides. Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health.

  7. The international electronics industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, J; Rohm, T

    1998-01-01

    High-technology microelectronics has a major presence in countries such as China, India, Indonesia, and Malaysia, now the third-largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The migration of European, Japanese, and American companies accommodates regional markets. Low wage rates and limited enforcement of environmental regulations in developing countries also serve as incentives for the dramatic global migration of this industry. The manufacture of microelectonics products is accompanied by a high incidence of occupational illnesses, which may reflect the widespread use of toxic materials. Metals, photoactive chemicals, solvents, acids, and toxic gases are used in a wide variety of combinations and workplace settings. The industry also presents problems of radiation exposure and various occupational stressors, including some unresolved ergonomic issues. The fast-paced changes of the technology underlying this industry, as well as the stringent security precautions, have added to the difficulty of instituting proper health and safety measures. Epidemiologic studies reveal an alarming increase in spontaneous abortions among cleanroom manufacturing workers; no definitive study has yet identified its cause. Other health issues, including occupational cancer, are yet to be studied. The microelectronics industry is a good example of an industry that is exported to many areas of the world before health and safety problems are properly addressed and resolved.

  8. Biopolitics in Roberto Bolaño’s 2666, “The Part About the Crimes”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Raghinaru

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Starting from Agamben’s theories of state of exception, and sovereignty and subalternity, this article looks at Roberto Bolaño’s 2004 novel, 2666, as a critique of neoliberal capitalism, where the law is predicated on violence and exploitation of surplus humanity—in this case, the poor female maquiladora workers at the U.S./Mexico border. Narco-trafficking and misogyny are symptomatic of a juridical and economic order that revolves around exploitation as central to the workings of transnational capitalism. As the boundary between legality and illegality breaks down, an aporetic state of exception forms, in which the transnational corporation acts as sovereign power by introducing a space of exception in the law. This force of law without law obscures the politicization of bare life, while maintaining traditional means of exploitation. The maquiladora workers emerge as docile bodies imprinted by the biopolitical power of sovereign financial capital. Powerless victims of overwork, displacement, destitution, and ultimately rape and slaughter, they objectify the violence of low wage labour in the global exchange of power and capital.

  9. MIGRASI BERULANG TENAGA KERJA MIGRAN INTERNASIONAL: KASUS PEKERJA MIGRAN ASAL DESA SUKOREJO WETAN, KABUPATEN TULUNGAGUNG

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    Mita Noveria

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Working overseas is an attempt to earn higher income and to accumulate financial capitals to run small enterprise in migrants’ place of origins. In fact, many Indonesia returned migrants decided to re-migrate, either to previous countries or to new destination countries. This paper aims to assess factors that cause remigration of the returned labor migrants. This study used quantitative and qualitative data, based on research in one of major international labor migrants sending village in Indonesia, namely Sukorejo Wetan in Tulungagung District. Quantitative data was collected through survey on selected households, while qualitative data was gathered by in-depth interview, focus group discussion (FGD, and observation. The analysis shows four dominant factors that caused returned migrants to re-migrate, namely: (1 the remittances only sufficed consumption needs; (2 the returned migrants faced difficulties in adapting to labor force conditions at place of origins (i.e., job scarceness and low wage; (3 limited ability in entrepreneurship; and (4 availability of social network that facilitates remigration.

  10. Sequencing Disadvantage: Barriers to Employment Facing Young Black and White Men with Criminal Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAGER, DEVAH; WESTERN, BRUCE; SUGIE, NAOMI

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors report the results of a large-scale field experiment conducted in New York City investigating the effects of race and a prison record on employment. Teams of black and white men were matched and sent to apply for low-wage jobs throughout the city, presenting equivalent resumés and differing only in their race and criminal background. The authors find a significant negative effect of a criminal record on employment outcomes that appears substantially larger for African Americans. The sequence of interactions preceding hiring decisions suggests that black applicants are less often invited to interview, thereby providing fewer opportunities to establish rapport with the employer. Furthermore, employers’ general reluctance to discuss the criminal record of an applicant appears especially harmful for black ex-offenders. Overall, these results point to the importance of rapport-building for finding work, something that the stigmatizing characteristics of minority and criminal status make more difficult to achieve. PMID:23459367

  11. Productive Employment in Romania: A Major Challenge to the Integration into the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Herman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that productive employment represents an essential element of inclusive economic growth, and it can be a driving force in reducing gaps between countries (especially experienced by productivity and income in order for these to integrate into the European Union. The aim of the article is to highlight the process of integration from the perspective of productive employment and its main determinants, in Romania, in the period following accession to the EU and integration into the European economic structures, the 2007-2014 period respectively. The results of this paper highlight a low level of productive employment in Romania determined mainly by low labour productivity, low wages, high vulnerable employment, high and inefficient employment in agriculture and a low level of employment in knowledge-intensive activities. The existence of large gaps, in terms of productive employment and economic development, between Romania and the developed EU countries, as well as the existence of the highest in-work poverty risk in EU emphasizes the need to accelerate productivity growth, which requires a real structural transformation, a shift from low-productivity sectors to high-productivity sectors. However, it is very important that poor workers should significantly benefit from the gains in labour productivity. The findings of this study can be useful for policy makers in order to support the improvement of productive employment so that productive employment contributes efficiently to the real integration of Romania into the EU.

  12. Determining the Factors Affecting Labor Productivity of Nurses

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    Yurdanur Dikmen

    2016-12-01

    Results: It was found that the 45.5% of nurses participated in the study were in the 23-53 age group, 79.5% were women, 76.9% married, 41.1% associate degree graduates. 42.3% of nurses' durations of professional experience were 0-5 years, 22.4% of nurses were clinical chief, 69.2% were working as shifts. Participants believe that the factors affecting the labor productivity were respectively organizational factors, ergonomic factors and personal factors. When organizational factors was examined; nurses stated that the lack of working personnel in the section, the low wages and unequal wages for the same work, the long working hours and the system which based on personal relations instead of merit were affecting productivity. The factors affecting labor productivity of nurses were not different according to age, gender, education level and marital status (p>0.05, but different according to mode of operation and years of experience (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to this study, it was found that there are many factors that affect the efficiency of the nurses. The most important factors affecting nurses' efficiency were determined as wage and working conditions. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(4.000: 334-342

  13. High mobile phone ownership, but low Internet and email usage among pregnant, HIV-infected women attending antenatal care in Johannesburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Kate; Schwartz, Sheree R; Van Rie, Annelies; Bassett, Jean; Vermund, Sten H; Pettifor, Audrey E

    2015-03-01

    We investigated mobile phone usage amongst HIV-positive pregnant women attending antenatal services in a primary care clinic in Johannesburg (n = 50). We conducted a semi-structured interview and asked them about their mobile phone, Internet and email use. The median age of the women was 28 years, 36% had moved one or more times in the past year, and most were employed or recently employed, albeit earning low wages. Nearly all women (94%) reported that they did not share their phone and 76% of the SIM cards were registered to the woman herself. The median time with the current phone was one year (range 1 month-6 years) and the median time with the current phone number was three years (range 1 month-13 years). Even though 42% of the participants were from outside South Africa, they all had mobile phone numbers local to South Africa. About one-third of respondents reported Internet use (30%) and about one-fifth reported using email (18%). Overall, 20% accessed the Internet and 10% accessed email on their mobile phone. Mobile phone interventions are feasible amongst HIV-positive pregnant women and may be useful in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Email and Internet-based interventions may not yet be appropriate. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. THE UNEMPLOYMENT PENSION-AGE AND INVALIDITY OF THE LAW OF THE IMSS, A PRACTICAL THEORETICAL ANALYSIS IN WORKERS OF SMES

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    Manuel Ildefonso Ruiz-Medina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes and discloses the impact of base salary contribution in determining the amount of pension severance at old age and disability insurance, that covers the Law of the current Social Security for each case, is studied also causes the lack of knowledge of Social Security benefits by the workers. This requires a mixed methodological approach supported in the qualitative tradition of case study aimed to particularization and not generalization, which made it possible to link the obtained data with the theory, and to describe, analyze and explain the results found with the object of study. The results emerged from the application of the survey conducted with 22 items, whose questions were closed and structured with the method of Likert that were answered by 40 workers at two companies known as SMEs in the City of Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico, during the month March 2014. On completion of the analysis of the data collected, the results show a severe deterioration of pensions due to low wages and lack of jobs and declining resources with the new pension system of pensions and from the workers an almost total ignorance of the benefits that the law provides motivated by the lack of diffusion by the IMSS and the lack of enterprise training.

  15. Household food insufficiency, financial strain, work-family spillover, and depressive symptoms in the working class: the Work, Family, and Health Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okechukwu, Cassandra A; El Ayadi, Alison M; Tamers, Sara L; Sabbath, Erika L; Berkman, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association of household-level stressors with depressive symptoms among low-wage nursing home employees. Data were collected in 2006 and 2007 from 452 multiethnic primary and nonprimary wage earners in 4 facilities in Massachusetts. We used logistic regression to estimate the association of depressive symptoms with household financial strain, food insufficiency, and work-family spillover (preoccupation with work-related concerns while at home and vice versa). Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with household financial strain (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 3.21) and food insufficiency (OR = 2.10; 95% CI = 1.10, 4.18). Among primary earners, stratified analyses showed that food insufficiency was associated with depressive symptoms (OR = 3.60; 95% CI = 1.42, 9.11) but financial strain was not. Among nonprimary wage earners, depressive symptoms correlated with financial strain (OR = 3.65; 95% CI = 1.48, 9.01) and work-family spillover (OR = 3.22; 95% CI = 1.11, 9.35). Household financial strain, food insufficiency, and work-family spillover are pervasive problems for working populations, but associations vary by primary wage earner status. The prevalence of food insufficiency among full-time employees was striking and might have a detrimental influence on depressive symptoms and the health of working-class families.

  16. International nurse migrations: Global trends

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    Ivković Marija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents global trends of migration of nurses, as specific qualified personnel in high demand. In the last couple of decades, and especially in the last couple of years, many countries have faced the problem of insufficient healthcare workers, particularly nurses. Reasons for this occurrence might be found in the deficiencies of their education systems, as well as the population aging of northern and western countries. As a response to this deficiency, those countries have begun intensive recruitment of foreign qualified female healthcare workers, which has led to the point that nurse migration today presents a very intense, and by many accounts specific migration flow. Female migrating work force is often in pursuit of low-wage and lowqualified work. Nurse migration is actually an example of motion of qualified female migrants in pursuit for better employment opportunities. While such a way of filling up the vacant positions works for the “importing” countries as a temporary solution, departure of trained female personnel presents a significant loss for the originating countries. In this paper we pay special attention to the countries who are the main “importers”, but also to those who are “exporters” of nursing personnel, and to specific national strategies these countries have applied.

  17. The Steel and Shipbuilding Industries of South Korea: Rising East Asia and Globalization

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    Kyoung-ho Shin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the roles of the steel and shipbuilding industries as generative sectors in Korea’s rapid economic ascent. We argue that a world-systems analysis focusing on these generative sectors provides a more complete understanding of Korea’s rapid economic ascent than do other theoretical models. We outline the similarities between this case and those analyzed by Bunker and Ciccantell (2005, 2007 both in terms of the central role of generative sectors in raw materials and transport industries and how the creation and growth of these two industrial sectors shaped institutional patterns and the broader economic ascent of South Korea and East Asia. Even though South Korea has not and may never become a challenger for global hegemony, its rapid ascent has helped reshape East Asia and the capitalist world-economy. We use the model of generative sectors to analyze the critical industries that underlay and shaped South Korea’s ascent from a low wage, light industry base to a world leader in electronics, automobiles, and other advanced industries.

  18. The crisis of the core seen through the eyes of the periphery: A Schelling model of the global-south megacity and the European crisis

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    Dymski Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adapting Schelling’s checker-board discrimination framework, we develop a disequilibrium model to examine growth in two core-periphery settings: global-South megacities and the Eurozone. Regarding megacities, informal sector growth undercuts the government’s capacity to fund fully adequate public services. Regarding the Eurozone, an increase in the relative size of the periphery will - under the government’s balanced-budget constraint - undercut the provision of public safety-net and infrastructure services. And if low-wage production is initiated in the European periphery, the core is likely to collapse. “Urbanization is decisive because it is so expensive. The difference between the costs of urban development and rural development does not turn on comparing the capital required for factories and that required for farms. Each of these is a small part of total investment, and the difference per head is not always in favor of industry. The difference turns on infrastructure.” W. Arthur Lewis (1977, pp. 39-40.

  19. Wild Food, Prices, Diets and Development: Sustainability and Food Security in Urban Cameroon

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    Lauren Q. Sneyd

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses wild food consumption in urban areas of Cameroon. Building upon findings from Cameroon’s Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (CFSVA this case study presents empirical data collected from 371 household and market surveys in Cameroonian cities. It employs the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food’s framework for understanding challenges related to the availability, accessibility, and adequacy of food. The survey data suggest that many wild/traditional foods are physically available in Cameroonian cities most of the time, including fruits, vegetables, spices, and insects. Cameroonians spend considerable sums of their food budget on wild foods. However, low wages and the high cost of city living constrain the social and economic access most people have to these foods. The data also suggest that imports of non-traditional staple foods, such as low cost rice, have increasingly priced potentially more nutritious or safe traditional local foods out of markets after the 2008 food price crisis. As a result, diets are changing in Cameroon as the resource-constrained population continues to resort to the coping strategy of eating cheaper imported foods such as refined rice or to eating less frequently. Cameroon’s nutrition transition continues to be driven by need and not necessarily by the preferences of Cameroonian consumers. The implications of this reality for sustainability are troubling.

  20. Una radiografía del sector hotelero andaluz : análisis del compromiso y la satisfacción laboral de sus trabajadores

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    Eva Gallardo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente estudio se realiza, en primer lugar, un análisis descriptivo del sector hotelero andaluz -sector de creciente importancia en la economía española-, considerando su composición en función de diversas variables sociodemográficas. Para, posteriormente, y dada la importancia que actualmente tienen las actitudes de los trabajadores en las organizaciones de servicios, analizar el grado de compromiso de los trabajadores así como su relación con el grado de satisfacción respecto a diversas facetas del trabajo. Los resultados muestran que, a pesar de que la plantilla de estas empresas es mayoritariamente joven, con un porcentaje elevado de contratos eventuales y de salarios bajos, el nivel de compromiso con la organización es singularmente alto.A descriptive analysis of the Andalusian hotel trade is carried out in this paper, on the basis of its different socio-demographical variables. Subsequently, and because of the increasing importance of employees' attitudes in the service sector organizations, the employees' degree of commitment and its correlation with their degree of satisfaction with some job facets have been analysed.The results have shown that, even though these organizations are characterized by young personnel, with a high percentage of temporary contracts and low wages, there is an outstanding high degree of organizational commitment within their staff.

  1. Migration and Workforce Planning in Medicine with Special Focus on Anesthesiology

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    Jannicke Mellin-Olsen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Counting health personnel and defining migration is more complicated than one should think at first glance. Migrating health workers are not a homogenous group, and many factors cause people to migrate—not only low wages but also lack of professional development possibilities, poor job satisfaction, outdated equipment, unsafe environment, and more. The opposite factors encourage people to stay. Many countries, including high-income countries benefit from remittances from migrating individuals. The World Health Organization has installed a code of Practice on the international recruitment of health workers. Although member countries have committed to follow this Code, it is not widely adhered to. Planning for the future is difficult, also because there are so many unknown factors related to the development of health-care levels, policies, inflow and outflow and more. Action must be taken in both donor and receiving countries. In anesthesiology, there is a huge workforce deficit globally. The world would need 136,000 additional physician anesthesia providers today to achieve an absolute minimum of five per 100,000 population. This will not happen unless all countries follow those that already have taken proactive steps in leading the direction forward. Anaesthesiology Society involvement is crucial.

  2. Responding to the Affordable Care Act: a leadership opportunity for social workers in employee assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenholtz, Susan

    2014-08-01

    Until recently, estimates indicated that more than half of Americans obtain health insurance through their employers. Yet the employer-based system leaves many vulnerable populations, such as low-wage and part-time workers, without coverage. The changes authorized by the Affordable Care Act (2010), and in particular the Health Insurance Marketplace (also known as health insurance exchanges), which became operational in 2014, are projected to have a substantial impact on the provision of employer-based health care coverage. Because health insurance is so intricately woven with employment, social workers in employee assistance programs (EAPs) are positioned to assume an active leadership role in guiding and developing the needed changes to employer-based health care that will occur as the result of health care reform. This article describes the key features and functions of the Health Insurance Marketplace and proposes an innovative role for EAP social workers in implementing the exchanges within their respective workplaces and communities. How EAP social workers can act as educators, advocates, and brokers of the exchanges, and the challenges they may face in their new roles, are discussed, and the next steps EAP social workers can take to prepare for health reform-related workplace changes are delineated.

  3. Health status, job stress and work-related injury among Los Angeles taxi drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pin-Chieh; Delp, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Taxi drivers work long hours for low wages and report hypertension, weight gain, and musculoskeletal pain associated with the sedentary nature of their job, stressful working conditions, and poor dietary habits. They also experience a high work-related fatality rate. The objective of this study is to examine the association of taxi drivers' health status and level of job stress with work-related injury and determine if a potential interaction exists. A survey of 309 Los Angeles taxi drivers provides basic data on health status, job stress, and work-related injuries. We further analyzed the data using a Modified Poisson regression approach with a robust error variance to estimate the relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) of work-related injuries. Focus group results supplemented and helped interpret the quantitative data. The joint effect of good health and low job stress was associated with a large reduction in the incidence of injuries, consistent with the hypothesis that health status and stress levels modify each other on the risk of work-related injury. These results suggest that the combination of stress reduction and health management programs together with changes in the stressful conditions of the job may provide targeted avenues to prevent injuries.

  4. Effects of People-oriented Leadership and Subordinate Employability on Call Center Withdrawal Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico R. León

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Call-center employees are prone to lateness, absenteeism, and turnover because their jobs are low-wage, low-skill, and provoke high levels of stress. Thus, considerate supervisors achieve from them better performance and reduced turnover. This study tested in a Peruvian call center (N = 255 various hypotheses concerned with the effects of people-oriented leadership on withdrawal behaviors, their moderation by subordinate perceived employability, and the nature of the relationships between withdrawal behaviors. The evidence revealed independence of uncertified absenteeism from turnover intention, negative effects of people-oriented leadership on subordinate turnover intention regardless of subordinate level of employability, and leadership x employability crossover interactive effects on subordinate uncertified absenteeism. Since people-oriented supervision is associated with increased absenteeism among highly employable subordinates and decreased absenteeism among low-employability workers, the effects cancel each other. Thus, there is a need for understanding the underlying determinants as a pre-condition to deriving practical recommendations.

  5. A STUDY ON THE ISSUES OF EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS AND PRACTICES OF EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS IN UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYED HUSSAIN HAIDER

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available People who belongs to underdeveloped and developing countries, focus on getting employment in different developed countries. In the recent past years the number of people working in different countries has increased dramatically. In Pakistan it’s a trend of moving to different countries to get better employment opportunities. For employment Hong Kong, Singapore, UAE, and Saudi Arabia are considered as the favorable countries for the Pakistanis. Despite the fact, these countries don’t offer favorable and secured working environment to the immigrants, but still people prefer to go there for better earnings. Employment issues such as low wage rate, preference to residents, absence of contractual nexus, and sexual abuse etc. are common. This study aims to identify the major gaps in the implementation of laws regarding immigrant work force and the conditions of immigrants working in these countries. The study is qualitative and the respondents are those who have work experience of minimum three years. The results of this study shows that employers hardly follow labor laws for the immigrant work force, where as some countries have a clear policy which is enforced by their government. There is a dire need to do legislation regarding the rights of immigrant workforce and its implementation.

  6. Welfare reform and women's health: review of the literature and implications for state policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Campo, P; Rojas-Smith, L

    1998-01-01

    In August 1996, the Personal Responsibility Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (P.L. 104-193) was signed into law, ending a 60-year federal entitlement guaranteeing families some basic level of assistance during periods of economic hardship. Several components of this new legislation have the potential to impact upon the health and well-being of women and children. We summarize studies examining the relationship between welfare participation and physical and mental well-being of women and what is known about the effects of poverty on health; the patterns of employment among welfare participants and the health consequences of low-wage work on women; domestic violence among welfare recipients; the potential health consequences of the provisions of the new Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program for women's and adolescent health; and the consequences of the new TANF provisions for the health and well-being of immigrant women. We discuss the implications for policy makers in monitoring and minimizing the negative impact of welfare reforms on women's health and well-being.

  7. A STUDY OF A SPECTRUM OF LESIONS IN FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATION SMEARS OF CERVICAL LYMPH NODE AMONG WORKERS IN A TEXTILE INDUSTRY AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veenaa Natchimuthu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Textile industry workers face so many health-related challenges compared to the general population. Lymphadenopathy is one of the most common presenting symptoms of these people. This study is done in inhabitants of Tiruppur, a major textile industry area in the state of Tamil Nadu, India, where people work in garment factories for low wages. The aim of the study is to- 1. Evaluate the usefulness of Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC as a diagnostic tool in cases of cervical lymphadenopathy. 2. Analyse the various cytomorphological presentations of tuberculous lymphadenopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, a spectrum of lesions was diagnosed by fine needle aspiration of lymph nodes of 56 patients presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy. The diseases were categorised into suppurative lymphadenitis, granulomatous lymphadenitis, metastatic tumour deposits and lymphoproliferative disorder. Various morphological presentations of tuberculous lymphadenitis were also analysed. RESULTS From this study, it is observed that the most common diagnosis of cervical lymphadenopathy is reactive lymphadenitis (34%, followed by granulomatous lymphadenitis (30%. Also, among the tuberculosis cases, it is found that majority of cases had only granulomas (45% followed by caseous necrosis with granulomas (28%. CONCLUSION Knowing the usefulness of FNAC, it is concluded that it is a valuable, noninvasive, reliable and cost-effective technique in such a high-risk population. It also helps the clinician to start treatment based on FNAC findings and do the necessary at the earliest.

  8. Violencia, conflicto e integración social en el agro uruguayo Violence, conflict and social integration in rural Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego E. Piñeiro

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available En el Uruguay no ha habido en las últimas décadas episodios de violencia física en el campo derivados de la violencia de clase o de la violencia política. Los pequeños productores y los trabajadores rurales están sometidos a situaciones de violencia cotidiana: disminución de la rentabilidad de sus pequeñas explotaciones, expulsión de sus tierras y emigración para los primeros. Bajos salarios, accidentes laborales, e impedimentos para organizarse para los segundos. Sin embargo, los mecanismos de integración social con que cuenta la sociedad uruguaya amortiguan los disensos e impiden que estos desemboquen en formas de violencia.In Uruguay, the last decades have not witnessed physical violence episodes in rural areas resulting from class or political violence. Small farmers and rural workers are under everyday violence: for the former, it is decrease in profitability at their small enterprises, being expelled from their land, emigration; for the latter, it is low wages, work accidents, and the absence of freedom of organization. However, the mechanisms of social integration available to the Uruguayan society absorb the dissent and prevent them from ending up in violence.

  9. Genealogies of Islamic radicalism in post-Suharto Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, M.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The emergence of violent Muslim vigilante groups employing a jihadist discourse and mobilizing followers for jihad in regions where there have been inter-religious conflicts, such as the Moluccas or the Poso district in Central Sulawesi, is one of the most conspicuous new phenomena

  10. Ten Ideas Worth Stealing from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarchow, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    New Zealand educators have some ideas worth stealing, including morning tea-time, the lie-flat manifold duplicate book for recording classroom observation comments, school uniforms, collegial planning and grading of college assignments, good meeting etiquette, a whole-child orientation, portable primary architecture, group employment interviews…

  11. Representing "Us" and "Them": Building Blocks of Intergroup Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Andrew Scott; Dunham, Yarrow

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments explored whether group membership affects the acquisition of richer information about social groups. Employing a minimal-groups paradigm, 6- to 8-year-olds were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 novel social groups. Experiment 1 demonstrated that immediately following random assignment to a novel group, children were more likely to…

  12. In silico approaches in the identification of Cryptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    taylorsadmin

    2012-06-07

    Jun 7, 2012 ... alignment was performed using the Clustal W software. exigua and Spodoptera litura based on the knowledge of highly conserved chemoreceptors in Drosophila melanogaster. Their research group employed bioinformatics approaches to identify the desired sequences and web-based TMHMM software to.

  13. County level socioeconomic position, work organization and depression disorder: a repeated measures cross-classified multilevel analysis of low-income nursing home workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaner, Carles; Li, Yong; Xue, Xiaonan; Thompson, Theresa; O'Campo, Patricia; Chung, Haejoo; Eaton, William W

    2006-12-01

    disorder. Longitudinal county level measures of low-income as predictors of depression may even offer a methodological advantage in that they are presumably more stable indicators of cumulative exposure of low income than are more transient workplace indicators. Incorporating measures of cumulative exposure to low income into empirical studies would be particularly timely given the global changes that are currently restructuring the labor force and influencing work organization and labor processes--most notably the growth in low income jobs and the deskilling of labor. Though this study provides evidence that workplace and organizational level variables are associated with depressive disorder among low-wage nursing assistants in US nursing homes, the fact that these relationships do not hold once county level measures of poverty are controlled for, suggests that more distal upstream determinants of workplace mental health problems, such economic inequality, may be at play in determining the mental health of low wage workers.

  14. Empleo y salarios en argentina en el periodo de la Post-Convertibilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Javier Ibagón Martín

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available El Articulo analiza los procesos de precarización laboral que se han dado en Argentina a la largo de los últimos 25 años, haciendo  especial énfasis en el llamado periodo de “post-convertibilidad” o “dólar alto”. En este sentido, se estudia para dicho periodo, la existencia de una serie de continuidades económicas y sociales  heredadas de la década del noventa, las cuales, ponen de manifiesto una serie de estrategias y políticas empleadas por parte de los sectores económicos dominantes, que les han permitido en buena parte, por un lado, transferir a las trabajadores los costos de las crisis económicas, y por otro, frenar el acceso de estos últimos a una             redistribución de la riqueza en tiempos de bonanza y crecimiento.Palabras clave: Empleo; Salarios bajos; Política Monetaria; Desindustrialización; Política Industrial. Employment and wages in argentina in the period of Post-ConvertibilityAbstract Article analyzes the processes of labor precariousness that have occurred in Argentina during the last 25 years, with particular emphasis in the period of “post-convertibility” or “high dollar”. In this direction, the existence of a number of inherited continuities of the nineties is studied. These legacies reveal a series of strategies and policies used by the dominant economic sectors, that have allowed them, on the one hand, transfer the costs of the economic crisis on workers, and secondly, curb the access of this group to a redistribution of wealth in good times and growth.Keywords: Employment; Low Wage; Monetary Policy; Deindustrialization; Industrial Policy.

  15. Rural African women and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadaki, K

    1994-01-01

    70-90% of Africans still live in rural areas, and 25-30% of rural households are headed by women. Standards of living in rural areas are lower than in urban areas. Rural African women's involvement in development is in its initial stages, and social development for women is likely to be slow. Increasing women's opportunities for education is a means of promoting social justice and fairness. Schools should offer courses of practical value for those not planning on higher education and special programs and career counseling for gifted girls. Women's organizations, African leaders, and other influential parties should aggressively create awareness about the oppressive aspects of traditional attitudes, beliefs, and views about women. Laws on ownership of property, inheritance, access to credit, and employment must be equitable and enforced. Consciousness-raising among rural women is an effective means of encouraging rural women to seek and assume new roles and for questioning unreasonable expectations and norms. Women's professional associations serve important functions and fulfill the need for role models. The quality of rural women's life is effectively improved through formulation of policies relevant to women's needs and problems and improve rural conditions. Women should have fair representation at local and national levels of government. Women's role in agriculture is likely to be enhanced through improved transportation systems, electricity supply, and introduction of intermediate technology. This assessment of rural African women's contributions to economic growth emphasizes women's involvement in farming and the informal sector and their lack of equal remuneration or low wages. Illiteracy places women in a disadvantaged position when competing for employment in the formal sector. Lack of access to credit and limits on credit are other obstacles in the informal sector. The reduced participation of rural women in the formal and informal sector is due to lack of

  16. Mental Health Insurance Parity and Provider Wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberstein, Ezra; Busch, Susan H

    2017-06-01

    Policymakers frequently mandate that employers or insurers provide insurance benefits deemed to be critical to individuals' well-being. However, in the presence of private market imperfections, mandates that increase demand for a service can lead to price increases for that service, without necessarily affecting the quantity being supplied. We test this idea empirically by looking at mental health parity mandates. This study evaluated whether implementation of parity laws was associated with changes in mental health provider wages. Quasi-experimental analysis of average wages by state and year for six mental health care-related occupations were considered: Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists; Substance Abuse and Behavioral Disorder Counselors; Marriage and Family Therapists; Mental Health Counselors; Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers; and Psychiatrists. Data from 1999-2013 were used to estimate the association between the implementation of state mental health parity laws and the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and average mental health provider wages. Mental health parity laws were associated with a significant increase in mental health care provider wages controlling for changes in mental health provider wages in states not exposed to parity (3.5 percent [95% CI: 0.3%, 6.6%]; pwages. Health insurance benefit expansions may lead to increased prices for health services when the private market that supplies the service is imperfect or constrained. In the context of mental health parity, this work suggests that part of the value of expanding insurance benefits for mental health coverage was captured by providers. Given historically low wage levels of mental health providers, this increase may be a first step in bringing mental health provider wages in line with parallel health professions, potentially reducing turnover rates and improving treatment quality.

  17. Manufacturing combustible briquettes from forestry and timber industries` wastes in order to reduce the overexploitation of fuelwood in Central American forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, L.; Gonzalez, E. [Renewable Energies Institute, Soria (Spain)

    1993-12-31

    A serious degradation of Central American forest is currently taking place because of uncontrolled fuelwood overexploitation. As an example, in Guatemala over 40% of forest destruction is caused by this reason. In the meanwhile, waste biomass from the sawmills representing 30 to 50% of total wood volume processed, due to low technological level of the facilities, and having an energetic potential equivalent to their thermal and electric needs is destroyed through uncontrolled burning, thus causing important environmental and landscape impact, since the byproducts are incinerated outdoors on the spot the constant smoke together with the noise level produced by the diesel power generators makes working conditions painful for the large labor force usually operating these sawmills because of low wages in these countries. To help solve this increasing problem, it would be possible to use the waste biomass for the production of electric power, through cogeneration, for sawmill selfuse or selling to the public electric lines, or even manufacturing of fuel briquettes which would have a potential market in countries such as Republica Dominicana, Honduras Guatemala, etc. as a substitute for charcoal and fuelwood, thus permitting a considerable reduction of the environmental degradation and predation suffered by forest areas in these countries. For these reasons, we consider it of interest to study briquetting techniques and their intrinsic problems in depth. For such purpose, we have carried out a series of real scale briquetting experiences with different types of lignocelulosic wastes and mixtures of them under different conditions, aiming to optimize procedure methodology and reduce production expenses, thus making offer increase easier. Manufacturing procedure and analytics developed to carry out the experiences are described in the present document. Main results obtained are summarized, and mathematical, energetic, analytical and economic aspects are discussed as well.

  18. EFFECTS OF REMITTANCES ON POVERTY REDUCTION: THE CASE OF INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Husnayeni Nahar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Remittances have been reported as a tool for fighting poverty in some selected countries, such as Indonesia. An increase of income through remittances tends to improve the economic status of the migrant’s household. Once they get a high salary, they will remit money (a remittance to their household in Indonesia via formal institutions, such as banks. The migrant’s household can fulfil their basic needs and can use the remittance for educational investment and productive activities. The education investment aims to educate the children or grandchildren of migrants, which will be beneficial for the future generations of the family, allowing them the chance of a more prosperous life. The poverty rate would be reduced gradually, and economic welfare can be achieved. The main objectives of this paper are first to estimate the effects of remittances on poverty in Indonesia from 1983 to 2015 and second, to propose several strategic policies related to remittances and poverty reduction. Other variables considered include inflation, exchange rates, income, income inequality and the labor force participation rate. An Ordinary Least Square (OLS method was used to explore the econometric and estimated results. The study found that an increase in remittances led to a reduction in poverty by 2.56%. Inflation and the exchange rate have positive and negative effects on poverty, respectively. The small effect of remittances on poverty’s reduction could possibly be explained by the low educational background of the migrants, low wage jobs, expensive remittance costs, and migrants not knowing how to remit money through formal financial institutions. Hence, to reduce the poverty level, the government needs to first facilitate skills training for the workers so that they could get a better job and earn more, second, lower the transaction costs of remittances, and lastly, provide agents at Indonesian banks overseas to provide better facilities to Indonesian

  19. Is family planning an economic decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, S R

    1995-09-01

    This study examines economic models of household choice and the role of economic factors in determining the timing of births. A static economic model is presented and tested with data from the Netherlands. After the availability of contraceptives, the family size variable shifted from being an exogenous to an endogenous one, because births could be regulated. Costs of childbearing were construed to have maintenance costs for parents and society, attendance costs of care, and intangible costs such as anxiety or personal freedom. Benefits were intangible ones, such as joy and happiness; income; public benefits; and attendance benefits. Intangible benefits enlarged the utility of children, but maintenance costs diminished resources available for consumption. Child quality was a product of market goods purchased by parents and others and household labor. Household time allocation varied with child's age. Private responsibility for children varied by country. Quality of child care varied between countries and over time. Quality was dependent upon economies of scale, variable costs by the age of the child, variable time commitments by age of the child, and market substitutes for private child care. Higher income families spent more money but less time on children. It is pointed out that Becker's model explained number of children, but not timing of births. Postponement of birth was unlikely for those with a limited education, an unpleasant job, and low wages. When the advantages and disadvantages of having a baby were positive, spouses or single women with a high subjective preference were expected to bear a child as soon as possible. Government policy can affect the average family size by increasing or decreasing the financial and/or time burden of children. Postponement may be chosen based on long term analysis of a couple's future, the formation and use of capital, and/or high subjective time preference. Before and after first birth are different frames of reference

  20. The future is urban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Urban centers are growing due to natural increase and the movement of people from rural areas. Urban areas are the traditional centers of trade, science, and culture, but growth over a threshold results in crime, congestion, and pollution. Sustainability is threatened in modern towns that are dependent on other sources for food, fuel, or water. Housing, water, food supplies, and sanitation, communication, and transportation services are threatened in rapidly growing cities. In 1990 45/100 people lived in towns or cities. Hyper-cities have grown in number to 20, of which 14 are in developing countries. 83% of world population increase is expected to occur in cities. In 48 countries with faster population growth cities had growth rates averaging about 6.1% per year, and the urban share of total population averaged 2.8%. In 49 countries with slower population growth, urban growth rates averaged only 3.6% per year, and the urban share of total population averaged about 1.8%. Squatter settlements are endemic to urban areas that are congested and without basic services, limited housing particularly for the poor, and few job opportunities. The number of street children in urban areas has risen. This child population is subjected to low wages, overwork, auto accidents, poor health, and lack of social services. Malnutrition is a more serious issue in urban areas. In the Philippines malnutrition is 3% nationally and 9% in Metro Manila. Rural land reform in the Philippines is no longer a viable solution. In Metro Manila squatters are expected to increase in number to 4 million people by the year 2000, which would be almost 50% of total population. The squatter areas are areas of neglect, decay, and poverty. Cities are viewed as development's "blind alleys."

  1. Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

  2. Mobbing, threats to employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Vene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Is there a connection among perception of hostile and unethical communication, timely removal of causes and employee satisfaction?Purpose: Perceived mobbing in the organization, analysing causes and timely removal of them without any effect; achieve an environment of satisfied employees. The purpose is to study the relationship amongthe categories: perceiving mobbing, removing the effects, employee satisfaction.Methods: Qualitative research approach, method of interview by using the seven steps principles.Results: The findings clearly state that being aware of the negative factors and psychological abuse in organizations was present. The interview participants perceived different negative behaviours especially by the female population and from the side of superiors. In some organizations perceived negative factors are insults,insinuations, low wages, inadequate working day, competition, lobbying, and verbal threats. All negative factors lead to serious implications for employees, in which the organization can lose its reputation, productivity is reduced, costs of employment can increase with more sick leaves and in extreme cases, the results can be soserious that the organization can end in bankruptcy or liquidation.Organization: The result of the study warns management to acceptcertain actions and remediate the situation in organizations. The employer and managers must do everything to protect their subordinates from violence and potential offenders.Society: The research study warns on the seriousness of mobbing among employees, the aim is to bring the issue to individuals and society. The victim usually needs help (health costs, losses in the pension system, increased unemployment, and lower productivity of the whole society.Originality: In view of the sensitivity of the issues, the author concludes that the existing research studies are based especially on closed questions (questionnaires; however, interviews create mutual trust between

  3. Exports of company: SWOT-analysis, product strategy and sales targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Hele

    1998-01-01

    Despite its smallness Estonia has a good chance to enjoy a success in the international peat market, due to the favourable geographical location and well developed peat industry. There are numerous harbours, low wages and salaries, and a good educational background in Estonia. Moreover, Estonian economy is aiming at a competitive market economy. Peat exports represent a great opportunity to improve the balance of payments, create jobs, support the State through the taxes paid, meet the needs of foreign customers, earn a profit for Estonian peat companies and better Estonian standard of living. When preparing this paper, marketing textbooks and professional articles of interest were used. The working experience of one of Estonian peat companies and acquired practical knowledge have also been of help throughout the thesis. In general, it may be expected that Estonian peat exports will increase in the next few years. The Netherlands and Germany will remain the main target countries, also France, Belgium and the United Kingdom are important. The exports to Italy will, for sure, increase, to the Middle-East these will be quite likely. The Far East is also a potential market, especially Korea and Japan. Peat marketing is based on the following premises: the demand for peat is a derived demand, being dependent on that for the end-products. The number of customers is small and their decisions are rational. Estonian peat producers also have to face the fact that the production needs to be marketed mostly abroad. While considering the product strategy, the conclusion was that with peat the least cost strategy is easily applicable. Possibilities for differentiation are almost next to nothing (except in case of packaging or transportation services). Possibilities will widen when the production of potting soils is launched. Most Estonian peat firms sell peat and products thereof through foreign wholesalers, some of them render also transportation services and this is well

  4. The impact of a private sector living wage intervention on consumption and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a middle income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehkopf, David H; Burmaster, Katharine; Landefeld, John C; Adler-Milstein, Sarah; Flynn, Emily P; Acevedo, Maria Cecilia; Jones-Smith, Jessica C; Adler, Nancy; Fernald, Lia C H

    2018-01-25

    A positive association of socioeconomic position and health is well established in high-income countries. In poorer nations, however, higher income individuals often have more cardiovascular risk factors (including obesity) than do those with less income. Our study goal was to estimate the effects of receiving a living wage (340% higher income) on short-term changes in consumption and cardiovascular risk factors among low-wage workers in a middle-income country. This cross-sectional study matched workers at an apparel factory (n=105) in the Dominican Republic with those at a similar factory (n=99) nearby, 15 months after the intervention factory introduced a substantially higher living wage. Statistical matching on non-time varying individual characteristics (childhood health, childhood living conditions, work experience, demographic factors) strengthened causal inference. Primary outcomes were blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), pulse rate, body mass index and waist circumference. Secondary outcomes were dietary consumption and spending on services, consumables and durable goods. Receiving the living wage was associated with increased consumption of protein, dairy, soda and juice and sugars, but not with cardiovascular risk factors. Intervention factory workers spent more on grocery items and household durable goods. While having a higher income in a middle-income country might be expected to increase obesity and its associated health risks, the current study found no short-term negative associations. There may be possible longer-term negative health consequences of increases in consumption of soda, juice and sugars, however. It is important to consider complementary interventions to support healthy dietary intake in areas with increasing wages.

  5. Contradictions and Their Consequences in the Labour Market in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yermolenko Oleksii A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers modern tendencies of the Ukrainian labour market and the most critical contradictions connected with the methods of their regulation. Urgency of study of problems of appearance of inconsistencies is caused by strengthening of social tension, which covered the Ukrainian labour market recently. The goal of the study is identification of modern contradictions of the labour market, which cause the biggest response in the society, and search for such regulation instruments, which would reduce negative manifestation of these contradictions. The following contradictions are quite frequent nowadays: considerable dependence of the whole economy on political solutions, when decisions made by the power are inconsistent; small volume of financing of the production sphere, due to which production assets deteriorate fast; critical demographic situation and asymmetric allocation of production facilities; rather big number of disengaged workers of the production sphere; low wages in the majority of spheres of economic activity and many other contradictions. In order to solve existing inconsistencies in general, state bodies apply adjustments only, but a more effective method is combination of state instruments of regulation and market instruments. Since there is a big number of contradictions in the market of labour, each of them should have relevant individual instruments, but with consideration of other problem issues in order not to aggravate the existing situation. Drawing the conclusion it should be noted that regulation of the labour market requires search for compromises between the market principles of regulation and state measures on avoiding the existing contradictions or minimisation of their negative impact on formation, functioning and development of the modern labour market.

  6. A sociohydrological model for smallholder farmers in Maharashtra, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Saket; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present a sociohydrological model that can help us to better understand the system dynamics of a smallholder farmer. It couples the dynamics of the six main assets of a typical smallholder farmer: water storage capacity, capital, livestock, soil fertility, grazing access, and labor. The hydroclimatic variability, which is a main driver and source of uncertainty of the smallholder system, is accounted for at subannual scale. The model incorporates rule-based adaptation mechanisms of smallholders (for example, adjusting expenditures on food and fertilizers and selling livestocks) when farmers face adverse sociohydrological conditions, such as low annual rainfall, occurrence of dry spells, or variability of input or commodity prices. We have applied the model to analyze the sociohydrology of a cash crop producing smallholder in Maharashtra, India, in a semisynthetic case study setting. Of late, this region has witnessed many suicides of farmers who could not extricate themselves out of the debt trap. These farmers lacked irrigation and were susceptible to fluctuating commodity prices and climatic variability. We studied the sensitivity of a smallholder's capital, an indicator of smallholder well-being, to two types of cash crops (cotton and sugarcane), water storage capacity, availability of irrigation, initial capital that a smallholder starts with, prevalent wage rates, and access to grazing. We found that (i) smallholders with low water storage capacities and no irrigation are most susceptible to distress, (ii) a smallholder's well-being is low at low wage rates, (iii) wage rate is more important than absolution of debt, (iv) well-being is sensitive to water storage capacity up to a certain level, and (v) well-being increases with increasing area available for livestock grazing. Our results indicate that government intervention to absolve the debt of farmers or to invest in local storage to buffer rainfall variability may not be enough. In addition, alternative

  7. Que transmet l’école publique au Brésil ? What is transmitted in Brazilian public schools ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Brochier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Cet article se propose d’examiner certains aspects de la transmission de connaissances scolaires dans les écoles publiques brésiliennes. Depuis les années 1980, en effet, le système scolaire s’est largement ouvert aux couches les plus défavorisées des populations urbaines, ce qui a provoqué des changements dans les modes de fonctionnement. Face à ce nouveau public, les exigences en termes de discipline et de travail scolaires se sont considérablement affaiblies, de même que le suivi des programmes. Par ailleurs, les enseignants surmenés qui occupent souvent plusieurs emplois pour compenser leurs bas salaires, manifestent un découragement évident tandis que les élèves s’habituent à un monde institutionnel tolérant qui ne propose plus une vraie rupture avec leur univers social d’origine.This article studies certain aspects of how knowledge is transmitted in Brazilian state schools. Since the 1980s, the school system has opened its doors to the most underprivileged segments of the urban populations, bringing about considerable changes in day-to-day behavior patterns. Faced with this new public, requirements in terms of discipline and dedication to learning have considerably weakened, as has the observance of the official programs. Moreover, the teachers, exhausted since they often hold down several jobs to compensate for their low wages, are prone to depression. The pupils, in turn, get used to a tolerant institutional world which no longer represents a departure from their original social environment.

  8. A Graduate Student's Perspective on Engaging High School Students in Research Outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, A. B.; Horton, R. A., Jr.; Andrews, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The southern San Joaquin basin is one of the United States' most prolific oil producing regions but also one facing numerous problems including low high school graduation rates, low college enrollments, high college dropout rates, low wages, and higher than average unemployment. Investment in STEM education experiences for high school students has been emphasized by California State University Bakersfield as a means to improving these metrics with programs such as the Research Experience Vitalizing Science-University Program (REVS-UP). Now in its seventh year, the REVS-UP (funded by Chevron) forms teams of high school students, a high school teacher, a CSUB graduate student, and a CSUB professor to work for four weeks on a research project. For the past two summers student-teacher teams investigated the diagenesis and mineralogy of the Temblor Formation sandstones in the subsurface of the San Joaquin basin oil fields that are potential CO2 sequestration sites. With a graduate student leading the teams in sample preparation and analysis by scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and cathode luminescence system (SEM-CL) data was gathered on diagenetic processes, detrital framework grains, and authigenic cements. Typically students are introduced to the project in a series of brief seminars by faculty and are then introduced to the techniques and samples. During the second week the students are usually capable of preparing samples and collecting data independently. The final week is focused on developing student-authored research posters which are independently presented by the students on the final day. This gives high school students the opportunity to learn advanced geologic topics and analytical techniques that they would otherwise not be exposed to as well as to gain research and presentation skills. These types of projects are equally important for the graduate students involved as it allows them the

  9. Urban scaling and the production function for cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, José; Bettencourt, Luís M A; Strumsky, Deborah; West, Geoffrey B

    2013-01-01

    The factors that account for the differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult to measure and identify unambiguously. Here we show that a microscopic derivation of urban scaling relations for economic quantities vs. population, obtained from the consideration of social and infrastructural properties common to all cities, implies an effective model of economic output in the form of a Cobb-Douglas type production function. As a result we derive a new expression for the Total Factor Productivity (TFP) of urban areas, which is the standard measure of economic productivity per unit of aggregate production factors (labor and capital). Using these results we empirically demonstrate that there is a systematic dependence of urban productivity on city population size, resulting from the mismatch between the size dependence of wages and labor, so that in contemporary US cities productivity increases by about 11% with each doubling of their population. Moreover, deviations from the average scale dependence of economic output, capturing the effect of local factors, including history and other local contingencies, also manifest surprising regularities. Although, productivity is maximized by the combination of high wages and low labor input, high productivity cities show invariably high wages and high levels of employment relative to their size expectation. Conversely, low productivity cities show both low wages and employment. These results shed new light on the microscopic processes that underlie urban economic productivity, explain the emergence of effective aggregate urban economic output models in terms of labor and capital inputs and may inform the development of economic theory related to growth.

  10. Effects of wages on smoking decisions of current and past smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Leigh, J Paul

    2015-08-01

    We used longitudinal data and instrumental variables (IVs) in a prospective design to test for the causal effects of wages on smoking prevalence among current and past smokers. Nationally representative U.S. data were drawn from the 1999-2009 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Our overall sample was restricted to full time employed persons, aged 21-65 years. We excluded part time workers and youths because smoking and wage correlations would be complicated by labor supply decisions. We excluded adult never smokers because people rarely begin smoking after the age of 20 years. IVs were created with state-level minimum wages and unionization rates. We analyzed subsamples of men, women, the less educated, the more educated, quitters, and backsliders. Validity and strength of instruments within the IV analysis were conducted with the Sargan-Hansen J statistic and F tests. We found some evidence that low wages lead to more smoking in the overall sample and substantial evidence for men, persons with high school educations or less (wages lead to 5.5 and 4.6 percentage point decreases in smoking for men and the less educated; they also increased the average chance of quitting among base-year smokers from 17.0% to 20.4%. Statistical tests suggested that IVs were strong and valid in most samples. Subjects' other family income, including spouses' wages, was entered as a control variable. Increases in an individual's wages, independent of other income, decreased the prevalence of smoking among current and past smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Community care workers in rural southern Illinois: job satisfaction and implications for employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D N; Sarvela, P D

    1989-01-01

    This study examined factors related to community care worker job satisfaction, as a method of assessing problems related to employee turnover, based on data collected from 393 community care workers who worked with elderly clients from the 13 southernmost rural counties in Illinois in 1987. Results suggested that the majority of workers were satisfied with their job; however, there was a difference in the mean scores of those employed for more than one year and those employed for less than one year (those employed for longer than one year had significantly lower satisfaction scores than those employed for less than one year). Although only 19 individuals indicated they were intending to quit within the year, 88 respondents answered "no opinion." Reasons given why new employees quit were: low wages, no benefits, no raises or promotions, cannot cope with the elderly, do not like the elderly, or not well-suited for this type of work. Also, many of the workers responded that people quit because the job was not what they expected, they did not give it a chance, they did not receive the proper training, and that the job was too stressful or frustrating. Recommendations made on the basis of these study data include the development of a new job hierarchy (which will increase the probability of being promoted) and more detailed pre-service training program which covers in detail what new employees can expect from the job. Health education training programs are recommended as a major tool for reducing the problem of employee turnover by helping the worker manage the high levels of stress experienced on the job.

  12. Impact of China in Latin America: The inter-industry trade and its challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hyong Rhee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the implications of the rapid economic rise of China for the development prospects of Latin America. Since 1990s we have witnessed the growing exchanges between Latin America and Asian economies. China has led the Latin-Pacific exchanges. Based on an analysis of the changing trade relations between China and major Latin American countries since 2000, it argues as follows. First, China imports energy, food and other resources for domestic and export needs, and looks more like a “trade angel” and a “helping hand” as well as being an outlet for huge amounts of commodities from the region. China’s trade impact on Latin America is positive with higher gdp per capita, both directly, through a boom of export and indirectly, through better terms of trade. But it is also a challenge for development for the future. Second, the trade relations are now structured into a kind of inter-industry trade. China imports natural resources and primary products but exports manufacturing products from low-wage products (such as textiles and apparel to high-wage products (mainly electronics and telecommunications. Lack of inter-industry relation with China shows the weaker side of Latin America’s integrations in the value chain of global production.In this sense, the China boom presents a challenge to Latin American countries. For the region’s raw-materials producers, there is good news in the short-term but they run the risk of losing enthusiasm for diversification beyond extraction-based industries. Economic forces tend to reduce incentives for engaging in activities outside the resource sector: the “Dutch disease.” In order to ameliorate somewhat the effects of Dutch disease and move up the value chain, they need more proactive development strategy which has focused on developing domestic technological capabilities and diversifying the productive structure.

  13. Mining lore : Chinese labourers in BC's coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, C.

    2010-09-15

    This article presented a historical review of Chinese labourers in Canada's industries and how they were often exploited and treated poorly. The 1860 gold rush in British Columbia attracted the first labourers from China. More labourers followed, the majority male, to work in the coal mines around Nanaimo. More than half the employees at coal baron Robert Dunsmuir's Wellington mine on Vancouver Island were Chinese labourers who worked under conditions and wages that other miners would not accept. During a large strike at the Wellington Mine in 1883, the striking white miners were replaced with Chinese from Victoria, which contributed to a brewing anti-Chinese sentiment. The striking miners eventually withdrew their demand for higher wages, insisting only that Dunsmuir rid his mine of the Chinese. Dunsmuir refused, held out, and broke the strike. When an anti-immigration bill was passed in 1884 by the British Columbia (BC) Legislative Assembly, the Canadian government stepped in, only to hire thousands of Chinese labourers to work on the railway. Their low wages saved contractors $3 million, making construction economically feasible. However, just a few weeks after blocking BC's anti-immigration bill, the Canadian government passed a Chinese Immigration Act that would come into effect only after construction was completed. The Act restricted and regulated Chinese immigration, and imposed a head tax on any Chinese entering the country, making it unaffordable to bring a wife and family to Canada. When the railroad was completed, thousands of Chinese labourers were left unemployed with nowhere to go. In 1887, an explosion at a Nanaimo mine killed 150 employees. The miners blamed the Chinese, claiming that their lack of English made them a safety hazard. By the early 1920s, the Chinese community in Victoria formed the Chinese Benevolent Association to provide general welfare assistance and oppose discriminatory laws. In 2006, the Canadian government

  14. Female labour force integration and the alleviation of urban poverty: a case study of Kingston, Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J

    1995-01-01

    The author posits that female labor force integration in Jamaica accomplishes little in alleviating poverty and making maximum use of human resources. Women are forced into employment in a labor market that limits their productivity. Women have greater needs to increase their economic activity due to price inflation and cuts in government spending. During the 1980s and early 1990s the country experienced stabilization and structural adjustment resulting in raised interest rates, reduced public sector employment, and deflated public expenditures. Urban population is particularly sensitive to monetary shifts due to dependency on social welfare benefits and lack of assets. Current strategies favor low wage creation in a supply-side export-oriented economy. These strategies were a by-product of import-substitution industrialization policies during the post-war period and greater control by multilateral financial institutions in Washington, D.C. The World Bank and US President Reagan's Caribbean Basin Initiative stressed export-oriented development. During the 1980s, Jamaican government failed to control fiscal policy, built up a huge external debt, and limited the ability of private businessmen to obtain money for investment in export-based production. Over the decade, uncompetitive production declined and light manufacturing increased. Although under 10% of new investment was in textile and apparel manufacturing, almost 50% of job creation occurred in this sector and 80% of all apparel workers were low-paid women. Devaluation occurred both in the exchange rate and in workers' job security, fringe benefits, union representation, and returns on skills. During 1977-89 women increased employment in the informal sector, which could not remain competitive under devaluation. Women's stratification in the labor market, high dependency burdens, and declining urban infrastructure create conditions of vulnerability for women in Jamaica.

  15. Trends in female labor force participation in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, S; Jacobsson, R

    1985-01-01

    The labor force participation of Swedish married women increased form 49.1% to 83.5% in the past 2 decades. Results from cross section analyses carried out on micro data from 3 standard of living investigations, done in 1968, 1974, and 1981, are used to predict changes over time. Women's real wages have increased over time more than men's real wages; in combination with estimated positve own wages elasticities, this change is the most important determinant of the increase in female labor supply. The labor force participation of married women ages 20-59 has increased from 49.1% in 1963 to 83.5% in 1982; the increase is especially large for women with children under 7. Over the decades 1920-1965, when real wages of woman increased more than real incomes of men, the labor force participation rates of married women increased even faster. From 1963-1981 a dramatic narrowing of the male-female wage gap occurred; most of the decrease is a result of factors other than the human capital variables accumulated at school and on the job. The effect of centralized collective bargaining and a strong union policy to increase low wages may be important explanatory factors. Generous parental leaves and subsidized day care may have an increasing effect on fertility; but instead, fertility has decreased, perhaps less than it might have done in the absence of such policies. By using individual cross section data from the 3 standard of living investigations, estimates of participation are performed. The own wage effects of the participation equation are positive and significant but decreasing over time. Important institutional changes between the sample periods are the extended parental leaves and the increased supply of government subsidized day care.

  16. Population and development problems: a critical assessment of conventional wisdom. The case of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, A E

    1988-01-01

    Conventional wisdom, as reflected in reports by the World Bank and the Whitsun Foundation, maintains that control of population growth is the key strategy for stimulating socioeconomic development and ending widespread poverty. The Witsun Foundation has criticized the Government of Zimbabwe for failing to include specific policies for population control in its National Transitional Development Plan. the report further expressed alarm about future availability of land to contain Zimbabwe's growing population. Communal areas are designed for a maximum of 325,000 families yet presently contain 700-800,000 families. This Malthusian, deterministic emphasis on population growth as the source of social ills ignores the broader, complex set of socioeconomic, historical, and political factors that determine material life. Any analysis of population that fails to consider the class structure of society, the type of division of labor, and forms of property and production can produce only meaningless abstractions. For example, consideration of crowding in communal areas must include consideration of inequitable patterns of land ownership in sub-Saharan Africa. Unemployment must be viewed within the context of a capitalist economic structure that relies on an industrial reserve army of labor to ensure acceptance of low wages and labor-intensive conditions. While it is accepted that population growth is creating specific and real problems in Zimbabwe and other African countries, these problems could be ameliorated by land reform and restructuring of the export-oriented colonial economies. Similarly, birth control should not be promoted as the solution to social problems, yet family planning services should be available to raise the status of women. Literacy, agrarian reform, agricultural modernization, and industrialization campaigns free from the dominance of Western capitalism represent the true solutions to Zimbabwe's problems.

  17. Workplace health and safety intervention for child care staff: Rationale, design, and baseline results from the CARE cluster randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dianne S; Vaughn, Amber E; Hales, Derek; Viera, Anthony J; Gizlice, Ziya; Bateman, Lori A; Grummon, Anna H; Arandia, Gabriela; Linnan, Laura A

    2018-05-01

    Low-wage workers suffer disproportionately high rates of chronic disease and are important targets for workplace health and safety interventions. Child care centers offer an ideal opportunity to reach some of the lowest paid workers, but these settings have been ignored in workplace intervention studies. Caring and Reaching for Health (CARE) is a cluster-randomized controlled trial evaluating efficacy of a multi-level, workplace-based intervention set in child care centers that promotes physical activity and other health behaviors among staff. Centers are randomized (1:1) into the Healthy Lifestyles (intervention) or the Healthy Finances (attention control) program. Healthy Lifestyles is delivered over six months including a kick-off event and three 8-week health campaigns (magazines, goal setting, behavior monitoring, tailored feedback, prompts, center displays, director coaching). The primary outcome is minutes of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA); secondary outcomes are health behaviors (diet, smoking, sleep, stress), physical assessments (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fitness), and workplace supports for health and safety. In total, 56 centers and 553 participants have been recruited and randomized. Participants are predominately female (96.7%) and either Non-Hispanic African American (51.6%) or Non-Hispanic White (36.7%). Most participants (63.4%) are obese. They accumulate 17.4 (±14.2) minutes/day of MVPA and consume 1.3 (±1.4) and 1.3 (±0.8) servings/day of fruits and vegetables, respectively. Also, 14.2% are smokers; they report 6.4 (±1.4) hours/night of sleep; and 34.9% are high risk for depression. Baseline data demonstrate several serious health risks, confirming the importance of workplace interventions in child care. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF SALARY CALCULATIONS AND EMPLOYEES’ LABOUR PRODUCTIVITY STIMULATION AT THE ENTERPRISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Odnoshevna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of the paper are: the detailed analysis of salary calculations, the evaluation of the effectiveness of employees’ work, the development of optimizing mechanisms of salary calculations by increasing productivity and implementation of the methods of employees’ labour stimulation. Methodology. The study is based on an analysis of different groups of enterprises, including agricultural ones. It is analysed that for today the efficiency of labour at some enterprises drops due to low wages and the lack of employees’ motivation mechanism. Results. The study found that the process of salary calculations has a lot of problematic aspects, such as a deficient work organization, insufficient stimulation of workers, poorly composed documents, etc. To improve such a situation, it is suggested an introduction of automation in order to reduce the wasting of working time for data processing of an accounting department and to improve significantly the quality and speed of information transfer to the head of an enterprise and external users. It is offered to use a labour ball to improve employees’ motivation, which is a form of accounting for the work varying on quality and quantity that was contributed to production. According to the scoring results, a mechanism of bonuses for employees is suggested. Practical implications. We suggested entering new documents to control the number of issued orders – “Registration Book of Issued Orders”. To provide a high level of quality control of executed works, it is suggested to display data in a special primary document “Record Sheet of Performance Quality”. It is offered to use partial salary payment for unprofitable enterprises through payment in kind. Value/originality. At first, the results will allow increasing the firm’s performance quality without losing employees, and subsequently – allow increasing the profitability of the enterprise.

  19. Women swell ranks of working poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Despite expanded global female employment (45% of women aged 15-64 years are economically active), women still comprise 70% of the world's 1 billion people living in poverty. Moreover, women's economic activities remain largely confined to low-wage, low-productivity forms of employment. A report by the International Labor Organization (ILO), prepared as a follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and the World Summit for Social Development, identified discrimination in education as a central cause of female poverty and underemployment. Each additional year of schooling is estimated to increase a woman's earnings by 15%, compared to 11% for a man. At the workplace, women face inequalities in terms of hiring and promotion standards, access to training and retraining, access to credit, equal pay for equal work, and participation in economic decision making. In addition, even women in higher-level jobs in developing countries spend 31-42 hours per week in unpaid domestic activities. The ILO has concluded that increasing employment opportunities for women is not a sufficient goal. Required are actions to improve the terms and conditions of such employment, including equal pay for work of equal value, improved occupational safety and health, enhanced security in informal or atypical forms of work, guarantees of freedom of association and the right to organize and bargain collectively, and appropriate maternity protection and child care provisions. Finally, taxation and social welfare policies must be rewritten to accommodate the reality that women are no longer the dependent or secondary earner in families.

  20. China's "missing girls": prospects and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, N E

    1996-02-01

    Women's conditions in China are viewed as deteriorating. The reduction in government control over urban factories and other places of employment has resulted in fewer women being hired. This leaves women in positions with low wages, poor working conditions, and discrimination based on sex, age, and marital status. The shift from rural state-controlled agricultural collectives to patriarchal family controls resulted in land distribution that gave men preference. The rapid growth in the economy and higher standards of living placed women at risk. Although the pressures to kill girl babies have relaxed, there is growing interest in making money from abducting and selling women for prostitution, marriage, and slavery. Women gained in recent decades greater participation in the labor force and higher educational levels. Women's access to health care is better. Female life expectancy is 72 years compared to 69 years for men. Maternal mortality is 95 deaths per 100,000 live births. Yet women hold subordinate positions to men in their jobs, and women are segregated in the textile and service industries. Women in rural areas have primarily access to agricultural jobs, which can be combined with child care. Women are less likely to be promoted and are retired 5 years earlier than men. Women carry a double burden of domestic labor and paid or unpaid labor. Women still have higher illiteracy rates than men, and the gender gap in higher education has remained stable since the 1970s. The imbalanced sex ratio is increasing. In some provinces it is 114 males for every 100 females, when the normal ratio is 105-106 males per 100 females. An estimated 12% of females are unaccounted for each year. The reasons for the missing children are identified as sex-selective abortion, infanticide, or underreporting. The next five-year plan holds the hope for improvement in women's status and an end to abuses against women and children.

  1. The future of globalisation. Changes in value adding networks in times of global climate change, rising energy cost and short traffic infrastructure capacities. A study; Die Zukunft der Globalisierung. Die Veraenderung von Wertschoepfungsnetzwerken in Zeiten des Klimawandels, steigender Energiekosten und knapper Verkehrsinfrastrukturkapazitaeten. Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretzke, Wolf-Ruediger [Barkawi Management Consultants GmbH und Co. KG, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    The authors examine the question of whether and to what extent globalization changes in the future. For this purpose, an expert survey is carried out. The results of this expert surveys are described in the contribution under consideration: (1) The vast majority of climate scientists says that limiting global warming to two degrees celsius only is possible if the developed industrial countries reduce their emissions by 80 % compared to the year 1990; (2) This inevitably requires interventions of the policy for sustainable management; (3) Despite the economic and financial crisis the policy shall not ease its ambitious targets in the medium term; (4) The threat of global warming is a global problem. The solution of this problem at political level requires a more advanced form of 'global governance'; (5) A significant increase in the petroleum price may affect the globally distributed industrial 'settlement structures' and the configuration of logistics networks. A possible adaptation may consist in multistage distribution systems with regional, customer-oriented stocks; (6) A stronger focus of companies to a low-polluting, sustainable business can be facilitated and supported by financial incentives; (7) It is not expected that professional buyers of companies do not sacrifice price advantages in low-wage countries; (8) Scale effects in the production by special factories result in a continuation of the current 'production footprints' even if this model significantly increases the transport intensity of the economy due to the longer distance between the place of production and the place of consumption; (9) In the logistics presumable there exists any other single measure to eliminate many pollutants such as the replacement of air cargo by sea freight; (10) Economic-historically, globalization has developed very quickly. The experts disagree on whether globalization slows down or whether the globalization changes at a constant speed.

  2. Heterogeneity in the background and earnings of nurses in India: evidence from a cross-sectional study in Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Katyayni

    2017-11-01

    It is important to understand the service conditions of nurses because these influence nurses' motivations and ability to provide care. Although nurses are estimated to constitute 30% of India's health workforce, limited empirical information is available about them. This paper attempts to address this gap in research. A cross-sectional survey of 266 nurses in the state of Gujarat was conducted to understand the demographic characteristics, qualifications and employment features of nurses working in India's private and public health sectors. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed using the collected information. A multivariate regression model was also estimated with monthly earnings as the dependent variable, and workplace, type of employment contract, caste background and years in the nursing workforce as independent variables. The three main findings presented in this article highlight considerable heterogeneity in the background and employment of nurses in India. First, 49% of nurses working in private hospitals and as temporary employees in public facilities belonged to historically disadvantaged social groups (deemed Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes) and were estimated to earn 9% less than similarly qualified and practiced nurses from general caste categories (P = 0.02). Second, 18% of nurses working in private hospitals did not have formal nursing qualifications. Third, nurses working in private hospitals and as temporary employees in public facilities earned less than the minimum wage stipulated by the Government of India. Permanent public sector nurses were estimated to earn 105% more than private sector nurses with the same qualifications, years of work and caste background (P nursing workforce, coupled with the failure of governmental agencies to regulate the health sector, might help explain the low wages and lack of job security that most nurses in India contend with. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in

  3. Neoliberalism, welfare policy and health: a qualitative meta-synthesis of single parents' experience of the transition from welfare to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kay

    2012-09-01

    Following the United States' lead, the emergence of neoliberal welfare policy across the western world has resulted in employment programmes for single parents, who are predominantly single mothers. While some governments claim that employment will improve single parents' incomes and well-being, researchers dispute that single parents can unproblematically move into the workforce, with net positive effects. While researchers have quantified the socio-economic effect of these programmes, in particular on participant health, no study has yet synthesized participants' experiences of welfare-to-work. Here, I present a meta-synthesis of eight qualitative health-related studies of single parents' (and exclusively single mothers') welfare-to-work transition. I report that single mothers faced a combination of health and economic issues which made their transition from welfare to work difficult, including degrees of poor physical and mental health. For participants in the United States, these health issues were often compounded by a loss of health benefits on moving into low-wage employment. In countries where a return to employment was required before children reached school age, a lack of affordable and appropriate child care, especially for children with health problems, exacerbated these difficulties. As a result of scarce resources, single mothers in receipt of welfare benefits often relied on food banks or went without food. A return to the workforce did not alleviate this problem as additional child care and reduced government subsidies depleted the funds available for food. I conclude that welfare-to-work policies are underpinned by the neoliberal assumption that the market more efficiently distributes resources than the State. However, for the women in the studies examined here, labour market participation often depleted access to essential resources. Interventions to address the 'problem' of welfare dependency must recognize the complex interplay between work

  4. Notes on the incorporation of third world women into wage-labor through immigration and off-shore production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen-koob, S

    1984-01-01

    The different forms and geographic locations in which the expanded incorporation of Third World women into wage labor occur may be closely interrelated. 2 such instances examined in this article are: 1) the recruitment of young women, without previous labor force experience, into the new manufacturing and service jobs generated by export-led manufacturing in several Caribbean and Asian countries; and 2) the employment of immigrant women in large cities of highly industrialized countries which have undergone basic economic restructuring. While many of these women may have become domestic or international migrants as a function of their husbands' or family's migration, the more fundamental processes of this restructuring are the ones promoting the formation of a supply of women migrants and a demand for this type of labor. Examples are the shift of plants and offices to Third World countries, and the demand for immigrant women labor in large cities within the US. The latter is a manifestation of the general shift to a service economy, the downgrading of manufacturing, partly to keep it competitive with overseas plants, and the direct and indirect demand for low-wage labor generated by the expansion of management and control functions centered in these large cities, and necessary for the regulation of the global economy. The feminization of job supply and the need to secure a politically adequate labor supply, which combine to create a demand for the type of labor represented by migrant women, suggest that gender has to be considered in conjunction with the structural arrangements and that gender by itself cannot adequately describe the nature of migrant labor.

  5. THE FREEDOMS OF MOVEMENT OF THE SINGLE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hategan Camelia - Daniela

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The European Single Market implies not only the free movement of goods and services, but also the free movement of production factors (the capital and the labor force.The liberalization of goods and services and of production factors movement has determined, on the short term, the appearance of some structural and specialization adjustment processes within the member countries, and on the long term a more efficient allocation of the production factors, an improvement of labor productivity and positive effects in the field of labor force employment. According to the neoclassical theory, the labor force migrates from regions with low wages and low profit rates, to regions having high wages and high profit rate. Thus, the production factors are used in a more productive way. According to this theory, the factors mobility contributes to the equalization of the wages and to a better factors allocation. Issues such as structural funds, persons freedom of movement, convergence could be turned into advantages by any member state, and especially by a new member state. From an economic perspective, the causes of labor force mobility, as a production factor, are: the price differences (wage differences, profit rates differences, interest rates differences according to neoclassical theory; income difference, meaning saving excess or insufficiency for the capital, according to Keynes approach; differences in the level of economic development, determining unequal changes, according to the monetarists. Romania has become a European Union member at January, the 1st, 2007. The accession road has been a long one, full of challenges, issues, but also satisfactions. The 1st of January has not been the end of a process, but the beginning of a new period for Romania's present history. The author will try to emphasize the freedoms of movement of the Single Market. The humanitarian reasons also determine the migration of the population; these are the refugees, the

  6. Determinants of the Egyptian labour migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, M; Metwally, M

    1992-03-01

    The objective is to summarize the pattern of Egyptian migration to Arab oil-producing countries (AOPC), to review some factors that are important determinants of labor movement based on theory, and to empirically model the migration rate to AOPC and to Saudi Arabia. Factors are differentiated as to their relative importance. Push factors are the low wages, high inflation rate, and high population density in Egypt; pull factors are higher wages. It is predicted that an increase in income from destination countries has a significant positive impact on the migration rate. An increase in population density stimulates migration. An increase in inflation acts to increase out-migration with a 2-year lag, which accommodates departure preparation. Egypt's experience with labor migration is described for the pre-oil boom, and the post-oil boom. Several estimates of labor migration are given. Government policy toward migration is positive. Theory postulates migration to be determined by differences in the availability of labor, labor rewards between destination and origin, and the cost of migration. In the empirical model, push factors are population density, the current inflation rate, and the ratio of income/capita in AOPC to Egypt. The results indicate that the ratio of income/capita had a strong pull impact and population density had a strong push impact. The inflation rate has a positive impact with a lag estimated at 2 years. Prior to the Camp David Accord, there was a significant decrease in the number of Egyptian migrants due to political tension. The findings support the classical theory of factor mobility. The consequences of migration on the Egyptian economy have been adverse. Future models should disaggregate data because chronic shortages exist in some parts of the labor market. Manpower needs assessment would be helpful for policy makers.

  7. The labor force of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, J L

    1987-07-01

    In the decades ahead, the US labor force will reflect changes in the industrial structure, with declines in some manufacturing industries and expansion in service industries. The services sector is so diverse that the jobs within it cannot be categorized as either high wage or low wage. The service-producing sector employs 85% of professional specialty workers in the US. In general, information on compensation trends indicates that greater increases in compensation have occurred for workers in service-producing as opposed to goods-producing industries. The increase in service sector jobs has created opportunities for women to enter the labor force and, at present, 5 out of 6 women work in this sector compared to fewer than 2 out of 3 men. Productivity growth rates in the service-producing industries vary substantially and are strongly affected by the business cycle. Central to employment opportunities in the years ahead will be the effect of new technology. To date, the aggregate effect of new technology has been increased employment and higher living standards. Although retraining programs should be in place, the scenario of a huge technology-created labor surplus seems unlikely. In fact, a more likely problem is a shortage of labor resulting from earlier labor force withdrawal and demographic aging of the population. Those in the 25-54-year age group will represent a larger share of the labor force in the years ahead. In addition, blacks are expected to account for 20% of the labor force growth in the next decade. Finally, given increasing labor force participation rates among mothers, employers may have to provide more flexible work schedules, assistance with day care, and more attractive benefits packages.

  8. Is the minimum enough? Affordability of a nutritious diet for minimum wage earners in Nova Scotia (2002-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Felicia D; Williams, Patricia L; Watt, Cynthia G

    2014-05-09

    This paper aims to assess the affordability of a nutritious diet for households earning minimum wage in Nova Scotia (NS) from 2002 to 2012 using an economic simulation that includes food costing and secondary data. The cost of the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB) was assessed with a stratified, random sample of grocery stores in NS during six time periods: 2002, 2004/2005, 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2012. The NNFB's cost was factored into affordability scenarios for three different household types relying on minimum wage earnings: a household of four; a lone mother with three children; and a lone man. Essential monthly living expenses were deducted from monthly net incomes using methods that were standardized from 2002 to 2012 to determine whether adequate funds remained to purchase a basic nutritious diet across the six time periods. A 79% increase to the minimum wage in NS has resulted in a decrease in the potential deficit faced by each household scenario in the period examined. However, the household of four and the lone mother with three children would still face monthly deficits ($44.89 and $496.77, respectively, in 2012) if they were to purchase a nutritiously sufficient diet. As a social determinant of health, risk of food insecurity is a critical public health issue for low wage earners. While it is essential to increase the minimum wage in the short term, adequately addressing income adequacy in NS and elsewhere requires a shift in thinking from a focus on minimum wage towards more comprehensive policies ensuring an adequate livable income for everyone.

  9. Children at health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, H R

    1992-01-01

    In India, 69% of the children of the working class die, most of whom are child laborers. Economic pressure forces parents to make their children work. Employers want child workers because they can manipulate them and pay them low wages, thereby ensuring their viability. The caste system induces social inequality, inheritance invokes cultural inequality, and patriarchal socialization is responsible for gender inequality, all of which perpetuates exploitation of children by employers. In Sivakasi, an estimated 125,000 children make up the child labor force, comprising 30% of the entire labor force. 75% are from the lowest castes. 90% of child workers are girls because they are more obedient and accept even lower wages than boys, and girls need to save for their dowry. Girls often suffer verbal and physical abuse. Like their parents who were also child workers, child workers are illiterate and work long hours. A small rich elite in Sivakasi controls most of the trading and industrial capital, educational institutions, and voluntary organizations. Employers' agents give parents a loan and use their children's labor as security. Each day, they bring child workers to Sivakasi in factory buses from villages to work at least 12 hour days. They work under hazardous conditions, e.g., working with toxic chemicals. Coughing, sore throat, dizziness, methemoglobinemia, and anemia are common effects of ingestion or inhalation of chlorate dust. Inhalation of sulphur dust causes respiratory infections, eye infections, and chronic lung diseases (e.g., asthma). Fires and explosions are common risks for working children. Factory management seldom undertake fire prevention measures. An extensive survey of the problem of child labor is needed in Sivakasi before systematic planning to protect children could be done. Overall development, especially agricultural development, is needed. Parents, employers, enforcement authorities, trade unions, and social groups need to be sensitized to the

  10. A poor country clothing the rich countries: case of garment trade in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mahboob Ali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ready-made garment industry of Bangladesh is one of the largest formal manufacturing sectors. It has played a key role in the country’s process of industrialisation, empowerment of women, export oriented development and growth. Workers from poor socio-economic backgrounds are working in the garment industry. Their health, safety and working conditions are very poor and not protected. There is a lack of regular inspection and compliance with local law in buildings and factories. This led to the collapse of the eight story Rana Plaza building in the capital Dhaka on the 24th of April 2013, “killing 1,100 workers and 2,500 injured”2 . The main aim of the study is to assess the impact of Rana Plaza Tragedy, where RMG workers make garments for multinational brands of Australia, Europe and USA, and the advantage which took these companies of the absence of labour laws, workplace health and safety standards, building standards, long working hours and low wages in Bangladesh. The study used both primary and secondary data including related case studies. The practical application of the study is to develop formal ethical, labour-law, health and safety standards for a factory worker; construction; institutions and courts for monitoring the supplier’s behaviour onshore and large multinational firms offshore. The study recommends to protect the rights of women workers who are sowing garments for the fashion conscious consumers from the developed countries. Future research will explore inclusive growth for workers and how to stimulate inclusive sustainable business for export led garment industry.

  11. Clinical performance and patient outcome after simulation-based training in prevention and management of postpartum haemorrhage : An educational intervention study in a low-resource setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Mduma, Estomih; Evjen-Olsen, Bjorg; Twisk, Jos; Broerse, Jacqueline; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a major cause of maternal mortality. Prevention and adequate treatment are therefore important. However, most births in low-resource settings are not attended by skilled providers, and knowledge and skills of healthcare workers that are available are low.

  12. Career Opportunities: Career Technical Education and the College Completion Agenda. Part III: Promising CTE Policies from across the States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulock, Nancy; Chisholm, Eric; Moore, Colleen; Harris, Latonya

    2012-01-01

    California's community colleges are key to resolving the shortage of educated workers that is threatening the competitive position of the state's economy. Tremendous potential for addressing this challenge resides in the system's career technical education (CTE) mission which, with appropriate structures and support, could help many more students…

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RELIGION REPORTING IN NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... The issue of religion is a very important one in the development of .... Supreme Council of Islamic Affairs (NSCIA) has none. .... among Christian workers that it is as a result of the anti-Christian campaign in the Local media ... Islam are sponsored by government if they are public servants or private sector if ...

  14. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    he initially told health care workers that he had ingested glyphosate. (Roundup). He developed type 1 respiratory failure due to pulmonary oedema. Although he had a mitral valve replacement 16 years ago and defaulted follow-up and treatment, he was not in cardiac failure. Over a period of 2 weeks his renal function and ...

  15. It Isn't Easy Being Green: Overcoming the Challenges of Building a Green Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmelman, Chris

    2011-01-01

    As community and technical colleges work to train workers for green-energy jobs, they face myriad challenges. Among them are the recession and the financial strain it places on institutions' ability to develop programs, trying to meet the demand for trained workers that is a projection and not a certainty, and training low-skilled individuals for…

  16. Fungal Adaptations to Mutualistic Life with Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooij, Pepijn Wilhelmus

    Fungus-growing ants (Attini) feed off a fungus they cultivate in a mutualistic symbiosis in underground chambers by providing it substrate they collect outside the colony. The tribe of Attine ants ranges from small colonies of the paleo- and basal Attine species with a few hundred workers that fo...... that the fungus evolved some incredible adaptations to a mutualistic life with the ants....

  17. The Impact Assessment of Demographic Factors on Faculty Commitment in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Adnan; Kokash, Husam A.; Al-Oun, Salem

    2011-01-01

    Organizational commitment is perceived as an attitude of association to the organization by an employee, which leads to particular job-related behaviors such as work absenteeism, job satisfaction and turnover intensions. Turnover is the ratio of the number of workers that had to be replaced in a given time period to the average number of workers.…

  18. Housing equity, residential mobility and commuting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloze, Gintautas; Skak, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Highly productive economies require a flexible labor force with workers that move in accordance with the changing demand for goods and services. In times with falling housing prices, the mobility of home owning workers may be hampered by a lock-in effect of low or even negative housing equity. Th...

  19. 47 CFR 2.1091 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transmission of a signal. In general, maximum average power levels must be used to determine compliance. (3) If... workers that can be easily re-located, such as wireless devices associated with a personal computer, are... Satellite Communications Services, the General Wireless Communications Service, the Wireless Communications...

  20. Optimizing Nursing and Midwifery Practice in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, the number of nurses remaining in practice in Rwanda was critically low. Since that time the leaders of Rwanda have worked diligently to increase both the number of nurses in Rwanda and their level of education. They have also set goals for the number of healthcare workers that ...

  1. A narrative analysis of educators' lived experiences of motherhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    dual role expectation of ideal mother and ideal worker that is firmly embedded in society's ... This line of reasoning follows the social constructionist-feministic trajec- ... socio- economic class in a non-random manner by using judgement sampling and .... This process allowed us to transform the actual experiences of par-.

  2. Colony fusion and worker reproduction after queen loss in army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    their reproductive success. We show that worker chemical recognition profiles remain similar after queen loss, but rapidly change into a mixed colony Gestalt odour after fusion, consistent with indiscriminate acceptance of alien workers that are no longer aggressive. We hypothesize that colony fusion after queen...

  3. Artificial Intelligence and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence (AI) in relation to intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) and science education. Provides a brief background of AI work, examples of expert systems, examples of ICAI work, and addresses problems facing AI workers that have implications for science education. Proposes a revised model of the Karplus/Renner…

  4. Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor. The Constitution Community: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Linda Darus

    By the early 1900s, many Americans were calling child labor child slavery and were demanding an end to it. Lewis Hine, a New York City schoolteacher and photographer, believed that a picture could tell a powerful story. He felt so strongly about the abuse of children as workers that he quit his teaching job and became an investigative photographer…

  5. Realities and Realizations: Reflections on a Social Work Exchange Program between the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Jennifer; Haney, Jolynn L.; Houser, Linda; Cao, Jun; Mi, Xi

    2016-01-01

    China has a long and complex history of political, economic, and educational shifts that have resulted in and from changing cultural values. Over time, the significance and format of social work education in China has changed, as has the need for professionally educated social workers that can support the ever-evolving social needs of China. To…

  6. Teaming Up with Unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the concept, first encouraged by Irving Bluestone of the United Auto Workers, that union and management personnel should work together to achieve company goals. The history of this cooperative effort movement within the United Auto Workers is described. (CH)

  7. Responses to "Intention to Leave, Anticipated Reasons for Leaving, and 12-Month Turnover of Child Care Center Staff."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Linda; Russell, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Two practitioners address problem of employee turnover in child care centers. The first plan argues for comprehensive wage raises, increased benefits, and low cost options to workers that increase flexibility. The second strategy advocates continuing education opportunities, special mentoring programs, and bonuses or raises paid early in the…

  8. Interplay between Insulin Signaling, Juvenile Hormone and Vitellogenin Regulates Maternal Effects on Polyphenism in Ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenism is the phenomenon where alternative phenotypes are produced by a single genotype in response to environmental cues. An extreme case is found in social insects, where reproductive queens and sterile workers that greatly differ in morphology and behavior can arise from a single genotype. T...

  9. 75 FR 60139 - Compass Group USA, Inc. Canteen: Webster City, Iowa; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... services supplied by the workers; that the workers' separation, or threat of separation, was not related to... of food service services. The request also alleges that, in the case of adversely-affected secondary...'s prior decision. The application is, therefore, granted. Signed at Washington, DC, this 21st day of...

  10. What makes workers happy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, P.H.; Wielers, R.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    This article answers the question what makes workers happy? It does so by combining insights from micro-economics, sociology and psychology. Basis is the standard utility function of a worker that includes income and hours of work and is elaborated with job characteristics. In this way it is

  11. Integrated ESL with Career and Vocational Training Program to Achieve Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, MaryAngel

    2017-01-01

    Training programs that combine learning English with career and vocational skills are highly desired to prepare many displaced workers that are English speakers of other languages (ESOL). Globalization has caused jobs to be exported and brought to this country, people with needed skills that do not have full command of the English language. The…

  12. Increasing cheat robustness of crowdsourcing tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eickhoff, C.; De Vries, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Crowdsourcing successfully strives to become a widely used means of collecting large-scale scientific corpora. Many research fields, including Information Retrieval, rely on this novel way of data acquisition. However, it seems to be undermined by a significant share of workers that are primarily

  13. Increasing Cheat Robustness of Crowdsourcing Tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Eickhoff (Carsten); A.P. de Vries (Arjen)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractCrowdsourcing successfully strives to become a widely used means of collecting large-scale scientific corpora. Many research fields, including Information Retrieval, rely on this novel way of data acquisition. However, it seems to be undermined by a significant share of workers that are

  14. Method for fluoride routine determination in urine of personnel exposed, by ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Bellintani, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    A simple, fast and sensible method is outlined for the determination of fluoride in urine of workers that handle fluorine compounds. The determination is based on the measurement of fluoride by ion selective electrode. Cationic interference like Ca ++ , Mg ++ , Fe +++ and Al +++ are complexed by EDTA and citric acid. (Author) [pt

  15. Asia-Pacific Journal for Student Affairs (AJSA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS) serves as a global network of student affairs and services workers that encourages sharing, cooperation, research, exchanges, and attendance at each other's conferences. The Vice President and. General Secretary of IASAS attended the 2016 Asia ...

  16. Sublingual immunotherapy for the treatment of allergies | Schellack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of allergies often involves pharmacological therapy and recommendations by healthcare workers that the allergen should be avoided. Allergen-specific immunotherapy has emerged as an alternative to effectively decrease the immunoglobulin (Ig) E:IgG4 ratio. Two routes of administration are described, ...

  17. Key Factors for the Development of a Culturally Appropriate Interactive Multimedia Informative Program for Aboriginal Health Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Faeka; Soar, Jeffrey; Wang, Zoe

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to create and evaluate a model for a culturally appropriate, interactive, multimedia and informative health program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers that aims to improve the capacity to independently control their learning within an attractive learning environment. The research also aims to provide…

  18. Functional flexibility and team performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Slomp, J.

    1999-01-01

    This study deals with workforce flexibility defined in terms of 'multifunctionality' and 'redundancy'. These concepts refer, respectively, to the number of different tasks a worker has mastered and the number of workers that are qualified to do a specific task. A third factor to be considered is

  19. Proletarianisation, land, income and living conditions of farm labourers in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foeken, D.W.J.; Tellegen, N.

    1996-01-01

    In some areas in sub-Saharan Africa a rural proletariat has emerged, consisting mainly of labourers living and working on plantations and large mixed farms. Besides these fully proletarianized estate workers, there is also a category of workers that can be labelled 'semi-proletarianized'. They live

  20. Spanish Language Self-Efficacy Beliefs among Spanish-Speaking Social Workers: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Limited research exists about Spanish-speaking social workers that provide bilingual social work services. To date, studies have not exclusively focused on actual language competence of bilingual social workers or even their self-perceived language beliefs. This study reviews the results of a cross-sectional Internet-based survey exploring…

  1. Going beyond Language: Soft Skill-ing Cultural Difference and Immigrant Integration in Toronto, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Kori

    2016-01-01

    This article traces how a language and soft skills training approach to Canadian immigrant integration emerged with Canada's shift towards a post-industrial tertiary economy. In this economy, soft skills index characteristics of ideal workers that fit the needs of Canada's post-Fordist labour regime. It examines how skills' training is not viewed…

  2. The nature of culture: technological variation in chimpanzee predation on army ants revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöning, Caspar; Humle, Tatyana; Möbius, Yasmin

    2008-01-01

    -eating may represent local behavioral responses of the chimpanzees to the anti-predator traits of the army ant species present at the different sites. We examined assemblages of available prey species, their behavior and morphology, consumption by chimpanzees, techniques employed, and tool lengths at 14...... sites in eastern, central, and western Africa. Where army ants are eaten, tool length and concomitant technique are a function of prey type. Epigaeically foraging species with aggressive workers that inflict painful bites are harvested with longer tools and usually by the "pull-through" technique......; species foraging in leaf-litter with less aggressive workers that inflict less painful bites are harvested with short tools and by the "direct-mouthing" technique. However, prey species characteristics do not explain several differences in army-ant-eating between Bossou (Guinea) and Taï (Ivory Coast...

  3. Refleksija profesinėje socialinio darbuotojo veikloje

    OpenAIRE

    Dromantienė, Leta; Indrašienė, Valdonė; Sadauskas, Justinas

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the use of activity reflection in social work, it discloses the experience of social workers that work with families at risk applying reflection. The peculiarity of the activity of the social worker is determined by the diversity of social problems and clients, dynamic relationship with different groups of clients. That means that the social worker must be able to organise the social work process with clients establishing and assessing the social needs and the social pr...

  4. Projekt om Arbejdstilsynets og ledelsesretten

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas, Larsen

    2016-01-01

    This project investigates The Danish Working Environment Authority with in relation to an agreement from the methods commission from 1995, saying that they do not have the right to interfere in psychosocial problems for the workers, that be related to management´s overall decisions and strategies. This is a problem in terms of regulating mishandling of management and lack of social support from managers. This project concludes that the criticism of this agreement has partly overlooked other w...

  5. How personal resources predict work engagement and self-rated performance among construction workers: A social cognitive perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lorente Prieto, Laura; Salanova Soria, Marisa; Martínez Martínez, Isabel M.; Vera Perea, María

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, research focussing on psychosocial factors in the construction industry has focused mainly on the negative aspects of health and on results such as occupational accidents. This study, however, focuses on the specific relationships among the different positive psychosocial factors shared by construction workers that could be responsible for occupational well-being and outcomes such as performance. The main objective of this study was to test whether personal resources predict se...

  6. Steve Rogers' Character in Captain America: the First Avenger as a Representation of Hard Working Value in Traditional American Values

    OpenAIRE

    RAMADHAN, BHAYU

    2013-01-01

    Film is one of the most popular media which often elevates social values of a society. One of American social values is shown in Captain America: The First Avenger. Captain America: The First Avenger clearly portrays Steve Rogers' character as the representation of the hard working value of the Traditional American Values. In this film, Steve Rogers represents the hard working value by depicting the six characteristics of hard worker. The first characteristic of hard worker that is depicted b...

  7. Market Orientation Impact on Radical and Incremental Marketing Innovation: A Study of Saudi Arabia Hospital Marketing Efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Alshahry Abdullah saeed A; Wang Aimin

    2015-01-01

    We conducted an empirical study to measure influence of market orientation on marketing innovation in hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The sample includes 109 hospital workers that have been identified as having an adequate knowledge of the subject of research. In particular we explain the impact of customer orientation, inter-functional orientation and competitor orientation on marketing innovation. Furthermore the moderating effects of centralization and formalization on those relationships are e...

  8. Stability characteristics of a single-phase free convection loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creveling, H. F.; De Paz, J. F.; Baladi, J. Y.; Schoenhals, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments investigating the stability characteristics of a single-phase free convection loop are reported. Results of the study confirm the contention made by previous workers that instabilities near the thermodynamic critical point can occur for ordinary fluids as well as those with unusual behavior in the near-critical region. Such a claim runs counter to traditional beliefs, but it is supported by the observation of such instabilities for water at atmospheric pressure and moderate temperatures in the present work.

  9. Helminthiasis Prevalence in Brick Makers at Lambada Peukan Village, Aceh Besar Region, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Syahrizal, Dedy; Mustika, Cut; Ikhsan,; Azhary, Mulkan

    2011-01-01

    Helminthiasis are the common health problem in the develop country. WHO prediction 400 million people had infection of helminthiasis. Soil is the usual media to transmitted helminth to human (soil transmitted helminthiasis). One of the rule worker that has hard contact to helminth is the brick maker. This activity usual doing with convensional technique.The objective of this devotion are to knowing helminthiasis prevalence on brick maker in Lambada Peukan Village. The primer data is the co...

  10. Proposal to integrate the service on radiation hygiene at the primary health care services for workers exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frometa Suarez, Ileana; Lopez Pumar, Georgina; Gonzalez Amil, Melva

    1998-01-01

    The National Health System implemented in the last few years a new pattern of primary attention for workers by creating doctors offices in work centers. At the same time, the Ministry of Public Health (MINSAP) carries the medical surveillance of the staff exposed to ionizing radiation. This work proposes a program to integrate the consulting room on radiation hygiene to primary health care services for workers that work with ionizing radiation sources, aiming to ameliorate and improve them

  11. Designing mobile instant messaging for collaborative health data management in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Fraschetti, Yrjan Aleksander Frøyland

    2017-01-01

    Fast and efficient communication is crucial for workers that are required to collaborate. Instant messaging has been found to be more efficient than email and other asynchronous messaging systems when used for asking quick questions. Group chats have also been shown to stimulate collaboration between multiple users. In this thesis, we explore how mobile instant messaging can facilitate and stimulate collaboration between health data managers working in different facilities in Rwanda. An insta...

  12. Open Component Portability Infrastructure (OPENCPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    declaration of the authored worker that must be implemented . If there is existing legacy VHDL entity architecture, then it is wrapped or modified to...that the software implementations were written to. Since all of the original code was VHDL , the HDL Authoring Model for VHDL was enhanced to meet...engineering process. This application was completed for the execution of all the components, the software implementations , and the VHDL skeletons for the

  13. Occupational Exposure to Antineoplastic Drugs: Identification of Job Categories Potentially Exposed throughout the Hospital Medication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yip Hon

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: We found drug contamination on select surfaces at every stage of the medication system, which indicates the existence of an exposure potential throughout the facility. Our results suggest that a broader range of workers are potentially exposed than has been previously examined. These results will allow us to develop a more inclusive exposure assessment encompassing all healthcare workers that are at risk throughout the hospital medication system.

  14. Near East/South Asia Report, No. 2770.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-17

    workers; that in 39 percent of the cases, there is no accurate record of absenteeism and attendance; that 42 percent of the employees do not carry out...growing phenomena of laziness, absenteeism , unconcern, and leaving work without set guidelines. 20. The emigration of competent and skilled...and landlords to exploit the labour of the farmers and peasants who work on land. Under the land reforms programme it is expected that thou- sands of

  15. Significance of Circadian Rhythms in Aerospace Operations,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    maximum during the day and a minimum at night. The differences of "efficiency" for 140 21 physical labour performed either at 1600 or at 0400 hours...magnitude of 5 - 10 % extra oxygen 120. uptake. The lower efficieny could explain the feeling of temporary night workers that nocturnal labour is...intestinal disturbances (reported in some studies only) - both, lower and higher absenteeism ; - no higher mortality rate. More recent investigations revealed

  16. Healthcare waste management in selected government and private hospitals in Southeast Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Angus Nnamdi Oli; Callistus Chibuike Ekejindu; David Ufuoma Adje; Ifeanyi Ezeobi; Obiora Shedrack Ejiofor; Christian Chibuzo Ibeh; Chika Flourence Ubajaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess healthcare workers' involvement in healthcare waste management in public and private hospitals. Methods: Validated questionnaires (n = 660) were administered to randomly selected healthcare workers from selected private hospitals between April and July 2013. Results: Among the healthcare workers that participated in the study, 187 (28.33%) were medical doctors, 44 (6.67%) were pharmacists, 77 (11.67%) were medical laboratory scientist, 35 (5.30%) were waste handlers...

  17. Designing health promotion programs by watching the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, B D; Bryant, J M

    1992-03-01

    More health care providers and payors are beginning to see health promotion programs as a significant tool for attracting patients, reducing costs, or both. To help design programs that take into account the values and lifestyles of the target group, naturalistic observation can be useful. The authors illustrate the approach in a study of pipeline workers that provided input for the design of nutrition and smoking cessation programs.

  18. Radiotoxicology analysis in Nuclear and Energetic Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, C.L.; Gaburo, J.C.; Bellintani, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The radiotoxicology laboratory of Nuclear and Energetic Research Institute (IPEN) has the objective of control the internal contamination of workers that handle radioactive materials, in industrial and medical sectors. This control is made through radiochemical analysis of excreta. Nowadays in this laboratory are realized occupational controls on individual, exposure to uranium, tritium, iodine, fluorine, lead compounds, for workers of IPEN and for external institutions, when solicited. (C.G.C.) [pt

  19. The Importance of Community Consultations for Generating Evidence for Health Reform in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Hankivsky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The paper presents the results of community consultations about the health needs and healthcare experiences of the population of Ukraine. The objective of community consultations is to engage a community in which a research project is studying, and to gauge feedback, criticism and suggestions. It is designed to seek advice or information from participants directly affected by the study subject of interest. The purpose of this study was to collect first-hand perceptions about daily life, health concerns and experiences with the healthcare system. This study provides policy-makers with additional evidence to ensure that health reforms would include a focus not only on health system changes but also social determinants of health (SDH. Methods The data collection consisted of the 21 community consultations conducted in 2012 in eleven regions of Ukraine in a mix of urban and rural settings. The qualitative data was coded in MAXQDA 11 software and thematic analysis was used as a method of summarizing and interpreting the results. Results The key findings of this study point out the importance of the SDH in the lives of Ukrainians and how the residents of Ukraine perceive that health inequities and premature mortality are shaped by the circumstances of their daily lives, such as: political and economic instability, environmental pollution, low wages, poor diet, insufficient physical activity, and unsatisfactory state of public services. Study participants repeatedly discussed these conditions as the reasons for the perceived health crisis in Ukraine. The dilapidated state of the healthcare system was discussed as well; high out-of-pocket (OOP payments and lack of trust in doctors appeared as significant barriers in accessing healthcare services. Additionally, the consultations highlighted the economic and health gaps between residents of rural and urban areas, naming rural populations among the most vulnerable social groups in Ukraine

  20. Journalists' working conditions in Chiapas/ La condición laboral del periodista en Chiapas

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    Ddo. Hugo A. Villar Pinto; hvillar@unach.mx

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Even if they are at the center of the opinion and the information, journalists are not well-known. In fact, we know little about them: their salary, the relationships they establish with their sources, the values they profess, their level of education, their social security benefits and their work routines. In the absence of studies about journalists in the context of Chiapas, Mexico, this work aims to investigate the conditions under which journalists perform, the average salary they receive, their benefits and the social organizations they belong to. In Chiapas, there are approximately 300 journalists; the remaining employees are sometimes involved in the tasks of information and opinion. We have focused on these 300 journalists in order to do this project. They have become the object of our study. We surveyed 158 journalists who live in different parts of the state and, afterwards, we interviewed 88 of them. The article shows the workings conditions in which the Chiapas journalists perform their job: low wages and little support from their companies to carry out their task of providing information.Aunque están en el centro de la opinión y de la información, los periodistas son poco conocidos. Se sabe escasamente de ellos: salarios, relaciones que establecen con sus fuentes, valores que profesan, grados de estudio, prestaciones sociales y rutinas laborales. Ante la inexistencia de estudios sobre el periodista chiapaneco en el contexto de Chiapas, México, este trabajo tiene como objetivo indagar las condiciones en que se desempeña el periodista, el salario promedio que percibe, prestaciones sociales y las organizaciones a las que pertenece.El número aproximado de periodistas en Chiapas es de 300; el restante son colaboradores que participan ocasionalmente en las labores de información y opinión. En esos 300 nos hemos centrado para hacer este trabajo. Ellos fueron nuestro objeto de estudio. Encuestamos a 158 comunicadores que viven en

  1. Readiness to Change Over Time: Change Commitment and Change Efficacy in a Workplace Health-Promotion Trial

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    Christian D. Helfrich

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionOrganizational readiness to change may be a key determinant of implementation success and a mediator of the effectiveness of implementation interventions. If organizational readiness can be reliably and validly assessed at the outset of a change initiative, it could be used to assess the effectiveness of implementation-support activities by measuring changes in readiness factors over time.MethodsWe analyzed two waves of readiness-to-change survey data collected as part of a three-arm, randomized controlled trial to implement evidence-based health promotion practices in small worksites in low-wage industries. We measured five readiness factors: context (favorable broader conditions; change valence (valuing health promotion; information assessment (demands and resources to implement health promotion; change commitment (an intention to implement health promotion; and change efficacy (a belief in shared ability to implement health promotion. We expected commitment and efficacy to increase at intervention sites along with their self-reported effort to implement health promotion practices, termed wellness-program effort. We compared means between baseline and 15 months, and between intervention and control sites. We used linear regression to test whether intervention and control sites differed in their change-readiness scores over time.ResultsOnly context and change commitment met reliability thresholds. Change commitment declined significantly for both control (−0.39 and interventions sites (−0.29 from baseline to 15 months, while context did not change for either. Only wellness program effort at 15 months, but not at baseline, differed significantly between control and intervention sites (1.20 controls, 2.02 intervention. Regression analyses resulted in two significant differences between intervention and control sites in changes from baseline to 15 months: (1 intervention sites exhibited significantly smaller change in

  2. The Importance of Community Consultations for Generating Evidence for Health Reform in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankivsky, Olena; Vorobyova, Anna; Salnykova, Anastasiya; Rouhani, Setareh

    2016-08-17

    The paper presents the results of community consultations about the health needs and healthcare experiences of the population of Ukraine. The objective of community consultations is to engage a community in which a research project is studying, and to gauge feedback, criticism and suggestions. It is designed to seek advice or information from participants directly affected by the study subject of interest. The purpose of this study was to collect first-hand perceptions about daily life, health concerns and experiences with the healthcare system. This study provides policy-makers with additional evidence to ensure that health reforms would include a focus not only on health system changes but also social determinants of health (SDH). The data collection consisted of the 21 community consultations conducted in 2012 in eleven regions of Ukraine in a mix of urban and rural settings. The qualitative data was coded in MAXQDA 11 software and thematic analysis was used as a method of summarizing and interpreting the results. The key findings of this study point out the importance of the SDH in the lives of Ukrainians and how the residents of Ukraine perceive that health inequities and premature mortality are shaped by the circumstances of their daily lives, such as: political and economic instability, environmental pollution, low wages, poor diet, insufficient physical activity, and unsatisfactory state of public services. Study participants repeatedly discussed these conditions as the reasons for the perceived health crisis in Ukraine. The dilapidated state of the healthcare system was discussed as well; high out-of-pocket (OOP) payments and lack of trust in doctors appeared as significant barriers in accessing healthcare services. Additionally, the consultations highlighted the economic and health gaps between residents of rural and urban areas, naming rural populations among the most vulnerable social groups in Ukraine. The study concludes that any meaningful reforms of

  3. PERAN GANDA PEREMPUAN PEMETIK TEH

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    Yunita Kusumawati

    2013-04-01

    , located near the tea plantation PT Pagilaran where many women of this village became tea pickers. Observation, interviews, and documentation were used in data collection. The validity of data is done by triangulation of data sources and analysis was conducted by interpretative analysis. This study explains that women has multiple roles in domestic and public, and this has impact in their life. The tea pickers women still have good social interactions with family, and even expanding relationships with the community. In terms of economics, the profession as a tea picker does not significantly raise the women’s welfare because of low wages they receive. But with economic independence that they gain as tea leaves pickers, these women have an active role in decision-making in the family. This socio-economic demands shouldered upon these women also reduce levels of discrimination.

  4. Decent wage is more important than absolution of debts: A smallholder socio-hydrological modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Saket; Savenije, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    We present a framework to understand the socio-hydrological system dynamics of a small holder. Small holders are farmers who own less than 2 ha of farmland. It couples the dynamics of 6 main variables that are most relevant at the scale of a small holder: local storage (soil moisture and other water storage), capital, knowledge, livestock production, soil fertility and grass biomass production. The hydroclimatic variability is at sub-annual scale and influences the socio-hydrology at annual scale. The model incorporates rule-based adaptation mechanisms (for example: adjusting expenditures on food and fertilizers, selling livestocks etc.) of small holders when they face adverse socio-hydrological conditions, such as low annual rainfall, higher intra-annual variability in rainfall or variability in agricultural prices. We apply the framework to understand the socio-hydrology of a sugarcane small holder in Aurangabad, Maharashtra. This district has witnessed suicides of many sugarcane farmers who could not extricate themselves out of the debt trap. These farmers lack irrigation and are susceptible to fluctuating sugar prices and intra-annual hydro-climatic variability. We study the sensitivity of annual total capital averaged over 30 years, an indicator of small holder wellbeing, to initial capital that a small holder starts with and the prevalent wage rates. We find that a smallholder well being is low (below Rs 30000 per annum, a threshold above which a smallholder can afford a basic standard of living) and is rather insensitive to initial capital at low wage rates. Initial capital perhaps matters to small holder livelihoods at higher wage rates. Further, the small holder system appears to be resilient at around Rs 115/mandays in the sense that small perturbations in wage rates around this rate still sustains the smallholder above the basic standard of living. Our results thus indicate that government intervention to absolve the debt of farmers is not enough. It

  5. Trabalho infanto-juvenil: motivações, aspectos legais e repercussão social Child and adolescent labor: factors, legal aspects, and social repercussions

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    Otávio Cruz Neto

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A população infanto-juvenil constitui-se hoje em um dos segmentos mais prejudicados pelo acirramento dos problemas sócio-econômico-culturais que o País enfrenta. O não oferecimento por parte do poder público de uma rede de ensino de qualidade e universal, a concentração de renda, os baixos salários, o desemprego e a desestruturação das famílias são fatores que vêm afetando diretamente a trajetória de vida de crianças e adolescentes, abrigando-os a inserirem-se precocemente no mercado de trabalho, no qual seus direitos como "cidadãos em condições especiais de desenvolvimento" são seguidamente vilipendiados. O presente artigo objetiva fornecer subsídios para a erradicação do trabalho infantil e para a adequação da atividade laboral juvenil ao preconizado pela legislação brasileira. Para isso, procura levantar na Constituição Federal, na Consolidação das Leis Trabalhistas e no Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente as situações em que estas atividades são ­ ou não ­ permitidas, dirimindo as possíveis divergências existentes entre estes instrumentos jurídicos e analisando seus aspectos sociais.Children and youth are currently one of the population segments most heavily jeopardized by the worsening of social, economic, and cultural problems in Brazil. Factors such as lack of government support for a sound, universally accessible school system, income concentration, low wages, unemployment, and family dysfunction have direct impacts on the life histories of children and adolescents, forcing them to join the labor market early, where their rights as "citizens with special developmental conditions" are routinely ignored. This article aims to provide support for the eradication of child labor and the adaptation of adolescent labor to the terms of the pertinent Brazilian legislation. To this end, the article reviews the Federal Constitution, Consolidated Labor Laws, and Statute for Children and Adolescents to

  6. Professores, desencanto com a profissão e abandono do magistério Teachers, disenchantment in the profession and quitting the public schools

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    Flavinês Rebolo Lapo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Ao examinar a questão do abandono do magistério público na rede de ensino do Estado de São Paulo, este artigo teve como principal objetivo compreender de que modo esse processo é tecido ao longo da vida e da experiência profissional dos professores. O estudo focalizou o período de 1990-1995 e se baseou em dados quantitativos, obtidos na Secretaria Estadual de Educação, a partir dos quais verificou-se, no interregno, um aumento da ordem de 300% nos pedidos de exoneração do magistério, e em dados qualitativos, obtidos de um questionário, enviado a 158 ex-professores da rede pública, e de 16 entrevistas sobre histórias de vida profissional. As análises evidenciam que, além dos baixos salários, as precárias situações, a insatisfação no trabalho e o desprestígio profissional estão entre os fatores que mais contribuem para que os professores deixem a profissão docente. Mostram também que esse processo acontece lentamente, por meio de uma série de mecanismos pessoais e institucionais de que os docentes fazem uso, até que ocorra o abandono definitivo.The goal of this study was to investigate why teachers give up their work at the State of São Paulo (Brazil public schools, understanding how this process is woven throughout their lives and professional experience. The study focused on the period between 1990 and 1995, and was based on two types of data: quantitative data, collected from the State Secretariat for Education revealed an increasing of 300%, approximately, in teachers' resignations in that period. Qualitative data were obtained through answers given to 158 questionnaire, besides 16 interviews on teachers' professional life histories. The analyses showed that, apart from low wages, bad working conditions, professional debasement, and dissatisfaction at work were among the factors that contributed most to teachers' disenchantment in their profession. They also showed that quitting does not happen suddenly. The

  7. Readiness to Change Over Time: Change Commitment and Change Efficacy in a Workplace Health-Promotion Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Kohn, Marlana J; Stapleton, Austin; Allen, Claire L; Hammerback, Kristen Elizabeth; Chan, K C Gary; Parrish, Amanda T; Ryan, Daron E; Weiner, Bryan J; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A

    2018-01-01

    Organizational readiness to change may be a key determinant of implementation success and a mediator of the effectiveness of implementation interventions. If organizational readiness can be reliably and validly assessed at the outset of a change initiative, it could be used to assess the effectiveness of implementation-support activities by measuring changes in readiness factors over time. We analyzed two waves of readiness-to-change survey data collected as part of a three-arm, randomized controlled trial to implement evidence-based health promotion practices in small worksites in low-wage industries. We measured five readiness factors: context (favorable broader conditions); change valence (valuing health promotion); information assessment (demands and resources to implement health promotion); change commitment (an intention to implement health promotion); and change efficacy (a belief in shared ability to implement health promotion). We expected commitment and efficacy to increase at intervention sites along with their self-reported effort to implement health promotion practices, termed wellness-program effort. We compared means between baseline and 15 months, and between intervention and control sites. We used linear regression to test whether intervention and control sites differed in their change-readiness scores over time. Only context and change commitment met reliability thresholds. Change commitment declined significantly for both control (-0.39) and interventions sites (-0.29) from baseline to 15 months, while context did not change for either. Only wellness program effort at 15 months, but not at baseline, differed significantly between control and intervention sites (1.20 controls, 2.02 intervention). Regression analyses resulted in two significant differences between intervention and control sites in changes from baseline to 15 months: (1) intervention sites exhibited significantly smaller change in context scores relative to control sites

  8. Max Havelaar Dan Citra Antikolonial: Sebuah Tinjauan Poskolonial

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    Christina Dewi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Max Havelaar is a literary work by Multatuli, a.k.a. E.E. Douwes Dekker. This novel is usually known as a novel with an anti-colonial image. While in the other hand, this novel never suggests to stop colonialism done by Dutch in Hindia Belanda. This research aims at revealing the relationship between colonialism's views with its innovation of narrative technique in this novel. The first analysis is trying to do a focalization on MH. The writer wants to do it because MH presents an argument about the essence of colonialism in Hindia Belanda through opinions and views from three focalizations. MH uniquely uses three focalizers and its uniqueness is shown by Stern as a narrator-fokalizer in the Lebak Episode. Although Stern is one of the characters in the novel, it gives the impression that Stern is in a neutral position. He takes place in the middle-position between the two other character-focalizers. However, since he is one of the characters in this novel, his focalization is not perfectly neutral in the manner of inviting the readers to support the attitude of Multatuli, Readers are confronted to make a choice between the war of anticolonial or procolonial interests and to support either one of the two character-fokulizers : Multatuli or Droogstoppcl. The orientalism theory has been applied to conduct focalization in the novel as the research object.. The novel characterizes Multatuli and Stern as opposing figures against the forced labor while Droogstoppcl, on the other hand, as a figure who is supporting forced labor of the coffee trade. MH strove for labors to earn proper wages so that the issue about the procedures of cultuur-stelsel has a special place in MH. Anti-colonial traits are shown by a rejection of low wages, oppression, robbery, injustice, mistreating, and discrimination. This novel is influencing the colonial hegemony of the competition of industrial products among colonized countries in Europe in the 19th century. That is

  9. In Search of Work – the Life of Croatian Immigrant Men in Canada between the Two World Wars

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    Snježana Ružić

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author attempts to describe the life of Croatian immigrants in Canada duringthe interwar period. She looks at how emigration to Canada effected family life, especially for men who went abroad in search of work and higher earnings. To begin the article, the author surveys the existing historiography, in particular the new trends in social history that examine the everyday life of “average” men and women which have opened new approaches in immigration history, paying less attention to the political and diplomatic events surrounding migration studies. Her methodological approach follows concepts developed by the “new” social history and is based on a theoretical concept of masculinity. The major primary source for her research is Canadian/Croatian Voice which was printed in Canada in Croatian, but she also leans heavily on important historiographical literature concerning Croatian immigrants in Canada. In her article the author provides a short survey of the emigration of Croatians to Canada which grows after an agreement was signed in 1925 between the Canadian government and the two large railway companies, Canadian Pacific Railway and Canadian National Railway. The major portion of the work examines the life of Croatian men in isolated labour camps, the hard working conditions, the constant search for work, and the psychological effects of long years of separation from family. Men leave for Canada with the intent of staying for only a certain period of time in order to bring money back home. But in the event of the economic crisis created by the Great Depression, low wages, and periods of unemployment, the length of the stay in Canada grows, creating frustration among the immigrant men as well as their families back home. In conclusion, the author shows how improving economic conditions in Canada in the mid 1930s coupled with worsening conditions in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia led most men to find steady employment in

  10. BELENGGU KEMISKINAN BURUH PEREMPUAN PABRIK ROKOK

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    Dian Maulina Wijayanti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Perempuan buruh pada umumnya memiliki tingkat pendidikan rendah, bekerja disektor pekerjaan yang tidak memerlukan pendidikan tinggi, ketrampilan dan keahlian khusus, serta berupah yang rendah. Salah satu pekerjaan yang dilakukan perempuan adalah sebagai buruh pabrik rokok. Dalam penelitian ini, penulis menjelaskan profil dan latar belakang yang mendorong perempuan bekerja sebagai buruh pabrik rokok Janur Kuning Kudus di desa Piji Kecamatan Dawe. Penelitian menggunakan metode kualitatif deskriptif analitis. Metode pengumpulan data dengan wawancara mendalam dan observasi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa perempuan bekerja sebagai buruh di pabrik rokok didorong oleh kondisi ekonomi keluarga yang terbelenggu dalam kemiskinan dan latar belakang tingkat pendidikan serta ketrampilan dan keahlian yang rendah. Jenis pekerjaan di pabrik Janur Kuning yang tidak memerlukan pendidikan tinggi, ketrampilan dan keahlian khusus dengan upah yang rendah, yaitu sebagai buruh mbatil, nggiling, dan nyontong. Dengan demikian para perempuan buruh pabrik rokok masih menjadi tenaga kerja yang termarginal. Dengan bekerjanya perempuan atau istri di luar rumah berarti perempuan atau istri mempunyai peran ganda yaitu bekerja di sektor domestik sebagai pengurus rumah tangga dan di sektor publik sebagai buruh pabrik rokok. Peran ganda tersebut akhirnya juga menjadikan mereka harus menyandang beban ganda yang lebih berat dibanding suami mereka.Working women from poor family generally have low education level, work sector jobs that do not require higher education, skills and expertise, as well as low wage. One of such women’s job is as cigarette factory workers. In this study, the author seeks to identify and explain the profiles and backgrounds that encourage women to work as a cigarette factory workers in Janur Kuning Kudus, Piji, Dawe, Kudus District. The research method used is qualitative descriptive method and data are collected with in-depth interviews and

  11. Migrasi Internasional dan Pembangunan Daerah: Realitas dan Dualisme Kebijakan Lokal

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    Abdul Haris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was an effort to understand the Sasak people migration phenomena to Malaysia and how those activities were placed in the local development policies This study was also done to understand its contribution in development process. This research was carried out in East Lombok and some sub.districts had been taken as area research sample, such as Pringgasela, Masbagik, Kerrie:1k and Sakra. The sample of research areas were chosen because statistically, were the most potential international migration sources in East Lombok and Lombok island in general. Based on this research, there are three conditions that forte the Sasak people migrate from their area of origin to Malaysia, e.g: poverty, lack of opportuniD4 and low wage compare to destination country. The inability of localgovernment to create new opportunity has become a main factor in all of the migration process. The increasing of employment growth that unbalanced with the growth of opportunity also creates open unemployment and under unemployment at the origin. This fact caused frustration among those of productive age that pushed them to get a better alternative of theirown. The fact also shows that localgovernmentfaced difficulties to put returnees in a clearposition in local development process. This was because there is no regulation that gives possibilities for returnees to involve in all of development process and policy implementation. Migrant participation in a whole development process, therefore, cannot be seen as a program made by government in order to give chance to the returnees directly involved. The other facts show of migrant workers' contribution in local economic development. The increasing of economic activities and local treading, workers substitution from farm to non farm are the real phenomenon that can be seen as their contribution in the whole of development process At the macro level, rnigrans' contribution has created new opportunity to improve economic

  12. Leadership Development Experiences of Women Leaders in State-Owned Enterprises in Indonesia

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    Yuliana Dewi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Similar to many other countries in the world, Indonesia has been experiencing the increasing number of women workers participation both in formal and informal sectors. While in formal sector the number of female employees has increased from around 10 millions in 2008 to nearly 13 millions in 2011; in informal sector the figure is even doubled: more than 28 millions in 2008 to more than 30 millions in 2011. However to date, women workers are associated with low-skilled, low-wage workers who work in precarious working environment. Women are seldom hold managerial position both in public and private sector. The proportion of women in Indonesia who sit in the board of directors is only 6% from the entire women workers. Thus, this research aims to explore their development experience along the way. In order to obtain initial information, interviews with nine women managers from State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs were conducted. SOEs were chosen for convenience reason. The research indicates the low ratio number of women in SOEs management team although there is an optimism that the number would increase. Key point discovered in this research is that development experience is mainly done by the participants own initiatives whereas organisational supports are found very limited. This findings will be further explored and confirmed by involving more women managers from various sectors. Keywords: women leaders, ledership development, qualitative, Indonesia. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  13. The Haitian Rice Tariff

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    Mats Lundahl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Se ha argumentado que los problemas agríco-las de Haití derivan de la tarifa del arroz de a mediados de los años noventa. Antes, supues-tamente, Haití fue autosuficiente, abastecida por su producción doméstica. Después de la reducción, el mercado haitiano se inundó en importaciones de arroz barato de los EEUU, lo cual despojó a los campesinos de sus fincas, convirtiendolos en migrantes internos, hacia los empleos de bajo pago de las ciudades. El artículo rechaza ese argumento y demuestra que es falso. La malnutrición fue un fenómeno extendido en Haití mucho antes de la reducción de la tarifa del arroz, la cual tampoco tuvo un gran impacto en la importación y la producción doméstica del arroz. Lo que sí impulsó el aumento de las importaciones fue el crecimiento de la población. También el artículo argumenta que un aumento de la tarifa del arroz no solucionará el problema de la alimentación que sufre Haití. English: It has been argued that Haiti’s agricultural problems derive from the reduction of the rice tariff in the mid-1990s. Before that Haiti was allegedly able to meet its food needs by domestic production. After the reduction the Haitian market was swamped by imports of cheap American rice which drove the farmers off their lands and forced them to migrate to low-wage industrial jobs in the cities. The article demonstrates that the argument is false. Malnutrition was widespread in Haiti long before the rice tariff reduction, and the latter did not have much of an impact on rice imports and domestic production. Instead, the main driving force behind imports appears to be population growth. It is also shown that an increase of the rice tariff will not solve Haiti’s food problem.

  14. AN EXPLORATORY RESEARCH OVER THE CHINESE PRODUCTS ON THE ROMANIAN MARKET

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    Aldea Roxana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the influence on the Asian products over the consumer decision making. We observed that because of the economic crisis most of the people are buying products made in China, although they now that the quality and the price are lower. The factors that change the habits and the consumer behavior decision making are: the lower wage, the small number of work places and the prices of the products. Regarding the low price of Chinese products quality, some times arouses suspicions. Romania is a parts of the European Union and on the market there are various products made in European countries but also products made in China. People with low wages from the last step of social classes are prone to buy lower prices products. Other consumers on the contrary became more sensitive and they prefer to pay more than to buy products made in China. The quality prevails over the price and sometimes over the quantity although the money to spend are dwindled. The crisis affected consumer behavior, consumers have become more attentive to the country of origin and the disposable income for shopping. In order to validate some of the ideas the authors undertook a quantitative online research. The research had as purpose to identify the main influences of the decision making when the consumer buys Chinese products. The chosen investigation was the selective survey, the research technique was the exploratory interrogation and the research instrument – structured in online questionnaire. After research we found that the economic crisis caused consumer behavior change as a result of diminishing the income buyers, the consumer is placed in a position to buy products of questionable quality at low prices, mostly from China. Lower purchase price often makes Chinese goods represent an attractive option for consumers. On the other hand, the quality of Chinese products has proven to not comply with the quality expectations of the consumers, based on

  15. Fighting poverty: the economic adjustment of female migrants in Dhaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq-hussain, S

    1995-10-01

    jobs more than once. 44% were satisfied with their work. Women were unhappy with low wages, tiring and hard work, and long working hours.

  16. Haiti. Educating factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, H

    1990-04-01

    There are approximately 50,000 workers employed in the light assembly industry in Haiti. About 70% are women, the majority of whom are aged between 25 and 34 years, and are either single or in a nonpermanent relationship with the father of their children. Many live and work in appalling conditions, surviving on very low wages to support several children and an extended family. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is now a visible problem in many factories. In October 1988, the Center for the Promotion of Women Workers (Centre de Promotion des Femmes Ouvriers/CPFO) launched a pilot AIDS education program for factory women. The Center, based in a large industrial zone near the airport, runs a health clinic and courses in literacy, communications skills, health promotion and family planning. The new AIDS program allowed CPFO staff to gain entry into factories for the 1st time. Other courses were held outside working hours and outside factory premises. Staff contacted manages by telephone to arrange a meeting to discuss AIDS and to ask permission to hold educational "round tables" with workers. Of 18 managers in the factories approached over a 12-month period, only 2 refused entry to CPFO staff. Almost all managers reported they had registered between 2 and 5 deaths from AIDS among their employees over the past couple of years. A total of 85 educational sessions, each lasting about 2 hours, were held within 28 different factories, community or labor organizations reaching 3063 workers (male and female). In each session, the presentation was carried out by 2 CPFO trained monitors and included a slide show, flip charts, and the video "Met ko," originally produced for Haitian immigrants in New York. The most important aspect of the program was the training of 38 volunteer factory-based health promoters. These promoters attended the round table sessions, where they facilitated discussion and distributed condoms and were subsequently available for counseling co

  17. Socioeconomic status and health of immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacková, Jitka; Brabcová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to acquaint the general public with select socioeconomic status (SES) parameters (type of work, education level, employment category, and net monthly income) of select nationalities (Ukrainians, Slovaks, Vietnamese, Poles, and Russians) from a total of 1,014 immigrants residing in the Czech Republic. It will also present a subjective assessment of socioeconomic status and its interconnection with subjective assessment of health status. This work was carried out as part of the "Social determinants and their impact on the health of immigrants living in the Czech Republic" project (identification number LD 13044), which was conducted under the auspices of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) agency. Quantitative methodology in the form of a questionnaire was selected to facilitate the research aim. Data was processed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 16.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical analyses were performed using the Pearson chi-square test, adjusted residual analysis, and multivariate correspondence analysis. The results of these tests demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between subjective assessments of socioeconomic status and the following related select characteristics: type of work performed (manual/intellectual), employment categories, education, and net monthly income. Results indicate that those situated lowest on the socioeconomic ladder feel the poorest in terms of health; not only from a subjective perspective, but also in terms of objective parameter comparisons (e.g. manual laborers who earn low wages). As the level of subjective SES assessment increases, the level of subjective health assessment increases, as well. Thus, the relationship has a natural gradient, as was described by Wilkinson and Marmot in 2003. Our study found no evidence of a healthy immigrant effect. Therefore, it was not possible to confirm that health status deteriorates

  18. Synthesis of Fluoroalkoxy Substituted Arylboronic Esters by Iridium-Catalyzed Aromatic C–H Borylation

    KAUST Repository

    Batool, Farhat

    2015-08-17

    The preparation of fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters by iridium-catalyzed aromatic C–H borylation is described. The fluoroalkoxy groups employed include trifluoromethoxy, difluoromethoxy, 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy, and 2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxole. The borylation reactions were carried out neat without the use of a glovebox or Schlenk line. The regioselectivities available through the iridium-catalyzed C–H borylation are complementary to those obtained by the electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions of fluoroalkoxy arenes. Fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters can serve as versatile building blocks.

  19. Getting what you need from the hospital to succeed as a traumatologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Samuel G; Jones, Clifford B

    2013-10-01

    Currently, the market for orthopaedic trauma surgeons is varied. The market consists of university employed, university private, medical group employed, medical group private, private employed, private contracted, and private. Each option has its positives and negatives. The orthopaedic trauma surgeon needs to determine which setting is appropriate for his/her given needs and wants. An experienced mentor(s) is invaluable for advice and guidance. The surgeon then needs to find an administrative leader to initiate, implement, and evaluate certain processes to succeed.

  20. Synthesis of Fluoroalkoxy Substituted Arylboronic Esters by Iridium-Catalyzed Aromatic C–H Borylation

    KAUST Repository

    Batool, Farhat; Parveen, Shehla; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Sioud, Salim; Gao, Xin; Munawar, Munawar A.; Chotana, Ghayoor A.

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters by iridium-catalyzed aromatic C–H borylation is described. The fluoroalkoxy groups employed include trifluoromethoxy, difluoromethoxy, 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy, and 2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxole. The borylation reactions were carried out neat without the use of a glovebox or Schlenk line. The regioselectivities available through the iridium-catalyzed C–H borylation are complementary to those obtained by the electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions of fluoroalkoxy arenes. Fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters can serve as versatile building blocks.

  1. Changes in the demand for private medical insurance following a shift in tax incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Marisol; Stoyanova, Alexandrina

    2008-02-01

    The 1998 Spanish reform of the Personal Income Tax eliminated the 15% deduction for private medical expenditures including payments on private health insurance (PHI) policies. To avoid an undesired increase in the demand for publicly funded health care, tax incentives to buy PHI were not completely removed but basically shifted from individual to group employer-paid policies. In a unique fiscal experiment, at the same time that the tax relief for individually purchased policies was abolished, the government provided for tax allowances on policies taken out through employment. Using a bivariate probit model on data from National Health Surveys, we estimate the impact of said reform on the demand for PHI and the changes occurred within it. Our findings indicate that the total probability of buying PHI was not significantly affected by the reform. Indeed, the fall in the demand for individual policies (by 10% between 1997 and 2001) was offset by an increase in the demand for group employer-paid ones. We also briefly discuss the welfare effects on the state budget, the industry and society at large.

  2. Supporting the patient's role in guideline compliance: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Stephen N; Shnaiden, Tatiana L; Wegh, Arnold A; Juster, Iver A

    2008-11-01

    Clinical messages alerting physicians to gaps in the care of specific patients have been shown to increase compliance with evidence-based guidelines. This study sought to measure any additional impact on compliance when alerting messages also were sent to patients. For alerts that were generated by computerized clinical rules applied to claims, compliance was determined by subsequent claims evidence (eg, that recommended tests were performed). Compliance was measured in the baseline year and the study year for 4 study group employers (combined membership >100,000) that chose to add patient messaging in the study year, and 28 similar control group employers (combined membership >700,000) that maintained physician messaging but did not add patient messaging. The impact of patient messaging was assessed by comparing changes in compliance from baseline to study year in the 2 groups. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for differences between the groups. Because a given member or physician could receive multiple alerts, generalized estimating equations with clustering by patient and physician were used. Controlling for differences in age, sex, and the severity and types of clinical alerts between the study and control groups, the addition of patient messaging increased compliance by 12.5% (P compliance with the evidence-based guidelines underlying the alerts.

  3. A comparison of mixed-integer linear programming models for workforce scheduling with position-dependent processing times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Camacho, Carlos A.; Montoya-Torres, Jairo R.; Vélez-Gallego, Mario C.

    2018-06-01

    Only a few studies in the available scientific literature address the problem of having a group of workers that do not share identical levels of productivity during the planning horizon. This study considers a workforce scheduling problem in which the actual processing time is a function of the scheduling sequence to represent the decline in workers' performance, evaluating two classical performance measures separately: makespan and maximum tardiness. Several mathematical models are compared with each other to highlight the advantages of each approach. The mathematical models are tested with randomly generated instances available from a public e-library.

  4. The balance of terror on main street, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, J.

    1987-01-01

    The movement to establish nuclear-free zones across America is quietly gaining momentum. Many of these ordinances go beyond mere symbolic declarations and are viewed as a threat by business. So far, nuclear-free zones have failed in cities with strong ties to the defense industry. The movement is increasingly colliding with the interests of corporations and workers that depend on Department of Defense contracts and support of America's nuclear arsenal. Examined are the various efforts to establish or defeat such proposals in several locals

  5. Complex families, the social determinants of health and psychosocial interventions: Deconstruction of a day in the life of hospital social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskat, Barbara; Craig, Shelley L; Mathai, Biju

    2017-09-01

    The roles of hospital social workers are delineated in the literature; however, their daily interventions have only been described anecdotally. This study analyzes the daily work of social workers in a pediatric hospital through a survey completed which examined factors related to interventions utilized and time spent per case over a 1-day period. Length and types of interventions were associated with the social determinants of health, time since diagnosis, biopsychosocial issues, and perception of complexity. The study offers a snapshot of the personalized expertise, provided by social workers that addresses complex contextual and biopsychosocial concerns of patient and families.

  6. KNOWLEDGE WORKERS’ MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona TODERICIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The empirical research of this paper deals with knowledge workers in Romanian organizations from different fields of activity, with the purpose of distinguishing them from other types of employees and clarifying their profile and individual characteristics. Also, the paper presents the most important challenges concerning the knowledge workers’ management: identifying, developing and evaluating knowledge workers, motivating and rewarding them, as well as describing specific structure of the organizations that rely mostly on knowledgeable workforce. The findings of the research represent an important factor in developing future efficient human resources strategies and practices regarding workers that fuel the knowledge economy.

  7. Permanent education that approaches radiation protection in hemodynamic service; Educacao permanente que aborde radioprotecao em servico de hemodinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flor, Rita de Cassia; Anjos, Djeniffer Valdirene dos, E-mail: flor@ifsc.edu.b [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IF-SC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    In the hemodynamic services that apply ionizing radiation yet exist the necessity of capacitation of workers for actuation in those areas. So, this qualitative study performed in a hemodynamic service at Sao Jose, Santa Catarina, Brazil, had the objective to analyse how are developed the permanent education programs and the real necessity of workers. The results have shown that the workers are longing for their qualification and formation, as generally they are admitted with not any qualification for those services. So, the workers that realize the on duty hemodynamic service praxis must do it in a conscious manner and the E P is a way for to adopt good practice in radiological protection

  8. Notes on the influence of Carlos Nelson Coutinho on Social Work in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabile Caetano Cazela

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports some results of a research study conducted for the master’s thesis in Social Work entitled Fundamental ethical principles of Social Work in Brazil: a study on the influence of Carlos Nelson Coutinho. It is based on bibliographic and field research, and it identifies and recognizes the influence of Coutinho on Social Work, as well as the intellectual contribution of Social Workers that are members of the Code of Ethics Revision Committee.

  9. Permanent education that approaches radiation protection in hemodynamic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flor, Rita de Cassia; Anjos, Djeniffer Valdirene dos

    2011-01-01

    In the hemodynamic services that apply ionizing radiation yet exist the necessity of capacitation of workers for actuation in those areas. So, this qualitative study performed in a hemodynamic service at Sao Jose, Santa Catarina, Brazil, had the objective to analyse how are developed the permanent education programs and the real necessity of workers. The results have shown that the workers are longing for their qualification and formation, as generally they are admitted with not any qualification for those services. So, the workers that realize the on duty hemodynamic service praxis must do it in a conscious manner and the E P is a way for to adopt good practice in radiological protection

  10. Attempt to stimulate cell division in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with weak ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quickenden, T.I.; Matich, A.J.; Pung, S.H.; Tilbury, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid cultures of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were irradiated with weak light having irradiances ranging from ca. 1 X 10(2) to 5 X 10(9) photons cm-2 s-1 and at wavelengths ranging from 200 to 700 nm. When particular care was taken to control the temperature of the cultures and the flow rate of oxygen, no evidence was obtained for stimulation of either yeast growth or division by the incident light. These results do not support the claims of early workers that very low intensity uv light can stimulate cell division in living organisms

  11. Prototype apparatus for the measurement of tritium in expired air using plastic scintillator pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Etsuko; Ito, Takeshi

    2018-02-01

    A new apparatus for measuring tritiated water in expired air was developed using plastic scintillator (PS) pellets and a low-background liquid scintillation counter. The sensitivity of the apparatus was sufficient when a large adapted Teflon vial was used. The measurement method generated low amounts of organic waste because the PS pellets were reusable by rinsing, and had adequate detection limits. The apparatus is useful for the safety management of workers that are exposed to radioactive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Working long hours: less productive but less costly? Firm-level evidence from Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    DELMEZ, Françoise; Vandenberghe, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    From the point of view of a profit-maximizing firm, the optimal number of working hours depends not only on the marginal productivity of hours but also on the marginal labour cost. This paper develops and assesses empirically a simple model of firms' decision making where productivity varies with hours and where the firm faces labour costs per worker that are invariant to the number of hours worked: i.e. quasi-fixed labour costs. Using Belgian firm-level data on production, labour costs, work...

  13. Transitions to employment from labour market enterprises in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Aakvik, Arild; Dahl, Svenn-Åge

    2004-01-01

    We analyse a labour market programme for partly disabled workers that involves the transition from Labour Market Enterprises to a job in the ordinary labour market. We find that the percentage of these people finding jobs after a maximum two-year programme period has increased over time. In 1995, 28 per cent became employed in the ordinary job market in that year after they have left the programme. Exit rates to employment increased to 36 per cent in 1998 and to 39 per cent in 1999. We also f...

  14. Occupational mercury vapour poisoning with a respiratory failure, pneumomediastinum and severe quadriparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Smiechowicz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Despite restrictions, mercury continues to pose a health concern. Mercury has the ability to deposit in most parts of the body and can cause a wide range of unspecific symptoms leading to diagnostic mistakes. Methods and results: We report the case of severe mercury vapour poisoning after occupational exposure in a chloralkali plant worker that resulted in life-threatening respiratory failure, pneumomediastinum and quadriparesis. Conclusions: Prolonged mechanical ventilation and treatment with penicillamine and spironolactone was used with successful outcome.

  15. On-site worker-risk calculations using MACCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    We have revised the latest version of MACCS for use with the calculation of doses and health risks to on-site workers for postulated accidents at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado. The modifications fall into two areas: (1) an improved estimate of shielding offered by buildings to workers that remain indoors; and, (2) an improved treatment of building-wake effects, which affects both indoor and outdoor workers. Because the postulated accident can be anywhere on plant site, user-friendly software has been developed to create those portions of the (revised) MACCS input data files that are specific to the accident site

  16. Staffing remote rural areas in middle- and low-income countries: A literature review of attraction and retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieleman Marjolein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many countries in middle- and low-income countries today suffer from severe staff shortages and/or maldistribution of health personnel which has been aggravated more recently by the disintegration of health systems in low-income countries and by the global policy environment. One of the most damaging effects of severely weakened and under-resourced health systems is the difficulty they face in producing, recruiting, and retaining health professionals, particularly in remote areas. Low wages, poor working conditions, lack of supervision, lack of equipment and infrastructure as well as HIV and AIDS, all contribute to the flight of health care personnel from remote areas. In this global context of accelerating inequities health service policy makers and managers are searching for ways to improve the attraction and retention of staff in remote areas. But the development of appropriate strategies first requires an understanding of the factors which influence decisions to accept and/or stay in a remote post, particularly in the context of mid and low income countries (MLICS, and which strategies to improve attraction and retention are therefore likely to be successful. It is the aim of this review article to explore the links between attraction and retention factors and strategies, with a particular focus on the organisational diversity and location of decision-making. Methods This is a narrative literature review which took an iterative approach to finding relevant literature. It focused on English-language material published between 1997 and 2007. The authors conducted Pubmed searches using a range of different search terms relating to attraction and retention of staff in remote areas. Furthermore, a number of relevant journals as well as unpublished literature were systematically searched. While the initial search included articles from high- middle- and low-income countries, the review focuses on middle- and low

  17. Potential Beneficiaries of the Obama Administration’s Executive Action Programs Deeply Embedded in US Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Kerwin

    2016-03-01

    ties, long tenure, and high employment rates in the United States. Nearly one-half of the DAPA population and far higher percentages of the two DACA populations speak English well, very well, or exclusively. An unknown, albeit not insubstantial percentage of both the DAPA- and DACA-eligible may already qualify for an immigration benefit or relief that would put them on a path to permanent residency and US citizenship. These mostly low-wage populations have relatively high rates of poverty and low rates of health insurance. Not surprisingly, the educational attainment, school enrollment rates, and English-language proficiency of the DACA-eligible substantially exceed those of the DAPA-eligible. Both populations enjoy high levels of computer and Internet access.The Center for Migration Studies (CMS derived its estimates on the DAPA- and DACA-eligible from statistics on the foreign-born population collected in the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS, as described in Warren (2016. It first derived detailed estimates for all undocumented residents, and then used the characteristics of this population (e.g., year of entry, age at entry, etc. to tabulate the numbers of those who would be eligible for DAPA and DACA in 2014, which is the most recent year available.

  18. Reestruturação produtiva, impactos na saúde e sofrimento mental: o caso de um banco estatal em Minas Gerais, Brasil Economic restructuring and impacts on health and mental distress: the case of a state-owned bank in Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Sérgio Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A reestruturação produtiva no setor financeiro brasileiro instalou-se por meio do trinômio demissões em massa, automação e terceirização, além de processos de reengenharia empresarial, com redução de níveis hierárquicos, flexibilização e polivalência de funções. O bancário, para se adaptar e resistir às exigências, aumentou seu nível de escolaridade, tornou-se polivalente e exímio vendedor, submetendo-se à precariedade das condições de trabalho, aumento da carga de serviços, longas jornadas e baixos salários. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o processo de reestruturação produtiva em um banco público do Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil, e seus possíveis impactos na saúde de seus trabalhadores. Analisou-se também o absenteísmo no período entre 1998 e 2003, quando houve maior desenvolvimento de doenças, como lesão por esforço repetitivo/distúrbios osteomusculares relacionados ao trabalho (LER/DORT e os distúrbios mentais e comportamentais, sendo responsáveis, respectivamente, por 56% e 19% do número de dias de afastamentos. O processo continuou até os dias atuais, com uma política restritiva de contratações. Novos estudos se fazem necessários para a continuidade desta análise e para confirmar os resultados encontrados.Restructuring of the Brazilian financial sector was consolidated through the combination of mass lay-offs, automation, and outsourcing, in addition to business reengineering with leveling of hierarchical echelons, labor casualization, and multi-function jobs. In order to comply and deal with the new demands, bank employees had to increase their schooling, become multi-functional and expert sales attendants, and submit to substandard conditions in the workplace, increased workload, overtime, and low wages. The purpose of the current study was to examine the restructuring process in a state-owned bank in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, and its impacts on workers' health. The study also

  19. Kadın Kütüphaneciler: Toplumsal Cinsiyet Sorunları = Female Librarians: Gender Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yılmaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bu araştırmanın amacı, kadın kütüphanecilerin cinsiyet ayrımcılığından dolayı kütüphanelerde karşılaşacakları olası sorunları irdelemektir. Bu amaç doğrultusunda araştırmada, kadın kütüphanecilerin kütüphanelerde karşılaşacakları sorunlar şu şekilde ayrılmıştır; ○ kütüphanelerde cinsel istismar (mobbing; ○ ücret ayrımcılığı (kadın kütüphaneci olarak düşük ücret alma ○ kariyer gelişiminde cinsiyet ayrımcılığı; ○ kadın kütüphaneci olarak haksız yere işten çıkarılma ○ kadın kütüphaneci olarak kariyere ara verme (evlilik ya da bebek sahibi olma gibi nedenler ve ○ iş görüşmelerinde kişisel sorularla karşılaşma (evlilikle ya da annelikle ilgili zamanlamayla ilgili sorular. Ayrıca araştırmada, kadın kütüphanecilerin cinsiyet ayrımcılığına ilişkin kütüphanelerde karşılaşacakları yukarıda sıralanan sorunlara ilişkin çeşitli çözüm önerileri de tartışılmıştır./The purpose of this study is to examine the possible problems being met by female librarians due to gender discrimination in libraries. With this purpose in this study, the relevant problems being met by female librarians in libraries are divided as follows; sexual harassment (mobbing in libraries, wage discrimination (receiving a low wage as a female librarian, gender discrimination in career development, unfair dismissal as a female librarian, career break as a female librarian (because of marriage or having a new baby, and encountering the personal questions in job interviews (such as the questions of the timing of marriage or motherhood. Furthermore, in the study, various recommendations for solving the above problems of gender discrimination met by female librarians in libraries have been also discussed.

  20. As características dos alunos são determinantes para o adoecimento de professores: um estudo comparativo sobre a incidência de Burnout em professores do ensino regular e especial The student characteristics affect teachers' illnesses: a comparative study on the incidence of Burnout in regular and special education teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Rogério da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O exercício da docência é permeado por condições de trabalho adversas, baixos salários, insuficiência de recursos materiais e didáticos, salas numerosas, tensão no relacionamento com os alunos, carga horária de trabalho excessiva, inexpressiva participação no planejamento da instituição e nas políticas institucionais e falta de segurança no ambiente escolar. O presente estudo teve por objetivo comparar a presença de indicadores de burnout em três grupos de professores que atuam no primeiro ciclo do Ensino Fundamental: a 20 no ensino regular, em turmas sem a inserção de alunos com necessidades educacionais especiais - RSI; b 20 no ensino regular, em turmas com a inserção de alunos com necessidades educacionais especiais - RCI; c 20 em salas de recursos - SR. Para a coleta, foi utilizado o Maslach Burnout Inventory -MBI. Na análise de dados, empregou-se o SPSS, versão 13.0, e o Teste de Kruskal-Wallis para comparação dos grupos. Os resultados, que foram organizados em forma de Figuras e Tabelas, revelam que, de maneira geral, os grupos apresentaram relativa similaridade. Entretanto, algumas diferenças foram encontradas. O grupo de professores SR obteve os melhores resultados na avaliação das três escalas do burnout, quando comparado com RSI e RCI, ou seja, com predominância de respostas nos níveis mais baixos de exaustão emocional, altos na diminuição da realização pessoal e baixos para despersonalização. Espera-se que os dados expostos contribuam para a compreensão do burnout em professores do ensino regular com e sem inclusão de alunos com necessidades educacionais especiais, e/ou suscitem novos encaminhamentos de pesquisas.The practice of teaching is permeated by adverse working conditions, low wages, inadequacy of material and teaching resources, overcrowded classrooms, tension in relationships with the students, excessive work load, lack of safety in the school environment, insignificant participation

  1. Governance in Times of Globalisation: the Kaleidoscope of the Legal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Scamardella

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, the West has been deeply transformed by globalisation; global markets have been replacing national economies and states have been losing their legislative and executive powers. The global economy is imposing its own standards, such as the so-called Brazilianisation of the West, consisting of labour changes inspired by typical Brazilian features (low wages, flexibility and insecurity. In such a context, a question arises: how is the legal system changing? Sociology of law has indicated legal transformations in terms of soft law, such as lex mercatoria, codes of conduct, etc. This informal system seems to constitute a legal kaleidoscope where global and local players are involved, rather than an effective legal system. From this perspective, globalisation can also be considered the legal premise of governance, based on the participation of social parties to policy and law-making processes. The aim of this article is to focus on legal transformations in times of globalisation, stressing the governance approach as a legal kaleidoscope capable of managing social inequalities, different distributions of power and knowledge and the other perverse effects determined by globalisation.En las últimas décadas, la globalización ha transformado profundamente Occidente; los mercados mundiales han ido sustituyendo a las economías nacionales y los Estados han ido perdiendo sus poderes legislativo y ejecutivo. La economía mundial está imponiendo sus propias normas, como la denominada brasileñización de Occidente, que consiste en implantar cambios laborales inspirados en las características típicas de Brasil (salarios bajos, flexibilidad e inseguridad. En este contexto, surge una pregunta: ¿cómo está cambiando el sistema legal? La sociología jurídica ha apuntado transformaciones legales en materia de leyes "blandas", como la lex mercatoria, códigos de conducta, etc. Este sistema informal parece constituir un caleidoscopio

  2. Três anos de acidentes do trabalho em uma metalúrgica: caminhos para seu entendimento Three years of work-related accidents in a metallurgic plant: ways to its understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Giglio de Oliveira Gonçalves

    2011-02-01

    -50 years (55.4%, 64.5% of workers had already suffered more than one accident. Besides, workers exposed to intense noise (+ 90 dBA were the most affected (53%. In the focal groups, perceptions and feelings of workers regarding the accidents were identified that had not appeared in the previous stages. It can be concluded that focal groups allow for a better identification of factors that may contribute for accidents such as performance pressures, extra-hours of work, low wages, and precarious conditions of work and work organization.

  3. Imperatives of globalization and Nigeria oil and gas development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, S.

    1998-01-01

    nations could raise their Gross Domestic Products (GDPs) by an average of 270 percen, compared to 80 percent for OECD nations. Translating these large change forecasts into corporate strategy is no easy task. However, it is equally dangerous to get too far ahead of the present into the unrealities of futurism as it is to get too caught up in day-to-day battles that obliterate the future from corporate consciousness. Managers do not need a perfect crystal ball to forecast the timing of globalisation. But what they do urgently need is vigilance and preparedness in developing capabilities and aptitudes for globalism. According to Schwab, the global environment is described as complex, volatile, and fraught with unintended consequence. As a result of which high technology, high productivity, and high quality plus low wages are common place in many countries. The dominant role that transnational corporations play today in international trade and in the competition between nations for fresh direct capital investment create the perception that there is today a definite shift of power in favour of the capital markets and financial capitalism. Business leaders are the key players in the great challenges of our times more so, perhaps, as the moral authority of government has declined. Business is a stakeholder in globalisation because of the heavy responsibility to contribute to the stability of the global system. One of the ways it can meet that responsibility is to do what business does best: innovate, invest and grow knowledge, build infrastructure, and create jobs. In order to succeed globally, new behaviours in all facets of Management are demand and the uncoupling of the corporation from the Nation-State. Flexibility in the local application of corporate culture is required in-order to be able to respond to globalisation

  4. Apropriação cultural e mediação pedagógica: contribuições de Vigotski na discussão do tema Apropiación cultural y mediación pedagógica: las contribuciones de Vigotski para discutir el tema Cultural appropriation and pedagogic mediation: contributions from Vygotsky to discuss the subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Cintra da Silva

    2011-06-01

    discusión sobre el tema que aborda, como la urgencia de crear una política pública para el bienestar cultural y estético de los docentes.This article refers to the research that targeted the understanding of the cultural repertoire of public school teachers in primary and high school of Uberaba and Uberlândia cities (Minas Gerais state. Based on on Vygotsky’s and Bourdieu’s theories, the project assumes that the mediation for learning would be better as much as its repertoire of knowledge and experience is wide and varied. Data on the aesthetic experiences of teachers were collected through a questionnaire. The results indicate that the majority does not have the habit of visit spaces and cultural events, and that the familiarity with expressions of high culture is weak or virtually nonexistent, mainly due to low wages and intense days of work. Considering that the school is, for many, the only possibility of accessing the non mass artistic production, the study identifies the need to expand investigations that deepen the discussion about the topic it addressed, as well as the urgent need of creating a governmental policy to the cultural and aesthetic formation of teachers.

  5. How a Guaranteed Annual Income Could Put Food Banks Out of Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Herbert Emery

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The federal Conservative government recently began phasing in a plan to raise the age of eligibility for Old Age Security from 65 to 67. But a more sensible move for improving the effectiveness of Canada’s social safety-net system may be to actually lower the age below 65 and rely strictly on an income test instead, regardless of age. The government could go a lot further toward the reduction of poverty in Canada by building on the success of its income supports for seniors, and making them available to poor Canadians of all ages. Canada can boast of having one of the lowest rates for poverty among seniors in the world, largely due to its guaranteed income programs for those 65 years and older. When low-income Canadians turn 65 years old and leave behind low-paying, often unstable jobs, their poverty levels drop substantially. What a guaranteed income provides, that their vulnerable job situation did not, is a form of protection against budget shocks — a sudden volatility in income or expenses without the access to savings or credit to smooth things out until stability returns. A guaranteed income provides a kind of “disaster insurance” that can protect someone in a crisis situation from going without necessities such as food or even shelter. Statistics show that the rate of Canadians experiencing “food insecurity” — that is, lack of access to food because of financial constraints — is half that among Canadians aged 65 to 69 years than it is among those aged 60 to 64. Self-reported rates of physical and mental health improve markedly as well after lowincome Canadians move from low-wage, insecure employment to a guaranteed income at the age of 65. That dramatic shift in physical and mental health indicates that expanding guaranteed income programs to younger Canadians is more than a simple cost calculation: there are potential savings to be found as poorer Canadians, given a guaranteed income, become healthier and therefore reduce

  6. Honeybees learn floral odors while receiving nectar from foragers within the hive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Walter M.; Grüter, Christoph; Acosta, Luis; Mc Cabe, Sofía

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies showed that nectar odors brought back by honeybee foragers can be learned associatively inside the hive. In the present study, we focused on the learning abilities of bees, which directly interact via trophallaxis with the incoming nectar foragers: the workers that perform nectar-receiving tasks inside the hive. Workers that have received food directly from foragers coming back from a feeder offering either unscented or scented sugar solution [phenylacetaldehyde (PHE) or nonanal diluted] were captured from two observational hives, and their olfactory memories were tested using the proboscis extension response paradigm. Bees that have received scented solution from incoming foragers showed significantly increased response frequencies for the corresponding solution odor in comparison with those that have received unscented solution. No differences in the response frequencies were found between food odors and colonies. The results indicate that first-order receivers learn via trophallaxis the association between the scent and the sugar solution transferred by incoming foragers. The implications of these results should be considered at three levels: the operational cohesion of bees involved in foraging-related tasks, the information propagation inside the hive related to the floral type exploited, and the putative effect of these memories on future preferences for resources.

  7. Enhancement of percutaneous penetration of aniline and o-toluidine in vitro using skin barrier creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinth, Gintautas; Lüersen, Lars; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Angerer, Jürgen; Drexler, Hans

    2008-04-01

    Aniline (ANI) and the human carcinogen o-toluidine (OT) are released at the workplace during the production and processing of rubber. Recently, we showed in rubber industry workers that a frequent use of skin barrier creams (SBC) increased the internal exposure of ANI and OT. In the present study, diffusion cells were used to investigate the effects of two SBC and one skin care cream (SCC) on percutaneous penetration of neat ANI and OT as well as of OT from a mixture with a workplace specific lubricant. The experiments were carried out with untreated and with skin creams treated human skin. A considerable percutaneous penetration enhancement of test compounds was observed for treated skin compared with untreated skin; the highest enhancement (mean factors 6.2-12.3) was found for SBC (based on oil in water emulsion) treated skin. The lowest penetration enhancement showed SCC treated skin (mean factors 4.2-9.7). The in vitro data support our findings in workers that the percutaneous absorption of aromatic amines significantly increases in presence of skin creams. The efficacy of skin creams to protect the percutaneous penetration of aromatic amines is not confirmed by our own experiments.

  8. Global network structure of dominance hierarchy of ant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, Hiroyuki; Abe, Masato S; Tsuji, Kazuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-10-06

    Dominance hierarchy among animals is widespread in various species and believed to serve to regulate resource allocation within an animal group. Unlike small groups, however, detection and quantification of linear hierarchy in large groups of animals are a difficult task. Here, we analyse aggression-based dominance hierarchies formed by worker ants in Diacamma sp. as large directed networks. We show that the observed dominance networks are perfect or approximate directed acyclic graphs, which are consistent with perfect linear hierarchy. The observed networks are also sparse and random but significantly different from networks generated through thinning of the perfect linear tournament (i.e. all individuals are linearly ranked and dominance relationship exists between every pair of individuals). These results pertain to global structure of the networks, which contrasts with the previous studies inspecting frequencies of different types of triads. In addition, the distribution of the out-degree (i.e. number of workers that the focal worker attacks), not in-degree (i.e. number of workers that attack the focal worker), of each observed network is right-skewed. Those having excessively large out-degrees are located near the top, but not the top, of the hierarchy. We also discuss evolutionary implications of the discovered properties of dominance networks. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution of 32P in laboratory colonies of Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) after feeding on labeled Heliothis zeal (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) eggs: an explanation of discrepancies encountered in field predation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuessly, G.S.; Sterling, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    Factors responsible for low recovery rates of radioactive Solenopsis invicta Buren following placement of 32 P-labeled Heliothis zea (Boddie) eggs on cotton in field predation tests were investigated using laboratory colonies of the ants. S. invicta workers became radioactive while handling labeled eggs by rupturing the egg chorion or by picking up labeled substances present on the surface of eggs. Foragers that removed the eggs from the plants picked up significantly more of the label than did workers that were sampled from the colonies between 12 and 72 h after egg introduction. Percentage of workers that became labeled over time was much lower with the solid live food than in other studies that used powdered food sources. Problems in finding labeled ants in the field may have been associated with low mean levels of 32 P per ant, together with difficulty in locating and isolating labeled ants from the population. Results indicate that egg predation rates estimated from counts per minute per predator have high variability, and suggest fairly large errors in estimates of eggs consumed per ant. Use of recovery rates of labeled predators to improve estimation of predation rates is discussed

  10. Decommissioning of a hot cell with high levels of contamination. Experience during the Undressed of Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Sancho, C.

    1998-01-01

    The object of this work is to show the radiological controls in decommissioning of the inner of the Base Cell of the Nuclear Facility of CIEMAT, IN-04 (Metallurgy Hot Cells) and the experience during the undressed of workers in decommissioning of this cell. The workers were equipped with one cotton overalls and one or two paper overalls of one-use. Also, when the radiation levels are high, the workers were equipped with leaded glasses and aprons. The protection equipment for internal contamination were autonomous and semi-autonomous respiratory equipment. Due to a high superficial contamination levels, two areas were established in order to proceed to the undressed of the workers when these concluded their work. The first area was a confined enclosure by joined to the hot cell, where an expert of the Radiation Protection Service (RPS), trained for it, take off the first paper overall and the first pair of gloves to the worker that come out the hot cells. The second area was at the exist of the Load Zone, where another expert of PRS, take off the second paper overall, the second pair of gloves and dislocated the pipe of air of the semi-autonomous respiratory equipment, to the worker that come out this zone. (Author)

  11. Evolution of Daily Activity Patterns from 1971 to 1981: A Study of the Halifax Activity Panel Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Harvey

    2001-12-01

    similarity measures between character strings, which can be used to measure the similarity of two persons’ daily activities, to measure change over time, or to determine the relative similarity of three or more activity diaries. The results of the research showed that both pure activities and activity-settings identified broadly the same behvioural groupings: employed workers, domestic workers, and weekend activities. The similarity of activity patterns of individuals was greater over the ten-year analysis period than the average similarity of the sample in either 1971 or 1981. The average similarity of activity and activitysetting patterns rose from 1971 to 1981, which contradicts observations that daily routines are becoming more complex and diverse.

  12. Properties of three-body decay functions derived with time-like jet calculus beyond leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    Three-body decay functions in time-like parton branching are calculated using the jet calculus to the next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The phase space contributions from each of the ladder diagrams and interference diagrams are presented. We correct part of the results for the three-body decay functions calculated previously by two groups. Employing our new results, the properties of the three-body decay functions in the regions of soft partons are examined numerically. Furthermore, we examine the contribution of the three-body decay functions modified by the restriction resulting from the kinematical boundary of the phase space for two-body decay in the parton shower model. This restriction leads to some problems for the parton shower model. For this reason, we propose a new restriction introduced by the kinematical boundary of the phase space for two-body decay. (author)

  13. Legomedicine-A Versatile Chemo-Enzymatic Approach for the Preparation of Targeted Dual-Labeled Llama Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lith, Sanne A M; van Duijnhoven, Sander M J; Navis, Anna C; Leenders, William P J; Dolk, Edward; Wennink, Jos W H; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; van Hest, Jan C M

    2017-02-15

    Conjugation of llama single domain antibody fragments (Variable Heavy chain domains of Heavy chain antibodies, VHHs) to diagnostic or therapeutic nanoparticles, peptides, proteins, or drugs offers many opportunities for optimized targeted cancer treatment. Currently, mostly nonspecific conjugation strategies or genetic fusions are used that may compromise VHH functionality. In this paper we present a versatile modular approach for bioorthogonal VHH modification and conjugation. First, sortase A mediated transPEGylation is used for introduction of a chemical click moiety. The resulting clickable VHHs are then used for conjugation to other groups employing the Cu + -independent strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloadition (SPAAC) reaction. Using this approach, tail-to-tail bispecific VHHs and VHH-targeted nanoparticles are generated without affecting VHH functionality. Furthermore, this approach allows the bioconjugation of multiple moieties to VHHs for simple and convenient production of VHH-based theranostics.

  14. Subjective Well-Being in Older Chinese and Korean Immigrants in the United States: Effects of Self-Rated Health and Employment Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Jung; Jun, Hyeyoun; Lee, Jisun; Linton, Kristen; Kim, Meehye; Browne, Colette

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of association between self-rated health and employment status on subjective well-being among older Chinese and Korean immigrants in the United States. Data were collected from 171 Chinese and 205 Korean older adult immigrants living in Los Angeles County. The primary variables included demographic data, subjective index of well-being, self-rated health, and employment status. Data support the association between self-rated health and subjective well-being for both groups. Employment, education, and age were associated with the level of subjective well-being only for older Korean immigrants. Similarities and differences were noted in these two Asian American subgroups. Findings suggest the need to develop health promotion services for both populations and employment opportunities targeted more so for Korean older immigrants to further support their subjective well-being. Results may have implications for other for older immigrants.

  15. Poly-functional porous-organic polymers to access functionality – CO 2 sorption energetic relationships

    KAUST Repository

    Alkordi, Mohamed H.; Haikal, Rana R.; Hassan, Youssef S.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile approach towards the construction of poly-functional porous organic polymers (POPs). The functional groups employed were selected to span the range of Lewis-base to neutral to Lewis-acid character. Our results underline the effect of chemical functionality on the observed Q for CO adsorption inside the material, being largest for functional groups with electron donating O- and N-centered Lewis base sites. Our systematic investigation within a family of POPs revealed a wide range for CO heat of adsorption (23.8-53.8 kJ mol) that is clearly associated with the chemical nature of the functional groups present. In addition, post-synthetic modification of POPs reported herein demonstrated a facile pathway to dramatically enhance carbon dioxide uptake energetics.

  16. Absolute differential cross sections for π±p elastic scattering at 30 ≤ Tπ ≤ 67 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, J.T.; Ristinen, R.A.; Kraushaar, J.J.

    1989-11-01

    Absolute π±p differential cross sections have been measured at incident pion energies of 30.0, 45.0, and 66.8 MeV, using active targets of scintillator plastic (CH 1.1 ) to detect recoil protons in coincidence with scattered pions. Statistical uncertainties are typically ±3%; systematic uncertainties are ±2%. The results are consistent with two earlier measurements by this group employing different experimental techniques at 67 MeV and higher incident pion energies. The π - p cross sections are in good agreement with currently accepted phase-shift analyses, but the corresponding π + p predictions are typically 15% higher at large angles than the π + p data reported here

  17. Disorienting the Art World: Mona Hatoum in Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Applin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1995 the German curator René Block was invited to curate the 4th International Istanbul Biennial. Titled “Orient/ation: The Vision of Art in a Paradoxical World”, Block eschewed the national groupings employed by most biennials, instead tackling head-on the idea of what nationality might mean in a climate of increasing global mobility in which the art world comprised an “international diaspora of artists”. Block’s poster for the Biennial was a hastily hand-drawn compass, its coordinates marked deliberately incorrectly. West was labelled North, South-East read as South-West, and the North-East was renamed “Istanbul”. According to this compass there is no one central point or locale relative to which its cardinal points of north, south, east, and west can make sense.

  18. The Importance of Motherhood among Women in the Contemporary United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Julia; Greil, Arthur L.; Scheffler, Karina M.; Tichenor, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    We contribute to feminist and gender scholarship on cultural notions of motherhood by analyzing the importance of motherhood among mothers and non-mothers. Using a national probability sample (N = 2,519) of U.S. women ages 25–45, we find a continuous distribution of scores measuring perceptions of the importance of motherhood among both groups. Employing OLS multiple regression, we examine why some women place more importance on motherhood, focusing on interests that could compete with valuing motherhood (e.g., education, work success, leisure), and controlling for characteristics associated with becoming a mother. Contrary to cultural schemas that view mother and worker identities as competing, we find that education level is not associated with the importance of motherhood for either group and that valuing work success is positively associated with valuing motherhood among mothers. Consistent with feminist explanations for delayed fertility, valuing leisure is negatively associated with valuing motherhood for non-mothers. PMID:20407592

  19. [Alimentation, health promotion and work: a strategy for alimentary education and food quality promotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pira, E; Coggiola, M; Romano, C

    2010-01-01

    As health promotion activity have been started two alimentary education projects for CTO Turin Hospital and LntesaSanpaolo bank group employers. Both projects have been co-ordinated by structure of Occupational Health of CTO Hospital and Turin University. The first step of the projects provided information and formation by using a brochure containing good alimentation tips. In the next step each participant at projects registered daily the food choice on specific software. At the end of observational period (six months) each participant received a final report containing quali-quantitative evaluation on the food choice uprightness. At the same time in IntesaSanpaolo bank group it have been proceeded, following Slow Food indication, on introducing a new menu based on using localfood products.

  20. Just a preference: racialised language in the sex-seeking profiles of gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Denton; Holt, Martin; Newman, Christy E

    2012-10-01

    Racialised language is a salient and contested aspect of contemporary sexual cultures, particularly in the online domain. This paper explores the ways in which gay men in Australia employ race-related language when using online sex/dating websites. Using inductive content analysis, descriptive categories were developed to identify recurrent patterns in the racialised language employed by website users. A coding framework was then constructed to identify the 'subject' (self, other or concept) of each piece of race-related content, its 'purpose' (marketing, negative or positive discrimination, commentary) and the 'position' adopted (defensive, normalised or critical). Descriptive and comparative analyses revealed differences in the ways in which members of racial groups employed racialised language online. These differences are reviewed in relation to broader discourses on Whiteness and race in Australia, as well as recent community-produced anti-racism campaigns.

  1. Poly-functional porous-organic polymers to access functionality – CO 2 sorption energetic relationships

    KAUST Repository

    Alkordi, Mohamed H.

    2015-09-21

    Herein, we report a facile approach towards the construction of poly-functional porous organic polymers (POPs). The functional groups employed were selected to span the range of Lewis-base to neutral to Lewis-acid character. Our results underline the effect of chemical functionality on the observed Q for CO adsorption inside the material, being largest for functional groups with electron donating O- and N-centered Lewis base sites. Our systematic investigation within a family of POPs revealed a wide range for CO heat of adsorption (23.8-53.8 kJ mol) that is clearly associated with the chemical nature of the functional groups present. In addition, post-synthetic modification of POPs reported herein demonstrated a facile pathway to dramatically enhance carbon dioxide uptake energetics.

  2. The Antecedent Variables of Quality of Life Among Female Factory Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Diana Purba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the quality of life of female factory workers that is hypothesized as affected by work-family conflict and job satisfaction and moderated by perceived organizational support and labor union support. The respondents of the research are female factory workers who are already married and have children, in which 158 respondents are from Jabodetabek and 66 are from Batam. The result shows that work-family conflict significantly decreases quality of life, and perceived organizational support also has a significant positive moderating effect toward quality of life. The quality of life is affected by job satisfaction and work-family conflict but not moderated by labor union support. This research describes that although the work-family conflict of female factory workers has no influence on job satisfaction but it reduces the quality of life directly with the result that job satisfaction is not an intervening variable.

  3. Atividades de coleta e origem floral do pólen armazenado em colônias de Plebeia saiqui (Holmberg (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponinae no sul do Brasil Collection activities and floral origin of the stored pollcn in colonies of Plebeia saiqui (Holmberg (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponinae in south Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel A. Pick

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Four colonies of Plebeia saiqui (Holmberg, 1903, of São Francisco de Paula, were studied during the period from October/1998 to October/1999. The counting of the bees was proceeded monthly, differentiated workers that came back with and without pollen in the corbicula. Grains of pollen of pots previously marked were collected monthly and identified. The percentage of the pollen types of the samples was estimated: 20% of Asteraceae, 17% Myrtaceae, 15% type Meliaceae and 10% Euphorbiaceae. The remaining corresponds to other pollen types of small representation, besides those the were no identified. The climatic influence on the pollen collection was analyzed being used simple and multiple regressions. It was verified that in the spring and in the summer the temperature, the solar irradiation and relative humidity were significant for the pollen foraging. During autumn and winter the relative humidity had smaller influence in the pollen collection.

  4. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Antigen/antibody in Patients of Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Joshi

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of Hepatitis B antigen positive hepatitis, a history of previous blood transfusion or any parenteral therapy is lacking and evidence for other routes of infections have to be sought. Sexual contact has been suggested as one of the methods of transmission of this infection. To approach the problem from this angle we studied 480 serawhich werepositive for syphilis serology for the presence of HB antigen and antibody by discontinuous counter immune electrophoresis method. It was found to be prevalent to the extentof 5.Z-per centagainst 1.4 per cent found in voluntary blood donors. Our observation agrees with that of other workers that HB antigen/antibody is seen more frequently in patients with positive syphilis serol-ogy.

  5. Gender, aging, and work: aging workers' strategies to confront the demands of production in maquiladora plants in nogales, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarga, Mireya Scarone; Becerril, Leonor Cedillo; Champion, Catalina Denman

    2010-01-01

    This work is part of a qualitative socio-cultural investigation with a group of men and women 40 years and older in the maquila export industry in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. In 1994, as a result of the North American Free Trade Agreement, maquila plants combined traditional intensive work methods with new "just in time" production norms that impacted work and health conditions, particularly in older, or aging, workers. The workers that were interviewed for this study show a reduction in their functional ability to work starting at 40 years of age. Work organization demands, general health conditions, and a decrease in physical abilities brings these 40-year-old workers to prematurely construct an image of themselves as aging workers and to develop coping strategies that vary by gender.

  6. La funzione di produttività di Sylos Labini tra mercato e territorio: un'analisi econometrica per le regioni italiane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Guarini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the labour productivity for the Italian regions estimating the Sylos Labini's function. In this function, in dynamic term, the labour productivity depends positively on market (Smith effect, on unit labour cost (organization's effect, on difference between wages and prices of machine (Ricardo effect and past investments, while it depends negatively on current investments (disturbance effect. According to the estimates, for the Italian regions, these three effects are significant; moreover the dimension of these effects are conditioned by sector and territorial peculiarities. In particular, the Smith effect could be determined by the phenomenon of labour hoarding for which during recession entrepreneur prefers to reduce utilization of workers that fire them. Finally, the significance of investments could be caused by an important multicollinearity between present and past investments.

  7. Urinary lithiasis in civil construction workers as a management indicator for health and improvement in personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ribeiro Nogueira Ferraz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Empirical information provided by health care professionals acting in the first line of care report a constant increase in the number of civil construction workers that present painful acute conditions, in most cases associated with the existence of urinary tract calculi. Aims: Evaluating the prevalence of urinary lithiasis in civil construction workers, as a means to identify indicators for the management of health and personnel. Methods: Observational study based on directed questionnaire. Results: From the 94 participants, 18 (19% were lithiasic, mostly due to overweight and reduced fluid intake. Conclusion: The observed prevalence appeared to be two times greater than that of the general population. Thus, prevention for such condition gains relevance, in order to avoid discomfort for the worker, and also reduce costs due to absenteeism, improving productivity, benefiting the workers by performance and creating the perspective of an improved quality of life.

  8. Causes and Scale of Winter Flights in Honey Bee (Apis Mellifera Carnica Colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzynowicz Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Winter honey bee losses were evaluated during the two overwintering periods of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. The research included dead bee workers that fell on the hive bottom board (debris and the ones that flew out of the hive. Differences were observed in the number of bees fallen as debris between the two periods, whereas the number of bees flying out was similar in both years. No differences were found between the numbers of dead bees in strong and weak colonies. The percentage of bees flying out of the colony increased in the presence of Nosema spores, Varroa infestation, increased average air temperature, and insolation during the day. In addition, both the presence of Nosema and insolation during the day had an impact on the number of bees that died and fell on the hive board.

  9. [Age effect on the life quality and health of garbage collectors of an association in Governador Valadares, Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Jane Rabelo; Elias, Elcinéia Tavares; Magalhães, Marcos Alves de; Vieira, Antônio José Dias

    2009-01-01

    Workers that segregate recyclable garbage are daily exposed to unhealthy work conditions which can have a more intense negative effect with aging of the garbage collector. A population of garbage collectors from Governador Valadares, Minas Gerais, Brazil answered a semi-structured questionnaire regarding the presence or absence of labor pain, pain intensity, living conditions, access to health services, occurrence of accidents at works and degree of personal satisfaction. These variables were correlated with the age of the workers. It was observed that pain is not associated to age increase and that it doesn't affect the degree of personal satisfaction of the studied population. The education degree was negatively related with age. The youngest garbage collectors presented a lower degree of life satisfaction. The age of the workers doesn't have any association with the occurrence of accidents at work and dwelling type.

  10. Domestic Service and the Labour Market in Spain: A Gender Perspective on Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Domínguez Mujica

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Many Spanish women manage to cope with the demands of both job and family by hiring immigrant women to do some housework and look after dependant relatives. In the last few years there has been an important increase in the demand for extra-communitarian workers to carry out this kind of task. These workers have been segregated by sex regarding occupation. In the procedure of regularisation of foreign workers that took place in Spain during 2005, 83.4 percent of the applications for jobs in the area of domestic service were submitted by women (around 220,000, with an absolute predominance of immigrants from Latin America. Among the factors that explain this specialization we may find cultural affinity and the flexibility that characterizes this kind of job. This phenomenon reveals an occupational ethno-stratification on the grounds of gender and origin.

  11. The Evaluation on Data Mining Methods of Horizontal Bar Training Based on BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of science and technology, data analysis has become an indispensable part of people’s work and life. Horizontal bar training has multiple categories. It is an emphasis for the re-search of related workers that categories of the training and match should be reduced. The application of data mining methods is discussed based on the problem of reducing categories of horizontal bar training. The BP neural network is applied to the cluster analysis and the principal component analysis, which are used to evaluate horizontal bar training. Two kinds of data mining methods are analyzed from two aspects, namely the operational convenience of data mining and the rationality of results. It turns out that the principal component analysis is more suitable for data processing of horizontal bar training.

  12. Cobalt deposition studies in the primary circuit under BWR conditions (Phase 1 and 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Peter

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the results from the first 2 phases of an experiment performed to investigate the effects of water chemistry on cobalt transport and deposition in the primary circuit under BWR conditions. Two high pressure water loops have been used to compare the incorporation of cobalt into the oxide films on coupons of various LWR primary circuit constructional materials, with several pretreatments, under Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) and Normal Water Chemistry (NWC) conditions. Cobalt-60 deposition rates onto samples that had been pre-oxidised in air were lower than on samples that had been exposed previously in a water loop or had untreated surfaces. In NWC, oxide layers were thicker, normalised Co-60 deposition rates were higher and Co-60 activities per unit volume of oxide were greater. Some evidence has been produced to support the conclusions of other workers that a chromium-rich outer oxide layer is responsible for enhanced cobalt incorporation. (author)

  13. Holocene climate and fjord glaciations in Northeast Greenland: implications for IRD deposition in the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels

    2004-01-01

    been released by intensive sub-glacial melting during the long stay of the ice-islands in coastal waters. The Holocene glacial geological record from Northeast Greenland is compared to the record of ice rafted debris (IRD) from North Atlantic deep-sea sediment cores. The comparison shows that transport...... by icebergs in the form of basal debris is unlikely to be the dominant transport mechanism of IRD to deposition sites in the North Atlantic during the Holocene. The ice rafted debris is more likely to be carried at the surface of sea- (or glacier) ice. This supports the result of previous studies by other...... workers that changes of atmospheric and ocean-surface circulation and temperature are the likely causes of Holocene cycles in IRD concentration in North Atlantic deep-sea sediments....

  14. Listening to Chinese Immigrant Restaurant Workers in the Midwest: Application of the Culture-Centered Approach (CCA) to Explore Perceptions of Health and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haijuan; Dutta, Mohan; Okoror, Titilayo

    2016-01-01

    This study engages with the culture-centered approach (CCA) to explore Chinese immigrant restaurant workers' perception of the U.S. health care system and their interactions with the health care system in interpreting meanings of health. Chinese restaurant workers are marginalized because of their struggles on the job, their immigrant identity, and their negotiations with the structural contexts of occupation, migration status, and culture. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 Chinese immigrant restaurant workers that lasted an average of 1.5 hours each, and were audiotaped. Interviews with participants highlighted critical issues in access to health care and the struggles experienced by restaurant workers in securing access to health, understood in the context of work. Critical to the workers' discourse is the acknowledgment of structural constraints such as lack of insurance coverage, immigration status, and lack of understanding of how the U.S. health care system works.

  15. Diabetes among refugee populations: what newly arriving refugees can learn from resettled Cambodians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Berthold, S Megan; Buckley, Thomas; Kong, Sengly; Kuoch, Theanvy; Scully, Mary

    2015-08-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that cardiometabolic disease generally and type 2 diabetes specifically are problems among refugee groups. This paper reviews rates of cardiometabolic disease and type 2 diabetes among refugees and highlights their unique risk factors including history of malnutrition, psychiatric disorders, psychiatric medications, lifestyle changes toward urbanization and industrialization, social isolation, and a poor profile on the social determinants of health. Promising interventions are presented for preventing and treating diabetes in these groups. Such interventions emphasize well-coordinated medical and mental health care delivered by cross-cultural and multidisciplinary teams including community health workers that are well integrated into the community. Finally, recommendations for service, policy, and research are made. The authors draw on local data and clinical experience of our collective work with Cambodian American refugees whose 30-year trajectory illustrates the consequences of ignoring diabetes and its risk factors in more recent, and soon to be arriving, refugee cohorts.

  16. Identification of occupational mortality risks for Hanford workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.; Mancuso, T.F.; Stewart, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Though most of the production work at Hanford is done by manual workers, 46% of the most dangerous jobs are performed by people who have professional or technical qualifications. For these privileged workers occupational mortality risks are positively correlated with radiation doses but for manual workers, who have relatively high death rates, there is an inverse relation with dose. The high ratio of professional to manual workers is clearly the reason for the industry having fewer observed than expected deaths and the inverse relation with dose for less privileged workers is probably a sign that there has been selective recruitment of the most highly paid manual workers-that is, skilled craftsmen into the more dangerous occupations. Evidence of this selective recruitment was obtained by equating danger levels with levels of monitoring for internal radiation. Therefore, there should be some control for these levels in any analysis of cancer effects of the measured dose of radiation. (author)

  17. WORK ACCIDENTS ANALYSIS, EMPHASIZING THE FOREST SECTORS, IN A FEDERAL HIGH EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héder Alencar Vianna

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed the probable causes of accidents at work, of the forest sectors, of a Federal Institution of Higher education in Minas Gerais State looking for minimizing risks damages to worker’s health and safety. The analyses were accomplished by means of the Accidents Communications in Service data bank and the results showed that in the studied period, for the forest sector, 50.71% of the accidents were attributed to the insecure act, 16.98% to insecure condition and 17.94% to personal factor of insecurity. The functional evaluation indicated that in 7.14% of the accidents occurred with workers that were not in the function established by the employment respective contracts. The rates of gravity and frequency of accidents calculated for the forest sectors allowed to conclude that the indices were higher than the others sectors and much higher than the values published by the Brazilian Ministry of Social Service and Assistance.

  18. Climatic and psychosocial risks of heat illness incidents on construction site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yunyan Andrea; Rowlinson, Steve; Ciccarelli, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The study presented in this paper aims to identify prominent risks leading to heat illness in summer among construction workers that can be prioritised for developing effective interventions. Samples are 216 construction workers' cases at the individual level and 26 construction projects cases at the organisation level. A grounded theory is generated to define the climatic heat and psychosocial risks and the relationships between risks, timing and effectiveness of interventions. The theoretical framework is then used to guide content analysis of 36 individual onsite heat illness cases to identify prominent risks. The results suggest that heat stress risks on construction site are socially constructed and can be effectively managed through elimination at supply chain level, effective engineering control, proactive control of the risks through individual interventions and reactive control through mindful recognition and response to early symptoms. The role of management infrastructure as a base for effective interventions is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of workers' dose records from the Greek Dose Registry Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Dimitriou, P.; Proukakis, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this work is the study of the individual film badge annual dose information of classified workers in Greece, monitored and assessed by the central dosimetry service of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission. Dose summaries were recorded and processed by the Dose Registry Information System. The statistical analysis refers to the years 1989-93 and deals with the distribution of individuals in the occupational groups, the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distribution of the dose over the different specialties and the number of workers that have exceeded any of the established dose limits. Results concerning the annual dose summaries, demonstrate a year-by-year reduction in the mean individual dose to workers in the health sector. Conversely, exposures in the industrial sector did not show any decreasing tendency during the period under consideration. (Author)

  20. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1979-11-01

    An updated compilation is presented of occupational radiation exposures at commercial nuclear power reactors for the years 1969 through 1978. Data received from the 64 light water cooled reactors (LWRs) that had completed at least one year of commercial operation as of December 31, 1978 are included. This represents an increase of seven reactors over the number contained in last year's report. The total number of personnel monitored at LWRs during 1978 increased by approximately 12% to 76,121. The number of workers that received measurable doses, however, increased only 8% to 45,978. The total collective dose for 1978 is estimated to be 31,806 man-rems, a small decrease from last year's value of 32,511, which results in the average dose per worker decreasing slightly to 0.69 rems. The average collective dose per reactor also decreased, by approximately 15%, to a value of 497 man-rems

  1. Ergonomic Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Findings published in the NASA Anthropometric Source Book by Johnson Space Center helped BodyBilt, Inc. to fashion controlled comfort chairs that lessen the harmful effects of gravity on seated workers. Crew members living aboard NASA's Skylab noted that in space the human posture differs from the normal posture caused by the tug of one gravity. There has been an alarming increase in back pain and muscle fatigue in workers, along with a dramatic escalation in repetitive stress injuries. BodyBilt's ergonomically-correct line of office chairs are targeted for the average worker that sits for prolonged periods, be it in the classroom or boardroom. Their roster of national clients lists such organizations as IBM, Microsoft, Texas Instruments, Hewlett-Packard, Eastman-Kodak, Boeing, Motorola, and Walt Disney Studios.

  2. Cross-sectoral Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lene Ekholm

    2016-01-01

    that the market is mainly composed of public institutions and consumers. Even though it is the citizen, patient or welfare worker that will use the device it is the institution that is the customer in terms of financing the welfare technology. Firms producing healthcare and welfare products mainly deliver to...... and Duguid, 2001 and Ellström, 2008) along with authors from evolutionary economic geography (Amin and Cohendet, 2009, Cooke et al., 2007, Creviosier and Jeannerat, 2009 and David and Foray, 2002). The paper will unpack the question of how cluster development can be seen taking an ANT approach when knowledge....... In Denmark the economic system or the nation’s type of capitalism would fall under the category of coordinated market economy (Hall and Soskice, 2001) contrary to a liberal market economy as is found in Britain. This means that public institutions and organizations play a central role in the economy. Hansen...

  3. Saúde ocupacional: considerações a respeito da perda auditiva induzida por ruído e da disfonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Corrêa de Barros

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This study provides some information about occupational health, more specifically about noise-induced hearing loss and voice disorders caused by the attempt to overcome background noise. Repeated exposures to excessive sound levels can lead to noise-induced hearing loss and voice disorders. Several studies have been conducted in order to suggest best means to control noise. Among the professionals involved in the hearing loss prevention are the industrial engineers and operations managers. This study also suggests that many of the workers that perform their job in a noisy place have to raise their voices to be heard over the sound environment, which could cause voice disorders. Therefore, some considerations have been made about the aspects of noise control projects and ways to prevent hearing loss and voice disorders in a noisy environment. Keywords: excessive sound levels, hearing loss, voice disorders.

  4. A genomic comparison of two termites with different social complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eKorb

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The termites evolved eusociality and complex societies before the ants, but have been studied much less. The recent publication of the first two termite genomes provides a unique comparative opportunity, particularly because the sequenced termites represent opposite ends of the social complexity spectrum. Zootermopsis nevadensis has simple colonies with totipotent workers that can develop into all castes (dispersing reproductives, nest-inheriting replacement reproductives, and soldiers. In contrast, the fungus-growing termite Macrotermes natalensis belongs to the higher termites and has very large and complex societies with morphologically distinct castes that are life-time sterile. Here we compare key characteristics of genomic architecture, focusing on genes involved in communication, immune defenses, mating biology and symbiosis that were likely important in termite social evolution. We discuss these in relation to what is known about these genes in the ants and outline hypotheses for further testing.

  5. A genomic comparison of two termites with different social complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Judith; Poulsen, Michael; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Zhang, Guojie; Liebig, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The termites evolved eusociality and complex societies before the ants, but have been studied much less. The recent publication of the first two termite genomes provides a unique comparative opportunity, particularly because the sequenced termites represent opposite ends of the social complexity spectrum. Zootermopsis nevadensis has simple colonies with totipotent workers that can develop into all castes (dispersing reproductives, nest-inheriting replacement reproductives, and soldiers). In contrast, the fungus-growing termite Macrotermes natalensis belongs to the higher termites and has very large and complex societies with morphologically distinct castes that are life-time sterile. Here we compare key characteristics of genomic architecture, focusing on genes involved in communication, immune defenses, mating biology and symbiosis that were likely important in termite social evolution. We discuss these in relation to what is known about these genes in the ants and outline hypothesis for further testing.

  6. Algorithmic mechanisms for reliable crowdsourcing computation under collusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Anta, Antonio; Georgiou, Chryssis; Mosteiro, Miguel A; Pareja, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We consider a computing system where a master processor assigns a task for execution to worker processors that may collude. We model the workers' decision of whether to comply (compute the task) or not (return a bogus result to save the computation cost) as a game among workers. That is, we assume that workers are rational in a game-theoretic sense. We identify analytically the parameter conditions for a unique Nash Equilibrium where the master obtains the correct result. We also evaluate experimentally mixed equilibria aiming to attain better reliability-profit trade-offs. For a wide range of parameter values that may be used in practice, our simulations show that, in fact, both master and workers are better off using a pure equilibrium where no worker cheats, even under collusion, and even for colluding behaviors that involve deviating from the game.

  7. Monthly radiation protection training of workers: An evaluation of two years operational practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berus, D.; Covens, P.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation protection training and education is important in stimulating safety culture of occupationally exposed workers. Taking into account the mandatory requirements in relation to education and training a digital training tool was introduced for communication of personal dose results and regular information on radiation protection. This tool enables that personal dose reports are monthly sent to the individual mailbox of workers together with short comprehensive slideshows on radiation protection topics. After two years of operational practice a survey was organised to evaluate the training tool. The results show that the majority (92%) of the occupationally exposed workers are aware of the communication of personal dose results through e-mail. Furthermore, 81% of these workers are also aware of their monthly and cumulated dose level. The monthly information on radiation protection topics is however less consulted. Around 40% of the workers that noticed the link are indifferent to the monthly information. The interest in radiation protection issues increases however with the education level.

  8. Dampak Peningkatan Jumlah Wanita Bekerja Karena Meningkatnya Taraf Pendidikan Terhadap Fenomena Shoushika Di Jepang (2002-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Handayani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Shoushika is a phenomenon facing today's Japanese society. Shoushika become a trend since the increasing female workers delay childbearing which consequently decrease the birth growth in Japan. Due to the decreasing number of future generations, the rate of Japanese economy is hampered and causes restlessness in society about the future. The author felt the need to analyze the underlying problems of women workers that delay having children. Its objective is to find the background of working Japanese females delaying childbearing in relation with the rising level of education, career and salary, referring to the feminism theory developed in Japan.

  9. Industrial Law and the Productive Capacity of Labour in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Enya Nwocha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This Paper has discussed the various employment laws in the country and the inherent defects in them that have impacted negatively on staff productivity. The Paper came against the background of the low productive output of the Nigerian worker that has adversely affected the growth of the national economy and created room for fraud and corruption in the public service as well as the private sector. The Paper has found that aside of defective labour laws, the mentality of Nigerian courts to labour disputes, the negative attitude of Nigerian workers and poor work ethics, and the poor conditions of service in the labour sector all contribute to low output and productivity. Therefore, the Paper has suggested ways that these negative trends can be reversed among them, the amendment of the extant industrial laws and improvement of the working conditions of the Nigerian employee.

  10. Public health response to striking solid waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murti, Michelle; Ayre, Reg; Shapiro, Howard; de Burger, Ron

    2011-10-01

    In 2009, the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, experienced a six-week labor disruption involving 24,000 city workers that included solid waste and public health employees. In an attempt to control illegal dumping and to manage garbage storage across the city during this period, 24 temporary garbage storage sites were established by the city (mostly in local parks) for residents to dispose of their household waste. No other municipality in North America has attempted to operate this many temporary sites for this long a period. Management and nonunion staff from Healthy Environments in Toronto Public Health performed daily inspections, responded to community questions, issued public health orders, and worked closely with Solid Waste Management and the Ministry of the Environment to actively manage the public health concerns associated with these sites. This intensive oversight mitigated public health risks to the community and facilitated an effective, safe solution to the temporary garbage storage problem.

  11. “Don’t Let the Illegals Vote!”: The Myths of Illegal Latino Voters and Voter Fraud in Contested Local Immigrant Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Courtney Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes how the belief and fear by mostly older, white voters, politicians, and poll workers that “illegal” Latino immigrants were seeking to vote in local elections led to stigmatization of and discrimination against some Latino citizen voters in Port Chester, New York. Stoked by and closely echoing national voter ID law rhetoric, this fear fueled an “illegal Latino voter threat” narrative. This article documents how Port Chester’s leaders and citizens repeated this narrative in public life, sometimes enacting it in politics, including in voting. The resultant stigma denies Latino voters the presumed legitimacy other citizens enjoy, discrediting them in one word: illegal. Such processes harm democracy in Port Chester and America, and were on display in the 2016 presidential election.

  12. Proposal and application of methodology for monitoring workers occupationally exposed to Thorium-232 and its decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Bernardo Maranhao

    1993-08-01

    Thorium-232 is the parent of one of the naturally occurring decay series and is widely spread on the earth's crust, being also present in higher concentrations at some deposits located mainly in Brazil and India. The occupational exposure to this radionuclide may occur in several steps of the thorium cycle. In Brazil, there is a large number of workers that should be monitored because they manipulate directly or indirectly different kinds of ores, raw materials and products containing significant amounts of thorium in its composition. In this study, the techniques developed specifically for the in vivo and in vitro monitoring of these workers are presented together with the application of these techniques to a group of selected workers classified as occupationally exposed. It is also presented the methodology by which the results obtained with these measurements are interpreted with the objective of identifying the main pathways of incorporation and reducing the internal doses to values as low as reasonably achievable. (author)

  13. An invasive social insect overcomes genetic load at the sex locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloag, Rosalyn; Ding, Guiling; Christie, Joshua R; Buchmann, Gabriele; Beekman, Madeleine; Oldroyd, Benjamin P

    2016-11-07

    Some invasive hymenopteran social insects found new populations with very few reproductive individuals. This is despite the high cost of founder effects for such insects, which generally require heterozygosity at a single locus-the complementary sex determiner, csd-to develop as females. Individuals that are homozygous at csd develop as either infertile or subfertile diploid males or not at all. Furthermore, diploid males replace the female workers that are essential for colony function. Here we document how the Asian honey bee (Apis cerana) overcame the diploid male problem during its invasion of Australia. Natural selection prevented the loss of rare csd alleles due to genetic drift and corrected the skew in allele frequencies caused by founder effects to restore high average heterozygosity. Thus, balancing selection can alleviate the genetic load at csd imposed by severe bottlenecks, and so facilitate invasiveness.

  14. Evaluation of work posture and quantification of fatigue by Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkya, I.; Syahputri, K.; Sari, R. M.; Anizar; Siregar, I.

    2018-02-01

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), poor body postures, and low back injuries are the most common problems occurring in many industries including small-medium industries. This study presents assessment and evaluation of ergonomic postures of material handling worker. That evaluation was carried out using REBA (Rapid Entire Body Assessment). REBA is a technique to quantize the fatigue experienced by the worker while manually lifting loads. Fatigue due to abnormal work posture leads to complaints of labor-perceived pain. REBA methods were used to an assessment of working postures for the existing process by a procedural analysis of body postures involved. This study shows that parts of the body have a high risk of work are the back, neck, and upper arms with REBA score 9, so action should be taken as soon as possible. Controlling actions were implemented to those process with high risk then substantial risk reduction was achieved.

  15. Perofrmance testing of personnel dosimetry services. Final report of a two-year pilot study, October 1977-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plato, P.; Hudson, G.

    1980-01-01

    A two-year pilot study was conducted of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee (HPSSC) Standard titled, Criteria for Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance. The objectives of the pilot study were: to give processors an opportunity to correct any problems that are uncovered; to develop operational and administrative prodedures to be used later by a permanent testing laboratory; and to determine whether the proposed HPSSC Standard provides an adequate and practical test of dosimetry performance. Fifty-nine dosimetry processors volunteered to submit dosimeters for test irradiations according to the requirements of the HPSSC Standard. The feasibility of using the HPSSC Standard for a future mandatory testing program for personnel dosimetry processors is discussed. This report shows the results of the pilot study and contains recommendations for revisions in the Standard that will make a mandatory testing program useful to regulatory agencies, dosimetry processors, and radiation workers that use personnel dosimeters

  16. IBM, Elsevier Science, and academic freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailar, John C; Cicolella, Andre; Harrison, Robert; LaDou, Joseph; Levy, Barry S; Rohm, Timothy; Teitelbaum, Daniel T; Wang, Yung-Der; Watterson, Andrew; Yoshida, Fumikazu

    2007-01-01

    Elsevier Science refused to publish a study of IBM workers that IBM sought to keep from public view. Occupational and environmental health (OEH) suffers from the absence of a level playing field on which science can thrive. Industry pays for a substantial portion of OEH research. Studies done by private consulting firms or academic institutions may be published if the results suit the sponsoring companies, or they may be censored. OEH journals often reflect the dominance of industry influence on research in the papers they publish, sometimes withdrawing or modifying papers in line with industry and advertising agendas. Although such practices are widely recognized, no fundamental change is supported by government and industry or by professional organizations.

  17. Ethics Do Matter, But Where?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. O'Brien

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The implications of social work being an ethics-based profession are explored. Conduct toward colleagues in the discharge of ethical practices is a focus of this article. The author’s view is that other disciplines involved in mental health, for example, psychiatry, family physicians, psychology, nursing, pastoral services, education, and rehabilitation therapy, share these values. As such, these themes are relevant across many professional disciplines. The article’s intent is to promote discussion as to how we cultivate a collective demeanor as social workers that is congruent with our most hallowed values and principles, namely, social justice, ethical practice, fairness and respect for all people. An examination of daily practices in the workplace and suggested remedies to enhance ethical conduct, including a series of questions we can ask ourselves, are offered.

  18. Hand Dose in Nuclear Medicine Staff Members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, T.M.; Shahein, A.Y.; Hassan, R.

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the hand dose during preparation and injection of radiopharmaceuticals is useful in the assessment of the extremity doses received by nuclear medicine personnel. Hand radiation doses to the occupational workers that handling 99m Tc-labeled compounds, 131 I for diagnostic in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. A convenient method is to use a TLD ring dosimeter for measuring doses of the diagnostic units of different nuclear medicine facilities . Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 4 weeks. The radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine staff at the hospitals under study were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y) because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year

  19. [Alcohol and work: the role of the company physician in the occupational health and safety management systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patussi, V; Muran, A

    2010-01-01

    The organization of safety in the working places and the increasing attention to behaviours and life styles of workers that may lead to increasing occupational risks are the pick innovative aspects of the recent changes in our country's legislation about occupational safety. In this organization, the role of the company physician is becoming more and more important and his work of evaluation beginning with the knowledge both of the working places and of the workers's lifestyles, is irreplaceable. His role in organizing the managing standards of occupational safety and health cannot be limited to health supervision but must be an essential element in risk assessment in the prevision of workplaces and of safe working conditions, in workers training and information, in organizing the control system of each business. The present paper examines--referring to the current regulation--the duties and functions of a company physician when facing the problems concerning the working risks tied to alcohol assumption.

  20. Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Munch-Hansen, T.; Wieclaw, J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription...... alone. None of the measured psychosocial work environment factors were consistently related to prescription of antidepressant drugs during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The study does not indicate that a poor psychosocial work environment among public service employees is related to prescription...... of antidepressant medication. METHODS: Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD) purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was obtained for a cohort of 21,129 Danish public service workers that participated in work climate surveys carried out during the period 2002-2005. Individual self...