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Sample records for group-a xp cell

  1. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and chemically-treated herpes simplex virus-1 by xeroderma pigmentosum, xp heterozygotes and normal skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylamino-fluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP was studied in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human skin fibroblasts. Virus treated with either agent demonstrated lower survival in XP cells from complementation groups A, B, C and D than in normal fibroblasts. The relative reactivation ability of XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups was found to be the same for both irradiated and chemically treated virus. In addition, the inactivation kinetics for virus treated with either agent in the XP variant were comparable to that seen in normal skin fibroblasts. The addition of 2 or 4 mmoles caffeine to the post-infection assay medium had no effect on the inactivation kinetics of virus treated by either agent in the XP variant or in XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups. Treatment of the virus with nitrogen mustard resulted in equivalent survival in normal and XP genetic complementation group D cells. No apparent defect was observed in the ability of XP heterozygous skin fibroblasts to repair virus damaged with up to 100 μg N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene per ml. These findings indicate that the repair of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus is accomplished by the same pathway or different pathways sharing a common intermediate step and that the excision defect of XP cells plays little if any role in the reactivation of nitrogen mustard treated virus. (Auth.)

  2. Analysis of point mutations in an ultraviolet-irradiated shuttle vector plasmid propagated in cells from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum patients in complementation groups A and F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, T.; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J.; Sato, M.; Kraemer, K.H.; Takebe, H.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the contribution to mutagenesis by human DNA repair defects, a UV-treated shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was passed through fibroblasts derived from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients in two different DNA repair complementation groups (A and F). Patients with XP have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of skin cancer, and defects in DNA repair. The XP DNA repair defects represented by complementation groups A (XP-A) and F (XP-F) are more common in Japan than in Europe or the United States. In comparison to results with DNA repair-proficient human cells (W138-VA13), UV-treated pZ189 passed through the XP-A [XP2OS(SV)] or XP-F [XP2YO(SV)] cells showed fewer surviving plasmids (XP-A less than XP-F) and a higher frequency of mutated plasmids (XP-A greater than XP-F). Base sequence analysis of more than 200 mutated plasmids showed the major type of base substitution mutation to be the G:C----A:T transition with all three cell lines. The XP-A and XP-F cells revealed a higher frequency of G:C----A:T transitions and a lower frequency of transversions among plasmids with single or tandem mutations and a lower frequency of plasmids with multiple point mutations compared to the normal line. The spectrum of mutations in pZ189 with the XP-A cells was similar to that with the XP-F cells. Seventy-six to 91% of the single base substitution mutations occurred at G:C base pairs in which the 5'-neighboring base of the cytosine was thymine or cytosine. These studies indicate that the DNA repair defects in Japanese XP patients in complementation groups A and F result in different frequencies of plasmid survival and mutagenesis but in similar types of mutagenic abnormalities despite marked differences in clinical features

  3. Clinicopathologic Characteristics and Prognosis of Xp11.2 Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma: Multicenter, Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Min Soo; Jeong, Chang Wook; Song, Cheryn; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Seo, Seong Il; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Chung, Jin Soo; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Kwak, Cheol

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of Xp11.2 translocation (Xp11.2t) renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from a multicenter study and compare them with clear-cell RCC using a propensity score matching analysis. Between 2004 and 2013, 8384 consecutive patients from 7 institutions who were diagnosed with RCC were reviewed, and the pathologically confirmed Xp11.2t cases were enrolled. The oncological outcomes of Xp11.2t were compared with those of clear-cell RCC by selecting matched cases using 1:3 propensity score matching methods in a precollected clear-cell RCC data set from our hospital. The patients were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of age of onset, either before (early) or after (late) 45 years old. Xp11.2t was found in 61 cases, corresponding to 0.72% of RCC cases for the 10 years. The mean age was 38.2 ± 19.4 years, and the mean tumor size was 6.2 ± 3.9 cm. The Xp11.2t cases were at more advanced stages and showed tendencies to involve lymph nodes at diagnosis. After the matching, there were no significant differences in recurrence-free and overall survival compared with clear-cell RCC. The age of incidence for Xp11.2t had a bimodal distribution, which was most common in the 30s and smaller peak in the 60s. Xp11.2t corresponded to a significantly worse prognosis for overall survival in late onset (after 45 years) subgroup (P = .038; hazard ratio, 3.199; 95% confidence interval, 1.065-9.609). This neoplasm has more aggressive clinicopathologic features at diagnosis. In older patients with onset age > 45 years, Xp11.2t showed a significantly worse prognosis than clear-cell RCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human chromosome 9 can complement UV sensitivity of xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Kanji; Sasaki, Masao S.; Ikenaga, Mituo; Nakamura, Yusuke

    1990-01-01

    A single human chromosome derived from normal human fibroblasts and tagged with the G418 resistance gene was transferred into SV40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A) cells via microcell fusion. When chromosome 1 or 12 was transferred, UV sensitivity of microcell hybrid cells was not changed. By contrast, after transferring chromosome 9,7 of 11 reipient clones were as UV-resistant as normal human cells. Four other clones were still as UV-sensitive as the parental XP-A cells. Southern hybridization analysis using a polymorphic probe, pEKZ19.3, which is homologous to a sequence of the D9S17 locus on chromosome 9, has confirmed that at least a part of normal human chromosome 9 was transferred into the recipient clones. However, amounts iof UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in the UV-resistant clones were only one-third of those in normal human cells. These results indicate that a gene on chromosome 9 can confer complementation of high UV sensitivity of XP-A cells although it is still possible that 2 or more genes might be involved in the defective-repair phenotypes of XP-A. (author). 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  5. Sirt1 suppresses RNA synthesis after UV irradiation in combined xeroderma pigmentosum group D/Cockayne syndrome (XP-D/CS) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Cruz, Renier; Zadorin, Anton S; Coin, Frédéric; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-15

    Specific mutations in the XPD subunit of transcription factor IIH result in combined xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)/Cockayne syndrome (CS), a severe DNA repair disorder characterized at the cellular level by a transcriptional arrest following UV irradiation. This transcriptional arrest has always been thought to be the result of faulty transcription-coupled repair. In the present study, we showed that, following UV irradiation, XP-D/CS cells displayed a gross transcriptional dysregulation compared with "pure" XP-D cells or WT cells. Furthermore, global RNA-sequencing analysis showed that XP-D/CS cells repressed the majority of genes after UV, whereas pure XP-D cells did not. By using housekeeping genes as a model, we demonstrated that XP-D/CS cells were unable to reassemble these gene promoters and thus to restart transcription after UV irradiation. Furthermore, we found that the repression of these promoters in XP-D/CS cells was not a simple consequence of deficient repair but rather an active heterochromatinization process mediated by the histone deacetylase Sirt1. Indeed, RNA-sequencing analysis showed that inhibition of and/or silencing of Sirt1 changed the chromatin environment at these promoters and restored the transcription of a large portion of the repressed genes in XP-D/CS cells after UV irradiation. Our work demonstrates that a significant part of the transcriptional arrest displayed by XP-D/CS cells arises as a result of an active repression process and not simply as a result of a DNA repair deficiency. This dysregulation of Sirt1 function that results in transcriptional repression may be the cause of various severe clinical features in patients with XP-D/CS that cannot be explained by a DNA repair defect.

  6. Cutaneous metastases during an aggressive course of Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma in a teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudour-Bonnange, Helene; Leroy, Xavier; Chauvet, Marie-Pierre; Classe, Marion; Robin, P M; Leblond, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    We reported a rare case of cutaneous metastases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with an Xp11.2 translocation in a 15-year-old female. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of this uncommon site of metastasis, which can indicate multivisceral dissemination of the disease. We discuss the feasibility and opportunity of treating such a patient with multiple line of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) targeting vascular endothelial and platelet-derived growth factor receptors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. XP11.2 Translocation renal cell carcinoma: Clinical experience of Taipei Veterans General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chen Hung

    2011-11-01

    Conclusion: Although RT-PCR and DNA sequencing are the final diagnoses of the molecular identity of Xp11.2 translocation RCC, experienced pathologists could confirm the histologic diagnosis based on the distinctive morphologic features with positive TFE3 immunochemical nuclear stain. Surgical resection is the only treatment. The role of systemic therapy for local recurrence and metastasis remains to be determined.

  8. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion: imaging findings in 21 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Hao; Duan, Na; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Zhongqiu [Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Zhu, Qingqiang [Medical School of Yangzhou University, Department of Medical Imaging, Subei People' s Hospital, Yangzhou (China); Li, Baoxin [Gulou Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Cui, Wenjing [Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Nanjing University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing (China); Kundra, Vikas [The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To characterize imaging features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion. Twenty-one patients with Xp11.2/TFE RCC were retrospectively evaluated. Tumour location, size, density, cystic or solid appearance, calcification, capsule sign, enhancement pattern and metastases were assessed. Fourteen women and seven men were identified with 12 being 25 years old or younger. Tumours were solitary and cystic-solid (76.2 %) masses with a capsule (76.2 %); 90.5 % were located in the medulla. Calcifications and lymph node metastases were each observed in 24 %. On unenhanced CT, tumour attenuation was greater than in normal renal parenchyma (85.7 %). Tumour enhancement was less than in normal renal cortex on all enhanced phases, greater than in normal renal medulla on cortical and medullary phases, but less than in normal renal medulla on delayed phase. On MR, the tumours were isointense on T1WI, heterogeneously hypointense on T2WI and slightly hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging. Xp11.2/TFE RCC usually occurs in young women. It is a cystic-solid, hyperdense mass with a capsule. It arises from the renal medulla with enhancement less than in the cortex but greater than in the medulla in all phases except the delayed phase, when it is lower than in the medulla. (orig.)

  9. The influence of DNA repair on neurological degeneration, cachexia, skin cancer and internal neoplasms: autopsy report of four xeroderma pigmentosum patients (XP-A, XP-C and XP-D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the association of DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) defects with neurological degeneration, cachexia and cancer, we performed autopsies on 4 adult xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients with different clinical features and defects in NER complementation groups XP-A, XP-C or XP-D. Results The XP-A (XP12BE) and XP-D (XP18BE) patients exhibited progressive neurological deterioration with sensorineural hearing loss. The clinical spectrum encompassed severe cachexia in the XP-A (XP12BE) patient, numerous skin cancers in the XP-A and two XP-C (XP24BE and XP1BE) patients and only few skin cancers in the XP-D patient. Two XP-C patients developed internal neoplasms including glioblastoma in XP24BE and uterine adenocarcinoma in XP1BE. At autopsy, the brains of the 44 yr XP-A and the 45 yr XP-D patients were profoundly atrophic and characterized microscopically by diffuse neuronal loss, myelin pallor and gliosis. Unlike the XP-A patient, the XP-D patient had a thickened calvarium, and the brain showed vacuolization of the neuropil in the cerebrum, cerebellum and brainstem, and patchy Purkinje cell loss. Axonal neuropathy and chronic denervation atrophy of the skeletal muscles were observed in the XP-A patient, but not in the XP-D patient. Conclusions These clinical manifestations and autopsy findings indicate advanced involvement of the central and peripheral nervous system. Despite similar defects in DNA repair, different clinicopathological phenotypes are seen in the four cases, and therefore distinct patterns of neurodegeneration characterize XP-D, XP-A and XP-C patients. PMID:24252196

  10. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene

  11. Host-cell reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated SV 40 DNA in five complementation groups of xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, P.J.; Eb, A.J. van der

    1976-01-01

    Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated double-stranded SV40 DNA was studied in BSC-1 monkey cells, normal human cells, heterozygous Xeroderma pigmentosum xp cells, representative cell strains of the five complemention groups of XP and in XP 'variant' cells. The following percentages of survival of the plaque-forming ability of double-stranded SV40 DNA were found in XP cells compared with the value found in normal monkey and human cells: groupA, 13%; group B, 30%; group C, 18%; group D, 14%; group E, 59%; and in the heterozygous XP cells almost 100%. The survival in XP 'variant' cells was 66%. The survival of single-stranded SV40 DNA in BSC-1 cells was much lower than that of double-stranded SV40 DNA in XP cells of complementation group A, which possibly indicates that some repair of UV damage occurs even in XP cells of group A

  12. DNA strand breaking and rejoining in response to ultraviolet light in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, C.W.; Kakunaga, T.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a reproducible technique for measuring DNA strand breaking and rejoining in cells after treatment with U.V.-light. Results obtained with normal human cells, xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP, complementation group A) and XP variant cells suggested that all three of these cell-types can carry out single-strand incision with equal rapidity. However, the breaks so induced appeared to be only slowly rejoined in the XP variant cells and rejoined not at all in XP complementation group A cells. Furthermore, parental strand rejoining was inhibited by caffeine in XP variant cells but not in normal cells. (author)

  13. Validation and utilization of a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay for Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma and alveolar soft part sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Dinesh; Roy, Somak; Quiroga-Garza, Gabriela; Cieply, Kathleen; Mahaffey, Alyssa L; Bastacky, Sheldon; Dhir, Rajiv; Parwani, Anil V

    2015-09-29

    Xp11.2 or TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) are characterized by chromosome translocations involving the Xp11.2 breakpoint resulting in transcription factor TFE3 gene fusions. The most common translocations documented in TFE3 RCCs are t(X;1) (p11.2;q21) and t(X;17) (p11.2;q25) which leads to fusion of TFE3 gene on Xp11.2 with PRCC or ASPL respectively. TFE3 immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been inconsistent over time due to background staining problems in part related to fixation issues. Karyotyping to detect TFE3 gene rearrangement requires typically unavailable fresh tissue. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is generally very challenging due to degradation of RNA in archival material. The study objective was to develop and validate a TFE3 break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay to confirm Xp11 translocation RCCs and ASPS. Representative sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were selected in 40 possible cases. Approximately 60 tumor cells were analyzed in the targeted region. The validation of TFE3 FISH was done with 11 negative and two positive cases. Cut off for a positive result was validated as >7.15 % positive nuclei with any pattern of break-apart signals. FISH evaluation was done blinded of the immunohistochemical or karyotype data. Three out of forty cases were positive for the TFE3 break-apart signals by FISH. The negative cases were reported as clear cell RCC with papillary features (10), clear cell RCC with sarcomatoid areas (2), Papillary RCC with clear cell areas (9), Chromophobe RCC (2), RCC, unclassified type (3) and renal medullary carcinoma (1). 3 of the negative cases were consultation cases for renal tumor with unknown histology. Seven negative cases were soft tissue tumor suspicious for ASPS. Our study validates the utility of TFE3 break-apart FISH on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections for diagnosis and confirmation of

  14. Interspecies complementation analysis of xeroderma pigmentosum and UV-sensitive Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanini, M.; Keijzer, W.; Westerveld, A.; Bootsma, D.

    1985-01-01

    Complementation analysis was performed 24 h after fusion of UV-sensitive CHO cells (CHO 12 RO) with XP cells of complementation groups A, B, C, D, F and G. The parental cells are characterized by low levels of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). In all combinations, the UDS levels observed in heterokaryons were higher than those in parental mutant cells, clearly indicating cooperation of human and Chinese hamster repair functions. In heterokaryons of CHO 12 RO with XP-A and XP-C cells, the UDS values reached about the normal human level, whereas in heterokaryons with XP-B, XP-D and XP-F, UDS was restored at a level approaching that in wild-type CHO cells. The results obtained after fusion of CHO cells with two representative cell strains from the XP-G group, XP 2 BI and XP 3 BR, were inconsistent. Fusion with XP 3 BR cells yielded UDS levels ranging from wild-type Chinese hamster to normal human, whereas fusion with XP 2 BI cells resulted in a slight increase in UDS which even after 48 h remained below the level found in wild-type CHO cells. The occurrence of complementation in these interspecies heterokaryons indicates that the genetic defect in the CHO 12 RO cells is different from the defects in the XP complementation groups tested

  15. Sodium butyrate stimulates cellular recovery from UV damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells belonging to complementation group F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishigori, Chikako; Takebe, Hiraku

    1987-01-01

    Possible stimulation of the DNA repair capacity by sodium butyrate in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells was investigated. XP cells belonging to the complementation group F showed considerable stimulation of DNA repair by sodium butyrate in terms of both the amount of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and the colony-forming ability after UV irradiation. UDS in XP cells belonging to the complementation group A was not enhanced, while normal cells showed slight enhancement, but less than that of XP F cells. In XP A, XP C, and normal cells, sodium butyrate treatment enhanced the killing effect of UV irradiation. The residual repair capacity in XP F cells appeared to be stimulated by sodium butyrate. (author)

  16. TFE3-positive renal cell carcinomas are not always Xp11 translocation carcinomas: Report of a case with a TPM3-ALK translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorner, Paul Scott; Shago, Mary; Marrano, Paula; Shaikh, Furqan; Somers, Gino R

    2016-10-01

    Translocation-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a distinct subtype of RCC with gene rearrangements of the TFE3 or TFEB loci. The TFE3 gene is located at Xp11 and can fuse to a number of translocation partners, resulting in high nuclear expression of TFE3 protein. TFE3 immunostaining is often used as a surrogate marker for a TFE3 translocation. We report a case of an RCC that expressed TFE3 but showed only gain of TFE3 rather than a translocation. Moreover, this case had a t(1;2) translocation fusing ALK and TMP3, identical to that seen in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour. There was resulting overexpression of ALK protein in a cytoplasmic and membranous pattern. The patient was not treated with chemotherapy but following regional nodal recurrence, an ALK inhibitor was added and the patient remains alive one year later. There are only rare reports of RCC with an ALK-TMP3 fusion, and these tumours can express TFE3 on some unknown basis not related to a TFE3 translocation. Any RCC positive for TFE3 and lacking a translocation should be tested for ALK expression and translocation. Recognition of this subtype of RCC will allow ALK inhibitor therapy to be added, in the hope of improving patient outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Migration towards Windows 2000/XP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, J.

    2004-01-01

    The article deals with interesting technical solutions used in the project 'Migration towards Windows 2000/XP', which was introduced by the company AITEN, Plc for companies SE Plc, SEPS Plc and TEKO, Plc in the period 2002 and 2003. The contents of the project was migration of about 100 servers and more than 4 000 PC to the Windows 2000 and XP environs. The result of the project is a unified and documented system in the field of file, print and small application servers and PC. It has enabled to increase the system reliability and availability, to decrease the total costs for administration and operation and to establish the steady environs for users of the applications. (author)

  18. Analysis of DNA repair in XP-HeLa hybrids; lack of correlation between excision repair of u.v. damage and adenovirus reactivation in an XP(D)-like cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.Y.; Squires, S.; Elliott, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Hybrids formed between HeLa cells and fibroblasts from xeroderma pigmentosum group D show either HeLa sensitivity or XPD-like hypersensitivity to u.v. radiation and corresponding high or low excision repair capability. Hybrids with low repair are presumed to have lost, via chromosome segregation, the HeLa wild type D alleles. The u.v. sensitivity and excision repair capability of another hybrid, HD1A, derived spontaneously from the normally sensitive hybrid HD1 are analyzed. While HD1A closely resembles the XPD phenotype in terms of u.v. sensitivity and excision repair it differs from XPD because of its ability to reactivate u.v.-irradiated adenovirus 2 to an extent similar to that of its HeLa parent. This capacity functionally dissociates excision repair of chromatin-based damage from damage in a viral environment. Moreover, on the basis of complementation studies the excision repair of genomic damage by HD1A is subtly different from that of a true XPD-like hybrid, HD2. The data are discussed in terms of a second change in the defective D allele of the HD1A cell. (author)

  19. Evidence that DNA excision-repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A is limited but biologically significant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, D.R.; Kantor, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    The loss of pyrimidine dimers in nondividing populations of an excision-repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum group. A strain (XP12BE) was measured throughout long periods (up to 5 months) following exposure to low doses of ultraviolet light (UV, 254 nm) using a UV endonuclease-alkaline sedimentation assay. Excision of about 90% of the dimers induced by 1 J/m 2 occurred during the first 50 days. The rate curve has some similarities with that of normal excision-repair proficient cultures that may not be coincidental. Rate curves for both XP12BE and normal cultures are characterized by a fast and slow component, with both rate constants for the XP12BE cultures (0.15 day -1 and 0.025 day -1 ) a factor of 10 smaller than those observed for the respective components of normal cell cultures. The slow components for both XP12BE and normal cultures extrapolate to about 30% of the initial number of dimers. No further excision was detected throughout an additional 90-day period even though the cultures were capable of excision-repair of other newly-introduced pyrimidine dimers. We conclude that nondividing XP12BE cells in addition to having a slower repair rate, cannot repair some of the UV-induced DNA damage. The repair in XP12BE is shown to have biological significance as detected by a cell-survival assay and dose-fractionation techniques. Nondividing XP12BE cells are more resistant to UV when irradiated chronically than when irradiated acutely with the same total dose. (orig.)

  20. Studies on the molecular mechanism of nucleotide excision repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Studies in this laboratory have focused on attempts to define the mechanism of nucleotide excision repair of DNA in human cells, with a view to understanding the molecular pathogenesis of the disease XP. With the advent of recombinant DNA technology, they directed their efforts to the molecular cloning of human genes defective in XP, with a view to using the cloned genes to overexpress proteins of interest for biochemical investigations. Initial studies exploited the selectable phenotype of marked sensitivity to killing of XP group A cells by UV radiation and by other DNA damaging agents. However, except for a single report in 1982 there has been no reproducible demonstration of complementation of the UV sensitivity of XP cells by DNA-mediated transfection. The apparent difficulties associated with transfection of XP cells have been the subject of several recent studies. In view of the multiple problems associated with stable transfection of XP cells using total genomic DNA, they have embarked on an alternative strategy designed to facilitate the cloning of human XP genes. This strategy involves the transfer of single human chromosomes into XP cells and screening for this relatively high frequency event. The idea is to identify chromosomes on which particular XP genes reside and then to isolate non-complementing derivatives of these chromosomes so that highly enriched DNA pools containing genes of interest can be generated by employing one or more subtractive strategies

  1. Windows XP Operating System Security Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goktepe, Meftun

    2002-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research is to determine if Windows XP, when used as a workstation operating system in domain- based networks, provides adequate security policy enforcement for organizations...

  2. Windows XP, El último neonato de Microsoft.

    OpenAIRE

    Ficarra, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    Un nuevo sistema operativo ha nacido el 25 de octubre del 2001 en Seattle; Estados Unidos, llamado Windows XP (XP deriva de la palabra eXPerience - experiencia). Sin embargo, la experiencia demuestra una vez más que los sistemas operativos traen aparejado un cambio de hardware. He aquí una primera contradicción de la actual industria del software.

  3. XP in a Small Software Development Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babb, Jeffry; Hoda, Rashina; Nørbjerg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    While small software development shops have trended towards the adoption of Agile methods, local conditions and high iteration pressure typically cause adaptations and appropriations of Agile methods. This paper shares evidence from a study concerning how a small software development company adopts...... and adapts, XP to suit their business. Based on a Dialogical Action Research project, the study reflects on the conditions leading to Agile process adaptation, and why ad hoc and “a la carte” approaches may be problematic. Limitations and drawbacks to aspects of XP are also discussed. The Agile practices...

  4. Schools Facing the Expiration of Windows XP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Microsoft's plans to end support for Windows XP, believed to be the dominant computer operating system in K-12 education, could pose big technological and financial challenges for districts nationwide--issues that many school systems have yet to confront. The giant software company has made it clear for years that it plans to stop supporting XP…

  5. Somatic mosaicism for DNA repair capacity in fibroblasts derived from a group A xeroderma pigmentosum patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.R.; Ishizaki, K.; Sasaki, M.S.; Toguchida, J.; Kato, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Moriguchi, T.; Ikenaga, M.

    1989-01-01

    A female Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patient with severe skin lesions and various neurologic abnormalities was assigned to complementation group A by conventional cell fusion studies. Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin fibroblasts showed a biphasic survival curve, as measured by colony-forming ability. The surviving fraction decreased rapidly up to 2 J/m2 of UV, with a steep slope of D(O) (mean lethal dose) = 0.95 J/m2. At much higher doses it decreased more slowly, with D(O) = 3.5 J/m2. To elucidate the cause of this unique survival response, we isolated a large number of independent clones from single colonies and measured their responses to UV. Of 81 clones analyzed, ten showed a marked resistance to killing by UV, which was only slightly more sensitive than normal cells, and these clones had a rate of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) that was about 45% of normal cells. By contrast, the remaining 71 clones were extremely sensitive to UV, typical of XP group A strains, and had a UDS level 1%-3% of normals. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism using seven polymorphic DNA probes indicated that the UV-resistant clones were derived from the same individual as the UV-sensitive clones. These results clearly demonstrate that this patient's fibroblast cells consist of two types with differing responses to UV, and provide direct evidence of somatic mosaicism for DNA repair capacity in an XP patient

  6. High mobility group A1 protein modulates autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Andrea; Paladino, Simona; Bianco, Gaia; Fasano, Dominga; Gerlini, Raffaele; Tornincasa, Mara; Renna, Maurizio; Fusco, Alfredo; Tramontano, Donatella; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria

    2017-11-01

    High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) is an architectural chromatin protein whose overexpression is a feature of malignant neoplasias with a causal role in cancer initiation and progression. HMGA1 promotes tumor growth by several mechanisms, including increase of cell proliferation and survival, impairment of DNA repair and induction of chromosome instability. Autophagy is a self-degradative process that, by providing energy sources and removing damaged organelles and misfolded proteins, allows cell survival under stress conditions. On the other hand, hyper-activated autophagy can lead to non-apoptotic programmed cell death. Autophagy deregulation is a common feature of cancer cells in which has a complex role, showing either an oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, depending on cellular context and tumor stage. Here, we report that depletion of HMGA1 perturbs autophagy by different mechanisms. HMGA1-knockdown increases autophagosome formation by constraining the activity of the mTOR pathway, a major regulator of autophagy, and transcriptionally upregulating the autophagy-initiating kinase Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1). Consistently, functional experiments demonstrate that HMGA1 binds ULK1 promoter region and negatively regulates its transcription. On the other hand, the increase in autophagosomes is not associated to a proportionate increase in their maturation. Overall, the effects of HMGA1 depletion on autophagy are associated to a decrease in cell proliferation and ultimately impact on cancer cells viability. Importantly, silencing of ULK1 prevents the effects of HMGA1-knockdown on cellular proliferation, viability and autophagic activity, highlighting how these effects are, at least in part, mediated by ULK1. Interestingly, this phenomenon is not restricted to skin cancer cells, as similar results have been observed also in HeLa cells silenced for HMGA1. Taken together, these results clearly indicate HMGA1 as a key regulator of the autophagic pathway in cancer cells

  7. Time fluctuations in the response of photomultiplier tubes Dario 56 AVP, XP 1021, XP 1210

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuze, G.; Sawine, P.

    1969-01-01

    The authors have studied experimentally the intrinsic time resolving power of 3 photomultiplier tubes, Dario 56 AVP, XP 1021, XP 1210 at various excitation levels produced by a source of short light pulses. They show, in agreement with present theories, that there exists an optimal resolving power for a certain trigger threshold, and they check the law governing the variations of this resolving power with the average number of photo-electrons emitted by light pulse, up to the limiting case of a single photo-electron. The results obtained show the progress which has been made by the constructor between the 56 AVP and the XP 1210 models: for 100 photo-electrons per pulse, for example, the times of resolution are 260 x 10 -12 s and 75 x 10 -12 s respectively; whereas the rise time for the anode pulses decreases from 2,3 to 1,2 x 10 -9 s. The intermediate tube XP 1021 has also a particularly good performance with respect to the 56 AVP, which it resembles very much both in its price and by its outer aspect. The authors stress finally the difficulties encountered in measuring with accuracy the time characteristics of PM as fast as the XP 1210, and in particular the limitation imposed by the light source. (author) [fr

  8. Group A Streptococcus Prevents Mast Cell Degranulation to Promote Extracellular Trap Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Clark

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The resurgence of Group A Streptococcus (GAS infections in the past two decades has been a rising major public health concern. Due to a large number of GAS infections occurring in the skin, mast cells (MCs, innate immune cells known to localize to the dermis, could play an important role in controlling infection. MCs can exert their antimicrobial activities either early during infection, by degranulation and release of antimicrobial proteases and the cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide LL-37, or by forming antibacterial MC extracellular traps (MCETs in later stages of infection. We demonstrate that MCs do not directly degranulate in response to GAS, reducing their ability to control bacterial growth in early stages of infection. However, MC granule components are highly cytotoxic to GAS due to the pore-forming activity of LL-37, while MC granule proteases do not significantly affect GAS viability. We therefore confirmed the importance of MCETs by demonstrating their capacity to reduce GAS survival. The data therefore suggests that LL-37 from MC granules become embedded in MCETs, and are the primary effector molecule by which MCs control GAS infection. Our work underscores the importance of a non-traditional immune effector cell, utilizing a non-conventional mechanism, in the defense against an important human pathogen.

  9. The Mitochondrial Unfoldase-Peptidase Complex ClpXP Controls Bioenergetics Stress and Metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Ho Seo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria must buffer the risk of proteotoxic stress to preserve bioenergetics, but the role of these mechanisms in disease is poorly understood. Using a proteomics screen, we now show that the mitochondrial unfoldase-peptidase complex ClpXP associates with the oncoprotein survivin and the respiratory chain Complex II subunit succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB in mitochondria of tumor cells. Knockdown of ClpXP subunits ClpP or ClpX induces the accumulation of misfolded SDHB, impairing oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production while activating "stress" signals of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy. Deregulated mitochondrial respiration induced by ClpXP targeting causes oxidative stress, which in turn reduces tumor cell proliferation, suppresses cell motility, and abolishes metastatic dissemination in vivo. ClpP is universally overexpressed in primary and metastatic human cancer, correlating with shortened patient survival. Therefore, tumors exploit ClpXP-directed proteostasis to maintain mitochondrial bioenergetics, buffer oxidative stress, and enable metastatic competence. This pathway may provide a "drugable" therapeutic target in cancer.

  10. The multislice CT findings of renal carcinoma associated with XP11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion and collecting duct carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Qingqiang; Zhu Wenrong; Chen Wenxin; Wu Jingtao [Subei People' s Hospital, Clinical School of Medical Coll., Yangzhou (China)], e-mail: wujingtaodoctor@163.com; Wang Zhongqiu [Dept. of Radiology, East Hospital, Tongji Univ. School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation and TFE gene fusion (Xp11.2/TFE RCC), and collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) are uncommon subtypes of renal cell carcinomas. Purpose: To investigate the multislice CT (MSCT) characteristics of these two tumor types. Material and Methods Nine patients with Xp11.2/TFE RCC and 10 patients with CDC were studied retrospectively. MSCT was undertaken to investigate differences in tumor characteristics and enhancement patterns. Results: All patients had single tumors centered in the renal medulla. Two patients with each tumor type had lymph node involvement and there was a single case of hepatic metastasis (Xp11.2/TFE RCC). The mean tumor diameter of Xp11.2/TFE RCC tumors was significantly larger than for CDC tumors. Two patients with Xp11.2/TFE RCC had cystic components as did eight patients with CDC (P < 0.05). Calcifications were present in six patients, each with CDC. Clear tumor boundaries were visible in two patients with CDC and in nine with Xp11.2/TFE RCC (P < 0.05). The density of Xp11.2/TFE RCC tumors was greater than that of CDC tumors, normal renal cortex, or medulla on unenhanced CT. Enhancement was higher with Xp11.2/TFE RCC than with CDC tumors during all phases. Xp11.2/TFE RCC enhancement was higher than in the renal medulla during cortical and medullary phase but lower than in normal renal medulla during the delayed phase. CDC tumor enhancement was lower than that for normal renal medulla during all enhanced phases. Conclusion: Both tumor types originated from the renal medulla. Distinguishing features included density on unenhanced CT, enhancement patterns, and capsule signs. Identifying these differences may aid diagnosis.

  11. Co-occurrence of Xp21 microduplication encompassing the DMD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alpa Sidhu

    2014-12-27

    Dec 27, 2014 ... fine motor tasks with her hands, pain in the upper extremities ... Xp21.1–Xp21.2 microduplication was confirmed by FISH ... Additional FISH or CMA testing on at risk family members was recommended to determine whether the microduplications were inherited or de novo, but was not performed due to lack ...

  12. Survival of Anaerobic Fe2+ Stress Requires the ClpXP Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brittany D; Redford, Kaitlyn E; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2018-04-15

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a versatile bacterium capable of respiring extracellular, insoluble ferric oxide minerals under anaerobic conditions. The respiration of iron minerals results in the production of soluble ferrous ions, which at high concentrations are toxic to living organisms. It is not fully understood how Fe 2+ is toxic to cells anaerobically, nor is it fully understood how S. oneidensis is able to resist high levels of Fe 2+ Here we describe the results of a transposon mutant screen and subsequent deletion of the genes clpX and clpP in S. oneidensis , which demonstrate that the protease ClpXP is required for anaerobic Fe 2+ resistance. Many cellular processes are known to be regulated by ClpXP, including entry into stationary phase, envelope stress response, and turnover of stalled ribosomes. However, none of these processes appears to be responsible for mediating anaerobic Fe 2+ resistance in S. oneidensis Protein trapping studies were performed to identify ClpXP targets in S. oneidensis under Fe 2+ stress, implicating a wide variety of protein targets. Escherichia coli strains lacking clpX or clpP also display increased sensitivity to Fe 2+ anaerobically, indicating Fe 2+ resistance may be a conserved role for the ClpXP protease system. Hypotheses regarding the potential role(s) of ClpXP during periods of high Fe 2+ are discussed. We speculate that metal-containing proteins are misfolded under conditions of high Fe 2+ and that the ClpXP protease system is necessary for their turnover. IMPORTANCE Prior to the evolution of cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis, life arose and flourished in iron-rich oceans. Today, aqueous iron-rich environments are less common, constrained to low-pH conditions and anaerobic systems such as stratified lakes and seas, digestive tracts, subsurface environments, and sediments. The latter two ecosystems often favor dissimilatory metal reduction, a process that produces soluble Fe 2+ from iron oxide minerals

  13. Windows XP Power Hound Teach Yourself New Tricks

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Preston

    2009-01-01

    Windows XP power-users troll the web, documentation, and friends for useful tips and tricks--a keyboard shortcut here, an undocumented double-click there to eliminate annoyances, save time, and take control of their Windows XP. There's an easier way. This insightful and amusing book is packed with hundreds of power tips, cool tricks, and workarounds in one organized, easy-to-use resource--for everything from the desktop to Office programs to the registry.

  14. Chance, destiny, and the inner workings of ClpXP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Rick; Matouschek, Andreas

    2014-07-31

    AAA+ proteases are responsible for protein degradation in all branches of life. Using single-molecule and ensemble assays, Cordova et al. investigate how the bacterial protease ClpXP steps through a substrate's polypeptide chain and construct a quantitative kinetic model that recapitulates the interplay between stochastic and deterministic behaviors of ClpXP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Defective homing is associated with altered Cdc42 activity in cells from patients with Fanconi anemia group A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Shang, Xun; Guo, Fukun; Murphy, Kim; Kirby, Michelle; Kelly, Patrick; Reeves, Lilith; Smith, Franklin O.; Williams, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Fanconi anemia (FA) murine stem cells have defective reconstitution after bone marrow (BM) transplantation. The mechanism underlying this defect is not known. Here, we report defective homing of FA patient BM progenitors transplanted into mouse models. Using cells from patients carrying mutations in FA complementation group A (FA-A), we show that when transplanted into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) recipient mice, FA-A BM cells exhibited impaired homing activity. FA-A cells also showed defects in both cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Complementation of FA-A deficiency by reexpression of FANCA readily restored adhesion of FA-A cells. A significant decrease in the activity of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 was found associated with these defective functions in patient-derived cells, and expression of a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant was able to rescue the adhesion defect of FA-A cells. These results provide the first evidence that FA proteins influence human BM progenitor homing and adhesion via the small GTPase Cdc42-regulated signaling pathway. PMID:18565850

  16. Microinjection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease restores UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.R. de Jonge; W. Vermeulen (Wim); W. Keijzer; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cultured cells of excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A through I was assayed after injection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease using glass microneedles. In all complementation groups a restoration of

  17. Generation of Xeroderma Pigmentosum-A Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Line for Use As Future Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Kawasaki, Takashi; Deguchi, Tomonori; Yuba, Shunsuke

    2015-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A) is a genetic disorder in which there is an abnormality in nucleotide excision repair that causes hypersensitivity to sunlight and multiple skin cancers. The development of central and peripheral neurological disorders not correlated to ultraviolet light exposure is associated with XP-A. The genes responsible for XP-A have been identified and a XPA knockout mouse has been generated. These knockout mice exhibit cutaneous symptoms, but they do not show neurological disorders. The mechanism of pathogenesis of neurological disorders is still unclear and therapeutic methods have not been established. Therefore, we generated XP-A patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (XPA-iPSCs) to produce in vitro models of neurological disorders. We obtained iPSC lines from fibroblasts of two patients carrying different mutations. Drugs screened using XPA-iPSC lines can be helpful for treating XP-A patients in Japan. Additionally, we revealed that these iPSCs have the potential to differentiate into neural lineage cells, including dopaminergic neurons, which decrease in XP-A patients. Our results indicate that expression of the normal XPA gene without mutations is not required for generation of iPSCs and differentiation of iPSCs into neural lineage cells. XPA-iPSCs may become useful models that clarify our understanding of neurological pathogenesis and help to establish therapeutic methods.

  18. Preclinical correction of human Fanconi anemia complementation group A bone marrow cells using a safety-modified lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P S; Taylor, J A; Trobridge, G D; Zhao, X; Beard, B C; Chien, S; Adair, J; Kohn, D B; Wagner, J E; Shimamura, A; Kiem, H-P

    2010-10-01

    One of the major hurdles for the development of gene therapy for Fanconi anemia (FA) is the increased sensitivity of FA stem cells to free radical-induced DNA damage during ex vivo culture and manipulation. To minimize this damage, we have developed a brief transduction procedure for lentivirus vector-mediated transduction of hematopoietic progenitor cells from patients with Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA). The lentiviral vector FancA-sW contains the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter, the FANCA cDNA, and a synthetic, safety-modified woodchuck post transcriptional regulatory element (sW). Bone marrow mononuclear cells or purified CD34(+) cells from patients with FANCA were transduced in an overnight culture on recombinant fibronectin peptide CH-296, in low (5%) oxygen, with the reducing agent, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), and a combination of growth factors, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), Flt3 ligand, stem cell factor, and thrombopoietin. Transduced cells plated in methylcellulose in hypoxia with NAC showed increased colony formation compared with 21% oxygen without NAC (Pgene-corrected cells in patients with FANCA.

  19. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Promotes Autophagy to Facilitate Cisplatin Resistance in Melanoma Cells through the Activation of PARP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Rui; Liu, Lin; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Weigang; Yang, Yuqi; Wang, Huina; Shi, Qiong; Guo, Sen; Yi, Xiuli; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen; Luan, Qi; Li, Chunying

    2016-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA), a key protein in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, has been shown to promote the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs by facilitating the DNA repair process. However, the role of XPA in the resistance of melanoma to platinum-based drugs like cisplatin is largely unknown. In this study, we initially found that XPA was expressed at higher levels in cisplatin-resistant melanoma cells than in cisplatin-sensitive ones. Furthermore, the knockdown of XPA not only increased cellular apoptosis but also inhibited cisplatin-induced autophagy, which rendered the melanoma cells more sensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, we discovered that the increased XPA in resistant melanoma cells promoted poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) activation and that the inhibition of PARP1 could attenuate the cisplatin-induced autophagy. Finally, we proved that the inhibition of PARP1 and the autophagy process made resistant melanoma cells more susceptible to cisplatin treatment. Our study shows that XPA can promote cell-protective autophagy in a DNA repair-independent manner by enhancing the activation of PARP1 in melanoma cells resistant to cisplatin and that the XPA-PARP1-mediated autophagy process can be targeted to overcome cisplatin resistance in melanoma chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nance-Horan syndrome: localization within the region Xp21.1-Xp22.3 by linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, D; Lewis, R A; Buetow, K; Bond, A; Nussbaum, R

    1990-07-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) or X-linked cataract-dental syndrome (MIM 302350) is a disease of unknown pathogenesis characterized by congenital cataracts and dental anomalies. We performed linkage analysis in three kindreds with NHS by using six RFLP markers between Xp11.3 and Xp22.3. Close linkage was found between NHS and polymorphic loci DXS43 (theta = 0 with lod score 2.89), DXS41 (theta = 0 with lod score 3.44), and DXS67 (theta = 0 with lod score 2.74), defined by probes pD2, p99-6, and pB24, respectively. Recombinations were found with the marker loci DXS84 (theta = .04 with lod score 4.13), DXS143 (theta = .06 with lod score 3.11) and DXS7 (theta = .09 with lod score 1.68). Multipoint linkage analysis determined the NHS locus to be linked completely to DXS41 (lod score = 7.07). Our linkage results, combined with analysis of Xp interstitial deletions, suggest that the NHS locus is located within or close to the Xp22.1-Xp22.2 region.

  1. The Fanconi anemia group A protein modulates homologous repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Herceg, Zdenko; Nakanishi, Koji; Demuth, Ilja; Piccoli, Colette; Michelon, Jocelyne; Hildebrand, Gabriele; Jasin, Maria; Digweed, Martin; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2005-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) cells exhibit hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and high levels of chromosome instability. FA gene products have been shown to functionally or physically interact with BRCA1, RAD51 and the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex, suggesting that the FA complex may be involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we have investigated specifically the function of the FA group A protein (FANCA) in the repair of DSBs in mammalian cells. We show that the targeted deletion of Fanca exons 37-39 generates a null for Fanca in mice and abolishes ubiquitination of Fancd2, the downstream effector of the FA complex. Cells lacking Fanca exhibit increased chromosomal aberrations and attenuated accumulation of Brca1 and Rad51 foci in response to DNA damage. The absence of Fanca greatly reduces gene-targeting efficiency in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and compromises the survival of fibroblast cells in response to ICL agent treatment. Fanca-null cells exhibit compromised homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSBs, particularly affecting the single-strand annealing pathway. These data identify the Fanca protein as an integral component in the early step of HDR of DSBs and thereby minimizing the genomic instability.

  2. An XPA gene splicing mutation resulting in trace protein expression in an elderly patient with xeroderma pigmentosum group A without neurological abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Endo, Y; Kusaka-Kikushima, A; Nakamaura, S; Nakazawa, Y; Ogi, T; Uryu, M; Tsuji, G; Furue, M; Moriwaki, S

    2017-07-01

    A certain relationship between XPA gene mutations and the severity of symptoms has been observed in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A). Patients with mutations within the DNA-binding domain usually exhibit severe symptoms, whereas splicing mutations in the same domain sometimes cause very mild symptoms. This inconsistency can be explained by a small amount of functional XPA protein produced from normally spliced transcripts. We herein report the case of an adult Japanese patient with XP-A with unusually mild symptoms. We identified a homozygous c.529G>A mutation in exon 4 of the XPA gene, which resulted in aberrant splicing with a 29-bp deletion in exon 4 causing a frameshift. Intact mRNA was observable, but a Western blot analysis failed to detect any normal XPA protein. We therefore evaluated the DNA repair capacity in normal cells in which the XPA expression was artificially diminished. The repair capacity was still present in cells with trace levels of the XPA protein. The repair capacity of the cells derived from our patient with mild symptoms was poor by comparison, but still significant compared with that of the cells derived from a patient with XP-A with severe symptoms. These results provide strong evidence that a trace level of XPA protein can still exert a relatively strong repair capacity, resulting in only a mild phenotype. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Characterization of a splicing mutation in group A xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satokata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Miura, Naoyuki; Miyamoto, Iwai; Okada, Yoshio; Satoh, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Seiji

    1990-01-01

    The molecular basis of group A xeroderma pigmentosum (WP) was investigated by comparison of the nucleotide sequences of multiple clones of the XP group A complementing gene (XPAC) from a patient with group A XP with that of a normal gene. The clones showed a G → C substitution at the 3' splice acceptor site of intron 3, which altered the obligatory AG acceptor dinucleotide to AC. Nucleotide sequencing of cDNAs amplified by the polymerase chain reaction revealed that this single base substitution abolishes the canonical 3' splice site, thus creating two abnormally spliced mRNA forms. The larger form is identical with normal mRNA except for a dinucleotide deletion at the 5' end of exon 4. This deletion results in a frameshift with premature translation termination in exon 4. The smaller form has a deletion of the entire exon 3 and the dinucleotide at the 5' end of exon 4. The result of a transfection study provided additional evidence that this single base substitution is the disease-causing mutation. This single base substitution creates a new cleavage site for the restriction nuclease AlwNI. Analysis of AlwNI restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a high frequency of this mutation in Japanese patients with group A XP: 16 of 21 unrelated Japanese patients were homozygous and 4 were heterozygous for this mutation. However, 11 Caucasians and 2 Blacks with group A XP did not have this mutant allele. The polymorphic AlwNI restriction fragments are concluded to be useful for diagnosis of group A XP in Japanese subjects, including prenatal cases and carriers

  4. Mutational spectrum of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Khalda; Messaoud, Olfa; El Darouti, Mohamad; Abdelhak, Sonia; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by hyperphotosensitivity, DNA repair defects and a predisposition to skin cancers. The most frequently occurring type worldwide is the XP group A (XPA). There is a close relationship between the clinical features that ranged from severe to mild form and the mutational site in XPA gene. The aim of this study is to carry out the mutational analysis in Egyptian patients with XP-A. This study was carried out on four unrelated Egyptian XP-A families. Clinical features were examined and direct sequencing of the coding region of XPA gene was performed in patients and their parents. Direct sequencing of the whole coding region of the XPA gene revealed the identification of two homozygous nonsense mutations: (c.553C >T; p.(Gln185)) and (c.331G>T; p.(Glu111)), which create premature, stop codon and a homodeletion (c.374delC: p.Thr125Ilefs 15) that leads to frameshift and premature translation termination. We report the identification of one novel XPA gene mutation and two known mutations in four unrelated Egyptian families with Xermoderma pigmentosum. All explored patients presented severe neurological abnormalities and have mutations located in the DNA binding domain. This report gives insight on the mutation spectrum of XP-A in Egypt. This would provide a valuable tool for early diagnosis of this severe disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Co-occurrence of Xp21 microduplication encompassing the DMD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Defects in the DMD gene (deletion, duplication, or mutation) are associated with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD). Combined microduplications of Xp21/DMD with 17p12/PMP22 are extremely rare with only one published report of a male patient with changes in both the DMD and PMP22 genes.

  6. Linearity measurement of the XP 1210 fast photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuze, G.; Sawine, P.

    1969-01-01

    A new X Y method of photomultipliers linearity measurement has been tested which is more suitable for fast photomultiplier tubes. The XP 1210 gives a linearity limit of 70 mA for the gain 10, i.e. 3.5 V for a 50 Ω charge impedance

  7. Ion feedback afterpulses in FEU-130 and XP2020 photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudanin, V.B.; Morozov, V.A.; Morozova, N.V.

    2003-01-01

    Intensities and time distributions of ion feedback afterpulses are studied as a function of the difference of potentials between the photocathode and the first dynodes in FEU-130. The intensities and amplitudes of afterpulses in FEU-130 are found to be appreciably larger than in XP2020, which may limit the use of FEU-130 in some experiments with autocorrelation delayed-coincidence spectrometers

  8. Microsoft Windows Xp. El último neonato de Microsoft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ficarra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estrena una nueva era de la informática con la llegada del Windows XP, mas al mismo tiempo se pronostica que eclosionará en el primer quinquenio de este siglo. Se afirma que sin embargo los sistemas operativos seguirán siendo los pilares fundamentales de esta nueva época.

  9. A Red Blood Cell Membrane-Camouflaged Nanoparticle Counteracts Streptolysin O-Mediated Virulence Phenotypes of Invasive Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Escajadillo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS, an important human-specific Gram-positive bacterial pathogen, is associated with a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from mild superficial infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to serious invasive infections including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The GAS pore-forming streptolysin O (SLO is a well characterized virulence factor produced by nearly all GAS clinical isolates. High level expression of SLO is epidemiologically linked to intercontinental dissemination of hypervirulent clonotypes and poor clinical outcomes. SLO can trigger macrophage and neutrophil cell death and/or the inactivation of immune cell functions, and promotes tissue injury and bacterial survival in animal models of infection. In the present work, we describe how the pharmacological presentation of red blood cell (RBC derived biomimetic nanoparticles (“nanosponges” can sequester SLO and block the ability of GAS to damage host cells, thereby preserving innate immune function and increasing bacterial clearance in vitro and in vivo. Nanosponge administration protected human neutrophils, macrophages, and keratinocytes against SLO-mediated cytotoxicity. This therapeutic intervention prevented SLO-induced macrophage apoptosis and increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, allowing increased GAS killing by the respective phagocytic cell types. In a murine model of GAS necrotizing skin infection, local administration of the biomimetic nanosponges was associated with decreased lesion size and reduced bacterial colony-forming unit recovery. Utilization of a toxin decoy and capture platform that inactivates the secreted SLO before it contacts the host cell membrane, presents a novel virulence factor targeted strategy that could be a powerful adjunctive therapy in severe GAS infections where morbidity and mortality are high despite antibiotic treatment.

  10. Antimicrobial and anti-virulence activity of capsaicin against erythromycin-resistant, cell-invasive Group A streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eMarini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide is the active component of Capsicum plants (chilli peppers, which are grown as food and for medicinal purposes since ancient times, and is responsible for the pungency of their fruit. Besides its multiple pharmacological and physiological properties (pain relief, cancer prevention, and beneficial cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal effects capsaicin has recently attracted considerable attention because of its antimicrobial and anti-virulence activity. This is the first study of its in vitro antibacterial and anti-virulence activity against Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococci (GAS], a major human pathogen. The test strains were previously characterized, erythromycin-susceptible (n=5 and erythromycin-resistant (n=27, cell-invasive pharyngeal isolates. The MICs of capsaicin were 64-128 μg/mL (the most common MIC was 128 µg/mL. The action of capsaicin was bactericidal, as suggested by MBC values that were equal or close to the MICs, and by early detection of dead cells in the live/dead assay. No capsaicin-resistant mutants were obtained in single-step resistance selection studies. Interestingly, growth in presence of sublethal capsaicin concentrations induced an increase in biofilm production (p ≤ 0.05 and in the number of bacteria adhering to A549 monolayers, and a reduction in cell-invasiveness and haemolytic activity (both p ≤ 0.05. Cell invasiveness fell so dramatically that a highly invasive strain became non-invasive. The dose-response relationship, characterized by opposite effects of low and high capsaicin doses, suggests a hormetic response. The present study documents that capsaicin has promising bactericidal activity against erythromycin-resistant, cell-invasive pharyngeal GAS isolates. The fact that sublethal concentrations inhibited cell invasion and reduced haemolytic activity, two important virulence traits of GAS, is also interesting, considering that cell

  11. Applications Performance on NAS Intel Paragon XP/S - 15#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Copper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division received an Intel Touchstone Sigma prototype model Paragon XP/S- 15 in February, 1993. The i860 XP microprocessor with an integrated floating point unit and operating in dual -instruction mode gives peak performance of 75 million floating point operations (NIFLOPS) per second for 64 bit floating point arithmetic. It is used in the Paragon XP/S-15 which has been installed at NAS, NASA Ames Research Center. The NAS Paragon has 208 nodes and its peak performance is 15.6 GFLOPS. Here, we will report on early experience using the Paragon XP/S- 15. We have tested its performance using both kernels and applications of interest to NAS. We have measured the performance of BLAS 1, 2 and 3 both assembly-coded and Fortran coded on NAS Paragon XP/S- 15. Furthermore, we have investigated the performance of a single node one-dimensional FFT, a distributed two-dimensional FFT and a distributed three-dimensional FFT Finally, we measured the performance of NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the Paragon and compare it with the performance obtained on other highly parallel machines, such as CM-5, CRAY T3D, IBM SP I, etc. In particular, we investigated the following issues, which can strongly affect the performance of the Paragon: a. Impact of the operating system: Intel currently uses as a default an operating system OSF/1 AD from the Open Software Foundation. The paging of Open Software Foundation (OSF) server at 22 MB to make more memory available for the application degrades the performance. We found that when the limit of 26 NIB per node out of 32 MB available is reached, the application is paged out of main memory using virtual memory. When the application starts paging, the performance is considerably reduced. We found that dynamic memory allocation can help applications performance under certain circumstances. b. Impact of data cache on the i860/XP: We measured the performance of the BLAS both assembly coded and Fortran

  12. Mislocalization of XPF-ERCC1 nuclease contributes to reduced DNA repair in XP-F patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwaar Ahmad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is caused by defects in the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway. NER removes helix-distorting DNA lesions, such as UV-induced photodimers, from the genome. Patients suffering from XP exhibit exquisite sun sensitivity, high incidence of skin cancer, and in some cases neurodegeneration. The severity of XP varies tremendously depending upon which NER gene is mutated and how severely the mutation affects DNA repair capacity. XPF-ERCC1 is a structure-specific endonuclease essential for incising the damaged strand of DNA in NER. Missense mutations in XPF can result not only in XP, but also XPF-ERCC1 (XFE progeroid syndrome, a disease of accelerated aging. In an attempt to determine how mutations in XPF can lead to such diverse symptoms, the effects of a progeria-causing mutation (XPF(R153P were compared to an XP-causing mutation (XPF(R799W in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant XPF harboring either mutation was purified in a complex with ERCC1 and tested for its ability to incise a stem-loop structure in vitro. Both mutant complexes nicked the substrate indicating that neither mutation obviates catalytic activity of the nuclease. Surprisingly, differential immunostaining and fractionation of cells from an XFE progeroid patient revealed that XPF-ERCC1 is abundant in the cytoplasm. This was confirmed by fluorescent detection of XPF(R153P-YFP expressed in Xpf mutant cells. In addition, microinjection of XPF(R153P-ERCC1 into the nucleus of XPF-deficient human cells restored nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Intriguingly, in all XPF mutant cell lines examined, XPF-ERCC1 was detected in the cytoplasm of a fraction of cells. This demonstrates that at least part of the DNA repair defect and symptoms associated with mutations in XPF are due to mislocalization of XPF-ERCC1 into the cytoplasm of cells, likely due to protein misfolding. Analysis of these patient cells therefore reveals a novel mechanism to potentially

  13. Recovery of DNA synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation of xeroderma pigmentosum cells depends on excision repair and is blocked by caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, excision-defective group A) cells (both SV40-transformed) pulse-labeled with [ 3 H] thymidine at various times after irradiation with ultraviolet light showed a decline and recovery of both the molecular weights of newly synthesized DNA and the rated of synthesis per cell. At the same ultraviolet dose, both molecular weights and rates of synthesis were inhibited more in XP than in normal cells. This indicates that excision repair plays a role in minimizing the inhibition of chain growth, possibly by excision of dimers ahead of the growing point. The ability to synthesize normal-sized DNA recovered more rapidly than rates of synthesis in normal cells, but both parameters recovered in phase in XP cells. During recovery in normal cells there are therefore fewer actively replicating clusters of replicons because the single-strand breaks involved in the excision of dimers inhibit replicon initiation. XP cells have few excision repair events and therefore fewer breaks to interfere with initiation, but chain growth is blocked by unexcised dimers. In both cell types recovery of the ability to synthesize normal-sized DNA was prevented by growing cells in caffeine after irradiation, possibly because of competition between the DNA binding properties of caffeine and replication proteins. These observations imply that excision repair and semiconservative replication interact strongly in irradiated cells to produce a complex spectrum of changes in DNA replication which may be confused with parts of alternative systems such as post-replication repair. (author)

  14. The ClpXP protease is dispensable for degradation of unfolded proteins in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Steen G.; Alqarzaee, Abdulelah A.; Jensen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    In living cells intracellular proteolysis is crucial for protein homeostasis, and ClpP proteases are conserved between eubacteria and the organelles of eukaryotic cells. In Staphylococcus aureus, ClpP associates to the substrate specificity factors, ClpX and ClpC forming two ClpP proteases, ClpXP...... cells, highly upregulated loci include the urease operon, the pyrimidine biosynthesis operon, the betA-betB operon, and the pathogenicity island, SaPI5, while virulence genes were dramatically down-regulated....

  15. Development of a YAC contig covering the minimal region of a CSNB1 locus in Xp11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boycott, K.M.; Gratton, K.J.; Moore, B.J. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) is an eye disorder that includes impairment of night vision, reduced visual acuity and, in some cases, myopia and congenital nystagmus. Electroretinography reveals a marked reduction of the b-wave in affected individuals suggesting that X-linked CSNB is due to a molecular defect in the bipolar layer of the retina. Based on our studies of a large four generation family with X-linked CSNB, a CSNB1 locus was mapped to a 4-5 cM region at Xp11.23-Xp11.22 bounded telomerically by DXS426 and centromerically by DXS988. Using a panel of radiation and conventional somatic cell hybrids, a detailed map of new and published STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for twenty-five STSs, including eleven end-clones, were used to isolate YAC clones from CEPH, mega-CEPH, and X chromosome-specific YAC libraries. In total, fifty-two YACs were characterized for STS overlaps and assembled to provide a minimum of 3 Mb of physical coverage in the region between DXS426 and DXS988. Five gaps proximal to SYP are still to be closed. Our physical map suggests the following gene order: Xpter-OTAL1-GF1-DXS1011E-MG81-HUMCRAS2P-SYP-Xcen. STS analysis of the YACs revealed three subregions of the physical map which appear to be particularly susceptible to internal deletions and end-clone analysis demonstrated chimerism in six of seventeen YACs. A physical map of Xp11.23-Xp11.22 will provide a resource for the isolation of candidate genes for the X-linked CSNB gene which maps to this region.

  16. Caffeine toxicity is inversely related to DNA repair in simian virus 40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum cells irradiated with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Human cells transformed by simian virus 40 (SV40) are more sensitive to killing by ultraviolet light when grown in caffeine after irradiation. The degree of sensitization at 2 mM caffeine (expressed as the ratio of the 37% survival dose for control cells divided by the 37% survival dose for cells grown in caffeine, i.e., the dose modification factor) was approximately 1.9 in transformed normal cells and 3.8-5.8 in excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) groups A, C, and D cells. A large dose modification factor of 12 was observed in a transformed XP variant cell line. Chinese hamster ovary cells were not significantly different from transformed normal human cells, with a maximum dose modification factor of 1.5. Two radioresistant XP revertants that do not excise cyclobutane dimers gave different responses; one resembled its group A parent in being sensitized by caffeine, and one did not. These results can be interpreted on the basis of a single hypothesis that cells are killed as a result of attempts to replicate damaged DNA. Increased replication rates caused by transformation, increased numbers of replication forks in DNA caused by caffeine, and increased numbers of damaged sites ahead of replication forks in excision-defective cells are all processes that will consequently increase killing according to this hypothesis. A corollary is that the XP variant may be highly sensitized to caffeine because of excision defects at the DNA replication forks, an idea that may be important in designing cloning strategies for the XP variant gene

  17. Caffeine toxicity is inversely related to DNA repair in simian virus 40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum cells irradiated with ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Human cells transformed by simian virus 40 (SV40) are more sensitive to killing by ultraviolet light when grown in caffeine after irradiation. The degree of sensitization at 2 mM caffeine (expressed as the ratio of the 37% survival dose for control cells divided by the 37% survival dose for cells grown in caffeine, i.e., the dose modification factor) was approximately 1.9 in transformed normal cells and 3.8-5.8 in excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) groups A, C, and D cells. A large dose modification factor of 12 was observed in a transformed XP variant cell line. Chinese hamster ovary cells were not significantly different from transformed normal human cells, with a maximum dose modification factor of 1.5. Two radioresistant XP revertants that do not excise cyclobutane dimers gave different responses; one resembled its group A parent in being sensitized by caffeine, and one did not. These results can be interpreted on the basis of a single hypothesis that cells are killed as a result of attempts to replicate damaged DNA. Increased replication rates caused by transformation, increased numbers of replication forks in DNA caused by caffeine, and increased numbers of damaged sites ahead of replication forks in excision-defective cells are all processes that will consequently increase killing according to this hypothesis. A corollary is that the XP variant may be highly sensitized to caffeine because of excision defects at the DNA replication forks, an idea that may be important in designing cloning strategies for the XP variant gene.

  18. Cytoplasmic localization of a functionally active Fanconi anemia group A green fluorescent protein chimera in human 293 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, FAE; Waisfisz, Q; Dijkmans, LM; Hermsen, M.A.; Youssoufian, H; Arwert, F; Joenje, H

    1997-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents and predisposition to malignancy are characteristic of the genetically heterogeneous inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, Fanconi anemia (FA). The protein encoded by the recently cloned FA complementation group A gene, FAA, has been expected to localize in

  19. The total number of Leydig and Sertoli cells in the testes of men across various age groups - a stereological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter M; Seierøe, Karina; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    is particularly sensitive to methodological problems. Therefore, using the optical fractionator technique and a sampling design specifically optimized for human testes, we estimated the total number of Sertoli and Leydig cells in the testes from 26 post mortem male subjects ranging in age from 16 to 80 years...... of Sertoli cells with age; no such decline was found for Leydig cells. Quantitative stereological analysis of post mortem tissue may help understand the influence of age or disease on the number of human testicular cells....

  20. Novel polyfucosylated N-linked glycopeptides with blood group A, H, X and Y determinants from human small intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Finne, J.; Breimer, M.E.; Hansson, G.C.; Karlsson, K.-A.; Leffler, H.; Halbeek, H. van

    1989-01-01

    A novel type of N-linked glycopeptides representing a major part of the glycans in human small intestinal epithelial cells from blood group A and O individuals were isolated by gel filtrations and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I-Sepharose.

  1. A locus for isolated cataract on human Xp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P J; Berry, V; Hardcastle, A J; Maher, E R; Moore, A T; Bhattacharya, S S

    2002-02-01

    To genetically map the gene causing isolated X linked cataract in a large European pedigree. Using the patient registers at Birmingham Women's Hospital, UK, we identified and examined 23 members of a four generation family with nuclear cataract. Four of six affected males also had complex congenital heart disease. Pedigree data were collated and leucocyte DNA extracted from venous blood. Linkage analysis by PCR based microsatellite marker genotyping was used to identify the disease locus and mutations within candidate genes screened by direct sequencing. The disease locus was genetically refined to chromosome Xp22, within a 3 cM linkage interval flanked by markers DXS9902 and DXS999 (Zmax=3.64 at theta=0 for marker DXS8036). This is the first report of a locus for isolated inherited cataract on the X chromosome. The disease interval lies within the Nance-Horan locus suggesting allelic heterogeneity. The apparent association with congenital cardiac anomalies suggests a possible new oculocardiac syndrome.

  2. An altered redox balance and increased genetic instability characterize primary fibroblasts derived from xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlanti, Eleonora; Pietraforte, Donatella; Iorio, Egidio; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Zijno, Andrea; D’Errico, Mariarosaria; Simonelli, Valeria; Sanchez, Massimo; Fattibene, Paola; Falchi, Mario; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increased levels and different types of intracellular radical species as well as an altered glutathione redox state characterize XP-A human cells when compared to normal. • A more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels are associated with alteration of mitochondrial morphology and response to mitochondrial toxicants when XPA is defective. • XP-A human cells show increased spontaneous micronuclei frequency, a hallmark of cancer risk. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A patients are characterized by increased solar skin carcinogenesis and present also neurodegeneration. XPA deficiency is associated with defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) and increased basal levels of oxidatively induced DNA damage. In this study we search for the origin of increased levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions in XP-A cell genome and then address the question of whether increased oxidative stress might drive genetic instability. We show that XP-A human primary fibroblasts present increased levels and different types of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to normal fibroblasts, with O_2_−· and H_2O_2 being the major reactive species. Moreover, XP-A cells are characterized by decreased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios as compared to normal fibroblasts. The significant increase of ROS levels and the alteration of the glutathione redox state following silencing of XPA confirmed the causal relationship between a functional XPA and the control of redox balance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ("1H NMR) analysis of the metabolic profile revealed a more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels in XP-A than in normal primary fibroblasts. This perturbation of bioenergetics is associated with different morphology and response of mitochondria to targeted toxicants. In line with cancer susceptibility, XP-A primary fibroblasts showed increased spontaneous micronuclei (MN) frequency, a hallmark of cancer

  3. An altered redox balance and increased genetic instability characterize primary fibroblasts derived from xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlanti, Eleonora [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Pietraforte, Donatella; Iorio, Egidio; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara [Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Zijno, Andrea; D’Errico, Mariarosaria; Simonelli, Valeria [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Sanchez, Massimo [Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Fattibene, Paola [Department of Technology and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Falchi, Mario [National AIDS Center, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Dogliotti, Eugenia, E-mail: dogliotti@iss.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Increased levels and different types of intracellular radical species as well as an altered glutathione redox state characterize XP-A human cells when compared to normal. • A more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels are associated with alteration of mitochondrial morphology and response to mitochondrial toxicants when XPA is defective. • XP-A human cells show increased spontaneous micronuclei frequency, a hallmark of cancer risk. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A patients are characterized by increased solar skin carcinogenesis and present also neurodegeneration. XPA deficiency is associated with defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) and increased basal levels of oxidatively induced DNA damage. In this study we search for the origin of increased levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions in XP-A cell genome and then address the question of whether increased oxidative stress might drive genetic instability. We show that XP-A human primary fibroblasts present increased levels and different types of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to normal fibroblasts, with O{sub 2−}· and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} being the major reactive species. Moreover, XP-A cells are characterized by decreased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios as compared to normal fibroblasts. The significant increase of ROS levels and the alteration of the glutathione redox state following silencing of XPA confirmed the causal relationship between a functional XPA and the control of redox balance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) analysis of the metabolic profile revealed a more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels in XP-A than in normal primary fibroblasts. This perturbation of bioenergetics is associated with different morphology and response of mitochondria to targeted toxicants. In line with cancer susceptibility, XP-A primary fibroblasts showed increased spontaneous micronuclei (MN) frequency, a

  4. Melanotic Xp11 Translocation Renal Cancer Managed With Radical Nephrectomy and IVC Tumor Thrombectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyad S. Khourdaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancer is a rarely observed neoplasm primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. Given the paucity of data describing this malignancy, its natural history and subsequent long-term management are not well understood. We report a case of melanotic Xp11 translocation with tumor thrombus extension managed with radical nephrectomy and inferior vena cava (IVC tumor thrombectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe use of conventional tumor thrombectomy techniques in a patient with melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancer.

  5. X-linked mental retardation with neonatal hypotonia in a French family (MRX15): Gene assignment to Xp11.22-Xp21.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynaud, M.; Dessay, B.; Ayrault, A.D. [INSERM, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1996-07-12

    Linkage analysis was performed in a family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX 15). Hypotonia in infancy was the most remarkable physical manifestation. The severity of mental deficiency was variable among the patients, but all of them had poor or absent speech. Significant lod scores at a recombination fraction of zero were detected with the marker loci DXS1126, DXS255, and DXS573 (Zmax = 2.01) and recombination was observed with the two flanking loci DXS164 (Xp21.1) and DXS988 (Xp11.22), identifying a 17 cM interval. This result suggests a new gene localization in the proximal Xp region. In numerous families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX), the corresponding gene has been localized to the paracentromeric region in which a low recombination rate impairs the precision of mapping. 58 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links

  7. Computer Security: Bye, Bye, Windows XP security... Welcome infections!

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2014-01-01

    Rest in peace, Windows XP. Since your birth on 25 October 2001, you have struggled hard to survive this harsh Internet world. You fell prey to “Melissa”, “Sasser” and “Conficker”, and brought CERN its last large-scale infection with “Blaster” in 2004.    After being upgraded to “SP2”, you discovered software development lifecycles, regular “Patch Tuesdays” and a local firewall that rejected everything by default. In the end, you outlived your weird brother “Vista” and survived as the ugly duckling cousin to the beautiful Mr. Mac. But all your ups and downs are over now. On 8 April 2014, you were given your very last security updates. These life-sustaining measures will be stopped now. Game over. From now on, you are a zombie: presumed dead, but still kept running by your master/owner/user. They might not even understand that you now pose a risk ...

  8. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  9. Repair of damage by ultraviolet radiation in xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains of complementation groups E and F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, B.; Berends, F.; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    The xeroderma pignemtosum fibroblast strains XP2RO, complementation group E, and XP23OS, group F were compared with normal human primary fibroblasts UV. regard to repair of damage induced by 254-nn UV> In XP2RO cells, repair DNA synthesis, measured by autoradiography (unscheduled DNA synthesis =

  10. Study of nuclear proteins in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amari, N.M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear histone and nonhistone (NHP) proteins from normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XP-A) lymphoblastoid cells were compared both qualitatively, quantitatively and for binding affinity for DNA. Histones and four NHP fractions (NHP/sub 1-4/) were isolated from purified cell nuclei. Binding affinity to [ 3 H] melanoma DNA of histones and each NHP fraction was then determined using gradient dialysis followed by a filter assay. Histones and each NHP fraction were then sub-fractionated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Densitometric scans of the separation of these proteins on the gels were qualitatively, and quantitatively analyzed and compared between the two cell lines. No qualitative or quantitative differences were observed between histones from XP-A or normal cells

  11. Host-cell reactivation of uv-irradiated and chemically treated Herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain mp was studied in normal human skin fibroblasts and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts from XP genetic complementation groups A-D and in an XP variant. The increasing relative order for the host-cell reactivation of both types of damaged virus in the different complementation groups is A = D < B < C; XP variant = normal controls. XP complementation group D cells, which manifest the most severe inhibition of her ability for both UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus, can reactivate nitrogen mustard treated HSV-1 mp to the same extent as normal cells. Together, these results indicate that (1) Excision repair of UV and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene DNA damaged viruses share a common rate limiting enzymatic step and (2) The repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells plays little or no role in the recovery of nitrogen mustard treated virus. The results of studies on the effect of caffeine on the survival of both UV- and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus in normal and XP cells imply that the reactivation of HSV-1 mp is mediated by an excision repair process with little if any recovery contributed by post-replication repair mechanisms. The host-cell reactivation of N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated HSV-1 mp was also correlated with the defective UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in two skin fibroblast strains established from a skin biopsy obtained from each of two juvenile females who had been clinically diagnosed as xeroderma pigmentosum. These findings are discussed in relation to the further characterization of the xeroderma pigmentosum phenotype and their possible utilization for the selection and isolation of new mammalian cell DNA repair mutants

  12. A subset of group A-like var genes encodes the malaria parasite ligands for binding to human brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claessens, Antoine; Adams, Yvonne; Ghumra, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most deadly manifestation of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathology of cerebral malaria is characterized by the accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the microvasculature of the brain caused by parasite adhesins on the surface of IEs binding to human...... receptors on microvascular endothelial cells. The parasite and host molecules involved in this interaction are unknown. We selected three P. falciparum strains (HB3, 3D7, and IT/FCR3) for binding to a human brain endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). The whole transcriptome of isogenic pairs of selected.......029) but not by antibodies from controls with uncomplicated malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.58). This work describes a binding phenotype for virulence-associated group A P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants and identifies targets for interventions to treat or prevent cerebral malaria....

  13. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. First reported case of intrachromosomal cryptic inv dup del Xp in a boy with developmental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Celine; Lebbar, Aziza; Teinturier, Cecile; Baverel, Françoise; Viot, Geraldine; Le Tessier, Dominique; Le Bozec, Jerome; Cuisset, Laurence; Dupont, Jean-Michel

    2007-06-01

    We report here on a 6-year-old boy referred to the laboratory for karyotyping and SHOX microdeletion testing. The most significant clinical findings in this boy were small stature, Madelung deformity, facial dysmorphism, mild mental retardation and behavioral problems. R-, G- and RTBG-banding chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype. Fine molecular characterization, by FISH, of terminal Xp microdeletion revealed an associated partial duplication. Further refinement of the molecular analysis indicated an inverted duplication of the Xp22.31-Xp22.32 (13.7 Mb) region including the STS, VCX-A and KAL1 genes, associated with a terminal Xp deletion Xp22.33-Xpter (3.6 Mb) encompassing the SHOX and ARSE genes. Such rearrangements have been characterized for other chromosomal pairs, but this is the first reported male patient involving the short arm of the X chromosome. Molecular analysis of the maternal and patient's microsatellite markers showed interchromatid mispairing leading to non-allelic homologous recombination to be the most likely mechanism underlying this rearrangement. This case highlights the importance of clinically driven FISH investigations in order to uncover cryptic micro-rearrangements. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Apical extrusion of debris during the preparation of oval root canals: a comparative study between a full-sequence SAF system and a rotary file system supplemented by XP-endo finisher file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfir, Anda; Moza-Levi, Rotem; Herteanu, Moran; Weissman, Amir; Wigler, Ronald

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the amount of apically extruded debris during the preparation of oval canals with either a rotary file system supplemented by the XP-endo Finisher file or a full-sequence self-adjusting file (SAF) system. Sixty mandibular incisors were randomly assigned to two groups: group A: stage 1-glide path preparation with Pre-SAF instruments. Stage 2-cleaning and shaping with SAF. Group B: stage 1-glide path preparation with ProGlider file. Stage 2-cleaning and shaping with ProTaper Next system. Stage 3-Final cleaning with XP-endo Finisher file. The debris extruded during each of the stages was collected, and the debris weights were compared between the groups and between the stages within the groups using t tests with a significance level set at P file followed by XP-endo Finisher file extruded significantly more debris than a full-sequence SAF system. Each stage, in either procedure, had its own contribution to the extrusion of debris. Final preparation with XP-endo Finisher file contributes to the total amount of extruded debris, but the clinical relevance of the relative difference in the amount of apically extruded debris remains unclear.

  17. Group A Streptococcus M1T1 Intracellular Infection of Primary Tonsil Epithelial Cells Dampens Levels of Secreted IL-8 Through the Action of SpyCEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia T. Soderholm

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus; GAS commonly causes pharyngitis in children and adults, with severe invasive disease and immune sequelae being an infrequent consequence. The ability of GAS to invade the host and establish infection likely involves subversion of host immune defenses. However, the signaling pathways and innate immune responses of epithelial cells to GAS are not well-understood. In this study, we utilized RNAseq to characterize the inflammatory responses of primary human tonsil epithelial (TEpi cells to infection with the laboratory-adapted M6 strain JRS4 and the M1T1 clinical isolate 5448. Both strains induced the expression of genes encoding a wide range of inflammatory mediators, including IL-8. Pathway analysis revealed differentially expressed genes between mock and JRS4- or 5448-infected TEpi cells were enriched in transcription factor networks that regulate IL-8 expression, such as AP-1, ATF-2, and NFAT. While JRS4 infection resulted in high levels of secreted IL-8, 5448 infection did not, suggesting that 5448 may post-transcriptionally dampen IL-8 production. Infection with 5448ΔcepA, an isogenic mutant lacking the IL-8 protease SpyCEP, resulted in IL-8 secretion levels comparable to JRS4 infection. Complementation of 5448ΔcepA and JRS4 with a plasmid encoding 5448-derived SpyCEP significantly reduced IL-8 secretion by TEpi cells. Our results suggest that intracellular infection with the pathogenic GAS M1T1 clone induces a strong pro-inflammatory response in primary tonsil epithelial cells, but modulates this host response by selectively degrading the neutrophil-recruiting chemokine IL-8 to benefit infection.

  18. GeoXp : An R Package for Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Laurent

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present GeoXp, an R package implementing interactive graphics for exploratory spatial data analysis. We use a data set concerning public schools of the French MidiPyrenees region to illustrate the use of these exploratory techniques based on the coupling between a statistical graph and a map. Besides elementary plots like boxplots,histograms or simple scatterplots, GeoXp also couples maps with Moran scatterplots, variogram clouds, Lorenz curves and other graphical tools. In order to make the most of the multidimensionality of the data, GeoXp includes dimension reduction techniques such as principal components analysis and cluster analysis whose results are also linked to the map.

  19. Xeroderma Pigmentosum: Low Prevalence of Germline XPA Mutations in a Brazilian XP Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Miranda Santiago

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by DNA repair defects that cause photophobia, sunlight-induced cancers, and neurodegeneration. Prevalence of germline mutations in the nucleotide excision repair gene XPA vary significantly in different populations. No Brazilian patients have been reported to carry a germline mutation in this gene. In this study, the germline mutational status of XPA was determined in Brazilian patients exhibiting major clinical features of XP syndrome. The study was conducted on 27 unrelated patients from select Brazilian families. A biallelic inactivating transition mutation c.619C>T (p.Arg207Ter was identified in only one patient with a history of neurological impairment and mild skin abnormalities. These findings suggest that XP syndrome is rarely associated with inherited disease-causing XPA mutations in the Brazilian population. Additionally, this report demonstrates the effectiveness of genotype-phenotype correlation as a valuable tool to guide direct genetic screening.

  20. Xeroderma pigmentosum: low prevalence of germline XPA mutations in a Brazilian XP population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Karina Miranda; França de Nóbrega, Amanda; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Achatz, Maria Isabel

    2015-04-22

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by DNA repair defects that cause photophobia, sunlight-induced cancers, and neurodegeneration. Prevalence of germline mutations in the nucleotide excision repair gene XPA vary significantly in different populations. No Brazilian patients have been reported to carry a germline mutation in this gene. In this study, the germline mutational status of XPA was determined in Brazilian patients exhibiting major clinical features of XP syndrome. The study was conducted on 27 unrelated patients from select Brazilian families. A biallelic inactivating transition mutation c.619C>T (p.Arg207Ter) was identified in only one patient with a history of neurological impairment and mild skin abnormalities. These findings suggest that XP syndrome is rarely associated with inherited disease-causing XPA mutations in the Brazilian population. Additionally, this report demonstrates the effectiveness of genotype-phenotype correlation as a valuable tool to guide direct genetic screening.

  1. Index of CD34+ Cells and Mononuclear Cells in the Bone Marrow of Spinal Cord Injury Patients of Different Age Groups: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyasagar Devaprasad Dedeepiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent evidence of safety and efficacy of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMNC in spinal cord injury makes the Bone Marrow (BM CD34+ percentage and the BMMNC count gain significance. The indices of BM that change with body mass index and aging in general population have been reported but seldom in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI victims, whose parameters of relevance differ from general population. Herein, we report the indices of BMMNC in SCI victims. Materials and Methods. BMMNCs of 332 SCI patients were isolated under GMP protocols. Cell count by Trypan blue method and CD34+ cells by flow cytometry were documented and analysed across ages and gender. Results. The average BMMNC per ml in the age groups 0–20, 21–40, 41–60, and 61–80 years were 4.71, 4.03, 3.67, and 3.02 million and the CD34+ were 1.05%, 1.04%, 0.94%, and 0.93% respectively. The decline in CD34+ was sharp between 20–40 and 40–60 age groups. Females of reproductive age group had lesser CD34+. Conclusion. The BMMNC and CD34+ percentages decline with aging in SCI victims. Their lower values in females during reproductive age should be analysed for relevance to hormonal influence. This study offers reference values of BMMNC and CD34+ of SCI victims for successful clinical application.

  2. Implementation and upgrading of operational I and C with Teleperm XP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidowitzsch, B.

    2004-01-01

    Teleperm XP is the digital IC platform especially developed and successfully implemented by Siemens AG for the modernization of normal operation IC in fossil fired and Nuclear Power Plants. After manifold usage in running German NPPs as well as in other countries all over the world it is going to be used also for IC modernization in the U.S.A, upcoming new plants like Finland 5 in Olkiluoto and in the next EPR to be built in France. The biggest Teleperm XP system was implemented at NPP Tianwan (VVER 1000) in China. (author)

  3. Efficacy of XP-endo Finisher File in Removing Calcium Hydroxide from Simulated Internal Resorption Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; Sariyilmaz, Evren; Sariyilmaz, Öznur

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of supplementary use of XP-endo Finisher file, passive ultrasonic activation (PUI), EndoActivator (EA), and CanalBrush (CB) on the removal of calcium hydroxide (CH) paste from simulated internal resorption cavities. The root canals of 110 extracted single-rooted teeth with straight canals were prepared up to size 50. The specimens were split longitudinally, and standardized internal resorption cavities were prepared with burs. The cavities and root canals were filled with CH paste. The specimens were divided into 5 groups as follows: XP-endo Finisher, EA, PUI, CB, and syringe irrigation (SI). The root canals were irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA for 2 minutes, respectively. Apart from the SI group, both solutions were activated by using tested techniques for 1 minute. The quantity of CH remnants on resorption cavities was scored. Data were analyzed by using Kruskal-Wallis H and Mann-Whitney U tests. XP-endo Finisher and PUI removed significantly more CH than SI, EA, and CB (P  .05). Differences among SI, EA, and CB were also non-significant (P > .05). None of the tested techniques render the simulated internal resorption cavities free of CH debris. XP-endo Finisher and PUI were superior to SI, CB, and EA. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Report: Passaic Valley Sewerage Commissioners – Unallowable Costs Claimed Under EPA Grant XP98237601

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #08-2-0226, August 6, 2008. The grantee claimed $2,385,634 for pre-award costs under Grant XP98237601 that were incurred prior to the grant award and thus were unallowable under the grant administrative conditions and OMB Circular A-87.

  5. An altered redox balance and increased genetic instability characterize primary fibroblasts derived from xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlanti, Eleonora; Pietraforte, Donatella; Iorio, Egidio; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Zijno, Andrea; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Simonelli, Valeria; Sanchez, Massimo; Fattibene, Paola; Falchi, Mario; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2015-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A patients are characterized by increased solar skin carcinogenesis and present also neurodegeneration. XPA deficiency is associated with defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) and increased basal levels of oxidatively induced DNA damage. In this study we search for the origin of increased levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions in XP-A cell genome and then address the question of whether increased oxidative stress might drive genetic instability. We show that XP-A human primary fibroblasts present increased levels and different types of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to normal fibroblasts, with O₂₋• and H₂O₂ being the major reactive species. Moreover, XP-A cells are characterized by decreased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios as compared to normal fibroblasts. The significant increase of ROS levels and the alteration of the glutathione redox state following silencing of XPA confirmed the causal relationship between a functional XPA and the control of redox balance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H NMR) analysis of the metabolic profile revealed a more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels in XP-A than in normal primary fibroblasts. This perturbation of bioenergetics is associated with different morphology and response of mitochondria to targeted toxicants. In line with cancer susceptibility, XP-A primary fibroblasts showed increased spontaneous micronuclei (MN) frequency, a hallmark of cancer risk. The increased MN frequency was not affected by inhibition of ROS to normal levels by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Minimum detectable activities for natural radionuclides for IRIS-XP airborne gamma-spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohera, Marcel; Sladek, Petr

    2009-01-01

    To subtract the 90 Sr background in the helicopter (the 90 Sr source is used as a freezing deposit indicator in Mi-17 helicopters), a spectrum at the altitude of more than 500 metre altitude above the ground for 10 minutes was acquired. The spectra at 50, 100 and 150 m altitude were corrected for the aircraft and the cosmics, stripping and height attenuation in K, U and Th peak windows. For IRIS-XP, better results have been obtained than presented so far. The new calculated minimum detectable activities (MDAs) are 114 Bq/kg for 40 K, 16 Bq/kg for 238 U and 8 Bq/kg for 232 Th at 95% confidence interval for 1 second spectra at 100 m altitude. This work deals with counting statistics and the estimate of the MDAs for natural radionuclides for the IRIS-XP airborne gamma-ray spectrometer (4 x 4 litre NaI(Tl)) produced by PICO Envirotec, Inc. in Toronto, Canada. The detection sensitivities (MDA) for 4 x 4 NaI(Tl) crystals at the altitude of 90 m presented by Pico Envirotec, Inc. are too high compared with the detection sensitivities presented by other airborne gamma-ray spectrometer producers. This was the reason why to calculate and verify the MDA for IRIS-XP. Firstly, the minimum detectable activities for IRIS-XP for 4 x 4 litre NaI(Tl) crystals were determined based on the data acquired on the calibration pads at the Holland Landing Airport in Toronto, Canada to test the method of calculation used. This method on calibration pads provides all available window sensitivities, stripping factors and counts in the natural radionuclide windows to verify the computing method. Secondly, the MDAs under the real flight conditions were also estimated for the IRIS-XP (4 x 4 litre NaI(Tl) crystals) which was delivered to the Czech Armed Forces. The MDAs were calculated based on the data acquired during the tests at the Military Training Area in Vyskov, Czech Republic. The data was collected at three different altitudes (50 m, 100 m and 150 m) when the Mi-17 helicopter with IRIS-XP

  7. Optical properties and energy spectra of donors in Gasub(x)Insub(1-x)P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, V.; Kopylov, A.A.; Pikhtin, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    Impurity optical absorption is studied in n-Gasub(x)Insub(1-x)P for compositions with indirect band structure. For the first time the photoionization bands of shallow donor centers have been observed in semiconductor solid solutions. Analysis of spectra has shown the electron transitions to excited states of donor to contribute considerably to absorption. A simple theoretical model is presented to explain the shift of ionization energy of silicon donor and the variation in shape of the impurity absorption band

  8. An investigation of the predictors of photoprotection and UVR dose to the face in patients with XP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walburn, Jessica; Sarkany, Robert; Norton, Sam

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare genetic condition caused by defective nucleotide excision repair and characterised by skin cancer, ocular and neurological involvement. Stringent ultraviolet protection is the only way to prevent skin cancer. Despite the risks, some patients...

  9. Evidence for an asthma risk locus on chromosome Xp: a replication linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasch-Andersen, C; Møller, M U; Haagerup, A

    2008-01-01

    replication sample as used in the present study. The aim of the study was to replicate linkage to candidate regions for asthma in an independent Danish sample. METHODS: We performed a replication study investigating linkage to candidate regions for asthma on chromosomes 1p36.31-p36.21, 5q15-q23.2, 6p24.3-p22...... studies have been carried out the results are still conflicting and call for replication experiments. A Danish genome-wide scan has prior reported evidence for candidate regions for asthma susceptibility genes on chromosomes 1p, 5q, 6p, 12q and Xp. Linkage to chromosome 12q was later confirmed in the same.......3, and Xp22.31-p11.4 using additional markers in an independent set of 136 Danish asthmatic sib pair families. RESULTS: Nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses yielded suggestive evidence for linkage to asthma to chromosome Xp21.2 (MLS 2.92) but failed to replicate linkage to chromosomes 1p36.31-p36.21, 5...

  10. Expressing complementarity and the x-p commutation relation through further quantum inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Estrada, Ramon F

    2010-01-01

    Complementarity and the commutation relation of position (x) and momentum (p) imply much more than the fundamental x-p uncertainty inequality. Here, we display some further consequences of the former that could have certain pedagogical interest and, so, contribute to the teaching of quantum mechanics. Inspired by an elementary derivation of the x-p uncertainty inequality, based upon a positive quadratic polynomial, we explore one possible extension, via quartic polynomials and simple algebra and integrations. Our analysis, aimed at providing some further pedagogic expression of genuine quantum behaviours, yields other quantum inequalities for expectation values, expressed through suitable discriminants associated with quartic algebraic equations, which differ from (and are not a strict consequence of) the x-p uncertainty inequality. Those quantum inequalities are confirmed, and genuine non-classical behaviours are exhibited, for simple cases: a harmonic oscillator, a hydrogenic atom and free Gaussian wave packets. The physical interest of the expectation values involved in the quantum inequalities and of the latter is discussed, in the framework of quantum optics and squeezing phenomena.

  11. A child with xeroderma pigmentosum for excision of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridevi M Mulimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is characterized by hypersensitivity to sunlight, ocular involvement, and progressive neurological complications. These manifestations are due to a cellular hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation leading to a defect in repair of DNA by the process of nucleotide excision repair. Basal cell carcinoma which is rare in children can occur with XP. Though the XP induced changes are predominately dermatologic, pose several challenges in anaesthetic management. Hence, we are reporting a 9-year-old child with XP scheduled for excision of basal cell carcinoma under general anaesthesia.

  12. Repair of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation and aromatic amines in normal and repair-deficient human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevnsner, Tinna; Frandsen, Henrik; Autrup, Herman

    1995-01-01

    (AAF) respectively. The cell line belonging to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) removed all three types of damage less efficiently than the normal cell line, but more efficiently than the cell line belonging to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XP-D). The cell line...

  13. Repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells made UV light resistant by fusion with X-ray-inactivated Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive human disease, characterized by an extreme sensitivity to sunlight, caused by the inability of cells to repair UV light-induced damage to DNA. Cell fusion was used to transfer fragments of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) chromosomes into XP cells. The hybrid cells exhibited UV resistance and DNA repair characteristics comparable to those expressed by CHO cells, and their DNA had greater homology with CHO DNA than did the DNA from XP cells. Control experiments consisted of fusion of irradiated and unirradiated XP cells and repeated exposure of unfused XP cells to UV doses used for hybrid selection. These treatments did not result in an increase in UV resistance, repair capability, or homology with CHO DNA. The hybrid cell lines do not, therefore, appear to be XP revertants. The establishment of these stable hybrid cell lines is an initial step toward identifying and cloning CHO DNA repair genes that complement the XP defect in human cells. The method should also be applicable to cloning genes for other diseases, such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Fanconi's anemia

  14. Differential features of sister-chromatid exchange responses to ultraviolet radiation and caffeine in xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoblastoid cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohda, H.; Oikawa, A.

    1983-01-01

    Sister-chromatic exchange (SCE) induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and viability after UV irradiation were studied in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 7 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and 6 normal donors. UV irradiation caused significant increases of SCEs in both XP and normal cells. In 3 XP cell lines, which were deficient in unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and sensitive to the killing effect of UV, very high SCE frequencies were observed after UV irradiation. Cells from a patient with the De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome were the most sensitive to UV in terms of both SCE induction and cell killing. In 2 of 4 UDS-proficient XP cell lines tested, the incidences of UV-induced SCEs were similar to those in normal cell lines, but in 2 other UDS-proficient lines from 2 XP patients with skin cancer, the frequencies of UV-induced SCEs were significantly higher than in normal cells. (orig./AJ)

  15. Cockayne syndrome group B (Csb) and group a (Csa) deficiencies predispose to hearing loss and cochlear hair cell degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagtegaal, A Paul; Rainey, Robert N; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata M C; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Borst, J Gerard G; Segil, Neil

    2015-03-11

    Sensory hair cells in the cochlea, like most neuronal populations that are postmitotic, terminally differentiated, and non-regenerating, depend on robust mechanisms of self-renewal for lifelong survival. We report that hair cell homeostasis requires a specific sub-branch of the DNA damage nucleotide excision repair pathway, termed transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome (CS), caused by defects in TCR, is a rare DNA repair disorder with a broad clinical spectrum that includes sensorineural hearing loss. We tested hearing and analyzed the cellular integrity of the organ of Corti in two mouse models of this disease with mutations in the Csb gene (CSB(m/m) mice) and Csa gene (Csa(-/-) mice), respectively. Csb(m/m) and Csa(-/-) mice manifested progressive hearing loss, as measured by an increase in auditory brainstem response thresholds. In contrast to wild-type mice, mutant mice showed reduced or absent otoacoustic emissions, suggesting cochlear outer hair cell impairment. Hearing loss in Csb(m/m) and Csa(-/-) mice correlated with progressive hair cell loss in the base of the organ of Corti, starting between 6 and 13 weeks of age, which increased by 16 weeks of age in a basal-to-apical gradient, with outer hair cells more severely affected than inner hair cells. Our data indicate that the hearing loss observed in CS patients is reproduced in mouse models of this disease. We hypothesize that accumulating DNA damage, secondary to the loss of TCR, contributes to susceptibility to hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354280-07$15.00/0.

  16. A data acquisition system based on general VME system in WinXP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Zhe; Qian Sen; Wang Yifang; Heng Yuekun; Zhang Jiawei; Fu Zaiwei; Qi Ming; Zheng Yangheng

    2010-01-01

    The compilation and encapsulation of a general data acquisition system based on VME board in WinXP environment was developed using LabVIEW with graphics interface. By integrating the emulational instrument panel of LabVIEW and calling the Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLs) of crate controller, the VME modules were encapsulated into function modules independently, for convenience of use. The BLT, MBLT and CBLT readout modes for different VME boards were studied. The modules can be selected and modified easily according to the requirements of different tests. Finally, successful applications of the high resolution data acquisition software (DAQ) in several experiment environments are reported.(authors)

  17. Detection of explosive atmospheres using the software AtmosXp V 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio Álvarez Álvarez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Las condiciones de atmósferas explosivas y acumulación de gases dentro de las minas subterráneas de carbón requieren un anális is detallado y el desarrollo de modelos y mecanismos que permitan su detección. Para tal fin se ha desarrollado el software Atmos Xp V2.0 que incluye el diagrama de Coward para el análisis de estas mez clas explosivas.

  18. Mechanism of protection induced by group A Streptococcus vaccine candidate J8-DT: contribution of B and T-cells towards protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Pandey

    Full Text Available Vaccination with J8-DT, a leading GAS vaccine candidate, results in protective immunity in mice. Analysis of immunologic correlates of protection indicated a role of J8-specific antibodies that were induced post-immunization. In the present study, several independent experimental approaches were employed to investigate the protective immunological mechanisms involved in J8-DT-mediated immunity. These approaches included the passive transfer of mouse or rabbit immune serum/antibodies in addition to selective depletion of T-cell subsets prior to bacterial challenge. Passive transfer of J8-DT antiserum/antibodies from mice and rabbits conferred significant resistance against challenge to mice. To exclude the possibility of involvement of other host immune factors, the studies were repeated in SCID mice, which highlighted the need for an ongoing immune response for long-lived protection. Depletion of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cell subsets confirmed that an active de novo immune response, involving CD4(+ T-helper cells, is required for continued synthesis of antibodies resulting in protection against GAS infection. Taken together these results indicate an involvement of CD4(+ T-cells in J8-DT-mediated protection possibly via an ability to maintain antibody levels. These results have considerable relevance to the development of a broad spectrum passive immunotherapy for GAS disease.

  19. The reprogramming factor nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 cannot replace octamer-binding transcription factor 4 function in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyeng-Won; Oh, Hye-Rim; Lee, Jaeyoung; Lim, Bobae; Han, Yong-Mahn; Oh, Junseo; Kim, Jungho

    2014-02-01

    Although octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct-4) is one of the most intensively studied factors in mammalian development, no cellular genes capable of replacing Oct-4 function in embryonic stem (ES) cells have been found. Recent data show that nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 (Nr5a2) is able to replace Oct-4 function in the reprogramming process; however, it is unclear whether Nr5a2 can replace Oct-4 function in ES cells. In this study, the ability of Nr5a2 to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency in ES cells was investigated. Nr5a2 localized to the nucleus in ES cells, similarly to Oct-4. However, expression of Nr5a2 failed to rescue the stem cell phenotype or to maintain the self-renewal ability of ES cells. Furthermore, as compared with Oct-4-expressing ES cells, Nr5a2-expressing ES cells showed a reduced number of cells in S-phase, did not expand normally, and did not remain in an undifferentiated state. Ectopic expression of Nr5a2 in ES cells was not able to activate transcription of ES cell-specific genes, and gene expression profiling demonstrated differences between Nr5a2-expressing and Oct-4-expressing ES cells. In addition, Nr5a2-expressing ES cells were not able to form teratomas in nude mice. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the gene regulation properties of Nr5a2 and Oct-4 and their abilities to confer self-renewal and pluripotency of ES cells differ. The present study provides strong evidence that Nr5a2 cannot replace Oct-4 function in ES cells. © 2013 FEBS.

  20. Frequency of intrachromosomal homologous recombination induced by UV radiation in normally repairing and excision repair-deficient human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, T.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.; Godwin, A.R.; Liskay, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair in intrachromosomal homologous recombination, a plasmid containing duplicated copies of the gene coding for hygromycin resistance was introduced into the genome of a repair-proficient human cell line, KMST-6, and two repair-deficient lines, XP2OS(SV) from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A and XP2YO(SV) from complementation group F. Neither hygromycin-resistance gene codes for a functional enzyme because each contains an insertion/deletion mutation at a unique site, but recombination between the two defective genes can yield hygromycin-resistant cells. The rates of spontaneous recombination in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains containing the recombination substrate were found to be similar. The frequency of UV-induced recombination was determined for three of these cell strains. At low doses, the group A cell strain and the group F cell strain showed a significant increase in frequency of recombinants. The repair-proficient cell strain required 10-to 20-fold higher doses of UV to exhibit comparable increases in frequency of recombinants. These results suggest that unexcised DNA damage, rather than the excision repair process per se, stimulates such recombination

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel serine-threonine kinase gene from the Xp22 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montini, E; Andolfi, G; Caruso, A; Buchner, G; Walpole, S M; Mariani, M; Consalez, G; Trump, D; Ballabio, A; Franco, B

    1998-08-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases are part of a large and expanding family of proteins. Through our transcriptional mapping effort in the Xp22 region, we have isolated and sequenced the full-length transcript of STK9, a novel cDNA highly homologous to serine-threonine kinases. A number of human genetic disorders have been mapped to the region where STK9 has been localized including Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome, oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1), and a novel locus for nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness (DFN6). To evaluate the possible involvement of STK9 in any of the above-mentioned disorders, a 2416-bp full-length cDNA was assembled. The entire genomic structure of the gene, which is composed of 20 coding exons, was determined. Northern analysis revealed a transcript larger than 9.5 kb in several tissues including brain, lung, and kidney. The mouse homologue (Stk9) was identified and mapped in the mouse in the region syntenic to human Xp. This location is compatible with the location of the Xcat mutant, which shows congenital cataracts very similar to those observed in NH patients. Sequence homologies, expression pattern, and mapping information in both human and mouse make STK9 a candidate gene for the above-mentioned disorders. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. An approach to SOA development methodology: SOUP comparison with RUP and XP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Svanidzaitė

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Service oriented architecture (SOA is an architecture for distributed applications composed of distributed services with weak coupling that are designed to meet business requirements. One of the research priorities in the field of SOA is creating such software design and development methodology (SDDM that takes into account all principles of this architecture and allows for effective and efficient application development. A lot of investigation has been carried out to find out whether can one of popular SDDM, such as agile methodologies or RUP suits, be adapted for SOA or there is a need to create some new SOA-oriented SDDM. This paper compares one of SOA-oriented SDDM – SOUP – with RUP and XP methodologies. The aim is to find out whether the SOUP methodology is already mature enough to assure successful development of SOA applications. This aim is accomplished by comparing activities, artifacts of SOUP and RUP and emphasizing which XP practices are used in SOUP.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15181/csat.v2i1.77 

  3. A novel Xp22.13 microdeletion in Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accogli, Andrea; Traverso, Monica; Madia, Francesca; Bellini, Tommaso; Vari, Maria Stella; Pinto, Francesca; Capra, Valeria

    2017-07-03

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies and facial dysmorphisms. Notably, up to 30% of NHS patients have intellectual disability and a few patients have been reported to have congenital cardiac defects. Nance-Horan syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene that is highly expressed in the midbrain, retina, lens, tooth, and is conserved across vertebrate species. Although most pathogenic mutations are nonsense mutations, a few genomic rearrangements involving NHS locus have been reported, suggesting a possible pathogenic role of the flanking genes. Here, we report a microdeletion of 170,6 Kb at Xp22.13 (17.733.948-17.904.576) (GRCh37/hg19), detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in an Italian boy with NHS syndrome. The microdeletion harbors the NHS, SCLML1, and RAI2 genes and results in a phenotype consistent with NSH syndrome and developmental delay. We compare our case with the previous Xp22.13 microdeletions and discuss the possible pathogenetic role of the flanking genes. Birth Defects Research 109:866-868, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Windows XP ends its life at CERN – register for Windows 7 training!

    CERN Multimedia

    Michał Kwiatek (IT-OIS)

    2012-01-01

    Windows XP has been around for over 10 years and it is now time to move on. At CERN, general support for Windows XP will end in December 2012, and before this date users are requested to schedule a migration to the next version of Windows – Windows 7.   Windows 7 is already well established at CERN – it is used by a large majority of users. In fact, there was a considerable user demand even before its official release in October 2009 and its adoption has been smooth. Users praise Windows 7 for its improved stability and a clear advantage on laptops is a much more efficient implementation of offline files. The migration to Windows 7 involves a reinstallation of the operating system. Files stored in user home folders on DFS will be immediately available after the reinstallation. Applications will be upgraded to more recent versions and in certain cases, an application may even be replaced by another application providing the same functionality. Microsoft Office suite is a good ...

  5. Cyclic fatigue resistance of XP-endo Shaper compared with different nickel-titanium alloy instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, Amr; Elsaka, Shaymaa

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study were to assess and compare the resistance to cyclic fatigue of XP-endo Shaper (XPS; FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) instruments with TRUShape (TRS; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK, USA), HyFlex CM (HCM; Coltene, Cuyahoga Falls, OH, USA), Vortex Blue (VB; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties), and iRace (iR; FKG Dentaire) nickel-titanium rotary instruments at body temperature. Size 30, 0.01 taper of XPS, size 30, 0.04 taper of HCM, VB, iR, and size 30, 0.06 taper of TRS instruments were immersed in saline at 37 ± 1 °C during cyclic fatigue testing. The instruments were tested with 60° angle of curvature and a 3-mm radius of curvature. The number of cycles to failure (NCF) was calculated and the length of the fractured segment was measured. Fractographic examination of the fractured surface was performed using a scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis H test and Mann-Whitney U tests. Statistical significance was set at P ductile fracture of cyclic fatigue failure. XPS instruments exhibited greater cyclic fatigue resistance compared with the other tested instruments. XP-endo Shaper instruments could be used more safely in curved canals due to their higher fatigue resistance.

  6. Xp11.22 Microduplications Including HUWE1: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orivoli, Sonia; Pavlidis, Elena; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Pezzella, Marianna; Zara, Federico; Garavelli, Livia; Pisani, Francesco; Piccolo, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Xp11.22 microduplications have been reported in different patients with X-linked intellectual disability. Comparing the duplicated segments, a minimum region of overlap has been identified. Within this region, only one gene, the HUWE1 gene, coding the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, turned out to be duplicated in all previously described patients. We provide a review of the literature on this topic, making a comparison not only of genetic aspects, but also of clinical, neurophysiological, and neuroradiological findings. Furthermore, we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of a case of intellectual disability in a child carrying one of the smallest Xp11.22 microduplications reported, involving the whole sequence of HUWE1 gene. Unlike previously described cases, our patient's neuroimaging showed abnormal findings; he also experienced one seizure and showed interictal electroencephalogram (EEG) epileptiform abnormalities. Given the fact that HUWE1 duplications and mutations have previously been described in several patients with X-linked cognitive impairment, our findings support the hypothesis that HUWE1 gene might be implicate in the pathogenesis of intellectual disability. Nevertheless, further investigations and a more detailed examination of patients' clinical history are needed to clear up other eventual genotype-phenotype correlations, such as the presence of epilepsy/epileptiform EEG abnormalities. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Different patterns of evolution in the centromeric and telomeric regions of group A and B haplotypes of the human killer cell Ig-like receptor locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Woo Pyo

    Full Text Available The fast evolving human KIR gene family encodes variable lymphocyte receptors specific for polymorphic HLA class I determinants. Nucleotide sequences for 24 representative human KIR haplotypes were determined. With three previously defined haplotypes, this gave a set of 12 group A and 15 group B haplotypes for assessment of KIR variation. The seven gene-content haplotypes are all combinations of four centromeric and two telomeric motifs. 2DL5, 2DS5 and 2DS3 can be present in centromeric and telomeric locations. With one exception, haplotypes having identical gene content differed in their combinations of KIR alleles. Sequence diversity varied between haplotype groups and between centromeric and telomeric halves of the KIR locus. The most variable A haplotype genes are in the telomeric half, whereas the most variable genes characterizing B haplotypes are in the centromeric half. Of the highly polymorphic genes, only the 3DL3 framework gene exhibits a similar diversity when carried by A and B haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates, point to the centromeric gene-content motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes having emerged ~6 million years ago, contemporaneously with the separation of human and chimpanzee ancestors. In contrast, the telomeric motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes emerged more recently, ~1.7 million years ago, before the emergence of Homo sapiens. Thus the centromeric and telomeric motifs that typify A and B haplotypes have likely been present throughout human evolution. The results suggest the common ancestor of A and B haplotypes combined a B-like centromeric region with an A-like telomeric region.

  8. Genomic amplification of Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FancA) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC): Cellular mechanisms of radioresistance and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Julia; Unger, Kristian; Orth, Michael; Schötz, Ulrike; Schüttrumpf, Lars; Zangen, Verena; Gimenez-Aznar, Igor; Michna, Agata; Schneider, Ludmila; Stamp, Ramona; Selmansberger, Martin; Braselmann, Herbert; Hieber, Ludwig; Drexler, Guido A; Kuger, Sebastian; Klein, Diana; Jendrossek, Verena; Friedl, Anna A; Belka, Claus; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Lauber, Kirsten

    2017-02-01

    Radio (chemo) therapy is a crucial treatment modality for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but relapse is frequent, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Therefore, novel biomarkers are urgently needed. Previously, we identified gains on 16q23-24 to be associated with amplification of the Fanconi anemia A (FancA) gene and to correlate with reduced progression-free survival after radiotherapy. Here, we analyzed the effects of FancA on radiation sensitivity in vitro, characterized the underlying mechanisms, and evaluated their clinical relevance. Silencing of FancA expression in HNSCC cell lines with genomic gains on 16q23-24 resulted in significantly impaired clonogenic survival upon irradiation. Conversely, overexpression of FancA in immortalized keratinocytes conferred increased survival accompanied by improved DNA repair, reduced accumulation of chromosomal translocations, but no hyperactivation of the FA/BRCA-pathway. Downregulation of interferon signaling as identified by microarray analyses, enforced irradiation-induced senescence, and elevated production of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) appeared to be candidate mechanisms contributing to FancA-mediated radioresistance. Data of the TCGA HNSCC cohort confirmed the association of gains on 16q24.3 with FancA overexpression and impaired overall survival. Importantly, transcriptomic alterations similar to those observed upon FancA overexpression in vitro strengthened the clinical relevance. Overall, FancA amplification and overexpression appear to be crucial for radiotherapeutic failure in HNSCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a GeXP-multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of six cattle viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Fan

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV, Bluetongue virus (BTV, Vesicular stomatitis Virus (VSV, Bovine viral diarrheal (BVDV, Bovine rotavirus (BRV, and Bovine herpesvirus 1 (IBRV are common cattle infectious viruses that cause a great economic loss every year in many parts of the world. A rapid and high-throughput GenomeLab Gene Expression Profiler (GeXP analyzer-based multiplex PCR assay was developed for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of these six cattle viruses. Six pairs of chimeric primers consisting of both the gene-specific primer and a universal primer were designed and used for amplification. Then capillary electrophoresis was used to separate the fluorescent labeled PCR products according to the amplicons size. The specificity of GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was examined with samples of the single template and mixed template of six viruses. The sensitivity was evaluated using the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay on serial 10-fold dilutions of ssRNAs obtained via in vitro transcription. To further evaluate the reliability, 305 clinical samples were tested by the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay. The results showed that the corresponding virus specific fragments of genes were amplified. The detection limit of the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was 100 copies/μL in a mixed sample of ssRNAs containing target genes of six different cattle viruses, whereas the detection limit for the Gexp-mono PCR assay for a single target gene was 10 copies/μL. In detection of viruses in 305 clinical samples, the results of GeXP were consistent with simplex real-time PCR. Analysis of positive samples by sequencing demonstrated that the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay had no false positive samples of nonspecific amplification. In conclusion, this GeXP-multiplex PCR assay is a high throughput, specific, sensitive, rapid and simple method for the detection and differentiation of six cattle viruses. It is an effective tool that can be applied for the rapid differential diagnosis

  10. Recurrent deletion of ZNF630 at Xp11.23 is not associated with mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zangrande-Vieira, Luiz; Kirchhoff, Maria

    2010-01-01

    that the deletions resulted from non-allelic homologous recombination. In 2,121 healthy male controls, 10 ZNF630 deletions were identified. In total, there was a 1.6-fold higher frequency of this deletion in males with mental retardation as compared to controls, but this increase was not statistically significant (P......ZNF630 is a member of the primate-specific Xp11 zinc finger gene cluster that consists of six closely related genes, of which ZNF41, ZNF81, and ZNF674 have been shown to be involved in mental retardation. This suggests that mutations of ZNF630 might influence cognitive function. Here, we detected...... 12 ZNF630 deletions in a total of 1,562 male patients with mental retardation from Brazil, USA, Australia, and Europe. The breakpoints were analyzed in 10 families, and in all cases they were located within two segmental duplications that share more than 99% sequence identity, indicating...

  11. Superficial characterization by XP S of silver nanoparticles and their hydrothermal deposit over zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras R, A.; Gutierrez W, C.; Martinez M, I.; Medina A, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S) is sensitive exclusively to the first layers of the solids surface, which allows obtaining information about the chemical, physical and electronic properties of them. The combustible elements of the boiling water nuclear reactors (BWR) are formed by zircaloy pipes that contain in their interior pellets or uranium dioxide. In this work is studied the zircaloy surface, oxidized zircaloy under similar conditions to those of a reactor BWR type and oxidized zircaloy with a hydrothermal deposit of silver nanoparticles and zinc. The silver deposit is a proposal of the Materials Technology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in Mexico, which has the same objective that the noble metals deposit (Pt, Pd, and Rh) that is practiced in some of the reactors BWR, in order to mitigating the speed of crack growth for IGSCC in stainless steels 304 Ss. (Author)

  12. ERP System Evaluation on SOFI XP Based Accounting Module in Software House Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinta Mardallena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accounting module is an important module for a company business process. The roles are in the form of parameter calculation of profits, losses and financial performance based on transaction, which basically is a real-time reporting system. The amount of company needs on accounting indicates that the accounting is one of the resources which support the establishment of a company. Thus, the company constantly improves the accounting performance, especially in handling of receivables, debts, and cash transactions. Evaluations which were performed at SOFI XP-based ERP system aims to provide a solution to a problem that was discovered during the analysis of the system needs. This evaluation was done in two stages: by collecting data and analyzing the system that running in the company. By doing this evaluation, the documentation of system performance and the solution for problems that were found in the company can be generated.

  13. Analysis of diffractive pd to Xd and pp to Xp interactions and test of the finite-mass sum rule

    CERN Document Server

    Akimov, Y; Golovanov, L B; Goulianos, K; Gross, D; Malamud, E; Melissinos, A C; Mukhin, S; Nitz, D; Olsen, S; Sticker, H; Tsarev, V A; Yamada, R; Zimmerman, P

    1976-01-01

    The first moment finite mass sum rule is tested by utilising cross- sections for pp to Xp extracted from recent Fermilab data on pd to Xd and also comparing with CERN ISR data. The dependences on M/sub x//sup 2/, t and s are also discussed. (11 refs).

  14. H2XP:OH2 Complexes: Hydrogen vs. Pnicogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibon Alkorta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD was carried out for phosphine-water and arsine-water complexes in which water is either the proton donor in hydrogen-bonded complexes, or the electron-pair donor in pnicogen-bonded complexes. The range of experimental P-O distances in the phosphine complexes is consistent with the results of ab initio MP2/aug’-cc-pVTZ calculations carried out on complexes H2XP:OH2, for X = NC, F, Cl, CN, OH, CCH, H, and CH3. Only hydrogen-bonded complexes are found on the H2(CH3P:HOH and H3P:HOH potential surfaces, while only pnicogen-bonded complexes exist on H2(NCP:OH2, H2FP:OH2, H2(CNP:OH2, and H2(OHP:OH2 surfaces. Both hydrogen-bonded and pnicogen-bonded complexes are found on the H2ClP:OH2 and H2(CCHP:OH2 surfaces, with the pnicogen-bonded complexes more stable than the corresponding hydrogen-bonded complexes. The more electronegative substituents prefer to form pnicogen-bonded complexes, while the more electropositive substituents form hydrogen-bonded complexes. The H2XP:OH2 complexes are characterized in terms of their structures, binding energies, charge-transfer energies, and spin-spin coupling constants 2hJ(O-P, 1hJ(H-P, and 1J(O-H across hydrogen bonds, and 1pJ(P-O across pnicogen bonds.

  15. The rate of DNA synthesis in normal human and ataxia telangiectasia cells after exposure to X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, J. de; Bootsma, D.; Jaspers, N.G.J.; Rijksverdedigingsorganisatie TNO, Rijswijk

    1981-01-01

    The rate of DNA synthesis was studied in normal cell strains and in strains from patients suffering from the inherited disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT). After exposure to relatively low doses of oxic X-rays (0- 4 krad) DNA synthesis was depressed in AT cell strains to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells. This response was observed in both an excision-deficient and an excision-proficient strain. In contrast, there was no difference in DNA-synthesis inhibition between AT and normal cells after UV exposure. After X-irradiation of cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, both complementation group A and XP variants, the observed rate of DNA synthesis was equal to that in normal cells. An exception was the strain XP3BR which has been shown to be X-ray-sensitive. This strain exhibited diminished DNA synthesis inhibition after X-ray doses below 1 krad. These data suggest a relationship between hypersensitivity to X-rays and diminished depression of DNA synthesis. (orig.)

  16. Identification of a microdeletion at Xp22.13 in a Taiwanese family presenting with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Niu, Dau-Ming; Chen, Yan-Jang; Fang, Jye-Siung; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies and mental retardation. The disease has been linked to a novel gene termed NHS located at Xp22.13. The majority of pathogenic mutations of the disease include nonsense mutations and small deletions and insertions that lead to truncation of the NHS protein. In this study, we identified a microdeletion of ∼ 0.92 Mb at Xp22.13 detected by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in two brothers presenting congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphisms and mental retardation. The deleted region encompasses the REPS2, NHS, SCML1 and RAI2 genes, and was transmitted from their carrier mother who presented only mild cataract. Our findings are in line with several recent case reports to indicate that genomic rearrangement involving the NHS gene is an important genetic etiology underlying NHS.

  17. MS Windows domēna darbstaciju migrācija no MS Windows XP uz Windows Vista.

    OpenAIRE

    Tetere, Agate

    2009-01-01

    Kvalifikācijas darbā izpētīju darbstaciju migrācijas no Windows XP uz Windows Vista plusus un mīnusus. Darba gaitā tika veikti sekojoši uzdevumi: 1.Veikta Windows XP un Windows Vista darbstaciju instalācija, iestatījumu konfigurēšana un tika pārbaudīta sistēmas darbība 2.Veikta Windows Server 2003 un Windows Server 2008 instalācija, iestatījumu konfigurēšana un tika pārbaudīta sistēmas darbība 3.Izstrādāts migrācijas modelis 4.Veikta migrācijas optimizēšana 5.Veikta datu migrāc...

  18. Performance of Oak Seedlings Grown under Different Oust® XP Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Self

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous weed control (HWC is prescribed for growing season control of vegetative competition in hardwood afforestation attempts on former agricultural areas. Without HWC, planted seedlings often exhibit poor growth and survival. While currently employed HWC methods are proven, there is a substantial void in research comparing HWC treatments spanning multiple years. A total of 4,320 bare-root seedlings of three oak species were planted on three Mississippi sites. All sites were of comparable soils and received above average precipitation for the majority of the three-year study. Eight combinations of HWC and mechanical site preparation were utilized at each site, with 480 seedlings planted in each of the nine blocks, and a total of 1,440 seedlings per species planted across all sites. Treatments were installed on 3.1 m centers, with mechanical treatments as follows: control, subsoiling, bedding, and combination plowing. HWC treatments included one and two-year applications of Oust® XP. Treatments were applied over seedlings post-planting in 1.5 m bands, at a rate of 140.1 g product/hectare. Excepting one species, HWC dependent height or groundline diameter differences were not detected among mechanical treatments, species, HWC regime, or combinations thereof. No survival differences were observed among site preparation treatments or species. However, analysis detected a growing season/HWC treatment interaction for seedling survival.

  19. Compound haplotypes at Xp11.23 and human population growth in Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, S; Armour, J A L

    2004-09-01

    To investigate patterns of diversity and the evolutionary history of Eurasians, we have sequenced a 2.8 kb region at Xp11.23 in a sample of African and Eurasian chromosomes. This region is in a long intron of CLCN5 and is immediately flanked by a highly variable minisatellite, DXS255, and a human-specific Ta0 LINE. Compared to Africans, Eurasians showed a marked reduction in sequence diversity. The main Euro-Asiatic haplotype seems to be the ancestral haplotype for the whole sample. Coalescent simulations, including recombination and exponential growth, indicate a median length of strong linkage disequilibrium, up to approximately 9 kb for this area. The Ka/Ks ratio between the coding sequence of human CLCN5 and its mouse orthologue is much less than 1. This implies that the region sequenced is unlikely to be under the strong influence of positive selective processes on CLCN5, mutations in which have been associated with disorders such as Dent's disease. In contrast, a scenario based on a population bottleneck and exponential growth seems a more likely explanation for the reduced diversity observed in Eurasians. Coalescent analysis and linked minisatellite diversity (which reaches a gene diversity value greater than 98% in Eurasians) suggest an estimated age of origin of the Euro-Asiatic diversity compatible with a recent out-of-Africa model for colonization of Eurasia by modern Homo sapiens.

  20. Torsional resistance of XP-endo Shaper at body temperature compared with several nickel-titanium rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, A M; Elsaka, S E

    2018-05-01

    To compare the torsional resistance of XP-endo Shaper (XPS; size 30, .01 taper, FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) instruments at body temperature with TRUShape (TRS; size 30, .06 taper, Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK, USA), ProFile Vortex (PV; size 30, .04 taper, Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties) and FlexMaster (FM; size 30, .04 taper, VDW GmbH, Munich, Germany) nickel-titanium rotary instruments. A metal block with a square-shaped mould (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) was positioned inside a glass container. Five millimetres of the tip of each instrument was held inside the metal block by filling the mould with a resin composite. The instruments were tested for torsional resistance in saline solution at 37 °C. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (anova) and Tukey post hoc tests. The significance level was set at P instruments tested (P instruments (P = 0.211). The ranking for torsional resistance values was: FM > PV > TRS > XPS. FlexMaster and ProFile Vortex instruments were more resistant to torsional stress compared with TRUShape and XP-endo Shaper instruments. The manufacturing process used to produce XP-endo Shaper instruments did not enhance their resistance to torsional stress as compared with the other instruments. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Verification of Bioanalytical Method for Quantification of Exogenous Insulin (Insulin Aspart) by the Analyser Advia Centaur® XP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailov, Rossen; Stoeva, Dilyana; Pencheva, Blagovesta; Pentchev, Eugeni

    2018-03-01

    In a number of cases the monitoring of patients with type I diabetes mellitus requires measurement of the exogenous insulin levels. For the purpose of a clinical investigation of the efficacy of a medical device for application of exogenous insulin aspart, a verification of the method for measurement of this synthetic analogue of the hormone was needed. The information in the available medical literature for the measurement of the different exogenous insulin analogs is insufficient. Thus, verification was required to be in compliance with the active standards in Republic of Bulgaria. A manufactured method developed for ADVIA Centaur XP Immunoassay, Siemens Healthcare, was used which we verified using standard solutions and a patient serum pool by adding the appropriate quantity exogenous insulin aspart. The method was verified in accordance with the bioanalytical method verification criteria and regulatory requirements for using a standard method: CLIA chemiluminescence immunoassay ADVIA Centaur® XP. The following parameters are determined and monitored: intra-day precision and accuracy, inter-day precision and accuracy, limit of detection and lower limit of quantification, linearity, analytical recovery. The routine application of the method for measurement of immunoreactive insulin using the analyzer ADVIA Centaur® XP is directed to the measurement of endogenous insulin. The method is applicable for measuring different types of exogenous insulin, including insulin aspart.

  2. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-13

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Chris Van Beneden discusses the dangers of group A strep infections.  Created: 6/13/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/13/2011.

  3. Targeted disruption of exons 1 to 6 of the Fanconi Anemia group A gene leads to growth retardation, strain-specific microphthalmia, meiotic defects and primordial germ cell hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jasmine C Y; Alon, Noa; Mckerlie, Colin; Huang, Jun R; Meyn, M Stephen; Buchwald, Manuel

    2003-08-15

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. Recent studies suggest that FA proteins share a common pathway with BRCA proteins. To study the in vivo role of the FA group A gene (Fanca), gene-targeting techniques were used to generate Fanca(tm1Hsc) mice in which Fanca exons 1-6 were replaced by a beta-galactosidase reporter construct. Fanca(tm1.1Hsc) mice were generated by Cre-mediated removal of the neomycin cassette in Fanca(tm1Hsc) mice. Fanca(tm1.1Hsc) homozygotes display FA-like phenotypes including growth retardation, microphthalmia and craniofacial malformations that are not found in other Fanca mouse models, and the genetic background affects manifestation of certain phenotypes. Both male and female mice homozygous for Fanca mutation exhibit hypogonadism, and homozygous females demonstrate premature reproductive senescence and an increased incidence of ovarian cysts. We showed that fertility defects in Fanca(tm1.1Hsc) homozygotes might be related to a diminished population of primordial germ cells (PGCs) during migration into the gonadal ridges. We also found a high level of Fanca expression in pachytene spermatocytes. Fanca(tm1Hsc) homozygous males exhibited an elevated frequency of mispaired meiotic chromosomes and increased apoptosis in germ cells, implicating a role for Fanca in meiotic recombination. However, the localization of Rad51, Brca1, Fancd2 and Mlh1 appeared normal on Fanca(tm1Hsc) homozygous meiotic chromosomes. Taken together, our results suggest that the FA pathway plays a role in the maintenance of reproductive germ cells and in meiotic recombination.

  4. The Norrie disease gene maps to a 150 kb region on chromosome Xp11.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, K B; Lebo, R V; Benson, G; Shalish, C; Schuback, D; Chen, Z Y; Bruns, G; Craig, I W; Golbus, M S; Breakefield, X O

    1992-05-01

    Norrie disease is a human X-linked recessive disorder of unknown etiology characterized by congenital blindness, sensory neural deafness and mental retardation. This disease gene was previously linked to the DXS7 (L1.28) locus and the MAO genes in band Xp11.3. We report here fine physical mapping of the obligate region containing the Norrie disease gene (NDP) defined by a recombination and by the smallest submicroscopic chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease identified to date. Analysis, using in addition two overlapping YAC clones from this region, allowed orientation of the MAOA and MAOB genes in a 5'-3'-3'-5' configuration. A recombination event between a (GT)n polymorphism in intron 2 of the MAOB gene and the NDP locus, in a family previously reported to have a recombination between DXS7 and NDP, delineates a flanking marker telomeric to this disease gene. An anonymous DNA probe, dc12, present in one of the YACs and in a patient with a submicroscopic deletion which includes MAOA and MAOB but not L1.28, serves as a flanking marker centromeric to the disease gene. An Alu-PCR fragment from the right arm of the MAO YAC (YMAO.AluR) is not deleted in this patient and also delineates the centromeric extent of the obligate disease region. The apparent order of these loci is telomere ... DXS7-MAOA-MAOB-NDP-dc12-YMAO.AluR ... centromere. Together these data define the obligate region containing the NDP gene to a chromosomal segment less than 150 kb.

  5. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Transfer of Chinese hamster DNA repair gene(s) into repair-deficient human cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of repair genes by DNA transfection into repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells has thus far been unsuccessful, presenting an obstacle to cloning XP genes. The authors chose an indirect route to transfer repair genes in chromosome fragments. DNA repair-competent (UV resistant) hybrid cell lines were established by PEG-mediated fusions of DNA repair-deficient (UV sensitive) human fibroblasts (XP12RO) with wild type Chinese hamster (CHO) cells (AA8). CHO cells were exposed to 5 Krad X-rays prior to fusions, predisposing hybrid cells to lose CHO chromosome fragments preferentially. Repair-competent hybrids were selected by periodic exposures to UV light. Secondary and tertiary hybrid cell lines were developed by fusion of X-irradiated hybrids to XP12RO. The hybrid cell lines exhibit resistance to UV that is comparable to that of CHO cells and they are proficient at repair replication after UV exposure. Whole cell DNA-DNA hybridizations indicate that the hybrids have greater homology to CHO DNA than is evident between XP12RO and CHO. These observations indicate that CHO DNA sequences which can function in repair of UV-damaged DNA in human cells have been transferred into the genome of the repair-deficient XP12RO cells

  7. Genetic recombination of Herpes simplex virus, the role of the host cell and UV-irradiation of the virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, U.B.; Summers, W.C.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT

    1980-01-01

    Recombination frequencies for two sets of genetic markers of Herpes simplex virus were determined in various host cells with and without ultraviolet irradiation of the virus. UV irradiation increased the recombination frequency in all the cell types studied in direct proportion to the unrepaired lethal damage. In human skin fibroblasts derived from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) of complementation group A, a given dose of UV stimulated recombination more than that in fibroblasts from normal individuals. On the other hand, UV stimulation of HSV recombination was slightly less than normal in fibroblasts derived from a patient with a variant form XP and from an ataxia telangiectasia patient. Caffeine, an agent known to inhibit repair of UV damage, reduced recombination in most of the cell types studied but did not suppress the UV-induced increase in recombination. These findings suggest that for virus DNA with the same number of unrepaired UV-lesions, each of the tested cell types promoted HSV-recombination to an equivalent extent. (orig.) [de

  8. DNA repair characteristics of a hybrid cell clone between xeroderma pigmentosum and Potorous tridactilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Kenji

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid cell clone PX1 was isolated by fusing UV sensitive XP20S(SV)neo, an SV-40-transformed, neomycin-resistant xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cell line, and Pt K2, a rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactilis) cell line. The UV-survival curve of PX1 cells fell midway between those of Pt K2 and XP20S(SV)neo cells, since mean lethal doses(D 0 ) were 2.5, 4.7 and 0.27 J/m 2 for PX1, Pt K2 and XP20S(SV)neo, respectively. Amounts of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) after UV, relative to normal human cells, were 60.4 % for Pt K2, 37.7 % for PX1 and 0.1 % for XP20S(SV)neo. Such relative UDS capacities for excision repair of Pt K2, PX1 and XP20S(SV)neo were also consistent with the respective relative capacities of host cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus. Apparently, there was no single Pt K2 chromosome in the PX1 cells. One possibility is that a gene which may account for the partial restoration of the UV resistance has been transferred from Pt K2 to PX1. (author)

  9. Herpes virus production as a marker of repair in ultra-violet irradiated human skin cells of different origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J; Nocentini, S; Menezes, S [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie; Moreno, G

    1979-07-01

    Human skin fibroblast cultures were irradiated with ultraviolet light 0 to 48 hours before infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV). Different viral yields were obtained according to the origin of the host cells. Cells from normal donors showed a dose-dependent recovery of HSV production during the 36-40 hours following U.V. exposure. The recovery was maximal for a dose at which a plateau level of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was reached (24Jm/sup -2/). In a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) heterozygote line from a mother of XP children, the level of UDS after irradiation up to 48 Jm/sup -2/ was normal whereas the extent of recovery of HSV production capacity was lower than normal. In strains from XP children, with a normal UDS (XP variants), the recovery process was slower and its extent was lower than in normal or XP heterozygote cells. Excision-deficient XP strains from XP children presented little or no recovery, the extent of which was in good agreement with the corresponding level of UDS. Measurement of this recovery seems to be a very sensitive assay for detecting differences in the repair abilities of U.V.-irradiated human skin cells of various origins.

  10. Nance-Horan syndrome: linkage analysis in 4 families refines localization in Xp22.31-p22.13 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, A; Ronce, N; Dessay, B; Robb, L; Francannet, C; Le Merrer, M; Briard, M L; Kaplan, J; Moraine, C

    1997-02-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked disease characterized by severe congenital cataract with microcornea, distinctive dental findings, evocative facial features and mental impairment in some cases. Previous linkage studies have placed the NHS gene in a large region from DXS143 (Xp22.31) to DXS451 (Xp22.13). To refine this localization further, we have performed linkage analysis in four families. As the maximum expected Lod score is reached in each family for several markers in the Xp22.31-p22.13 region and linkage to the rest of the X chromosome can be excluded, our study shows that NHS is a genetically homogeneous condition. An overall maximum two-point Lod score of 9.36 (theta = 0.00) is obtained with two closely linked markers taken together. DXS207 and DXS1053 in Xp22.2. Recombinant haplotypes indicate that the NHS gene lies between DXS85 and DXS1226. Multipoint analysis yield a maximum Lod score of 9.45 with the support interval spanning a 15-cM region that includes DXS16 and DXS1229/365. The deletion map of the Xp22.3-Xp21.3 region suggests that the phenotypic variability of NHS is not related to gross rearrangement of sequences of varying size but rather to allelic mutations in a single gene, presumably located proximal to DXS16 and distal to DXS1226. Comparison with the map position of the mouse Xcat mutation supports the location of the NHS gene between the GRPR and PDHA1 genes in Xp22.2.

  11. Inversion (X)(p11.4q22) associated with Norrie disease in a four generation family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettenati, M J; Rao, P N; Weaver, R G; Thomas, I T; McMahan, M R

    1993-03-01

    We report on a 4-generation family in which Norrie disease occurs together with a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome in all affected males and carrier females. The breakpoint in the short arm of the X chromosome appears to be at the purported location of the Norrie disease gene. This is the second report of an association between Norrie disease and a chromosome aberration involving Xp11, and the first report of a specific gene disruption, thus physical gene location, due to a pericentric chromosome inversion.

  12. Refinement of the NHS locus on chromosome Xp22.13 and analysis of five candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, Annick; Dessay, Benoît; Ronce, Nathalie; Ferrante, Maria-Immacolata; Tranchemontagne, Julie; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Burn, John; Kaplan, Josseline; Rossi, Annick; Russo, Silvia; Walpole, Ian; Hartsfield, James K; Oyen, Nina; Nemeth, Andrea; Bitoun, Pierre; Trump, Dorothy; Moraine, Claude; Franco, Brunella

    2002-09-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked condition characterised by congenital cataracts, dental abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and mental retardation in some cases. Previous studies have mapped the disease gene to a 2 cM interval on Xp22.2 between DXS43 and DXS999. We report additional linkage data resulting from the analysis of eleven independent NHS families. A maximum lod score of 9.94 (theta=0.00) was obtained at the RS1 locus and a recombination with locus DXS1195 on the telomeric side was observed in two families, thus refining the location of the gene to an interval of around 1 Mb on Xp22.13. Direct sequencing or SSCP analysis of the coding exons of five genes (SCML1, SCML2, STK9, RS1 and PPEF1), considered as candidate genes on the basis of their location in the critical interval, failed to detect any mutation in 12 unrelated NHS patients, thus making it highly unlikely that these genes are implicated in NHS.

  13. A Binaural CI Research Platform for Oticon Medical SP/XP Implants Enabling ITD/ILD and Variable Rate Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiloğlu, K.; Herzke, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first portable, binaural, real-time research platform compatible with Oticon Medical SP and XP generation cochlear implants. The platform consists of (a) a pair of behind-the-ear devices, each containing front and rear calibrated microphones, (b) a four-channel USB analog-to-digital converter, (c) real-time PC-based sound processing software called the Master Hearing Aid, and (d) USB-connected hardware and output coils capable of driving two implants simultaneously. The platform is capable of processing signals from the four microphones simultaneously and producing synchronized binaural cochlear implant outputs that drive two (bilaterally implanted) SP or XP implants. Both audio signal preprocessing algorithms (such as binaural beamforming) and novel binaural stimulation strategies (within the implant limitations) can be programmed by researchers. When the whole research platform is combined with Oticon Medical SP implants, interaural electrode timing can be controlled on individual electrodes to within ±1 µs and interaural electrode energy differences can be controlled to within ±2%. Hence, this new platform is particularly well suited to performing experiments related to interaural time differences in combination with interaural level differences in real-time. The platform also supports instantaneously variable stimulation rates and thereby enables investigations such as the effect of changing the stimulation rate on pitch perception. Because the processing can be changed on the fly, researchers can use this platform to study perceptual changes resulting from different processing strategies acutely. PMID:26721923

  14. A Binaural CI Research Platform for Oticon Medical SP/XP Implants Enabling ITD/ILD and Variable Rate Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, B; Adiloğlu, K; Herzke, T

    2015-12-30

    We present the first portable, binaural, real-time research platform compatible with Oticon Medical SP and XP generation cochlear implants. The platform consists of (a) a pair of behind-the-ear devices, each containing front and rear calibrated microphones, (b) a four-channel USB analog-to-digital converter, (c) real-time PC-based sound processing software called the Master Hearing Aid, and (d) USB-connected hardware and output coils capable of driving two implants simultaneously. The platform is capable of processing signals from the four microphones simultaneously and producing synchronized binaural cochlear implant outputs that drive two (bilaterally implanted) SP or XP implants. Both audio signal preprocessing algorithms (such as binaural beamforming) and novel binaural stimulation strategies (within the implant limitations) can be programmed by researchers. When the whole research platform is combined with Oticon Medical SP implants, interaural electrode timing can be controlled on individual electrodes to within ±1 µs and interaural electrode energy differences can be controlled to within ±2%. Hence, this new platform is particularly well suited to performing experiments related to interaural time differences in combination with interaural level differences in real-time. The platform also supports instantaneously variable stimulation rates and thereby enables investigations such as the effect of changing the stimulation rate on pitch perception. Because the processing can be changed on the fly, researchers can use this platform to study perceptual changes resulting from different processing strategies acutely. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Comparative Analysis Of The Development Of Swarming Communities Of Bacillus Subtilis In Case Of Pta And ComXP Mutant Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassem Hamze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Swarming Experiments were carried on with Bacillus subtilis strains to identify the activity of certain genes in the swarming ability and surfactin production. We will examine the effect of comXP as well as pta mutations on the capability of swarming. In different experiments we showed that strain OMG 903 that carries mutation in comXP managed to produce surfactin but showed attenuated defective and random swarming pattern strain OMG 928 that carries mutation in pta gene managed to produce surfactin and showed normal swarming pattern meanwhile double mutation in comXP and pta in strain OMG 929 lead to the absence of surfactin production and didnt manage Thesetoswarmdatashowed. that a threshold of surfactin production is necessary for a normal swarming pattern.

  16. A patient with de-novo partial deletion of Xp (p11.4-pter) and partial duplication of 22q (q11.2-qter).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Christine M; McGowan-Jordan, Jean; Lawrence, Sarah E; Bouchard, Amélie; Basik, Mark; Allanson, Judith E

    2008-01-01

    We report on a girl with partial deletion of Xp and partial duplication of 22q. Family studies demonstrate that both the patient's mother and her nonidentical twin sister carry the corresponding balanced translocation; 46,X,t(X;22)(p11.4;q11.2). This girl has developmental delay, microcephaly, mild dysmorphisms and hearing loss but otherwise shows few of the features described in individuals with duplications of the long arm of chromosome 22. She does manifest characteristics, such as short stature and biochemical evidence of ovarian failure, which are seen in partial or complete Xp deletions and Turner's syndrome.

  17. Ultraviolet-induced mutations in Cockayne syndrome cells are primarily caused by cyclobutane dimer photoproducts while repair of other photoproducts is normal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parris, C.N.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors compared the contribution to mutagenesis on Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of the major class of UV photoproducts, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, to that of other DNA photoproducts by using the mutagenesis shuttle vector pZ189. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from the DNA repair-deficient disorders CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and a normal line were transfected with UV-treated pZ189. Cyclobutane dimers were selectively removed before transfection by photoreactivation (PR), leaving nondimer photoproducts intact. After UV exposure and replication in CS and XP cells, plasmid survival was abnormally elevated. After PR, plasmid survival increased and mutation frequency in CS cells decreased to normal levels but remained abnormal in XP cells. Sequence analysis of >200 mutant plasmids showed that with CS cells a major mutational hot spot was caused by unrepaired cyclobutane dimers. These data indicate that with both CS and XP cyclobutane dimers are major photoproducts generating reduced plasmid survival and increased mutation frequency. However, unlike XP, CS cells are proficient in repair of nondimer photoproducts. Since XP but not CS patients have a high frequency of UV-induced skin cancers, the data suggest that prevention of UV-induced skin cancers is associated with proficient repair of nondimer photoproducts. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  18. The effect of the initial exciton numbers on 54,56Fe(p, xp) Pre-Equilibrium Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bölükdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.; Aydın, A.; Okuducu, S.; Kaplan, A.

    2011-01-01

    In pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions, the geometry-dependent hybrid model is applied with the use of the neutron and proton densities to investigate the effect of initial exciton numbers on the nucleon emission spectra. The initial exciton numbers calculated with the theoretical neutron and proton densities have been obtained within the Skryme-Hartree-Fock method with SKM* and SLy4 forces on target nuclei in the 54,56 Fe(p, xp) reaction at 61.5-MeV incident proton energy by using a new calculationmethod of Tel et al. Also, the differences between the initial exciton numbers for protons and neutrons as a function of nuclear radius, focusing on systematic discrepancies correlated to differences in the proton and neutron densities have been investigated.

  19. Experimental investigations of atomic ordering effects in the epitaxial Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P, coherently grown on GaAs (100) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seredin, P.V., E-mail: paul@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University, Universitetskaya pl., 1, 394006 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Goloshchapov, D.L.; Khudyakov, Yu.Yu.; Lenshin, A.S.; Lukin, A.N. [Voronezh State University, Universitetskaya pl., 1, 394006 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Arsentyev, I.N., E-mail: arsentyev@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Physical and Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya, 26, 194021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Prutskij, Tatiana, E-mail: prutskij@yahoo.com [Instituto de Ciencias, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, Col San Miguel Hueyotlipan, 72050 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2017-03-15

    A range of structural and spectroscopic techniques were used for the study of the properties of epitaxial Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P alloys with an ordered arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice grown by MOCVD on single-crystalline substrates of GaAs (100). The appearance of atomic ordering in the coherent growth conditions of the ordered Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P alloy on GaAs (100) resulted in cardinal changes of the structural and optical properties of semiconductor in comparison to disordered alloys, including the change of the crystal lattice parameter and, consequently, reduced crystal symmetry, decreased band gap and formation of two different types of surface nanorelief. This is the first report of the calculation of parameters of the crystal lattice in Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P with ordering taking into account the elastic stresses dependent on long-range ordering. Based on the variance analysis data with regard to the IR-reflection spectra as well as the UV-spectroscopy data obtained in the transmission-reflection mode, the main optical characteristics of the ordered Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P alloys were determined for the first time, namely, refractive index dispersion and high-frequency dielectric constant. All of the experimental results were in good agreement with the previously developed theoretical beliefs.

  20. CONFIRMATION OF X-LINKED INHERITANCE AND PROVISIONAL MAPPING OF THE KERATOSIS FOLLICULARIS SPINULOSA DECALVANS GENE ON XP IN A LARGE DUTCH FAMILY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; NELEN, M; VANZANDVOORT, PM; VANOSCH, LDM; ORANJE, AP; WITTEBOLPOST, D; VANOOST, BA

    In a large Dutch family with keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD, MIM 308800), DNA linkage analysis was performed in order to locate the gene. Pedigree analysis and lod score calculation confirmed X-linked inheritance and revealed significant linkage to DNA markers on Xp. A maximum lod

  1. Replicative bypass repair of ultraviolet damage to DNA of mammalian cells: caffeine sensitive and caffeine resistant mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Tatsumi, M.

    1976-01-01

    Replicative bypass repair of UV damage to DNA was studied in a wide variaty of human, mouse and hamster cells in culture. Survival curve analysis revealed that in established cell lines (mouse L, Chinese hamster V79, HeLa S3 and SV40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), post-UV caffeine treatment potentiated cell killing by reducing the extrapolation number and mean lethal UV fluence (Do). In the Do reduction as the result of random inactivation by caffeine of sensitive repair there were marked clonal differences among such cell lines, V79 being most sensitive to caffeine potentiation. However, other diploid cell lines (normal human, excision-defective XP and Syrian hamster) exhibited no obvious reduction in Do by caffeine. In parallel, alkaline sucrose sedimentation results showed that the conversion of initially smaller segments of DNA synthesized after irradiation with 10 J/m 2 to high-molecular-weight DNA was inhibited by caffeine in transformed XP cells, but not in the diploid human cell lines. Exceptionally, diploid XP variants had a retarded ability of bypass repair which was drastically prevented by caffeine, so that caffeine enhanced the lethal effect of UV. Neutral CsCl study on the bypass repair mechanism by use of bromodeoxyuridine for DNA synthesis on damaged template suggests that the pyrimodine dimer acts as a block to replication and subsequently it is circumvented presumably by a new process involving replicative bypassing following strand displacement, rather than by gap-filling de novo. This mechanism worked similarly in normal and XP cells, whether or not caffeine was present, indicating that excision of dimer is not always necessary. However, replicative bypassing became defective in XP variant and transformed XP cells when caffeine was present. It appears, therefore, that the replicative bypass repair process is either caffeine resistant or sensitive, depending on the cell type used, but not necessarily on the excision repair capability

  2. Identification of genes and proteins involved in excision repair of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Westerveld, A.; Van Duin, M.; Vermeulen, W.; Odijk, H.; De Wit, J.; Bootsma, D.

    1986-01-01

    The autosomal, recessive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by extreme sensitivity of the skin to sun exposure and prediposition to skin cancer. The basic defect in most XP patients is thought to reside in an inefficient removal of UV-induced lesions in the DNA by excision repair. The biochemical complexity of this process is amply illustrated by the fact that so far nine complementary groups within this syndrome have been identified. Despite extensive research, none of these genes or proteins involved have been isolated. Using a microinjection assay system the authors identified components in crude cell extracts that transiently correct the defect in (injected) fibroblasts of all excision-deficient XP complementation groups, as indicated by temporary restoration of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. This correction is complementation group specific, since it is only found when extracts from complementing XP cells are injected. After incubation of extracts with proteinase K the XP-A and KP-G correcting activities were lost, indicating that the complementation is due to proteins. The XP-A correcting protein was found to precipitate between 30 and 60% ammonium sulfate saturation. Furthermore this protein binds to DEAE-cellulose and to (UV-irradiated) double-strand (ds) DNA attached to cellulose. The latter affinity chromatography step allows a considerable purification, since less than 1% of the proteins applied to such columns is retained. It has to be established whether the XP-A correcting proteins binds by itself or via other proteins to the UV-irradiated DNA and whether it also binds to nonirradiated (ds or ss) DNA. Similar experiments with the XP-G correcting protein are in progress

  3. High sensitivity but normal DNA-repair activity after UV irradiation in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Orii, T.

    1980-01-01

    We established lymphoblastoid cell lines from 2 children with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), 2 xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients and control donors after transformation of peripheral lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We used these lymphoblastoid cell lines to investigate repair activity after ultraviolet irradiation. Cell survival of both CHS lymphoblastoid cell lines after irradiation by UV and treatment by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) fell between those of the XP and control cells lines. Unscheduled DNA synthesis of CHS cells after UV irradiation occured at rates similar to those of control cells. (orig.)

  4. Host cell reactivation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Benane, S.G.; Stafford, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was determined in cultured Potoroo (a marsupial) and human cells under lighting conditions which promoted photereactivation. Photoreactivation was readily demonstrated for herpes virus in two lines of Potoroo cells with dose reduction factors of 0.7 to 0.8 for ovary cells and 0.5 to 0.7 for kidney cells. Light from Blacklite (near UV) lamps was more effective than from Daylight (mostly visible) lamps, suggesting that near UV radiation was more effecient for photoreactivation in Potoroo cells. The quantitative and qualitative aspects of this photoreactivation were similar to those reported for a similar virus infecting chick embryo cells. UV-survival curves of herpes virus in Potoroo cells indicated a high level of 'dark' host cell reactivation. No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated vaccinia virus in Potoroo cells. A similar photoreactivation study was done using special control lighting (lambda>600 nm) and human cells with normal repair and with cells deficient in excision repair (XP). No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated herpes virus in either human cell with either Blacklite or Daylight lamps as the sources of photoreactivating light. This result contrasts with a report of photoreactivation for a herpes virus in the same XP cells using incandescent lamps. (author)

  5. Radiation effects in amorphous Fe/sub x/Ni/sub 80-x/P14B6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, W.T.; Steck, G.; Kramer, J.J.; Murray, R.B.; Onn, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in the Curie temperature and magnetic saturation of the amorphous ferromagnetic series Fe/sub x/Ni/sub 80-x/P 14 B 6 for 20 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 34 induced by proton bombardment have been studied, and correlated with small angle x-ray scattering measurements performed for x = 20 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both the Curie temperature and the low temperature saturation magnetization increase with proton fluence up to 10 16 cm -2 but are constant for higher fluences. Protons of energy 2.25 MeV (range much greater than the sample thickness) are more effective at producing changes than protons of energy 0.25 MeV (range much less than sample thickness). Thus, hydrogen implantation is eliminated as the principal source of the observed changes. In addition, careful attention to sample temperature during irradiation excludes thermal annealing as the origin of the effect. Proton bombardment at the same fluences produces scattering centers that are observed by small angle x-ray scattering. The concentration of scattering centers increases with proton fluence up to 10 16 cm -2 , but remains constant thereafter. The size of the centers remains constant at about 16 to 30 A. Possible structural changes to account for these observations are incipient recrystallization, void formation, and phosphorous segregation

  6. Phase transitions and magnetocaloric effects in intermetallic compounds MnFeX (X=P, As, Si, Ge)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegus, O.; Bao Li-Hong; Song Lin

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of giant magnetocaloric effect in MnFeP 1−x As x compounds, much valuable work has been performed to develop and improve Fe 2 P-type transition-metal-based magnetic refrigerants. In this article, the recent progress of our studies on fundamental aspects of theoretical considerations and experimental techniques, effects of atomic substitution on the magnetism and magnetocalorics of Fe 2 P-type intermetallic compounds MnFeX (X=P, As, Ge, Si) is reviewed. Substituting Si (or Ge) for As leads to an As-free new magnetic material MnFeP 1−x Si(Ge) x . These new materials show large magnetocaloric effects resembling MnFe(P, As) near room temperature. Some new physical phenomena, such as huge thermal hysteresis and ‘virgin’ effect, were found in new materials. On the basis of Landau theory, a theoretical model was developed for studying the mechanism of phase transition in these materials. Our studies reveal that MnFe(P, Si) compound is a very promising material for room-temperature magnetic refrigeration and thermo-magnetic power generation. (topical review - magnetism, magnetic materials, and interdisciplinary research)

  7. Structural and optical properties of GaxIn1-xP layers grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Tae-Yeon; Yang, Jung-Ja; Ryu, Mee Yi; Song, Jong-In; Yu, Phil W.

    1998-05-01

    Chemical beam epitaxial (CBE) GaxIn1-xP layers (x≈0.5) grown on (001) GaAs substrates at temperatures ranging from 490 to 580°C have been investigated using transmission electron diffraction (TED), transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence (PL). TED examination revealed the presence of diffuse scattering 1/2{111}B positions, indicating the occurrence of typical CuPt-type ordering in the GaInP CBE layers. As the growth temperature decreased from 580 to 490°C, maxima in the intensity of the diffuse scattering moved from ½{111}B to ½{-1+δ,1-δ,0} positions, where δ is a positive value. As the growth temperature increased from 490 to 550°C, the maxima in the diffuse scattering intensity progressively approached positions of 1/2\\{bar 110\\} , i.e., the value of δ decreased from 0.25 to 0.17. Bandgap reduction (˜45 meV) was observed in the CBE GaInP layers and was attributed to the presence of ordered structures.

  8. An evolutionary rearrangement of the Xp11.3-11.23 region in 3p21.3, a region frequently deleted in a variety of cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, T; Terpstra, P; van den Berg, Anke; Veldhuis, PMJF; Ter Elst, A; van der Veen, AY; Kok, K; Naylor, SL; Buys, CHCM

    1999-01-01

    In searching for a tumor suppressor gene in the 3p21.3 region, we isolated two genes, RBM5 and RBM6. Sequence analysis indicated that these genes share similarity. RBM5 and-to a lesser extent-RBM6 also have similarity to DXS8237E at Xp11.3-11.23, which maps less than 20 kb upstream of UBE1. A

  9. Measurements of (n,xp), (n,xd) double differential cross sections of Al and C for neutrons at 75 and 65 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauchi, Yasushi; Baba, Mamoru; Iwasaki, Tomohiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering] [and others

    1998-03-01

    The (n,xp) and (n,xd) double differential cross sections (DDXs) of Al and C were measured at 6 angles (12deg, 17deg, 25deg, 40deg, 55deg and 70deg) for neutrons En=65 and 75 MeV. These data are compared with theoretical calculations of ISOBAR and GNASH. A new wide range spectrometer under fabrication to down the detection threshold is also described. (author)

  10. Group A Streptococcus vulvovaginitis in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahangdale, Lisa; Lacy, Judith; Hillard, Paula A

    2008-08-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus-associated vulvovaginitis is uncommon in adult women. Clinicians should include group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus as a possible cause of vulvovaginal symptoms in breastfeeding women. Along with appropriate antibiotic therapy, vaginal estrogen therapy may be considered to diminish susceptibility to recurrent infection in women with vaginal atrophy.

  11. Analysis of DNA binding by human factor xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) provides insight into its interactions with nucleotide excision repair substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Norie; Voehler, Markus W; Roh, Michelle S; Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M; Chazin, Walter J

    2017-10-13

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A (XPA) is an essential scaffolding protein in the multiprotein nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The interaction of XPA with DNA is a core function of this protein; a number of mutations in the DNA-binding domain (DBD) are associated with XP disease. Although structures of the central globular domain of human XPA and data on binding of DNA substrates have been reported, the structural basis for XPA's DNA-binding activity remains unknown. X-ray crystal structures of the central globular domain of yeast XPA (Rad14) with lesion-containing DNA duplexes have provided valuable insights, but the DNA substrates used for this study do not correspond to the substrates of XPA as it functions within the NER machinery. To better understand the DNA-binding activity of human XPA in NER, we used NMR to investigate the interaction of its DBD with a range of DNA substrates. We found that XPA binds different single-stranded/double-stranded junction DNA substrates with a common surface. Comparisons of our NMR-based mapping of binding residues with the previously reported Rad14-DNA crystal structures revealed similarities and differences in substrate binding between XPA and Rad14. This includes direct evidence for DNA contacts to the residues extending C-terminally from the globular core, which are lacking in the Rad14 construct. Moreover, mutation of the XPA residue corresponding to Phe-262 in Rad14, previously reported as being critical for DNA binding, had only a moderate effect on the DNA-binding activity of XPA. The DNA-binding properties of several disease-associated mutations in the DBD were investigated. These results suggest that for XPA mutants exhibiting altered DNA-binding properties, a correlation exists between the extent of reduction in DNA-binding affinity and the severity of symptoms in XP patients. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The present status of xeroderma pigmentosum in Japan and a tentative severity classification scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Eiji; Masaki, Taro; Kanda, Fumio; Ono, Ryusuke; Takeuchi, Seiji; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Nishigori, Chikako

    2016-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease. Patients with XP have severe hypersensitivity to sunlight, resulting in skin cancers, and some patients have neurological symptoms. In Japan, XP complementation group A (XP-A) is the most common form, and it is associated with severe neurological symptoms. We performed a nationwide survey on XP to determine the present status of XP in Japan. The distribution of complementation groups in Japan was considerably different from that in other countries, but there was a higher frequency in group A and the variant type, which is similar to previous reports in Japan. Basal cell carcinoma was the most frequent skin cancer that patients with XP developed, followed by squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. The frequency of these skin cancers in patients with XP-A has decreased, and these skin cancers have been occurring in much older people than those previously observed. Diagnosing XP in patients at younger ages seems to encourage patients and their parents to use sun protection, which helps prevent skin cancer. We also created a tentative scale for classifying the severity of XP, and we evaluated the neurological symptoms of XP-A using this severity scale. Our classification correlated well with patients' age, suggesting that it may be useful and feasible in clinical practice to assess the progression of symptoms of each patient with XP and evaluate the effects of treatment in the future. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Single-Cell Quantitative PCR: Advances and Potential in Cancer Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Chi Young; Singh, Rajesh R; Salim, Alaa A

    2016-01-01

    Tissues are heterogeneous in their components. If cells of interest are a minor population of collected tissue, it would be difficult to obtain genetic or genomic information of the interested cell population with conventional genomic DNA extraction from the collected tissue. Single-cell DNA analysis is important in the analysis of genetics of cell clonality, genetic anticipation, and single-cell DNA polymorphisms. Single-cell PCR using Single Cell Ampligrid/GeXP platform is described in this chapter.

  14. Desarrollo de herramienta de gestión de proyectos RUP usando metodologías Scrum + XP : gestión del proyecto y requisitos

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Romero, Javier; Quishpi Betún, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Una de las principales causas por las que los proyectos de desarrollo software fracasan es la ausencia de metodología en su desarrollo. La motivación que hay detrás de este proyecto es el desarrollo de una aplicación web usando la metodología Rational Unified Process (RUP) y aprender, en una situación real, cómo desarrollar utilizando las metodologías Scrum + XP. El principal objetivo de este proyecto es el seguimiento y documentación de una aplicación web para gestionar proyectos mediant...

  15. Excision repair of bulky lesions in the DNA of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Grist, E.

    1980-01-01

    The report examines the process of excision repair of pyrimidine dimers from uv-irradiated and chemically challenged human cells. It is shown by means of a sensitive endonuclease assay that the amount of excision observed depends upon the isotope used to label cells, and that XP heterozygotes are between normals and XPs

  16. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome with Epibulbar Dermoid: An Unusual Association in a Patient with 4p Deletion and Functional Xp Disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragagnolo, Silvia; Colovati, Mileny E S; Guilherme, Roberta S; Dantas, Anelisa G; de Souza, Malú Zamariolli; de Soares, Maria F; Melaragno, Maria I; Perez, Ana B

    2016-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene and multiple malformation syndrome that results from a deletion in the 4p16.3 region. We describe here a 6-month-old girl that presented with WHS features but also displayed unusual findings, such as epibulbar dermoid in the left eye, ear tags, and left microtia. Although on G-banding her karyotype appeared to be normal, chromosomal microarray analysis revealed an ∼13-Mb 4p16.3p15.33 deletion and an ∼9-Mb Xp22.33p22.31 duplication, resulting from a balanced maternal t(X;4)(p22.31;p15.33) translocation. The patient presented with functional Xp disomy due to an unbalanced X-autosome translocation, a rare cytogenetic finding in females with unbalanced rearrangements. Sequencing of both chromosome breakpoints detected no gene disruption. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient described in the literature with WHS and epibulbar dermoid, a typical characteristic of the oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS). Our data suggest that possible candidate genes for OAVS may have been deleted along with the WHS critical region. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Epileptic encephalopathy in a girl with an interstitial deletion of Xp22 comprising promoter and exon 1 of the CDKL5 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Girard, Benoit; Gautier, Agnes; Nectoux, Juliette; Fichou, Yann; Saillour, Yoann; Poirier, Karine; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2010-01-05

    We report a 2-year-old girl with early onset seizures variant of Rett syndrome with a deletion at Xp22 detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique. This patient presented with tonic seizures at 7 days of life. Subsequently, she developed infantile spasms at three months and finally refractory myoclonic epilepsy. She demonstrated severe encephalopathy with hypotonia, deceleration of head growth, with eye gaze but limited eye pursuit, no language, limited hand use, and intermittent hand stereotypies. This combination of clinical features, suggestive of early onset variant of Rett syndrome led us to screen the CDKL5 gene. In a first step, screening of the whole coding sequence of the CDKL5 gene revealed no point mutations. In a second step, we searched gross rearrangements by MLPA and identified a microdeletion affecting both the promoter and exon 1 in CDKL5. Subsequent analysis on a Nimblegen HD2 microarray confirmed a deletion of approximately 300 kb at Xp22, including the BEND2, SCML2, and CDKL5 genes. In conclusion, our report suggests that searching for large rearrangements in CDKL5 should be considered in girls with early onset seizures and Rett-like features. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. First-principle study of the electronic band structure and the effective mass of the ternary alloy GaxIn1-xP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; Song, T. L.; Liang, X. X.; Zhao, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the electronic band structure and the effective mass of the ternary alloy GaxIn1-xP are studied by the first principle calculations. The software QUANTUM ESPRESSO and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange correlations have been used in the calculations. We calculate the lattice parameter, band gap and effective mass of the ternary alloy GaxIn1-xP for the Ga composition x varying from 0.0 to 1.0 by the step of 0.125. The effect of the Ga composition on the lattice parameter and the electronic density of states are discussed. The results show that the lattice parameter varies with the composition almost linearly following the Vegard's law. A direct-to-indirect band-gap crossover is found to occur close to x = 0.7. The effective masses are also calculated at Γ(000) high symmetry point along the [100] direction. The results show that the band gap and the electron effective mass vary nonlinearly with composition x.

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  20. Cyclosporin A inhibits nucleotide excision repair via downregulation of the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and G proteins, which is mediated by calcineurin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Thoms, Kai-Martin; Boeckmann, Lars; Laspe, Petra; Apel, Antje; Schön, Michael P; Emmert, Steffen

    2011-10-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells, a process that contributes to the skin cancer proneness in organ transplant patients. We investigated the mechanisms of CsA-induced NER reduction by assessing all xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) genes (XPA-XPG). Western blot analyses revealed that XPA and XPG protein expression was reduced in normal human GM00637 fibroblasts exposed to 0.1 and 0.5 μm CsA. Interestingly, the CsA treatment reduced XPG, but not XPA, mRNA expression. Calcineurin knockdown in GM00637 fibroblasts using RNAi led to similar results suggesting that calcineurin-dependent signalling is involved in XPA and XPG protein regulation. CsA-induced reduction in NER could be complemented by the overexpression of either XPA or XPG protein. Likewise, XPA-deficient fibroblasts with stable overexpression of XPA (XP2OS-pCAH19WS) did not show the inhibitory effect of CsA on NER. In contrast, XPC-deficient fibroblasts overexpressing XPC showed CsA-reduced NER. Our data indicate that the CsA-induced inhibition of NER is a result of downregulation of XPA and XPG protein in a calcineurin-dependent manner. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Interference Between Lactobacilli And Group A Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, these isolates dramatically inhibited the in vitro growth of GAS. They also induced the IL-6 production by FaDu cells to levels comparable to that brought about by GAS infection and counteracted the IL-8 decreasing property of GAS which was reported as an important immune evasion mechanism by the pathogen.

  2. Molecular cloning of the papillary renal cell carcinoma-associated translocation (X;1)(p11;q21) breakpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, MAJ; Janssen, [No Value; Janssen, HAP; vandenBerg, E; Fisher, SE; Craig, [No Value; vanKessel, AG

    1996-01-01

    A combination of Southern blot analysis on a panel of tumor-derived somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques was used to map YACs, cosmids and DNA markers from the Xp11.2 region relative to the X chromosome breakpoint of the renal cell carcinoma-associated

  3. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C cells remove pyrimidine dimers selectively from the transcribed strand of active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, J.; van Hoffen, A.; Karcagi, V.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mullenders, L.H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA fragments of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes in primary normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells. Using strand-specific probes, we show that in normal cells, preferential repair of the 5' part of the ADA gene is due to the rapid and efficient repair of the transcribed strand. Within 8 h after irradiation with UV at 10 J m-2, 70% of the pyrimidine dimers in this strand are removed. The nontranscribed strand is repaired at a much slower rate, with 30% dimers removed after 8 h. Repair of the transcribed strand in XP-C cells occurs at a rate indistinguishable from that in normal cells, but the nontranscribed strand is not repaired significantly in these cells. Similar results were obtained for the DHFR gene. In the 3' part of the ADA gene, however, both normal and XP-C cells perform fast and efficient repair of either strand, which is likely to be caused by the presence of transcription units on both strands. The factor defective in XP-C cells is apparently involved in the processing of DNA damage in inactive parts of the genome, including nontranscribed strands of active genes. These findings have important implications for the understanding of the mechanism of UV-induced excision repair and mutagenesis in mammalian cells

  4. Smear layer removal evaluation of different protocol of Bio Race file and XP- endo Finisher file in corporation with EDTA 17% and NaOCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Vahid; Mokhtari, Hadi; Reyhani, Mohammad-Frough; Nahavandizadeh, Neda; Azimi, Shahram

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the amount of the smear layer remaining in prepared root canals with different protocols of Bio RaCe files and XP-endo Finisher file (XPF) in association with 17% EDTA and sodium hypochlorite solution. A total of 68 extracted single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n=14) and two control groups (n=6). The root canals were prepared with Bio RaCe files (FKG Dentaire, Switzerland) using the crown-down technique based on manufacturer's instructions and irrigated according to the following irrigation techniques: Group 1: XPF with 2 mL of 2.5% NaOCl for 1 minute. Group 2:, XPF with 1 mL of 17% EDTA for one minute. Group 3: XPF was used for 1 minute in association with normal saline solution. Group 4: XP-endo Finisher file for 30 seconds in association with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA for 30 seconds. The negative control group: NaOCl (2.5%) was used during root canal preparation, followed by irrigation with 17% EDTA at the end of root canal preparation. The positive control group: Normal saline solution was used for irrigation during root canal preparation. In all the groups, during preparation of the root canals with Bio RaCe file, 20 mL of 2.5% NaOCl was used for root canal irrigation and at the end of the procedural steps 20 mL of normal saline solution was used as a final irrigant. The samples were analyzed under SEM at ×1000‒2000 magnification and evaluated using Torabinejad scoring system. Data were analyzed with non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc Mann-Whitney U test, using SPSS. Statistical significant was defined at P <0.05. The results of the study showed the least amount of the smear layer at coronal, middle and apical thirds of the root canals in groups 2, which was not significantly different from the negative control group ( P <0.5). Under the limitations of the present study, use of a combination of NaOCl and EDTA in association with XPF exhibited the best efficacy for the

  5. Encephalopathy and bilateral cataract in a boy with an interstitial deletion of Xp22 comprising the CDKL5 and NHS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Esch, Hilde; Jansen, Anna; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2007-02-15

    We describe a male patient with a deletion at Xp22, detected by high resolution X-array CGH. The clinical phenotype present in this infant boy, consists of severe encephalopathy, congenital cataracts and tetralogy of Fallot and can be attributed to the deletion of the genes within the interval. Among these deleted genes are the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome and the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5), responsible for the early seizure variant of Rett syndrome. This is the first description of a male patient with a deletion of these genes, showing the involvement of CDKL5 in severe epileptic encephalopathy in males. Moreover it illustrates the added value of high resolution array-CGH in molecular diagnosis of mental retardation-multiple congenital anomaly cases. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. MS Windows domēna darbstacijas migrācijas iespējas no MS Windows XP uz MS Windows 7.

    OpenAIRE

    Zariņš, Valdis

    2009-01-01

    Kvalifikācijas darbā tiek aprakstītas MS Windows domēna darbstacijas migrācijas iespējas no MS Windows XP uz MS Windows 7, kā servera operētājsistēmas izmantojot tādus Microsoft produktus, kā Microsoft Windows Server 2003 un Microsoft Windows Server 2008. Kvalifikācijas darba teorētiskaja daļā tiek apskatīti Microsoft Windows 7 priekšrocības un uzlabojumus gan no darbstacijas lietotāja , gan no darbstacijas administratora puses. Ir aprakstītas Microsoft Windows Server 2008 jauninājumu ie...

  7. Superficial characterization by XP S of silver nanoparticles and their hydrothermal deposit over zircaloy; Caracterizacion superficial por XPS de nanoparticulas de plata y su deposito hidrotermal sobre zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras R, A.; Gutierrez W, C.; Martinez M, I.; Medina A, A. L., E-mail: aida.contreras@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Tecnologia de Materiales, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The analysis technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S) is sensitive exclusively to the first layers of the solids surface, which allows obtaining information about the chemical, physical and electronic properties of them. The combustible elements of the boiling water nuclear reactors (BWR) are formed by zircaloy pipes that contain in their interior pellets or uranium dioxide. In this work is studied the zircaloy surface, oxidized zircaloy under similar conditions to those of a reactor BWR type and oxidized zircaloy with a hydrothermal deposit of silver nanoparticles and zinc. The silver deposit is a proposal of the Materials Technology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in Mexico, which has the same objective that the noble metals deposit (Pt, Pd, and Rh) that is practiced in some of the reactors BWR, in order to mitigating the speed of crack growth for IGSCC in stainless steels 304 Ss. (Author)

  8. Puerperal and intrapartum group A streptococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteby, E Y; Yagel, S; Hanoch, J; Shapiro, M; Moses, A E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the demographic and clinical variables characteristic of non-epidemic intrapartum or puerperal group A streptococcal (GAS) infection. METHODS: The records of 47 patients diagnosed with intrapartum or puerperal GAS infection over a 6 1/2 year period at Hadassah-University Hospital-Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem were reviewed. Data regarding 25,811 women, the general population of women that delivered during that period, were obtained from their computerized medical records. Frequency distributions, t-test, chi-square, and Spearman's Rank Correlation were used, as appropriate, to analyze and compare demographic and clinical variables associated with development of GAS infection, its clinical course and subsequent development of septic shock. RESULTS: Mean age of mothers with GAS infection was higher than that of our general pregnant population (30.4 versus 27.4 years, P = 0.0019), and a higher proportion of GAS infected patients (30% versus 12%, P < 0.005) experienced PROM. Thirty-one (66%) women had fever as their sole presenting symptom, eight (17%) had fever and abdominal pain, seven (15%) had fever and abnormal vaginal bleeding, and one patient (2%) presented with a rash. Three patients (6%) developed a septic shock. Two of these patients presented with symptoms more than 14 days after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: We describe the characteristics of non-epidemic intrapartum or puerperal GAS infection. Data from our study and review of the literature suggest that some patients who develop septic shock may present later in the puerperium than patients with an uncomplicated GAS infection. PMID:10598916

  9. A Brief Investigation of the Hydrodynamic Characteristics of a 1/13.33-Scale Powered Dynamic Model of a Preliminary Design of the Martin XP6M-1 Flying Boat, TED No. NACA DE-385

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Ulysse J.

    1953-01-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of a preliminary design of the Martin XP6M-1 flying boat have been determined. Longitudinal stability during take-off and landing, resistance of the complete model, and behavior during taxiing and landing in rough water are presented.

  10. An investigation of the predictors of photoprotection and UVR dose to the face in patients with XP: a protocol using observational mixed methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walburn, Jessica; Sarkany, Robert; Norton, Sam; Foster, Lesley; Morgan, Myfanwy; Sainsbury, Kirby; Araújo-Soares, Vera; Anderson, Rebecca; Garrood, Isabel; Heydenreich, Jakob; Sniehotta, Falko F; Vieira, Rute; Wulf, Hans Christian; Weinman, John

    2017-08-21

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare genetic condition caused by defective nucleotide excision repair and characterised by skin cancer, ocular and neurological involvement. Stringent ultraviolet protection is the only way to prevent skin cancer. Despite the risks, some patients' photoprotection is poor, with a potentially devastating impact on their prognosis. The aim of this research is to identify disease-specific and psychosocial predictors of photoprotection behaviour and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dose to the face. Mixed methods research based on 45 UK patients will involve qualitative interviews to identify individuals' experience of XP and the influences on their photoprotection behaviours and a cross-sectional quantitative survey to assess biopsychosocial correlates of these behaviours at baseline. This will be followed by objective measurement of UVR exposure for 21 days by wrist-worn dosimeter and daily recording of photoprotection behaviours and psychological variables for up to 50 days in the summer months. This novel methodology will enable UVR dose reaching the face to be calculated and analysed as a clinically relevant endpoint. A range of qualitative and quantitative analytical approaches will be used, reflecting the mixed methods (eg, cross-sectional qualitative interviews, n-of-1 studies). Framework analysis will be used to analyse the qualitative interviews; mixed-effects longitudinal models will be used to examine the association of clinical and psychosocial factors with the average daily UVR dose; dynamic logistic regression models will be used to investigate participant-specific psychosocial factors associated with photoprotection behaviours. This research has been approved by Camden and King's Cross Research Ethics Committee 15/LO/1395. The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international scientific conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of

  11. Multimodality infarct identification for optimal image-guided intramyocardial cell injections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slochteren, F.J.; van Es, R.; Koudstaal, S.; Spoel, van der T.I.G.; Sluijter, J.P.G.; Verbree, J.; Pruim, R.H.R.; Pluim, J.; Leiner, T.; Doevendans, P. A.; Chamuleau, S.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intramyocardial cell injections in the context of cardiac regenerative therapy can currently be performed using electromechanical mapping (EMM) provided by the NOGA®XP catheter injection system. The gold standard technique to determine infarct size and location, however, is late

  12. Readthrough of stop codons by use of aminoglycosides in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum group C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Khan, Sikandar G; Enk, Benedikt; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    Readthrough of premature termination (stop) codons (PTC) is a new approach to treatment of genetic diseases. We recently reported that readthrough of PTC in cells from some xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) patients could be achieved with the aminoglycosides geneticin or gentamicin. We found that the response depended on several factors including the PTC sequence, its location within the gene and the aminoglycoside used. Here, we extended these studies to investigate the effects of other aminoglycosides that are already on the market. We reasoned that topical treatment could deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the skin, the therapeutic target, and thus increase the therapeutic effect while reducing renal or ototoxicity in comparison with systemic treatment. Our prior clinical studies indicated that only a few percent of normal XPC expression was associated with mild clinical disease. We found minimal cell toxicity in the XP-C cells with several aminoglycosides. We found increased XPC mRNA expression in PTC-containing XP-C cells with G418, paromomycin, neomycin and kanamycin and increased XPC protein expression with G418. We conclude that in selected patients with XP, topical PTC therapy can be investigated as a method of personalized medicine to alleviate their cutaneous symptoms. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Lethality and the depression on DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, K. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation suppresses the semiconservative DNA replication in mammalian cells. The rate of DNA synthesis is initially depressed and later recovers after low doses of UV radiation in human cells. Such a response is more sensitive to UV radiation in cells derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) than that in normal human cells. The relative rate of DNA synthesis is not always correlated with cell survival because, unlike cell survival, the dose-response curve of the relative rate of DNA synthesis shows the biphasic nature of the sensitivity. In the experiments reported herein, the total amount (not the rate) of DNA synthesized during a long interval of incubation which covers the period of inhibition and recovery (but not longer than one generation time) after irradiation with various doses of UV radiation was examined in normal human and XP cells, and was found to be well correlated with cell survival in all the cells tested.

  14. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase. When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO, and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells.

  15. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. © FEMS 2015.

  16. Gamma-ray excision repair in normal and diseased human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerutti, P.A.; Remsen, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation products of the 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine type (t') are efficiently removed from the DNA during postirradiation incubation of bacterial and mammalian cells. In this chapter we describe the t'-excision system contained in normal human cells, in human carcinoma HeLa S-3 cells, and in skin fibroblasts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Fanconi's anemia (FA) patients. The latter diseases are characterized among other symptoms by a genetically increased susceptibility for the development of cancer

  17. Mapping X-linked ophthalmic diseases. IV. Provisional assignment of the locus for X-linked congenital cataracts and microcornea (the Nance-Horan syndrome) to Xp22.2-p22.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R A; Nussbaum, R L; Stambolian, D

    1990-01-01

    The Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent X-linked disorder typified by dense congenital central cataracts, microcornea, anteverted and simplex pinnae, brachymetacarpalia, and numerous dental anomalies. The regional location of the genetic mutation causing NHS is unknown. The authors applied the modern molecular techniques of analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms to five multigenerational kindreds in which NHS segregated. Provisional linkage is established to two DNA markers--DXS143 at Xp22.3-p22.2 and DXS43 at Xp22.2. Regional localization of NHS will provide potential antenatal diagnosis in families at risk for the disease and will enhance understanding of the multifaceted genetic defects.

  18. Linux vs : Windows - är Linux KDE möjlig ersättare till Microsoft Windows XP i en likvärdig konkurrenssituation sett ur ett användbarhetsperspektiv?

    OpenAIRE

    Wiberg, Björn; Gustavsson, Patrik

    2005-01-01

    Syfte Syftet med denna uppsats var att genomföra en kvalitativ undersökning kring om KDE kan ersätta Windows XP som användargränssnitt för normalanvändare på en persondator. Vi ville även ta fram de fördelar och nackdelar som KDE har i jämförelse med Windows XP, med eventuella förslag till förbättring. Metod Primärdata hämtades genom att testa operativsystemet på 25 personer som fick "tänka högt". Detta för att få en anblick om var det kan finnas problem. Även sekundärdata i form av litteratu...

  19. Host cell reactivation by fibroblasts from patients with pigmentary degeneration of the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H.; Wirtschafter, J.D.; Dupuy, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by numerous clinical abnormalities including acute sun sensitivity and primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Cultured fibroblasts from CS patients are hypersensitive to ultraviolet radiation. Host cell reactivation of irradiated virus was studied in CS and in other diseases with retinal degeneration to evaluate repair. The survival of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 was determined in fibroblast lines from four normal donors, two patients with CS, one with both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS, and from several other patients with (Usher syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa) and without (XP, ataxia telangiectasia) primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. The viral survival curves in all cell lines showed two components: a very sensitive initial component followed by an exponential, less sensitive component. The exponential component had greater sensitivity than normal in the case of the CS patients, the patient with both XP and CS, and the XP patient. It was proposed that patients with CS have defective repair of DNA which may be the cause of their retinal degeneration. (author)

  20. Host cell reactivation by fibroblasts from patients with pigmentary degeneration of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytle, C.D. (Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (USA)); Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Wirtschafter, J.D. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (USA). Hospitals); Dupuy, J.M. (Quebec Univ., Laval-des-Rapides (Canada). Inst. Armand-Frappier)

    1983-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by numerous clinical abnormalities including acute sun sensitivity and primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. Cultured fibroblasts from CS patients are hypersensitive to ultraviolet radiation. Host cell reactivation of irradiated virus was studied in CS and in other diseases with retinal degeneration to evaluate repair. The survival of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 was determined in fibroblast lines from four normal donors, two patients with CS, one with both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS, and from several other patients with (Usher syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa) and without (XP, ataxia telangiectasia) primary pigmentary degeneration of the retina. The viral survival curves in all cell lines showed two components: a very sensitive initial component followed by an exponential, less sensitive component. The exponential component had greater sensitivity than normal in the case of the CS patients, the patient with both XP and CS, and the XP patient. It was proposed that patients with CS have defective repair of DNA which may be the cause of their retinal degeneration.

  1. Apically Extruded Debris during Root Canal Instrumentation with Reciproc Blue, HyFlex EDM, and XP-endo Shaper Nickel-titanium Files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Gülşah; Özyürek, Taha; Yılmaz, Koray; Gündoğar, Mustafa; Plotino, Gianluca

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the amount of apically extruded debris by Reciproc Blue (REC Blue; VDW, Munich, Germany), HyFlex EDM (HEDM; Coltene/Whaledent, Altstätten, Switzerland), and XP-endo Shaper (XPS; FKG Dentaire SA, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) files during root canal preparation at body temperature. Sixty extracted single-rooted mandibular premolar human teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n = 20). The canals were instrumented using 1 of the following instruments: REC Blue, HEDM, or XPS. Apically extruded debris during instrumentation was collected into preweighed Eppendorf tubes. All the procedures were performed at 35°C. The amount of extruded debris was calculated by subtracting the weight value of the tooth-free apparatus from the postpreparation weight value. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test at a 5% significance level. All the instruments tested caused extrusion of some debris from the apical foramen. XPS extruded significantly less debris from the apex than REC Blue (P  .05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the amount of apically extruded debris registered for the different files tested was REC Blue > HEDM > XPS, with a statistical difference only between XPS and REC Blue. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The parallel processing of EGS4 code on distributed memory scalar parallel computer:Intel Paragon XP/S15-256

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemiya, Hiroshi; Ohta, Hirofumi; Honma, Ichirou

    1996-03-01

    The parallelization of Electro-Magnetic Cascade Monte Carlo Simulation Code, EGS4 on distributed memory scalar parallel computer: Intel Paragon XP/S15-256 is described. EGS4 has the feature that calculation time for one incident particle is quite different from each other because of the dynamic generation of secondary particles and different behavior of each particle. Granularity for parallel processing, parallel programming model and the algorithm of parallel random number generation are discussed and two kinds of method, each of which allocates particles dynamically or statically, are used for the purpose of realizing high speed parallel processing of this code. Among four problems chosen for performance evaluation, the speedup factors for three problems have been attained to nearly 100 times with 128 processor. It has been found that when both the calculation time for each incident particles and its dispersion are large, it is preferable to use dynamic particle allocation method which can average the load for each processor. And it has also been found that when they are small, it is preferable to use static particle allocation method which reduces the communication overhead. Moreover, it is pointed out that to get the result accurately, it is necessary to use double precision variables in EGS4 code. Finally, the workflow of program parallelization is analyzed and tools for program parallelization through the experience of the EGS4 parallelization are discussed. (author).

  3. Full-Scale Hydrodynamic Evaluation of a Modified Navy J4F-2 Amphibian with a 0.425-Scale XP5M-1 Hull Bottom. TED No. NACA DE325

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Norman S.; Elliott, John M.; Christopher, Kenneth W.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was made to evaluate the hydrodynamic qualities of a 0.425-scale model of the Navy XP5M-1 hull, which was installed on a modified Navy J4F-2 amphibian. Longitudinal and directional stability during take-off and landing, low-speed maneuverability, spray characteristics, and take-off performance were investigated. The behavior of the airplane in moderately rough water was also observed. The opinions of three pilots have been correlated with the data.

  4. Substance P and Calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in human periodontal ligament after root canal preparation with Reciproc Blue, WaveOne Gold, XP EndoShaper and hand files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Bucheli, J; Rios-Osorio, N; Rey-Rojas, M; Laguna-Rivero, F; Azuero-Holguin, M M; Diaz, L E; Curtidor, H; Castaneda-Ramirez, J J; Munoz, H R

    2018-05-17

    To quantify the Substance P (SP) and Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in healthy human periodontal ligament from premolars after root canal preparation with Reciproc Blue, WaveOne Gold, XP EndoShaper and hand files. Fifty human periodontal ligament samples were obtained from healthy mandibular premolars where extraction was indicated for orthodontic reasons. Prior to extraction, 40 of these premolars were equally divided into four groups, and root canals were prepared using four different systems: Reciproc Blue, WaveOne Gold, XP EndoShaper, and a hand instrumentation technique. The remaining 10 healthy premolars were extracted without treatment and served as a negative control group. All periodontal ligament samples were processed, and SP and CGRP were measured by radioimmunoassay. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to establish significant differences between groups and LSD post hoc comparisons were also performed. Greater SP and CGRP values were found in the hand instrumentation group, followed by the XP EndoShaper, WaveOne Gold and the Reciproc groups. The lower SP and CGRP values were for the healthy periodontal ligament group. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant differences between groups (p 0.05). All the root canal preparation techniques tested increased SP and CGRP expression in human periodontal ligament, with hand files and XP EndoShaper instruments being associated with greater neuropeptide release compared to Reciproc Blue and WaveOne Gold files. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. New process of preparation, X-ray characterisation, structure and vibrational studies of a solid solution LiTiOAs 1-xP xO 4 (0⩽ x⩽1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakir, M.; El Jazouli, A.; Chaminade, J. P.; Bouree, F.; de Waal, D.

    2006-01-01

    LiTiOAs 1-xP xO 4 (0⩽ x⩽1) compounds have been prepared using solutions of Li, Ti, As and P elements as starting products. Selected compositions have been investigated by powder X-ray or neutrons diffraction analysis, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of LiTiOAs 1-xP xO 4 ( x=0, 0.5 and 1) samples determined by Rietveld analysis is orthorhombic with Pnma space group. It is formed by a 3D network of TiO 6 octahedra and XO 4 ( X=As 1-xP x) tetrahedra where octahedral cavities are occupied by lithium atoms. TiO 6 octahedra are linked together by corners and form infinite chains along a-axis. Ti atoms are displaced from the centre of octahedral units in alternating short (1.700-1.709 Å) and long (2.301-2.275 Å) Ti-O bonds. Raman and infrared studies confirm the existence of Ti-O-Ti chains. Thermal stability of LiTiOAsO 4 has been reported.

  6. Herpes virus production as a marker of repair in ultraviolet irradiated human skin cells of different origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J; Nocentini, S [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France); Moreno, G [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital de Bicetre, 94 - le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1978-01-01

    When confluent human skin cultures are ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated before infection with Herpes Simplex type 1 virus (HSV), their capacity to support virus growth is impaired. When the time interval between UV-exposure and infection is increased up to 36 hours, different recoveries of HSV production capacity are observed according to the origin of the host cells. 1) Two normal donors: the cells present a dose dependent recovery which is maximal for a dose (24 J/m/sup 2/) at which a plateau level of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) is reached. 2) A mother of two Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) children: in this line which exhibits a normal level of UDS, the extent of recovery is significantly decreased after exposures <=12 J/m/sup 2/. 3) An XP child: these cells have a normal level of UDS (XP variant) whereas they present a low extent of recovery as compared with that of the normal subjects. 4) Five XP children: in these excision deficient lines (UDS < 15%), HSV production capacity decreases with increasing time intervals after UV exposure for doses >=3 J/m/sup 2/. For doses < 3 J/m/sup 2/, a small recovery with an overshoot of viral production is observed 24 h after UV exposure in the lines (three) which present the highest UDS (10-15%) and not in the two lines which present a very low UDS (1-2%).

  7. Transient correction of excision repair defects in fibroblasts of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups by microinjection of crude human cell extract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Vermeulen (Wim); P. Osseweijer; A.J.R. de Jonge; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractCrude extracts from human cells were microinjected into the cytoplasm of cultured fibroblasts from 9 excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups. The level of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured to determine the effect of the extract on the

  8. Effect of DNA repair on the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of uv irradiation and of chemical carcinogens in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and of aromatic amides or polycyclic hydrocarbons was quantitatively compared in normally repairing strains of human cells and in several excision-repair deficient or post-replication repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) strains

  9. DNA repair capacity and rate of excision repair in UV-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masao; Takebe, Hiraku.

    1978-01-01

    Repair capacities of five mammalian cell strains were measured by colony-forming ability, HCR of UV-irradiated virus, UDS, pyrimidine dimer excision, and semi-conservative DNA replication. Colony-forming ability of UV-irradiated cells was high for human amnion FL cells and mouse L cells, slightly low for African green monkey CV-1 cells, and extremely low for xeroderma pigmentosum cells. HCR of UV-irradiated Herpes simplex virus was high in CV-1 cells, FL and normal human fibroblast cells, low in both XP and L cells. The amount of UDS was high in FL and normal human fibroblast cells, considerably low in CV-1 cells, and essentially no UDS was observed in XP cells. Rate of UDS after UV-irradiation was slower for CV-1 cells than FL and human fibroblast cells. Rate of the excision of thymine-containing dimers from the acid-insoluble fraction during post-irradiation incubation of the cells was rapid in FL and normal human cells and slow in CV-1 cells, and no excision took place in XP cells. Semi-conservative DNA synthesis was reduced after UV-irradiation in all cell lines, but subsequently recovered in FL, normal human and CV-1 cells. The onset of recovery was 4 h after UV-irradiation for FL and normal human cells, but about 6 h for CV-1 cells. The apparent intermediate repair of CV-1 cells except for HCR may be related to the slow rate of excision repair. ''Patch and cut'' model is more favorable than ''cut and patch'' model to elucidate these results. (auth.)

  10. Forensic analysis of explosives using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)--part 1: instrument validation of the DELTAplusXP IRMS for bulk nitrogen isotope ratio measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sarah J; Lennard, Christopher J; Hill, David M; Maynard, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of research has been conducted into the use of stable isotopes to assist in determining the origin of various materials. The research conducted in the forensic field shows the potential of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to provide a level of discrimination not achievable utilizing traditional forensic techniques. Despite the research there have been few, if any, publications addressing the validation and measurement uncertainty of the technique for forensic applications. This study, the first in a planned series, presents validation data for the measurement of bulk nitrogen isotope ratios in ammonium nitrate (AN) using the DELTA(plus)XP (Thermo Finnigan) IRMS instrument equipped with a ConFlo III interface and FlashEA 1112 elemental analyzer (EA). Appropriate laboratory standards, analytical methods and correction calculations were developed and evaluated. A validation protocol was developed in line with the guidelines provided by the National Association of Testing Authorities, Australia (NATA). Performance characteristics including: accuracy, precision/repeatability, reproducibility/ruggedness, robustness, linear range, and measurement uncertainty were evaluated for the measurement of nitrogen isotope ratios in AN. AN (99.5%) and ammonium thiocyanate (99.99+%) were determined to be the most suitable laboratory standards and were calibrated against international standards (certified reference materials). All performance characteristics were within an acceptable range when potential uncertainties, including the manufacturer's uncertainty of the technique and standards, were taken into account. The experiments described in this article could be used as a model for validation of other instruments for similar purposes. Later studies in this series will address the more general issue of demonstrating that the IRMS technique is scientifically sound and fit-for-purpose in the forensic explosives analysis field.

  11. A rare cause of neonatal meningitis: Group A streptecocci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Annagür

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococci are rare cause of neonatal meningitis.In this case report, we discussed a case of newbornmeningitis caused by Group A beta hemolytic streptococcusunder the light of related literature. Twenty four daysold male baby who was reported to be completely healthybefore was referred to our clinic with symptoms of fever,not sucking and left localized convulsion which were presentfor one day. Lumbar puncture was consistent with purulentmeningitis. Group A beta hemolytic streptococcusgrowth both in blood and Cerebrospinal liquid. Patientwas treated with Penicillin G. In clinical follow-up, tetraventricular hydrocephaly was detected but there was noneed for shunt. Later follow-up revealed hearing loss.Meningitis caused by Group A beta hemolytic streptococcusalthough is quite rare must be kept in mind in casesof newborn meningitis. Group A Streptococcus can alsocause serious neurological sequel as in other newbornmeningitis causes.Key words: Group A streptococci, neonatal meningitis,Streptococcus pyogenes, hydrocephaly

  12. Functional analysis of the putative peroxidase domain of FANCA, the Fanconi anemia complementation group A protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J; Youssoufian, H

    2001-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder manifested by chromosomal breakage, birth defects, and susceptibility to bone marrow failure and cancer. At least seven complementation groups have been identified, and the genes defective in four groups have been cloned. The most common subtype is complementation group A. Although the normal functions of the gene products defective in FA cells are not completely understood, a clue to the function of the FA group A gene product (FANCA) was provided by the detection of limited homology in the amino terminal region to a class of heme peroxidases. We evaluated this hypothesis by mutagenesis and functional complementation studies. We substituted alanine residues for the most conserved FANCA residues in the putative peroxidase domain and tested their effects on known biochemical and cellular functions of FANCA. While the substitution mutants were comparable to wild-type FANCA with regard to their stability, subcellular localization, and interaction with FANCG, only the Trp(183)-to-Ala substitution (W183A) abolished the ability of FANCA to complement the sensitivity of FA group A cells to mitomycin C. By contrast, TUNEL assays for apoptosis after exposure to H2O2 showed no differences between parental FA group A cells, cells complemented with wild-type FANCA, and cells complemented with the W183A of FANCA. Moreover, semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis for the expression of the peroxide-sensitive heme oxygenase gene showed appropriate induction after H2O2 exposure. Thus, W183A appears to be essential for the in vivo activity of FANCA in a manner independent of its interaction with FANCG. Moreover, neither wild-type FANCA nor the W183A mutation appears to alter the peroxide-induced apoptosisor peroxide-sensing ability of FA group A cells. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Epidemiology of streptococcus group A in school aged children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the epidemiology of group A streptococci and to the environmental and underlying factors which predispose to late group A streptococci sequelae, we suggest to consider antibiotic treatment for children presenting with sore throat with fever and swollen cervical lymphonodes without cough or coryza.

  14. High mobility group A1 enhances tumorigenicity of human cholangiocarcinoma and confers resistance to therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Piscuoglio, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein has been described to play an important role in numerous types of human carcinoma. By the modulation of several target genes HMGA1 promotes proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells. However, its role in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has...

  15. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth of Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P toward direct Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P/Si heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omanakuttan, Giriprasanth; Stergiakis, Stamoulis; Sychugov, Ilya; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Institute of Technology-KTH, Kista (Sweden); Sahgal, Abhishek [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Institute of Technology-KTH, Kista (Sweden); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2017-03-15

    The growth of GaInP by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) was studied on planar GaAs, patterned GaAs for epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG), and InP/Si seed templates for corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth (CELOG). First results on the growth of direct GaInP/Si heterojunction by CELOG is presented. The properties of Ga{sub x}In{sub (1-x)}P layer and their dependence on the process parameters were investigated by X-ray diffraction, including reciprocal lattice mapping (XRD-RLM), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), photoluminescence (PL), and Raman spectroscopy. The fluctuation of Ga composition in the Ga{sub x}In{sub (1-x)}P layer was observed on planar substrate, and the strain caused by the composition variation is retained until relaxation occurs. Fully relaxed GaInP layers were obtained by ELOG and CELOG. Raman spectroscopy reveals that there is a certain amount of ordering in all of the layers except those grown at high temperatures. Orientation dependent Ga incorporation in the CELOG, but not in the ELOG Ga{sub x}In{sub (1-x)}P layer, and Si incorporation in the vicinity of direct Ga{sub x}In{sub (1-x)}P/Si heterojunction from CELOG are observed in the SEM-EDS analyses. The high optical quality of direct GaInP/Si heterojunction was observed by cross-sectional micro-PL mapping and the defect reduction effect of CELOG was revealed by high PL intensity in GaInP above Si. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Inclusive spectra of reactions 56Fe(P, XP), (P, X α) measured at Ep=29,9 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duisebayev, A.; Duisebayev, B.; Zholdybaev, T.; Ismailov, K.; Sadykov, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The inclusive spectra of protons and α-particles emitted from proton induced reactions on 56 Fe isotopes at E p =29.9 ± 0.1MeV in angular range 30-135 o with the step 15 o have been measured on isochronous cyclotron U-150M of Institute of Nuclear Physics. Typically, intensities between 40 and 180 nA have been utilized with a beam energy resolution of 0.3%. The self-supporting isotopic enriched (95%) foil of 56 Fe with thickness of 2.7 mg/cm 2 in these experiments has been used. The two-detector telescope system (Δ E-E) registration of α-particles has been used. The thicknesses of silicon detectors are ΔE-30 microns and E-2000 microns. Solid angle subtended by a telescope of detectors was equal to Ω =2.72 * 10 -5 sr ± 1%. For registration and identification of protons in the whole energy range the same two-detector telescope (Δ E-E) system has been used. It was consisted of silicon surface-barrier ORTEC detector (100 micron) and a scintillation detector with a total absorption of CsI (Tl) (25 mm). The solid angle subtended by a telescope of detectors is equal to Ω =2.59 * 10 -5 sr. Basing on exciton model of pre-equilibrium decay have been calculated spectra of multi-step direct (MSD) and compound (MSC) processes for (p,xp), (p,x α) reaction on 56 Fe. From comparison of experimental and calculated integral spectra it follows that main contribution in experimental cross section is due to MSD reaction mechanism. It is shown also that evaporated part of cross-section is underestimated in framework of used version of exciton model. It can be explained by the following fact that used master equation approach gives only pre-equilibrium part of MSC process, so the emission from complex equilibrium configuration of composite system are not considered

  17. Antibody to histo-blood group A antigen neutralizes HIV produced by lymphocytes from blood group A donors but not from blood group B or O donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Hansen, J E; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Three virus isolates HTLV-IIIB/lyA, HTLV-IIIB/lyB and HTLV-IIIB/lyO, obtained by passaging and propagating the HTLV-IIIB/H9 isolate in three separate cultures of mixed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from donors of blood type A, B or O, respectively, were tested for susceptibility...... for virus neutralization by the monoclonal antibody (MAb) AH16 directed against the blood group A epitope. MAb AH16 was previously shown to inhibit cell-free virus infection using HTLV-IIIB propagated in H9 cells. AH16 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of the HTLV-IIIB/lyA isolate but did...... not inhibit the HTLV-IIIB/lyB or the HTLV-IIIB/lyO isolate. Specificity of the MAb-mediated inhibition was shown using A-antigen (tetrasaccharide). Thus, HIV infection of PBMC from donors with blood type A appears to induce expression of host-cell-encoded carbohydrate blood group A epitope on HIV which can...

  18. Antibody to histo-blood group A antigen neutralizes HIV produced by lymphocytes from blood group A donors but not from blood group B or O donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Hansen, J E; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Three virus isolates HTLV-IIIB/lyA, HTLV-IIIB/lyB and HTLV-IIIB/lyO, obtained by passaging and propagating the HTLV-IIIB/H9 isolate in three separate cultures of mixed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from donors of blood type A, B or O, respectively, were tested for susceptibility...... not inhibit the HTLV-IIIB/lyB or the HTLV-IIIB/lyO isolate. Specificity of the MAb-mediated inhibition was shown using A-antigen (tetrasaccharide). Thus, HIV infection of PBMC from donors with blood type A appears to induce expression of host-cell-encoded carbohydrate blood group A epitope on HIV which can...... for virus neutralization by the monoclonal antibody (MAb) AH16 directed against the blood group A epitope. MAb AH16 was previously shown to inhibit cell-free virus infection using HTLV-IIIB propagated in H9 cells. AH16 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of the HTLV-IIIB/lyA isolate but did...

  19. Characterization of the enhancing effect of caffeine on sister-chromatid exchanges induced by ultraviolet radiation in excision-proficient xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoda, Hiroko; Oikawa, Atsushi

    1988-01-01

    Cells of some excision-proficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cell lines are highly sensitive to post-UV caffeine treatment in terms of sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as well as cell lethality. In the present study, the authors conducted a detailed investigation of the enhancing effect of caffeine on SCE frequency induced by UV in excision-proficient XP cells, and obtained the following results. (1). Continuous post-UV treatment with 1mM caffeine markedly enhances UV-induced SCEs and such enhanced SCEs occur with similar frequency during either the 1st or the 2nd cell cycle in the presence of caffeine and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd). (2) The high sensitivity of the cells to post-UV caffeine treatment persists for at least 2 days after UV when irradiated cells are held in either the proliferating of the nonproliferating state prior to the addition of BrdUrd. (3) Caffeine exerts its effect on cells in S phase. The most likely explanation for our findings is as follows. In excision-proficient XP cells, the cause of SCE formation such as UV-induced lesions or resulting perturbations of DNA replication persists untill the 2nd round or more of post-UV DNA replication. If caffeine is given as post-UV treatment, such abnormalities may be amplified, resulting in a synergistic increase in SCE frequency. (author). 21 refs.; 4 figs.; 4 tabs

  20. Genetic Correction of Stem Cells in the Treatment of Inherited Diseases and Focus on Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bernerd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Somatic stem cells ensure tissue renewal along life and healing of injuries. Their safe isolation, genetic manipulation ex vivo and reinfusion in patients suffering from life threatening immune deficiencies (for example, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID have demonstrated the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy. Similarly, adult epidermal stem cells have the capacity to renew epidermis, the fully differentiated, protective envelope of our body. Stable skin replacement of severely burned patients have proven life saving. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a devastating disease due to severe defects in the repair of mutagenic DNA lesions introduced upon exposure to solar radiations. Most patients die from the consequences of budding hundreds of skin cancers in the absence of photoprotection. We have developed a safe procedure of genetic correction of epidermal stem cells isolated from XP patients. Preclinical and safety assessments indicate successful correction of XP epidermal stem cells in the long term and their capacity to regenerate a normal skin with full capacities of DNA repair.

  1. Characterization of DNA repair phenotypes of Xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines by a paralleled in vitro test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffin, A.L.

    2009-06-01

    DNA is constantly damaged modifying the genetic information for which it encodes. Several cellular mechanisms as the Base Excision Repair (BER) and the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) allow recovering the right DNA sequence. The Xeroderma pigmentosum is a disease characterised by a deficiency in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to propose an efficient and fast test for the diagnosis of this disease as an alternative to the currently available UDS test. DNA repair activities of XP cell lines were quantified using in vitro miniaturized and paralleled tests in order to establish DNA repair phenotypes of XPA and XPC deficient cells. The main advantage of the tests used in this study is the simultaneous measurement of excision or excision synthesis (ES) of several lesions by only one cellular extract. We showed on one hand that the relative ES of the different lesions depend strongly on the protein concentration of the nuclear extract tested. Working at high protein concentration allowed discriminating the XP phenotype versus the control one, whereas it was impossible under a certain concentration's threshold. On the other hand, while the UVB irradiation of control cells stimulated their repair activities, this effect was not observed in XP cells. This study brings new information on the XPA and XPC protein roles during BER and NER and underlines the complexity of the regulations of DNA repair processes. (author)

  2. Genetic Correction of Stem Cells in the Treatment of Inherited Diseases and Focus on Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouanet, Sophie; Warrick, Emilie; Gache, Yannick; Scarzello, Sabine; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Bernerd, Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Somatic stem cells ensure tissue renewal along life and healing of injuries. Their safe isolation, genetic manipulation ex vivo and reinfusion in patients suffering from life threatening immune deficiencies (for example, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)) have demonstrated the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy. Similarly, adult epidermal stem cells have the capacity to renew epidermis, the fully differentiated, protective envelope of our body. Stable skin replacement of severely burned patients have proven life saving. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a devastating disease due to severe defects in the repair of mutagenic DNA lesions introduced upon exposure to solar radiations. Most patients die from the consequences of budding hundreds of skin cancers in the absence of photoprotection. We have developed a safe procedure of genetic correction of epidermal stem cells isolated from XP patients. Preclinical and safety assessments indicate successful correction of XP epidermal stem cells in the long term and their capacity to regenerate a normal skin with full capacities of DNA repair. PMID:24113582

  3. Clinical, biochemical, and neuropsychiatric evaluation of a patient with a contiguous gene syndrome due to a microdeletion Xp11.3 including the Norrie disease locus and monoamine oxidase (MAOA and MAOB) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, F A; Murphy, D L; Reiss, A L; Sims, K B; Lewis, J G; Freund, L; Karoum, F; Zhu, D; Maumenee, I H; Antonarakis, S E

    1992-01-01

    Norrie disease is a rare X-linked recessive disorder characterized by blindness from infancy. The gene for Norrie disease has been localized to Xp11.3. More recently, the genes for monoamine oxidase (MAOA, MAOB) have been mapped to the same region. This study evaluates the clinical, biochemical, and neuropsychiatric data in an affected male and 2 obligate heterozygote females from a single family with a submicroscopic deletion involving Norrie disease and MAO genes. The propositus was a profoundly retarded, blind male; he also had neurologic abnormalities including myoclonus and stereotopy-habit disorder. Both obligate carrier females had a normal IQ. The propositus' mother met diagnostic criteria for "chronic hypomania and schizotypal features." The propositus' MAO activity was undetectable and the female heterozygotes had reduced levels comparable to patients receiving MAO inhibiting antidepressants. MAO substrate and metabolite abnormalities were found in the propositus' plasma and CSF. This study indicates that subtle biochemical and possibly neuropsychiatric abnormalities may be detected in some heterozygotes with the microdeletion in Xp11.3 due to loss of the gene product for the MAO genes; this deletion can also explain some of the complex phenotype of this contiguous gene syndrome in the propositus.

  4. XP S, DRUV-Vis and ESR characterization of the non-stoichiometric compound Ge{sub 0.74}V{sub 0.21} □{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldu, J. L.; Barreto, J.; Rosales, I.; Bucio, L.; Orozco, E., E-mail: eligio@fisica.unam.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-11-01

    Microcrystalline powders of the nonstoichiometric Ge{sub 0.74}V{sub 0.21} □{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} compound were prepared by conventional high temperature solid-state reactions. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscopy (Sem); X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S); diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (DRUV-Vis) and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. From the analysis performed on compound, it was found that: the powders showed a rutile type crystalline structure with a rectangular prismatic crystalline habit. The XP S analysis, confirm the presence of V{sup 4+} and V{sup 5+} vanadium ions, the DRUV-Vis spectra show absorption bands in the 200-800 nm wave length interval and the ESR analysis confirms that the V{sup 4+} ions are within microcrystals, hosted as VO{sup 2+} at sites of rhombic (C{sub 2v}) symmetry. (Author)

  5. Controlled phase stability of highly Na-active triclinic structure in nanoscale high-voltage Na2-2xCo1+xP2O7 cathode for Na-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hee Jo; Kim, Jae-Chan; Dar, Mushtaq Ahmad; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2018-02-01

    With the increasing demand for high energy density in energy-storage systems, a high-voltage cathode is essential in rechargeable Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. The operating voltage of a triclinic-polymorph Na2CoP2O7, also known as the rose form, is above 4.0 V (vs. Na/Na+), which is relatively high compared to that of other cathode materials. Thus, it can be employed as a potential high-voltage cathode material in Na-ion batteries. However, it is difficult to synthesize a pure rose phase because of its low phase stability, thus limiting its use in high-voltage applications. Herein, compositional-engineered, rose-phase Na2-2xCo1+xP2O7/C (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.2) nanopowder are prepared using a wet-chemical method. The Na2-2xCo1+xP2O7/C cathode shows high electrochemical reactivity with Na ions at 4.0 V, delivering high capacity and high energy density.

  6. DNA repair in human cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP 2 fibroblasts were treated with uv plus uv-mimetic chemicals. The uv dose used was sufficient to saturate the uv excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a uv specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from uv and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of uv and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from uv or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170

  7. Mustelidae are natural hosts of Staphylococcus delphini group A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Schmidt, Kristina Runge; Petersen, Tina Steiner

    2012-01-01

    158 SIG isolates from less studied animal species belonging to the order Carnivora, including mink (n=118), fox (n=33), badger (n=6) and ferret (n=1). Species identification was performed by nuc PCR in combination with sodA sequence analysis and pta PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP......). The results showed a consistent association between host and bacterial species. All isolates from minks, ferret and badgers belonged to S. delphini group A, whereas all fox isolates except one were identified as S. pseudintermedius. The remaining fox isolate belonged to S. delphini group A. The results...... through host adaptation....

  8. New patient with both xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome establishes the new xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshell, A.N.; Ganges, M.B.; Lutzner, M.A.; Coon, H.G.; Barrett, S.F.; Dupuy, J.M.; Robbins, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A second patient, XP-CS-2, has been discovered with both xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. His fibroblasts have 30% of the normal rate of uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. His fibroblasts were fused with those from each of the xeroderma pigmentosum groups A through G. His cells complemented every cell line, since in each case there were obtained multinucleate cells which had a normal amount of uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. Since the XP-CS-2 cells complement all the currently established xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups, this new XP-CS patient is in a new group which we designate group H. 10 references, 1 figure

  9. Typical xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A fibroblasts have detectable ultraviolet light-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petinga, R.A.; Andrews, A.D.; Robbins, J.H.; Tarone, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Ultraviolet-induced nuclear uptake of tritiated thymidine [ 3 H]dThd demonstrable by autoradiography in non-synthesis phases of the cell cycle is known as unscheduled DNA synthesis and reflects repair replication of ultraviolet-damaged DNA. We have reported that the rate of any such unscheduled DNA synthesis in typical group A xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts, if present, is less than 2% of the normal rate. We have now performed experiments to determine whether these fibroblasts have any unscheduled DNA synthesis. Fibroblast coverslip cultures of four xeroderma pigmentosum group A strains were prepared. Irradiated (254 nm ultraviolet light) and unirradiated cultures from each strain were incubated with [ 3 H]dThd at 37degC, and autoradiograms were prepared using NTB-3 emulsion. A nuclear grain count was made of 100 consecutive nuclei of non-S-phase irradiated and unirradiated cells. A slide background grain count was simultaneously made from an acellular area adjacent to each cell analyzed. When a strain's irradiated and unirradiated autoradiograms having similar slide background grain count averages were compared, the nuclear grain count average of the irradiated cells was always higher than that of the unirradiated cells. This ultraviolet-induced increase in the mean nuclear grain count ranged from 0.4 to 1.3% of that given by normal non-xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts and was not reduced by 10 -2 M hydroxyurea. Planimetric studies showed that the ultraviolet-induced increase in nuclear grain count is not due to an increased nuclear area in irradiated cells. We conclude that these typical group A xeroderma pigmentosum strains perform very low, but detectable, ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis which probably reflects repair replication. We cannot, however, determine if there are significantly different rates of ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis among these ultraviolet strains

  10. Group A Rotavirus Associated with Encephalitis in Red Fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Chiara; Martella, Vito; Papetti, Alice; Sabelli, Cristiano; Lelli, Davide; Alborali, G Loris; Gibelli, Lucia; Gelmetti, Daniela; Lavazza, Antonio; Cordioli, Paolo; Boniotti, M Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    In 2011, a group A rotavirus was isolated from the brain of a fox with encephalitis and neurologic signs, detected by rabies surveillance in Italy. Intracerebral inoculation of fox brain homogenates into mice was fatal. Genome sequencing revealed a heterologous rotavirus of avian origin, which could provide a model for investigating rotavirus neurovirulence.

  11. Biofilm in group A streptococcal necrotizing soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Shambat, Srikanth Mairpady

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection. At present, biofilm is not recognized as a potential problem in GAS necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), as it is typically linked to chronic infections or associated with forei...

  12. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease. National Epidemiology and Genetic Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Infections with group A streptococci (GAS), or S. pyogenes, range from mild and superficial to very severe and lethal invasive disease. In severe invasive GAS infections, hypotension and multiorgan failure may develop rapidly resulting in the development of toxic shock-like syndrome (TSS). In the

  13. electropherotypes and subgroups of group a rotaviruses circulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Ameh

    diarrhea caused by rotaviruses. The virus is a double stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus with 11 segments. Group A rotaviruses show a characteristic 4-2-3-2 pattern following electrophoresis. The VP6 subgroups, I and II exist. This work was carried out to study the prevalence of rotavirus infection among children 0-5 years with ...

  14. Rotavirus Group A in Danish Cattle and Swine Herds 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, Nina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    Rotavirus group A infection causes gastroenteritis in both humans and a variety of animal species. Both domestic pet species such as cats and dogs, and commercial species such as pigs and cows can be affected. Zoonotic transmission is a possibility and could lead to the introduction into human...

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV bronchiolitis: comparative study of RSV groups A and B infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selir M. Straliotto

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The grouping characteristics of 29 respiratory syncitial virus (RSV present in nasopharyngeal cells collectedfrom hospitalized children with bronchiolitis during the 1990RSVseason in Porto Alegre, RS, were analysed. Twenty-two were grouped as belonging to group A and 7 to group B. Cyanosis, oxigen therapy, cough, lenght of hospitalization and atelectasis were observed to be more frequently found within group B infected children. Other clinical signs and symptoms were similarly found in both groups.

  16. Case report on xeroderma pigmentosum with squamous cell carcinoma in a ten year old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Kumar Sonnappa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPis a rare inherited skin disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to the DNA damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation (UV. The main source of UV is the sun. The symptoms of XP can be seen in any sun-exposed area of the body. The effects are greatest on the skin, the eyelids and the surface of the eyes but the tip of the tongue may also be damaged. In addition, approximately 25% of XP patients also develop abnormalities of the nervous system manifesting as progressive neuro-degeneration with hearing loss. People with XP have a 10,000-fold increased risk for developing skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. They also have a 2000-fold increased risk for cancer of the eye and surrounding ocular tissues. These symptoms appear early in life, typically before age 10 years. This case is being presented to highlight the rarity of a case of xeroderma pigmentosum with squamous cell carcinoma in a ten year old child.

  17. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Suppresses Mutagenesis Caused by Clustered Oxidative DNA Adducts in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassa, Akira; Kamoshita, Nagisa; Kanemaru, Yuki; Honma, Masamitsu; Yasui, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is defined as multiple sites of DNA damage within one or two helical turns of the duplex DNA. This complex damage is often formed by exposure of the genome to ionizing radiation and is difficult to repair. The mutagenic potential and repair mechanisms of clustered DNA damage in human cells remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the involvement of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in clustered oxidative DNA adducts. To identify the in vivo protective roles of NER, we established a human cell line lacking the NER gene xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). XPA knockout (KO) cells were generated from TSCER122 cells derived from the human lymphoblastoid TK6 cell line. To analyze the mutagenic events in DNA adducts in vivo, we previously employed a system of tracing DNA adducts in the targeted mutagenesis (TATAM), in which DNA adducts were site-specifically introduced into intron 4 of thymidine kinase genes. Using the TATAM system, one or two tandem 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts were introduced into the genomes of TSCER122 or XPA KO cells. In XPA KO cells, the proportion of mutants induced by a single 8-oxoG (7.6%) was comparable with that in TSCER122 cells (8.1%). In contrast, the lack of XPA significantly enhanced the mutant proportion of tandem 8-oxoG in the transcribed strand (12%) compared with that in TSCER122 cells (7.4%) but not in the non-transcribed strand (12% and 11% in XPA KO and TSCER122 cells, respectively). By sequencing the tandem 8-oxoG-integrated loci in the transcribed strand, we found that the proportion of tandem mutations was markedly increased in XPA KO cells. These results indicate that NER is involved in repairing clustered DNA adducts in the transcribed strand in vivo. PMID:26559182

  18. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Suppresses Mutagenesis Caused by Clustered Oxidative DNA Adducts in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassa, Akira; Kamoshita, Nagisa; Kanemaru, Yuki; Honma, Masamitsu; Yasui, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is defined as multiple sites of DNA damage within one or two helical turns of the duplex DNA. This complex damage is often formed by exposure of the genome to ionizing radiation and is difficult to repair. The mutagenic potential and repair mechanisms of clustered DNA damage in human cells remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the involvement of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in clustered oxidative DNA adducts. To identify the in vivo protective roles of NER, we established a human cell line lacking the NER gene xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). XPA knockout (KO) cells were generated from TSCER122 cells derived from the human lymphoblastoid TK6 cell line. To analyze the mutagenic events in DNA adducts in vivo, we previously employed a system of tracing DNA adducts in the targeted mutagenesis (TATAM), in which DNA adducts were site-specifically introduced into intron 4 of thymidine kinase genes. Using the TATAM system, one or two tandem 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts were introduced into the genomes of TSCER122 or XPA KO cells. In XPA KO cells, the proportion of mutants induced by a single 8-oxoG (7.6%) was comparable with that in TSCER122 cells (8.1%). In contrast, the lack of XPA significantly enhanced the mutant proportion of tandem 8-oxoG in the transcribed strand (12%) compared with that in TSCER122 cells (7.4%) but not in the non-transcribed strand (12% and 11% in XPA KO and TSCER122 cells, respectively). By sequencing the tandem 8-oxoG-integrated loci in the transcribed strand, we found that the proportion of tandem mutations was markedly increased in XPA KO cells. These results indicate that NER is involved in repairing clustered DNA adducts in the transcribed strand in vivo.

  19. Viable group A streptococci in macrophages during acute soft tissue infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Thulin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells.We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria.This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis of streptococcal soft tissue infections

  20. Viable Group A Streptococci in Macrophages during Acute Soft Tissue Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis

  1. Molecular Epidemiology and Genomics of Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessen, Debra E.; McShan, W. Michael; Nguyen, Scott V.; Shetty, Amol; Agrawal, Sonia; Tettelin, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) is a strict human pathogen with a very high prevalence worldwide. This review highlights the genetic organization of the species and the important ecological considerations that impact its evolution. Recent advances are presented on the topics of molecular epidemiology, population biology, molecular basis for genetic change, genome structure and genetic flux, phylogenomics and closely related streptococcal species, and the long- and short-term evolution of GAS. The application of whole genome sequence data to addressing key biological questions is discussed. PMID:25460818

  2. Suspected zoonotic transmission of rotavirus group A in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, S. E.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses infect humans and a variety of animals. In July 2006 a rare rotavirus strain with G8P[14] specificity was identified in the stool samples of two adult patients with diarrheoa, who lived in the same geographical area in Denmark. Nucleotide sequences of the VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4...... genes of the identified strains were identical. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both Danish G8P[14] strains clustered with rotaviruses of animal, mainly, bovine and caprine, origin. The high genetic relatedness to animal rotaviruses and the atypical epidemiological features suggest that these human G8...

  3. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation

  4. Xeroderma pigmentosum exhibiting neurological disorders and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hananian, J; Cleaver, J E

    1980-01-01

    A patient is described who has a unique combination of symptoms that correspond with two sun-sensitive conditions: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both of these conditions have been suggested as being associated with a defect in DNA repair, but this is only clearly established for XP. The patient described is the only known case among US blacks, thus far, although African black cases are known. Her DNA repair levels are 20-30% of normal, within the range found for many XP cell cultures and consistent with her assignment to group C by other investigators. Unusual for group C cases, however, are the neurological disorders, some of which correspond to those found in the de Sanctis Cacchione form of XP, which is commonly assigned to group A. Whether the associated SLE is a consequence of some special aspect of this particular XP condition or whether it is fortuitous cannot be resolved at present. 25 references, 2 figures.

  5. Recurrent group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in adult women: family epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Jack D; Funaro, Deana; Kaplan, Edward L

    2007-03-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) vulvovaginitis has been reported in prepubertal girls. In adult women, a vaginal carrier state has been described, but vulvovaginitis is rarely reported. We describe 2 cases of recurrent GAS vulvovaginitis in women whose husbands were gastrointestinal carriers of GAS. Characterization of the isolated strains demonstrated that identical emm types of GAS were shared by partners. Treatment of both partners resulted in resolution of vaginitis. On the basis of negative vaginal culture results obtained after treatment of each individual episode of vaginitis, we believe that the female patients were reinfected as a result of exposure to their husbands, with shedding likely to have occurred in bed. These cases reiterate the necessity for adequate screening of the patient's family and contacts in cases of recurrent GAS infection by culturing all potential areas of GAS carriage.

  6. Progressive dysautonomia in two patients with xeroderma pigmentosum group A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Osamu; Miyahara, Hiroaki; Abe, Naho; Goto, Chika; Okanari, Kazuo; Akiyoshi, Kensuke; Korematsu, Seigo; Izumi, Tatsuro

    2014-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder caused by a defect in nucleotide excision repair. Progressive dysautonomia in patients with XPA is rarely described. Two juvenile male patients with XPA suffered from dysphagia, sleep interruption, and dysuria from the age of 10 to 19 years, successively. These autonomic symptoms might have been caused by progressive descending degeneration of cranial nerves IX and X and the sacral parasympathetic nerve, including Onuf's nucleus. One patient died from sudden cardiopulmonary arrest during postural change and tracheal suction. Heart rate variability analyses of these patients revealed parasympathetic dysautonomia, based on decreased high-frequency values. The insidiously progressive dysautonomia in these two patients with XPA suggested progressive descending degeneration extending from the medulla oblongata to the sacral spinal cord, which is an ominous sign of end-stage disease and a risk factor of sudden death attributable to XPA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  8. Differences between Belgian and Brazilian group A Streptococcus epidemiologic landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Robert Smeesters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A Streptococcus (GAS clinical and molecular epidemiology varies with location and time. These differences are not or are poorly understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We prospectively studied the epidemiology of GAS infections among children in outpatient hospital clinics in Brussels (Belgium and Brasília (Brazil. Clinical questionnaires were filled out and microbiological sampling was performed. GAS isolates were emm-typed according to the Center for Disease Control protocol. emm pattern was predicted for each isolate. 334 GAS isolates were recovered from 706 children. Skin infections were frequent in Brasília (48% of the GAS infections, whereas pharyngitis were predominant (88% in Brussels. The mean age of children with GAS pharyngitis in Brussels was lower than in Brasília (65/92 months, p<0.001. emm-typing revealed striking differences between Brazilian and Belgian GAS isolates. While 20 distinct emm-types were identified among 200 Belgian isolates, 48 were found among 128 Brazilian isolates. Belgian isolates belong mainly to emm pattern A-C (55% and E (42.5% while emm pattern E (51.5% and D (36% were predominant in Brasília. In Brasília, emm pattern D isolates were recovered from 18.5% of the pharyngitis, although this emm pattern is supposed to have a skin tropism. By contrast, A-C pattern isolates were infrequently recovered in a region where rheumatic fever is still highly prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiologic features of GAS from a pediatric population were very different in an industrialised country and a low incomes region, not only in term of clinical presentation, but also in terms of genetic diversity and distribution of emm patterns. These differences should be taken into account for designing treatment guidelines and vaccine strategies.

  9. Fluid intake from beverages across age groups: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, A E; Bibiloni, M Del Mar; Pons, A; Tur, J A

    2015-10-01

    Fluid intake, especially water, is essential for human life and also necessary for physical and mental function. The present study aimed to assess beverage consumption across age groups. A systematic review was conducted. Original research in English language publications and available studies (or abstracts in English) from 2000 to 2013 was searched for by using the medical subheading (MeSH) terms: ('beverage' OR 'fluid' [Major]) AND ('consumption' [Mesh] OR 'drinking' [Mesh] OR 'intake' [Mesh]) AND ('child' [Mesh] OR 'adolescent' [Mesh] OR 'adult' [Mesh]). Article selection was restricted to those papers covering healthy populations of all age groups in a nationwide sample, or from a representative sample of the population of a city or cities, which examined the trends or patterns of beverage intake and the determinants of beverage intake. Sixty-five studies were identified with respect to beverage consumption across age groups. The papers were screened by thoroughly reading titles or abstracts. Full-text articles were assessed by three investigators. Total beverage intake varied between 0.6 and 3.5 L day(-1) among all age groups (males more than females). Plain water contributed up to 58%, 75% and 80% of the total beverage intake in children, adolescents and adults, respectively. Milk consumption was higher among children; consumption of soft drinks was higher among adolescents; and the consumption of tea, coffee and alcoholic beverages was higher among adults. Plain water is the main water source for all age groups and the consumption of other beverages varies according to age. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Invasive Group A streptococcal disease in Ireland, 2004 to 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2011-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infections (iGAS) are a major clinical and public health challenge. iGAS is a notifiable disease in Ireland since 2004. The aim of this paper is to describe the epidemiology of iGAS in Ireland for the first time over the seven-year period from 2004 to 2010. The Irish national electronic infectious disease reporting system was used by laboratories to enter the source of iGAS isolates, and by departments of public health to enter clinical and epidemiological details. We extracted and analysed data from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. Over the study period, 400 iGAS cases were notified. The annual incidence of iGAS doubled, from 0.8 per 100,000 population in 2004 to 1.6 in 2008, and then remained the same in 2009 and 2010. The reported average annual incidence rates were highest among children up to five years of age (2.3\\/100,000) and adults aged over 60 years (3.2\\/100,000). The most common risk factors associated with iGAS were skin lesions or wounds. Of the 174 people for whom clinical syndrome information was available, 28 (16%) cases presented with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 19 (11%) with necrotising fasciitis. Of the 141 cases for whom seven-day outcomes were recorded, 11 people died with iGAS identified as the main cause of death (seven-day case fatality rate 8%). The notification rate of iGAS in Ireland was lower than that reported in the United Kingdom, Nordic countries and North America but higher than southern and eastern European countries. The reasons for lower notification rates in Ireland compared with other countries may be due to a real difference in incidence, possibly due to prescribing practices, or due to artefacts resulting from the specific Irish case definition and\\/or low reporting in the early stages of a new surveillance system. iGAS disease remains an uncommon but potentially severe disease in Ireland. Ongoing surveillance is required in order to undertake appropriate control measures and

  11. Reduced superoxide dismutase activity in xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishigori, C.; Miyachi, Y.; Imamura, S.; Takebe, H.

    1989-01-01

    This study was performed in order to assess the possible protective effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on ultraviolet (UV) damage in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts. SOD activity in fibroblasts originating from seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients was significantly lower than that in normal cells (p less than 0.005). Average SOD activity in XP cells belonging to complementation group A was 3.68 +/- 0.54 (n = 7) and that in normal human cells was 5.79 +/- 1.59 (n = 6). Addition of SOD before and during UV irradiation (UVB and UVC) to the cells caused no change in the amount of unscheduled DNA synthesis and UV survival. A possible involvement of reduced SOD in XP and a possible protective effect by SOD on UV damage is discussed

  12. Characterization of DNA repair phenotypes of Xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines by a paralleled in vitro test; Phenotypage de la reparation de l'ADN de lignees Xeroderma pigmentosum, par un test in vitro multiparametrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffin, A.L.

    2009-06-15

    DNA is constantly damaged modifying the genetic information for which it encodes. Several cellular mechanisms as the Base Excision Repair (BER) and the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) allow recovering the right DNA sequence. The Xeroderma pigmentosum is a disease characterised by a deficiency in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to propose an efficient and fast test for the diagnosis of this disease as an alternative to the currently available UDS test. DNA repair activities of XP cell lines were quantified using in vitro miniaturized and paralleled tests in order to establish DNA repair phenotypes of XPA and XPC deficient cells. The main advantage of the tests used in this study is the simultaneous measurement of excision or excision synthesis (ES) of several lesions by only one cellular extract. We showed on one hand that the relative ES of the different lesions depend strongly on the protein concentration of the nuclear extract tested. Working at high protein concentration allowed discriminating the XP phenotype versus the control one, whereas it was impossible under a certain concentration's threshold. On the other hand, while the UVB irradiation of control cells stimulated their repair activities, this effect was not observed in XP cells. This study brings new information on the XPA and XPC protein roles during BER and NER and underlines the complexity of the regulations of DNA repair processes. (author)

  13. Diagnosis of a terminal deletion of 4p with duplication of Xp22.31 in a patient with findings of Opitz G/BBB syndrome and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Joyce; Müller, Ines; Kunath, Melanie; Herrmann, Susanne; Ullmann, Reinhard; Schweiger, Susann

    2008-01-01

    Opitz G/BBB syndrome (OS) is a congenital midline malformation syndrome characterized by hypertelorism, hypospadias, cleft lip/palate, laryngotracheoesophageal abnormalities, imperforate anus, developmental delay and cardiac defects. The X-linked form is caused by mutations in the MID1 gene, while no gene has yet been identified for the autosomal dominant form. Here, we report on a 15-year-old boy who was referred for MID1 mutation analysis with findings typical of OS, including apparent hypertelorism, hypospadias, a history of feeding difficulties, dysphagia secondary to esophageal arteria lusoria, growth retardation and developmental delay. No MID1 mutation was found, but subsequent sub-megabase resolution array CGH unexpectedly documented a 2.34 Mb terminal 4p deletion, suggesting a diagnosis of WHS, and a duplication in Xp22.31. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving terminal chromosome 4p deletions, in particular 4p16.3. WHS is characterized by typical facial appearance ("Greek helmet facies"), mental retardation, congenital hypotonia, and growth retardation. While the severity of developmental delay in this patient supports the diagnosis of WHS rather than OS, this case illustrates the striking similarities of clinical findings in seemingly unrelated syndromes, suggesting common or interacting pathways at the molecular and pathogenetic level. This is the first report of arteria lusoria (esophageal vascular ring) in a patient with WHS. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Xeroderma pigmentosum: Carcinome spinocellulaire infiltrant et délabrant du visage, chez une fillette de 3 ans et demi [Xeroderma pigmentosum: Squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating and disfiguring facial, in a girl of 3 years and a half

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laouali Salissou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of serious complications observed during the development of Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP are cancerous. These include skin, eyes, tongue, nervous system, etc. We report the case of a 3 1/2-year-old girl with squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating and disfiguring the face with rapid onset of death. RÉSUMÉ La plupart des complications graves observées au cours de l’évolution du Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP sont de nature cancéreuse. Celles-ci concernent notamment la peau, mais également les yeux, la langue, le système nerveux, etc. Nous rapportons le cas d’une fillette âgée de 3 ans et demie ayant présenté un carcinome épidermoïde infiltrant et délabrant du visage avec la survenue rapide de décès.

  15. G{sub 2} radiosensitivity of cells derived from cancer-prone individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darroudi, F.; Vyas, R.C.; Vermeulen, S.; Natarajan, A.T. [J.A. Cohen Institute of Radiopathology and Radiation Protection, Interuniversity Institute, Leiden (Netherlands)

    1995-04-01

    The potential of enhanced chromatid damage, observed after X-irradiation of G{sub 2} phase, has been used to detect individuals genetically predisposed to cancer, utilising fibroblasts/lymphocytes from these patients as well as fibroblasts derived from human tumours. Fibroblasts and/or lymphocyte samples of two autosomal recessive syndromes (xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Fanconi`s anaemia (FA)) and one congenital or acquired disorder, aplastic anaemia (AA), were employed for the G{sub 2} radiosensitivity assay. In addition, we have estimated the frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations as well as G{sub 2} radiosensitivity of eight samples of fibroblasts/fibroblast-like cells (two normal, two colorectal carcinoma, two Wilms` tumour, one retinoblastoma and one polyposis coli), and three samples of lymphocytes (two normal and one from a lymphoma patient). The results obtained indicate that there were no differences between fibroblast cells derived from patients or tumours, except FA patients, in the frequency of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations when compared to normal cells. Following X-irradiation we did not observe any significantly increased G{sub 2} radiosensitivity in FA and XP cells. Lymphocytes from AA and lymphoma patients, and all tumour cell lines except retinoblastoma, responded with increased frequencies of aberrations following G{sub 2} X-irradiation in comparison to cells derived from normal individuals. In our hands, the G{sub 2} sensitivity assay could not always discriminate cells from cancer-prone individuals from those of controls.

  16. Evaluation of simplified dna extraction methods for EMM typing of group a streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose JJM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Simplified methods of DNA extraction for amplification and sequencing for emm typing of group A streptococci (GAS can save valuable time and cost in resource crunch situations. To evaluate this, we compared two methods of DNA extraction directly from colonies with the standard CDC cell lysate method for emm typing of 50 GAS strains isolated from children with pharyngitis and impetigo. For this, GAS colonies were transferred into two sets of PCR tubes. One set was preheated at 94oC for two minutes in the thermal cycler and cooled while the other set was frozen overnight at -20oC and then thawed before adding the PCR mix. For the cell lysate method, cells were treated with mutanolysin and hyaluronidase before heating at 100oC for 10 minutes and cooling immediately as recommended in the CDC method. All 50 strains could be typed by sequencing the hyper variable region of the emm gene after amplification. The quality of sequences and the emm types identified were also identical. Our study shows that the two simplified DNA extraction methods directly from colonies can conveniently be used for typing a large number of GAS strains easily in relatively short time.

  17. Composition modulation analysis of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}P layers grown on (0 0 1) germanium substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, C.E.; Araujo, D. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e IM y QI, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Gutierrez, M., E-mail: marina.gutierrez@uca.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e IM y QI, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Miguel-Sanchez, J.; Rodriguez-Messmer, E. [Isofoton, C/ Severo Ochoa 50, 29590 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    The development of new photovoltaic approach to improve costs and efficiencies is focused on the new materials and new technologies. InGaP is, in this sense, a key material for solar conversion. In particular, in the solar concentration approach, this material is part of multiple junction solar cells. Its low lattice mismatch with germanium and its adequate bandgap make it very promising. This paper shows how compositional modulation can affect the InGaP emitter and the AlGaAs tunnel junctions. The influence of the growth conditions, on the compositional modulation and misfit and threading dislocations, in In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P layers is demonstrated by TEM on purposely grown single InGaP layers. High resolution electron microscopy (HREM) intensity profiles showed no elastic lattice related modulation.

  18. Isolation and identification of group A rotaviruses among neonatal diarrheic calves, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennima, Imane; Sebbar, Ghizlane; Harif, Bachir; Amzazi, Saaid; Loutfi, Chafiqa; Touil, Nadia

    2016-05-05

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the main cause of neonatal calve diarrhea (NCD) in Morocco. In this study, we isolated RVA strains from NCD clinical samples in order to support RVA disease control in Morocco. This isolation process constitutes a first step toward vaccine development. Thirteen fecal samples were obtained from calves with a single episode of neonate calf diarrhea at three different dairies and two samples were collected from field during a severe NCD outbreak. Diagnosis of RVA infection was based on fecal immune-chromatographic rapid test and further evaluated for their hemagglutination (HA) activity. RVA isolation was carried out on MA104 cells after inoculates were treated with different concentrations of trypsin TPCK. All RVA isolates were confirmed by LSI VetMAX™ Triplex Ruminant Rotavirus & Coronavirus Real-Time PCR kit. G and P typing were determined by direct sequencing of the VP4 and VP7 amplicons. RVA isolation was achieved for nine clinical samples following one or two passages (60 %) and was properly depended on HA activity and trypsin treatment of inoculates. The first sign of CPE detected consisted of increased cell granularity, obscure cell boundaries, cell rounding, and eventual degeneration and detachment of cells. At lower TPCK concentration (3-10 μg/inoculum), no changes at the cellular level were observed, while cells activated with 25-30 μg of trypsin/inoculums, they degenerated and trypsin cytotoxicity was enhanced. Appreciable changes in cell's morphology were detected with optimal trypsin concentration of 15-20 μg trypsin/inoculums. Data from qRT-PCR confirmed that unsuccessful cultivations have No-Ct, and all nine isolates have Ct values ranged between 12.17 and 24.69. Analysis sequencing revealed that field isolates were of G6 P[5] serotype and isolates from the dairy NCD samples were of G10 P[14] serotype. To our knowledge, this is the first study in Morocco which reports the circulation of G10P[14] in NCD on dairy

  19. Sensitivity of hyperthermia-treated human cells to killing by ultraviolet or gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.; Smith, B.P.; Wheatly, N.; Chan, A.; Child, S.; Paterson, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Human xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or Fanconi anemia (FA) fibroblasts displayed shouldered 45 0 C heat survival curves not significantly different from normal fibroblasts, a result similar to that previously found for ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells, indicating heat resistance is not linked to either uv or low-LET ionizing radiation resistance. Hyperthermia (45 0 C) sensitized normal and XP fibroblasts to killing by gamma radiation but failed to sensitize the cells to the lethal effects of 254 nm uv radiation. Thermal inhibition of repair of ionizing radiation lesions but not uv-induced lesions appears to contribute synergistically to cell death. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) for the synergistic interaction of hyperthermia (45 0 C, 30 min) and gamma radiation was significantly lower in one FA and two strains (TER = 1.7-1.8) than that reported previously for three normal strains (TER = 2.5-3.0). These XP and FA strains may be more gamma sensitive than normal human fibroblasts. Since hyperthermia treatment only slightly increases the gamma-radiation sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia (AT) fibroblasts compared to normal strains, it is possible that the degree of thermal enhancement attainable reflects the genetically inherent ionizing radiation repair capacity of the cells. The data indicate that both repair inhibition and particular lesion types are required for lethal synergism between heat and radiation. We therefore postulate that the transient thermal inhibition of repair results in the conversion of gamma-induced lesions to irrepairable lethal damage, while uv-type damage can remain unaltered during this period

  20. Whole-exome sequencing of fibroblast and its iPS cell lines derived from a patient diagnosed with xeroderma pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohji Okamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells from a patient with a DNA repair-deficiency disorder are anticipated to bear a large number of somatic mutations. Because such mutations occur independently in each cell, there is a high degree of mosaicism in patients' tissues. While major mutations that have been expanded in many cognate cells are readily detected by sequencing, minor ones are overlaid with a large depth of non-mutated alleles and are not detected. However, cell cloning enables us to observe such cryptic mutations as well as major mutations. In the present study, we focused on a fibroblastic cell line that is derived from a patient diagnosed with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, which is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. By making a list of somatic mutations, we can expect to see a characteristic pattern of mutations caused by the hereditary disorder. We cloned a cell by generating an iPS cell line and performed a whole-exome sequencing analysis of the progenitor and its iPS cell lines. Unexpectedly, we failed to find causal mutations in the XP-related genes, but we identified many other mutations including homozygous deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1. In addition, we found that the long arm of chromosome 9 formed uniparental disomy in the iPS cell line, which was also confirmed by a structural mutation analysis using a SNP array. Type and number of somatic mutations were different from those observed in XP patients. Taken together, we conclude that the patient might be affected by a different type of the disorder and that some of the mutations that we identified here may be responsible for exhibiting the phenotype. Sequencing and SNP-array data have been submitted to SRA and GEO under accession numbers SRP059858 and GSE55520, respectively.

  1. Clindamycin Affects Group A Streptococcus Virulence Factors and Improves Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, Federica; Zürcher, Claudia; Tarnutzer, Andrea; Schilcher, Katrin; Neff, Andrina; Keller, Nadia; Marques Maggio, Ewerton; Poyart, Claire; Schuepbach, Reto A; Zinkernagel, Annelies S

    2017-01-15

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) has acquired an arsenal of virulence factors, promoting life-threatening invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. Current therapeutic regimens for necrotizing fasciitis include surgical debridement and treatment with cell wall-active antibiotics. Addition of clindamycin (CLI) is recommended, although clinical evidence is lacking. Reflecting the current clinical dilemma, an observational study showed that only 63% of the patients with severe invasive GAS infection received CLI. This work thus aimed to address whether CLI improves necrotizing fasciitis outcome by modulating virulence factors of CLI-susceptible and CLI-resistant GAS in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with CLI reduced extracellular DNase Sda1 and streptolysin O (SLO) activity in vivo, whereas subinhibitory CLI concentrations induced expression and activity of SLO, DNase, and Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope protease in vitro. Our in vivo results suggest that CLI should be administered as soon as possible to patients with necrotizing fasciitis, while our in vitro studies emphasize that a high dosage of CLI is essential. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Generation of GZKHQi001-A and GZWWTi001-A, two induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yuhuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene, which spans ~2.4 Mb of genomic sequence at locus Xp21. This mutation results in the loss of the protein dystrophin. DMD patients die in their second or third decade due to either respiratory failure or cardiomyopathy, as the absence of dystrophin leads to myofiber membrane fragility and necrosis, eventually resulting in muscle atrophy and contractures. Currently, there is no effective treatment for DMD, therefore induced pluripotent stem cells from DMD patients would be a powerful tool for studying disease mechanisms.

  3. Introduction of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1 into normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the work described herein is to determine how UV light kills and mutates human cells. Specifically, the hypothesis to be tested states that the major cause of cell death is the cyclobutane dimer. The yeast (S. cerevisiae) enzyme photolyase provides an elegant means of dissecting the biological effects of the two lesions. Photolyase, the product of the PHR1 gene, catalyzes the visible light-dependent reversal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Introducing the gene for photolyase into human cells, which do not have a functional photoreactivation mechanism, should allow specific repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. To express the yeast DNA repair gene in human cells, the yeast PHR1 coding sequence was cloned into the mammalian expression vector pRSV4NEO-I. The resulting plasmid, pRSVPHR1, contains the coding sequence of the yeast gene, under control of transcription signals recognized by mammalian cells, and the dominant selectable gene neo. pRSVPHR1 was introduced into normal and XP SV40-transformed fibroblasts by the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique, and G418-resistant clones were isolated. The level of PHR1 expression was determined by cytoplasmic RNA dot blots. Two clones, XP-3B and GM-20A, had high levels of expression

  4. Targeted gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum cells using meganuclease and TALEN™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Dupuy

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C is a rare human syndrome characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and a dramatic predisposition to skin neoplasms. XP-C cells are deficient in the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway, a complex process involved in the recognition and removal of DNA lesions. Several XPC mutations have been described, including a founder mutation in North African patients involving the deletion of a TG dinucleotide (ΔTG located in the middle of exon 9. This deletion leads to the expression of an inactive truncated XPC protein, normally involved in the first step of NER. New approaches used for gene correction are based on the ability of engineered nucleases such as Meganucleases, Zinc-Finger nucleases or TALE nucleases to accurately generate a double strand break at a specific locus and promote correction by homologous recombination through the insertion of an exogenous DNA repair matrix. Here, we describe the targeted correction of the ΔTG mutation in XP-C cells using engineered meganuclease and TALEN™. The methylated status of the XPC locus, known to inhibit both of these nuclease activities, led us to adapt our experimental design to optimize their in vivo efficacies. We show that demethylating treatment as well as the use of TALEN™ insensitive to CpG methylation enable successful correction of the ΔTG mutation. Such genetic correction leads to re-expression of the full-length XPC protein and to the recovery of NER capacity, attested by UV-C resistance of the corrected cells. Overall, we demonstrate that nuclease-based targeted approaches offer reliable and efficient strategies for gene correction.

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-06-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-06-0050 ref|XP_510783.2| PREDICTED: cell death inducing protein isoform 4... [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001168950.1| PREDICTED: cell death inducing protein isoform 2 [Pan troglodytes] re...f|XP_001168974.1| PREDICTED: cell death inducing protein isoform 3 [Pan troglodytes] XP_510783.2 1e-66 69% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-1044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-1044 ref|XP_510783.2| PREDICTED: cell death inducing protein isoform 4... [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001168950.1| PREDICTED: cell death inducing protein isoform 2 [Pan troglodytes] re...f|XP_001168974.1| PREDICTED: cell death inducing protein isoform 3 [Pan troglodytes] XP_510783.2 3e-73 73% ...

  7. Scrum en XP frisse wind in onderwijs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, G. (Gerben); Leeuwen, van H. (Henk)

    2009-01-01

    Projecten in het hbo kenmerken zich meestal door een strakke rolverdeling, een flinke hoeveelheid documentatie en een watervalaanpak. De resultaten met een Agile-werkwijze zijn echter bemoedigend. Studenten zijn enthousiast door de continue focus op werkende software en de verbeterde communicatie in

  8. Immunological evaluation of lipopeptide group A streptococcus (GAS vaccine: structure-activity relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehfuz Zaman

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide variety of diseases. To date, GAS vaccine development has focused primarily on the M-protein. The M-protein is highly variable at the amino (N-terminus (determining serotype but is conserved at the carboxyl (C-terminus. Previously a 29 amino acid peptide (named J14 from the conserved region of the M-protein was identified as a potential vaccine candidate. J14 was capable of eliciting protective antibodies that recognized many GAS serotypes when co-administered with immuno-stimulants. This minimal epitope however showed no immunogenicity when administered alone. In an attempt overcome this immunological non-responsiveness, we developed a self-adjuvanting vaccine candidate composed of three components: the B-cell epitope (J14, a universal helper T-cell epitope (P25 and a lipid moiety consisting of lipoamino acids (Laas which target Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Immunological evaluation in B10.BR (H-2k mice demonstrated that the epitope attachment to the point of lipid moiety, and the length of the Laa alkyl chain have a profound effect on vaccine immunogenicity after intranasal administration. It was demonstrated that a vaccine featuring C-terminal lipid moiety containing alkyl chains of 16 carbons, with P25 located at the N-terminus, and J14 attached to the side chain of a central lysine residue was capable of inducing optimal antibody response. These findings have considerable relevance to the development of a broad spectrum J14-based GAS vaccine and in particular provided a rational basis for peptide vaccine design based on this self-adjuvanting lipopeptide technology.

  9. Two group A streptococcal peptide pheromones act through opposing Rgg regulators to control biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Chang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS is an important human commensal that occasionally causes localized infections and less frequently causes severe invasive disease with high mortality rates. How GAS regulates expression of factors used to colonize the host and avoid immune responses remains poorly understood. Intercellular communication is an important means by which bacteria coordinate gene expression to defend against host assaults and competing bacteria, yet no conserved cell-to-cell signaling system has been elucidated in GAS. Encoded within the GAS genome are four rgg-like genes, two of which (rgg2 and rgg3 have no previously described function. We tested the hypothesis that rgg2 or rgg3 rely on extracellular peptides to control target-gene regulation. We found that Rgg2 and Rgg3 together tightly regulate two linked genes encoding new peptide pheromones. Rgg2 activates transcription of and is required for full induction of the pheromone genes, while Rgg3 plays an antagonistic role and represses pheromone expression. The active pheromone signals, termed SHP2 and SHP3, are short and hydrophobic (DI[I/L]IIVGG, and, though highly similar in sequence, their ability to disrupt Rgg3-DNA complexes were observed to be different, indicating that specificity and differential activation of promoters are characteristics of the Rgg2/3 regulatory circuit. SHP-pheromone signaling requires an intact oligopeptide permease (opp and a metalloprotease (eep, supporting the model that pro-peptides are secreted, processed to the mature form, and subsequently imported to the cytoplasm to interact directly with the Rgg receptors. At least one consequence of pheromone stimulation of the Rgg2/3 pathway is increased biogenesis of biofilms, which counteracts negative regulation of biofilms by RopB (Rgg1. These data provide the first demonstration that Rgg-dependent quorum sensing functions in GAS and substantiate the role that Rggs play as peptide

  10. Tissue tropisms in group A Streptococcus: what virulence factors distinguish pharyngitis from impetigo strains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessen, Debra E

    2016-06-01

    Group A streptococci (GAS) are a common cause of pharyngitis and impetigo, and distinct throat strains and skin strains have been long recognized. This review aims to describe recent advances in molecular differences between throat and skin strains, and the pathogenic mechanisms used by virulence factors that may distinguish between these two groups. Recent findings include a new typing scheme for GAS strains based on sequence clusters of genes encoding the entire surface-exposed portion of M protein; correlations between emm-based typing schemes, clinical disease and surface adhesins; covalent bond formation mediated by GAS pili and other adhesins in binding to host ligands; a key role for superantigens in oropharyngeal infection via binding major histocompatibility complex class II antigen; and migration of GAS-specific Th17 cells from the upper respiratory tract to the brain, which may be relevant to autoimmune sequelae. The gap between molecular markers of disease (correlation) and virulence mechanisms (causation) in the establishment of tissue tropisms for GAS infection currently remains wide, but the gap also continues to narrow. Whole genome sequencing combined with mutant construction and improvements in animal models for oropharyngeal infection by GAS may help pave the way for new discoveries.

  11. Evaluation of a Group A Streptococcus synthetic oligosaccharide as vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanova, Anna; Margarit, Immaculada; Berti, Francesco; Romano, Maria R; Grandi, Guido; Bensi, Giuliano; Chiarot, Emiliano; Proietti, Daniela; Swennen, Erwin; Cappelletti, Emilia; Fontani, Paola; Casini, Daniele; Adamo, Roberto; Pinto, Vittoria; Skibinski, David; Capo, Sabrina; Buffi, Giada; Gallotta, Marilena; Christ, William J; Campbell, A Stewart; Pena, John; Seeberger, Peter H; Rappuoli, Rino; Costantino, Paolo

    2010-12-10

    Bacterial infections caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) are a serious health care concern that currently cannot be prevented by vaccination. The GAS cell-wall polysaccharide (GAS-PS) is an attractive vaccine candidate due to its constant expression pattern on different bacterial strains and protective properties of anti-GAS-PS antibodies. Here we report for the first time the immunoprotective efficacy of glycoconjugates with synthetic GAS oligosaccharides as compared to those containing the native GAS-PS. A series of hexa- and dodecasaccharides based on the GAS-PS structure were prepared by chemical synthesis and conjugated to CRM(197). When tested in mice, the conjugates containing the synthetic oligosaccharides conferred levels of immunoprotection comparable to those elicited by the native conjugate. Antisera from immunized rabbits promoted phagocytosis of encapsulated GAS strains. Furthermore we discuss variables that might correlate with glycoconjugate immunogenicity and demonstrate the potential of the synthetic approach that benefits from increased antigen purity and facilitated manufacturing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV bronchiolitis: comparative study of RSV groups A and B infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selir M. Straliotto

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The grouping characteristics of 29 respiratory syncitial virus (RSV present in nasopharyngeal cells collectedfrom hospitalized children with bronchiolitis during the 1990RSVseason in Porto Alegre, RS, were analysed. Twenty-two were grouped as belonging to group A and 7 to group B. Cyanosis, oxigen therapy, cough, lenght of hospitalization and atelectasis were observed to be more frequently found within group B infected children. Other clinical signs and symptoms were similarly found in both groups.Estudos recentes de amostras do vírus respiratório sincicial (VRS usando anticorpos monoclonais distiguiram duas variantes antigênicas, designadas como grupos A e B. Estes grupos foram estudados em 29 secreções de nasofaringe positivas para o VRS, provenientes de crianças hospitalizadas com bronquiolite durante surto de virose por VRS, em Porto Alegre, em 1990. Destas, 22 foram grupadas como pertencentes ao grupo A e 7 ao grupo B. Alguns achados clínicos como cianose, tosse, uso de oxigênio e dias de hospitalização foram mais freqüentemente observados em crianças infectadas coin o grupo B do VRS. Outros sinais e sintomas clínicos foram similarmente encontrados nos 2 grupos.

  13. Mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I defects in Fanconi anemia complementation group A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Silvia; Vaccaro, Daniele; Cuccarolo, Paola; Columbaro, Marta; Capanni, Cristina; Bartolucci, Martina; Panfoli, Isabella; Morelli, Alessandro; Dufour, Carlo; Cappelli, Enrico; Degan, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare and complex inherited blood disorder of the child. At least 15 genes are associated with the disease. The highest frequency of mutations belongs to groups A, C and G. Genetic instability and cytokine hypersensitivity support the selection of leukemic over non-leukemic stem cells. FA cellular phenotype is characterized by alterations in red-ox state, mitochondrial functionality and energy metabolism as reported in the past however a clear picture of the altered biochemical phenotype in FA is still elusive and the final biochemical defect(s) still unknown. Here we report an analysis of the respiratory fluxes in FANCA primary fibroblasts, lymphocytes and lymphoblasts. FANCA mutants show defective respiration through Complex I, diminished ATP production and metabolic sufferance with an increased AMP/ATP ratio. Respiration in FANCC mutants is normal. Treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) restores oxygen consumption to normal level. Defective respiration in FANCA mutants appear correlated with the FA pro-oxidative phenotype which is consistent with the altered morphology of FANCA mitochondria. Electron microscopy measures indeed show profound alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure and shape. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and viability of group A rotavirus in dairy farm water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, M; Schild, C; Caffarena, D; Bok, M; Giannitti, F; Armendano, J; Riet-Correa, F; Victoria, M; Parreño, V; Colina, R

    2018-03-01

    To analyse group A rotavirus (RVA) environmental contamination in waters used for calves' consumption and to assess viral viability in dairy farm water sources. We analysed 202 samples of water used for calves' consumption and RVA was detected by RT-qPCR in 35·1% (95% CI: 28·9-42·0%). A marked pattern of seasonality was observed with higher frequency of detection in colder than warmer months (P = 0·002). There was no association between viral load and season or between the number of milking cows in the herd and the detection of RVA in the farm. The viability of the RVA particles detected was confirmed by isolation of RVA in cell culture from 5 of 10 water samples. Furthermore, an RVA waterborne outbreak of neonatal calf diarrhoea was described. We demonstrate that RVA is frequent in dairy farm waters, and that the virus is infectious and capable of generating a diarrhoea outbreak. Neonatal diarrhoea syndrome leads to economic losses to the livestock industry worldwide. To determine transmission routes is essential to take action in this regard and reduce the impact that this syndrome has for the livestock production. The results obtained in this work alert the dairy industry and highlight that mitigation strategies are crucial to improve the microbiological quality of this water. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on the cell cycle in normal and UV-sensitive cell lines with reference to the nature of the defect in xeroderma pigmentosum variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imray, P.; Mangan, T.; Saul, A.; Kidson, C.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of the distribution of cells through the phases of the cell cycle by DNA flow cytofluorimetry has been utilized to investigate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on cell-cycle progression in normal and UV-sensitive lymphoblastoid cell lines. In time-course studies only slight perturbation of DNA distribution was seen in normal cells, or UV-sensitive familial melanoma (FM) lines in the 48 h following irradiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPA) excision-deficient cells showed a large increase in the proportion of cells in S phase 16-40 h post-irradiation. XP variant (XPV) cells were blocked in G 1 and S phases with the complete absence of cells with G 2 DNA content 16-28 h after irradiation. By 48 h post-irradiation the DNA distribution of XPA and XPV cells had returned to that of an unirradiated control. When colcemid was added to the cultures immediately after irradiation to prevent mitotic cells dividing and re-entering the cell cycle, progression through the first cycle after irradiation was followed. UV irradiation did not affect the rate of movement of cells out of G 1 into S phase in normal, FM or XPA cells. The proportion of cells in S phase was increased in UV-irradiated cultures in these cell types and the number of cells entering the G 2 +M compartment was reduced. (orig./AJ)

  16. Induction of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response Constitutes a Pathogenic Strategy of group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel eHanski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The connection between bacterial pathogens and unfolded protein response (UPR is poorly explored. In this review we highlight the evidence showing that group A streptococcus (GAS induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and UPR through which it captures the amino acid asparagine (ASN from the host. GAS acts extracellularly and during adherence to host cells it delivers the hemolysin toxins; streptolysin O (SLO and streptolysin S (SLS. By poorly understood pathways, these toxins trigger UPR leading to the induction of the transcriptional regulator ATF4 and consequently to the upregulation of asparagine synthetase (ASNS transcription leading to production and release of ASN. GAS senses ASN and alters gene expression profile accordingly, and increases the rate of multiplication. We suggest that induction of UPR by GAS and by other bacterial pathogens represent means through which bacterial pathogens gain nutrients from the host, obviating the need to become internalized or inflict irreversible cell damage.

  17. Eradicating group A streptococcus bacteria and biofilms using functionalised multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole; Young, Christie; MacNeill, Christopher; Braden, Amy; Argenta, Louis; Reid, Sean

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that multi-wall carbon nanotubes can be functionalised with antibodies to group A streptoccocus (GAS) for targeted photothermal ablation of planktonic and biofilm residing bacteria. Antibodies for GAS were covalently attached to carboxylated multi-wall carbon nanotubes and incubated with either planktonic or biofilm GAS. Bacterium was then exposed to 1.3 W/cm(2) of 800 nm light for 10-120 s, and then serially diluted onto agar plates from which the number of colony forming units was determined. Photothermal ablation of GAS on the surface of full thickness ex vivo porcine skin and histological sectioning were done to examine damage in adjacent tissue. Approximately 14% of the GAS antibody-functionalised nanotubes attached to the bacterium, and this amount was found to be capable of inducing photothermal ablation of GAS upon exposure to 1.3 W/cm(2) of 800 nm light. Cell viability was not decreased upon exposure to nanotubes or infrared light alone. Compared to carboxylated multi-wall carbon nanotubes, antibody-labelled nanotubes enhanced killing in both planktonic and biofilm GAS in conjunction with infrared light. Analysis of GAS photothermally ablated in direct contact with ex vivo porcine skin shows that heat sufficient for killing GAS remains localised and does not cause collateral damage in tissue adjacent to the treated area. The results of this study support the premise that carbon nanotubes may be effectively utilised as highly localised photothermal agents with the potential for translation into the clinical treatment of bacterial infections of soft tissue.

  18. Safety of the use of group A plasma in trauma: the STAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Nancy M; Yazer, Mark H

    2017-08-01

    Use of universally ABO-compatible group AB plasma for trauma resuscitation can be challenging due to supply limitations. Many centers are now using group A plasma during the initial resuscitation of traumatically injured patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of this practice on mortality and hospital length of stay (LOS). Seventeen trauma centers using group A plasma in trauma patients of unknown ABO group participated in this study. Eligible patients were group A, B, and AB trauma patients who received at least 1 unit of group A plasma. Data collected included patient sex, age, mechanism of injury, Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) probability of survival, and number of blood products transfused. The main outcome of this study was in-hospital mortality differences between group B and AB patients compared to group A patients. Data on early mortality (≤24 hr) and hospital LOS were also collected. There were 354 B and AB patients and 809 A patients. The two study groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, TRISS probability of survival, and total number of blood products transfused. The use of group A plasma during the initial resuscitation of traumatically injured patients of unknown ABO group was not associated with increased in-hospital mortality, early mortality, or hospital LOS for group B and AB patients compared to group A patients. These results support the practice of issuing thawed group A plasma for the initial resuscitation of trauma patients of unknown ABO group. © 2017 AABB.

  19. The effect of alcoholism on secretor status of blood groups A and B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty were alcoholics and one hundred and fifty non-alcoholics served as controls. In the alcoholic group, seventy five were blood group B while seventy five were blood group A. Fifty out of the seventy five (67%) group A alcoholics were secretors, while 25 (33%) were non-secretors. Fourty two out of the ...

  20. 78 FR 61387 - Supermedia LLC, Publishing Operations Divison, Account Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... LLC, Publishing Operations Divison, Account Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex Media Inc..., Publishing Operations Divison, Listing Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex Media Inc., Including On-Site... to workers and former workers of SuperMedia LLC, Publishing Operation Division, Account Management...

  1. Clinical symptoms and DNA repair characteristics of xeroderma pigmentosum patients from Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thielmann, H.W.; Popanda, O.; Edler, L.; Jung, E.G.

    1991-01-01

    Sixty-one xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients living in the Federal Republic of Germany were investigated. Clinical symptoms were correlated with DNA repair parameters measured in fibroblasts grown from skin biopsies. Classification according to the international complementation groups revealed that of the 61 patients 3 belonged to group A, 26 to group C, 16 to group D, 3 to group E, and 2 to group F; 11 were of the XP variant type. A striking clinical aspect was the frequency of histogenetically different skin tumors varying from one XP complementation group to the other: squamous and basal cell carcinomas predominated in XP group C; lentigo maligna melanomas were most frequent in group D; basal cell carcinomas occurred preferentially in group E and XP variants. Three DNA repair parameters were determined for 46 fibroblast strains: colony-forming ability (D0); DNA repair synthesis (G0); and DNA-incising capacity (E0). Dose-response experiments with up to 13 dose levels were performed throughout to achieve sufficient experimental accuracy. DNA-damaging treatments included UV light, the 'UV-like' carcinogen N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, and the alkylating carcinogens methyl methanesulfonate and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Comparison of clinical signs and repair data was made on the basis of D0, G0, and E0 values of both individual cell strains and weighted means of XP complementation groups. Despite considerable clinical and biochemical heterogeneity within complementation groups distinctive features emerged. In general, D0, G0, and E0 values of all XP strains investigated, including XP variants, were found to be reduced upon treatment with UV light or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene

  2. Evasion of Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum: Rosettes of Blood Group A Impair Recognition of PfEMP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Kirsten; Palmkvist, Mia; Ch'ng, Junhong; Kiwuwa, Mpungu Steven; Wahlgren, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The ABO blood group antigens are expressed on erythrocytes but also on endothelial cells, platelets and serum proteins. Notably, the ABO blood group of a malaria patient determines the development of the disease given that blood group O reduces the probability to succumb in severe malaria, compared to individuals of groups A, B or AB. P. falciparum rosetting and sequestration are mediated by PfEMP1, RIFIN and STEVOR, expressed at the surface of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC). Antibodies to these antigens consequently modify the course of a malaria infection by preventing sequestration and promoting phagocytosis of pRBC. Here we have studied rosetting P. falciparum and present evidence of an immune evasion mechanism not previously recognized. We find the accessibility of antibodies to PfEMP1 at the surface of the pRBC to be reduced when P. falciparum forms rosettes in blood group A RBC, as compared to group O RBC. The pRBC surrounds itself with tightly bound normal RBC that makes PfEMP1 inaccessible to antibodies and clearance by the immune system. Accordingly, pRBC of in vitro cloned P. falciparum devoid of ABO blood group dependent rosetting were equally well detected by anti-PfEMP1 antibodies, independent of the blood group utilized for their propagation. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the severe forms of malaria may in patients of blood group A depend on the ability of the parasite to mask PfEMP1 from antibody recognition, in so doing evading immune clearance. PMID:26714011

  3. Repair of human DNA: radiation and chemical damage in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    We present the experimental evidence we have gathered, using a particular assay for DNA repair in human cells, the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporated during repair. This assay characterizes the sequence of repair events that occur in human cells after radiation, both ultraviolet and ionizing, and permits an estimation of the size of the average repaired region after these physical insults to DNA. We will discuss chemical insults to DNA and attempt to liken the repair processes after chemical damages of various kinds to those repair processes that occur in human DNA after damage from physical agents. We will also show results indicating that, under certain conditions, repair events resembling those seen after uv-irradiation can be observed in normal human cells after ionizing radiation. Furthermore the XP cells, defective in the repair of uv-induced DNA damage, show defective repair of these uv-like DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation

  4. Mutagenesis and lethality following S phase irradiation of xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human diploid fibroblasts with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Little, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of u.v. light exposure in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle were determined in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XP-A), hereditary adenomatosis of the colon and rectum (ACR), and a normal, foreskin derived cell strain (AG1522). For AG1522, an increased sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of u.v. light was observed as compared to previous findings for confluent, non-proliferating cultures. XP-A fibroblasts were markedly hypersensitive and ACR fibroblasts exhibited an intermediate response. The mutagenic response of ACR fibroblasts, however, was similar to normal fibroblasts. A threshold of 1.5-2 J/m 2 was observed for u.v. induced mutagenesis in normal and ACR fibroblasts. XP fibroblasts, on the other hand, were strikingly hypermutable and demonstrated little or no threshold. When S phase mutagenesis was considered as a function of survival level rather than u.v. light dose, XP fibroblasts remained significantly hypermutable as compared with normal fibroblasts at all survival levels. Previous mutagenesis results with confluent, non-proliferating cultures of XP and normal fibroblasts were reanalyzed as a function of cytotoxicity; XP hypermutability at all survival levels was also observed. (author)

  5. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  6. Caffeine Abolishes the Ultraviolet-Induced REV3 Translesion Replication Pathway in Mouse Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Yamada

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available When a replicative DNA polymerase stalls upon encountering a photoproduct on the template strand, it is relieved by other low-processivity polymerase(s, which insert nucleotide(s opposite the lesion. Using an alkaline sucrose density gradient sedimentation technique, we previously classified this process termed UV-induced translesion replication (UV-TLS into two types. In human cancer cells or xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V cells, UV-TLS was inhibited by caffeine or proteasome inhibitors. However, in normal human cells, the process was insensitive to these reagents. Reportedly, in yeast or mammalian cells, REV3 protein (a catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ is predominantly involved in the former type of TLS. Here, we studied UV-TLS in fibroblasts derived from the Rev3-knockout mouse embryo (Rev3KO-MEF. In the wild-type MEF, UV-TLS was slow (similar to that of human cancer cells or XP-V cells, and was abolished by caffeine or MG-262. In 2 cell lines of Rev3KO-MEF (Rev3−/− p53−/−, UV-TLS was not observed. In p53KO-MEF, which is a strict control for Rev3KO-MEF, the UV-TLS response was similar to that of the wild-type. Introduction of the Rev3 expression plasmid into Rev3KO-MEF restored the UV-TLS response in selected stable transformants. In some transformants, viability to UV was the same as that in the wild-type, and the death rate was increased by caffeine. Our findings indicate that REV3 is predominantly involved in UV-TLS in mouse cells, and that the REV3 translesion pathway is suppressed by caffeine or proteasome inhibitors.

  7. Genetic Architecture of Group A Streptococcal Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections in the Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Alagarsamy, Jeyashree

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variations play an important role in several pathogenic diseases, and we have previously provided strong evidences that these genetic variations contribute significantly to differences in susceptibility and clinical outcomes of invasive Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections, includi...

  8. MiT family translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argani, Pedram

    2015-03-01

    The MiT subfamily of transcription factors includes TFE3, TFEB, TFC, and MiTF. Gene fusions involving two of these transcription factors have been identified in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The Xp11 translocation RCCs were first officially recognized in the 2004 WHO renal tumor classification, and harbor gene fusions involving TFE3. The t(6;11) RCCs harbor a specific Alpha-TFEB gene fusion and were first officially recognized in the 2013 International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver classification of renal neoplasia. These two subtypes of translocation RCC have many similarities. Both were initially described in and disproportionately involve young patients, though adult translocation RCC may overall outnumber pediatric cases. Both often have unusual and distinctive morphologies; the Xp11 translocation RCCs frequently have clear cells with papillary architecture and abundant psammomatous bodies, while the t(6;11) RCCs frequently have a biphasic appearance with both large and small epithelioid cells and nodules of basement membrane material. However, the morphology of these two neoplasms can overlap, with one mimicking the other. Both of these RCCs underexpress epithelial immunohistochemical markers like cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) relative to most other RCCs. Unlike other RCCs, both frequently express the cysteine protease cathepsin k and often express melanocytic markers like HMB45 and Melan A. Finally, TFE3 and TFEB have overlapping functional activity as these two transcription factors frequently heterodimerize and bind to the same targets. Therefore, on the basis of clinical, morphologic, immunohistochemical, and genetic similarities, the 2013 ISUP Vancouver classification of renal neoplasia grouped these two neoplasms together under the heading of "MiT family translocation RCC." This review summarizes our current knowledge of these recently described RCCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  10. Human uracil DNA N-glycosidase: studies in normal and repair defective cultured fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnlein, U; Lee, B; Linn, S

    1978-01-01

    Uracil DNA N-glycosidase, an enzyme which participates in the excision of uracil from DNA, was measured in extracts from fibroblast lines cultured from normal subjects, from several subjects with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum, and from a subject with ataxia telangiectasia. The cell lines representative of complementation groups A and D of xeroderma pigmentosum and of ataxia telangiectasia had roughly the same level of activity as did the normal cells. On the other hand, cells from two xeroderma pigmentosum variants (XP4BE and XP13BE) had roughly half the normal level of activity, and cells from the heterozygous mother of XP4BE had an intermediate level of activity. In spite of these quantitative differences, no systematic alterations in reaction characteristics, apparent K/sub m/ for substrate, or purification characteristics were noted for enzyme from any of the lines. Thus a causal relationship, if any, between levels of activity and the disease symptoms is equivocal.

  11. Fanconi anemia group A and C double-mutant mice: functional evidence for a multi-protein Fanconi anemia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Meenakshi; Battaile, Kevin P; Bateman, Raynard; Lax, Timothy P; Rathbun, Keany; Reifsteck, Carol; Bagby, Grover; Finegold, Milton; Olson, Susan; Grompe, Markus

    2002-07-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with defects in at least eight genes. The biochemical function(s) of the FA proteins are unknown, but together they define the FA pathway, which is involved in cellular responses to DNA damage and in other cellular processes. It is currently unknown whether all FA proteins are involved in controlling a single function or whether some of the FA proteins have additional roles. The aim of this study was 1) to determine whether the FA group A and group C genes have identical or partially distinct functions, and 2) to have a better model for human FA. We generated mice with a targeted mutation in fanca and crossed them with fancc disrupted animals. Several phenotypes including sensitivity to DNA cross linkers and ionizing radiation, hematopoietic colony growth, and germ cell loss were analyzed in fanca-/-, fancc-/-, fanca/fancc double -/-, and controls. Fibroblast cells and hematopoietic precursors from fanca/fancc double-mutant mice were not more sensitive to MMC than those of either single mutant. fanca/fancc double mutants had no evidence for an additive phenotype at the cellular or organismal level. These results support a model where both FANCA and FANCC are part of a multi-protein nuclear FA complex with identical function in cellular responses to DNA damage and germ cell survival.

  12. Biochemical and biological properties of the binding of human fibrinogen to M protein in group A streptococci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitnack, E.; Beachey, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Fibrinogen is known to bind to group A streptococci and precipitate with extracts containing streptococcal M protein. The authors have previously shown that the binding of fibrinogen to M-positive streptococci prevents opsonization by complement and protects that organism from phagocytosis in nonimmune blood. In the present study, they used 3 H-labeled fibrinogen, a highly purified peptide fragment of type 24 M protein (pep M24), and anti-pep M sera to show that fibrinogen binds to M-positive streptococci with high affinity; occupation of the high-affinity binding sites suffices to protect the organism from phagocytosis; proteolytic treatments that remove M protein from streptococcal cells abolish binding; binding is competitively inhibited by anti-pep M sera; pep M24 precipitates fibrinogen; and binding to type 24 cells is inhibited by pep M24. They conclude that M protein is the cell surface structure principally responsible for binding fibrinogen on the surface of M-positive streptococci and that this binding contributes to the known antiopsonic property of M proteins

  13. A Two-Component Regulatory System Impacts Extracellular Membrane-Derived Vesicle Production in Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Resch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Export of macromolecules via extracellular membrane-derived vesicles (MVs plays an important role in the biology of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria have also recently been reported to produce MVs; however, the composition and mechanisms governing vesiculogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria remain undefined. Here, we describe MV production in the Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS, the etiological agent of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. M1 serotype GAS isolates in culture exhibit MV structures both on the cell wall surface and in the near vicinity of bacterial cells. A comprehensive analysis of MV proteins identified both virulence-associated protein substrates of the general secretory pathway in addition to “anchorless surface proteins.” Characteristic differences in the contents, distributions, and fatty acid compositions of specific lipids between MVs and GAS cell membrane were also observed. Furthermore, deep RNA sequencing of vesicular RNAs revealed that GAS MVs contained differentially abundant RNA species relative to bacterial cellular RNA. MV production by GAS strains varied in a manner dependent on an intact two-component system, CovRS, with MV production negatively regulated by the system. Modulation of MV production through CovRS was found to be independent of both GAS cysteine protease SpeB and capsule biosynthesis. Our data provide an explanation for GAS secretion of macromolecules, including RNAs, lipids, and proteins, and illustrate a regulatory mechanism coordinating this secretory response.

  14. Photoreactivation of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Oliver, R.; Fuselier, C.O.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    Photoproducts formed in the DNA of human cells irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv) were identified as cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers by their chromatographic mobility, reversibility to monomers upon short wavelength uv irradiation, and comparison of the kinetics of this monomerization with that of authentic cis--syn thymine--thymine dimers prepared by irradiation of thymine in ice. The level of cellular photoreactivation of these dimers reflects the level of photoreactivating enzyme measured in cell extracts. Action spectra for cellular dimer photoreactivation in the xeroderma pigmentosum line XP12BE agree in range (300 nm to at least 577 nm) and maximum (near 400 nm) with that for photoreactivation by purified human photoreactivating enzyme. Normal human cells can also photoreactivate dimers in their DNA. The action spectrum for the cellular monomerization of dimers is similar to that for photoreactivation by the photoreactivating enzyme in extracts of normal human fibroblasts

  15. Non-group A streptococci in the pharynx. Pathogens or innocent bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, G F; Murphy, T F; Hendley, J O

    1989-07-01

    To determine whether beta-hemolytic streptococci from groups other than A are an important cause of sporadic pharyngitis in children. Cross-sectional, case-referent survey. General pediatric clinic at a military base in Ohio. One hundred fifty children with symptomatic pharyngitis and 150 controls matched for age and time of presentation over a 20-month study period. None. Anaerobic culture technique was used to improve isolation of beta-hemolytic streptococci. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci were detected significantly more often among the ill children than among the controls (39% vs 16%, respectively). In contrast, non-group A beta-hemolytic streptococci were isolated in similar frequency from the ill and control children (17% vs 21%, respectively). Non-group A beta-hemolytic streptococci from groups B, C, F, and G were each isolated in similar frequency among the ill and control children. The isolation rate of non-group A organisms increased with age among both patients and controls. Non-group A beta-hemolytic streptococci seemed not to be an important cause of sporadic pharyngitis in this pediatric population.

  16. PathwayAccess: CellDesigner plugins for pathway databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemert, John L; Dickerson, Julie A

    2010-09-15

    CellDesigner provides a user-friendly interface for graphical biochemical pathway description. Many pathway databases are not directly exportable to CellDesigner models. PathwayAccess is an extensible suite of CellDesigner plugins, which connect CellDesigner directly to pathway databases using respective Java application programming interfaces. The process is streamlined for creating new PathwayAccess plugins for specific pathway databases. Three PathwayAccess plugins, MetNetAccess, BioCycAccess and ReactomeAccess, directly connect CellDesigner to the pathway databases MetNetDB, BioCyc and Reactome. PathwayAccess plugins enable CellDesigner users to expose pathway data to analytical CellDesigner functions, curate their pathway databases and visually integrate pathway data from different databases using standard Systems Biology Markup Language and Systems Biology Graphical Notation. Implemented in Java, PathwayAccess plugins run with CellDesigner version 4.0.1 and were tested on Ubuntu Linux, Windows XP and 7, and MacOSX. Source code, binaries, documentation and video walkthroughs are freely available at http://vrac.iastate.edu/~jlv.

  17. [The effect of hydrophobicity of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in the process of adherence and biofilm production ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cell hydrophobicity and adherence to a substrate are one of the most important factors in biofilm formation. Group A streptococcus is an unstable and low biofilm productor. Importance of biofilm production in streptococcal pathogenesis is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of hydrophobicity and adherence on the biofilm production of group A streptococcal invasive and noninvasive isolates, and also to evaluate the stability of biofilm production in time function. Adherence, hydrophobicity and biofilm production were investigated in a total of 172 isolates divided into three groups: noninvasive, low invasive and highly invasive. Adher- ence to uncoated and laminin-coated microtiter plates and biofilm production after 12, 24 and 48 hours of incubation was determined using the method described by Stepanović et al. Hydrophobicity was measured using the MATH test by Rosenberg and SAT test by Lindhal. Correlation between adherence and biofilm produc- tion was detected in the group of noninvasive isolates. These isolates were stable biofilm productors during all three time periods of biofilm production. In the groups of invasive and noninvasive isolates no statistical correlation was detected among the analysed variables. The invasive isolates were un- stable biofilm productors. Noninvasive isolates were stable biofilm producers; as detected, they showed a direct correlation between adherence and biofilm production, and a negative impact of hydrophobicity on the biofilm production. Invasive isolates were unstable biofilm productors; it was observed that there was no correlation between adherence and hydrophobicity with biofilm production.

  18. The streptococcal collagen-like protein-1 (Scl1 is a significant determinant for biofilm formation by group a Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver-Kozup Heaven A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human-specific pathogen responsible for a number of diseases characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations. During host colonization GAS-cell aggregates or microcolonies are observed in tissues. GAS biofilm, which is an in vitro equivalent of tissue microcolony, has only recently been studied and little is known about the specific surface determinants that aid biofilm formation. In this study, we demonstrate that surface-associated streptococcal collagen-like protein-1 (Scl1 plays an important role in GAS biofilm formation. Results Biofilm formation by M1-, M3-, M28-, and M41-type GAS strains, representing an intraspecies breadth, were analyzed spectrophotometrically following crystal violet staining, and characterized using confocal and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The M41-type strain formed the most robust biofilm under static conditions, followed by M28- and M1-type strains, while the M3-type strains analyzed here did not form biofilm under the same experimental conditions. Differences in architecture and cell-surface morphology were observed in biofilms formed by the M1- and M41-wild-type strains, accompanied by varying amounts of deposited extracellular matrix and differences in cell-to-cell junctions within each biofilm. Importantly, all Scl1-negative mutants examined showed significantly decreased ability to form biofilm in vitro. Furthermore, the Scl1 protein expressed on the surface of a heterologous host, Lactococcus lactis, was sufficient to induce biofilm formation by this organism. Conclusions Overall, this work (i identifies variations in biofilm formation capacity among pathogenically different GAS strains, (ii identifies GAS surface properties that may aid in biofilm stability and, (iii establishes that the Scl1 surface protein is an important determinant of GAS biofilm, which is sufficient to enable biofilm formation in the heterologous host

  19. [A postpartum woman with toxic shock syndrome: group A streptococcal infection, a much feared postpartum complication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, K.; Kortekaas, J.C.; Buise, M.P.; Dokter, J.; Kuppens, S.M.; Hasaart, T.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The development of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) after an invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection in the postpartum period is a much feared complication. The mortality rate of TSS with necrotizing fasciitis is 30 to 50%. CASE DESCRIPTION: We present the case of a woman with atypical

  20. Defects in degradation of blood group A and B glycosphingolipids in Schindler and Fabry diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asfaw, B.; Ledvinova, J.; Dobrovolny, R.; Bakker, H.; Desnick, R.J.; Diggelen, O.P. van; Jong, J.G.N. de; Kanzaki, T.; Chabas, A.; Maire, I.; Conzelmann, E.; Schindler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Skin fibroblast cultures from patients with inherited lysosomal enzymopathies, alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NAGA) and alpha-galactosidase A deficiencies (Schindler and Fabry disease, respectively), and from normal controls were used to study in situ degradation of blood group A and B

  1. Is group A thawed plasma suitable as the first option for emergency release transfusion? (CME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhibber, Vishesh; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Bailey, Jeff; Weinstein, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Group AB plasma, which lacks anti-A and anti-B isohemagglutinins, is issued for emergency transfusion when a patient's ABO group is unknown, but the relative scarcity of group AB blood donors limits its availability. We sought to establish a thawed plasma inventory to improve the rapid availability of plasma in the emergency release setting but were concerned about potential wastage of group AB plasma. Recognizing that plasma-incompatible apheresis platelets are routinely transfused and only rarely result in hemolytic reactions if the donor is blood group O, and considering that group A plasma would be compatible with approximately 85% of our patient population, we instituted an emergency release policy whereby thawed group A plasma is issued to all patients of unknown blood group or if compatible plasma is not available. ABO-compatible plasma is then issued, if needed, once the patient's blood group is determined. We prospectively assessed the outcomes of all patients who received incompatible plasma under our policy. During the first 5 years under this policy, 385 emergency release requests for plasma were received by our blood bank. Among them, 23 group B or AB patients met criteria for receiving a median of 2 units of incompatible group A plasma. No hemolytic transfusion reactions or other adverse events related to transfusion were seen in any of these 23 patients. We propose that group A plasma may be an acceptable alternative to AB plasma as the first option in the emergency release setting. © 2014 AABB.

  2. Two cases of group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in premenopausal adults in a sexual health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Susan; Morgan, Jane

    2006-09-01

    Two cases of group A streptococcus (GAS) causing vulvovaginitis in premenopausal adults are described. A review of the literature of genital GAS is made, as this is an uncommon cause of vulvovaginitis in premenopausal adults. Contrasts are made between anogenital carriage of GAS and group B streptococcus (GBS) to highlight the differences in anogenital carriage between these two organisms.

  3. Reassortment Group A Rotavirus from Straw-colored Fruit Bat (Eidolon helvum)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-12-02

    In this podcast, Dr. Mathew Esona of the Division of Viral Diseases at CDC describes the discovery of a unique Group A rotavirus isolated from fruit bats in Kenya.  Created: 12/2/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.   Date Released: 12/2/2010.

  4. OCCURRENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI CLONAL GROUP A IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolates of Escherichia coli belonging to clonal group A (CGA), a recently described disseminated cause of drug-resistant urinary tract infections in humans, were present in four of seven sewage effluents collected from geographically dispersed areas of the United States. ...

  5. Localization of ultraviolet-induced excision repair in the nucleus and the distribution of repair events in higher order chromatin loops in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullenders, L.H.F.; Zeeland, A.A. van; Natarajan, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that eukaryotic DNA is arranged in highly supercoiled domains or loops, and that the repeating loops are constrained by attachment to a nuclear skeletal structure termed the nuclear matrix. We have investigated whether the repair of DNA damage occurs in the nuclear matrix compartment. Normal human fibroblasts, ultraviolet (u.v.)-irradiated with 30 J m/sup -2/ and post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea, did not show any evidence for the occurrence of repair synthesis at the nuclear matrix. 5 J m/sup -2/ repair synthesis seems to initiate at the nuclear matrix, although only part of the total repair could be localized there. In u.v.-irradiated (30 J m/sup -2/) normal human fibroblast post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea and arabinsosylcytosine for 2h, multiple single-stranded regions are generated in a DNA loop as a result of the inhibition of the excision repair process. Preferential repair of certain domains in the chromatin was shown to occur in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C (XP-C) in contrast to XP-D cells and Syrian hamster embryonic cells.

  6. The localization of ultraviolet-induced excision repair in the nucleus and the distribution of repair events in higher order chromatin loops in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullenders, L.H.F.; Zeeland, A.A. van; Natarajan, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that eukaryotic DNA is arranged in highly supercoiled domains or loops, and that the repeating loops are constrained by attachment to a nuclear skeletal structure termed the nuclear matrix. We have investigated whether the repair of DNA damage occurs in the nuclear matrix compartment. Normal human fibroblasts, ultraviolet (u.v.)-irradiated with 30 J m -2 and post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea, did not show any evidence for the occurrence of repair synthesis at the nuclear matrix. 5 J m -2 repair synthesis seems to initiate at the nuclear matrix, although only part of the total repair could be localized there. In u.v.-irradiated (30 J m -2 ) normal human fibroblast post-u.v. incubated in the presence of hydroxyurea and arabinsosylcytosine for 2h, multiple single-stranded regions are generated in a DNA loop as a result of the inhibition of the excision repair process. Preferential repair of certain domains in the chromatin was shown to occur in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group C (XP-C) in contrast to XP-D cells and Syrian hamster embryonic cells. (author)

  7. Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) localizes to centrosomes and functions in the maintenance of centrosome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunshin; Hwang, Soo Kyung; Lee, Mihee; Kwak, Heejin; Son, Kook; Yang, Jiha; Kim, Sung Hak; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2013-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins are known to play roles in the cellular response to DNA interstrand cross-linking lesions; however, several reports have suggested that FA proteins play additional roles. To elucidate novel functions of FA proteins, we used yeast two-hybrid screening to identify binding partners of the Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) protein. The candidate proteins included never-in-mitosis-gene A (NIMA)-related kinase 2 (Nek2), which functions in the maintenance of centrosome integrity. The interaction of FANCA and Nek2 was confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells. Furthermore, FANCA interacted with γ-tubulin and localized to centrosomes, most notably during the mitotic phase, confirming that FANCA is a centrosomal protein. Knockdown of FANCA increased the frequency of centrosomal abnormalities and enhanced the sensitivity of U2OS osteosarcoma cells to nocodazole, a microtubule-interfering agent. In vitro kinase assays indicated that Nek2 can phosphorylate FANCA at threonine-351 (T351), and analysis with a phospho-specific antibody confirmed that this phosphorylation occurred in response to nocodazole treatment. Furthermore, U2OS cells overexpressing the phosphorylation-defective T351A FANCA mutant showed numerical centrosomal abnormalities, aberrant mitotic arrest, and enhanced nocodazole sensitivity, implying that the Nek2-mediated T351 phosphorylation of FANCA is important for the maintenance of centrosomal integrity. Taken together, this study revealed that FANCA localizes to centrosomes and is required for the maintenance of centrosome integrity, possibly through its phosphorylation at T351 by Nek2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Repair of ultraviolet radiation damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells belonging to complementation group F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, H.; Ishizaki, K.; Yagi, T.; Takebe, H.; Inoue, M.; Sekiguchi, M.; Kyoto Univ.

    1981-01-01

    DNA-repair characteristics of xeroderma pigmentosum belonging to complementation group F were investigated. The cells exhibited an intermediate level of repair as measured in terms of (1) disappearance of T4 endonuclease-V-susceptible sites from DNA, (2) formation of ultraviolet-induced strand breaks in DNA, and (3) ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis during post-irradiation incubation. The impaired ability of XP3YO to perform unscheduled DNA synthesis was restored, to half the normal level, by the concomitant treatment with T4 endonuclease V and ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus. It is suggested that xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group F may be defective, at least in part, in the incision step of excision repair. (orig.)

  9. Developmental strategy fora new Group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVacR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prasad S; Jadhav, Suresh S; LaForce, F Marc

    2017-10-19

    Until recently, periodic Group A meningococcal meningitis outbreaks were a major public health problem in the sub-Saharan Africa. In 2001, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP), a partnership between the World Health Organization (WHO) and PATH, a Seattle-based NGO, and the Serum Institute of India Pvt Ltd (SIIPL) initiated discussions aimed at establishing a collaboration to develop a Group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine for this unmet medical need. Over the next 8 years the partnership made countless strategic decisions about product characteristics, raw materials, potential target populations, geographic prioritization and affordability of the vaccine to name a few. These decisions evolved into detailed plans for preclinical development, extensive field trials in Africa and India and a focused regulatory strategy specific for the Men A conjugate vaccine. Important characteristics of the process included, flexibility, transparency andeffective partnerships that included public agencies as well as private companies in Africa, Europe, the United States and India.

  10. Virulence of Group A Streptococci Is Enhanced by Human Complement Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermert, David; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Joeris, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an important human bacterial pathogen that can cause invasive infections. Once it colonizes its exclusively human host, GAS needs to surmount numerous innate immune defense mechanisms, including opsonization by complement and c...... in studies of GAS pathogenesis and for developing vaccines and therapeutics that rely on human complement activation for efficacy.......Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an important human bacterial pathogen that can cause invasive infections. Once it colonizes its exclusively human host, GAS needs to surmount numerous innate immune defense mechanisms, including opsonization by complement...... and consequent phagocytosis. Several strains of GAS bind to human-specific complement inhibitors, C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and/or Factor H (FH), to curtail complement C3 (a critical opsonin) deposition. This results in diminished activation of phagocytes and clearance of GAS that may lead to the host being...

  11. Diversity and population structure of Marine Group A bacteria in the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Allers, Elke; Wright, Jody J; Konwar, Kishori M; Howes, Charles G; Beneze, Erica; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Marine Group A (MGA) is a candidate phylum of Bacteria that is ubiquitous and abundant in the ocean. Despite being prevalent, the structural and functional properties of MGA populations remain poorly constrained. Here, we quantified MGA diversity and population structure in relation to nutrients and O2 concentrations in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean using a combination of catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) and ...

  12. New Highly Sensitive Real-Time PCR Assay for HIV-2 Group A and Group B DNA Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertine, Mélanie; Gueudin, Marie; Mélard, Adeline; Damond, Florence; Descamps, Diane; Matheron, Sophie; Collin, Fidéline; Rouzioux, Christine; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique

    2017-09-01

    HIV-2 infection is characterized by a very low replication rate in most cases and low progression. This necessitates an approach to patient monitoring that differs from that for HIV-1 infection. Here, a new highly specific and sensitive method for HIV-2 DNA quantification was developed. The new test is based on quantitative real-time PCR targeting the long terminal repeat (LTR) and gag regions and using an internal control. Analytical performance was determined in three laboratories, and clinical performance was determined on blood samples from 63 patients infected with HIV-2 group A ( n = 35) or group B ( n = 28). The specificity was 100%. The 95% limit of detection was three copies/PCR and the limit of quantification was six copies/PCR. The within-run coefficients of variation were between 1.03% at 3.78 log 10 copies/PCR and 27.02% at 0.78 log 10 copies/PCR. The between-run coefficient of variation was 5.10%. Both manual and automated nucleic acid extraction methods were validated. HIV-2 DNA loads were detectable in blood cells from all 63 patients. When HIV-2 DNA was quantifiable, median loads were significantly higher in antiretroviral-treated than in naive patients and were similar for groups A and B. HIV-2 DNA load was correlated with HIV-2 RNA load ( r = 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4 to 0.8; P < 0.0001). Our data show that this new assay is highly sensitive and quantifies the two main HIV-2 groups, making it useful for the diagnosis of HIV-2 infection and for pathogenesis studies on HIV-2 reservoirs. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Evaluation of group A1B erythrocytes converted to type as group O: studies of markers of function and compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Wei; Zhuo, Hai-Long; Zhang, Xue; Ji, Shou-Ping; Tan, Ying-Xia; Li, Su-Bo; Jia, Yan-Jun; Xu, Hua; Wu, Qing-Fa; Yun, Zhi-Min; Luo, Qun; Gong, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Enzymatic conversion of blood group A1B red blood cells (RBC) to group O RBC (ECO) was achieved by combined treatment with α-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function and safety of these A1B-ECO RBC in vitro. Materials and methods A 20% packed volume of A1B RBC was treated with enzymes in 250 mM glycine buffer, pH 6.8. The efficiency of the conversion of A and B antigen was evaluated by traditional typing in test tubes, gel column agglutination technology and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. The physiological and metabolic parameters of native and ECO RBC were compared, including osmotic fragility, erythrocyte deformation index, levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, ATP, methaemoglobin, free Na+, and free K+. The morphology of native and ECO RBC was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Residual α-galactosidase or α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in A1B-ECO RBC was detected by double-antibody sandwich ELISA method. Manual cross-matching was applied to ensure blood compatibility. Results The RBC agglutination tests and FACS results showed that A1B RBC were efficiently converted to O RBC. Functional analysis suggested that the conversion process had little impact on the physiological and metabolic parameters of the RBC. The residual amounts of either α-galactosidase or α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in the A1B-ECO RBC were less than 10 ng/mL of packed RBC. About 18% of group B and 55% of group O sera reacted with the A1B-ECO RBC in a sensitive gel column cross-matching test. Discussion The conversion process does not appear to affect the morphological, physiological or metabolic parameters of A1B-ECO RBC. However, the A1B-ECO RBC still reacted with some antigens. More research on group O and B sera, which may partly reflect the complexity of group A1 the safety of A1B-ECO RBC is necessary before the application of these RBC in clinical transfusion. PMID:26509826

  14. Vismodegib Therapy for Basal Cell Carcinoma in an 8-Year-Old Chinese Boy with Xeroderma Pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Douglas; Laitinen, Marko A; Myers, David J; Landsteiner, Pamela B

    2017-03-01

    Vismodegib is an oral inhibitor of the Hedgehog signaling pathway and has been used to treat basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in adults. This article reports clearance of a nodular BCC of the nasal tip in an 8-year-old boy with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). BCC can pose therapeutic challenges when located in areas that are not amenable to traditional therapies such as Mohs micrographic surgery or topical agents. Vismodegib was used at a dose of 150 mg/day to treat the boy's BCC. After 4 months of therapy, we achieved complete clinical clearance. During 21 months of follow-up, the patient's nose remained clinically clear of tumor. Vismodegib was successfully used to treat a child with XP and nodular BCC. Our goal in using vismodegib was tumor regression while avoiding cosmetic and functional disfigurement. Vismodegib was effective in clinically clearing the tumor, and the patient has shown no signs of recurrence. Further studies are warranted. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 and Ki-67 in nonmelanoma skin cancer in xeroderma pigmentosum and non-xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hawary, Amira K; Yassin, Eman; Khater, Ashraf; Abdelgaber, Soheir

    2013-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a heterogenous group of genetic diseases in which basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and Ki-67 in SCC and BCC from patients with and without XP to elucidate their roles in the pathogenesis of these highly aggressive tumors in patients with XP. Immunolabeling using MMP-13 and Ki-67 antibodies was performed on tissue sections derived from skin biopsies of SCC and BCC of 15 patients with XP and 40 non-XP patients. There was no significant difference between XP and non-XP patients as regards MMP-13 expression by epithelial and stromal cells of SCC or BCC. Ki-67 expression in SCC and BCC of patients with XP was significantly higher than in non-XP patients. We concluded that the higher expression of Ki-67 in NMSC of patients with XP than of non-XP patients may reflect the growth and invasive capacity of these tumors in patients with XP. MMP-13 is expressed by tumor epithelial cells, stromal and inflammatory cells of NMSC of both XP and non-XP patients.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Group A Rotaviruses in Water Sources and Selected Raw Vegetables in Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, W. B.; Page, N. A.; Grabow, W. O. K.; Steele, A. D.; Taylor, M. B.

    2006-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are the most important cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children. In this study raw and treated drinking water supplies at plants in two geographic areas, as well as selected irrigation water and corresponding raw vegetables in three regions of southern Africa, were screened for the presence of RVs using molecular techniques. Group A RVs were detected in 11.8% of partially treated and 1.7% of finally treated drinking water samples and in 14% of irrigation water samples and 1.7% of corresponding raw vegetable samples. Type-specific reverse transcriptase-PCR and sequence analysis revealed the presence of multiple types (G1, G2, G8, and G9) in irrigation water and single types (G1 or G3) in raw and treated drinking water. Group A RVs detected in all samples consisted of mixed P types (P[4], P[6], P[8], and P[9]), with P[6] predominating. The detection of types G8, G9, and P[6] reflects the emergence of these types in clinical infections. The similarity of environmental types to those in patients with clinical RV infections confirms the value of wastewater screening as a tool for assessing RVs circulating in communities, with the benefit of detecting types that cause both clinical and subclinical infections. The results provide new information on RV types in water and related environments and identify the potential risk of waterborne transmission. In addition, the presence of RVs in drinking water underlines shortcomings in quality specifications. These data provide valuable information regarding the prevalence of RVs in environmental sources, with important implications for vaccine development. PMID:16820443

  17. Development of a Real-time PCR test for porcine group A rotavirus diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marconi, Elizabeth C.M.; Bernardes, Nara T.C.G.; Beserra, Laila A.R.; Silva, Fernanda D.F.; Gregori, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and several animal species. A SYBR-Green Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to diagnose RVA from porcine fecal samples, targeting amplification of a 137-bp fragment of nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5) gene using mRNA of bovine NADH-desidrogenase-5 as exogenous internal control. Sixty-five samples were tested (25 tested positive for conventional PCR and genetic sequencing). The overall agreement (...

  18. Diagnosis and management of group A streptococcal pharyngitis and associated complications [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Michelle N; Sanders, Jennifere E; Wilson, Bryan

    2017-12-21

    Although group A Streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis is the most common cause of bacterial pharyngitis in children and adolescents, many viral and bacterial infections mimic the symptoms of GAS pharyngitis. Emergency clinicians must recognize the symptomatology of GAS pharyngitis and use appropriate means of diagnosis and treatment to promote good antibiotic stewardship. This issue reviews the signs and symptoms of GAS pharyngitis, as well as associated complications, and provides recommendations for appropriate treatment that focuses on reducing the severity and duration of symptoms, reducing the incidence of nonsuppurative complications, and reducing transmission. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  19. Blood group A and Rh(D)-negativity are associated with symptomatic West Nile virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidarova, Zhanna; Bravo, Marjorie D.; Kamel, Hany T.; Custer, Brian S; Busch, Michael P.; Lanteri, Marion C.

    2016-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) infection is mostly asymptomatic but 20% of subjects report WNV fever and 1% of patients experience neurological diseases with higher rates in elderly and immunosuppressed persons. With no treatment and no vaccine to prevent the development of symptomatic infections, it is essential to understand prognostic factors influencing symptomatic disease outcome. Host genetic background has been linked to the development of WNV neuroinvasive disease. The present study investigates the association between the ABO and Rh(D) blood group status and WNV disease outcome. Study Design and Methods The distribution of blood groups was investigated within a cohort of 374 WNV+ blood donors including 244 asymptomatic (AS) and 130 symptomatic (S) WNV+ blood donors. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations between A, B, O and Rh(D) blood groups and WNV clinical disease outcome. Results Symptomatic WNV+ donors exhibited increased frequencies of blood group A (S 47.6% AS 36.8%, P=0.04, OR [95%CI] 1.56 [1.01–2.40]) and Rh(D)-negative individuals (S 21.5% AS 13.1%, P=0.03, OR [95%CI] 1.82 [1.04–3.18]). Conclusion The findings suggest a genetic susceptibility placing blood group A and Rh(D)-negative individuals at risk for the development of symptomatic disease outcome after WNV infection. PMID:27189860

  20. Expression of the Fanconi anemia group A gene (Fanca) during mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Issa, R; Eichele, G; Youssoufian, H

    1999-07-15

    About 80% of all cases of Fanconi anemia (FA) can be accounted for by complementation groups A and C. To understand the relationship between these groups, we analyzed the expression pattern of the mouse FA group-A gene (Fanca) during embryogenesis and compared it with the known pattern of the group-C gene (Fancc). Northern analysis of RNA from mouse embryos at embryonic days 7, 11, 15, and 17 showed a predominant 4.5 kb band in all stages. By in situ hybridization, Fanca transcripts were found in the whisker follicles, teeth, brain, retina, kidney, liver, and limbs. There was also stage-specific variation in Fanca expression, particularly within the developing whiskers and the brain. Some tissues known to express Fancc (eg, gut) failed to show Fanca expression. These observations show that (1) Fanca is under both tissue- and stage-specific regulation in several tissues; (2) the expression pattern of Fanca is consistent with the phenotype of the human disease; and (3) Fanca expression is not necessarily coupled to that of Fancc. The presence of distinct tissue targets for FA genes suggests that some of the variability in the clinical phenotype can be attributed to the complementation group assignment.

  1. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo.

  2. DNase Sda1 allows invasive M1T1 Group A Streptococcus to prevent TLR9-dependent recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS has developed a broad arsenal of virulence factors that serve to circumvent host defense mechanisms. The virulence factor DNase Sda1 of the hyperinvasive M1T1 GAS clone degrades DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps allowing GAS to escape extracellular killing. TLR9 is activated by unmethylated CpG-rich bacterial DNA and enhances innate immune resistance. We hypothesized that Sda1 degradation of bacterial DNA could alter TLR9-mediated recognition of GAS by host innate immune cells. We tested this hypothesis using a dual approach: loss and gain of function of DNase in isogenic GAS strains and presence and absence of TLR9 in the host. Either DNA degradation by Sda1 or host deficiency of TLR9 prevented GAS induced IFN-α and TNF-α secretion from murine macrophages and contributed to bacterial survival. Similarly, in a murine necrotizing fasciitis model, IFN-α and TNF-α levels were significantly decreased in wild type mice infected with GAS expressing Sda1, whereas no such Sda1-dependent effect was seen in a TLR9-deficient background. Thus GAS Sda1 suppressed both the TLR9-mediated innate immune response and macrophage bactericidal activity. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of bacterial innate immune evasion based on autodegradation of CpG-rich DNA by a bacterial DNase.

  3. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  4. In vitro phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitors from Fanconi anemia group A knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Paula; Segovia, José Carlos; Hanenberg, Helmut; Casado, José Antonio; Martínez, Jesús; Göttsche, Kerstin; Cheng, Ngan Ching; Van de Vrugt, Henri J; Arwert, Fré; Joenje, Hans; Bueren, Juan A

    2002-09-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition. So far, 8 complementation groups have been identified, although mutations in FANCA account for the disease in the majority of FA patients. In this study we characterized the hematopoietic phenotype of a Fanca knockout mouse model and corrected the main phenotypic characteristics of the bone marrow (BM) progenitors using retroviral vectors. The hematopoiesis of these animals was characterized by a modest though significant thrombocytopenia, consistent with reduced numbers of BM megakaryocyte progenitors. As observed in other FA models, the hematopoietic progenitors from Fanca(-/-) mice were highly sensitive to mitomycin C (MMC). In addition, we observed for the first time in a FA mouse model a marked in vitro growth defect of Fanca(-/-) progenitors, either when total BM or when purified Lin(-)Sca-1(+) cells were subjected to in vitro stimulation. Liquid cultures of Fanca(-/-) BM that were stimulated with stem cell factor plus interleukin-11 produced low numbers of granulocyte macrophage colony-forming units, contained a high proportion of apoptotic cells, and generated a decreased proportion of granulocyte versus macrophage cells, compared to normal BM cultures. Aiming to correct the phenotype of Fanca(-/-) progenitors, purified Lin(-)Sca-1(+) cells were transduced with retroviral vectors encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and human FANCA genes. Lin(-)Sca-1(+) cells from Fanca(-/-) mice were transduced with an efficiency similar to that of samples from wild-type mice. More significantly, transductions with FANCA vectors corrected both the MMC hypersensitivity as well as the impaired ex vivo expansion ability that characterized the BM progenitors of Fanca(-/-) mice.

  5. Group A rotavirus in Brazilian bats: description of novel T15 and H15 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Karen Miyuki; Gregori, Fabio; Hora, Aline Santana; Scheffer, Karin Corrêa; Fahl, Willian Oliveira; Iamamoto, Keila; Mori, Enio; Silva, Fernanda Dornelas Florentino; Taniwaki, Sueli Akemi; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to survey for group A rotaviruses (RVA) in bats from Brazil and to perform phylogenetic inferences for VP4, VP7, NSP3, NSP4 and NSP5 genes. RVA was found in 9.18 % (28/305) of tested samples. The partial genotype constellation of a Molossus molossus RVA strain was G3-P[3]-Ix-Rx-Cx-Mx-Ax-Nx-T3-E3-H6, and that of a Glossophaga soricina RVA strain was G20-P[x]-Ix-Rx-Cx-Mx-Ax-Nx-T15-Ex-H15. These findings demonstrate an important role of bats in RVA epidemiology and provide evidence of participation of bat RVA strains in interspecies transmission and reassortment events.

  6. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ki Tsoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of group A streptococcus from pharyngeal isolates in Auckland, New Zealand, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Deborah A; Moreland, Nicole J; Carter, Philip; Upton, Arlo; Morgan, Julie; Proft, Thomas; Lennon, Diana; Baker, Michael G; Dunbar, Rod; Fraser, John D

    2014-01-24

    To describe the molecular epidemiology of emm types associated with circulating pharyngeal group A streptococcus (GAS) isolates in Auckland, New Zealand. GAS isolates were collected over a 10-day period from a community pathology provider in Auckland. PCR analysis and sequencing of the emm gene was performed at the Institute of Environmental Science and Research. A total of 52 emm types were identified from 278 GAS isolates. The three most common emm types were emm1, emm89 and emm12. Overall, the experimental 30-valent GAS M protein vaccine covered 19 / 52 (37%) of emm types in our study. Our study provides baseline data on the circulating pharyngeal GAS emm types in Auckland. Future clinical and molecular surveillance of GAS pharyngitis is essential in the context of ongoing GAS vaccine development.

  8. Development of a Real-time PCR test for porcine group A rotavirus diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C.M. Marconi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Rotavirus (RVA is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and several animal species. A SYBR-Green Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR was developed to diagnose RVA from porcine fecal samples, targeting amplification of a 137-bp fragment of nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5 gene using mRNA of bovine NADH-desidrogenase-5 as exogenous internal control. Sixty-five samples were tested (25 tested positive for conventional PCR and genetic sequencing. The overall agreement (kappa was 0.843, indicating 'very good' concordance between tests, presenting 100% of relative sensitivity (25+ Real Time PCR/25+ Conventional PCR and 87.5% of relative sensitivity (35- Real Time PCR/40- Conventional PCR. The results also demonstrated high intra- and inter-assay reproducibility (coefficient of variation ≤1.42%; thus, this method proved to be a fast and sensitive approach for the diagnosis of RVA in pigs.

  9. Group A Streptococcal Endometritis: Report of an Outbreak and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad A Memish

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of group A streptococcus (gas postpartum endometritis were diagnosed within 24 h following uncomplicated vaginal delivery. Investigation by the infection control service identified all 10 obstetric personnel who performed any invasive procedure on both cases. These personnel were questioned about a recent history of sore throat, skin lesions, vaginal or rectal symptoms. Throat and rectal cultures were obtained for gas from all 10 personnel. A carrier was identified among the personnel screened. This nurse was removed from direct patient care and treated with a two-week course of oral clindamycin and rifampin with documentation of carrier eradication of gas at the end of therapy, 30 days, 60 days and six months post-treatment. All three isolated strains were identical by restriction endonuclease analysis and by M and T typing. Rapid implementation of infection control measures were successful in arresting this outbreak, with no further cases of gas occurring in the subsequent year.

  10. SUMMARY OF GENERAL WORKING GROUP A+B+D: CODES BENCHMARKING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI, J.; SHAPOSHNIKOVA, E.; ZIMMERMANN, F.; HOFMANN, I.

    2006-05-29

    Computer simulation is an indispensable tool in assisting the design, construction, and operation of accelerators. In particular, computer simulation complements analytical theories and experimental observations in understanding beam dynamics in accelerators. The ultimate function of computer simulation is to study mechanisms that limit the performance of frontier accelerators. There are four goals for the benchmarking of computer simulation codes, namely debugging, validation, comparison and verification: (1) Debugging--codes should calculate what they are supposed to calculate; (2) Validation--results generated by the codes should agree with established analytical results for specific cases; (3) Comparison--results from two sets of codes should agree with each other if the models used are the same; and (4) Verification--results from the codes should agree with experimental measurements. This is the summary of the joint session among working groups A, B, and D of the HI32006 Workshop on computer codes benchmarking.

  11. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, Pierre R.; Frost, Hannah R. C.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates. PMID:26101780

  12. Erythromycine resistance in streptococcus pyogenes group a throat isolates in sukkur city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, B.

    2007-01-01

    To examine and evaluate the predominant and common etiologic agent(s) of pharyngitis in Sukkur city and to determine their current antibiotic susceptibility/resistance trends. Out of 257 throat samples, 149 positive for Streptococcus pyogenes Group A between November 2001 and May 2003 from adult population of Sukkur city were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin, azithromycin and clairithromycin. The throat samples (swabs) were examined by Gram-stain, API system, and for presence of a hemolysis. Samples were further cultured on Muller Hinton agar for determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The sensitivity was performed on only those samples which were positive for S. pyogenes. Of all throat isolates, 95% were predominantly resistant to erythromycin. Their sensitivity towards clindamycin was 30%, azithromycin 44% and clairithromycin 76% respectively. The current pharyngeal isolates of S. pyogenes exhibited frequent and alarmingly high erythromycin resistance which may be due to both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. (author)

  13. [Tonsillopharyngitis outbreak caused by foodborne group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Vera, Juan; Figueroa Murillo, Estrella; Cruz Calderón, María Victoria; Pérez Alonso, Aránzazu

    2011-08-01

    Although infrequent, some authors have reported outbreaks of foodborne tonsillopharyngitis. On May 11, 2010 a series of cases of tonsillopharyngitis among those attending a fellowship meeting on 8 March was notified to the Epidemiological Surveillance Network in Andalusia (SVEA). The aim of this study is to epidemiologically characterise the outbreak. Descriptive analysis of reported cases and case - control exposure to the implicated food. The variables taken into account were age, sex, symptoms and start date. Sources of information used were the records of the SVEA and individual digital report (DIRAYA). Frequencies and attack rates were calculated, and a Bayesian analysis for the comparison of difference in proportions of disease was carried out for a 95% probability or credibility range (IP). Among the 130 attendees at a communion 41 cases of tonsillopharyngitis (attack rate 31.5%) were detected, and in smears Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated. The most affected age group was the 25-44 year-olds, 16 (39,0%); 68.6% (24) female. The egg salad showed a probability greater than 80% P(Δ>0.10 and Δ>0.15) for a 95% IP of risk of disease after intake and a probability of having a lower risk of no disease. It was a Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal outbreak, the epidemiological evidence indicates exposure to common single source, hence the hypothesis of dietary origin, the implicated food was egg salad. Contributing factors could be cross-contamination after preparation favoured by the bad practice and the conditions of the place.

  14. Rapid antigen group A streptococcus test to diagnose pharyngitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily H Stewart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharyngitis management guidelines include estimates of the test characteristics of rapid antigen streptococcus tests (RAST using a non-systematic approach. OBJECTIVE: To examine the sensitivity and specificity, and sources of variability, of RAST for diagnosing group A streptococcal (GAS pharyngitis. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Cochrane Reviews, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Scopus, SciELO, CINAHL, guidelines, 2000-2012. STUDY SELECTION: Culture as reference standard, all languages. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Study characteristics, quality. MAIN OUTCOME(S AND MEASURE(S: Sensitivity, specificity. RESULTS: We included 59 studies encompassing 55,766 patients. Forty three studies (18,464 patients fulfilled the higher quality definition (at least 50 patients, prospective data collection, and no significant biases and 16 (35,634 patients did not. For the higher quality immunochromatographic methods in children (10,325 patients, heterogeneity was high for sensitivity (inconsistency [I(2] 88% and specificity (I(2 86%. For enzyme immunoassay in children (342 patients, the pooled sensitivity was 86% (95% CI, 79-92% and the pooled specificity was 92% (95% CI, 88-95%. For the higher quality immunochromatographic methods in the adult population (1,216 patients, the pooled sensitivity was 91% (95% CI, 87 to 94% and the pooled specificity was 93% (95% CI, 92 to 95%; however, heterogeneity was modest for sensitivity (I(2 61% and specificity (I(2 72%. For enzyme immunoassay in the adult population (333 patients, the pooled sensitivity was 86% (95% CI, 81-91% and the pooled specificity was 97% (95% CI, 96 to 99%; however, heterogeneity was high for sensitivity and specificity (both, I(2 88%. CONCLUSIONS: RAST immunochromatographic methods appear to be very sensitive and highly specific to diagnose group A streptococcal pharyngitis among adults but not in children. We could not identify sources of variability among higher quality studies. The

  15. Comparative studies of host-cell reactivation, cellular capacity and enhanced reactivation of herpes simplex virus in normal, xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, D.K.G.; Rainbow, A.J.; McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario

    1986-01-01

    Host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), capacity of UV-irradiated cells to support HSV-2 plaque formation and UV-enhanced reactivation (UVER) of UV-irradiated HSV-2 were examined in fibroblasts from 4 patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), 5 with xeroderma pigmentosum and 5 normals. The results indicate that delayed capacity for HSV-2 plaque formation is a more sensitive assay than HCR in the detection of cellular DNA-repair deficiency for XP and CS. For the examination of UVER, fibroblasts were irradiated with various UV doses and subsequently infected with either unirradiated or UV-irradiated HSV and scored for plaque formation 2 days later. UVER expression was maximum when the delay between UV-irradiation of the cells and HSV infection was 48 h. (Auth.)

  16. DNA repair and ultraviolet mutagenesis in cells from a new patient with xeroderma pigmentosum group G and Cockayne syndrome resemble xeroderma pigmentosum cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S-I. Moriwaki; M. Stefanini (Miria); A.R. Lehmann (Alan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J.H. Robbins; I. Rapin; E. Botta (Elena); B. Tanganelli; W. Vermeulen (Wim); B.C. Broughton; K.H. Kraemer (Kenneth)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractXeroderma pigmentosum (XP)/Cockayne syndrome (CS) complex is a combination of clinical features of two rare genetic disorders in one individual. A sun-sensitive boy (XP20BE) who had severe symptoms of CS, with dwarfism, microcephaly, retinal degeneration, and mental impairment, had

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-05-0198 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-05-0198 ref|XP_001163354.1| PREDICTED: T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia ...1 isoform 1 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001163426.1| PREDICTED: T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 isoform 2 [...Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_513389.2| PREDICTED: T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 isoform 3 [Pan troglodytes] XP_001163354.1 1e-174 91% ...

  18. Differing Efficacies of Lead Group A Streptococcal Vaccine Candidates and Full-Length M Protein in Cutaneous and Invasive Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rivera-Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is an important human pathogen responsible for both superficial infections and invasive diseases. Autoimmune sequelae may occur upon repeated infection. For this reason, development of a vaccine against GAS represents a major challenge, since certain GAS components may trigger autoimmunity. We formulated three combination vaccines containing the following: (i streptolysin O (SLO, interleukin 8 (IL-8 protease (Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope proteinase [SpyCEP], group A streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA, arginine deiminase (ADI, and trigger factor (TF; (ii the conserved M-protein-derived J8 peptide conjugated to ADI; and (iii group A carbohydrate lacking the N-acetylglucosamine side chain conjugated to ADI. We compared these combination vaccines to a “gold standard” for immunogenicity, full-length M1 protein. Vaccines were adjuvanted with alum, and mice were immunized on days 0, 21, and 28. On day 42, mice were challenged via cutaneous or subcutaneous routes. High-titer antigen-specific antibody responses with bactericidal activity were detected in mouse serum samples for all vaccine candidates. In comparison with sham-immunized mice, all vaccines afforded protection against cutaneous challenge. However, only full-length M1 protein provided protection in the subcutaneous invasive disease model.

  19. Prospective Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease, Fiji, 2005–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenney, Adam; Kado, Joseph; Good, Michael F.; Batzloff, Michael; Waqatakirewa, Lepani; Mullholland, E. Kim; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    We undertook a prospective active surveillance study of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) disease in Fiji over a 23-month period, 2005–2007. We identified 64 cases of invasive GAS disease, which represents an average annualized all-ages incidence of 9.9 cases/100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.6–12.6). Rates were highest in those >65 years of age and in those <5 years, particularly in infants, for whom the incidence was 44.9/100,000 (95% CI 18.1–92.5). The case-fatality rate was 32% and was associated with increasing age and underlying coexisting disease, including diabetes and renal disease. Fifty-five of the GAS isolates underwent emm sequence typing; the types were highly diverse, with 38 different emm subtypes and no particular dominant type. Our data support the view that invasive GAS disease is common in developing countries and deserves increased public health attention. PMID:19193265

  20. Intensive care management of severe hypernatraemia in the context of group A streptococcal septicaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Bethan; Jesty, Robert; Uddin, Shahana; Metaxa, Victoria

    2018-04-26

    This case describes a 54-year-old woman with exudative eczema, who was admitted to the intensive care unit with a serum sodium concentration of 191 mmol/L, secondary to profound dehydration in the context of group A streptococcal septicaemia. Successful rehydration and electrolyte normalisation was achieved with continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), the replacement fluid of which was infused with hypertonic saline to limit the rate of sodium reduction. This case report comments on three areas of interest. First, hypernatraemia of this level is unusual. Second, the infusion of hypertonic saline into the replacement fluid of the CVVHDF filter is not common practice but successfully ensured a controlled reduction in serum sodium concentration while aggressively replacing a 9 L water deficit. Third, the notable physiological reserve demonstrated by the patient: despite an extraordinary serum sodium concentration in the context of overwhelming streptococcal septicaemia, she has made a full cognitive recovery. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Antibiotic Susceptibility Evaluation of Group A Streptococcus Isolated from Children with Pharyngitis: A Study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyahfar, Shirin; Fahimzad, Alireza; Naddaf, Amir; Tavassoli, Sara

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Group A streptococcus (GAS) to antibiotics usually used in Iran for treatment of GAS pharyngitis in children. From 2011 to 2013, children 3-15 years of age with acute tonsillopharyngitis who attended Mofid Children's Hospital clinics and emergency ward and did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in a prospective study in a sequential manner. The isolates strains from throat culture were identified as GAS by colony morphology, gram staining, beta hemolysis on blood agar, sensitivity to bacitracin, a positive pyrrolidonyl aminopeptidase (PYR) test result, and the presence of Lancefield A antigen determined by agglutination test. Antimicrobial susceptibility was identified by both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods. From 200 children enrolled in this study, 59 (30%) cases were culture positive for GAS. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G. The prevalence of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin resistance by broth dilution method was 33.9%, 57.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. Surprisingly, 8.4% of GAS strains were resistant to rifampin. In this study, 13.5% and 32.2% of the strains were resistant to clindamycin and ofloxacin, respectively. The high rate of resistance of GAS to some antibiotics in this study should warn physicians, especially in Iran, to use antibiotics restrictedly and logically to prevent the rising of resistance rates in future. It also seems that continuous local surveillance is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic option for GAS treatment.

  2. Serological Evidence of Immune Priming by Group A Streptococci in Patients with Acute Rheumatic Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy M Raynes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever (ARF is an autoimmune response to Group A Streptococcus (GAS infection. Repeated GAS exposures are proposed to ‘prime’ the immune system for autoimmunity. This notion of immune-priming by multiple GAS infections was first postulated in the 1960s, but direct experimental evidence to support the hypothesis has been lacking. Here we present novel methodology, based on antibody responses to GAS T‑antigens, that enables previous GAS exposures to be mapped in patient sera. T-antigens are surface expressed, type specific antigens and GAS strains fall into 18 major clades or T-types. A panel of recombinant T-antigens was generated and immunoassays were performed in parallel with serum depletion experiments allowing type-specific T‑antigen antibodies to be distinguished from cross-reactive antibodies. At least two distinct GAS exposures were detected in each of the ARF sera tested. Furthermore, no two sera had the same T-antigen reactivity profile suggesting that each patient was exposed to a unique series of GAS T‑types prior to developing ARF. The methods have provided much-needed experimental evidence to substantiate the immune-priming hypothesis, and will facilitate further serological profiling studies that explore the multifaceted interactions between GAS and the host.

  3. [Group A streptococcus-induced toxic shock syndrome in pregnancy: a case report of cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kumiko; Fukuda, Taeko; Kimura, Maiko; Hagiya, Keiichi; Danmura, Masato; Nakayama, Shin; Ogura, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Makoto

    2012-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS)-induced toxic shock syndrome (TSS) in pregnancy is rare, but its clinical course is fulminant. The mortality rates of mother and fetus are reported to be 58 and 66%, respectively. We report a case of GAS-TSS after cesarean section. A 38-year-old pregnant woman of 38 weeks gestation was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, fever of 39 degrees C, and continuous abdominal pain with scanty genital bleeding. She had complained of sore throat several days before. One hour after admission, external fetal monitoring revealed periodic pulse deceleration to 90 x beats min(-1). The emergent cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia. Approximately 8 hours after the cesarean section, she developed coma, shock and respiratory insufficiency requiring intubation. Streptococcus pyogens were isolated from her blood sample and the patient met criteria for GAS-TSS. She was treated with antibiotics (penicillin and clindamycin), antithrombin III, recomodulin, catecholamins, and continuous hemodialysis with filtration of toxins. Although the patient recovered and was discharged on 63rd day, the infant died on postpartum day 4. Early recognition and intensive treatment for GAS is recommended in a late stage pregnancy with an episode of sore throat, vomiting, high fever, strong labor pain, and DIC signs.

  4. A Cluster of Paediatric Invasive Group A Streptococcal and Chicken Pox Infections

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, C

    2018-03-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a variety of acute clinical syndromes from pharyngitis and scarlet fever commonly seen in primary care to more severe life-threatening invasive disease. Invasive GAS, categorised into three groups - necrotising fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and sepsis with or without an identifiable source of infection- is a notifiable disease to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)1. Laboratory criteria for a confirmed case require isolation of GAS from a normally sterile site. The HPSC previously reported a marked increase in the incidence of invasive GAS infections from 1.65\\/100,000 population in 2011 to 3.65\\/100,000 in 20132. The increased incidence was notable also for a 300% increase in the proportion of invasive GAS cases in children. After a slight decrease in incidence in 20153 (2.3\\/100000), we noted a cluster of invasive GAS cases referred to the paediatric infectious disease (PID) department of Children’s University Hospital (CUH), Temple Street, in 2016. We sought to further characterise this cluster of paediatric invasive GAS infections.

  5. ABO blood grouping: A potential risk factor for early childhood caries - A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraju, Lavanya; Jeevanandan, Ganesh; Subramanian, E M G

    2018-01-01

    The paradigm of etiology of early childhood caries (ECC) is shifting toward genetics. Of various inherited factors, blood group of an individual is genetically determined. The aim of the study is to determine if blood group of an individual will serve as a potential risk factor in the development of ECC. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Chennai. Blood samples were collected from a total of 500 children age for determination of the blood group. Of which 96 children (24 per blood group) were randomly selected and were included in the study. Oral screening of the selected children was done by a pediatric dentist who was blinded to the blood group of the children. Decayed, extracted, and filling index was noted. Details on other associated factors for the development of ECC such as the socioeconomic status, oral hygiene measures, diet, and feeding practices were collected by directly interviewing the parents through a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc Tukey test with significance level set at 0.05. Intergroup analysis of the associated factors showed no significant differences between the children of different blood groups. A statistically significant relation was noted between the blood groups and development of ECC (P = 0.025). Blood group is a potential risk indicator for the development of ECC.

  6. Group A T-loop for differential moment mechanics: an implant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Renato Parsekian; Buschang, Peter H; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga

    2009-02-01

    When anchorage control is critical and compliance is less than ideal, efficient treatment depends on differential tooth movements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distal tipping of partially retracted canines and the mesial movement of the molars. Eleven patients had their maxillary and mandibular canines partially retracted with TMA (Ormco Corp, Orange, Calif) T-loop springs with 45 degrees gable bends distal to the loops preactivated for group A (maximum anchorage). Metallic bone markers served as references. The canines were retracted until enough space was available for alignment of the incisors without proclination. Oblique (45 degrees) radiographs were taken immediately before the initial activation and after partial retraction. The radiographs were scanned, superimposed on the bone markers, and measured digitally. The mandibular canine crowns were retracted (4.1 +/-1.9 mm) and intruded (0.7 +/- 0.3 mm) by uncontrolled tipping. In contrast, the maxillary canine crowns were retracted (3.2 +/- 1.4 mm) by controlled tipping. The maxillary and mandibular molars crowns were protracted by similar amounts (1.0 +/- 0.6 and 1.2 +/-1.2 mm, respectively) by controlled tipping, without significant extrusion. The molars were protracted approximately 0.3 mm for every 1 mm of canine retraction. The T-loop spring used in this investigation produced controlled tipping of the maxillary canines, but it did not produce controlled tipping of the mandibular canines or translation of the molar as expected.

  7. Screening strategies for a highly polymorphic gene: DHPLC analysis of the Fanconi anemia group A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischewski, J; Schneppenheim, R

    2001-01-30

    Patients with Fanconi anemia (Fanc) are at risk of developing leukemia. Mutations of the group A gene (FancA) are most common. A multitude of polymorphisms and mutations within the 43 exons of the gene are described. To examine the role of heterozygosity as a risk factor for malignancies, a partially automatized screening method to identify aberrations was needed. We report on our experience with DHPLC (WAVE (Transgenomic)). PCR amplification of all 43 exons from one individual was performed on one microtiter plate on a gradient thermocycler. DHPLC analysis conditions were established via melting curves, prediction software, and test runs with aberrant samples. PCR products were analyzed twice: native, and after adding a WT-PCR product. Retention patterns were compared with previously identified polymorphic PCR products or mutants. We have defined the mutation screening conditions for all 43 exons of FancA using DHPLC. So far, 40 different sequence variations have been detected in more than 100 individuals. The native analysis identifies heterozygous individuals, and the second run detects homozygous aberrations. Retention patterns are specific for the underlying sequence aberration, thus reducing sequencing demand and costs. DHPLC is a valuable tool for reproducible recognition of known sequence aberrations and screening for unknown mutations in the highly polymorphic FancA gene.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Avian Rotaviruses Group A and D shed by different bird species in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Maude; Oni, Oluwole O; Sausy, Aurélie; Owoade, Ademola A; Adeyefa, Christopher A O; Muller, Claude P; Hübschen, Judith M; Snoeck, Chantal J

    2017-06-12

    Avian rotaviruses (RVs) cause gastrointestinal diseases of birds worldwide. However, prevalence, diversity, epidemiology and phylogeny of RVs remain largely under-investigated in Africa. Fecal samples from 349 birds (158 symptomatic, 107 asymptomatic and 84 birds without recorded health status) were screened by reverse transcription PCR to detect RV groups A and D (RVA and RVD). Partial gene sequences of VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP4 for RVA, and of VP6 and VP7 for RVD were obtained and analyzed to infer phylogenetic relationship. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression were applied to identify factors potentially influencing virus shedding in chickens. A high prevalence of RVA (36.1%; 126/349) and RVD (31.8%; 111/349) shedding was revealed in birds. In chickens, RV shedding was age-dependent and highest RVD shedding rates were found in commercial farms. No negative health effect could be shown, and RVA and RVD shedding was significantly more likely in asymptomatic chickens: RVA/RVD were detected in 51.9/48.1% of the asymptomatic chickens, compared to 18.9/29.7% of the symptomatic chickens (p epidemiology, diversity and classification of avian RVA and RVD in Nigeria. We show that cross-species transmission of host permissive RV strains occurs when different bird species are mixed.

  9. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection and Vaccine Implications, Auckland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Atheer; Stewart, Joanna; Trenholme, Adrian; Drinkovic, Dragana; Peat, Briar; Taylor, Susan; Read, Kerry; Roberts, Sally; Voss, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection and the potential effects of a multivalent GAS vaccine in New Zealand. During January 2005–December 2006, we conducted prospective population-based laboratory surveillance of Auckland residents admitted to all public hospitals with isolation of GAS from normally sterile sites. Using emm typing, we identified 225 persons with confirmed invasive GAS infection (median 53 years of age; range 0–97 years). Overall incidence was 8.1 cases per 100,00 persons per year (20.4/100,000/year for Maori and Pacific Islanders; 24.4/100,000/year for persons >65 years of age; 33/100,000/year for infants Auckland’s lowest socioeconomic quintile. Twenty-two persons died, for an overall case-fatality rate of 10% (63% for toxic shock syndrome). Seventy-four percent of patients who died had an underlying condition. To the population in our study, the proposed 26-valent vaccine would provide limited benefit. PMID:21749758

  10. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm.

  11. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Miyata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm.

  12. MANAGEMENT OF CLINICALLY CURED TONSILLOPHARYNGITIS IN PATIENTS WITH GROUP A STREPTOCOCCUS ISOLATED FROM A PHARYNGEAL SWAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radica Živković-Zarić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The group A streptococcus (GAS tonsillopharyngitis is a very common disease in children’s age. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is frequently encountered, both for treatment purposes and for eradication of the causative agents. The aim of our study was to discover reasons and causes for inappropriate use of antibiotics in children. We have used the triangulation approach to the problem which was studied by the analysis of interviews, observation of patient-cases and by the review of medical records. We discovered that prescribers had very different attitudes towards curing GAS tonsillopharyngitis as well as towards curing GAS carriage. The physicians were under the pressure to prescribe antibiotics and the parents were prone to administer antibiotics to children by themselves. Such behavior could be partially explained by the lack of funds for laboratory analyses. Moreover, the patients were still allowed to buy antibiotics without prescriptions. General culture of using antibiotics should be increased to a higher level among both health workers and parents in order to change some irrational behavior when managing patients who have been cured from streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis.

  13. Group A rotavirus genotypes in hospital-acquired gastroenteritis in Italy, 2012-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, G; Delogu, R; Fiore, L; Monini, M; Ruggeri, F M

    2017-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young (aged rotavirus are presently known, most RVA infections in humans worldwide are related to five major G/P combinations: G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], and G9P[8]. To provide the hospitals of the Italian surveillance network with update information on RVA AGE. During RVA gastroenteritis surveillance in Italy in 2012-14, a total of 2341 RVA-positive faecal samples were collected from children hospitalized with AGE, and RVA strains were genotyped following standard EuroRotaNet protocols. Most strains analysed belonged to the five major human genotypes and 118 out of 2341 (5.0%) were reported to be hospital-acquired. Comparison of the distributions of the RVA genotypes circulating in the community or associated with nosocomial infections showed a different distribution of genotypes circulating inside the hospital wards, with respect to those observed in the community. G1P[8] and G9P[8] RVA strains were detected frequently, whereas G12P[8] caused a single large nosocomial outbreak. The information from this study will be useful to implement guidelines for preventing RVA AGE and optimizing the management of patients in hospital wards. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stem cells from umbilical cord blood do have myogenic potential, with and without differentiation induction in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gollop Thomaz R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The dystrophin gene, located at Xp21, codifies dystrophin, which is part of a protein complex responsible for the membrane stability of muscle cells. Its absence on muscle causes Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD, a severe disorder, while a defect of muscle dystrophin causes Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMB, a milder disease. The replacement of the defective muscle through stem cells transplantation is a possible future treatment for these patients. Our objective was to analyze the potential of CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood to differentiate in muscle cells and express dystrophin, in vitro. Protein expression was analyzed by Immunofluorescence, Western Blotting (WB and Reverse Transcriptase – Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR. CD34+ stem cells and myoblasts from a DMD affected patient started to fuse with muscle cells immediately after co-cultures establishment. Differentiation in mature myotubes was observed after 15 days and dystrophin-positive regions were detected through Immunofluorescence analysis. However, WB or RT-PCR analysis did not detect the presence of normal dystrophin in co-cultures of CD34+ and DMD or DMB affected patients' muscle cells. In contrast, some CD34+ stem cells differentiated in dystrophin producers' muscle cells, what was observed by WB, reinforcing that this progenitor cell has the potential to originate muscle dystrophin in vitro, and not just in vivo like reported before.

  15. Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Blood Group A-Transgenic Mouse Model of ABO-Incompatible Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyka, Bruce; Fisicaro, Nella; Wang, Szu-I; Kratochvil, Annetta; Labonte, Katrina; Tao, Kesheng; Pearcey, Jean; Marshall, Thuraya; Mengel, Michael; Sis, Banu; Fan, Xiaohu; dʼApice, Anthony J F; Cowan, Peter J; West, Lori J

    2016-06-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) organ transplantation is performed owing to unremitting donor shortages. Defining mechanisms of antibody-mediated rejection, accommodation, and tolerance of ABOi grafts is limited by lack of a suitable animal model. We report generation and characterization of a murine model to enable study of immunobiology in the setting of ABOi transplantation. Transgenesis of a construct containing human A1- and H-transferases under control of the ICAM-2 promoter was performed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. A-transgenic (A-Tg) mice were assessed for A-antigen expression by histology and flow cytometry. B6 wild-type (WT) mice were sensitized with blood group A-human erythrocytes; others received passive anti-A monoclonal antibody and complement after heart transplant. Serum anti-A antibodies were assessed by hemagglutination. "A-into-O" transplantation (major histocompatibility complex syngeneic) was modeled by transplanting hearts from A-Tg mice into sensitized or nonsensitized WT mice. Antibody-mediated rejection was assessed by morphology/immunohistochemistry. A-Tg mice expressed A-antigen on vascular endothelium and other cells including erythrocytes. Antibody-mediated rejection was evident in 15/17 A-Tg grafts in sensitized WT recipients (median titer, 1:512), with 2 showing hyperacute rejection and rapid cessation of graft pulsation. Hyperacute rejection was observed in 8/8 A-Tg grafts after passive transfer of anti-A antibody and complement into nonsensitized recipients. Antibody-mediated rejection was not observed in A-Tg grafts transplanted into nonsensitized mice. A-Tg heart grafts transplanted into WT mice with abundant anti-A antibody manifests characteristic features of antibody-mediated rejection. These findings demonstrate an effective murine model to facilitate study of immunologic features of ABOi transplantation and to improve potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Balancing risk and benefit: maintenance of a thawed Group A plasma inventory for trauma patients requiring massive transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Chelsea R; Gupta, Rajan; von Recklinghausen, Friedrich M; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; Dunbar, Nancy M

    2013-06-01

    Transfusion of plasma and red blood cell (RBC) units in a balanced ratio approximating 1:1 has been shown in retrospective studies to be associated with improved outcomes for trauma patients. Our low-volume rural trauma center uses a trauma-activated transfusion algorithm. Plasma is thawed upon activation to avoid wastage. However, the time required for plasma thawing has made achievement of a 1:1 ratio early in resuscitation challenging. In this study, the time required for plasma thawing is characterized, and a potential solution is proposed. A retrospective chart study of 38 moderately and massively transfused (≥6 U in the first 24 hours) trauma patients admitted from January 2008 to March 2012 was performed. We evaluated the time required to dispense plasma and the number of RBCs dispensed before plasma in these patients. The average time between the dispense of RBCs and plasma was 26 minutes (median, 28; range, 0-48 minutes). The average number of RBCs dispensed before plasma was 8 U (median, 7 U; range, 0-24 U). Nearly one third of massively transfused patients had 10 RBCs or greater dispensed before plasma was available. There exists the potential for delayed plasma availability owing to time required for thawing, which may compromise the ability to provide balanced plasma to RBC transfusion to trauma patients. Maintenance of a thawed Group AB plasma inventory may not be operationally feasible for rural centers with low trauma volumes. Use of a thawed Group A plasma inventory is a potential alternative to ensure rapid plasma availability. Therapeutic study, level V.

  17. Immunoglobulin G antibody reactivity to a group A Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 and protection from P. falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magistrado, Pamela A; Lusingu, John; Vestergaard, Lasse S

    2007-01-01

    where P. falciparum is endemic, parasites causing severe malaria and malaria in young children with limited immunity tend to express semiconserved PfEMP1 molecules encoded by group A var genes. Here we investigated antibody responses of Tanzanians who were 0 to 19 years old to PF11_0008, a group A Pf...

  18. Dermatological disease in the older age group: a cross-sectional study in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Maneka S; Kerse, Ngaire; Vandal, Alain C; Jarrett, Paul

    2015-12-23

    To estimate the prevalence of dermatological disease in aged care facilities, and the relationship between cognitive or physical disability and significant disease. 2 large aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand, each providing low and high level care. All 161 residents of the facilities were invited to participate. The only exclusion criterion was inability to obtain consent from the individual or designated guardian. 88 participants were recruited-66 females (75%), 22 males (25%) with average age 87.1 years (SD 5.5 years). Primary--presence of significant skin disease (defined as that which in the opinion of the investigators needed treatment or was identified as a patient concern) diagnosed clinically on full dermatological examination by a dermatologist or dermatology trainee. Secondary--functional and cognitive status (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Abbreviated Mental Test Score). 81.8% were found to have at least one significant condition. The most common disorders were onychomycosis 42 (47.7%), basal cell carcinoma 13 (14.8%), asteototic eczema 11 (12.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ 9 (10.2%). Other findings were invasive squamous cell carcinoma 7 (8%), bullous pemphigoid 2 (2.3%), melanoma 2 (2.3%), lichen sclerosus 2 (2.3%) and carcinoma of the breast 1 (1.1%). Inflammatory disease was more common in those with little physical disability compared with those with serious physical disability (OR 3.69; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6, p=0.04). No significant association was found between skin disease and cognitive impairment. A high rate of dermatological disease was found. Findings ranged from frequent but not life-threatening conditions (eg, onychomycosis), to those associated with a significant morbidity (eg, eczema, lichen sclerosus and bullous pemphigoid), to potentially life-threatening (eg, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and breast cancer). Those with less significant physical impairment were found to be at greater risk of inflammatory

  19. Defective recoveryfrom potentially lethal damage in some human fibroblast cell strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlett, C.F.; Priestley, A.

    1983-01-01

    The repair of potentially lethal damage following treatment by gamma radiation was investigated in human fibroblasts held in a non-cycling state by maintenance in a medium containing 0.5 per cent foetal calf serum. Variation in their capacity to repair PLD was noted between three normal cell strains. A failure to repair PLD in ataxia-telangiectasia cells (AT5BI) was confirmed. In three cell strains which were intermediate between normals and A-T cells in their sensitivity, XP3BR, 46BR and GB1142, a limited capacity for the repair of PLD was observed. Two other cell strains, 47BR and 67BR, which showed little if any hypersensitivity could be clearly distinguished from normals after a 24 hour period for the repair of PLD. Thus the technique might permit better discrimination between cell strains. One other cell strain, H15617, could be distinguished from normals by proving hypersensitive under all conditions. Here, however, the repair of PLD appeared to be normal. (author)

  20. Statistics on Lie groups: A need to go beyond the pseudo-Riemannian framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miolane, Nina; Pennec, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Lie groups appear in many fields from Medical Imaging to Robotics. In Medical Imaging and particularly in Computational Anatomy, an organ's shape is often modeled as the deformation of a reference shape, in other words: as an element of a Lie group. In this framework, if one wants to model the variability of the human anatomy, e.g. in order to help diagnosis of diseases, one needs to perform statistics on Lie groups. A Lie group G is a manifold that carries an additional group structure. Statistics on Riemannian manifolds have been well studied with the pioneer work of Fréchet, Karcher and Kendall [1, 2, 3, 4] followed by others [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. In order to use such a Riemannian structure for statistics on Lie groups, one needs to define a Riemannian metric that is compatible with the group structure, i.e a bi-invariant metric. However, it is well known that general Lie groups which cannot be decomposed into the direct product of compact and abelian groups do not admit a bi-invariant metric. One may wonder if removing the positivity of the metric, thus asking only for a bi-invariant pseudo-Riemannian metric, would be sufficient for most of the groups used in Computational Anatomy. In this paper, we provide an algorithmic procedure that constructs bi-invariant pseudo-metrics on a given Lie group G. The procedure relies on a classification theorem of Medina and Revoy. However in doing so, we prove that most Lie groups do not admit any bi-invariant (pseudo-) metric. We conclude that the (pseudo-) Riemannian setting is not the richest setting if one wants to perform statistics on Lie groups. One may have to rely on another framework, such as affine connection space.

  1. Diversity and population structure of Marine Group A bacteria in the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allers, Elke; Wright, Jody J; Konwar, Kishori M; Howes, Charles G; Beneze, Erica; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-02-01

    Marine Group A (MGA) is a candidate phylum of Bacteria that is ubiquitous and abundant in the ocean. Despite being prevalent, the structural and functional properties of MGA populations remain poorly constrained. Here, we quantified MGA diversity and population structure in relation to nutrients and O(2) concentrations in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean using a combination of catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) and 16S small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene sequencing (clone libraries and 454-pyrotags). Estimates of MGA abundance as a proportion of total bacteria were similar across all three methods although estimates based on CARD-FISH were consistently lower in the OMZ (5.6%±1.9%) than estimates based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (11.0%±3.9%) or pyrotags (9.9%±1.8%). Five previously defined MGA subgroups were recovered in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and five novel subgroups were defined (HF770D10, P262000D03, P41300E03, P262000N21 and A714018). Rarefaction analysis of pyrotag data indicated that the ultimate richness of MGA was very nearly sampled. Spearman's rank analysis of MGA abundances by CARD-FISH and O(2) concentrations resulted in significant correlation. Analyzed in more detail by 16S rRNA pyrotag sequencing, MGA operational taxonomic units affiliated with subgroups Arctic95A-2 and A714018 comprised 0.3-2.4% of total bacterial sequences and displayed strong correlations with decreasing O(2) concentration. This study is the first comprehensive description of MGA diversity using complementary techniques. These results provide a phylogenetic framework for interpreting future studies on ecotype selection among MGA subgroups, and suggest a potentially important role for MGA in the ecology and biogeochemistry of OMZs.

  2. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289.

  3. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O'Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage

  4. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O' Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H

    2004-10-04

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  5. Erythromycin-resistant genes in group A β-haemolytic Streptococci in Chengdu, Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The management of Group A β-haemolytic Streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes or GAS infection include the use of penicillins, cephalosporins or macrolides for treatment. A general increase in macrolides resistance in GAS has been observed in recent years. Differences in rates of resistance to these agents have existed according to geographical location and investigators. Aims: To investigate the antibiotic pattern and erythromycin-resistant genes of GAS isolates associated with acute tonsillitis and scarlet fever in Chengdu, southwestern China. Settings and Design: To assess the macrolide resistance, phenotype, and genotypic characterization of GAS isolated from throat swabs of children suffering from different acute tonsillitis or scarlet fever between 2004 and 2011 in the city of Chengdu, located in the southwestern region of China. Materials and Methods: Minimal inhibitory concentration with seven antibiotics was performed on 127 GAS isolates. Resistance phenotypes of erythromycin-resistant GAS isolates were determined by the double-disk test. Their macrolide-resistant genes (mefA, ermB and ermTR were amplified by PCR. Results: A total of 98.4% (125/127 of the isolates exhibited resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G and cefotaxime. Moreover, 113 ermB-positive isolates demonstrating the cMLS phenotype of erythromycin resistance were predominant (90.4% and these isolates showed high-level resistance to both erythromycin and clindamycin (MIC 90 > 256 μg/ml; 12 (9.6% isolates demonstrating the MLS phenotype of erythromycin resistance carried the mefA gene, which showed low-level resistance to both erythromycin (MIC 90 = 8 μg/ml and clindamycin (MIC 90 = 0.5 μg/ml; and none of the isolates exhibited the M phenotype. Conclusions: The main phenotype is cMLS, and the ermB gene code is the main resistance mechanism against macrolides in GAS. Penicillin is the most beneficial

  6. Validation of an automated colony counting system for group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, H R; Tsoi, S K; Baker, C A; Laho, D; Sanderson-Smith, M L; Steer, A C; Smeesters, P R

    2016-02-08

    The practice of counting bacterial colony forming units on agar plates has long been used as a method to estimate the concentration of live bacteria in culture. However, due to the laborious and potentially error prone nature of this measurement technique, an alternative method is desirable. Recent technologic advancements have facilitated the development of automated colony counting systems, which reduce errors introduced during the manual counting process and recording of information. An additional benefit is the significant reduction in time taken to analyse colony counting data. Whilst automated counting procedures have been validated for a number of microorganisms, the process has not been successful for all bacteria due to the requirement for a relatively high contrast between bacterial colonies and growth medium. The purpose of this study was to validate an automated counting system for use with group A Streptococcus (GAS). Twenty-one different GAS strains, representative of major emm-types, were selected for assessment. In order to introduce the required contrast for automated counting, 2,3,5-triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) dye was added to Todd-Hewitt broth with yeast extract (THY) agar. Growth on THY agar with TTC was compared with growth on blood agar and THY agar to ensure the dye was not detrimental to bacterial growth. Automated colony counts using a ProtoCOL 3 instrument were compared with manual counting to confirm accuracy over the stages of the growth cycle (latent, mid-log and stationary phases) and in a number of different assays. The average percentage differences between plating and counting methods were analysed using the Bland-Altman method. A percentage difference of ±10 % was determined as the cut-off for a critical difference between plating and counting methods. All strains measured had an average difference of less than 10 % when plated on THY agar with TTC. This consistency was also observed over all phases of the growth

  7. Molecular analysis of group A rotaviruses detected in hospitalized children from Rawalpindi, Pakistan during 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umair, Massab; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Nisar, Nadia; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Sharif, Salmaan; Shaukat, Shahzad; Rana, Muhammad Suleman; Khurshid, Adnan; Mujtaba, Ghulam; Aamir, Uzma Bashir; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2017-09-01

    As a part of strategy to control diarrheal diseases, World Health Organization (WHO) recommends to include rotavirus vaccines in national immunization programs. Sentinel surveillance networks have been established to monitor rotavirus disease burden and genotype distribution in both pre and post vaccine era in many countries. Unfortunately, due to lack of proper surveillance programs, data on rotavirus disease burden and genotype distribution from Pakistan is scarce. We investigated 502 stool samples from children (Pakistan during 2014 for the presence of group A rotavirus (RVA) and its genotypic diversity. Among 147 ELISA positive samples, 131 were successfully genotyped for RVA. Common G types detected were G1 (23.6%), followed by G3 (22.9%), G12 (19.8%), G2 (19.08%) and G9 (9.9%). The most common P-type was P[8] (41.2%), followed by P[6] (29%) and P[4] (28.24%). G3P[8] (17.55%) was the most prevalent genotype combination followed by G12P[6] (16.7%), G2P[4] (15.2%) and G1P[8] (14.5%). Mixed infection of rotavirus G-P types was also observed in 6% of samples. Phylogenetic analysis of VP7 and VP4 genes of Pakistani strains showed that G1, G2, G9 and P[4], P[6], P[8] were closely related to strains circulating worldwide as well as previously reported strains from Pakistan. Pakistani G12P[8] strains NIH-BBH-3981 and NIH-BBH-4003 belonged to lineage 3 cluster 3a along with strains from USA and Italy whereas G12P[6] strains NIH-BBH-3978, NIH-BBH-4052 and NIH-BBH-4444 were closely related to strains from Italy, Thailand, United Kingdom and with previously reported G12 strains from Pakistan within lineage 3 cluster 3b. This pre-vaccination data supports the need for RVA vaccine inclusion at our national level and will be helpful in assessing the effect of vaccination on RVA genotype diversity due to vaccine selection pressure once post-vaccination data becomes available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA repair in human xeroderma pigmentosum and chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelle, B.

    1980-01-01

    The investigations described were performed to study the genetic heterogeneity of excision repair-deficient XP (xeroderma pigmentosum) strains and the biochemical defects in their repair processes after irradiation with ultraviolet radiation. (Auth.)

  9. Enhanced capacity of DNA repair in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Y.; Rapp, F.

    1981-01-01

    Plaque formation in Vero cells by UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was enhanced by infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), UV irradiation, or treatment with methylmethanesulfonate. Preinfection of Vero cells with HCMV enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus more significantly than did treatment with UV or methylmethanesulfonate alone. A similar enhancement by HCMV was observed in human embryonic fibroblasts, but not in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP12BE) cells. It was also found that HCMV infection enhanced hydroxyurea-resistant DNA synthesis induced by UV light or methylmethanesulfonate. Alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis revealed an enhanced rate of synthesis of all size classes of DNA in UV-irradiated HCMV-infected Vero cells. However, HCMV infection did not induce repairable lesions in cellular DNA and did not significantly inhibit host cell DNA synthesis, unlike UV or methylmethanesulfonate. These results indicate that HCMV enhanced DNA repair capacity in the host cells without producing detectable lesions in cellular DNA and without inhibiting DNA synthesis. This repair appeared to be error proof for UV-damaged herpes simplex virus DNA when tested with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-negative mutants

  10. [Study on immunogenicity of group A and group C meningococcal conjugate vaccine with coupling group B meningococcal outer membrane protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fu-Bao; Tao, Hong; Wang, Hong-Jun

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the Immunogenicity of Group A and Group C Meningococcal conjugate Vaccine with coupling Group B Meningococcal Outer Membrane Protein (Men B-OMP). 458 healthy children aged 3-5 months, 6-23 months, 2-6 years and 7-24 years were given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP or other vaccine as control group to measure the pre-and post-vaccination Men A and C and B by Serum Bactericidal Assay (SBA) in the double-blind randomized controlled trial. 97.65%-100% were 4 times or greater increase in SBA titer for the healthy children given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP, The geometric mean titer of SBA were 1:194-1:420, which significantly higber than controls. The Group A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP was safe and well immunogenic.

  11. Fanconi anemia in Tunisia: high prevalence of group A and identification of new FANCA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlaka, Chiraz; Abdelhak, Sonia; Amouri, Ahlem; Ben Abid, Hela; Hadiji, Sondes; Frikha, Mounir; Ben Othman, Tarek; Amri, Fethi; Ayadi, Hammadi; Hachicha, Mongia; Rebaï, Ahmed; Saad, Ali; Dellagi, Koussay

    2003-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive pancytopenia, congenital malformations, and predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. Fanconi anemia is genetically heterogeneous, with at least eight distinct complementation groups of FA (A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, and G) having been defined by somatic cell fusion studies. Six genes (FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCG, and FANCF) have been cloned. Mutations of the seventh Fanconi anemia gene, BRCA2, have been shown to lead to FAD1 and probably FAB groups. In order to characterize the molecular defects underlying FA in Tunisia, 39 families were genotyped with microsatellite markers linked to known FA gene. Haplotype analysis and homozygosity mapping assigned 43 patients belonging to 34 families to the FAA group, whereas one family was probably not linked to the FANCA gene or to any known FA genes. For patients belonging to the FAA group, screening for mutations revealed four novel mutations: two small homozygous deletions 1693delT and 1751-1754del, which occurred in exon 17 and exon 19, respectively, and two transitions, viz., 513G-->A in exon 5 and A-->G at position 166 (IVS24+166A-->G) of intron 24. Two new polymorphisms were also identified in intron 24 (IVS24-5G/A and IVS24-6C/G).

  12. Human group A rotavirus infections in children in Denmark; detection of reassortant G9 strains and zoonotic P 14 strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, S.; Bottiger, B.; Jensen, T. G.

    2014-01-01

    One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children......One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children...

  13. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  14. Radioresistant DNA synthesis in cells of patients showing increased chromosomal sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barenfeld, L.S.; Pleskach, N.M.; Bildin, V.N.; Prokofjeva, V.V.; Mikhelson, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of DNA synthesis after γ-irradiation was studied either by analysis of the steady-state distribution of daughter [ 3 H]DNA in alkaline sucrose gradients or by direct assay of the amount of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporated into DNA of fibroblasts derived from a normal donor (LCH882) and from Down's syndrome (LCH944), Werner's syndrome (WS1LE) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP2LE) patients with chromosomal sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Doses of γ-irradiation that markedly inhibited the rate of DNA synthesis in normal human cells caused almost no inhibition of DNA synthesis in the cells from the affected individuals. The radioresistant DNA synthesis in Down's syndrome cells was mainly due to a much lower inhibition of replicon initiation than that in normal cells; these cells were also more resistant to damage that inhibited replicon elongation. Our data suggest that radioresistant DNA synthesis may be an intrinsic feature of all genetic disorders showing increased radiosensitivity in terms of chromosome aberrations. (orig.)

  15. Presence of fibronectin-binding protein gene prtF2 in invasive group A streptococci in tropical Australia is associated with increased internalisation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, Davina; Norton, Robert; Layton, Ramon; Smith, Helen; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2005-03-01

    The fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) PrtF1 and PrtF2 are considered to be major group A streptococcal virulence factors, mediating adherence to and internalisation of host cells. The present study investigated an association between the presence of prtF1 and prtF2 genes and internalisation efficiency in group A streptococci (GAS) isolated from patients with invasive disease. Of the 80 isolates tested, 58 (73%) had prtF1 and 71 (89%) possessed prtF2. Three isolates (4%) had neither gene, seven (9%) had prtF1 only, 19 (24%) had prtF2 only and 51 isolates (64%) had both prtF1 and prtF2. prtF2-positive isolates internalised up to three times more efficiently than isolates that had prtF1 alone (Pinternalisation efficiency and presence of the prtF1 gene. Analysis of the fibronectin-binding repeat domain (FBRD) of prtF2 revealed that this gene can contain 2, 3, 4 or 5 repeat regions and that five repeat regions conferred very high internalisation efficiency in invasive GAS isolates.

  16. IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Vitè, Davide F; Wagner, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: IT3T - IT Technical Training Tutorials (Summer 2005) The presentation will explain how to configure and use your Windows computer when abroad from CERN, either at home or when traveling. How to access your files, the Distributed File System (DFS) space; how to read your mails; how to work remotely on CERN resources using Terminal Services are all the questions that will be addressed during this tutorial. The tutorials are free of charge, but separate registration to each is required. Participation to any of the tutorials is open: attendance to any tutorial is not a prerequisite to attend subsequent ones. If you are interested in attending, please discuss with your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH. Registered participants will be invited to each tutorial; attendance will be recorded in the personal training records. More information, online registration, and the detailed IT3T programmes are available on the IT Technical Training Tutorials webpage, http:...

  17. Flood simulation model using XP-SWMM along Terengganu River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaysia is one of the tropical countries in the world with heavy rainfall throughout the year and floods are the most common disaster in Malaysia. Flood simulation model was carried out along Terengganu River for dry and rainy seasons. The result of the simulation shows the water level reached its maximum level at the 1st ...

  18. MWR-05XP Mobile Phased Array Weather Radar

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The NPS/CIRPAS Weather Radar Project objective is to develop the technology for adding a parallel weather processor capability to tactical military radars and to develop an advanced scientific instrument for investigation of atmospheric phenomena and other various types of research. The payoff to the military will be the integration of current weather data into the tactical radar picture. The payoff to the science community will be the availability of an advanced instrument for inves...

  19. Do you know this syndrome? Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Fernanda de Oliveira; Cavaleiro, Luíza Helena dos Santos; Carneiro, Clívia Maria Moraes de Oliveira; Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Barros, Renata Silva; Fonseca, Diana Mendes da

    2011-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare genetic disease characterized by clinical and cellular hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation and DNA repair defects. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum experience sun-induced cutaneous and ocular abnormalities, including cancer. Some develop neurological disorders. We describe the case of a 2 year-old child with DeSanctis-Cacchione's syndrome, with severe neurological deterioration associated with schizencephaly. In the current clinical classification of xeroderma pigmentosum, the term is reserved for cases with severe neurological disorders linked to dwarfism and immature sexual development. The association of xeroderma pigmentosum with schizencephaly has not to date been reported in the literature.

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus groups A and B in Porto Alegre, Brazil, from 1990 to 1995 and 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straliotto Selir M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV groups and their epidemiological pattern that were detected over the course of seven years in southern Brazil. The two RSV groups co-circulated each year, but frequencies of groups A and B varied both between and within yearly outbreaks. In 1991, group A predominated over group B (p=0.0016. RSV outbreaks analyzed showed a temperature-dependent pattern and no association with rainfall, similarly to other countries from southern South America. Knowledge of the variants is important in terms of both diagnosis and definition of a vaccine composition.

  1. Development of primers for sequencing the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes of the group A porcine rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Dornelas Florentino Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the causative pathogen of diarrhea in humans and in several animal species. Eight pairs of primers were developed and used for Sanger sequencing of the coding region of the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes based on the conserved regions of the genome of the group A porcine rotavirus. Three samples previously screened as positive for group A rotaviruses were subjected to gene amplification and sequencing to characterize the pathogen. The information generated from this study is crucial for the understanding of the epidemiology of the disease.

  2. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.

    1993-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs

  3. Resistance of plateau-phase human normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts to the cytotoxic effect of ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, G.L.; Little, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Clonogenic survival response to 254-nm ultraviolet light was measured in 2 strains of repair-proficient normal human fibroblasts and 4 strains of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts belonging to complementation groups A, C, D and variant. In all strains except XPA, cells irradiated in plateau phase and subcultured immediately were much more resistant to the lethal effect of UV than cells irradiated in the exponential phase of growth. Typically, 10-20% of plateau-phase cells were extremely resistant. When the cultures were held in plateau phase for 24 h after irradiation and before subculture, there was a further enhancement of survival. By use of a UV-specific endonuclease assay, no difference was found in the number of DNA lesions induced in exponentially growing and plateau cultures by the same dose of UV light. Thus plateau-phase cells appear to be more efficient in their DNA-repair capability than cells in exponential growth. XP group A cells were uniquely found to be deficient in the processes which lead to plateau-phase resistance. Since plateau-phase repair was not lacking in XP groups C, D and variant, it may be related to a DNA-repair process different from that which is responsible for the overall UV sensitivity of these cells. (orig.)

  4. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1...

  5. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the following... type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1% xylene...

  6. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction... formulation data: Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1...

  9. Invasive group A streptococcal disease in The Netherlands : Evidence for a protective role of anti-exotoxin A antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, EM; Jansze, M; Schellekens, JFP; Musser, JM; Faber, JAJ; Verhoef-Verhage, LAE; Schouls, L; van Leeuwen, WJ; Verhoef, J; van Dijk, H

    As part of a nationwide surveillance in The Netherlands during 1994-1997, 53 patients with invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections were evaluated for medical history, symptoms, and outcome. Patients' isolates were tested for the production of pyrogenic exotoxins A (SPE-A) and B (SPE-B).

  10. A renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma/perivascular epithelioid cell tumor with TFE3 gene break visualized by FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, Chisato; Kuroda, Naoto; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Vanecek, Tomas; Grossmann, Petr; Tanaka, Yukichi; Tanaka, Mio; Inui, Hidekazu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Tadashi; Uemura, Yoshiko

    2012-12-01

    We present a case of renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma (eAML)/perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) with a TFE3 gene break visible by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Histologically, the tumor was composed of mainly epithelioid cells forming solid arrangements with small foci of spindle cells. In a small portion of the tumor, neoplastic cells displayed nuclear pleomorphism, such as polygonal and enlarged vesicular nuclei with prominent nucleoli. Marked vascularity was noticeable in the background, and perivascular hyaline sclerosis was also seen. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were diffusely positive for α-smooth muscle actin and melanosome in the cytoplasm. Nuclei of many neoplastic cells were positive for TFE3. FISH analysis of the TFE3 gene break using the Poseidon TFE3 (Xp11) Break probe revealed positive results. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) for ASPL/TFE3, PRCC/TFE3, CLTC/TFE3, PSF/TFE3, and NonO/TFE3 gene fusions all revealed negative results. This is the first reported case of renal eAML/PEComa with a TFE3 gene break, and it has unique histological findings as compared to previously reported TFE3 gene fusion-positive PEComas. Pathologists should recognize that PEComa with TFE3 gene fusion can arise even in the kidney.

  11. Diagnosis of Xeroderma Pigmentosum Groups A and C by Detection of Two Prevalent Mutations in West Algerian Population: A Rapid Genotyping Tool for the Frequent XPC Mutation c.1643_1644delTG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensenouci, Salima; Louhibi, Lotfi; De Verneuil, Hubert; Mahmoudi, Khadidja; Saidi-Mehtar, Nadhira

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Considering that XP patients have a defect of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway which enables them to repair DNA damage caused by UV light, they have an increased risk of developing skin and eyes cancers. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of the prevalent XPA and XPC genes mutations-nonsense mutation (c.682C>T, p.Arg228X) and a two-base-pair (2 bp) deletion (c.1643_1644delTG or p.Val548Ala fsX25), respectively-in 19 index cases from 19 unrelated families in the West of Algeria. For the genetic diagnosis of XPA gene, we proceeded to PCR-RFLP. For the XPC gene, we validated a routine analysis which includes a specific amplification of a short region surrounding the 2 bp deletion using a fluorescent primer and fragment sizing (GeneScan size) on a sequencing gel. Among the 19 index cases, there were 17 homozygous patients for the 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene and 2 homozygous patients carrying the nonsense XPA mutation. Finally, XPC appears to be the major disease-causing gene concerning xeroderma pigmentosum in North Africa. The use of fragment sizing is the simplest method to analyze this 2 bp deletion for the DNA samples coming from countries where the mutation c.1643_1644delTG of XPC gene is prevalent.

  12. [Cardiac invasion of ATLL cells and therapeutic effects of local along with systemic treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, S; Nakagawa, T; Ito, M

    1989-07-01

    We report a rare case of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in which cardiac invasion was clinically demonstrated and treated effectively. A 45-year-old female was admitted because of exertional dyspnea and cervical tumors. The leukocyte count was 19,100/microliters with 20% of flower cells. HTLV-I antibody was positive. She was diagnosed as ATLL and treated with VEPA. She got remission for a short duration which was followed by relapse. OPEC was started as salvage therapy. In the course, extensive pericardial effusion was found in chest X-P. Pericardial puncture demonstrated ATLL cells and high titer of free IL-2 receptor (57,400U/ml) in the effusion. It was diagnosed as pericardial invasion of ATLL cells. Chemotherapy was started with new combination of drugs (cisplatin, mitoxantrone, ifosfamide, and prednisolone). Concomitantly pericardial drainage was performed and the drugs were administered directly into the pericardial cavity. The clinical improvement was obtained and pericardial effusion did not appear thereafter. She died 4 months after the diagnosis of cardiac invasion. On autopsy myocardial invasion was identified. The pericardium widely adhered and effusion measured 42 ml.

  13. Cloning and analysis of the mouse Fanconi anemia group A cDNA and an overlapping penta zinc finger cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J C; Alon, N; Norga, K; Kruyt, F A; Youssoufian, H; Buchwald, M

    2000-08-01

    Despite the cloning of four disease-associated genes for Fanconi anemia (FA), the molecular pathogenesis of FA remains largely unknown. To study FA complementation group A using the mouse as a model system, we cloned and characterized the mouse homolog of the human FANCA cDNA. The mouse cDNA (Fanca) encodes a 161-kDa protein that shares 65% amino acid sequence identity with human FANCA. Fanca is located at the distal region of mouse chromosome 8 and has a ubiquitous pattern of expression in embryonic and adult tissues. Expression of the mouse cDNA in human FA-A cells restores the cellular drug sensitivity to normal levels. Thus, the expression pattern, protein structure, chromosomal location, and function of FANCA are conserved in the mouse. We also isolated a novel zinc finger protein, Zfp276, which has five C(2)H(2) domains. Interestingly, Zfp276 is situated in the Fanca locus, and the 3'UTR of its cDNA overlaps with the last four exons of Fanca in a tail-to-tail manner. Zfp276 is expressed in the same tissues as Fanca, but does not complement the mitomycin C (MMC)-sensitive phenotype of FA-A cells. The overlapping genomic organization between Zfp276 and Fanca may have relevance to the disease phenotype of FA. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  15. Group A Streptococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relations Cyber Infrastructure Computational Biology Equal Employment Opportunity Ethics Global Research Office of Mission Integration and Financial Management Strategic Planning Workforce Effectiveness Workplace Solutions Technology Transfer Intellectual Property Division of AIDS ...

  16. Excision and crosslink repair of DNA and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured human fibroblasts with different repair capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y; Kano, Y; Paul, P; Goto, K; Yamamoto, K [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1981-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) groups A to G lacked the initial stage of ultraviolet (UV) excision repair in the order of A = G > C > D > E asymptotically equals F, while the XP variant was weakly defective in the later repair steps. Killing sensitivities were in the orders of A >= G > D > C > E asymptotically equals F asymptotically equals variant > normal to UV, A = G > D > F > C = E > variant > normal to 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), and A > C > D = E = F = variant > G = normal to decarbamoyl mitomycin-C(DCMC). The induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency was unrelated to the extent of repair deficiency. The SCE induction rate was consistently 3 - 6 fold higher by these UV-like mutagens in XP group A cells than in normal cells. However, repair-proficient Cockayne's syndrome (CS) cells showed a higher SCE induction by UV, which was normalized by NAD/sup +/, suggesting that chromatin lesions as well as DNA damage contribute to SCE. Two-step crosslink repair involves a first rapid half-excision and a second slow nucleotide-excision repair. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells had an impaired first half-excision and were supersensitive to MC, but not to UV and DCMC. The SCE frequency induced by MC (1 hr) was higher in FA cells than in normal cells despite their normal response to DCMC, and vice versa in XP cells. FA cells lacked the first rapid decline and showed higher remaining SCEs. Thus, part of the crosslink seems to lead to SCE formation. Caffeine synergistically elevated UV-induced SCEs, but not UV induced mutations in V79 cells, implying that SCE may not necessarily involve mutation.

  17. Excision and crosslink repair of DNA and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured human fibroblasts with different repair capacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Kano, Yoshio; Paul, P.; Goto, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) groups A to G lacked the initial stage of ultraviolet (UV) excision repair in the order of A = G > C > D > E asymptotically equals F, while the XP variant was weakly defective in the later repair steps. Killing sensitivities were in the orders of A >= G > D > C > E asymptotically equals F asymptotically equals variant > normal to UV, A = G > D > F > C = E > variant > normal to 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), and A > C > D = E = F = variant > G = normal to decarbamoyl mitomycin-C(DCMC). The induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency was unrelated to the extent of repair deficiency. The SCE induction rate was consistently 3 - 6 fold higher by these UV-like mutagens in XP group A cells than in normal cells. However, repair-proficient Cockayne's syndrome (CS) cells showed a higher SCE induction by UV, which was normalized by NAD + , suggesting that chromatin lesions as well as DNA damage contribute to SCE. Two-step crosslink repair involves a first rapid half-excision and a second slow nucleotide-excision repair. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells had an impaired first half-excision and were supersensitive to MC, but not to UV and DCMC. The SCE frequency induced by MC (1 hr) was higher in FA cells than in normal cells despite their normal response to DCMC, and vice versa in XP cells. FA cells lacked the first rapid decline and showed higher remaining SCEs. Thus, part of the crosslink seems to lead to SCE formation. Caffeine synergistically elevated UV-induced SCEs, but not UV induced mutations in V79 cells, implying that SCE may not necessarily involve mutation. (J.P.N.)

  18. Excision and crosslink repair of DNA and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured human fibroblasts with different repair capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kano, Y.; Paul, P.; Goto, K.; Yamamoto, K. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) groups A to G lacked the initial stage of ultraviolet (UV) excision repair in the order of A = G > C > D > E asymptotically equals F, while the XP variant was weakly defective in the later repair steps. Killing sensitivities were in the orders of A >= G > D > C > E asymptotically equals F asymptotically equals variant > normal to UV, A = G > D > F > C = E > variant > normal to 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), and A > C > D = E = F = variant > G = normal to decarbamoyl mitomycin-C(DCMC). The induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency was unrelated to the extent of repair deficiency. The SCE induction rate was consistently 3 - 6 fold higher by these UV-like mutagens in XP group A cells than in normal cells. However, repair-proficient Cockayne's syndrome (CS) cells showed a higher SCE induction by UV, which was normalized by NAD/sup +/, suggesting that chromatin lesions as well as DNA damage contribute to SCE. Two-step crosslink repair involves a first rapid half-excision and a second slow nucleotide-excision repair. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells had an impaired first half-excision and were supersensitive to MC, but not to UV and DCMC. The SCE frequency induced by MC (1 hr) was higher in FA cells than in normal cells despite their normal response to DCMC, and vice versa in XP cells. FA cells lacked the first rapid decline and showed higher remaining SCEs. Thus, part of the crosslink seems to lead to SCE formation. Caffeine synergistically elevated UV-induced SCEs, but not UV induced mutations in V79 cells, implying that SCE may not necessarily involve mutation.

  19. Diagnosis of eight groups of xeroderma pigmentosum by genetic complementation using recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Toshiharu; Okura, Masae; Ishii-Osai, Yasue; Hida, Tokimasa

    2016-10-01

    Because patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) must avoid ultraviolet (UV) light from an early age, an early diagnosis of this disorder is essential. XP is composed of seven genetic complementation groups, XP-A to -G, and a variant type (XP-V). To establish an easy and accurate diagnosis of the eight disease groups, we constructed recombinant adenoviruses that expressed one of the XP cDNA. When fibroblasts derived from patients with XP-A, -B, -C, -D, -F or -G were infected with the adenovirus expressing XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, XPF or XPG, respectively, and UV-C at 5-20 J/m 2 was irradiated, cell viability was clearly recovered by the corresponding recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, XP-E and XP-V cells were not significantly sensitive to UV irradiation and were barely complemented by the matched recombinant adenoviruses. However, co-infection of Ad-XPA with Ad-XPE increased survival rate of XP-E cells after UV-C exposure. When XP-V cell strains, including one derived from a Japanese patient, were infected with Ad-XPV, exposed to UV-B and cultured with 1 mmol/L of caffeine, flow cytometry detected a characteristic decrease in the S phase in all the XP-V cell strains. From these results, the eight groups of XP could be differentiated by utilizing a set of recombinant adenoviruses, indicating that our procedure provides a convenient and correct diagnostic method for all the XP groups including XP-E and XP-V. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and carvacrol, and synergy of carvacrol and erythromycin, against clinical, erythromycin-resistant Group A Streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria eMagi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro antibacterial activity of essential oils from Origanum vulgare, Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, and Melaleuca alternifolia against 32 erythromycin-resistant [MIC ≥1 µg/mL; inducible, constitutive, and efflux-mediated resistance phenotype; erm(TR, erm(B, and mef(A genes] and cell-invasive Group A streptococci (GAS isolated from children with pharyngotonsillitis in Italy. Over the past decades erythromycin resistance in GAS has emerged in several countries; strains combining erythromycin resistance and cell invasiveness may escape β-lactams because of intracellular location and macrolides because of resistance, resulting in difficulty of eradication and recurrent pharyngitis. Thyme and origanum essential oils demonstrated the highest antimicrobial activity with MICs ranging from 256 to 512 µg/mL. The phenolic monoterpene carvacrol [2-Methyl-5-(1-methylethyl phenol] is a major component of the essential oils of Origanum and Thymus plants. MICs of carvacrol ranged from 64 to 256 µg/mL. In the live/dead assay several dead cells were detected as early as 1 h after incubation with carvacrol at the MIC. In single-step resistance selection studies no resistant mutants were obtained. A synergistic action of carvacrol and erythromycin was detected by the checkerboard assay and calculation of the FIC Index. A 2- to 2048-fold reduction of the erythromycin MIC was documented in checkerboard assays. Synergy (FIC Index ≤0.5 was found in 21/32 strains and was highly significant (p <0.01 in strains where resistance is expressed only in presence of erythromycin. Synergy was confirmed in 17/23 strains using 24-h time-kill curves in presence of carvacrol and erythromycin. Our findings demonstrated that carvacrol acts either alone or in combination with erythromycin against erythromycin-resistant GAS and could potentially serve as a novel therapeutic tool.

  1. Radioimmunoassay of capsular polysaccaride antigens of groups A and C meningococci and Haemophilus influenza type b in cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeyhty, H.; Maekelae, P.H.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1977-01-01

    Sensitive radioimmunoassays capable of measuring 0.5 ng/ml of the Haemophilus influenza type b polysaccharide and 2 ng/ml of the groups A and C meningococcal polysaccharides were developed and used to detect these substances in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Polysaccharide of the causative agent was detected in the CSF of 14 out of 15 patients with Haemophilus influenza type b meningitis, in 18 out of 23 patients with group A, and in two out of four patients with group C meningococcal meningitis. In some cases the antigen could be detected even after three days of antibacterial treatment. No false positive reactions were seen. The assay procedure could be shortened to approximately three hours. These assays could be useful in routine diagnostic work and epidemiological investigations. (author)

  2. Regulation of adult neural progenitor cell functions by purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong; Illes, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular purines are signaling molecules in the neurogenic niches of the brain and spinal cord, where they activate cell surface purinoceptors at embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) and adult neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Although mRNA and protein are expressed at NSCs/NPCs for almost all subtypes of the nucleotide-sensitive P2X/P2Y, and the nucleoside-sensitive adenosine receptors, only a few of those have acquired functional significance. ATP is sequentially degraded by ecto-nucleotidases to ADP, AMP, and adenosine with agonistic properties for distinct receptor-classes. Nucleotides/nucleosides facilitate or inhibit NSC/NPC proliferation, migration and differentiation. The most ubiquitous effect of all agonists (especially of ATP and ADP) appears to be the facilitation of cell proliferation, usually through P2Y1Rs and sometimes through P2X7Rs. However, usually P2X7R activation causes necrosis/apoptosis of NPCs. Differentiation can be initiated by P2Y2R-activation or P2X7R-blockade. A key element in the transduction mechanism of either receptor is the increase of the intracellular free Ca 2+ concentration, which may arise due to its release from intracellular storage sites (G protein-coupling; P2Y) or due to its passage through the receptor-channel itself from the extracellular space (ATP-gated ion channel; P2X). Further research is needed to clarify how purinergic signaling controls NSC/NPC fate and how the balance between the quiescent and activated states is established with fine and dynamic regulation. GLIA 2017;65:213-230. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Association between group A beta-haemolytic streptococci and vulvovaginitis in adult women: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, M J; Damoiseaux, R A M J; Ruijs, G J H M

    2009-08-01

    Guidelines for the management of vaginal discharge mention Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, bacterial vaginosis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae as causes and do not recommend full microbiological culture. The role of non-group B beta-haemolytic streptococci in vaginal cultures is unclear, except for group A streptococci that are known to cause vulvovaginitis in children. In a case-control study, we investigated the association between non-group B beta-haemolytic streptococci and vulvovaginitis in adult women. Cases were women with recurrent vaginal discharge from whom a sample was cultured. Controls were asymptomatic women who consented to submitting a vaginal swab. Group A streptococci were isolated from 49 (4.9%) of 1,010 cases and not from the 206 controls (P < 0.01). Isolation rates of group C, F and G streptococci were low and did not differ statistically between cases and controls. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococci are associated with vaginal discharge in adult women. The other non-group B streptococci require more study. For the adequate management of vaginal discharge, culturing is necessary if initial treatment fails. Guidelines should be amended according to these results.

  4. Unique Footprint in the scl1.3 Locus Affects Adhesion and Biofilm Formation of the Invasive M3-Type Group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachert, Beth A; Choi, Soo J; LaSala, Paul R; Harper, Tiffany I; McNitt, Dudley H; Boehm, Dylan T; Caswell, Clayton C; Ciborowski, Pawel; Keene, Douglas R; Flores, Anthony R; Musser, James M; Squeglia, Flavia; Marasco, Daniela; Berisio, Rita; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    The streptococcal collagen-like proteins 1 and 2 (Scl1 and Scl2) are major surface adhesins that are ubiquitous among group A Streptococcus (GAS). Invasive M3-type strains, however, have evolved two unique conserved features in the scl1 locus: (i) an IS1548 element insertion in the scl1 promoter region and (ii) a nonsense mutation within the scl1 coding sequence. The scl1 transcript is drastically reduced in M3-type GAS, contrasting with a high transcription level of scl1 allele in invasive M1-type GAS. This leads to a lack of Scl1 expression in M3 strains. In contrast, while scl2 transcription and Scl2 production are elevated in M3 strains, M1 GAS lack Scl2 surface expression. M3-type strains were shown to have reduced biofilm formation on inanimate surfaces coated with cellular fibronectin and laminin, and in human skin equivalents. Repair of the nonsense mutation and restoration of Scl1 expression on M3-GAS cells, restores biofilm formation on cellular fibronectin and laminin coatings. Inactivation of scl1 in biofilm-capable M28 and M41 strains results in larger skin lesions in a mouse model, indicating that lack of Scl1 adhesin promotes bacterial spread over localized infection. These studies suggest the uniquely evolved scl1 locus in the M3-type strains, which prevents surface expression of the major Scl1 adhesin, contributed to the emergence of the invasive M3-type strains. Furthermore these studies provide insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating colonization, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis of group A streptococci.

  5. Unique footprint in the scl1.3 locus affects adhesion and biofilm formation of the invasive M3-type group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Alexandra Bachert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The streptococcal collagen-like proteins 1 and 2 (Scl1 and Scl2 are major surface adhesins that are ubiquitous among group A Streptococcus (GAS. Invasive M3-type strains, however, have evolved two unique conserved features in the scl1 locus: (i an IS1548 element insertion in the scl1 promoter region and (ii a nonsense mutation within the scl1 coding sequence. The scl1 transcript is drastically reduced in M3-type GAS, contrasting with a high transcription level of scl1 allele in invasive M1-type GAS. This leads to a lack of Scl1 expression in M3 strains. In contrast, while scl2 transcription and Scl2 production are elevated in M3 strains, M1 GAS lack Scl2 surface expression. M3-type strains were shown to have reduced biofilm formation on inanimate surfaces coated with cellular fibronectin and laminin, and in human skin equivalents. Repair of the nonsense mutation and restoration of Scl1 expression on M3-GAS cells, restores biofilm formation on cellular fibronectin and laminin coatings. Inactivation of scl1 in biofilm-capable M28 and M41 strains results in larger skin lesions in a mouse model, indicating that lack of Scl1 adhesin promotes bacterial spread over localized infection. These studies suggest the uniquely evolved scl1 locus in the M3-type strains, which prevents surface expression of the major Scl1 adhesin, contributed to the emergence of the invasive M3-type strains. Furthermore these studies provide insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating colonization, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis of group A streptococci.

  6. A specific role for the ZipA protein in cell division: stabilization of the FtsZ protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Manuel; Natale, Paolo; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, the cell division protein FtsZ is anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane by the action of the bitopic membrane protein ZipA and the cytoplasmic protein FtsA. Although the presence of both ZipA and FtsA is strictly indispensable for cell division, an FtsA gain-of-function mutant FtsA* (R286W) can bypass the ZipA requirement for cell division. This observation casts doubts on the role of ZipA and its need for cell division. Maxicells are nucleoid-free bacterial cells used as a whole cell in vitro system to probe protein-protein interactions without the need of protein purification. We show that ZipA protects FtsZ from the ClpXP-directed degradation observed in E. coli maxicells and that ZipA-stabilized FtsZ forms membrane-attached spiral-like structures in the bacterial cytoplasm. The overproduction of the FtsZ-binding ZipA domain is sufficient to protect FtsZ from degradation, whereas other C-terminal ZipA partial deletions lacking it are not. Individual overproduction of the proto-ring component FtsA or its gain-of-function mutant FtsA* does not result in FtsZ protection. Overproduction of FtsA or FtsA* together with ZipA does not interfere with the FtsZ protection. Moreover, neither FtsA nor FtsA* protects FtsZ when overproduced together with ZipA mutants lacking the FZB domain. We propose that ZipA protects FtsZ from degradation by ClpP by making the FtsZ site of interaction unavailable to the ClpX moiety of the ClpXP protease. This role cannot be replaced by either FtsA or FtsA*, suggesting a unique function for ZipA in proto-ring stability.

  7. P/N InP solar cells on Ge wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Vernon, Stanley; Burke, Edward A.

    1994-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) P-on-N one-sun solar cells were epitaxially grown using a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process on germanium (Ge) wafers. The motivation for this work is to replace expensive InP wafers, which are fragile and must be thick and therefore heavy, with less expensive Ge wafers, which are stronger, allowing use of thinner, lighter weight wafers. An intermediate InxGs1-xP grading layer starting as In(0.49)Ga(0.51) at the GaAs-coated Ge wafer surface and ending as InP at the top of the grading layer (backside of the InP cell) was used to attempt to bend some of the threading dislocations generated by lattice-mismatch between the Ge wafer and InP cell so they would be harmlessly confined in this grading layer. The best InP/Ge cell was independently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-sun 25 C AMO efficiently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-circuit photocurrent 22.6 mA/sq cm. We believe this is the first published report of an InP cell grown on a Ge wafer. Why get excited over a 9 percent InP/Ge cell? If we look at the cell weight and efficiency, a 9 percent InP cell on an 8 mil Ge wafer has about the same cell power density, 118 W/kg (BOL), as the best InP cell ever made, a 19 percent InP cell on an 18 mil InP wafer, because of the lighter Ge wafer weight. As cell panel materials become lighter, the cell weight becomes more important, and the advantage of lightweight cells to the panel power density becomes more important. In addition, although InP/Ge cells have a low beginning-of-life (BOL) efficiency due to dislocation defects, the InP/Ge cells are very radiation hard (end-of-life power similar to beginning-of-life). We have irradiated an InP/Ge cell with alpha particles to an equivalent fluence of 1.6 x 10(exp 16) 1 MeV electrons/sq cm and the efficiency is still 83 percent of its BOL value. At this fluence level, the power output of these InP/Ge cells matches the GaAs/Ge cell data tabulated in the JPL handbook. Data are presented

  8. [Notochord cells enhance proliferation and phenotype-keeping of intervertebral disc chondroid cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianfeng; Liu, Hao; Feng, Ganjun; Deng, Li; Li, Xiuqun; Liang, Tao

    2008-08-01

    To isolate and culture the chondroid cells and notochord cells from New Zealand rabbit immature nucleus pulposus (NP) in monolayer, and to evaluate the responsiveness of rabbit disc-derived chondroid cells to notochord cells with respect to cell proliferation and phenotype. The NP cells were released from the minced immature NP of 6 New Zealand rabbits (4-week-old) by 0.2% collagenase II digestion. The chondroid cells and notochord cells were purified by discontinuous gradient density centrifugation. The chondroid cells were cultured alone (group A) and co-cultured with notochord cells (group B) (1:1), and cell proliferation and phenotype including proteoglycan and collagen II were evaluated. The cells in both groups were observed by the inverted microscope, and the survival rates of the primary and passage cells were detected by toluidine blue staining. The growth curves of the second passage cells in both groups were determined by MTT. Besides, the expressions of proteoglycan and collagen II of the primary and passage cells were examined by toluidine blue and immunocytochemistry staining. The notochord cells and chondroid cells were isolated and purified. With the diameter of 10-15 microm, the notochord cell had abundant intracytoplasmic vesicles, while the chondroid cell, with the diameter of 4-6 microm, had no intracytoplasmic vesicle. The cell survival rate was 89.0%-95.3% in group A and 91.3%-96.3% in group B. There was no significant difference between the same passages in both groups (P > 0.05). The co-cultured cells (group B) increased in cell proliferation compared with the chondroid cells alone (group A) in repeated experiments. The cells in group A reached their logarithmic growth phase after 3-4 days of culture, while the cells in group B did after 2 days of culture. The cell proliferation in group B was more than that in group A after 4-day culture (P notochord cells are conducive for the proliferation and phenotype-keeping of the chondroid cells and

  9. DNA repair in mammalian cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    Cells defective in one or more aspects of repair are killed and often mutagenized more readily than normal cells by DNA damaging agents, and humans whose cells are deficient in repair are at an increased carcinogenic risk compared to normal individuals. The excision repair of uv induced pyrimidine dimers is a well studied system, but the details of the steps in this repair system are far from being understood in human cells. We know that there are a number of chemicals that mimic uv in that normal human cells repair DNA damage from both these agents and from uv by a long patch excision repair system, and that xeroderma pigmentosum cells defective in repair of uv are also defective in the repair of damage from these chemicals. The chemicals we have investigated are AAAF, 4-NQO, DMBA-epoxide, and ICR-170. We describe experiments, using several techniques, in which DNA excision repair is measured after treatment of various human cell strains with combinations of uv and these agents. If two agents have a common rate limiting step then, at doses high enough to saturate the repair system, one would expect the observed repair after a treatment with a combination of agents to be equal to that from one agent alone. Such is not the case for normal human or excision-deficient XP cells. In the former repair is additive and in the latter repair is usually appreciably less than that observed with either agent alone. Models that attempt to explain these surprising results involve complexes of enzymes and cofactors

  10. Prevalence of Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococcus isolated from children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba-Saddik, I A; Munibari, A A; Alhilali, A M; Ismail, S M; Murshed, F M; Coulter, J B S; Cuevas, L E; Hart, C A; Brabin, B J; Parry, C M

    2014-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus (GAS) and non-GAS infections among children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen, to evaluate the value of a rapid diagnostic test and the McIsaac score for patient management in this setting and to determine the occurrence of emm genotypes among a subset of GAS isolated from children with acute pharyngotonsillitis and a history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) or rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus infections in school-aged children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen, were diagnosed by a rapid GAS antigen detection test (RADT) and/or GAS culture from a throat swab. The RADT value and the McIsaac screening score for patient management were evaluated. The emm genotype of a subset of GAS isolates was determined. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus pharyngotonsillitis was diagnosed in 287/691 (41.5%; 95% CI 37.8-45.3) children. Group B, Group C and Group G beta-haemolytic streptococci were isolated from 4.3% children. The RADT had a sensitivity of 238/258 (92.2%) and specificity of 404/423 (95.5%) against GAS culture. A McIsaac score of ≥4 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 82% for confirmed GAS infection. The emm genotypes in 21 GAS isolates from children with pharyngitis and a history of ARF and confirmed RHD were emm87 (11), emm12 (6), emm28 (3) and emm5 (1). This study demonstrates a very high prevalence of GAS infections in Yemeni children and the value of the RADT and the McIsaac score in this setting. More extensive emm genotyping is necessary to understand the local epidemiology of circulating strains. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Thermodynamic properties of damaged DNA and its recognition by xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein and replication protein A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor; Stehlíková, Kristýna; Malina, Jaroslav; Vojtíšková, Marie; Kašpárková, Jana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 446, č. 1 (2006), s. 1-10 ISSN 0003-9861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/2030; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/03/H016; GA MZd(CZ) NR8562; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB400040601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : differential scanning calorimetry * xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein * replication protein A Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2006

  12. Identifikasi Carrier Bakteri Streptococcus β hemolyticus Group A pada Murid SD Negeri 13 Padang Berdasarkan Perbedaan Umur dan Jenis Kelamin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhila Aini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakStreptococcus β hemolyticus Grup A atau yang disebut juga Streptococcus pyogenes merupakan salah satu bakteri patogen yang banyak menginfeksi manusia.Bakteri ini dapat ditemukan sebagai carrier di saluran pernafasan terutama pada anak-anak, tidak menimbulkan penyakit tetapi berisiko untuk menyebarkan penyakit. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan jumlah carrier  bakteri Streptococcus β hemolyticus Grup A pada murid berdasarkan perbedaan umur dan jenis kelamin. Jenis penelitian ini adalah deskriptif cross-sectional dengan menggunakan sampel seluruh murid SD Negeri 13 Padang. Hasil penelitian adalah didapatkan 2 orang murid yang menderita carrier, yaitu pada kelompok usia>8-9 tahun dan >11 tahun. Berdasarkan jenis kelamin yang terdiri dari 54 orang laki-laki dan 50 orang perempuan, didapatkan 2 orang carrier yaitu hanya pada anak laki-laki. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa carrier bakteri Streptococcus β hemolyticus Group  A terdapat pada anak usia tersebut karena masih kurangnya pengetahuan tentang kebersihan. Carrier yang ditemukan hanya pada anak laki-laki kemungkinan disebabkan mereka lebih sering bermain di luar rumah dan terpapar dengan berbagai bakteri patogen dan kurang memperhatikan kebersihan diri.Kata kunci: carrier, streptococcus β hemolyticus grup A, umur, jenis kelamin AbstractGroup A Streptococcus β hemolyticus or also called Streptococcus pyogenes is one of many pathogenic bacteria that infect humans. These bacteria can be found as a carrier in the respiratory tract especially in children, do not cause disease but can be a risk for spreading the disease. This objective of this study was to determine the amount of the carrier of bacteria group A Streptococcus β hemolyticus based on age and gender differences. This research is a descriptive cross - sectional study using a sample of all students of SD Negeri 13 Padang. Based on the age of 104 students found that students who suffer 2 carrier, which is in the age

  13. Increased expression of high-mobility group A2: A novel independent indicator of poor prognosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongna Wei

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: High HMGA2 expression was related to lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in ESCC. Our results indicated that HMGA2 could act as a potential biomarker for prognosis evaluation of ESCC patients.

  14. The Scl1 protein of M6-type group A Streptococcus binds the human complement regulatory protein, factor H, and inhibits the alternative pathway of complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Clayton C; Han, Runlin; Hovis, Kelley M; Ciborowski, Pawel; Keene, Douglas R; Marconi, Richard T; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2008-02-01

    Non-specific activation of the complement system is regulated by the plasma glycoprotein factor H (FH). Bacteria can avoid complement-mediated opsonization and phagocytosis through acquiring FH to the cell surface. Here, we characterize an interaction between the streptococcal collagen-like protein Scl1.6 of M6-type group A Streptococcus (GAS) and FH. Using affinity chromatography with immobilized recombinant Scl1.6 protein, we co-eluted human plasma proteins with molecular weight of 155 kDa, 43 kDa and 38 kDa. Mass spectrometry identified the 155 kDa band as FH and two other bands as isoforms of the FH-related protein-1. The identities of all three bands were confirmed by Western immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Structure-function relation studies determined that the globular domain of the Scl1.6 variant specifically binds FH while fused to collagenous tails of various lengths. This binding is not restricted to Scl1.6 as the phylogenetically linked Scl1.55 variant also binds FH. Functional analyses demonstrated the cofactor activity of the rScl1.6-bound FH for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b. Finally, purified FH bound to the Scl1.6 protein present in the cell wall material obtained from M6-type GAS. In conclusion, we have identified a functional interaction between Scl1 and plasma FH, which may contribute to GAS evasion of complement-mediated opsonization and phagocytosis.

  15. Progress toward characterization of the group A Streptococcus metagenome: complete genome sequence of a macrolide-resistant serotype M6 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, David J; Porcella, Stephen F; Barbian, Kent D; Beres, Stephen B; Philips, Lauren E; Voyich, Jovanka M; DeLeo, Frank R; Martin, Judith M; Somerville, Greg A; Musser, James M

    2004-08-15

    We describe the genome sequence of a macrolide-resistant strain (MGAS10394) of serotype M6 group A Streptococcus (GAS). The genome is 1,900,156 bp in length, and 8 prophage-like elements or remnants compose 12.4% of the chromosome. A 8.3-kb prophage remnant encodes the SpeA4 variant of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A. The genome of strain MGAS10394 contains a chimeric genetic element composed of prophage genes and a transposon encoding the mefA gene conferring macrolide resistance. This chimeric element also has a gene encoding a novel surface-exposed protein (designated "R6 protein"), with an LPKTG cell-anchor motif located at the carboxyterminus. Surface expression of this protein was confirmed by flow cytometry. Humans with GAS pharyngitis caused by serotype M6 strains had antibody against the R6 protein present in convalescent, but not acute, serum samples. Our studies add to the theme that GAS prophage-encoded extracellular proteins contribute to host-pathogen interactions in a strain-specific fashion.

  16. Regulatory Role of GSK-3β on NF-κB, Nitric Oxide, and TNF-α in Group A Streptococcal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS imposes a great burden on humans. Efforts to minimize the associated morbidity and mortality represent a critical issue. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β is known to regulate inflammatory response in infectious diseases. However, the regulation of GSK-3β in GAS infection is still unknown. The present study investigates the interaction between GSK-3β, NF-κB, and possible related inflammatory mediators in vitro and in a mouse model. The results revealed that GAS could activate NF-κB, followed by an increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and NO production in a murine macrophage cell line. Activation of GSK-3β occurred after GAS infection, and inhibition of GSK-3β reduced iNOS expression and NO production. Furthermore, GSK-3β inhibitors reduced NF-κB activation and subsequent TNF-α production, which indicates that GSK-3β acts upstream of NF-κB in GAS-infected macrophages. Similar to the in vitro findings, administration of GSK-3β inhibitor in an air pouch GAS infection mouse model significantly reduced the level of serum TNF-α and improved the survival rate. The inhibition of GSK-3β to moderate the inflammatory effect might be an alternative therapeutic strategy against GAS infection.

  17. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from a Becker muscular dystrophy patient carrying a deletion of exons 45-55 of the dystrophin gene (CCMi002BMD-A-9 ∆45-55

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Gowran

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD is a dystrophinopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21. BMD mutations result in truncated semi-functional dystrophin isoforms. Consequently, less severe clinical symptoms become apparent later in life compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dermal fibroblasts from a BMD patient were electroporated with episomal plasmids containing reprogramming factors to create the induced pluripotent stem cell line: CCMi002BMD-A-9 that showed pluripotent markers, were karyotypically normal and capable of trilineage differentiation. MLPA analyses performed on DNA extracted from CCMi002BMD-A-9 showed an in-frame deletion of exons 45 to 55 (CCMi002BMD-A-9 Δ45-55.

  18. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from a Becker muscular dystrophy patient carrying a deletion of exons 45-55 of the dystrophin gene (CCMi002BMD-A-9 ∆45-55).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowran, Aoife; Spaltro, Gabriella; Casalnuovo, Federica; Vigorelli, Vera; Spinelli, Pietro; Castiglioni, Elisa; Rovina, Davide; Paganini, Stefania; Di Segni, Marina; Gervasini, Cristina; Nigro, Patrizia; Pompilio, Giulio

    2018-04-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a dystrophinopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21. BMD mutations result in truncated semi-functional dystrophin isoforms. Consequently, less severe clinical symptoms become apparent later in life compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dermal fibroblasts from a BMD patient were electroporated with episomal plasmids containing reprogramming factors to create the induced pluripotent stem cell line: CCMi002BMD-A-9 that showed pluripotent markers, were karyotypically normal and capable of trilineage differentiation. MLPA analyses performed on DNA extracted from CCMi002BMD-A-9 showed an in-frame deletion of exons 45 to 55 (CCMi002BMD-A-9 Δ45-55). Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cockayne syndrome group A and B proteins converge on transcription-linked resolution of non-B DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Tseng, Anne; Jensen, Martin Borch

    2016-01-01

    of CSA or CSB in a neuroblastoma cell line converges on mitochondrial dysfunction caused by defects in ribosomal DNA transcription and activation of the DNA damage sensor poly-ADP ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1). Indeed, inhibition of ribosomal DNA transcription leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in a number...... to polymerase stalling at non-B DNA in a neuroblastoma cell line, in particular at G-quadruplex structures, and recombinant CSB can melt G-quadruplex structures. Indeed, stabilization of G-quadruplex structures activates PARP1 and leads to accelerated aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. In conclusion, this work...

  20. Increased β-haemolytic group A streptococcal M6 serotype and streptodornase B-specific cellular immune responses in Swedish narcolepsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, A; Poiret, T; Svahn, B-M; Valentini, D; Khademi, M; Kockum, I; Lima, I; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Lamb, F; Fink, K; Meng, Q; Kumar, A; Rane, L; Olsson, T; Maeurer, M

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy associated with the HLA allele DQB1*06:02. Genetic predisposition along with external triggering factors may drive autoimmune responses, ultimately leading to the selective loss of hypocretin-positive neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate potential aetiological factors in Swedish cases of postvaccination (Pandemrix) narcolepsy defined by interferon-gamma (IFNγ) production from immune cells in response to molecularly defined targets. Cellular reactivity defined by IFNγ production was examined in blood from 38 (HLA-DQB1*06:02(+) ) Pandemrix-vaccinated narcolepsy cases and 76 (23 HLA-DQB1*06:02(+) and 53 HLA-DQB1*06:02(-) ) control subjects, matched for age, sex and exposure, using a variety of different antigens: β-haemolytic group A streptococcal (GAS) antigens (M5, M6 and streptodornase B), influenza (the pandemic A/H1N1/California/7/09 NYMC X-179A and A/H1N1/California/7/09 NYMC X-181 vaccine antigens, previous Flu-A and -B vaccine targets, A/H1N1/Brisbane/59/2007, A/H1N1/Solomon Islands/3/2006, A/H3N2/Uruguay/716/2007, A/H3N2/Wisconsin/67/2005, A/H5N1/Vietnam/1203/2004 and B/Malaysia/2506/2004), noninfluenza viral targets (CMVpp65, EBNA-1 and EBNA-3) and auto-antigens (hypocretin peptide, Tribbles homolog 2 peptide cocktail and extract from rat hypothalamus tissue). IFN-γ production was significantly increased in whole blood from narcolepsy cases in response to streptococcus serotype M6 (P = 0.0065) and streptodornase B protein (P = 0.0050). T-cell recognition of M6 and streptodornase B was confirmed at the single-cell level by intracellular cytokine (IL-2, IFNγ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and IL-17) production after stimulation with synthetic M6 or streptodornase B peptides. Significantly, higher (P = 0.02) titres of serum antistreptolysin O were observed in narcolepsy cases, compared to vaccinated controls. β-haemolytic GAS may be

  1. Structural dynamics and interactions of Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA98-210) with damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sushmita; Mattaparthi, Venkata Satish Kumar

    2017-10-25

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) in higher organisms repair massive DNA abrasions caused by ultraviolet rays, and various mutagens, where Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein is known to be involved in damage recognition step. Any mutations in XPA cause classical Xeroderma pigmentosum disease. The extent to which XPA is required in the NER is still unclear. Here, we present the comparative study on the structural and conformational changes in globular DNA binding domain of XPA 98-210 in DNA bound and DNA free state. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulation was carried out for both XPA 98-210 systems using AMBER force fields. We observed that XPA 98-210 in presence of damaged DNA exhibited more structural changes compared to XPA 98-210 in its free form. When XPA is in contact with DNA, we found marked stability of the complex due to the formation of characteristic longer antiparallel β-sheets consisting mainly lysine residues.

  2. Group A rotavirus and norovirus display sharply distinct seasonal profiles in Belém, northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Anderson Monteiro Siqueira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Several viruses have been associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE, and group A rotavirus (RVA and nor-ovirus (NoV are the most prevalent. This study aimed to assess their prevalence among children hospitalised for diarrhoea during a three-year surveillance study. From May 2008-April 2011, overall positivity rates of 21.6% (628/2904 and 35.4% (171/483 were observed for RVA and NoV, respectively. The seasonality observed indicated distinct patterns when both viruses were compared. This finding may explain why hospitalisation for AGE remains constant throughout the year. Continuous AGE monitoring is needed to better assess the patterns of infection.

  3. Epidemiology of group A rotavirus infection after the introduction of monovalent vaccine in the National Immunization Program of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ayed, Mohammed Saeed Zayed; Asaad, Ahmed Morad; Qureshi, Mohamed Ansar; Hawan, Ali Abdullah

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of group A rotavirus (RVA) gastroenteritis and the distribution of the RVA genotypes as well as to determine a possible change in the age of occurrence of the RVA infection in the first 2 years after Rotarix® vaccine introduction in Saudi Arabia. This descriptive study included 850 hospitalized children vaccine introduction, especially in the age group between 1 and 12 months, and a reduction in the circulation of G1P[6]. The parallel rise and spread of G2P[4] in post-vaccination period might pose an impact to long-term vaccine efficacy. Continued surveillance studies in different Saudi regions are crucial to document the effectiveness of Rotarix® vaccine and evaluate the potential emergence of rare/novel RVA genotypes. J. Med. Virol. 89:429-434, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis and carriage rate among Egyptian children: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Ghany, Shereen Mohamed; Abdelmaksoud, Abeer Ahmed; Saber, Sally Mohamed; Abd El Hamid, Dalia Hosni

    2015-01-01

    Improper prescription of antibiotics for treatment of acute pharyngitis predisposes to emergence of a carrier state and antibiotic-resistant strains of group A streptococci (GAS). We sought to identify the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of group A streptococci among Egyptian children with acute pharyngitis compared with asymptomatic children. Case-control study conducted from September 2013 to August 2014 at a pediatric outpatient clinic in Egypt. Throat swabs were collected from children with acute pharyngitis and from asymptomatic children. We evaluated the accuracy of McIsaac scores and the rapid antigen detection test (RADT) for diagnosis of GAS pharyngitis with throat culture as a reference test. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of GAS isolates was done by the disc diffusion method. Of 142 children with acute pharyngitis (cases) and 300 asymptomatic children (controls) (age range, 4-16 years), GAS pharyngitis was diagnosed in 60/142 children (42.2%); 48/300 (16%) were found to be carriers. All GAS isolates in the case group were sensitive to penicillin; however, an MIC90 (0.12 micro g/mL) for penicillin is high and an alarming sign. The resistance rate to macrolides was 70% with the cMLSB phenotype in 65.1%. The sensitivities and specificities were 78.3% and 73.2% for McIsaac score of >=4 and 81.1% and 93.9% for RADT, respectively. GAS isolates in the control group were 100% sensitive to penicillin, while 12.5% and 37.5% were resistant to macrolides and tetracycline, respectively. An increased MIC90 for GAS isolates to penicillin is an alarming sign. A high frequency of resistance to macrolides was also observed.

  5. Fiscal 1993 achievement report on New Sunshine Program. Development of photovoltaic power generation system practicalization technology (Development of ultrahigh-efficiency solar cell technology - Development of crystalline compound solar cell technology); 1993 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Chokokoritsu taiyo denchi no gijutsu kaihatsu (kessho kagobutsu taiyo denchi no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Efforts are made to enhance InGaP cell efficiency (target 16%) on a GaAs substrate by prolonging the InGaP minor carrier life span. In preparation of InGaP cell fabrication on silicon, a study is made of epitaxial growth of a wide band gap layer. By improving on the conditions of InGaP heteroepitaxial growth under the MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition) method on a GaAs substrate, the InGaP cell base layer minority carrier life span is increased to be longer than 5ns. The use of epitaxial crystals greatly improves on the efficiency of InGaP cells on a GaAs substrate. Furthermore, cell structure improvement and the like are accomplished, which results in the achievement of an efficiency rate of 17.4%. As a basic technology for the fabrication of InGaP/Si tandem cells, experiments are conducted of growing a wide gap layer for the growth of Ln{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}P on an silicon substrate. For the evaluation of epitaxial crystals and interfaces, time resolution photoluminescence measurement is performed and the result is compared with the result of simulation. (NEDO)

  6. Cockayne syndrome group A and B proteins converge on transcription-linked resolution of non-B DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Tseng, Anne; Borch Jensen, Martin; Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Fang, Evandro Fei; Iyama, Teruaki; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Marosi, Krisztina; Froetscher, Lynn; Kassahun, Henok; Eckley, David Mark; Maul, Robert W; Bastian, Paul; De, Supriyo; Ghosh, Soumita; Nilsen, Hilde; Goldberg, Ilya G; Mattson, Mark P; Wilson, David M; Brosh, Robert M; Gorospe, Myriam; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-11-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a neurodegenerative accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in the CSA or CSB genes. Although the pathogenesis of Cockayne syndrome has remained elusive, recent work implicates mitochondrial dysfunction in the disease progression. Here, we present evidence that loss of CSA or CSB in a neuroblastoma cell line converges on mitochondrial dysfunction caused by defects in ribosomal DNA transcription and activation of the DNA damage sensor poly-ADP ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1). Indeed, inhibition of ribosomal DNA transcription leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in a number of cell lines. Furthermore, machine-learning algorithms predict that diseases with defects in ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription have mitochondrial dysfunction, and, accordingly, this is found when factors involved in rDNA transcription are knocked down. Mechanistically, loss of CSA or CSB leads to polymerase stalling at non-B DNA in a neuroblastoma cell line, in particular at G-quadruplex structures, and recombinant CSB can melt G-quadruplex structures. Indeed, stabilization of G-quadruplex structures activates PARP1 and leads to accelerated aging in Caenorhabditis elegans In conclusion, this work supports a role for impaired ribosomal DNA transcription in Cockayne syndrome and suggests that transcription-coupled resolution of secondary structures may be a mechanism to repress spurious activation of a DNA damage response.

  7. Whole genome sequencing of group A Streptococcus: development and evaluation of an automated pipeline for emmgene typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Kapatai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes group A Streptococcus (GAS is the most common cause of bacterial throat infections, and can cause mild to severe skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, erysipelas, necrotizing fasciitis, as well as systemic and fatal infections including septicaemia and meningitis. Estimated annual incidence for invasive group A streptococcal infection (iGAS in industrialised countries is approximately three per 100,000 per year. Typing is currently used in England and Wales to monitor bacterial strains of S. pyogenes causing invasive infections and those isolated from patients and healthcare/care workers in cluster and outbreak situations. Sequence analysis of the emm gene is the currently accepted gold standard methodology for GAS typing. A comprehensive database of emm types observed from superficial and invasive GAS strains from England and Wales informs outbreak control teams during investigations. Each year the Bacterial Reference Department, Public Health England (PHE receives approximately 3,000 GAS isolates from England and Wales. In April 2014 the Bacterial Reference Department, PHE began genomic sequencing of referred S. pyogenes isolates and those pertaining to selected elderly/nursing care or maternity clusters from 2010 to inform future reference services and outbreak analysis (n = 3, 047. In line with the modernizing strategy of PHE, we developed a novel bioinformatics pipeline that can predict emmtypes using whole genome sequence (WGS data. The efficiency of this method was measured by comparing the emmtype assigned by this method against the result from the current gold standard methodology; concordance to emmsubtype level was observed in 93.8% (2,852/3,040 of our cases, whereas in 2.4% (n = 72 of our cases concordance was observed to emm type level. The remaining 3.8% (n = 117 of our cases corresponded to novel types/subtypes, contamination, laboratory sample transcription errors or problems arising

  8. Group A Rotaviruses in Chinese Bats: Genetic Composition, Serology, and Evidence for Bat-to-Human Transmission and Reassortment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Biao; Huang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Fuqiang; Tan, Weilong; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Qin, Shaomin; Xu, Lin; Zhao, Zihan; Yang, Ling'en; Wang, Quanxi; Hu, Tingsong; Bao, Xiaolei; Wu, Jianmin; Tu, Changchun

    2017-06-15

    Bats are natural reservoirs for many pathogenic viruses, and increasing evidence supports the notion that bats can also harbor group A rotaviruses (RVAs), important causative agents of diarrhea in children and young animals. Currently, 8 RVA strains possessing completely novel genotype constellations or genotypes possibly originating from other mammals have been identified from African and Chinese bats. However, all the data were mainly based on detection of RVA RNA, present only during acute infections, which does not permit assessment of the true exposure of a bat population to RVA. To systematically investigate the genetic diversity of RVAs, 547 bat anal swabs or gut samples along with 448 bat sera were collected from five South Chinese provinces. Specific reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) screening found four RVA strains. Strain GLRL1 possessed a completely novel genotype constellation, whereas the other three possessed a constellation consistent with the MSLH14-like genotype, a newly characterized group of viruses widely prevalent in Chinese insectivorous bats. Among the latter, strain LZHP2 provided strong evidence of cross-species transmission of RVAs from bats to humans, whereas strains YSSK5 and BSTM70 were likely reassortants between typical MSLH14-like RVAs and human RVAs. RVA-specific antibodies were detected in 10.7% (48/448) of bat sera by an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIFA). Bats in Guangxi and Yunnan had a higher RVA-specific antibody prevalence than those from Fujian and Zhejiang provinces. These observations provide evidence for cross-species transmission of MSLH14-like bat RVAs to humans, highlighting the impact of bats as reservoirs of RVAs on public health. IMPORTANCE Bat viruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses, are important pathogens causing outbreaks of severe emerging infectious diseases. However, little is known about bat viruses capable

  9. Modeling xeroderma pigmentosum associated neurological pathologies with patients-derived iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lina; Xu, Xiuling; Ren, Ruotong; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Weiqi; Yang, Jiping; Ren, Xiaoqing; Wang, Si; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Liang; Yu, Yang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Yang, Ze; Yuan, Yun; Qiao, Jie; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Qu, Jing; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a group of genetic disorders caused by mutations of XP-associated genes, resulting in impairment of DNA repair. XP patients frequently exhibit neurological degeneration, but the underlying mechanism is unknown, in part due to lack of proper disease models. Here, we generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) harboring mutations in five different XP genes including XPA, XPB, XPC, XPG, and XPV. These iPSCs were further differentiated to neural cells, and their susceptibility to DNA damage stress was investigated. Mutation of XPA in either neural stem cells (NSCs) or neurons resulted in severe DNA damage repair defects, and these neural cells with mutant XPA were hyper-sensitive to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Thus, XP-mutant neural cells represent valuable tools to clarify the molecular mechanisms of neurological abnormalities in the XP patients.

  10. Substrate overlap and functional competition between human nucleotide excision repair and Escherichia coli photolyase and (A)BC excision nuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibghat-Ullah; Sancar, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Human cell free extract prepared by the method of Manley et al. carries out repair synthesis on UV-irradiated DNA. Removal of pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation with DNA photolyase reduces repair synthesis by about 50%. With excess enzyme in the reaction mixture photolyase reduced the repair signal by the same amount even in the absence of photoreactivating light, presumably by binding to pyrimidine dimers and interfering with the binding of human damage recognition protein. Similarly, the UvrB subunit of Escherichia coli (A)BC excinuclease when loaded onto UV-irradiated or psoralen-adducted DNA inhibited repair synthesis by cell-free extract by 75-80%. The opposite was true also as HeLa cell free extract specifically inhibited the photorepair of a thymine dimer by DNA photolyase and its removal by (A)BC excinuclease. Cell-free extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A and C were equally effective in blocking the E. coli repair proteins, while extracts from complementation groups D and E were ineffective in blocking the E. coli enzyme. These results suggest that XP-D and XP-E cells are defective in the damage recognition subunits(s) of human excision nuclease

  11. Gingival Pigmentation Affected by Smoking among Different Age Groups: A Quantitative Analysis of Gingival Pigmentation Using Clinical Oral Photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tomotaka; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hanioka, Takashi; Naito, Toru

    2017-08-04

    The presence of any age-related differences in gingival pigmentation associated with smoking, particularly in a young population, remains to be fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the age-related differences in smoking gingival pigmentation. Gingival pigmentation was analyzed using the gingival melanosis record (GMR) and Hedin's classification with frontal oral photographs taken at 16 dental offices in Japan. Participants were categorized into 10-year age groups, and their baseline photographs were compared. In addition, to evaluate the effect of smoking cessation on gingival pigmentation, subjects were divided into a former smoker group (stopped smoking) and current smoker group. A total of 259 patients 19 to 79 years of age were analyzed. People in their 30s showed the most widespread gingival pigmentation. In addition, subjects in their 20s showed a weak effect of smoking cessation on gingival pigmentation. These findings suggested that the gingival pigmentation induced by smoking was more remarkable in young people than in middle-aged people. This information may be useful for anti-smoking education, especially among young populations with a high affinity for smoking.

  12. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Are emm Type-Specific in Highly Prevalent Group A Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Chan, Yuen-Chi; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are the bacterial adaptive immune system against foreign nucleic acids. Given the variable nature of CRISPR, it could be a good marker for molecular epidemiology. Group A streptococcus is one of the major human pathogens. It has two CRISPR loci, including CRISPR01 and CRISPR02. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CRISPR-associated gene cassettes (cas) and CRISPR arrays in highly prevalent emm types. The cas cassette and CRISPR array in two CRISPR loci were analyzed in a total of 332 strains, including emm1, emm3, emm4, emm12, and emm28 strains. The CRISPR type was defined by the spacer content of each CRISPR array. All strains had at least one cas cassette or CRISPR array. More than 90% of the spacers were found in one emm type, specifically. Comparing the consistency between emm and CRISPR types by Simpson's index of diversity and the adjusted Wallace coefficient, CRISPR01 type was concordant to emm type, and CRISPR02 showed unidirectional congruence to emm type, suggesting that at least for the majority of isolates causing infection in high income countries, the emm type can be inferred from CRISPR analysis, which can further discriminate isolates sharing the same emm type.

  13. Detection and molecular characterization of group A rotavirus from hospitalized children in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Anibal Carvalho-Costa

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a major cause of infantile acute diarrhea, causing about 440,000 deaths per year, mainly in developing countries. The World Health Organization has been recommending the assessment of rotavirus burden and strain characterization as part of the strategies of immunization programs against this pathogen. In this context, a prospective study was made on a sample of 134 children with acute diarrhea and severe dehydration admitted to venous fluid therapy in two state hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from February to September 2004. Rotavirus where detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE and by an enzyme-linked immunoassay to rotavirus and adenovirus (EIARA in 48% of the children. Positive samples for group A rotavirus (n = 65 were analyzed by reverse transcription/heminested multiplex polymerase chain reaction to determine the frequency of G and [P] genotypes and, from these, 64 samples could be typed. The most frequent G genotype was G1 (58% followed by G9 (40%. One mixed infection (G1/G9 was detected. The only [P] genotype identified was [8]. In order to estimate the rotavirus infection frequency in children who acquired diarrhea as hospital infection in those hospitals, we studied 24 patients, detecting the pathogen in 41% of them. This data suggest that genotype G9 is an important genotype in Rio de Janeiro, with implications to the future strategies of vaccination against rotavirus, reinforcing the need of continuous monitoring of circulating strains of the pathogen, in a surveillance context.

  14. Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) protein has intrinsic affinity for nucleic acids with preference for single-stranded forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fenghua; Qian, Liangyue; Zhao, Xinliang; Liu, Jesse Y; Song, Limin; D'Urso, Gennaro; Jain, Chaitanya; Zhang, Yanbin

    2012-02-10

    The Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) gene is one of 15 disease-causing genes and has been found to be mutated in ∼60% of Fanconi anemia patients. Using purified protein, we report that human FANCA has intrinsic affinity for nucleic acids. FANCA binds to both single-stranded (ssDNA) and double-stranded (dsDNA) DNAs; however, its affinity for ssDNA is significantly higher than for dsDNA in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. FANCA also binds to RNA with an intriguingly higher affinity than its DNA counterpart. FANCA requires a certain length of nucleic acids for optimal binding. Using DNA and RNA ladders, we determined that the minimum number of nucleotides required for FANCA recognition is ∼30 for both DNA and RNA. By testing the affinity between FANCA and a variety of DNA structures, we found that a 5'-flap or 5'-tail on DNA facilitates its interaction with FANCA. A patient-derived FANCA truncation mutant (Q772X) has diminished affinity for both DNA and RNA. In contrast, the complementing C-terminal fragment of Q772X, C772-1455, retains the differentiated nucleic acid-binding activity (RNA > ssDNA > dsDNA), indicating that the nucleic acid-binding domain of FANCA is located primarily at its C terminus, where most disease-causing mutations are found.

  15. Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group A (FANCA) Protein Has Intrinsic Affinity for Nucleic Acids with Preference for Single-stranded Forms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fenghua; Qian, Liangyue; Zhao, Xinliang; Liu, Jesse Y.; Song, Limin; D'Urso, Gennaro; Jain, Chaitanya; Zhang, Yanbin

    2012-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA) gene is one of 15 disease-causing genes and has been found to be mutated in ∼60% of Fanconi anemia patients. Using purified protein, we report that human FANCA has intrinsic affinity for nucleic acids. FANCA binds to both single-stranded (ssDNA) and double-stranded (dsDNA) DNAs; however, its affinity for ssDNA is significantly higher than for dsDNA in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. FANCA also binds to RNA with an intriguingly higher affinity than its DNA counterpart. FANCA requires a certain length of nucleic acids for optimal binding. Using DNA and RNA ladders, we determined that the minimum number of nucleotides required for FANCA recognition is ∼30 for both DNA and RNA. By testing the affinity between FANCA and a variety of DNA structures, we found that a 5′-flap or 5′-tail on DNA facilitates its interaction with FANCA. A patient-derived FANCA truncation mutant (Q772X) has diminished affinity for both DNA and RNA. In contrast, the complementing C-terminal fragment of Q772X, C772–1455, retains the differentiated nucleic acid-binding activity (RNA > ssDNA > dsDNA), indicating that the nucleic acid-binding domain of FANCA is located primarily at its C terminus, where most disease-causing mutations are found. PMID:22194614

  16. Neutronic calculation of reactor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaliff, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    Multigroup calculations of cylindrical pin cells were programmed, in Fortran IV, upon the basis of collision probabilities in each energy group. A rational approximation to the fuel-to-fuel collision probability in resonance groups was used. Together with the intermediate resonance theory, cross sections corrected for heterogeneity and absorber interactions were found. For the optimization of the program, the cell of a BWR reactor was taken as reference. Data for such a cell and the reactor's operating conditions are presented. PINCEL is a fast and flexible program, with checked results, around a 69-group library. (M.E.L.) [es

  17. The FasX Small Regulatory RNA Negatively Regulates the Expression of Two Fibronectin-Binding Proteins in Group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danger, Jessica L; Makthal, Nishanth; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Sumby, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) causes more than 700 million human infections each year. The success of this pathogen can be traced in part to the extensive arsenal of virulence factors that are available for expression in temporally and spatially specific manners. To modify the expression of these virulence factors, GAS use both protein- and RNA-based regulators, with the best-characterized RNA-based regulator being the small regulatory RNA (sRNA) FasX. FasX is a 205-nucleotide sRNA that contributes to GAS virulence by enhancing the expression of the thrombolytic secreted virulence factor streptokinase and by repressing the expression of the collagen-binding cell surface pili. Here, we have expanded the FasX regulon, showing that this sRNA also negatively regulates the expression of the adhesion- and internalization-promoting, fibronectin-binding proteins PrtF1 and PrtF2. FasX posttranscriptionally regulates the expression of PrtF1/2 through a mechanism that involves base pairing to the prtF1 and prtF2 mRNAs within their 5' untranslated regions, overlapping the mRNA ribosome-binding sites. Thus, duplex formation between FasX and the prtF1 and prtF2 mRNAs blocks ribosome access, leading to an inhibition of mRNA translation. Given that FasX positively regulates the expression of the spreading factor streptokinase and negatively regulates the expression of the collagen-binding pili and of the fibronectin-binding PrtF1/2, our data are consistent with FasX functioning as a molecular switch that governs the transition of GAS between the colonization and dissemination stages of infection. More than half a million deaths each year are a consequence of infections caused by GAS. Insights into how this pathogen regulates the production of proteins during infection may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic or preventative regimens aimed at inhibiting this activity. Here, we have expanded insight into the regulatory activity of the GAS small

  18. The role of group A beta hemolytic streptococcal infections in patients with tic and tourett's disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorbakhsh S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Recently, many cases diagnosed as pediatric autoimmune neuropsy-chiatric disorders associated with group A beta hemolytic streptococcus infection (PANDAS due to production of autoimmune antibodies. Object of this study was comparison the titer of antibodies against group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (ASOT, Anti-DNase B, and Anti streptokinase between children with movement disorders (tic and tourett's disorders; pediatric autoimmune psychiatric disorders and healthy control."n"nMethods: A cross sectional/ cases control study in pediatric neuropsychology ward and clinics in two referral hospitals (Rasoul & Aliasghar affiliated by IUMS had done in Tehran, Iran (2008-2010. We selected 53 children with tic disorder and 76 healthy controls (age matched children. The antibody titers (IU/ml in their area were compared and analyzed statistically. The area under ROC, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of tests calculated."n"nResults: Age of cases was between 4-16 years. All antibody titers had significant difference between two groups (p<0.0001; p=0.05; p=0.002 for ASOT, Anti-DNase and Antihyaloronidase respectively. ASOT (cut off level> 200IU/ml had 75% sensitivity; 84% specificity and 80

  19. Protein array profiling of tic patient sera reveals a broad range and enhanced immune response against Group A Streptococcus antigens.

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    Mauro Bombaci

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS is widely recognized as a major cause of common pharyngitis as well as of severe invasive diseases and non-suppurative sequelae associated with the existence of GAS antigens eliciting host autoantibodies. It has been proposed that a subset of paediatric disorders characterized by tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms would exacerbate in association with relapses of GAS-associated pharyngitis. This hypothesis is however still controversial. In the attempt to shed light on the contribution of GAS infections to the onset of neuropsychiatric or behavioral disorders affecting as many as 3% of children and adolescents, we tested the antibody response of tic patient sera to a representative panel of GAS antigens. In particular, 102 recombinant proteins were spotted on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides and probed against 61 sera collected from young patients with typical tic neuropsychiatric symptoms but with no overt GAS infection. Sera from 35 children with neither tic disorder nor overt GAS infection were also analyzed. The protein recognition patterns of these two sera groups were compared with those obtained using 239 sera from children with GAS-associated pharyngitis. This comparative analysis identified 25 antigens recognized by sera of the three patient groups and 21 antigens recognized by tic and pharyngitis sera, but poorly or not recognized by sera from children without tic. Interestingly, these antigens appeared to be, in quantitative terms, more immunogenic in tic than in pharyngitis patients. Additionally, a third group of antigens appeared to be preferentially and specifically recognized by tic sera. These findings provide the first evidence that tic patient sera exhibit immunological profiles typical of individuals who elicited a broad, specific and strong immune response against GAS. This may be relevant in the context of one of the hypothesis proposing that GAS

  20. Population and Whole Genome Sequence Based Characterization of Invasive Group A Streptococci Recovered in the United States during 2015

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    Sopio Chochua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococci (GAS are genetically diverse. Determination of strain features can reveal associations with disease and resistance and assist in vaccine formulation. We employed whole-genome sequence (WGS-based characterization of 1,454 invasive GAS isolates recovered in 2015 by Active Bacterial Core Surveillance and performed conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Predictions were made for genotype, GAS carbohydrate, antimicrobial resistance, surface proteins (M family, fibronectin binding, T, R28, secreted virulence proteins (Sda1, Sic, exotoxins, hyaluronate capsule, and an upregulated nga operon (encodes NADase and streptolysin O promoter (Pnga3. Sixty-four M protein gene (emm types were identified among 69 clonal complexes (CCs, including one CC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. emm types predicted the presence or absence of active sof determinants and were segregated into sof-positive or sof-negative genetic complexes. Only one “emm type switch” between strains was apparent. sof-negative strains showed a propensity to cause infections in the first quarter of the year, while sof+ strain infections were more likely in summer. Of 1,454 isolates, 808 (55.6% were Pnga3 positive and 637 (78.9% were accounted for by types emm1, emm89, and emm12. Theoretical coverage of a 30-valent M vaccine combined with an M-related protein (Mrp vaccine encompassed 98% of the isolates. WGS data predicted that 15.3, 13.8, 12.7, and 0.6% of the isolates were nonsusceptible to tetracycline, erythromycin plus clindamycin, erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, respectively, with only 19 discordant phenotypic results. Close phylogenetic clustering of emm59 isolates was consistent with recent regional emergence. This study revealed strain traits informative for GAS disease incidence tracking, outbreak detection, vaccine strategy, and antimicrobial therapy.

  1. M protein typing of Thai group A streptococcal isolates by PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

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    Good Michael F

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group A streptococcal (GAS infections can lead to the development of severe post-infectious sequelae, such as rheumatic fever (RF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD. RF and RHD are a major health concern in developing countries, and in indigenous populations of developed nations. The majority of GAS isolates are M protein-nontypeable (MNT by standard serotyping. However, GAS typing is a necessary tool in the epidemiologically analysis of GAS and provides useful information for vaccine development. Although DNA sequencing is the most conclusive method for M protein typing, this is not a feasible approach especially in developing countries. To overcome this problem, we have developed a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP-based assay for molecular typing the M protein gene (emm of GAS. Results Using one pair of primers, 13 known GAS M types showed one to four bands of PCR products and after digestion with Alu I, they gave different RFLP patterns. Of 106 GAS isolates examined from the normal Thai population and from patients with GAS-associated complications including RHD, 95 isolates gave RFLP patterns that corresponded to the 13 known M types. Only 11 isolates gave RFLP patterns that differed from the 13 known M types. These were then analyzed by DNA sequencing and six additional M types were identified. In addition, we found that M93 GAS was the most common M type in the population studied, and is consistent with a previous study of Thai GAS isolates. Conclusion PCR-RFLP analysis has the potential for the rapid screening of different GAS M types and is therefore considerably advantageous as an alternative M typing approach in developing countries in which GAS is endemic.

  2. Awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic testing for cancer risk among ethnic minority groups: a systematic review.

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    Hann, Katie E J; Freeman, Madeleine; Fraser, Lindsay; Waller, Jo; Sanderson, Saskia C; Rahman, Belinda; Side, Lucy; Gessler, Sue; Lanceley, Anne

    2017-05-25

    Genetic testing for risk of hereditary cancer can help patients to make important decisions about prevention or early detection. US and UK studies show that people from ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive genetic testing. It is important to understand various groups' awareness of genetic testing and its acceptability to avoid further disparities in health care. This review aims to identify and detail awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic counselling/testing for cancer risk prediction in ethnic minority groups. A search was carried out in PsycInfo, CINAHL, Embase and MEDLINE. Search terms referred to ethnicity, genetic testing/counselling, cancer, awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions. Quantitative and qualitative studies, written in English, and published between 2000 and 2015, were included. Forty-one studies were selected for review: 39 from the US, and two from Australia. Results revealed low awareness and knowledge of genetic counselling/testing for cancer susceptibility amongst ethnic minority groups including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanics. Attitudes towards genetic testing were generally positive; perceived benefits included positive implications for personal health and being able to inform family. However, negative attitudes were also evident, particularly the anticipated emotional impact of test results, and concerns about confidentiality, stigma, and discrimination. Chinese Australian groups were less studied, but of interest was a finding from qualitative research indicating that different views of who close family members are could impact on reported family history of cancer, which could in turn impact a risk assessment. Interventions are needed to increase awareness and knowledge of genetic testing for cancer risk and to reduce the perceived stigma and taboo surrounding the topic of cancer in ethnic minority groups. More detailed research is needed in countries other than the US and

  3. Diversity of group A rotavirus genes detected in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Ana Carolina Bernardes Dulgheroff

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Group A rotaviruses are the main causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis. The segmented nature of the viral genome allows reassortment of genome segments, which can generate genetic variants. In this study, we characterized the diversity of the VP7, VP4 (VP8*, VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes of the rotaviruses that circulated from 2005 to 2011 in the Triângulo Mineiro (TM region of Brazil. Samples with genotypes G2 (sublineages IVa-1 and IVa-3, G1 (sublineage I-A, G9 (lineage III, G12 (lineages II and III, G8 (lineage II, G3 (lineage III, P[4] (sublineages IVa and IVb, P[8] (sublineages P[8]-3.6, P[8]-3.3, and P[8]-3.1, I2 (lineage VII, E2 (lineages VI, XII, and X, and H2 (lineage III were identified. The associations found in the samples were G1, G9, or G12 with P[8]-I1-E1-H1; G2 or G8 with P[4]-I2-E2-H2; G12 with I3-E3-H6; and G3 with P[4]-I2-E3-H3 (previously unreported combination. Reassortment events in G2P[4] strains and an apparent pattern of temporal segregation within the lineages were observed. Five TM samples contained genes that exhibited high nucleotide and amino acid identities with strains of animal origin. The present study includes a period of pre- and post-introduction of rotavirus vaccination in all Brazilian territories, thereby serving as a basis for monitoring changes in the genetic constitution of rotaviruses. The results also contribute to the understanding of the diversity and evolution of rotaviruses in a global context.

  4. Detection and genotyping of group A rotaviruses isolated from sewage samples in Monastir, Tunisia between April 2007 and April 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassine-Zaafrane, M; Kaplon, J; Ben Salem, I; Sdiri-Loulizi, K; Sakly, N; Pothier, P; Aouni, M; Ambert-Balay, K

    2015-11-01

    To ascertain the viral load, the distribution of G and P types of group A rotaviruses (RV-A) in sewage samples and to compare strains in clinical, animal and environmental samples. During our study from April 2007 to April 2010, 518 samples of raw and treated sewage were collected from two biological sewage treatment plants (STPs) located in the Monastir region, Tunisia. RV-A was detected by real-time RT-PCR in 375 (72·4%) sewage samples. According to the quantification results of RV-A, it appears that the viral load in raw and treated sewage of the two STPs was quite similar (P = 0·735). The genotyping of RV-A strains detected in sewage samples showed a great diversity with 10 G types and 8 P types. Most of them were described as common in humans, but we also detected genotypes commonly found in animals. All the genotypes detected in two previous studies performed in our laboratory on clinical and bovine samples were also found in environmental samples. However, some genotypes commonly found in animal were only found in sewage samples. The comparison of environmental, clinical and animal data suggests that STPs may convey not only human sewage but also animal wastes, both of them contaminated with numerous RV-A strains which are not efficiently eliminated by the sewage treatment process and may spread to surface waters. This work demonstrates the potential release of human and animal RV-A into water sources, representing a public health risk, by inducing gastroenteritis in population, but also by increasing the risk of zoonotic transmission and formation of reassortant viruses which could get a higher infectious potential. Our findings also suggest that monitoring of sewage may provide an additional tool to determine the epidemiology of RV-A circulating in a given community. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. The change of macrolide resistance rates in group A Streptococcus isolates from children between 2002 and 2013 in Asahikawa city.

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    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    This study targeted patients in the Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Kosei Hospital, between January 2002 and December 2013. In patients suspected of having hemolytic streptococcal infection, Group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains isolated from a throat swab were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The MICs were measured by the broth microdilution method. The annual number of GAS strains examined for antimicrobial susceptibility testing ranged from 28 to 65 strains, for a total of 574 strains. Some of the isolates obtained from 2006 to 2009 and from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed to determine their emm types. An erythromycin (EM) resistant strain was not detected until 2004, but one EM-resistant strain appeared in 2005. Subsequently, EM-resistant strains rapidly increased, and 48 of 65 strains (73.8%) examined in 2009 were resistant. In 2010, the number of EM-resistant strains decreased to 12 of 36 strains (33.3%). However, it gradually increased afterwards, and 37 of 60 strains (61.7%) were resistant in 2013. Out of 574 strains examined, 184 exhibited EM-resistance, and the overall resistance rate was 31.9%. Partitioning the 124 strains examined between 2006 and 2008 according to emm types, only emm28 strains, which exhibited a high resistance rate, and emm12 strains demonstrated resistance. For the 142 strains examined between 2011 and 2013, the resistance rate of emm28 strains was similarly high; the resistance of emm12 strains significantly increased, and emm1 strains exhibited a high resistance rate. The number of emm types associated with the resistant strains increased. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cells and cell biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Alistair; Hendry, Charles; McLafferty, Ella

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series, aims to promote understanding of the basic structure and function of cells. It assists healthcare professionals to appreciate the complex anatomy and physiology underpinning the functioning of the human body. Several introductory chemical concepts and terms are outlined. The basic building blocks of all matter, atoms, are examined and the way in which they may interact to form new compounds within the body is discussed. The basic structures and components that make up a typical cell are considered.

  7. Novel gene fusion of PRCC-MITF defines a new member of MiT family translocation renal cell carcinoma: clinicopathological analysis and detection of the gene fusion by RNA sequencing and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Ye, Sheng-Bing; Wang, Xuan; Li, Rui; Shi, Shan-Shan; Fang, Ru; Zhang, Ru-Song; Ma, Heng-Hui; Lu, Zhen-Feng; Shen, Qin; Bao, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Rao, Qiu

    2018-04-01

    MITF, TFE3, TFEB and TFEC belong to the same microphthalmia-associated transcription factor family (MiT). Two transcription factors in this family have been identified in two unusual types of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): Xp11 translocation RCC harbouring TFE3 gene fusions and t(6;11) RCC harbouring a MALAT1-TFEB gene fusion. The 2016 World Health Organisation classification of renal neoplasia grouped these two neoplasms together under the category of MiT family translocation RCC. RCCs associated with the other two MiT family members, MITF and TFEC, have rarely been reported. Herein, we identify a case of MITF translocation RCC with the novel PRCC-MITF gene fusion by RNA sequencing. Histological examination of the present tumour showed typical features of MiT family translocation RCCs, overlapping with Xp11 translocation RCC and t(6;11) RCC. However, this tumour showed negative results in TFE3 and TFEB immunochemistry and split fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH) assays. The other MiT family members, MITF and TFEC, were tested further immunochemically and also showed negative results. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of a PRCC-MITF gene fusion: a fusion of PRCC exon 5 to MITF exon 4. We then developed FISH assays covering MITF break-apart probes and PRCC-MITF fusion probes to detect the MITF gene rearrangement. This study both proves the recurring existence of MITF translocation RCC and expands the genotype spectrum of MiT family translocation RCCs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Bactericidal activity of M protein conserved region antibodies against group A streptococcal isolates from the Northern Thai population

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    Pruksachatkunakorn Chulabhorn

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most group A streptococcal (GAS vaccine strategies have focused on the surface M protein, a major virulence factor of GAS. The amino-terminus of the M protein elicits antibodies, that are both opsonic and protective, but which are type specific. J14, a chimeric peptide that contains 14 amino acids from the M protein conserved C-region at the carboxy-terminus, offers the possibility of a vaccine which will elicit protective opsonic antibodies against multiple different GAS strains. In this study, we searched for J14 and J14-like sequences and the number of their repeats in the C-region of the M protein from GAS strains isolated from the Northern Thai population. Then, we examined the bactericidal activity of J14, J14.1, J14-R1 and J14-R2 antisera against multiple Thai GAS strains. Results The emm genes of GAS isolates were sequenced and grouped as 14 different J14-types. The most diversity of J14-types was found in the C1-repeat. The J14.1 type was the major sequence in the C2 and C3-repeats. We have shown that antisera raised against the M protein conserved C-repeat region peptides, J14, J14.1, J14-R1 and J14-R2, commonly found in GAS isolates from the Northern Thai population, are able to kill GAS of multiple different emm types derived from an endemic area. The mean percent of bactericidal activities for all J14 and J14-like peptide antisera against GAS isolates were more than 70%. The mean percent of bactericidal activity was highest for J14 antisera followed by J14-R2, J14.1 and J14-R1 antisera. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that antisera raised against the M protein conserved C-repeat region are able to kill multiple different strains of GAS isolated from the Northern Thai population. Therefore, the four conserved "J14" peptides have the potential to be used as GAS vaccine candidates to prevent streptococcal infections in an endemic area.

  9. Seven-year surveillance of emm types of pediatric Group A streptococcal pharyngitis isolates in Western Greece.

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    George A Syrogiannopoulos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An experimental 26-valent M protein Group A streptococcal (GAS vaccine has entered clinical studies. Pharyngeal GAS emm type surveillances in different areas and time-periods enhance the understanding of the epidemiology of GAS pharyngitis. Moreover, these surveillances, combined with the data on GAS invasive disease, can play a significant role in the formulation of multivalent type-specific vaccines. METHODS: During a 7-year period (1999-2005, 2408 GAS isolates were recovered from consecutive children with pharyngitis in Western Greece. The overall macrolide resistance rate was 22.8%. Along the study period we noted a tendency towards significantly decreased rates of resistance, with the lowest rates occurring in 2002 (15.3%, 2003 (15% and 2004 (16.7%. A random sample of isolates from each year, 338 (61.7% of the 548 macrolide-resistant and 205 (11% of the macrolide-susceptible, underwent molecular analysis, including emm typing. RESULTS: The 543 typed isolates had 28 different emm types. A statistically significant association was found between macrolide resistance and emm4, emm22 and emm77, whereas emm1, emm3, emm6, emm12, emm87 and emm89 were associated with macrolide susceptibility. A significant yearly fluctuation was observed in emm4, emm28 and emm77. The most common macrolide-resistant GAS were emm77 isolates harboring erm(A, either alone or in combination with mef(A, emm4 carrying mef(A, emm28 possessing erm(B, emm75 carrying mef(A, emm12 harboring mef(A and emm22 carrying erm(A. We estimated that 82.8% of the isolates belonged to emm types included in the novel 26-valent M protein vaccine. The vaccine coverage rate was determined mainly by the increased frequency of nonvaccine emm4 isolates. CONCLUSIONS: A limited number of emm types dominated among macrolide-susceptible and macrolide-resistant GAS isolates. We observed seasonal fluctuations, which were significant for emm4, emm28 and emm77. This type of data can serve as

  10. Analysis for prognostic factors of radiotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Takashi; Ito, Jun; Ito, Ichiro; Yamanaka, Mikio; Suto, Hisao; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated at our department from 1969 to 1981 with radiotherapy involving radiation alone and pre-and/or post-operative radiotherapy. For 167 patients receiving radiotherapy alone, 144 were inoperable cases and only 60 patients could be radically treated. The others were palliative treated patients because of the locally advanced state or distant metastases or severe complications. For 83 patients receiving pre-and/or post-operative radiotherapy, 62 were radically treated. Results of radiotherapy were analyzed to elucidate factors responsible for these prognosis. Relative 5 years survival rates for radically treated patients were 26% in radiotherapy alone and 20% in pre-and/or post-operative radiotherapy respectively. In radiotherapy alone, quite a good prognoses could be obtained in the patients with tumors less than 5cm at radiografical finding (42% for 5 yrs), with tumors located in Ei, Ea esophagus (40%), with tumors of serrative and tumorous X-P types (48%, 43%, respectively) and with good radiation response at the end of radiotherapy (54%). From the analysis of 12 patients surviving more than 5 years from onset of treatment, not only tumor size less than 5cm but also radiation response was major factor responsible for the prognosis. It might be important to treat patients precisely according to their own clinical characteristics and considering tumor host relationship. (author)

  11. Ataxia-telangiectasia cells are not uniformly deficient in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis following X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwelling, L.A.; Kerrigan, D.; Mattern, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of poly(adenosine diphosphoribose [poly(ADP-R)] follows the DNA strand breakage produced by a number of physical and chemical agents, including X-radiation, and may be important for repair of several types of DNA damage. The reduction or abolition of its synthesis following X-irradiation might explain the enhanced sensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells to X-ray. We have examined 8 lines of human fibroblasts (including 4 A-T lines) for stimulation of the synthesis of poly(ADP-R) by X-irradiation. Similar amounts of X-ray-stimulated synthesis of poly(ADP-R) were detected in 4 lines of A-T fibroblasts, and in fibrolasts from a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patient, a Fanconi's anemia (FA) patient and 2 normal patients. 6 lines of human lymphoblastoid lines were also examined for X-ray-stimulated poly(ADP-R) synthesis. 4 A-T lines displayed an unusually high synthesis of poly(ADP-R) in unirradiated cells compared with 2 normal lines. (orig./AJ)

  12. Ataxia-telangiectasia cells are not uniformly deficient in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis following X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwelling, L.A.; Kerrigan, D. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA). Lab. of Molecular Pharmacology); Mattern, M.R. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA). Lab. of Molecular Carcinogenesis)

    1983-04-01

    The synthesis of poly(adenosine diphosphoribose (poly(ADP-R)) follows the DNA strand breakage produced by a number of physical and chemical agents, including X-radiation, and may be important for repair of several types of DNA damage. The reduction or abolition of its synthesis following X-irradiation might explain the enhanced sensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells to X-ray. We have examined 8 lines of human fibroblasts (including 4 A-T lines) for stimulation of the synthesis of poly(ADP-R) by X-irradiation. Similar amounts of X-ray-stimulated synthesis of poly(ADP-R) were detected in 4 lines of A-T fibroblasts, and in fibrolasts from a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patient, a Fanconi's anemia (FA) patient and 2 normal patients. 6 lines of human lymphoblastoid lines were also examined for X-ray-stimulated poly(ADP-R) synthesis. 4 A-T lines displayed an unusually high synthesis of poly(ADP-R) in unirradiated cells compared with 2 normal lines.

  13. Cloning and characterization of murine fanconi anemia group A gene: Fanca protein is expressed in lymphoid tissues, testis, and ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vrugt, H J; Cheng, N C; de Vries, Y; Rooimans, M A; de Groot, J; Scheper, R J; Zhi, Y; Hoatlin, M E; Joenje, H; Arwert, F

    2000-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder in humans characterized by bone marrow failure, cancer predisposition, and cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C and diepoxybutane. FA genes display a caretaker function essential for maintenance of genomic integrity. We have cloned the murine homolog of FANCA, the gene mutated in the major FA complementation group (FA-A). The full-length mouse Fanca cDNA consists of 4503 bp and encodes a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 161 kDa. The deduced Fanca mouse protein shares 81% amino acid sequence similarity and 66% identity with the human protein. The nuclear localization signal and partial leucine zipper consensus motifs found in the human FANCA protein were also present in the murine homolog. In spite of the species difference, the murine Fanca cDNA was capable of correcting the cross-linker sensitive phenotype of human FA-A cells, suggesting functional conservation. Based on Northern as well as Western blots, Fanca was mainly expressed in lymphoid tissues, testis, and ovary. This expression pattern correlates with some of the clinical symptoms observed in FA patients. The availability of the murine Fanca cDNA now allows the gene to be studied in experimental mouse models.

  14. Conventional and molecular cytogenetics of human non-medullary thyroid carcinoma: characterization of eight cell line models and review of the literature on clinical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Franclim Ricardo; Meireles, Ana Margarida; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Teixeira, Manuel Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Cell lines are often poorly characterized from a genetic point of view, reducing their usefulness as tumor models. Our purpose was to assess the genetic background of eight commonly used human thyroid carcinoma models and to compare the findings with those reported for primary tumors of the gland. We used chromosome banding analysis and comparative genomic hybridization to profile eight non-medullary thyroid carcinoma cell lines of papillary (TPC-1, FB2, K1 and B-CPAP), follicular (XTC-1) or anaplastic origin (8505C, C643 and HTH74). To assess the representativeness of the findings, we additionally performed a thorough review of cytogenetic (n = 125) and DNA copy number information (n = 270) available in the literature on clinical samples of thyroid carcinoma. The detailed characterization of chromosomal markers specific for each cell line revealed two cases of mistaken identities: FB2 was shown to derive from TPC-1 cells, whereas K1 cells have their origin in cell line GLAG-66. All cellular models displayed genomic aberrations of varying complexity, and recurrent gains at 5p, 5q, 8q, and 20q (6/7 cell lines) and losses at 8p, 13q, 18q, and Xp (4/7 cell lines) were seen. Importantly, the genomic profiles were compatible with those of the respective primary tumors, as seen in the meta-analysis of the existing literature data. We provide the genomic background of seven independent thyroid carcinoma models representative of the clinical tumors of the corresponding histotypes, and highlight regions of recurrent aberrations that may guide future studies aimed at identifying target genes. Our findings further support the importance of routinely performing cytogenetic studies on cell lines, to detect cross-contamination mishaps such as those identified here

  15. Stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jukes, Jojanneke; Both, Sanne; Post, Janine; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Marcel; de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter defines stem cells and their properties. It identifies the major differences between embryonic and adult stem cells. Stem cells can be defined by two properties: the ability to make identical copies of themselves and the ability to form other cell types of the body. These properties are

  16. Cytological evidence for DNA chain elongation after UV irradiation in the S phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minka, D.F.; Nath, J.

    1981-01-01

    Human cells irradiated with UV light synthesize lower molecular weight DNA than unirradiated cells. This reduction in molecular weight is greater in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells than in normal cells. The molecular weight of DNA is further reduced by the addition of caffeine to XP cells. By several hours after irradiation, DNA fragments are barely detectable. Cells from excision-proficient and excision-deficient XP patients were studied autoradiographically to produce cytological evidence of DNA chain elongation. Replicate cultures with and without caffeine were synchronized and irradiated with UV light during the S phase. Caffeine was removed in G2, and the cells were labeled with 3 H-thymidine. Results showed significantly increased labeling during G2 of excision-deficient XP cells. Labeling was dependent on the time of irradiation and presence of caffeine. The XP variant cells had no increase in labeling for any irradiation time

  17. Cell Biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioufle, B. Le; Picollet-D'Hahan, N.

    A cell biochip is a microsystem, equipped with electronic and microfluidic functions, designed to manipulate or analyse living cells. The first publications in this emerging area of research appeared toward the end of the 1980s. In 1989 Washizu described a biochip designed to fuse two cells by electropermeabilisation of the cytoplasmic membrane [1]. Research centers have devised a whole range of cell chip structures, for simultaneous or sequential analysis of single cells, cell groups, or cell tissues reconstituted on the chip. The cells are arranged in a square array on a parallel cell chip for parallel analysis, while they are examined and processed one by one in a microchannel in the case of a series cell chip. In contrast to these biochips for high-throughput analysis of a large number of cells, single-cell chips focus on the analysis of a single isolated cell. As in DNA microarrays, where a large number of oligonucleotides are ordered in a matrix array, parallel cell chips order living cells in a similar way. At each point of the array, the cells can be isolated, provided that the cell type allows this, e.g., blood cells, or cultivated in groups (most adhesion cells can only survive in groups). The aim is to allow massively parallel analysis or processing. Le Pioufle et al. describe a microdevice for the culture of single cells or small groups of cells in a micropit array [2]. Each pit is equipped to stimulate the cell or group of cells either electrically or fluidically. Among the applications envisaged are gene transfer, cell sorting, and screening in pharmacology. A complementary approach, combining the DNA microarray and cell biochip ideas, has been put forward by Bailey et al. [3]. Genes previously arrayed on the chip transfect the cultured cells on the substrate depending on their position in the array (see Fig. 19.1). This way of achieving differential lipofection on a chip was then taken up again by Yoshikawa et al. [4] with primary cells, more

  18. Development of a liquid-holding technique for the study of DNA-repair in human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, J.W.I.M.

    1979-01-01

    Liquid-holding conditions can be obtained for human diploid skin fibro-blasts by keeping confluent cultures stationary over periods of 7 days or longer by means of conditioned medium. Under this condition recovery of radiation damage induced by ultraviolet light or X-rays is observed as an increase in cloning efficiency. The amount of recovery when expressed in a dose-modifying-factor appears higher than in bacteria and yeast. The repair-deficient human cell strains XP25Ro and XP7Be (xeroderma pigmentosum from complementation groups A and D respectively) exhibit less but still discernible recovery after UV-irradiation and the same was observed for AT5Bi (ataxia telangiectasia) after X-irradiation. Experiments on mutation induction indicated that the repair which takes place during liquid holding of UV-irradiated XP7Be cells reduces the mutant frequency considerably while after liquid holding of UV-irradiated wild-type cells the same or lower mutant frequencies were found for the lower exposures and the same or higher mutant frequencies for the higher exposures. (Auth.)

  19. Action spectra for inactivation of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human skin fibroblasts by ultraviolet radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; Moss, S.H.; Davies, D.J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Action spectra for UV-induced lethality as measured by colony forming ability were determined both for a normal human skin fibroblast strain (1BR) and for an excision deficient xeroderma pigmentosum strain (XP4LO) assigned to complementation group A using 7 monochromatic wavelengths in the range 254-365 nm. The relative sensitivity of the XP strain compared to the normal skin fibroblasts shows a marked decrease at wavelengths longer than 313 nm, changing from a ratio of about 20 at the shorter wavelengths to just greater than 1.0 at the longer wavelengths. The action spectra thus indicate that the influence on cell inactivation of the DNA repair defect associated with XP cells is decreased and almost reaches zero at longer UV wavelengths. This would occur, for example, if the importance of pyrimidine dimers as the lethal lesion decreased with increasing wavelength. These results are consistent with pyrimidine dimers induced in DNA being the major lethal lesion in both cell strains over the wavelength range 254-313 nm. However, it is indicated that different mechanisms of inactivation operate at wavelengths longer than 313 nm. (author)

  20. Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Cornea in a Child with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lids, conjunctiva, and cornea are affected by the disease process.[3] A case of XP ... In the left eye, almost the entire cornea was involved with a grayish-white, irregular, and ... referring to its characteristic dry pigmented skin. It was also named ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-05-0198 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-05-0198 ref|XP_596853.2| PREDICTED: similar to T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia...-1 protein (TAL-1 protein) (Stem cell protein) (T-cell leukemia/lymphoma-5 protein) [Bos taurus] XP_596853.2 1e-168 89% ...

  2. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage binding protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Keeney; A.P.M. Eker (André); T. Brody; W. Vermeulen (Wim); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Linn

    1994-01-01

    textabstractCells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells

  3. Semi-conservative deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in unirradiated and ultraviolet-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rude, J.M.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    Rates of semiconservative DNA synthesis have been investigated in asynchronous xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP variant, and normal human skin fibroblasts using the technique of cellular autoradiography. In unirradiated cells, no differences in DNA synthesis rates were detected among the three cell strains. Exposure to UV radiation caused the rate of DNA synthesis to decrease for at least three hours in all three cell strains. In the normal cell strain, recovery of the DNA synthetic rate occurred at later times following a UV fluence of 5 J/m 2 . At this same UV fluence, recovery was absent in classical XP cells during a 24 h post-irradiation period while it was slower than normal in XP variant cells. When the UV fluence to classical XP and XP variant cells was reduced so that survival in all three cell strains was approximately the same (25%), recovery of the DNA synthetic rate was similar in all three cell strains. These results are discussed in terms of current models of DNA replication in UV-irradiated cells and indicate: (1) that pyrimidine dimers are very effective blocks to DNA synthesis and (2) that there is no inherent defect in semiconservative DNA synthesis in either classical XP or XP variant cells which is independent of a defect in DNA repair capacity

  4. Semi-conservative deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in unirradiated and ultraviolet-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rude' e, J.M.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1977-03-01

    Rates of semiconservative DNA synthesis have been investigated in asynchronous xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP variant, and normal human skin fibroblasts using the technique of cellular autoradiography. In unirradiated cells, no differences in DNA synthesis rates were detected among the three cell strains. Exposure to uv radiation caused the rate of DNA synthesis to decrease for at least three hours in all three cell strains. In the normal cell strain, recovery of the DNA synthetic rate occurred at later times following a uv fluence of 5 J/m2. At this same uv fluence, recovery was absent in classical XP cells during a 24 h post-irradiation period while it was slower than normal in XP variant cells. When the uv fluence to classical XP and XP variant cells was reduced so that survival in all three cell strains was approximately the same (25%), recovery of the DNA synthetic rate was similar in all three cell strains. These results are discussed in terms of current models of DNA replication in uv-irradiated cells and indicate: (1) that pyrimidine dimers are very effective blocks to DNA synthesis and (2) that there is no inherent defect in semi-conservative DNA synthesis in either classical XP or XP variant cells which is independent of a defect in DNA repair capacity.

  5. Orbital amelanotic melanoma in xeroderma pigmentosum: A rare association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitava, Abadan K; Mehdi, Ghazala; Sharma, Rajeev; Alam, Mohammad S

    2008-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder of DNA repair in which the body′s normal ability to repair damage caused by ultraviolet light is deficient. This leads to a 1000-fold increased risk of cutaneous and ocular neoplasms. Ocular neoplasms occurring in XP in order of frequency are squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and melanoma. Malignant melanomas occur at an early age in patients with XP. We report a case of XP with massive orbital melanoma in an eight-year-old boy which is unique due to its amelanotic presentation confirmed histopathologically. PMID:18711275

  6. Molecular elucidation of a new allelic variation at the Sg-5 gene associated with the absence of group A saponins in wild soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Park, Gyu Tae; Mukaiyama, Kyosuke; Tsukamoto, Chigen; Chang, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Song, Jong Tae

    2018-01-01

    In soybean, triterpenoid saponin is one of the major secondary metabolites and is further classified into group A and DDMP saponins. Although they have known health benefits for humans and animals, acetylation of group A saponins causes bitterness and gives an astringent taste to soy products. Therefore, several studies are being conducted to eliminate acetylated group A saponins. Previous studies have isolated and characterized the Sg-5 (Glyma.15g243300) gene, which encodes the cytochrome P450 72A69 enzyme and is responsible for soyasapogenol A biosynthesis. In this study, we elucidated the molecular identity of a novel mutant of Glycine soja, 'CWS5095'. Phenotypic analysis using TLC and LC-PDA/MS/MS showed that the mutant 'CWS5095' did not produce any group A saponins. Segregation analysis showed that the absence of group A saponins is controlled by a single recessive allele. The locus was mapped on chromosome 15 (4.3 Mb) between Affx-89193969 and Affx-89134397 where the previously identified Glyma.15g243300 gene is positioned. Sequence analysis of the coding region for the Glyma.15g243300 gene revealed the presence of four SNPs in 'CWS5095' compared to the control lines. One of these four SNPs (G1127A) leads to the amino acid change Arg376Lys in the EXXR motif, which is invariably conserved among the CYP450 superfamily proteins. Co-segregation analysis showed that the missense mutation (Arg376Lys) was tightly linked with the absence of group A saponins in 'CWS5095'. Even though Arg and Lys have similar chemical features, the 3D modelled protein structure indicates that the replacement of Arg with Lys may cause a loss-of-function of the Sg-5 protein by inhibiting the stable binding of a heme cofactor to the CYP72A69 apoenzyme.

  7. Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell motility is a fascinating example of cell behavior which is fundamentally important to a number of biological and pathological processes. It is based on a complex self-organized mechano-chemical machine consisting of cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. In general, the cytoskeleton is responsible for the movement of the entire cell and for movements within the cell. The main challenge in the field of cell motility is to develop a complete physical description on how and why cells move. For this purpose new ways of modeling the properties of biological cells have to be found. This long term goal can only be achieved if new experimental techniques are developed to extract physical information from these living systems and if theoretical models are found which bridge the gap between molecular and mesoscopic length scales. Cell Motility gives an authoritative overview of the fundamental biological facts, theoretical models, and current experimental developments in this fascinating area.

  8. Cell Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Home, Business, and Entertainment Products Cell Phones Cell Phones Share Tweet Linkedin ... Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos on Flickr FDA Archive Combination ...

  9. Differences in the levels of UV repair and in clinical symptoms in two sibs affected by xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanini, M; Nuzzo, F [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia (Italy). Lab. di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica; Keijzer, W [Erasmus Universiteit, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Cell Biology and Genetics; Dalpra, L [Milan Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Biologia; Elli, R; Nicoletti, B [Rome Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Biologia Generale 1; Nazzaro Porro, M [Ospedale Dermatologico S. Gallicano, Rome (Italy)

    1980-01-01

    UV-repair activity was studied in two sibs affected by XP showing different clinical symptoms. Complementation studies indicated that both patients fit into complementation group A. The levels of UV-induced /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation, in fibroblasts and in lymphocytes, are different in the two patients: residual level of repair DNA synthesis in the sister is higher than in the brother. In one of the cell samples analyzed UDS analysis showed that in the sister a low proportion of cells with normal repair synthesis is present.

  10. Photovoltaic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Karolis Kiela

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with an overview of photovoltaic cells that are currently manufactured and those being developed, including one or several p-n junction, organic and dye-sensitized cells using quantum dots. The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of various photovoltaic cells, identifies the main parameters, explains the main reasons for the losses that may occur in photovoltaic cells and looks at the ways to minimize them.Article in Lithuanian

  11. Electrochemical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising a negative electrode, an electrolyte and a positive electrode in which the positive electrode structure comprises a lithium cobalt manganese oxide of the composition Li¿2?Co¿y?Mn¿2-y?O¿4? where 0 ... for capacity losses in lithium ion cells and lithium-alloy cells....

  12. Cell Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Radisic, M.; Levenberg, S.; Woodfield, T.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Svalander, P.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.; Blitterswijk, C.; Thomsen, P.; Lindahl, A.; Hubbel, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the role of mass transport in providing nutrients to the cells. It describes how mathematical modeling can enhance the understanding of nutrient limitation in tissue engineering. The nutrient requirements of the cells are explained and the components of the cell culture

  13. Cloning and analysis of the mouse Fanconi anemia group a cDNA and an overlapping penta zinc finger cDNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, JCY; Alon, N; Norga, K; Kruyt, FAE; Youssoufian, H; Buchwald, M

    2000-01-01

    Despite the cloning of four disease-associated genes for Fanconi anemia (FA), the molecular pathogenesis of FA remains largely unknown. To study FA complementation group A using the mouse as a mode I system, we cloned and characterized the mouse homolog of the human FANCA cDNA, The mouse cDNA

  14. Atomic Energy Research working group a on improvement extension and validation of parametrized FEW-group libraries for WWER-440 and WWER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svarny, J.

    1998-01-01

    The AER Working Groups A and B held its sixth meeting at SKODA JS, Plzen in April 28 and 29, 1998. There were altogether 13 participants from 6 member organizations. The list of participants and the list of papers are attached. (Author)

  15. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salgård Jensen, Christian; Dam-Nielsen, Casper; Arpi, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate whether large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G can be adequately identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Previous studies show varying...

  16. 76 FR 20045 - The Ubs Group, a Division Of Ubs Ag, Also Known as Ubs Financial Services, Inc. and/or Ubs-Glb...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... Division Of Ubs Ag, Also Known as Ubs Financial Services, Inc. and/or Ubs-Glb (Americas), Inc., Formerly... UBS AG, also known as UBS Financial Services, Inc., and/or UBS-GLB (Americas), Inc., Corporate Center... The UBS Group, a division of UBS AG, also known as UBS Financial Services, Inc., and/or UBS-GLB...

  17. Formation and repair of physically and chemically induced DNA damage in human cells. Final report, September 1, 1976-November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerutti, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The major topic was the study of the formation and repair of DNA damage by energy related physical and chemical agents in cultured human cells. Two pathways of damage production were distinguished: (1) indirect action, i.e., attack of DNA by active oxygen species which are formed by the reaction of the primary agent with a non-DNA target; and (2) direct action, i.e., reaction of the primary agent or a chemical derivative of the primary agent with DNA usually resulting in the formation of a covalent adduct. Near-ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation were studied as agents which operate at least in part via indirect action and benzo(a)pyrene as chemical carcinogen operating mostly by direct action. The formation of monomeric thymine damage of the 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine type by γ-rays and ultraviolet light was investigated. Indirect action of near-ultraviolet light is also responsible for the induction of DNA single strand breaks. Their formation and repair following exposure to 313 nm light was studied in skin fibroblasts from patients with the hereditary disease Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Excision repair of γ-ray induced 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine type lesions was studied in fibroblasts from Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients. The formation and repair of covalent purine adducts was studied in actively metabolizing rodent and human cells following treatment with the procarcinogen benzo(a)pyrene and with the ultimate metabolite benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide I

  18. High Efficiency Multijunction Solar Cells with Finely-Tuned Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varonides, Argyrios C.

    at each interface and connecting the layers in series). This basic idea of a design has proven very successful in recent years, leading to solar cells of efficiency levels well above 30% (Fraunhofer Institute's multi-gap solar cell at 40.8%, and NREL's device at 40.2% respectively). Successful alloys have demonstrated high performance, such as InxGa1 - xP alloys (x (%) of gallium phosphide and (1 - x) (%) of indium phosphide). Other successful candidates, in current use and perpetual cell design consideration, are the lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs and InP/GaAs pairs or AlAs/GaAs/GaAs triple layers and alloys, which are heavily used in both solar and the electronics industry.

  19. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  20. Merkel cell distribution in the human eyelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. May

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Merkel cell carcinoma of the eye lid is reported frequently in the literature, only limited information exists about the distribution of Merkel cells in this tissue. Therefore, serial sections of 18 human cadaver eye lids (donors ages ranging between 63 and 97 years were stained for cytokeratin 20 in various planes. The overall appearance of Merkel cells in these samples was low and mainly located in the outer root layer of the cilia hair follicles. Merkel cells were more frequent in the middle, and almost not detectable at the nasal and temporal edges. The localization is in accordance with that of Merkel cell carcinoma, but concerning the scarce appearance within this adulthood group, a specific physiological role of these cells in the eye lid is difficult to establish.

  1. Repair of DNA in xeroderma pigmentosum conjunctiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, D.A.; Kraemer, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease with tumor formation on sun-exposed areas of the skin and eyes. Cells from most XP patients are deficient in repairing DNA damaged by ultraviolet (uv) light as shown by a reduced rate of tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) incorporation during their DNA repair synthesis. We have studied such repair synthesis in conjunctival cells from an XP patient with a conjunctival epithelioma and from normal cadaver conjunctiva. Cultured conjunctival cells were irradiated with uv light and then incubated with 3HTdR. Autoradiograms were prepared and showed that uv radiation induced a considerably slower rate of DNA repair synthesis in the XP cells than in normal cells. Many of the ocular abnormalities of XP, including tumor formation, may be the result of this defective DNA repair process

  2. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...... of the different types of fuel cells. Finally, their role in a future energy supply with a large share of fluctuating sustainable power sources, e.g., solar or wind, is surveyed....

  3. Cell suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, E.; Coffigny, H.

    2000-01-01

    In the fight of the cell against the damages caused to its DNA by genotoxic agents and specially by ionizing radiations, the p53 protein plays a central part. It intervenes in the proliferation control and the differentiation but also in the keeping of genome integrity. It can direct the damages cells toward suicide, or apoptosis, to avoid the risk of tumor appearance that would be fatal to the whole organism. That is by the disordered state of cells suicide programs that the tumor cells are going to develop. The knowledge of apoptosis mechanisms, to eventually start them on demand, rises up broad hopes in the cancer therapy. (N.C.)

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and group A beta-haemolytic streptococci in 2002-2003. Results of the multinational GRASP Surveillance Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekmann, Susan E; Heilmann, Kris P; Richter, Sandra S

    2005-01-01

    A multinational surveillance study, GRASP, was conducted between November 2002 and April 2003 with the aim of assessing rates of antimicrobial resistance among 2656 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2486 isolates of group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, 1358 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae...... and 1047 of Moraxella catarrhalis from 20 countries in Europe, eastern Asia and southern Africa. Conspicuous differences between various countries were noted in the S. pneumoniae resistance rates observed for penicillin (0-79.2%) and erythromycin (4-66%), along with other antimicrobials. The percentage...... of MDR strains was above 25% in 8 of the 20 countries studied. Group A streptococcal macrolide resistance rates ranged from 0% to 35% by country, while rates of beta-lactamase production ranged from 0% to 39% for H. influenzae and 80-100% for M. catarrhalis. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae remains...

  5. ABO blood groups: A risk factor for left atrial and left atrial appendage thrombogenic milieu in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Li, Kuibao; Yang, Xinchun

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have identified ABO blood groups as predictors of thromboembolic diseases. In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), however, potential association between ABO blood groups and the risk of left atrial (LA) and/or left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombogenic milieu (TM) has not been established. This is a retrospective case-control study that included 125 consecutive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) plus TM, as evidenced by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during a period from1 January 2010 to 31 December 2016. The controls were selected randomly from 1072 NVAF without TM at a 1:2 ratio. Potential association between ABO blood groups and TM was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk of TM was higher in patients with blood group A (33.6% vs. 20.2% in non-A blood groups, P=0.005). After adjusting for age, sex, oral anticoagulant use, AF type and duration, and relevant functional measures (e.g., NT-pro BNP level, left atrium diameter, and left ventricular ejection fraction), blood group A remained associated with an increased risk of TM (OR=2.99, 95% CI 1.4-6.388, P=0.005). Blood group A is an independent risk factor for TM in NVAF patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of diagnostic laboratory methods of beta hemolytic streptococcus group A in comparison with clinical findings in the diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat and unnecessary antibacterial therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Eini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus Pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is the most important cause of bacterial pharyngitis in children and adolescents. Acute pharyngitis is one of the most common conditions in all ages but it is most common in children. Over diagnosis of acute pharyngitis represents one of the major causes of antibiotic abuse. The goal of this study is to make an estimate of the frequency of group A streptococcus in sore throat patients in Farshchian hospital emergency department and clinic in Hamadan. Methods: For estimation of the clinical features role in diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat, we took samples of 100 patients with average age of 32.96±29.86 years with sore throat. We took samples from pharynx and used standard methods of bacteriology in order to detect streptococcus. Results: Group A Streptococcus (GAS accounts for 3 percent of all cases of pharyngitis. Clinically, all of the patients had sore throat. The percent breakdowns are as follows: 30% had exudate, 78% had fever, 8% had lymphadenopathy and 7.7 percent of exudative pharyngitis was streptococcal. The cost for unnecessary antibiotic therapy for every single patient who had negative pharynx culture was approximately 32160 Rails. Conclusion: The low frequency of streptococcus pharyngitis in treated patients reveal that diagnosis based on clinical features is not reliable. We recommend use of other diagnostic methods such as Rapid Antigen Detection Tests (RATs. Only reliable and scientific protocols for antibiotic to therapy.

  7. Fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van J.A.R.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The principles and present-day embodiments of fuel cells are discussed. Nearly all cells are hydrogen/oxygen ones, where the hydrogen fuel is usually obtained on-site from the reforming of methane or methanol. There exists a tension between the promise of high efficiency in the conversion of

  8. Cardiovascular disease and ABO blood-groups in Africans. Are blood-group A individuals at higher risk of ischemic disease?: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Djibril Marie; Sow, Mamadou Saidou; Diack, Aminata; Dia, Khadidiatou; Mboup, Mouhamed Cherif; Fall, Pape Diadie; Fall, Moussa Daouda

    2017-12-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group system by Karl Landsteiner in 1901, several reports have suggested an important involvement of the ABO blood group system in the susceptibility to thrombosis. Assessing that non-O blood groups in particular A blood group confer a higher risk of venous and arterial thrombosis than group O.Epidemiologic data are typically not available for all racial and ethnics groups.The purpose of this pilot study was to identify a link between ABO blood group and ischemic disease (ID) in Africans, and to analyze whether A blood group individuals were at higher risk of ischemic disease or not. A total of 299 medical records of patients over a three-year period admitted to the cardiology and internal medicine department of military hospital of Ouakam in Senegal were reviewed. We studied data on age, gender, past history of hypertension, diabetes, smoking, sedentarism, obesity, hyperlipidemia, use of estrogen-progestin contraceptives and blood group distribution.In each blood group type, we evaluated the prevalence of ischemic and non-ischemic cardiovascular disease. The medical records were then stratified into two categories to evaluate incidence of ischemic disease: Group 1: Patients carrying blood-group A and Group 2: Patients carrying blood group non-A (O, AB and B). Of the 299 patients whose medical records were reviewed, 92 (30.8%) were carrying blood group A, 175 (58.5%) had blood group O, 13 (4.3%) had blood group B, and 19 (6.4%) had blood group AB.The diagnosis of ischemic disease (ID) was higher in patients with blood group A (61.2%) than in other blood groups, and the diagnosis of non-ischemic disease (NID) was higher in patients with blood group O (73.6%) compared to other groups. In patients with blood group B or AB compared to non-B or non-AB, respectively there was no statistically significant difference in ID incidence.Main risk factor for ID was smoking (56.5%), hypertension (18.4%) and diabetes (14.3%).In our study

  9. Cockayne syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, I.; Lindenbaum, Y.; Dickson, D.W.; Kraemer, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To review genetic variants of Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), autosomal recessive disorders of DNA repair that affect the nervous system, and to illustrate them by the first case of xeroderma pigmentosum–Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) complex to undergo neuropathologic examination. Methods Published reports of clinical, pathologic, and molecular studies of CS, XP neurologic disease, and the XP-CS complex were reviewed, and a ninth case of XP-CS is summarized. Results CS is a multisystem disorder that causes both profound growth failure of the soma and brain and progressive cachexia, retinal, cochlear, and neurologic degeneration, with a leukodystrophy and demyelinating neuropathy without an increase in cancer. XP presents as extreme photosensitivity of the skin and eyes with a 1000-fold increased frequency of cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas and melanomas and a small increase in nervous system neoplasms. Some 20% of patients with XP incur progressive degeneration of previously normally developed neurons resulting in cortical, basal ganglia, cerebellar, and spinal atrophy, cochlear degeneration, and a mixed distal axonal neuropathy. Cultured cells from patients with CS or XP are hypersensitive to killing by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Both CS and most XP cells have defective DNA nucleotide excision repair of actively transcribing genes; in addition, XP cells have defective repair of the global genome. There are two complementation groups in CS and seven in XP. Patients with the XP-CS complex fall into three XP complementation groups. Despite their XP genotype, six of nine individuals with the XP-CS complex, including the boy we followed up to his death at age 6, had the typical clinically and pathologically severe CS phenotype. Cultured skin and blood cells had extreme sensitivity to killing by UV radiation, DNA repair was severely deficient, post-UV unscheduled DNA synthesis was reduced to less than 5%, and post-UV plasmid

  10. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  11. Challenges and Opportunities While Developing a Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Within a Product Development Partnership: A Manufacturer's Perspective From the Serum Institute of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Socquet, Muriel; Jadhav, Suresh S.; Kapre, Subhash V.; LaForce, F. Marc; Poonawalla, Cyrus S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2002, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) chose the Serum Institute of India, Ltd (SIIL), as its manufacturing partner to establish a product development partnership (PDP) with the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP). MVP was a collaboration between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop meningococcal conjugate vaccines for sub-Saharan Africa. Method. From the outset, SIIL recognized that a partnership with MVP carried some risk but also offered important opportunities for accessing new conjugate vaccine technology and know-how. Over 3 years, SIIL successfully accepted technology transfer for the group A meningococcal polysaccharide from SynCo Bio Partners and a conjugation method from the US Food and Drug Administration. Results. SIIL successfully scaled up production of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine that used SIIL tetanus toxoid as the carrier protein. Phase 1 studies began in India in 2005, followed by phase 2/3 studies in Africa and India. A regulatory dossier was submitted to the Indian authorities in April 2009 and WHO in September 2009. Export license was granted in December 2009, and WHO prequalification was obtained in June 2010. Vaccine was introduced at public scale in Burkina Faso that December. The group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine was named MenAfriVac, and is the first internationally qualified vaccine developed outside of big pharma. Conclusions. The project proved to be a sound investment for SIIL and is a concrete example of the potential for PDPs to provide needed products for resource-poor countries. PMID:26553678

  12. AER working group A on improvement extension and validation of parametrized few-group libraries for VVER-440 and VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svarny, J.

    1998-01-01

    The AER Working Groups A and B held its sixth meeting at SKODA JS, Plzen in April 28 and 29, 1998. There were altogether 13 participants from 6 member organizations. The list of participants and the list of papers are attached. Main topics of the meeting were: A few-group cross-section library preparation methodology (standard few-group libraries, kinetics parameters, SPND signal interpretation parametrization) and its validation; Participation on intercomparisons of spectral codes (spectral codes benchmark); of kinetics parameters calculations (kinetics parameters benchmark). (author)

  13. Cell differentiation: therapeutical challenges in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Enrique; Vicente-Salar, Nestor; Arribas, Maribel; Paredes, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells, derived from either embryonic or adult tissues, are considered to be potential sources of insulin-secreting cells to be transplanted into type 1 and advanced stages of type 2 diabetic patients. Many laboratories have considered this possibility, resulting in a large amount of published protocols, with a wide degree of complexity among them. Our group was the first to report that it was possible to obtain insulin-secreting cells from mouse embryonic stem cells, proving the feasibility of this new challenge. The same observation was immediately reported using human embryonic stem cells. However, the resulting cell product was not properly characterised, affecting the reproducibility of the protocol by other groups. A more elaborated protocol was developed by Lumelsky and co-workers, demonstrating that neuroectodermal cells could be an alternative source for insulin-producing cells. However, the resulting cells of this protocol produced low amounts of the hormone. This aimed other groups to perform key changes in order to improve the insulin content of the resulting cells. Recently, Baetge's group has published a new protocol based on the knowledge accumulated in pancreatic development. In this protocol, human embryonic stem cells were differentiated into islet-like structures through a five step protocol, emulating the key steps during embryonic development of the endocrine pancreas. The final cell product, however, seemed to be in an immature state, thus further improvement is required. Despite this drawback, the protocol represents the culmination of work performed by different groups and offers new research challenges for the investigators in this exciting field. Concerning adult stem cells, the possibility of identifying pancreatic precursors or of reprogramming extrapancreatic derived cells are key possibilities that may circumvent the problems that appear when using embryonic stem cells, such as immune rejection and tumour formation.

  14. Fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederdoeckl, J.

    2001-01-01

    Europe has at present big hopes on the fuel cells technology, in comparison with other energy conversion technologies, this technology has important advantages, for example: high efficiency, very low pollution and parallel use of electric and thermal energy. Preliminary works for fuel cells developing and its commercial exploitation are at full speed; until now the European Union has invested approx. 1.7 billion Schillings, 60 relevant projects are being executed. The Austrian industry is interested in applying this technique to drives, thermal power stations and the miniature fuel cells as replacement of batteries in electronic products (Notebooks, mobile telephones, etc.). A general description of the historic development of fuel cells including the main types is given as well as what is the situation in Austria. (nevyjel)

  15. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  16. Software Design Description for the Polar Ice Prediction System (PIPS) Version 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-05

    ice area with respect to x and y real trc- tracer at geometric center of cell real trx , try- limited derivative of tracer with respect to x and y...yp1 real xp2, yp2 real xp3, yp3 integer iflux, jflux real aic, aix, aiy real aiflx real trc, trx , try real atflx 95 PIPS 3.0 SDD Subroutine

  17. Homozygous R788W point mutation in the XPF gene of a patient with Xeroderma pigmentosum and late-onset neurologic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbers, AM; Vader, PCV; Snoek, JW; Raams, A; Jaspers, NGJ; Kleijer, WJ

    The second Caucasian xeroderma pigmentosum patient (XP42RO) belonging to complementation group F (XP-F) is described, Mild ocular photophobia was present from childhood, and acute skin reactions occurred upon exposure to sunlight. Basal and squamous cell carcinomas developed after his twenty-seventh

  18. SHINING A LIGHT ON XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of DNA repair characterized by sun sensitivity and ultraviolet (UV) induced skin and mucous membrane cancers. Described in 1874 by Moriz Kaposi in Vienna, nearly 100 years later James Cleaver in San Francisco reported defective DNA repair in XP cells. This eventually provided the basis for a mechanistic link between sun exposure, DNA damage, somatic mutations and skin cancer. XP cells were found to have defects in 7 of the proteins of the nucleotide excision repair pathway and in DNA polymerase eta. XP cells are hypersensitive to killing by UV and XP cancers have characteristic “UV signature” mutations. Clinical studies at NIH found a nearly 10,000-fold increase in skin cancer in XP patients under age 20 years demonstrating the substantial importance of DNA repair in cancer prevention in the general population. About 25 % of XP patients have progressive neurological degeneration with progressive loss of neurons, probably from DNA damage induced by oxidative metabolism which kills non-dividing cells in the nervous system. Interestingly, patients with another disorder, trichothiodystrophy have defects in some of the same genes as XP but they have primary developmental abnormalities without an increase in skin cancer. PMID:22217736

  19. DNA polymerase eta participates in the mutagenic bypass of adducts induced by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alden C Klarer

    Full Text Available Y-family DNA-polymerases have larger active sites that can accommodate bulky DNA adducts allowing them to bypass these lesions during replication. One member, polymerase eta (pol eta, is specialized for the bypass of UV-induced thymidine-thymidine dimers, correctly inserting two adenines. Loss of pol eta function is the molecular basis for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP variant where the accumulation of mutations results in a dramatic increase in UV-induced skin cancers. Less is known about the role of pol eta in the bypass of other DNA adducts. A commonly encountered DNA adduct is that caused by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE, the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental chemical benzo[a]pyrene. Here, treatment of pol eta-deficient fibroblasts from humans and mice with BPDE resulted in a significant decrease in Hprt gene mutations. These studies in mammalian cells support a number of in vitro reports that purified pol eta has error-prone activity on plasmids with site-directed BPDE adducts. Sequencing the Hprt gene from this work shows that the majority of mutations are G>T transversions. These data suggest that pol eta has error-prone activity when bypassing BPDE-adducts. Understanding the basis of environmental carcinogen-derived mutations may enable prevention strategies to reduce such mutations with the intent to reduce the number of environmentally relevant cancers.

  20. Introduction and Rollout of a New Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PsA-TT) in African Meningitis Belt Countries, 2010–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Diomandé, Fabien V. K.; Barry, Rodrigue; Kandolo, Denis; Shirehwa, Florence; Lingani, Clement; Novak, Ryan T.; Tevi-Benissan, Carol; Perea, William; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; LaForce, F. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background. A group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) was developed specifically for the African “meningitis belt” and was prequalified by the World Health Organization (WHO) in June 2010. The vaccine was first used widely in Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger in December 2010 with great success. The remaining 23 meningitis belt countries wished to use this new vaccine. Methods. With the help of African countries, WHO developed a prioritization scheme and used or adapted existing immunization guidelines to mount PsA-TT vaccination campaigns. Vaccine requirements were harmonized with the Serum Institute of India, Ltd. Results. Burkina Faso was the first country to fully immunize its 1- to 29-year-old population in December 2010. Over the next 4 years, vaccine coverage was extended to 217 million Africans living in 15 meningitis belt countries. Conclusions. The new group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine was well received, with country coverage rates ranging from 85% to 95%. The rollout proceeded smoothly because countries at highest risk were immunized first while attention was paid to geographic contiguity to maximize herd protection. Community participation was exemplary. PMID:26553672

  1. Comparative Study of 5-Day and 10-Day Cefditoren Pivoxil Treatments for Recurrent Group A β-Hemolytic Streptococcus pharyngitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Kikuta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of short-course therapy with cephalosporins for treatment of group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS pharyngitis is still controversial. Subjects were 226 children with a history of at least one episode of GABHS pharyngitis. Recurrence within the follow-up period (3 weeks after initiation of therapy occurred in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and in 1 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group; the incidence of recurrence being significantly higher in the 5-day treatment group. Bacteriologic treatment failure (GABHS isolation without overt pharyngitis at follow-up culture was observed in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and 17 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group. There was no statistical difference between the two groups. A 5-day course of oral cephalosporins is not always recommended for treatment of GABHS pharyngitis in children who have repeated episodes of pharyngitis.

  2. Concentration of acrylamide in a polyacrylamide gel affects VP4 gene coding assignment of group A equine rotavirus strains with P[12] specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background It is universally acknowledged that genome segment 4 of group A rotavirus, the major etiologic agent of severe diarrhea in infants and neonatal farm animals, encodes outer capsid neutralization and protective antigen VP4. Results To determine which genome segment of three group A equine rotavirus strains (H-2, FI-14 and FI-23) with P[12] specificity encodes the VP4, we analyzed dsRNAs of strains H-2, FI-14 and FI-23 as well as their reassortants by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) at varying concentrations of acrylamide. The relative position of the VP4 gene of the three equine P[12] strains varied (either genome segment 3 or 4) depending upon the concentration of acrylamide. The VP4 gene bearing P[3], P[4], P[6], P[7], P[8] or P[18] specificity did not exhibit this phenomenon when the PAGE running conditions were varied. Conclusions The concentration of acrylamide in a PAGE gel affected VP4 gene coding assignment of equine rotavirus strains bearing P[12] specificity. PMID:20573245

  3. Identification of Molecular Tumor Markers in Renal Cell Carcinomas with TFE3 Protein Expression by RNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Pflueger

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinoma (tRCC is defined by chromosomal translocations involving the TFE3 transcription factor at chromosome Xp11.2. Genetically proven TFE3 tRCCs have a broad histologic spectrum with overlapping features to other renal tumor subtypes. In this study,we aimed for characterizing RCC with TFE3 protein expression. Using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq as a discovery tool, we analyzed fusion transcripts, gene expression profile, and somatic mutations in frozen tissue of one TFE3 tRCC. By applying a computational analysis developed to call chimeric RNA molecules from paired-end RNA-Seq data, we confirmed the known TFE3 translocation. Its fusion partner SFPQ has already been described as fusion partner in tRCCs. In addition, an RNAread-through chimera between TMED6 and COG8 as well as MET and KDR (VEGFR2 point mutations were identified. An EGFR mutation, but no chromosomal rearrangements, was identified in a control group of five clear cell RCCs (ccRCCs. The TFE3 tRCC could be clearly distinguished from the ccRCCs by RNA-Seq gene expression measurements using a previously reported tRCC gene signature. In validation experiments using reverse transcription-PCR, TMED6-COG8 chimera expression was significantly higher in nine TFE3 translocated and six TFE3-expressing/non-translocated RCCs than in 24 ccRCCs (P<.001 and 22 papillaryRCCs (P<.05-.07. Immunohistochemical analysis of selected genes from the tRCC gene signature showed significantly higher eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 2 (EEF1A2 and Contactin 3 (CNTN3 expression in 16 TFE3 translocated and six TFE3-expressing/non-translocated RCCs than in over 200 ccRCCs (P < .0001, both.

  4. H2O2 Production in Species of the Lactobacillus acidophilus Group: a Central Role for a Novel NADH-Dependent Flavin Reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertzberger, R.; Arents, J.; Dekker, H.L.; Pridmore, R.D.; Gysler, C.; Kleerebezem, M.; Mattos, de M.J.T.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide production is a well-known trait of many bacterial species associated with the human body. In the presence of oxygen, the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 excretes up to 1 mM H2O2, inducing growth stagnation and cell death. Disruption of genes

  5. H2O2 Production in Species of the Lactobacillus acidophilus Group : A Central Role for a Novel NADH-Dependent Flavin Reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertzberger, R.; Arents, J.; Dekker, H.L.; Pridmore, D.; Gysler, C.; Kleerebezem, M.; Teixeira de Mattosa, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide production is a well-known trait of many bacterial species associated with the human body. In the presence of oxygen, the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 excretes up to 1 mM H2O2, inducing growth stagnation and cell death. Disruption of genes

  6. Antibody guided irradiation of brain glioma by arterial infusion of radioactive monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor and blood group A antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epenetos, A.A.; Courtenay-Luck, N.; Pickering, D.; Hooker, G.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenzie, C.G. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Durbin, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (UK). Labs.)

    1985-05-18

    In a patient with recurrent grade IV glioma of the brain resistant to conventional treatment an antibody guided isotopic scan showed uptake by the tumour of a monoclonal antibody (9A) that was developed against epidermal growth factor receptor but cross reacted with blood group A antigen. As a therapeutic attempt antibody labelled with 1665 MBq (45.0 mCi) iodine-131 was delivered to the tumour area by infusion into the internal carotid artery. Computed tomography showed regression of the tumour after treatment, and an appreciable and sustained clinical improvement was noted without any toxicity. Delivery of irradiation guided by monoclonal antibody delivered by arterial infusion of the tumour area may be of clinical value in the treatment of brain gliomas resistant to conventional forms of treatment.

  7. Response to vicriviroc in treatment-experienced subjects, as determined by an enhanced-sensitivity coreceptor tropism assay: reanalysis of AIDS clinical trials group A5211.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhaohui; Gulick, Roy M; Krambrink, Amy; Coakley, Eoin; Hughes, Michael D; Han, Dong; Flexner, Charles; Wilkin, Timothy J; Skolnik, Paul R; Greaves, Wayne L; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Reeves, Jacqueline D

    2009-12-01

    The enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) was used to retest coreceptor use at both study screening and study entry for 118 treatment-experienced subjects in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5211 who had CCR5-tropic (R5) virus detected by the original Trofile assay at study screening. Among 90 recipients of vicriviroc, a significantly (P< .001) greater mean reduction in HIV-1 RNA was observed in 72 subjects with R5 virus versus 15 subjects reclassified as having dual/mixed-tropic viruses at screening: -1.11 versus -0.09 log(10) copies/mL at day 14 and -1.91 versus -0.57 log(10) copies/mL at week 24, respectively. Results suggest that the enhanced-sensitivity assay is a better screening tool for determining patient eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy.

  8. Prevalence of group a rotavirus, enteric adenovirus, norovirus and astrovirus infections among children with acute gastroenteritis in al-qassim, saudi arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meqdam, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Norovirus, and Astrovirus among Saudi children with gastroenteritis. This study was conducted at the Department of Medical Laboratories, Qassim University during the winter seasons of the years 2004 and 2005. A total of 284 diarrhoeal fecal specimens collected from children were tested for the gastroenteritis causing viruses using enzyme immunoassay. Of the 284 specimens, 142 (50%) were found to be positive for viruses causing gastroenteritis. Rotavirus (66.2%) was the most frequently detected, followed by adenovirus (15.5%), norovirus and astrovirus each with 9.2%. All of rotavirus detected belonged to group A. Eight specimens were found positive by two viruses. The introduction of simple and rapid tests for diagnosis of viruses causing gastroenteritis in our pediatric hospitals will improve patient care by reducing unnecessary treatments and hospital stay for patients. (author)

  9. Neisseria meningitidis Group A IgG1 and IgG2 Subclass Immune Response in African Children Aged 12–23 Months Following Meningococcal Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Daniel; Findlow, Helen; Sow, Samba O.; Idoko, Olubukola T.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Carlone, George; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Borrow, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Background. A group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT, was licensed in 2010 and was previously studied in a phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate its safety and immunogenicity in African children 12–23 months of age. Methods. Subjects received either PsA-TT; meningococcal group A, C, W, Y polysaccharide vaccine (PsACWY); or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (Hib-TT). Forty weeks following primary vaccination, the 3 groups were further randomized to receive either PsA-TT, one-fifth dose of PsACWY, or Hib-TT. Group A–specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass response was characterized using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. The predominant IgG subclass response, regardless of vaccine, was IgG1. One month following primary vaccination, the geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) of IgG1 and IgG2 in the PsA-TT group were 21.73 µg/mL and 6.27 µg/mL, whereas in the PsACWY group the mean GMCs were 2.01 µg/mL and 0.97 µg/mL, respectively (P Group A–specific IgG1 and IgG2 GMCs remained greater in the PsA-TT group than in the PsACWY group 40 weeks following primary vaccination (P vaccines. Conclusions. Vaccination of African children aged 12–24 months with either PsA-TT or PsACWY elicited a predominantly IgG1 response. The IgG1:IgG2 mean ratio decreased following successive vaccination with PsACWY, indicating a shift toward IgG2, suggestive of the T-cell–independent immune response commonly associated with polysaccharide antigens. Clinical Trials Registration. SRCTN78147026. PMID:26553689

  10. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christian Salgård; Dam-Nielsen, Casper; Arpi, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G can be adequately identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Previous studies show varying results, with an identification rate from below 50% to 100%. Large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G isolated from blood cultures between January 1, 2007 and May 1, 2012 were included in the study. Isolates were identified to the species level using a combination of phenotypic characteristics and 16s rRNA sequencing. The isolates were subjected to MALDI-ToF analysis. We used a two-stage approach starting with the direct method. If no valid result was obtained we proceeded to an extraction protocol. Scores above 2 were considered valid identification at the species level. A total of 97 Streptococcus pyogenes, 133 Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and 2 Streptococcus canis isolates were tested; 94%, 66%, and 100% of S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis, respectively, were correctly identified by MALDI-ToF. In most instances when the isolates were not identified by MALDI-ToF this was because MALDI-ToF was unable to differentiate between S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae. By removing two S. pyogenes reference spectra from the MALDI-ToF database the proportion of correctly identified isolates increased to 96% overall. MALDI-ToF is a promising method for discriminating between S. dysgalactiae, S. canis, and S. equi, although more strains need to be tested to clarify this.

  11. Solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method of producing solar cells is described which consists of producing a substantially monocrystalline tubular body of silicon or other suitable semiconductor material, treating this body to form an annular rectifying junction and then cutting it longitudinally to form a number of nearly flat ribbons from which the solar cells are fabricated. The P=N rectifying junction produced by the formation of silicon dioxide on the layers at the inner and outer surfaces of the body can be formed by ion-implantation or diffusion. (U.K.)

  12. Electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1 to 10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

  13. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    In his influential essay on markets, An essay on framing and overflowing (1998), Michel Callon writes that `the growing complexity of industrialized societies [is] due in large part to the movements of the technosciences, which are causing connections and interdependencies to proliferate'. This p...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products.......'. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...

  14. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil and nucl......A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  15. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Squamous cell carcinoma Overview Squamous cell carcinoma: This man's skin ... a squamous cell carcinoma on his face. Squamous cell carcinoma: Overview Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a ...

  16. Repair Mechanism of UV-damaged DNA in Xeroderma Pigmentosum | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, inherited disorder characterized by extreme skin sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. XP is caused by mutations in genes involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) of damaged DNA. Normal cells are usually able to fix this damage before it leads to problems; however, the DNA damage is not repaired normally in patients with XP. As more abnormalities form in DNA, cells malfunction and eventually become cancerous or die. XP patients have more than a 10,000-fold increased risk of developing skin cancer. Kenneth Kraemer, M.D., in CCR’s Dermatology Branch, has been studying XP patients at the Clinical Center for more than 40 years.

  17. Photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  18. Potent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    It seems hard to believe that Dolly the cloned sheep was born 10 years ago, kindling furious arguments over the prospects and ethics of cloning a human. Today, the controversy over cloning is entwined, often confused, with concerns over the use of human embryonic stem cells. Most people are unclear what cloning is, and they know even less when it…

  19. Cellulose bearing Schiff base and carboxylic acid chelating groups: a low cost and green adsorbent for heavy metal ion removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, R; Ravikumar, L

    2016-10-01

    Chemically modified cellulose bearing metal binding sites like Schiff base and carboxylic acid groups was synthesized and characterized through Fourier transform infrared and solid state 13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The chemically modified cellulose (Cell-PA) adsorbent was examined for its metal ion uptake ability for Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. Kinetic and isotherm studies were carried out under optimum conditions. Pseudo-second-order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm fit well with the experimental data. Thermodynamic studies were also performed along with adsorption regeneration performance studies. The adsorbent (Cell-PA) shows high potential for the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) metal ions, and it shows antibacterial activity towards selected microorganisms.

  20. Fanconi anemia (FA) binding protein FAAP20 stabilizes FA complementation group A (FANCA) and participates in interstrand cross-link repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Justin Wai Chung; Wang, Yucai; Fong, Ka Wing; Huen, Michael Shing Yan; Li, Lei; Chen, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway participates in interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair and the maintenance of genomic stability. The FA core complex consists of eight FA proteins and two Fanconi anemia-associated proteins (FAAP24 and FAAP100). The FA core complex has ubiquitin ligase activity responsible for monoubiquitination of the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) complex, which in turn initiates a cascade of biochemical events that allow processing and removal of cross-linked DNA and thereby promotes cell survival following DNA damage. Here, we report the identification of a unique component of the FA core complex, namely, FAAP20, which contains a RAD18-like ubiquitin-binding zinc-finger domain. Our data suggest that FAAP20 promotes the functional integrity of the FA core complex via its direct interaction with the FA gene product, FANCA. Indeed, somatic knockout cells devoid of FAAP20 displayed the hallmarks of FA cells, including hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, chromosome aberrations, and reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Taking these data together, our study indicates that FAAP20 is an important player involved in the FA pathway. PMID:22396592