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Sample records for group trog study

  1. Update on TROG trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Validation of treatment methodologies can only be achieved in the context of unambiguous, efficiently managed, randomised and controlled clinical trials. Since 1991, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) has coordinated over 29 protocols in radiation oncology, including several key randomised controlled trials. The impetus behind TROG is the establishment of an evidence base for particular approaches to radiotherapy and its adjunct use with alternative and complementary treatment methods. As the level of technology incorporated into radiotherapy continues to increase, as the need for improved accuracy in dose assessment increases and as the requirements of realistic quality assurance (QA) for clinical trials becomes more demanding it is imperative that all professionals involved in radiotherapy, including physicists, become actively involved in the QA of trials. This is particularly important for large scale multi-centre trials which intend to prove the benefits of particular treatment approaches on a national or international stage rather then in the context of a single clinic. This talk will: 1. Examine the outcomes of TROG trials to date in terms of the information obtained. 2. Briefly consider current and impending TROG trials and their requirements in terms of clinical and physics input. 3. Examine the results of international clinical trials in terms of the influence they have had on radiotherapy practice and health outcomes, and the advantages they have obtained by consistent co-operation between clinical and technological staff. 4. Consider the benefits of multi-centre clinical trials and the QA controls that are necessary to ensure accuracy of resulting recommendations. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  2. Phase 3 trial of domiciliary humidification to mitigate acute mucosal toxicity during radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: first report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macann, Andrew; Fua, Tsien; Milross, Chris G; Porceddu, Sandro V; Penniment, Michael; Wratten, Chris; Krawitz, Hedley; Poulsen, Michael; Tang, Colin I; Morton, Randall P; Hay, K David; Thomson, Vicki; Bell, Melanie L; King, Madeleine T; Fraser-Browne, Carol L; Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P

    2014-03-01

    To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H&N) cancer. From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H&N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher & Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macann, Andrew, E-mail: amacann@adhb.govt.nz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Fua, Tsien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Milross, Chris G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia); Porceddu, Sandro V. [Oncology Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Penniment, Michael [Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Wratten, Chris [Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Krawitz, Hedley [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Poulsen, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, South Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tang, Colin I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Morton, Randall P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Middlemore Hospital, Otahuhu, Auckland (New Zealand); Hay, K. David [Department of Oral Health, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Thomson, Vicki [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T. [Psycho-oncology Cooperative Research Group, Univerity of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol L. [Adult Oncology Research Centre, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P. [Biometrics Matters Ltd, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility.

  4. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macann, Andrew; Fua, Tsien; Milross, Chris G.; Porceddu, Sandro V.; Penniment, Michael; Wratten, Chris; Krawitz, Hedley; Poulsen, Michael; Tang, Colin I.; Morton, Randall P.; Hay, K. David; Thomson, Vicki; Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T.; Fraser-Browne, Carol L.; Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility

  5. A quality assurance audit: phase iii trial of maximal androgen deprivation in prostate cancer (TROG 96.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigler, A.; Kovacev, O.; Denham, J.; Lamb, D.; North, J.

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) performed a quality assurance (QA) audit of its phase III randomized clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of different durations of maximal androgen deprivation prior to and during definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the prostate (TROG 96.01). The audit reviewed a total of 60 cases from 15 centres across Australia and New Zealand. In addition to verification of technical adherence to the protocol, the audit also incorporated a survey of centre planning techniques and a QA time/cost analysis. The present report builds on TROG's first technical audit conducted in 1996 for the phase III accelerated head and neck trial (TROG 91.01) and highlights the significant progress TROG has made in the interim period. The audit provides a strong validation of the results of the 96.01 trial, as well as valuable budgeting and treatment planning information for future trials. Overall improvements were detected in data quality and quantity, and in protocol compliance, with a reduction in the rate of unacceptable protocol violations from 10 to 4%. Audit design, staff education and increased data management resources were identified as the main contributing factors to these improvements. In addition, a budget estimate of $100 per patient has been proposed for conducting similar technical audits. The next major QA project to be undertaken by TROG during the period 1998-1999 is an intercentre dosimetry study. Trial funding and staff education have been targeted as the key major issues essential to the continued success and expansion of TROG's QA programme. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. A role for radiotherapy in neuropathic bone pain: preliminary response rates from a prospective trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, TROG 96.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel E.; O'Brien, Peter C.; Smith, Jennifer G.; Spry, Nigel A.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Turner, Sandra L.; Bernshaw, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) has a proven role in palliation of pain from bone metastases with numerous randomized trials obtaining response rates (RRs) of typically 70-80% regardless of the fractionation employed. However RT for neuropathic bone pain (NBP), i.e., pain with a radiating cutaneous component due to compression/irritation of nerves by tumor has not previously been studied, and its role is thus uncertain. Methods and Materials: In February 1996, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a multicenter randomized trial comparing a single 8 Gy fraction with 20 Gy in 5 fractions for NBP with an accrual target of 270. Formal interim analyses were planned at 90 and 180 patients. The 90th patient was accrued in June 1998, and data from the first interim analysis with both arms combined form the basis of this report. Results: Forty-four patients were randomized to a single 8 Gy, 46 to 20 Gy in 5 fractions. The commonest primary sites were prostate (34%), lung (28%) and breast (10%). Median age was 68 years (range 37-89). The index site was spine (86%), rib (13%), base of skull (1%). On an intention-to-treat basis, the overall RR was 53/90 = 59% (95% CI = 48-69%), with 27% achieving a complete response and 32% a partial response. The overall RR for eligible patients was 49/81 = 60% (95% CI = 49-71%) with 27% and 33% achieving complete and partial responses respectively. Estimated median time to treatment failure was 3.2 months (95% CI = 2.1-5.1 months), with estimated median survival of 5.1 months (95% CI = 4.2-7.2 months). To date, six spinal cord/cauda equina compressions and four new or progressive pathological fractures have been detected at the index site after randomization, although one cord compression occurred before radiotherapy was planned to commence. In February 1999, the Independent Data Monitoring Committee strongly recommended continuation of the trial. Conclusion: Although these results are preliminary, it seems clear that there

  7. A Paired, Double-Blind, Randomized Comparison of a Moisturizing Durable Barrier Cream to 10% Glycerine Cream in the Prophylactic Management of Postmastectomy Irradiation Skin Care: Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Peter H.; Plant, Natalie; Graham, Jennifer L.; Browne, Lois; Borg, Martin; Capp, Anne; Delaney, Geoff P.; Harvey, Jennifer; Kenny, Lisbeth; Francis, Michael; Zissiadis, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A previous, unblinded study demonstrated that an alcohol-free barrier film containing an acrylate terpolymer (ATP) was effective in reducing skin reactions compared with a 10% glycerine cream (sorbolene). The different appearances of these products precluded a blinded comparison. To test the acrylate terpolymer principle in a double-blinded manner required the use of an alternative cream formulation, a moisturizing durable barrier cream (MDBC); the study was conducted by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) as protocol 04.01. Methods and Materials: A total of 333 patients were randomized; 1 patient was ineligible and 14 patients withdrew or had less than 7 weeks' observations, leaving 318 for analysis. The chest wall was divided into medial and lateral compartments, and patients were randomized to have MDBC applied daily to the medial or lateral compartment and sorbolene to the other compartment. Weekly observations, photographs, and symptom scores (pain and pruritus) were collected to week 12 or resolution of skin reactions if earlier. Skin dose was confirmed by centrally calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results: Rates of medial and lateral compartment Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 3, greater than or equal to grade 3 skin reactions were 23% and 41%, but rates by skin care product were identical at 32%. There was no significant difference between MDBC and sorbolene in the primary endpoint of peak skin reactions or secondary endpoints of area-under-the-curve skin reaction scores. Conclusions: The MDBC did not reduce the peak skin reaction compared to sorbolene. It is possible that this is related to the difference in the formulation of the cream compared with the film formulation. Skin dosimetry verification and double blinding are essential for radiation skin care comparative studies

  8. Humidification mitigates acute mucosal toxicity during radiotherapy when factoring volumetric parameters. Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) RadioHUM 07.03 substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macann, A; Fauzi, F; Simpson, J; Sasso, G; Krawitz, H; Fraser-Browne, C; Manitz, J; Raith, A

    2017-12-01

    To model in a subset of patients from TROG 07.03 managed at a single site the association between domiciliary based humidification use and mucositis symptom burden during radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC) when factoring in volumetric radiotherapy parameters derived from tumour and normal tissue regions of interest. From June 2008 through June 2011, 210 patients with HNC receiving RT were randomised to either a control arm or humidification using the Fisher & Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. This subset analysis involves patients recruited from Auckland City Hospital treated with a prescribed dose of ≥70 Gy. Regression models included control variables for Planning Target Volume 70 GY (PTV70Gy); Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD) MOIST and TSV (surrogates of total mucosal and total swallowing volumes respectively). The analysis included 39 patients (humidification 20, control 19). There was a significant odds reduction in CTCAE v3.0 functional mucositis score of 0.29 associated with the use of humidification (phumidification patient being scored as experiencing a one-step increase in functional mucositis was 3.45 times lower (1/0.29) than for control patients. A control patient was 4.17 times more likely to receive an unfavourable nutritional mode score (phumidification patients (p=.013). The results support the hypothesis that humidification can help mitigate mucositis symptom burden. Radiotherapy dosimetric parameters assist in the evaluation of toxicity interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tilpasning, Standardisering og Validering af den Danske Version af Test for Reception of Grammar-2 (TROG-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen de López, Kristine M.; Knüppel, Ane

    2010-01-01

    of TROG-2 was validated against a standardized Danish vocubulary comprihenseion test The Viborg Test (Pedersen & Skyrum Kjøge, 2005) and results show that the language measures correlate strongly (r=0,80, p=.001). As a whole we can conclude that the Danis version of TROG-2 seems a reliable and valid test...... study were tested on the adapted Danish versionof the relative clause comprehension test developed bu Friedmann (1998). The results from the children's performance on the two receptive grammar tests correlated need for further modifications of the test in order to attain a valid Danish verion of TROG-2......The following study presents results from the pilot as well as the final version of the Danish adaptation of Dorothy Bishop's Test for Reception of Grammar 2 (TROG-2). The original British test was modified according to Danish grammar. It was the piloted, re-modified and finally standardized...

  10. Assessment of grammar comprehension: Adaptation of TROG for Serbian language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darinka Č.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present our adaptation and preliminary standardization of Test for Reception of Grammar TROG (Bishop, 1989 for Serbian language. TROG is a receptive test of grammatical structures, constructed primarily for an assessment of grammatical development and detection of children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI. Due to the lack of standardized tests for language development in our clinical community, TROG is selected for adaptation as a test which includes two components relevant for discrimination of children with language difficulties: a measure of receptive abilities and b distinguishing knowledge of grammar from semantic aspect of comprehension. Preliminary standardization was done on a sample of 335 participants between 4 and 7 years of age, divided into 8 age subsamples. Since dynamic of language change at early ages is faster, age samples covered range of 3 months at the ages 4;0-4;2, 4;3-4;5, 4;6-4;8, 4;9-4;11, and range of 6 months at the ages 5;0-5;5, 5;6-5;11, 6;00-6;05, 6;06-6;11. Analyses have revealed that the first version of Serbian TROG is discriminative for the differences between age samples, but discrimination is smaller then it was expected. The test discriminates three age-samples (4;0-4;8, 4;9-5;5, and 5;6-6;11. It is easier for the children older then 5 years, which causes statistical significance of discrimination to tilt within a narrow margin around 0,05. Reliability of the whole instrument is estimated very high - between 0,86 and 0,91, depending on the method of estimation. However, reliability estimated for particular blocks (grammatical structure revealed that internal consistency of blocks is not homogeneous. This finding prevents reliable estimation of competence for particular structures, and makes difficult to define which contrast is understood by a child and which is not. Furthermore, internal inconsistency of blocks may also be additional source of low discrimination of test for children

  11. Digital photography as source documentation of skin toxicity: an analysis from the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01 Post-Mastectomy Radiation Skin Care trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Peter H.; Plant, Natalie A.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated digital photographs as a method of providing auditable source documentation for radiotherapy-induced skin toxicity and the possibility therefore of centralised, blinded scoring for a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Digital photograph sets from the first five patients from each of 12 participating centres were audited. Minimum camera specifications and photograph requirements were protocol specified. Three readers rated photographs for four key quality items. They also scored skin reactions according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) v3.0 acute skin score and also for the presence of any moist desquamation. Five hundred fifty-two images were available. Field of view was scored as inadequate in 1–10%, focus inadequate in 0.4–4%, lighting inadequate in 0.2–3% and dividing line marking inadequate for scoring of skin reactions within sectors in 18–23% of photographs by three readers. Reader pairwise inter-observer agreement was 83–88% for CTC acute skin scores, but the kappa value ranged from 0.58 to 0.73. The percentage of image sectors not scored by readers due to difficulty in assessing was 1–10%. Moist desquamation was scored by clinicians in 8 (medial)–13% (lateral) of patients compared with 3–5% and 5–11% by readers. Photo reader inter-observer agreement is only moderate. Photo readers tended to underscore the frequency of moist desquamation, but the trend by sector parallels the clinical scorers. Photographs are useful source documents for auditing and monitoring, but not a replacement for clinical scoring.

  12. Digital photography as source documentation of skin toxicity: an analysis from the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01 post-mastectomy radiation skin care trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter H; Plant, Natalie A; Graham, Jennifer Louise; Browne, Lois H; Borg, Martin; Capp, Anne; Delaney, Geoff P; Harvey, Jennifer; Kenny, Lizbeth; Francis, Michael; Zissiadis, Yvonne

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated digital photographs as a method of providing auditable source documentation for radiotherapy-induced skin toxicity and the possibility therefore of centralised, blinded scoring for a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Digital photograph sets from the first five patients from each of 12 participating centres were audited. Minimum camera specifications and photograph requirements were protocol specified. Three readers rated photographs for four key quality items. They also scored skin reactions according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) v3.0 acute skin score and also for the presence of any moist desquamation. Five hundred fifty-two images were available. Field of view was scored as inadequate in 1-10%, focus inadequate in 0.4-4%, lighting inadequate in 0.2-3% and dividing line marking inadequate for scoring of skin reactions within sectors in 18-23% of photographs by three readers. Reader pairwise inter-observer agreement was 83-88% for CTC acute skin scores, but the kappa value ranged from 0.58 to 0.73. The percentage of image sectors not scored by readers due to difficulty in assessing was 1-10%. Moist desquamation was scored by clinicians in 8 (medial)-13% (lateral) of patients compared with 3-5% and 5-11% by readers. Photo reader inter-observer agreement is only moderate. Photo readers tended to underscore the frequency of moist desquamation, but the trend by sector parallels the clinical scorers. Photographs are useful source documents for auditing and monitoring, but not a replacement for clinical scoring. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  13. Eligibility audits for the randomized neuropathic bone pain trial (TROG 96.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, D.E.; Turner, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    In February 1996 the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a two-arm, multicentre, prospective randomized trial on radiotherapy for neuropathic pain due to bone metastases (TROG 96.05). This trial compares the response to a single 8-Gy fraction with 20 Gy in five fractions. The accrual target is 270 patients. In order to evaluate compliance with eligibility criteria after approximately 1 year of accrual, an independent audit of the first 42 randomized patients was commissioned. This found that only one of these patients did not have genuine neuropathic pain, but that this patient and seven others (19%) had infringements of other eligibility/exclusion criteria for the trial. Accordingly it was decided to continue the full audit up to 90 patients. This detected no further patients without genuine neuropathic pain, and found only one other eligibility infringement (1/48; 2%). It is concluded that this quality assurance (QA) measure undertaken early in the trial led to significantly improved clinician awareness of, and compliance with, eligibility/exclusion criteria. It also enabled an accurate comparison of outcome data for all randomized versus all eligible patients at the time of the preplanned first interim analysis at 90 patients. In view of the excellent compliance demonstrated in the second audit, a one-in-five sampling is proposed for future audits from centres that have already accrued at least five consecutive eligible patients. This is consistent with TROG QA guidelines now operational. Copyright (2000) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Quality assurance audit in an Australasian phase III trial of accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (TROG 91.01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, C.; Denham, J.; Steigler, A. [Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital, NSW (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology; Poulsen, M. [Queensland Radium Institute Mater Centre, South Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Walker, Q. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia). Queensland Radium Institute; Krawitz, H. [Auckland Hospital, Auckland, (New Zealand); Hindley, A. [Royal Preston Hospital, Fullwood, Preston, (United Kingdom). Lancashire and Lakeland Radiotherapy Unit; Spry, N. [Geelong Hospital, Geelong, VIC (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology; Peters, L. [Peter MacCallum Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Lamb, D. [Wellington Hospital, Wellington, (New Zealand). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1999-05-01

    The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a randomized trial, testing accelerated (twice daily) radiotherapy against conventional radiotherapy for stage II and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in 1991. In 1996, the Trial Management Committee arranged for a technical audit of 76 cases from 11 institutions, conducted by investigators from interstate institutions. A 10% unacceptable protocol violation rate was detected, which compares favourably with initial Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) experience in the late 1970s. Infrastructural deficits with poor quality of documentation, incomplete retrieval of films and document return have been demonstrated in some cases. The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group is actively pursuing procedural and resourcing issues in order to redress this and is actively expanding its Quality Assurance (QA) Programme with an intercentre dosimetry study. Ultimately, comprehensive clinical and technical QA site visits are planned. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Quality assurance audit in an Australasian phase III trial of accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (TROG 91.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.; Denham, J.; Steigler, A.; Walker, Q.; Hindley, A.; Lamb, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a randomized trial, testing accelerated (twice daily) radiotherapy against conventional radiotherapy for stage II and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in 1991. In 1996, the Trial Management Committee arranged for a technical audit of 76 cases from 11 institutions, conducted by investigators from interstate institutions. A 10% unacceptable protocol violation rate was detected, which compares favourably with initial Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) experience in the late 1970s. Infrastructural deficits with poor quality of documentation, incomplete retrieval of films and document return have been demonstrated in some cases. The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group is actively pursuing procedural and resourcing issues in order to redress this and is actively expanding its Quality Assurance (QA) Programme with an intercentre dosimetry study. Ultimately, comprehensive clinical and technical QA site visits are planned. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. A Multidisciplinary Evaluation of a Web-based eLearning Training Programme for SAFRON II (TROG 13.01): a Multicentre Randomised Study of Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, D; Hardcastle, N; Foroudi, F; Kron, T; Bressel, M; Hilder, B; Chesson, B; Oates, R; Montgomery, R; Ball, D; Siva, S

    2016-09-01

    In technically advanced multicentre clinical trials, participating centres can benefit from a credentialing programme before participating in the trial. Education of staff in participating centres is an important aspect of a successful clinical trial. In the multicentre study of fractionated versus single fraction stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy in lung oligometastases (TROG 13.01), knowledge transfer of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy techniques to the local multidisciplinary team is intended as part of the credentialing process. In this study, a web-based learning platform was developed to provide education and training for the multidisciplinary trial teams at geographically distinct sites. A web-based platform using eLearning software consisting of seven training modules was developed. These modules were based on extracranial stereotactic theory covering the following discrete modules: Clinical background; Planning technique and evaluation; Planning optimisation; Four-dimensional computed tomography simulation; Patient-specific quality assurance; Cone beam computed tomography and image guidance; Contouring organs at risk. Radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation therapists from hospitals in Australia and New Zealand were invited to participate in this study. Each discipline was enrolled into a subset of modules (core modules) and was evaluated before and after completing each module. The effectiveness of the eLearning training will be evaluated based on (i) knowledge retention after participation in the web-based training and (ii) confidence evaluation after participation in the training. Evaluation consisted of a knowledge test and confidence evaluation using a Likert scale. In total, 130 participants were enrolled into the eLearning programme: 81 radiation therapists (62.3%), 27 medical physicists (20.8%) and 22 radiation oncologists (16.9%). There was an average absolute improvement of 14% in test score (P 4 weeks) after

  17. The outcome of a multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer TROG 10.01 BOLART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Rolfo, Aldo; Bressel, Mathias; Tang, Colin I.; Tan, Alex; Turner, Sandra; Hruby, George; Williams, Stephen; Hayne, Dickon; Lehman, Margot; Skala, Marketa; Jose, Chakiath C.; Gogna, Kumar; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is feasible across multiple Radiation Oncology departments using different imaging, delivery and recording technology. Materials and methods: A multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy, using a choice of three “plan of the day”, was conducted at 12 departments. Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Departments were activated if part of the pilot study or after a site-credentialing visit. There was real time review of the first two cases from each department. Results: 54 patients were recruited, with 50 proceeding to radiotherapy. There were 43 males and 7 females with a mean age of 78 years. The tumour stages treated included T1 (1 patient), T2 (35), T3 (10) and T4 (4). One patient died of an unrelated cause during radiotherapy. The three adaptive plans were created before the 10th fraction in all cases. In 8 (16%) of the patients, a conventional plan using a ‘standard’ CTV to PTV margin of 1.5 cm was used for one or more fractions where the pre-treatment bladder CTV was larger than any of the three adaptive plans. The bladder CTV extended beyond the PTV on post treatment imaging in 9 (18%) of the 49 patients. Conclusions: From a technical perspective an online adaptive radiotherapy technique can be instituted in a multi-centre setting. However, without further bladder filling control or imaging, a CTV to PTV margin of 7 mm is insufficient

  18. Independent student study groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Graham D; Hyde, Sarah J; Davy, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Teachers and students regulate learning to varying degrees in educational programmes in higher education. We present evidence that students in a student-centred medical programme self- and co-regulate their learning in independently formed study groups. We describe the perceived benefits of study groups and the effect of study group membership on student achievement. Years 1-2 of a 4-year, graduate-entry problem-based medical programme. We surveyed 233 year 2 students about features of their study groups and their study group membership in years 1-2. We compared study group membership with students' scores on a written summative assessment held at the end of their second year. For students who joined 1 study group, the length of time their group stayed together was positively related to achievement in the written summative assessment. There were no differences in summative assessment results between students who had been in a study group and students who had not been in a study group. Effective study groups are supportive, socially cohesive groups who generate mutual trust and loyalty, and self- and co-regulate their learning by giving and receiving explanations and summaries and motivating individual study. Teachers can support the formation of study groups by using small-group teaching/learning activities, providing clear learning outcomes and assessment criteria, minimising competition for grades and allocating room space.

  19. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions.......Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  20. PV systems with passive solar tracking and V-trough concentrators; Photovoltaikanlagen mit passiver Nachfuehrung und V-Trog Konzentratoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, F.H. [Fachgebiet Photovoltaische Anlagentechnik, Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Passive tracking and V-trough concentration (PV V-trough) can enhance the array yield (energy yield per installed power) of photovoltaic systems in Europe by 60% to 100% (dependent on site and configuration). By the use of simple techniques, energy costs can be decreased by 20% to 30% relative to conventional fixed-tilt PV systems. This contribution presents the passively tracked PV V-trough concentrator concept. The state-of-the-art of this technology will be demonstrated by results from two systems in Widderstall/Schwaebische Alb and Manfredonia/Apulien. The technical and economic potential of this system concept will be discussed for different climates and system configurations. (orig.) [Deutsch] Passive Nachfuehrung und V-Trog Konzentration koennen die spezifische Energieausbeute (Energieertrag pro installierter Leistung) von Photovoltaikanlagen in Europa etwa 60% bis 100% (je nach Standort und Anlagenkonfiguration) steigern. Durch den Einsatz besonders einfacher Technik koennen damit die Energiegestehungskosten gegenueber konventionellen, festorientierten Photovoltaikanlagen um ca. 20% bis 30% gesenkt werden. Dieser Beitrag stellt das Konzept der passiv nachgefuehrten Photovoltaikanlage mit V-Trog Konzentrator (PV V-Trog) vor. Der Stand der Technik wird anhand der Betriebsergebnisse von realisierten Anlagen in Widderstall/Schwaebische Alb und in Manfredonia/Apulien dargestellt. Das technische und wirtschaftliche Potential dieser Anlagentechnik wird fuer verschiedene Standorte und Systemvarianten aufgezeigt und diskutiert. (orig.)

  1. Oligometastatic bone disease in prostate cancer patients treated on the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Swetha; Steigler, Allison; Spry, Nigel A; Joseph, David; Lamb, David S; Matthews, John H; Atkinson, Chris; Tai, Keen-Hun; Duchesne, Gillian; Christie, David; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Denham, James W

    2016-10-01

    It remains unclear whether eradication of oligometastases by stereotactic body radiation therapy or other means will result in cure or prolongation of survival in some cases, or merely provide palliation. We address this issue with prospectively collected progression and treatment data from the TROG 03.04 RADAR randomised controlled trial for men with locally advanced prostate cancer (PC). Three Fine and Gray competing risk survival models with time-dependent covariates were used to determine whether metastatic progression status at first diagnosis of bony metastases, i.e. number of bony sites involved and presence of prior or simultaneous other sites of progression, impacts on prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) when adjusted for baseline prognostic factors and allocated primary treatment. Between 2003 and 2014, 176 of the 1071 subjects developed bone metastases, 152 developed other sites of progression and 91 died of PC. All subjects received secondary treatment using androgen suppression but none received extirpative treatments. The three models found evidence: 1 - of a clear prognostic gradient according to number of bony metastatic sites; 2 - that other sites of progression contributed to PCSM to a lesser extent than bone progression; and 3 - that further bony metastatic progression in men with up to 3 bony metastases had a major impact on PCSM. Randomised trials are essential to determine the value of extirpative treatment for oligometastatic bony metastases due to PC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ability Grouping in Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a position statement of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). Reports that the NCSS objects to ability grouping in social studies. Argues that ability grouping disadvantages minority, handicapped, and low ability students. Suggests that ability grouping undermines the democratic ideals that should be the basis of the social…

  3. Hanford Waste Tank Grouping Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remund, K.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1996-01-01

    This letter report discusses the progress and accomplishments of the Tank Grouping Study in FY96. Forty-one single-shell tanks (SSTs) were included in the FY95. In FY96, technical enhancements were also made to data transformations and tank grouping methods. The first focus of the FY96 effort was a general tank grouping study in which the 41 SSTs were grouped into classes with similar waste properties. The second FY96 focus was a demonstration of how multivariate statistical methods can be used to help resolve tank safety issues

  4. A randomised phase II trial of Stereotactic Ablative Fractionated radiotherapy versus Radiosurgery for Oligometastatic Neoplasia to the lung (TROG 13.01 SAFRON II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Haas, Marion; Mai, Tao; Vinod, Shalini; Sasso, Giuseppe; Wong, Wenchang; Le, Hien; Eade, Thomas; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Chesson, Brent; Pham, Daniel; Høyer, Morten; Montgomery, Rebecca; Ball, David

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is emerging as a non-invasive method for precision irradiation of lung tumours. However, the ideal dose/fractionation schedule is not yet known. The primary purpose of this study is to assess safety and efficacy profile of single and multi-fraction SABR in the context of pulmonary oligometastases. The TROG 13.01/ALTG 13.001 clinical trial is a multicentre unblinded randomised phase II study. Eligible patients have up to three metastases to the lung from any non-haematological malignancy, each < 5 cm in size, non-central targets, and have all primary and extrathoracic disease controlled with local therapies. Patients are randomised 1:1 to a single fraction of 28Gy versus 48Gy in four fractions of SABR. The primary objective is to assess the safety of each treatment arm, with secondary objectives including assessment of quality of life, local efficacy, resource use and costs, overall and disease free survival and time to distant failure. Outcomes will be stratified by number of metastases and origin of the primary disease (colorectal versus non-colorectal primary). Planned substudies include an assessment of the impact of online e-Learning platforms for lung SABR and assessment of the effect of SABR fractionation on the immune responses. A total of 84 patients are required to complete the study. Fractionation schedules have not yet been investigated in a randomised fashion in the setting of oligometastatic disease. Assuming the likelihood of similar clinical efficacy in both arms, the present study design allows for exploration of the hypothesis that cost implications of managing potentially increased toxicities from single fraction SABR will be outweighed by costs associated with delivering multiple-fraction SABR

  5. Association between measures of treatment quality and disease progression in prostate cancer radiotherapy: An exploratory analysis from the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcello, Marco; Ebert, Martin A; Haworth, Annette; Steigler, Allison; Kennedy, Angel; Bulsara, Max; Kearvell, Rachel; Joseph, David J; Denham, James W

    2018-04-01

    Quality assurance methods are incorporated into multicentre radiotherapy clinical trials for ensuring consistent application of trial protocol and quantifying treatment uncertainties. The study's purpose was to determine whether post-treatment disease progression is associated with measures of the quality of radiotherapy treatment. The TROG 03.04 RADAR trial tested the impact of androgen deprivation on prostate cancer patients receiving dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. The trial incorporated a plan-review process and Level III dosimetric intercomparison at each centre, from which variables suggestive of treatment quality were collected. Kaplan-Meier statistics and Fine and Gray competing risk modelling were employed to test for associations between quality-related variables and the participant outcome local composite progression. Increased 'dose-difference' at the prostatic apex and at the anterior rectal wall, between planned and measured dose, was associated with reduced progression. Participants whose treatment plans included clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins exceeding protocol requirements also experienced reduced progression. Other quality-related variables, including total accrual from participating centres, measures of target coverage and other variations from protocol, were not significantly associated with progression. This analysis has revealed the association of several treatment quality factors with disease progression. Increased dose and dose margin coverage in the prostate region can reduce disease progression. Extensive and rigorous monitoring has helped to maximise treatment quality, reducing the incidence of quality-indicator outliers, and thus reduce the chance of observing significant associations with progression rates. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. Developing a universal reading comprehension intervention for mainstream primary schools within areas of social deprivation for children with and without language-learning impairment: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elspeth; Boyle, James; Ellis, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Some children in areas of social deprivation in Scotland have lower reading attainment than neighbouring children in less deprived areas, and some of these also have lower spoken language comprehension skills than expected by assessment norms. There is a need to develop effective reading comprehension interventions that fit easily into the school curriculum and can benefit all pupils. A feasibility study of reading comprehension strategies with existing evidence of efficacy was undertaken in three mainstream primary schools within an area of social deprivation in west central Scotland, to decide whether further investigation of this intervention was warranted. Aims were to measure comprehension of spoken language and reading via standardised assessments towards the beginning of the school year (T1) in mainstream primary school classrooms within an area of social deprivation; to have teachers introduce previously-validated text comprehension strategies, and to measure change in reading comprehension outcome measures towards the end of the year (T2). A pre- and post-intervention cohort design was used. Reading comprehension strategies were introduced to staff in participating schools and used throughout the school year as part of on-going reading instruction. Spoken language comprehension was measured by TROG-2 at T1, and reading progress by score changes from T1 to T2 on the WIAT-II(UK) -T reading comprehension scale. Forty-seven pupils in five classes in three primary schools took part: 38% had TROG-2 scores below the 10(th) centile. As a group, children made good reading comprehension progress, with a medium effect size of 0.46. Children with TROG-2 scores below the 10(th) centile had lower mean reading scores than others at T1 and T2, although with considerable overlap. However, TROG-2 did not make a unique contribution to reading progress: children below the 10(th) centile made as much progress as other children. The intervention was welcomed by schools, and the

  7. The Ignition Physics Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the US magnetic fusion program there have been relatively few standing committees of experts, with the mandate to review a particular sub-area on a continuing basis. Generally, ad hoc committees of experts have been assembled to advise on a particular issue. There has been a lack of broad, systematic and continuing review and analysis, combining the wisdom of experts in the field, in support of decision making. The Ignition Physics Study Group (IPSG) provides one forum for the systematic discussion of fusion science, complementing the other exchanges of information, and providing a most important continuity in this critical area. In a similar manner to the European program, this continuity of discussion and the focus provided by a national effort, Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), and international effort, Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), are helping to lower those barriers which previously were an impediment to rational debate

  8. International Study Group Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2000-07-18

    The focus of the ISG work was on advancing the accelerator design and supporting technologies. This is a complex process which involves a close interaction between theoretical analysis of the collider design and R and D progress on hardware components. The sequence of efforts took place roughly in the following order: (1) Optimization of the collider parameters and definition of system and subsystem requirements, (2) Identification of design strategies and options, and (3) Development of specific technologies to achieve these requirements. Development and testing of the required components, and R and D on manufacturing techniques have been important activities of the ISG. Experiments at the major test facilities such as the ATF at KEK and ASSET at SLAC have also played a significant role in the ISG studies.

  9. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres for a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, Tomas; Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Daily variations in bladder filling make conformal treatment of bladder cancer challenging. On-line adaptive radiotherapy with a choice of plans has been demonstrated to reduce small bowel irradiation in single institution trials. In order to support a multicentre feasibility clinical trial on adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01) a credentialing programme was developed for centres wishing to participate. Methods: The credentialing programme entails three components: a facility questionnaire; a planning exercise which tests the ability of centres to create three adaptive plans based on a planning and five cone beam CTs; and a site visit during which image quality, imaging dose and image guidance procedures are assessed. Image quality and decision making were tested using customised inserts for a Perspex phantom (Modus QUASAR) that mimic different bladder sizes. Dose was assessed in the same phantom using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Results: All 12 centres participating in the full credentialing programme were able to generate appropriate target volumes in the planning exercise and identify the correct target volume and position the bladder phantom in the phantom within 3 mm accuracy. None of the imaging doses exceeded the limit of 5 cGy with a CT on rails system having the lowest overall dose. Conclusion: A phantom mimicking the decision making process for adaptive radiotherapy was found to be well suited during site visits for credentialing of centres participating in a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer. Combined with a planning exercise the site visit allowed testing the ability of centres to create adaptive treatment plans and make appropriate decisions based on the volumetric images acquired at treatment.

  10. Common Group Problems: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Sanford B.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A field study of a naturally functioning group (N=125) was conducted to identify common group problems. Trained observers attended group meetings and described the problems encountered. Difficulties of cohesion, leadership, sub-group formation, and personality conflict were identified. (RC)

  11. Statistical study of some Lee galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sabry A.; Fouad, Ahmed M.

    2017-12-01

    Compact groups of galaxies are systems of small number of galaxies close to each other. They are a good laboratory to study galaxy properties, such as structure, morphology and evolution which are affected by the environment and galaxy interactions. We applied the tree clustering technique (the Euclidean separation distance coefficients) to test the physical reality of groups and used certain criteria (Sabry et al., 2009) depending on the physical attributes of the galaxies. The sample of the data is the quintets groups of Lee compact groups of galaxies (Lee et al., 2004). It is based on a modified version of Hickson's criteria (Hickson, 1982). The results reveal the membership of each galaxy and how it is related to its group. The tables of groups and their members are included. Our results indicates that 12 Groups are real groups with real members while 18 Groups have one galaxy that has attribute discordant and should be discarded from its group.

  12. Optimizing Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance in Clinical Trials: A TROG 08.03 RAVES Substudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trada, Yuvnik, E-mail: yuvnik@gmail.com [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Royal North Shore Hospital, St Lenoards, New South Wales (Australia); Paneghel, Andrea [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Pearse, Maria [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Sidhom, Mark [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Tang, Colin [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Wiltshire, Kirsty; Haworth, Annette [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Martin, Jarad [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To explore site- and clinician-level factors associated with protocol violations requiring real-time-review (RTR) resubmission in a multicenter clinical trial to help tailor future quality assurance (QA) protocols. Methods and Materials: RAVES (Radiation Therapy–Adjuvant vs Early Salvage) (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 08.03) is a randomized trial comparing adjuvant with early salvage radiation therapy in men with positive surgical margins or pT3 disease after prostatectomy. Quality assurance in RAVES required each clinician and site to submit a credentialing dummy run (DR) and for each patient's radiation therapy plan to undergo external RTR before treatment. Prospectively defined major violations from trial protocol required remedy and resubmission. Site and clinician factors associated with RTR resubmission were examined using hierarchical modeling. Results: Data were collected from 171 consecutive patients, treated by 46 clinicians at 32 hospitals. There were 47 RTR resubmissions (27%) due to 65 major violations. The relative rate of resubmission decreased by 29% per year as the study progressed (odds ratio OR. 0.71, P=.02). The majority of resubmissions were due to contouring violations (39 of 65) and dosimetric violations (22 of 65). For each additional patient accrued, significant decreases in RTR resubmission were seen at both clinician level (OR 0.75, P=.02) and site level (OR 0.72, P=.01). The rate of resubmission due to dosimetric violations was only 1.6% after the first 5 patients. Use of IMRT was associated with lower rates of resubmission compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (OR 0.38, P=.05). Conclusion: Several low- and high-risk factors that may assist with tailoring future clinical trial QA were identified. Because the real-time resubmission rate was largely independent of the credentialing exercise, some form of RTR QA is recommended. The greatest benefit from QA was derived early in trial activation

  13. Statistical study of some Lee galaxy groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry A. Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Compact groups of galaxies are systems of small number of galaxies close to each other. They are a good laboratory to study galaxy properties, such as structure, morphology and evolution which are affected by the environment and galaxy interactions. We applied the tree clustering technique (the Euclidean separation distance coefficients to test the physical reality of groups and used certain criteria (Sabry et al., 2009 depending on the physical attributes of the galaxies. The sample of the data is the quintets groups of Lee compact groups of galaxies (Lee et al., 2004. It is based on a modified version of Hickson’s criteria (Hickson, 1982. The results reveal the membership of each galaxy and how it is related to its group. The tables of groups and their members are included.Our results indicates that 12 Groups are real groups with real members while 18 Groups have one galaxy that has attribute discordant and should be discarded from its group. Keywords: Galaxies, Cluster analysis, Galaxy groups, Lee galaxy groups

  14. Attraction to Group, Group Cohesiveness, and Individual Outcome: A Study of Training Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Thomas L.; Duncan, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Examined relationships between attraction to group and individual outcome in groups and between group cohesiveness and individual outcome in groups in four groups of 27 graduate students participating in a group psychotherapy experiential training program. Results revealed that attraction to group and group cohesiveness were both related to…

  15. TOPGEAR: a randomised phase III trial of perioperative ECF chemotherapy versus preoperative chemoradiation plus perioperative ECF chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer (an international, intergroup trial of the AGITG/TROG/EORTC/NCIC CTG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Trevor; Smithers, B Mark; Michael, Michael; Gebski, Val; Boussioutas, Alex; Miller, Danielle; Simes, John; Zalcberg, John; Haustermans, Karin; Lordick, Florian; Schuhmacher, Christoph; Swallow, Carol; Darling, Gail; Wong, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    surgical technique. TOPGEAR is an international, intergroup collaboration led by the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG), in collaboration with the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG), European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the NCIC Clinical Trials Group. It addresses a globally significant question that will help inform future international standards for clinical practice in resectable gastric cancer

  16. Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Concerns of the National Security Agency (NSA) that information contained in some articles about cryptography in learned and professional journals and in monographs might be inimical to the national security are addressed. The Public Cryptography Study Group, with one dissenting opinion, recommends that a voluntary system of prior review of…

  17. Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop, has taken place at Snowmass, Colorado, 11-23 July 1999. Its purpose was to discuss opportunities and directions in fusion energy science for the next decade. About 300 experts from all fields in the magnetic and inertial fusion communities attended, coming mostly from the US, but with some foreign participation

  18. Receiving group clinical supervision: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claire

    This study examined the process of group supervision as experienced by one team of biofeedback therapists working in the south of England. A phenomenological study was undertaken to examine the team's perceptions of attending group supervision over time. Ten one-to-one in-depth interviews were conducted, six of which were with biofeedback therapists currently receiving supervision, three with nurses who used to receive this supervision and one interview with the supervisor. A four-stage model detailing how supervisees' experiences changed as a consequence of continued group supervision was developed. Study data revealed how this process allowed the biofeedback therapists to examine their clinical interventions and align their approach and perspective alongside other team members. This was a valuable and safe way of learning 'on the job' for the newer members of the team. The opportunity for free-thinking and reflection on practice supported clinical decision-making and therapeutic nursing. The more experienced supervisees demonstrated how their continued attendance of the group supervision sessions not only confirmed their expertise in role, but also facilitated their colleagues' development, which enhanced role satisfaction. The data also indicated some of the essential supervisory features of this process.

  19. Risk Stratification after Biochemical Failure following Curative Treatment of Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Data from the TROG 96.01 Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Steigler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Survival following biochemical failure is highly variable. Using a randomized trial dataset, we sought to define a risk stratification scheme in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC. Methods. The TROG 96.01 trial randomized 802 men with LAPC to radiation ± neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy (AST between 1996 and 2000. Ten-year follow-up data was used to develop three-tier post-biochemical failure risk stratification schemes based on cutpoints of time to biochemical failure (TTBF and PSA doubling time (PSADT. Schemes were evaluated in univariable, competing risk models for prostate cancer-specific mortality. The performance was assessed by c-indices and internally validated by the simple bootstrap method. Performance rankings were compared in sensitivity analyses using multivariable models and variations in PSADT calculation. Results. 485 men developed biochemical failure. c-indices ranged between 0.630 and 0.730. The most discriminatory scheme had a high risk category defined by PSADT  9 months or TTBF > 3 years. Conclusion. TTBF and PSADT can be combined to define risk stratification schemes after biochemical failure in men with LAPC treated with short-term AST and radiotherapy. External validation, particularly in long-term AST and radiotherapy datasets, is necessary.

  20. Environmental studies group. Annual report for 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, D. C.; Hurley, J. D. [eds.

    1980-08-21

    Group projects included radioecological studies of aquatic and terrestrial systems, land management activities, foodstuff monitoring, dust transport studies including fugitive dust measurements and modeling, and several support programs involving evaluation of the plant's ambient air samplers and airborne tritium monitoring techniques. Some salient results from the several project reports include determination of an appropriate model for mechanically generated fugitive dust dispersion, a radionuclide inventory of Smart Ditch Pond (Pond D-1), a coefficient of community determination for two terrestrial sample plots on the plant site buffer zone, a natality and mortality rate determination for fawns in the plant deer herd (including one positive coyote-kill determination), inlet loss and filter paper collection efficiencies for the plant ambient air samplers, and differential tritium sampling measurements of the vapor in Building 771 stack effluent.

  1. Environmental studies group. Annual report for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.C.; Hurley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Group projects included radioecological studies of aquatic and terrestrial systems, land management activities, foodstuff monitoring, dust transport studies including fugitive dust measurements and modeling, and several support programs involving evaluation of the plant's ambient air samplers and airborne tritium monitoring techniques. Some salient results from the several project reports include determination of an appropriate model for mechanically generated fugitive dust dispersion, a radionuclide inventory of Smart Ditch Pond (Pond D-1), a coefficient of community determination for two terrestrial sample plots on the plant site buffer zone, a natality and mortality rate determination for fawns in the plant deer herd (including one positive coyote-kill determination), inlet loss and filter paper collection efficiencies for the plant ambient air samplers, and differential tritium sampling measurements of the vapor in Building 771 stack effluent

  2. Report of JLC site study group

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, T; Yamashita, S

    2003-01-01

    This study group selected some good sites for construction of JLC (Electron-Positron Linear Collider) on the basis of investigation of data and field survey. The aims, activity, use of underground of private land, conditions of site, selection of site at present and future, summary and proposal are reported. 9 sites (Hidaka, Kitakami, Murayama, Abukuma, Kitaibaraki, Aichi and Gifu, Takamatsu, Hiroshima and Seburi range) are selected for the construction on the basis of firm ground and 4 sites (Okinawa, Harima, Tsukuba and Mutsuogawara) for development and researches. 9 sites area consists of plutonic rock or old strata of Paleozoic era. Many problems in each site are reported. There are three following proposals; 1) the self-governing communities of the sites have to understand JLC and start to construct it by information, 2) a site evaluation committee consists of specialist of civil engineering, building, social and natural environment and disaster prevention and 3) the vibration test should be carried out ...

  3. Education for minority groups: a case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    1993:79) definition is more appropriate: a minority is a group that is numerically inferior to the rest of the population of .... the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination (United Nations,. 1965, articles 1(4) and 2):. Special measures must be ...

  4. The EULAR Study Group for Registers and Observational Drug Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kearsley-Fleet, Lianne; Závada, Jakub; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), a study group of investigators representing European biologic DMARD (bDMARD) registers was convened. The purpose of this initial assessment was to collect and compare a cross section of patient characteristics...

  5. Facilitating peer learning in study groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 University of Aarhus, Denmark, issued a report concerning student experience with the study environment. Among the university's eight faculties, the Danish School of Education (DPU) held the sad record of having the lowest student well-being. This led to an action research project 'Facili...... on the students' own resources, using peer-learning and facilitating these activities....

  6. Study on school lunch of four groups

    OpenAIRE

    大迫, 康子; 小住, フミ子; Yasuko, OSAKO; Fumiko, OZUMI

    1984-01-01

    There are many small islands, villages and fishing ports in Kagoshima. This study was designed to investigate whether a local color in school lnuch exist or not. It was found that the school lunch served in small island had the best nutritional quantity and quality and menu contents. Contradictionus results, vitamin deficiency in village and protein deficiency in fishing ports, were also obtained. There is a correlation between lunch cost and menu contents. The shotage of potatos and beans ob...

  7. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  8. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01): lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Kron, Tomas; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment). Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated 'help-desk' team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%), technical problems (46%) while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support. (author)

  9. Dialogical Approach Applied in Group Counselling: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuluhta, Merja; Puhakka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes structured group counselling and a dialogical approach to develop a group counselling intervention for students beginning a computer science education. The study assesses the outcomes of group counselling from the standpoint of the development of the students' self-observation. The research indicates that group counselling…

  10. Rezultati modeliranja borbenog manevra napada aviona na zemaljski cilj iz oštrog obrušavanja / The results of combat attack maneuver modelling on ground target using aircraft steep diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Pekić

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available U ovom radu prikazani su rezultati matematičkog modeliranja kretanja aviona u borbenom manevru pri napadu na zemaljski cilj iz oštrog obrušavanja. Kretanje aviona razmatrano je kao kretanje materijalne tačke u prostoru. Takođe, prikazane su prednosti aviona sa otklonom vektora potiska i njegove primene u manevru u odnosu na avion sa klasičnom pogonskom grupom i klasičnim aerodinamičkim upravljačkim površinama. / This paper presents the results of mathematical modeling of aircraft movement in combat maneuver during attack on ground target using steep diving. Aircraft movement is considered as movement of a material point in space. Also, the advantages of aircraft with thrust vector deflection and its applications during maneuver when compared to the aircraft with classical engines and classical aerodynamic controls.

  11. Photovoltaic systems with passive tracking by V-trough concentrators - results and experiences during the first years of operation; Photovoltaiksysteme mit passiver Nachfuehrung von V-Trog Konzentratoren - Ergebnisse und Erfahrungen der ersten Betriebsjahre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, F.H. [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    There are two sites in Europe where PV V trough systems have been operated for more than two years: Widderstall and Manffredonia. This article summarises the operating experiences and results obtained with these systems. This type of plant is suited abve all for local applications, though it can be used both in solitary and grid-connected systems. (HW) [Deutsch] In Europa werden an den Standorten Widderstall und Manfredonia seit mehr als 2 Jahren PV-V-Trog-Anlagen betrieben. Die Betriebserfahrungen und erzielten Resultate werden zusammengefasst dargestellt. Dieser Anlagentyp eignet sich vor allem fuer den dezentralen Einsatz sowohl fuer netzferne Anwendungen als auch fuer die Netzkopplung. Er deckt damit ein weites Gebiet von Anwendungen in Europa und den Entwicklungslaendern ab. (HW)

  12. The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

  13. Group-as-a-whole as a context for studying individual behaviour: A group diagnostic intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J. Geldenhuys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Traditionalists view group interventions from three perspectives: singletons, dyads and whole groups. The focus of this research was on interventions from the third perspective, that of the whole group, using a systems psychodynamic stance. Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to use group-as-a-whole to study individual behaviour in organisations.Motivation for the study: Team research and practice is not on a par with the complexities that teams actually experience. Traditional group interventions use humanistic and functionalistic paradigms that do not consider the unconscious functioning of groups. Interventions that use the system psychodynamic paradigm could address these dynamics because they study behaviour of individual group members in the context of the group-as-a-whole. Research design, approach and method: The researcher conducted action research in a publishing company. He used purposive sampling and analysed the data using qualitative content analysis.Main findings: The researcher found that the group-as-a-whole partly explains the behaviour of team members and that intervening from this perspective could improve negative relationships.Practical/managerial implications: Managers can use interventions that use the groupas- a-whole concept as a diagnostic intervention to study and possibly change the complex behavioural issues that team members experience.Contribution/value-add: The findings give one an understanding of the behaviour of individual group members when one views it from a systems psychodynamic stance. Furthermore, the researcher proposes a group diagnostic intervention that will allow some of the root causes of poor interpersonal behaviour to surface and group members to diagnose and take ownership of their own behaviour.

  14. A Group Approach in a Community Empowerment: A Case Study of Waste Recycling Group in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiyanti, Puji

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews a group approach in empowering the community through waste recycling activities related to the development of human resources in Jakarta. The specific objectives to be achieved are the wish to understand and find: (1) Conditions of waste recycling empowerment in Jakarta, (2) Mechanisms of a group approach in empowering…

  15. Group-analytic training groups for psychology students: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, Vibeke Torpe; Poulsen, Stig

    2004-01-01

    This article presents results from an interview study of psychology students' experiences from group-analytic groups conducted at the University of Copenhagen. The primary foci are the significance of differences in themotivation participants'  personal aims of individual participantsfor...

  16. Group-as-a-whole as a context for studying individual behaviour: A group diagnostic intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J. Geldenhuys

    2012-06-01

    Motivation for the study: Team research and practice is not on a par with the complexities that teams actually experience. Traditional group interventions use humanistic and functionalistic paradigms that do not consider the unconscious functioning of groups. Interventions that use the system psychodynamic paradigm could address these dynamics because they study behaviour of individual group members in the context of the group-as-a-whole. Research design, approach and method: The researcher conducted action research in a publishing company. He used purposive sampling and analysed the data using qualitative content analysis. Main findings: The researcher found that the group-as-a-whole partly explains the behaviour of team members and that intervening from this perspective could improve negative relationships. Practical/managerial implications: Managers can use interventions that use the groupas- a-whole concept as a diagnostic intervention to study and possibly change the complex behavioural issues that team members experience. Contribution/value-add: The findings give one an understanding of the behaviour of individual group members when one views it from a systems psychodynamic stance. Furthermore, the researcher proposes a group diagnostic intervention that will allow some of the root causes of poor interpersonal behaviour to surface and group members to diagnose and take ownership of their own behaviour.

  17. The professional development of a facilitator through a study group

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra Piedrahita, Ana María

    2009-01-01

    This article presents part of the results of a study that was conducted to observe the professional development of a group of foreign language teacher educators and preservice teachers. The study focused on the knowledge, skills and attitudes these teachers developed through their participation in a study group. This article reports specifically on the skills and attitudes the facilitator of the study group developed due to her role in it. Key words: Professional development, facilitator’...

  18. Comparison of Natural Drainage Group and Negative Drainage Groups after Total Thyroidectomy: Prospective Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung Hoon; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Shim, Hyun Seok; Lee, Sang Ha; Lee, Ho Joong; Won, Seong Jun; Son, Hee Young; Kim, Rock Bum

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare a negative pressure drain with a natural drain in order to determine whether a negative pressure drainage tube causes an increase in the drainage volume. Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) were enrolled in the study between March 2010 and August 2010 at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. The patients were prospectively and randomly assigned to two groups, a negative pressure drainage group (n=32) and natural drainage group (n=30). Every 3 hours, the volume of drainage was checked in the two groups until the tube was removed. Results The amount of drainage during the first 24 hours postoperatively was 41.68±3.93 mL in the negative drain group and 25.3±2.68 mL in the natural drain group (pdrainage at postoperative day 3 was not statistically different between the two groups. In addition, the vocal cord palsy and temporary and permanent hypocalcemia were not different between the two groups. Conclusion These results indicate that a negative pressure drain may increase the amount of drainage during the first 24-48 hours postoperatively. Therefore, it is not necessary to place a closed suction drain when only a total thyroidectomy is done. PMID:23225820

  19. Measuring Time to Biochemical Failure in the TROG 96.01 Trial: When Should the Clock Start Ticking?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, James W.; Steigler, Allison; Kumar, Mahesh; Lamb, David S.; Joseph, David; Spry, Nigel A.; Tai, Keen-Hun; Atkinson, Chris; Turner, Sandra FRANZCR; Greer, Peter B.; Gleeson, Paul S.; D'Este, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether short-term neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (STAD) duration influences the optimal time point from which Phoenix fail (time to biochemical failure; TTBF) should be measured. Methods and Materials: In the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96.01 trial, men with locally advanced prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 6 months STAD before and during prostatic irradiation (XRT) or to XRT alone. The prognostic value of TTBF measured from the end of radiation (ERT) and randomization were compared using Cox models. Results: Between 1996 and 2000, 802 eligible patients were randomized. In 436 men with Phoenix failure, TTBF measured from randomization was a powerful predictor of prostate cancer-specific survival and marginally more accurate than TTBF measured from ERT in Cox models. Insufficient data were available to confirm that TTBF measured from testosterone recovery may also be a suitable option. Conclusions: TTBF measured from randomization (commencement of therapy) performed well in this trial dataset and will be a convenient option if this finding holds in other datasets that include long-term androgen deprivation data.

  20. Interim Report by Asia International Grid Connection Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omatsu, Ryo

    2018-01-01

    The Asia International Grid Connection Study Group Interim Report examines the feasibility of developing an international grid connection in Japan. The Group has investigated different cases of grid connections in Europe and conducted research on electricity markets in Northeast Asia, and identifies the barriers and challenges for developing an international grid network including Japan. This presentation introduces basic contents of the interim report by the Study Group.

  1. The Impact of Study Groups and Roommates on Academic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Tarun Jain; Mudit Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses random assignment of students to investigate the impact of study groups and roommates on academic achievement. We find that informal social interaction with roommates has a significant positive impact on academic achievement, while study group peers have no discernible impact, a result driven by group heterogeneity in ability. We also find that lower-ability students benefit from high-ability students but not vice versa. © 2015 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and...

  2. Cooperative Study Groups: Give Your Students the Home Team Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Tony

    2007-01-01

    In this article I discuss the factors that led me to implement study groups in the teaching of mathematics. An important influence in this decision began with an experimental study conducted with two College Algebra classes in which students were randomly assigned to treatment groups. While there was no statistical difference between the study…

  3. Comparative Study on Liver Enzymes Activity and Blood Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to determine the activities of some selected liver enzymes amongst apparently healthy subjects of different blood groups. The study involved 95 apparently healthy students of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria, between the ages of 18-30, and distributed as follows; blood group O ...

  4. Women's groups and individual entrepreneurs: a Ugandan case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, H; Kajura, E; Katongole, G; Whitworth, J

    1996-10-01

    This study is based on interviews conducted among 8 women's income-generating groups and 12 individual women entrepreneurs in 15 villages in Masaka district, Uganda. The Baganda are the main tribe in the study villages. The study evaluates the economic achievement, objectives, and social characteristics of the groups. Groups ranged in size from 9-20 members. All had functioned for 3-5 years. A regular membership fee was paid through the sale of agricultural produce. Groups met at least every 2 weeks. This study revealed that the individual goals were to increase individual wealth, while the stated group goals were to invest in the community. Members considered the groups as useful in providing an easy way to raise capital. Most members considered financial status as a criterion for group membership. Elderly women tended to join social and handicraft groups. The women's group members tended to be friends before the establishment of the group and tended to be currently married to men residing in the area. Of the 12 women entrepreneurs, only 5 were currently married. All 12 women entrepreneurs had considerable initiative. The 12 women and the women's group members derived income from two or more sources: agricultural projects, animal husbandry, craft production, alcohol production and sale, or other activities. Study findings indicate that decisions were often delayed or avoided in order to preserve social cohesion. In a market-oriented enterprise, quick response time is needed and the bureaucratic dynamics would hinder some agricultural ventures. The poorest women experienced barriers to group membership. Women entrepreneurs were more successful than group women.

  5. group

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane T. B, Nlandu M, Matondo M, Evelyn G. L.. Factors Influencing the Use of Traditional versus. Modern Family Planning Methods in Bas Zaire. Studies in Family Planning, November/December. 1885;16(6):332-34l. Peter W. H. A natural method of child spacing. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology,. December ...

  6. Distribution of streptococcal groups causing infective endocarditis: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Lim; Gordon, Steven M; Shrestha, Nabin K

    2018-02-24

    The purpose of this study was to describe the distribution of streptococci causing infective endocarditis (IE). A total of 296 patients with definite IE admitted from July 2007 to December 2014 were identified, with microbial identification done by a combination of blood culture, valve culture, and valve polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The overall distribution of streptococci was 76% viridans (n = 224), 17% pyogenic (50), 6% nutritionally variant (17), and 2% anaerobic (5). Sixty-three (21%) viridans group streptococci were not identified further. The distribution of the remaining 161 viridans group streptococci was Streptococcus mitis group 61%, S. bovis group 15%, S. mutans group 13%, S. anginosus group 9%, and S. salivarius group 1%. Of the 50 pyogenic streptococci, 78% were S. agalactiae and 16% were S. dysgalactiae. PCR was significantly more sensitive than culture in identifying streptococci in excised heart valves. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Religious and national group identification in adolescence: a study among three religious groups in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng Tseung-Wong, Caroline; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2013-01-01

    Religious group identification is an important but understudied social identity. The present study investigates religious group identification among adolescents of different faiths (Hindu, Muslim, Christian) living in multicultural Mauritius. It further explores how religious and national group identities come together among religious majority and minority adolescents. For three age groups (11 to 19 years, N = 2152) we examined the strength of adolescents' religious and national group identification, the associations between these two identities, and the relationships to global self-esteem. Across age and religious group, participants reported stronger identification with their religious group than with the nation. Identification with both categories declined with age, with the exception of Muslims, whose strong religious identification was found across adolescence. The association between religious and national identification was positive, albeit stronger for the majority group of Hindus and for early adolescents. We examined the manner in which religious and national identities come together using a direct self-identification measure and by combining the separate continuous measures of identification. Four distinct clusters of identification (predominant religious identifiers, dual identifiers, neutrals, and separate individuals) that were differently associated with global self-esteem were found. Dual identifiers reported the highest level of global self-esteem. The clusters of identification did not fully correspond to the findings for the direct self-identification measure. The results are discussed in terms of the meaning of dual identity and the positive manner in which adolescents can manage their multiple identities while taking into account the ideological framework in which those identities are played out.

  8. STUDIES ON HUMAN FALLOPIAN TUBAL EPITHELIUM IN DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS The “fallopian tubes” (oviducts or uterine tubes are long paired flexuous reproductive organ which transports ova, spermatozoa, zygotes, the pre-implantation morulae and blastocyst. It has major role during reproductive period, but it remains as if vestigial organ before puberty and after menopause. Due to increasing rate of tubal block and infertility, oviducts and their structures gaining importance and have become a subject of research in present days particularly epithelium. The aim of the study is to ascertain any histological difference of tubal epithelium in different age groups and the research work could be utilized for investigation and management of infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven samples of each group i.e., prereproductive, reproductive & postmenopausal were collected from fresh unembalmed human cadavers received in the department of Anatomy, FAA Medical College, Barpeta, Assam. The slides were prepared using the standard laboratory procedure. Under low and high power objectives the type of cells were observed and epithelial height was measured in the different segments. Stress was given for any significant difference of epithelial height between the different age groups. RESULTS Study revealed that among the groups within the same segment, epithelial height was recorded highest (33.57µm in reproductive group as against the lowest (22.91µm in post-menopausal group. Epithelial structures of the prereproductive and reproductive groups were significantly differed (p<0.01 from the postmenopausal group. CONCLUSIONS From the findings of the present study it can be concluded that: 1. In all the groups fallopian tubal epithelium is of simple columnar type and contains three types of cells. Cells are ciliated, secretory & peg (intercalary cells. 2. In all the groups same type of increasing trend of epithelial height from intramural segment to ampullary segment was recorded. 3. In intergroup comparison of

  9. Content-Related Interactions in Self-initiated Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Karen; Talanquer, Vicente

    2012-09-01

    The central goal of the present exploratory study was to investigate the nature of the content-related interactions in study groups independently organized by college organic chemistry students. We were particularly interested in the identification of the different factors that affected the emergence of opportunities for students to co-construct understanding and engage in higher levels of cognitive processing. Our results are based on the analysis of in situ observations of 34 self-initiated study sessions involving over a 100 students in three academic semesters. The investigation revealed three major types of social regulation processes, teaching, tutoring, and co-construction in the observed study sessions. However, the extent to which students engaged in each of them varied widely from one session to another. This variability was mostly determined by the specific composition of the study groups and the nature of the study tasks in which they were engaged. Decisions about how to organize the study session, the relative content knowledge and conceptual understanding expressed by the participants, as well as the cognitive level of the problems that guided group work had a strong impact on the nature of student interactions. Nevertheless, group talk in the observed study groups was mostly focused on low-level cognitive processes. The results of our work provide insights on how to better support students' productive engagement in study groups.

  10. Piezoelectricity in quasicrystals: A group-theoretical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Group-theoretical methods have been accepted as exact and reliable tools in studying the physical properties of crystals and quasicrystalline materials. By group representation theory, the maximum number of non-vanishing and independent second- order piezoelectric coefficients required by the seven pentagonal and ...

  11. Advisory Groups to Encourage Collaboration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Lisa A.; Glynn, Graham; Lavallee, David; Moreau, Joseph; Orzech, Mary Jo; Pence, Harry E.

    2011-01-01

    This article is a case study of how the provost and senior executive leadership of one large university system capitalized on a long-standing advisory group as a tool to support communication and collaboration across a broad constituency. These advisory efforts help guide both future directions and investment. It is the story of how this group has…

  12. Bion's thinking about groups: a study of influence and originality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John A

    2015-04-01

    One of Bion's least-acknowledged contributions to psychoanalytic theory is his study of the relationship between the mind of the individual (the ability to think), the mentalities of groups of which the individual is a member, and the individual's bodily states. Bion's early work on group therapy evolved into a study of the interplay between mind and bodily instincts associated with being a member of a group, and became the impetus for his theory of thinking. On the foundation of Bion's ideas concerning this interaction among the thinking of the individual, group mentality, and the psyche-soma, the author presents his thoughts on the ways in which group mentality is recognizable in the analysis of individuals. © 2015 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  13. Open mic: Introduction to the CERN Study Group

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Mozilla Study Groups are knowledge- and skill-sharing meet-ups for people to get help with their research or work on open-science projects. A CERN chapter was launched recently and you are invited to participate!

  14. Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Hoogveld, Bert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Stoyanov, S., Hoogveld, A. W. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands; EU Forlic project.

  15. ABO blood groups and psychiatric disorders: a Croatian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisk, Sandra Vuk; Vuk, Tomislav; Ivezić, Ena; Jukić, Irena; Bingulac-Popović, Jasna; Filipčić, Igor

    2018-02-15

    The prevalence of ABO alleles is different in different populations, and many studies have shown a correlation between the occurrences of some diseases and different genotypes of ABO blood groups. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a significant association between psychiatric syndromes and ABO blood groups. This case-control study involved 156 psychiatric patients and 303 healthy, unrelated, voluntary blood donors. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood on a QIAcube device using a QIAamp DNA Blood mini QIAcube kit. ABO genotyping on five basic ABO alleles was performed using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis. Compared with healthy subjects, a significantly higher proportion of psychiatric patients had AB blood group (χ 2 =9.359, df=3, p=0.025) and, accordingly, a significantly higher incidence of A1B genotype (χ 2 =8.226, df=3, p=0.042). The odds ratio showed that psychiatric disorders occur almost three times more frequently in carriers of AB group compared to other blood groups. However, no statistically significant difference was found in the distribution of ABO blood groups among patients with different psychiatric diagnoses. Likewise, no correlations were found between ABO blood groups and other characteristics of the psychiatric patients (sex, psychiatric heredity, somatic comorbidity, suicidality). The results of this study support the hypothesis of an association between psychiatric disorders and ABO blood groups. The probability is that psychiatric disorders will occur almost three times more frequently in carriers of AB group compared to other ABO blood groups in the Croatian population.

  16. Studies on representation of the Lorentz group and gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanitriarivo, R.

    2002-01-01

    This work is focused on studies about the representation of the Lorentz group and gauge theory. The mathematical tools required for the different studies are presented, as well as for the representation of the Lorentz group and for the gauge theory. Representation of the Lorentz group gives the possible types of fields and wave functions that describe particles: fermions are described by spinors and bosons are described by scalar or vector. Each of these entities (spinors, scalars, vectors) are characterized by their behavior under the action of Lorentz transformations.Gauge theory is used to describe the interactions between particles. [fr

  17. [Study on immunogenicity of group A and group C meningococcal conjugate vaccine with coupling group B meningococcal outer membrane protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fu-Bao; Tao, Hong; Wang, Hong-Jun

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the Immunogenicity of Group A and Group C Meningococcal conjugate Vaccine with coupling Group B Meningococcal Outer Membrane Protein (Men B-OMP). 458 healthy children aged 3-5 months, 6-23 months, 2-6 years and 7-24 years were given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP or other vaccine as control group to measure the pre-and post-vaccination Men A and C and B by Serum Bactericidal Assay (SBA) in the double-blind randomized controlled trial. 97.65%-100% were 4 times or greater increase in SBA titer for the healthy children given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP, The geometric mean titer of SBA were 1:194-1:420, which significantly higber than controls. The Group A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP was safe and well immunogenic.

  18. Career exploration in young people: Study with specific groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Daniela Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents two studies of career exploration with specific groups of youth, using the Career Exploration Survey (CES. The first study compares the career exploration process of 136 foster-care youth and 186 youth living with their families, using the One-Way MANOVA. In the second study we analyzed the process of career exploration of 323 young people in vocational education, comparing it with the 208 regular education using the T-Test. Implications for career intervention with specific groups will be taken based on the results.

  19. Group-analytic training groups for psychology students: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, Vibeke Torpe; Poulsen, Stig

    2004-01-01

    participation in the group, the impact of the composition of participants on the group process, and the professional learning through the group experience. In general the interviews show a marked satisfaction with the group participation. In particular, learning about the importance of group boundaries...... and about being in the dual position of both helper and client is seen as important. However the fact that all group members are fellow students is challenging to the participants....

  20. Difficulties in Balint groups: a qualitative study of leaders' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldmand, Dorte; Holmström, Inger

    2010-11-01

    Balint groups (BGs) are a means of enhancing competence in the physician-patient relationship and are also regarded as beneficial for GPs' mental health. However, voluntary BGs are still few, some members terminate their participation, and problems are reported in obligatory groups in residency programmes. This raises questions about possible negative aspects of BGs. To examine difficulties in BGs as experienced by BG leaders. Qualitative study using interviews. Eight BG leaders from five countries were interviewed. The interviews focused on the informants' experiences of difficulties in their groups and were analysed with a systematic text-condensation method. Three categories of difficulties emerged from the analysis: 1) the individual physician having needs, vulnerabilities, and defences; 2) the group (including the leader) having problems of hidden agendas, rivalries, and frames; and 3) the surrounding environment defining the conditions of the group. BGs were found to fit into modern theories of small groups as complex systems. They are submitted to group dynamics that are sometimes malicious, and are exposed to often tough environmental conditions. Professionally conducted BGs seem to be a gentle, efficient method to train physicians, but with limitations. Participation of a member demands psychological stability and an open mind. BGs need support from the leadership of healthcare organisations in order to exist.

  1. Leadership and regressive group processes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudden, Marie G; Twemlow, Stuart; Ackerman, Steven

    2008-10-01

    Various perspectives on leadership within the psychoanalytic, organizational and sociobiological literature are reviewed, with particular attention to research studies in these areas. Hypotheses are offered about what makes an effective leader: her ability to structure tasks well in order to avoid destructive regressions, to make constructive use of the omnipresent regressive energies in group life, and to redirect regressions when they occur. Systematic qualitative observations of three videotaped sessions each from N = 18 medical staff work groups at an urban medical center are discussed, as is the utility of a scale, the Leadership and Group Regressions Scale (LGRS), that attempts to operationalize the hypotheses. Analyzing the tapes qualitatively, it was noteworthy that at times (in N = 6 groups), the nominal leader of the group did not prove to be the actual, working leader. Quantitatively, a significant correlation was seen between leaders' LGRS scores and the group's satisfactory completion of their quantitative goals (p = 0.007) and ability to sustain the goals (p = 0.04), when the score of the person who met criteria for group leadership was used.

  2. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  3. Group schema therapy for eating disorders: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Fiona; Smith, Evelyn; Brockman, Rob; Simpson, Susan

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of eating disorders is a difficult endeavor, with only a relatively small proportion of clients responding to and completing standard cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Given the prevalence of co-morbidity and complex personality traits in this population, Schema Therapy has been identified as a potentially viable treatment option. A case series of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) yielded positive findings and the study protocol outlined in this article aims to extend upon these preliminary findings to evaluate group Schema Therapy for eating disorders in a larger sample ( n  = 40). Participants undergo a two-hour assessment where they complete a number of standard questionnaires and their diagnostic status is ascertained using the Eating Disorder Examination. Participants then commence treatment, which consists of 25 weekly group sessions lasting for 1.5 h and four individual sessions. Each group consists of five to eight participants and is facilitated by two therapists, at least one of who is a registered psychologist trained on schema therapy. The primary outcome in this study is eating disorder symptom severity. Secondary outcomes include: cognitive schemas, self-objectification, general quality of life, self-compassion, schema mode presentations, and Personality Disorder features. Participants complete psychological measures and questionnaires at pre, post, six-month and 1-year follow-up. This study will expand upon preliminary research into the efficacy of group Schema Therapy for individuals with eating disorders. If group Schema Therapy is shown to reduce eating disorder symptoms, it will hold considerable promise as an intervention option for a group of disorders that is typically difficult to treat. ACTRN12615001323516. Registered: 2/12/2015 (retrospectively registered, still recruiting).

  4. Revitalising PBL groups: evaluating PBL with study teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moust, Jos; Roebertsen, Herma; Savelberg, Hans; De Rijk, Angelique

    2005-03-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), students are actively engaged with psychological learning principles as activation of prior knowledge, elaboration and organization of knowledge. In their tutorial groups, however, students do not always apply these principles when working with a procedure like the "Seven-Jump" method. To stimulate students to use these principles more often, they were offered another format within a PBL context: PBL with study teams. During the period of self-study, students work on a regular basis in so-called study teams, small groups of 3-4 persons. In these groups they explain to each other their learning outcomes, clarify for each other their problems while studying texts and organize their knowledge to present this to the members of other study teams in their tutorial group. Previous research showed that students spent more time on self-study in a PBL with study team condition than in a traditional PBL context. In this study the achievement as well as appreciation of students participating in a PBL with study teams' environment, is compared with students working in a traditional PBL environment. To determine whether PBL with study teams differs from the traditional PBL environment in students' appreciation and study time. We conducted an experiment in two blocks over two years. Questionnaires were administered to collect data on appreciation and time for self-study. Students' appreciation of the two formats did not differ much. The large standard deviations indicate considerable differences in appreciation between individual students. Appreciation was slightly higher in the second experiment when instructions about how to collaborate were less strict. Students devoted twice as many hours studying in the study group format compared with the traditional PBL format. The students indicated that they enjoyed the format but that the increased workload disturbed their customary study rhythm. Assessment scores and tutors'impressions suggest that

  5. Ethics reflection groups in community health services: an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillemoen, Lillian; Pedersen, Reidar

    2015-04-17

    Systematic ethics support in community health services in Norway is in the initial phase. There are few evaluation studies about the significance of ethics reflection on care. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematic ethics reflection in groups in community health (including nursing homes and residency), - from the perspectives of employees participating in the groups, the group facilitators and the service managers. The reflection groups were implemented as part of a research and development project. A mixed-methods design with qualitative focus group interviews, observations and written reports were used to evaluate. The study was conducted at two nursing homes, two home care districts and a residence for people with learning disabilities. Participants were employees, facilitators and service managers. The study was guided by ethical standard principles and was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. We found support for ethics reflection as a valuable measure to strengthen clinical practice. New and improved solutions, more cooperation between employees, and improved collaboration with patients and their families are some of the results. No negative experiences were found. Instead, the ethics reflection based on experiences and challenges in the workplace, was described as a win-win situation. The evaluation also revealed what is needed to succeed and useful tips for further development of ethics support in community health services. Ethics reflection groups focusing on ethical challenges from the participants' daily work were found to be significant for improved practice, collegial support and cooperation, personal and professional development among staff, facilitators and managers. Resources needed to succeed were managerial support, and anchoring ethics sessions in the routine of daily work.

  6. Facial exercises for facial rejuvenation: a control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Marie-Camille; Van den Brande, Helen; Boone, Barbara; Van Borsel, John

    2013-01-01

    Facial exercises are a noninvasive alternative to medical approaches to facial rejuvenation. Logopedists could be involved in providing these exercises. Little research has been conducted, however, on the effectiveness of exercises for facial rejuvenation. This study assessed the effectiveness of 4 exercises purportedly reducing wrinkles and sagging of the facial skin. A control group study was conducted with 18 participants, 9 of whom (the experimental group) underwent daily training for 7 weeks. Pictures taken before and after 7 weeks of 5 facial areas (forehead, nasolabial folds, area above the upper lip, jawline and area under the chin) were evaluated by a panel of laypersons. In addition, the participants of the experimental group evaluated their own pictures. Evaluation included the pairwise presentation of pictures before and after 7 weeks and scoring of the same pictures by means of visual analogue scales in a random presentation. Only one significant difference was found between the control and experimental group. In the experimental group, the picture after therapy of the upper lip was more frequently chosen to be the younger-looking one by the panel. It cannot be concluded that facial exercises are effective. More systematic research is needed. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. A comparative study of group versus individual diabetes education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A comparative study consisting of two hundred consenting type 2 diabetics receiving care at the general outpatient department of Bingham University Teaching Hospital was done. Subjects were recruited by systematic random sampling and randomly allocated into intervention (group education) and control (one- ...

  8. Sixteenth Meeting of the IMS Study Group "Cantus Planus"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vozková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 48, 2-3 (2011), s. 310-311 ISSN 0018-7003. [Sixteenth Meeting of the IMS Study Group “Cantus Planus”. Vídeň, 21.08.2011–27.08.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : plainchant * annual conference * International Musicological Society Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  9. Adolescent girls' views on cosmetic surgery: a focus group study

    OpenAIRE

    Ashikali, E.-M.; Dittmar, H.; Ayers, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined adolescent girls’ views of cosmetic surgery. Seven focus groups were run with girls aged 15 to 18 (N = 27). Participants read case studies of women having cosmetic surgery, followed by discussion and exploration of their views. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1)\\ud Dissatisfaction with appearance, (2) Acceptability of cosmetic surgery, (3) Feelings about undergoing cosmetic surgery, and (4) Cosmetic surgery in the media. Results suggest the acceptability of cosm...

  10. Renormalization-group study of one-dimensional quasiperiodic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qian; Nori, Franco

    1986-10-01

    We report a new approach to the study of electron spectral clustering and wave-function scaling in several one-dimensional quasiperiodic systems. The approach is based on renormalization-group ideas. We introduce a novel decimation technique which generates a simple physical picture of the electronic spectral behavior and the nature of the wave functions. Our renormalization-group scheme is verified by the numerical computation of the probability density summed over the states belonging to the clusters and subclusters of the spectrum.

  11. Young Adults, Technology, and Weight Loss: A Focus Group Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Janna; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn K.

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are a major concern in young adults. Technology has been integrated into many weight loss interventions; however little is known about the use of this technology in young adults. The purpose of this study was to explore through focus group sessions the opinions of young adults on the use of technology for weight loss. A total of 17 young adults, between 18 and 25 years of age, participated in three focus group sessions. Major results indicated that young adults have ver...

  12. Unilateral neglect and perceptual parsing: a large-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppi-Mòdona, Marco; Savazzi, Silvia; Ricci, Raffaella; Genero, Rosanna; Berruti, Giuseppina; Pepi, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    Array-centred and subarray-centred neglect were disambiguated in a group of 116 patients with left neglect by means of a modified version of the Albert test in which the central column of segments was deleted so as to create two separate sets of targets grouped by proximity. The results indicated that neglect was more frequent in array- than subarray-centred coordinates and that, in a minority of cases, neglect co-occurred in both coordinate-systems. The two types of neglect were functionally but not anatomically dissociated. Presence of visual field defects was not prevalent in one type of neglect with respect to the other. These data contribute further evidence to previous single-case and small-group studies by showing that neglect can occur in single or multiple reference frames simultaneously, in agreement with current neuropsychological, neurophysiological and computational concepts of space representation.

  13. Report of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In order to establish the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power generation, the study group has discussed necessary measures. Japan's attitudes to the recent international situation are first expounded. Then, the steps to be taken by the Government and private enterprises respectively are recommended regarding acquisition of natural uranium, acquisition of enriched uranium, establishment of fuel reprocessing system, utilization of plutonium, management of radioactive wastes, and transport system of spent fuel. (Mori, K.)

  14. Innovation in Accounting Tasks: Empirical Study in Two Professional Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Cristina da Silva Vicente

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge on innovation in accounting tasks, from the point of view of two professional groups. Its goals are: evaluating the importance given by the professionals to accounting tasks; identifying whether there is convergence between the two professional groups, regarding the importance of the tasks; examining whether there is an association between the professionals’ individual characteristics and the importance they attach to the tasks. Two professional groups were surveyed: 105 financial officers of the top 500 Portuguese companies; and 412 Chartered Accountants. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the respondents attach more importance to the traditional tasks, linked to the concept of a monetary-oriented accountant, and less importance to the more innovative tasks, related to business strategy; there is no convergence between the two professional groups in terms of the importance of the accountants’ participation in the strategic tasks. Regarding the association between individual characteristics and the level of importance assigned to the accounting tasks, we found an influence of the following characteristics: gender; academic degree of the professionals; and the institution where that degree was obtained.

  15. Adolescent girls' views on cosmetic surgery: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikali, Eleni-Marina; Dittmar, Helga; Ayers, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined adolescent girls' views of cosmetic surgery. Seven focus groups were run with girls aged 15-18 years (N = 27). Participants read case studies of women having cosmetic surgery, followed by discussion and exploration of their views. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) dissatisfaction with appearance, (2) acceptability of cosmetic surgery, (3) feelings about undergoing cosmetic surgery and (4) cosmetic surgery in the media. Results suggest the acceptability of cosmetic surgery varies according to the reasons for having it and that the media play an important role by normalising surgery and under-representing the risks associated with it. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Progress in the Study of ALFALFA Galaxy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troischt, Parker; Nichols, Nathan

    2013-04-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team Groups Project is a collaborative undertaking of faculty and students at 11 institutions, aimed at investigating properties of galaxy groups surveyed by the ALFALFA blind HI survey. The survey covers 7,000 square degrees and is expected to include more than 30,000 extragalactic sources when completed. Here we present analysis of HI spectra taken at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center and report on progress made with developing analysis software tools as part of the UAT study. These tools will be implemented with follow up observations of targeted sources generated from the original blind survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918, AST-0725267 and AST-0725380.

  17. Newcomers in self-organising task groups : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoethout, Kees; Jager, Wander; Molleman, Eric; Takahashi, S; Scallach, D; Rouchier, J

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the consequences of turnover, especially how a work group and a newcomer mutually adapt. We tested two groups, a group in which the task allocation gives space for a newcomer to fit in and a group in which this space was not available. For both groups, we tested conditions with

  18. Young adult smoking in peer groups: an experimental observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakeh, Zeena; Vollebergh, Wilma A M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this experimental observational study is to examine whether, in a group setting (same-sex triads), passive peer influence (imitation) in the context of homogeneous and heterogeneous (contradictory) behavior of peer models affects young adults' smoking behavior. An experiment was conducted among 48 daily-smoking college and university students aged 17-25. Participants had to complete a 30-min music task with two same-sex confederates. We tested the following three conditions: (a) neither of the confederates is smoking, (b) one confederate is smoking and the other is not, and (c) both confederates are smoking. The primary outcome tested was the total number of cigarettes smoked during the task. Students in the condition with two smoking peer models and in the condition with one smoking peer model and one nonsmoking peer model smoked significantly more cigarettes than those in the condition with two nonsmoking peer models. However, results for the condition with two smoking peer models did not differ significantly from the condition with one smoking peer model and one nonsmoking peer model. Our findings show that in a group setting, the impact of the homogeneity of smoking peers on young adults' smoking behavior is not greater than the impact of the heterogeneity of smoking and nonsmoking peers. This would suggest that the smoking peer in the group has a greater impact on the daily-smoking young adult, thus reducing or even eliminating the protective effect of the nonsmoking peer model.

  19. Meaning making in cancer survivors: a focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia van der Spek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Confrontation with a life-threatening disease like cancer can evoke existential distress, which can trigger a search for meaning in people after having survived this disease. METHODS: In an effort to gain more insight in the meaning making process, we conducted four focus groups with 23 cancer survivors on this topic. Participants responded to questions about experienced meaning making, perceived changes in meaning making after cancer and the perceived need for help in this area. RESULTS: Most frequently mentioned meaning making themes were relationships and experiences. We found that, in general, cancer survivors experienced enhanced meaning after cancer through relationships, experiences, resilience, goal-orientation and leaving a legacy. Some participants, however, also said to have (also experienced a loss of meaning in their lives through experiences, social roles, relationships and uncertainties about the future. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that there is a group of cancer survivors that has succeeded in meaning making efforts, and experienced sometimes even more meaning in life than before diagnosis, while there is also a considerable group of survivors that struggled with meaning making and has an unmet need for help with that. The results of this study contribute to develop a meaning centered intervention for cancer survivors.

  20. Study group meeting on steam generators for LMFBR's. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Meeting organised by IAEA international working group on fast reactors which considered that the subject of sodium heated steam generators was a topic which needed study by the experts of several disciplines. For example: people who design such steam generators, specialists in the field of sodium water reactions, experts in material and water chemistry and members of the utilities who would be the customers for such units. Besides the exchange of large amount of information, it was considered that further special studies were necessary for the following subjects: materials; maintenance and repair; operating procedures and control of steam generators. A separate study of sodium-water reactions was recommended considering the safety aspects related to large water leakage and economic advantage of possible detection and protection against small water leaks

  1. Report of the Study Group on Medical Uses of Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Medical uses of accelerators to raise the welfare of peoples are advancing rapidly due to the improvement of using technology. Under the situation, the Study Group on Medical Uses of Accelerators set up in the Science and Technology Agency has surveyed the status in Japan of radiation therapy of cancers and nuclear medicine with accelerators, and has studied on the future research and development in this field. The present report should contribute to the plans by the Government for the future. The results obtained by the study Group are described: the trends of medicine for the next ten years, especially the advances of cancer diagnosis and treatment and nuclear medicine; and medical radiation sources and the accelerators as their generators expected to be in practical utilization. As for the particles from accelerators used for medical purposes, there are fast neutrons, protons, helium particles, charged heavy particles, and π-mesons. For diagnosis and treatment, the radiation sources must be chosen according to the purposes, and their combination becomes necessary. (Mori, K.)

  2. A Clinico - Aetiological Study Of Dermatoses In Paediatric Age Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sadhan K

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Five hundred patients of the age group 0-12 years were studied for different types of dermatoses. Pyoderma (35.6%, scabies (22.4% and eczema (17.6% were the most common dermatological conditions, followed by molluscum contagiosum (4.6%, popular urticaria with insect bite (4%, vitiligo (3.4%, miliaria (2.8%, nevus (1.6%. Other dermatoses (8% were pityriasis rosea, wart, chicken pox, herpes zoster, acne vulgaris, leprosy, angular stomatitis, pruritus vulvae, psoriasis, candidiasis, condylomatalata, fixed drug relation, tinea capitis and corporis, phrynoderma, alopecia areata, phimosis, geographic tongue, trichotillomania, canitis, pediculosis, hypertrophic scar and pityriasis versicolor.

  3. Actions to promote energy efficient electric motors. Motors study group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, A.T. de [Coimbra Univ. (PT). Inst. of Systems and Robotics (ISR)

    1996-10-01

    Motor electricity consumption is influenced by many factors including: motor efficiency, motor speed controls, power supply quality, harmonics, systems oversizing, distribution network, mechanical transmission system, maintenance practices, load management and cycling, and the efficiency of the end-use device (e.g. fan, pump, etc.). Due to their importance, an overview of these factors is presented in this report. This study also describes the electricity use in the industrial and tertiary sectors and the electricity consumption associated with the different types of electric motors systems in the Member States of the European Union, as well as estimated future evolution until 2010. The studies for individual countries were carried out by the different partners of the motors study group at a previous stage. The study has found that there is a lack of accurate information about the motor electricity consumption, installed motor capacity and the motor market in almost all the European Union countries and only some general statistical sources are available. There is little field data, which is mainly available in Denmark, France, Italy and the Netherlands. Due to this lack of primary information, some common assumptions were made, based on the experience of the members of the study group. This lack of end-use characterisation data shows the need for improvement from the point of view of current knowledge. It is therefore recommended that further research is undertaken to arrive at more accurate figures. These could be the basis for a better understanding for motor use in practice and - as a consequence - for a more precise appraisal of potentials and barriers to energy efficiency. (orig.)

  4. Group hypnotherapy versus group relaxation for smoking cessation: an RCT study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson-Spillmann Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of smokers would like to stop smoking. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of pharmacological smoking cessation treatments, many smokers are unwilling to use them; however, they are inclined to try alternative methods. Hypnosis has a long-standing reputation in smoking cessation therapy, but its efficacy has not been scientifically proven. We designed this randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effects of group hypnosis as a method for smoking cessation, and we will compare the results of group hypnosis with group relaxation. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial (RCT to compare the efficacy of a single session of hypnosis with that of relaxation performed in groups of 8-15 smokers. We intend to include at least 220 participants in our trial. The inclusion criteria include smoking at least 5 cigarettes per day, not using other cessation methods and being willing to quit smoking. The intervention is performed by a trained hypnotist/relaxation therapist. Both groups first receive 40 min of mental preparation that is based on motivational interviewing. Then, a state of deep relaxation is induced in the hypnosis condition, and superficial relaxation is induced in the control condition. Suggestions are made in the hypnosis condition that aim to switch the mental self-image of the participants from that of smokers to that of non-smokers. Each intervention lasts for 40 min. The participants also complete questionnaires that assess their smoking status and symptoms of depression and anxiety at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 months post-intervention. In addition, saliva samples are collected to assess cotinine levels at baseline and at 6 months post-intervention. We also assess nicotine withdrawal symptoms at 2 weeks post-intervention. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this RCT is the first to test the efficacy of group hypnosis versus group relaxation. Issues requiring discussion in the outcome

  5. Group hypnotherapy versus group relaxation for smoking cessation: an RCT study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Spillmann, Maria; Kraemer, Thomas; Rust, Kristina; Schaub, Michael

    2012-04-04

    A significant number of smokers would like to stop smoking. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of pharmacological smoking cessation treatments, many smokers are unwilling to use them; however, they are inclined to try alternative methods. Hypnosis has a long-standing reputation in smoking cessation therapy, but its efficacy has not been scientifically proven. We designed this randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effects of group hypnosis as a method for smoking cessation, and we will compare the results of group hypnosis with group relaxation. This is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to compare the efficacy of a single session of hypnosis with that of relaxation performed in groups of 8-15 smokers. We intend to include at least 220 participants in our trial. The inclusion criteria include smoking at least 5 cigarettes per day, not using other cessation methods and being willing to quit smoking. The intervention is performed by a trained hypnotist/relaxation therapist. Both groups first receive 40 min of mental preparation that is based on motivational interviewing. Then, a state of deep relaxation is induced in the hypnosis condition, and superficial relaxation is induced in the control condition. Suggestions are made in the hypnosis condition that aim to switch the mental self-image of the participants from that of smokers to that of non-smokers. Each intervention lasts for 40 min. The participants also complete questionnaires that assess their smoking status and symptoms of depression and anxiety at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 months post-intervention. In addition, saliva samples are collected to assess cotinine levels at baseline and at 6 months post-intervention. We also assess nicotine withdrawal symptoms at 2 weeks post-intervention. To the best of our knowledge, this RCT is the first to test the efficacy of group hypnosis versus group relaxation. Issues requiring discussion in the outcome paper include the lack of standardisation of hypnotic

  6. Diagnosis related group grouping study of senile cataract patients based on E-CHAID algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Jing Luo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To figure out the contributed factors of the hospitalization expenses of senile cataract patients (HECP and build up an area-specified senile cataract diagnosis related group (DRG of Shanghai thereby formulating the reference range of HECP and providing scientific basis for the fair use and supervision of the health care insurance fund. METHODS: The data was collected from the first page of the medical records of 22 097 hospitalized patients from tertiary hospitals in Shanghai from 2010 to 2012 whose major diagnosis were senile cataract. Firstly, we analyzed the influence factors of HECP using univariate and multivariate analysis. DRG grouping was conducted according to the exhaustive Chi-squared automatic interaction detector (E-CHAID model, using HECP as target variable. Finally we evaluated the grouping results using non-parametric test such as Kruskal-Wallis H test, RIV, CV, etc. RESULTS: The 6 DRGs were established as well as criterion of HECP, using age, sex, type of surgery and whether complications/comorbidities occurred as the key variables of classification node of senile cataract cases. CONCLUSION: The grouping of senile cataract cases based on E-CHAID algorithm is reasonable. And the criterion of HECP based on DRG can provide a feasible way of management in the fair use and supervision of medical insurance fund.

  7. Study of the Moraxella group. I. Genus Moraxella and the Neisseria catarrhalis group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, P; Doudoroff, M; Stanier, R Y

    1968-01-01

    A number of strains of oxidase-positive moraxellas and of neisserias related to Neisseria catarrhalis were characterized with respect to a number of nutritional and physiological properties and could be assigned to several species or species groups on the basis of their phenotypic traits. This grouping was consistent with that established by Bövre on the basis of transformation frequencies for streptomycin resistance. It is proposed to reserve the generic name Moraxella for the oxidase-positive rodshaped organisms, and a redescription of the genus is offered. Following the recent taxonomic proposals of Bövre and Henriksen, the specific name Moraxella osloensis is applied to the nutritionally unexacting strains that accumulate poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate as carbon reserve. The nutritionally exacting strains are assigned to three distinct groups which can be regarded as separate species or as varieties of M. lacunata. The epithets applicable to these groups appear to be lacunata, nonliquefaciens, and bovis. The "false neisserias" could be assigned to at least three subgroups, one of which constitutes the clearly defined entity, N. catarrhalis, which could be distinguished from N. caviae and N. ovis.

  8. Study of the Moraxella Group I. Genus Moraxella and the Neisseria catarrhalis Group1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, P.; Doudoroff, M.; Stanier, R. Y.

    1968-01-01

    A number of strains of oxidase-positive moraxellas and of neisserias related to Neisseria catarrhalis were characterized with respect to a number of nutritional and physiological properties and could be assigned to several species or species groups on the basis of their phenotypic traits. This grouping was consistent with that established by Bövre on the basis of transformation frequencies for streptomycin resistance. It is proposed to reserve the generic name Moraxella for the oxidase-positive rodshaped organisms, and a redescription of the genus is offered. Following the recent taxonomic proposals of Bövre and Henriksen, the specific name Moraxella osloensis is applied to the nutritionally unexacting strains that accumulate poly-β-hydroxybutyrate as carbon reserve. The nutritionally exacting strains are assigned to three distinct groups which can be regarded as separate species or as varieties of M. lacunata. The epithets applicable to these groups appear to be lacunata, nonliquefaciens, and bovis. The “false neisserias” could be assigned to at least three subgroups, one of which constitutes the clearly defined entity, N. catarrhalis, which could be distinguished from N. caviae and N. ovis. Images PMID:4866103

  9. An ethnography of reading in a spiritist study group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Lewgoy

    Full Text Available As a religion, Kardecism confers fundamental importance to the study of its own body of literature, understood as the complement to religious revelation. Based upon ethnographic research in a traditional middle-class Kardecist centre in Porto Alegre, this article examines some ways through which the Kardecists, structured in small groups, interact with this written tradition. The group is fundamental in forming a spiritist identity for two reasons: firstly, it delimits internal alliances, whether or not these are translated into differences in doctrinal views. Secondly, it is one of the spaces in which the spiritist orator is formed by learning to make use of formulas extracted from a specific repertoire. Inspired by the discussions on orality and literacy and by the recent proposal for an ethnography of reading (Boyarin 1993, I aim to show that, if the spiritist speech is constructed as orality supported by texts, there are also very important informal dimensions to be considered which contextualize and actualize these group’s relation with sacred texts.

  10. The narrow range of perceived predation: a 19 group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Mesly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper rests largely on the works of Mesly (1999 to 2012. It argues that the phenomenon of perceived predation as a functional behavioural phenomenon is subjected to certain limits, a finding based on studies performed on 19 different groups spread over a four-year span. It also finds a constant of k = 1.3 which reflects the invariant nature of perceived predation. These findings add to the theory of financial predation which stipulates that financial predators operate below the limits of detection pertaining to their customers (and market regulators. They are experts at minimizing the perception that clients could have that they are after their money, causing them financial harm, by surprise (perceived predation. Understanding the narrow range in which financial predators operate is setting the grounds to offer better protection to investors and to implementing better control and punitive measures.

  11. Accountable Metadata-Hiding Escrow: A Group Signature Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohlweiss Markulf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A common approach to demands for lawful access to encrypted data is to allow a trusted third party (TTP to gain access to private data. However, there is no way to verify that this trust is well placed as the TTP may open all messages indiscriminately. Moreover, existing approaches do not scale well when, in addition to the content of the conversation, one wishes to hide one’s identity. Given the importance of metadata this is a major problem. We propose a new approach in which users can retroactively verify cryptographically whether they were wiretapped. As a case study, we propose a new signature scheme that can act as an accountable replacement for group signatures, accountable forward and backward tracing signatures.

  12. Virtual Gaming Simulation in Nursing Education: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyl, Margaret; Hughes, Michelle; Tsui, Joyce; Betts, Lorraine; St-Amant, Oona; Lapum, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    The use of serious gaming in a virtual world is a novel pedagogical approach in nursing education. A virtual gaming simulation was implemented in a health assessment class that focused on mental health and interpersonal violence. The study's purpose was to explore students' experiences of the virtual gaming simulation. Three focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 20 first-year nursing students after they completed the virtual gaming simulation. Analysis yielded five themes: (a) Experiential Learning, (b) The Learning Process, (c) Personal Versus Professional, (d) Self-Efficacy, and (e) Knowledge. Virtual gaming simulation can provide experiential learning opportunities that promote engagement and allow learners to acquire and apply new knowledge while practicing skills in a safe and realistic environment. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):274-280.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Exploratory Study of Children's Task Groups: Instructional Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann; Dodson, Nancy L.

    Despite the increasing popularity of cooperative learning techniques in elementary instruction, many educators believe that children do not possess effective group interaction skills and advocate that children be taught the group communication skills necessary for group interaction as a separate instructional component. Unfortunately,…

  14. Industrial radioisotope economics. Findings of the study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    Within twenty years of the availability of radioisotopes in quantity the use of these as tracers has been widely applied in scientific research and in industrial process and product control. Industry spends millions of dollars on these new techniques. Since the overall attitude of industry is to favour methods that involve rapid financial returns the economic benefits must be considerable. In promoting the peaceful uses of atomic energy, the IAEA is actively interested in the international exchange of experience in all applications of radioisotopes. This has been demonstrated by a number of scientific conferences where new results of direct importance to the industrial use of radioisotopes have been presented. In 1963 the IAEA also published literature survey on radioisotope applications described in the scientific literature up to 1960, classified according to industry. However, the available scientific literature was found insufficient to determine the extent of the use of radioisotopes and the economic benefits derived from it. Therefore, further fact-finding efforts were necessary. The IAEA thus decided to carry out an International Survey on the Use of Radioisotopes in Industry. In 1962 the IAEA's highly industrialized Member States Were invited to participate in the Survey; 25 declared their willingness to do so and in due course submitted their national reports. These included information on how radioisotopes were used by industry in each country and indicated the size and form of the economic advantages, primarily in terms of savings made by industry. The findings from the Survey were discussed at a Study Group Meeting on Radioisotope Economics, held in Vienna in March 1964. Forty participants from 22 countries were nominated for this Study Group. The program of the meeting was divided in three parts: (1) experience of the International Survey on the use of radioisotopes in industry; (2) present use of radioisotopes, technical and economic aspects; (3

  15. Music during after-death care: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Marianne S; Fålun, Nina; Gjengedal, Eva; Norekvål, Tone M

    2012-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is not only a place to recover from injuries incurred during accidents and from serious illness. For many patients, it is also a place where they might die. Nursing care does not stop when a patient dies; rather, it continues with the care of the deceased and with family support. The aims of this study were (1) to explore the experiences and attitudes of nurses towards the use of ambient music in the ICU during after-death care and (2) to describe the feedback nurses received from relatives when music was used during the viewing. A qualitative design employing focus group interviews was used. Three focus group interviews with 15 nurses were conducted. All the interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Six main categories of attitudes emerged from the analysis: (1) different attitudes among nurses towards the use of music; (2) music affects the atmosphere; (3) music affects emotions; (4) use of music was situational; (5) special choice of music and (6) positive feedback from the bereaved. This study demonstrates that music might be helpful for nurses during after-death care as well as for the care of the relatives. Including ambient music in an after-death care programme can help nurses show respect for the deceased as the body is being prepared. Music played during the viewing may be a way of helping relatives in their time of grieving. It may ease the situation by making that event special and memorable. However, standardizing this intervention does not seem appropriate. Rather, the individual nurse and the family must decide whether music is to be used in a particular situation. © 2012 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2012 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  16. Gout in immigrant groups: a cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wändell, Per; Carlsson, Axel C; Li, Xinjun; Gasevic, Danijela; Ärnlöv, Johan; Holzmann, Martin J; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-05-01

    Our aim was to study the association between country of birth and incidence of gout in different immigrant groups in Sweden. The study population included the whole population of Sweden. Gout was defined as having at least one registered diagnosis in the National Patient Register. The association between incidence of gout and country of birth was assessed by Cox regression, with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), using Swedish-born individuals as referents. All models were conducted in both men and women, and the full model was adjusted for age, place of residence in Sweden, educational level, marital status, neighbourhood socio-economic status and co-morbidities. The risk of gout varied by country of origin, with highest estimates, compared to Swedish born, in fully adjusted models among men from Iraq (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.54-2.16), and Russia (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.26-2.27), and also high among men from Austria, Poland, Africa and Asian countries outside the Middle East; and among women from Africa (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.50-3.31), Hungary (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.45-2.71), Iraq (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.13-2.74) and Austria (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.07-2.70), and also high among women from Poland. The risk of gout was lower among men from Greece, Spain, Nordic countries (except Finland) and Latin America and among women from Southern Europe, compared to their Swedish counterparts. The increased risk of gout among several immigrant groups is likely explained by a high cardio-metabolic risk factor pattern needing attention.

  17. Gender-based education during clerkships: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Leerdam L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lotte van Leerdam, Lianne Rietveld, Doreth Teunissen, Antoine Lagro-JanssenDepartment of Primary and Community Care, Gender and Women's Health, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsObjectives: One of the goals of the medical master's degree is for a student to become a gender-sensitive doctor by applying knowledge of gender differences in practice. This study aims to investigate, from the students’ perspective, whether gender medicine has been taught in daily practice during clerkship.Methods: A focus group study was conducted among 29 medical students from Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, who had just finished either their internal medicine or surgical clerkships. Data were analyzed in line with the principles of constant comparative analysis.Results: Four focus groups were conducted with 29 participating students. Clinical teachers barely discuss gender differences during students’ clerkships. The students mentioned three main explanatory themes: insufficient knowledge; unawareness; and minor impact. As a result, students feel that they have insufficient competencies to become gender-sensitive doctors.Conclusion: Medical students at our institution perceive that they have received limited exposure to gender-based education after completing two key clinical clerkships. All students feel that they have insufficient knowledge to become gender-sensitive doctors. They suppose that their clinical teachers have insufficient knowledge regarding gender sensitivity, are unaware of gender differences, and the students had the impression that gender is not regarded as an important issue. We suggest that the medical faculty should encourage clinical teachers to improve their knowledge and awareness of gender issues.Keywords: medical education, clerkship, gender, hidden curriculum, clinical teachers

  18. Epidemiological studies of groups with occupational exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The exposure of man to radiation and the resulting risk of carcinogenesis continues to be of concern to the public. In this context, there is often a tendency to carry out epidemiological studies concerning the induction of cancer in radiation workers and members of the public which are not supported by a statistically valid data base or whose results are misinterpreted or misused. To assist national authorities in evaluating radiological risks, the Nuclear Energy Agency has sponsored a critical review of the methodologies for, and the limitations of, these epidemiological studies, and of the precautions to be adopted in interpreting their results. Prepared by a consultant, Dr. Joan M. Davies, the review focuses on the problems encountered when carrying out epidemiological studies on groups of workers occupationally exposed to radiations, and using their results for radiological protection purposes. It is published under the responsibility of the Secretary General of the OECD, and does not necessarily reflect the views of Member Governments. The primary objective is to provide background material to be used by national authorities that have responsibilities in the field of radiological protection as well as by other persons interested in this subject

  19. National logistics working groups: A landscape analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leab, Dorothy; Schreiber, Benjamin; Kasonde, Musonda; Bessat, Olivia; Bui, Son; Loisel, Carine

    2017-04-19

    Several countries have acknowledged the contributions made by national logistics working groups (NLWG) to ensure equitable access to the expanded program on immunization's (EPI) vaccines against preventable diseases. In order to provide key insights to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) supply chain hub - as well as other players, including national EPI - a landscape analysis study was conducted from September 2015 to February 2016. This is a cross-sectional survey taken by 43 countries that combines qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data was collected through a desk review, consultation, interviews, and distance questioning. References and guidance were used to determine and specify the underlying mechanisms of NLWGs. The key findings are:This study has provided a general overview of the status of NLWGs for immunization in various countries. Based on the key insights of the study, technical assistance needs have been identified, and immunization partners will be required to help countries create and reinforce their NLWGs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Occupational therapists' perceptions of gender - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedberg, Gunilla M; Björk, Mathilda; Hensing, Gunnel

    2010-10-01

    Women and men are shaped over the courses of their lives by culture, society and human interaction according to the gender system. Cultural influences on individuals' social roles and environment are described in occupational therapy literature, but not specifically from a gender perspective. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how a sample of occupational therapists perceives the 'gender' concept. Four focus group interviews with 17 occupational therapists were conducted. The opening question was: 'How do you reflect on the encounter with a client depending on whether it is a man or a woman?' The transcribed interviews were analysed and two main themes emerged: 'the concept of gender is tacit in occupational therapy' and 'client encounters'. The occupational therapists expressed limited theoretical knowledge of 'gender'. Furthermore, the occupational therapists seemed to be 'doing gender' in their encounters with the clients. For example, in their assessment of the client, they focussed their questions on different spheres: with female clients, on the household and family; with male clients, on their paid work. This study demonstrated that occupational therapists were unaware of the possibility that they were 'doing gender' in their encounters with clients. There is a need to increase occupational therapists' awareness of their own behaviour of 'doing gender'. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate whether gendered perceptions will shorten or lengthen a rehabilitation period and affect the chosen interventions, and in the end, the outcome for the clients. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2010 Australian Association of Occupational Therapists.

  1. Italian Adolescents and Emergency Contraception: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivari, Maria Giulia; Cuccì, Gaia; Confalonieri, Emanuela

    2017-02-01

    Using a qualitative method, the purpose of this study was to: (1) obtain information directly from the adolescents on their attitudes and knowledge regarding emergency contraception; and (2) investigate the presence of differences between male and female participants' attitudes and knowledge. This study consisted of 24 single-sex focus groups with 160 adolescents (male = 46.3% (74 of 160); female = 53.7% (86 of 160)) aged 15-19 years conducted among high schools in 3 regions of Italy. Data were analyzed through thematic analysis taking into account gender differences and 2 main themes emerged. The first was labeled "Adolescents' attitudes toward emergency contraception" and it was divided into 3 subthemes: You should be aware; It's a life line; and Everything but a child. The second theme was labeled "Adolescents' knowledge toward emergency contraception" and it was divided into 3 subthemes: False myths; Baseline information; and Just take it. Italian adolescents believed it is important to prevent the risk of unprotected sex by using contraceptive methods and their motivation to use emergency contraception is related to critical attitudes toward the consequences of irresponsible/ineffective contraception. Although adolescents have an awareness of emergency contraception, more comprehensive knowledge is needed. These findings can inform specific interventions aimed at educating adolescents in need of emergency contraception. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Karyometry in atypical endometrial hyperplasia: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Peter H; Garcia, Francisco AR; Trimble, Cornelia L; Kauderer, James; Curtin, John; Lim, Peter C; Hess, Lisa M; Silverberg, Steven; Zaino, Richard J; Yozwiak, Michael; Bartels, Hubert G; Alberts, David S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment for atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH) is based on pathologic diagnosis. About 40% of AEH is found to be carcinoma at surgery. This study's objective is to derive an objective characterization of nuclei from cases diagnosed as AEH or superficially invasive endometrial cancer (SIEC). Methods Cases from GOG study 167A were classified by a central pathology committee as AEH (n=39) or SIEC (n=39). High resolution digitized images of cell nuclei were recorded. Features of the nuclear chromatin pattern were computed. Classification rules were derived by discriminant analysis. Results Nuclei from cases of AEH and SIEC occupy the same range on a progression curve for endometrial lesions. Cases of AEH and SIEC both comprise nuclei of two phenotypes: hyperplastic characteristics and premalignant/neoplastic characteristics. The principal difference between AEH and SIEC is percentage of premalignant/neoplastic nuclei. When this percentage approaches 50-60% superficial invasion is likely. SIEC may develop already from lesions at the low end of the progression curve. Conclusions AEH comprises cases which may constitute a low risk group involving 40 % of nuclei of preneoplastic phenotype. Nuclei of the preneoplastic phenotype in AEH lesions are almost indistinguishable from nuclei in SIEC, where this percentage exceeds 60%. The percentage of nuclei of the preneoplastic phenotype in AEH lesions might serve as criterion for assessment of risk for the development of invasive disease. PMID:22155796

  3. An Item Analysis of the French Version of the Test for Reception of Grammar Among Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome or Intellectual Disability of Undifferentiated Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facon, Bruno; Magis, David

    2016-10-01

    An item analysis of Bishop's (1983) Test for Reception of Grammar (TROG) in its French version (F-TROG; Lecocq, 1996) was conducted to determine whether the difficulty of items is similar for participants with or without intellectual disability (ID). In Study 1, responses to the 92 F-TROG items by 55 participants with Down syndrome (DS), 55 with ID of undifferentiated etiology (UND), and 55 typical children (TYP) matched on their F-TROG total score were compared using the transformed item difficulties method, a statistical approach designed to detect differential item functioning (DIF) between groups. In Study 2, an additional comparison involving 526 TYP participants and 526 participants with UND was conducted to increase the statistical power of the analysis. The difficulty of items was highly similar whatever the sample size or clinical status of participants. Fewer than 3.5% of the items were flagged as showing DIF. Tests such as the TROG can be used with confidence in clinical practice as well as in research studies comparing participants with or without ID. Methods designed for investigating potential internal test bias-such as done here-should be more regularly employed in the developmental disability field to affirm the absence of DIF.

  4. Case Study: Student Perceptions of Groups & Teams in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coers, Natalie; Lorensen, Marianne; Anderson, James C., II.

    2009-01-01

    Working in groups and teams is a common practice in today's college classroom, partly in order to meet the growing demand by employers that students entering the workforce have leadership and group experience. This practice has many inherent benefits and challenges. The experiences created must meet the needs of both students and other…

  5. Anthropometric variability study of two Nigerian ethnic groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of ten selected anthropometric dimensions of two Nigerian major ethnic groups (Hausa and Yoruba) living in southwestern Nigeria was conducted. The aim were to obtain anthropometric data that could be useful for design purpose and to examine possible differences between the data of the two ethnic groups and ...

  6. Community attitudes to deceased organ donation: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Michelle J; Tong, Allison; Jan, Stephen; Cass, Alan; Chadban, Steven; Allen, Richard D; Craig, Jonathan C; Wong, Germaine; Howard, Kirsten

    2012-05-27

    Despite broad community support for organ donation, there is a chronic shortage of donor organs for transplantation. This study elicited community attitudes on deceased organ donation and the current Australian organ donation system. Thirteen focus groups with 114 participants aged between 18 and 75 years. Qualitative analysis using a grounded theory approach was used. Participants were generally positive toward deceased organ donation, but this did not always translate to decisions to be a donor. Three main categories of themes emerged. (1) Participants held core beliefs that both encouraged donation, such as "giving is good" and "saving lives," and discouraged donation, such as loss of body dignity, need for body wholeness, and differing medical care for donors. (2) A range of factors could influence how core beliefs were weighted in the decision-making process, including family, knowledge, information, media, grief, apathy, and fear. (3) Participants discussed the need for a simpler consent system where family members could not overrule their donation decision, greater public awareness for organ donation, and the availability of more information on the organ donation process. Opportunities exist to improve deceased organ donation rates by education to improve confidence in the donation process, positive media coverage, and clear information on each religion's stance on organ donation. Options for greater public recognition for organ donors should be explored. Finally, our findings suggest that aspects of the current donation consent system are not aligned with community values, and reforms should be debated publicly.

  7. Interprofessional Perspectives on ABCDE Bundle Implementation: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Leanne M; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Mion, Lorraine C

    The ABCDE bundle is a multifaceted, interprofessional intervention that is associated with reduced ventilator and delirium days as well as increased likelihood of mobility in intensive care. The aim of this study is to describe organizational domains that contribute to variation in ABCDE bundle implementation as reported by intensive care unit providers and to examine the capability of a conceptual framework for identifying variation in ABCDE bundle implementation. We conducted 2 separate focus groups that included nurses, respiratory therapists, occupational and physical therapists (N = 16) from the surgical and medical intensive care units at 1 academic medical center. All participants had experience performing ABCDE bundle activities. Variation in how the ABCDE bundle was interpreted and executed within and across disciplines was noted. Organizational facets, the physical environment, labor quantity and quality, task burden, provider attitudes, and patient characteristics were noted to influence ABCDE bundle execution. The difficulty coordinating and implementing early mobility was emphasized. The number of disciplines required to perform an activity and individual component complexity was reported to influence ABCDE bundle implementation. Nurses repeatedly described challenges with coordinating care across disciplines. Small tests of change, adequate staffing, interprofessional training and protocol development efforts, and role modeling may be effective methods for successful ABCDE bundle implementation.

  8. Hypovitaminosis D according to psychiatric diagnosis groups: A study with control group

    OpenAIRE

    Derya Güliz Mert

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYObjective: One of the risk factor for different psychiatric disorders has been indicated as hypovitaminosis D. The present study aimed to compare 25 (OH) D level between 4 different types of psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety disorder) and healthy controls, and to assess the risk factors of hypovitaminosis D in psychiatric inpatients.Method: This retrospective study included 974 individuals [depression (n=553), bipolar disorder (n=135), schiz...

  9. Many hands make light work: further studies in group evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Nicholas; Harvey, Inman; Virgo, Nathaniel; Philippides, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    When niching or speciation is required to perform a task that has several different component parts, standard genetic algorithms (GAs) struggle. They tend to evaluate and select all individuals on the same part of the task, which leads to genetic convergence within the population. The goal of evolutionary niching methods is to enforce diversity in the population so that this genetic convergence is avoided. One drawback with some of these niching methods is that they require a priori knowledge or assumptions about the specific fitness landscape in order to work; another is that many such methods are not set up to work on cooperative tasks where fitness is only relevant at the group level. Here we address these problems by presenting the group GA, described earlier by the authors, which is a group-based evolutionary algorithm that can lead to emergent niching. After demonstrating the group GA on an immune system matching task, we extend the previous work and present two modified versions where the number of niches does not need to be specified ahead of time. In the random-group-size GA, the number of niches is varied randomly during evolution, and in the evolved-group-size GA the number of niches is optimized by evolution. This provides a framework in which we can evolve groups of individuals to collectively perform tasks with minimal a priori knowledge of how many subtasks there are or how they should be shared out.

  10. Interpersonal processes in psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive behavioral group therapy: a systematic case study of two groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Foot, Meredith; Leite, Catherine; Maxwell, Hilary; Balfour, Louise; Bissada, Hany

    2011-09-01

    This mixed method systematic case study applied an interpersonal stage model of the therapeutic process to examine interpersonal processes among a highly adherent Group Psychodynamic-Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP) therapist and a highly adherent Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) therapist and their groups of binge eating disordered (BED) patients. This is the first case study to apply the interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy to compare GCBT and GPIP methods and the first to apply the model to group therapy. Early-, middle-, and late-stage transcribed video recordings of sequential interactions among therapists and patients in each of these two time-limited group therapies were analyzed with the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). We also provide qualitative presentations of the transcripts from each stage as context for the quantitative analyses. BED patients in both groups achieved positive outcomes for binge eating and depression. Consistent with their treatment model, the GPIP therapist was more autonomy-giving, whereas the GCBT therapist was more controlling/directive. The GPIP therapist and her group had high levels of interpersonal complementary interaction sequences in the early stage followed by lower complementarity in the middle stage. The GCBT therapist and her group showed a high-low-high pattern of complementarity across the three stage of therapy. However, overall the GPIP group had higher levels complementarity than the GCBT group. This mixed method case study of group processes based on an interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy suggested specific therapist behaviors in each modality to maximize positive therapeutic interactions at each stage of group therapy. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. An international investigation into O red blood cell unit administration in hospitals: the GRoup O Utilization Patterns (GROUP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Michelle P; Barty, Rebecca; Aandahl, Astrid; Apelseth, Torunn O; Callum, Jeannie; Dunbar, Nancy M; Elahie, Allahna; Garritsen, Henk; Hancock, Helen; Kutner, José Mauro; Manukian, Belinda; Mizuta, Shuichi; Okuda, Makoto; Pagano, Monica B; Pogłód, Ryszard; Rushford, Kylie; Selleng, Kathleen; Sørensen, Claess Henning; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Staves, Julie; Weiland, Thorsten; Wendel, Silvano; Wood, Erica M; van de Watering, Leo; van Wordragen-Vlaswinkel, Maria; Ziman, Alyssa; Jan Zwaginga, Jaap; Murphy, Michael F; Heddle, Nancy M; Yazer, Mark H

    2017-10-01

    Transfusion of group O blood to non-O recipients, or transfusion of D- blood to D+ recipients, can result in shortages of group O or D- blood, respectively. This study investigated RBC utilization patterns at hospitals around the world and explored the context and policies that guide ABO blood group and D type selection practices. This was a retrospective study on transfusion data from the 2013 calendar year. This study included a survey component that asked about hospital RBC selection and transfusion practices and a data collection component where participants submitted information on RBC unit disposition including blood group and D type of unit and recipient. Units administered to recipients of unknown ABO or D group were excluded. Thirty-eight hospitals in 11 countries responded to the survey, 30 of which provided specific RBC unit disposition data. Overall, 11.1% (21,235/191,397) of group O units were transfused to non-O recipients; 22.6% (8777/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to O D+ recipients, and 43.2% (16,800/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to recipients that were not group O D-. Disposition of units and hospital transfusion policy varied within and across hospitals of different sizes, with transfusion of group O D- units to non-group O D- patients ranging from 0% to 33%. A significant proportion of group O and D- RBC units were transfused to compatible, nonidentical recipients, although the frequency of this practice varied across sites. © 2017 AABB.

  12. Profiles in Successful Group Piano for Children: A Collective Case Study of Children's Group-Piano Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to explore the best practices in beginning group-piano instruction. Four beginning and intermediate groups of piano students (N =20) were observed. Data were triangulated through in-class observation of students and teachers, teacher interviews and student questionnaires. The master teachers…

  13. Studying the Stellar Populations of the Local Group with VLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline

    The best chance we have to understand star formation and how it proceeds in the Universe is going to come from detailed studies of the numerous different environments found within the Local Group (LG). Present day star formation in our Galaxy occurs exclusively in metal rich environments (Z ˜ Z_⊙), so if we want to study how low metallicity stars form (and thus understand observations of galaxies at high-redshift) we have to look beyond our Galaxy, to the smallest star forming dwarf galaxies, which can have extremely low metallicities (Z ˜ 0.02-0.05Z_⊙). Of course in its entirety a stellar population always contains the complete details of the star formation history of a galaxy, however this information is often hard to disentangle retroactively. We also have much to learn from the Magellanic Clouds (Z ˜ 0.1- 0.3Z_⊙), although because they are undergoing interactions with our Galaxy and each other their evolutionary picture and its general applicability less obvious. In our LG there are also a number of "remnants", or galaxies which which currently do not form stars (e.g. the dSph, such as Carina, Leo I, Ursa Minor, etc..). It is not straight forward to draw parallels between galaxies which are forming stars and those which aren't. This is of course because star formation has such a dramatic impact upon a galaxy, and alternative methods have to be used to make the most basic of comparisons of properties (e.g. metallicity, mass, luminosity evolution). It is necessary to put all the dwarf galaxies into a global picture if we are to draw meaningful conclusions about their star formation properties (e.g. Ferrara & Tolstoy 1999). Many of the small LG galaxies contain direct evidence of complicated star formation histories (e.g. Smecker-Hane et al. 1994; Tolstoy et al. 1998; Gallart et al. 1999), which suggests that star formation patterns can change dramatically over long time scales. This kind of evolutionary behaviour can have a dramatic impact upon the

  14. The Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group: past activities, current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Asamura, Hisao

    2017-03-01

    The Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group was organized in 1986. Initially, 26 collaborative institutions participated. In the early period, the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group focused on combined modality therapies and conducted nine trials, including JCOG9101: adjuvant chemotherapy for resected small-cell lung cancer, and JCOG9806: induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for superior sulcus tumor, which greatly impacted the treatment strategies for some special kinds of lung cancer. Since the 2000s, the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group has defined radiologically noninvasive adenocarcinoma: JCOG0201 and investigated adequate modes of surgical resection for small-sized non-small cell lung cancer: JCOG0802, JCOG0804 and JCOG1211. The accrual of these trials is now complete and we are waiting for the maturation of follow-up data. In addition, two adjuvant trials have been conducted: JCOG0707; a Phase III study of adjuvant chemotherapy for resected pathological stage I (T1 > 2 cm) non-small cell lung cancer, and JCOG1205; a Phase III study of adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected pulmonary high-grade neuroendocrine tumor. The accrual of JCOG0707 is complete and we are waiting for the maturation of follow-up data. At present, 44 institutions are active members of the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group. In addition to thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, pathologists and radiotherapists are participating in the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group. The Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group continues to conduct various clinical trials in an effort to improve survival in patients with lung cancer. In this review, we provide an overview of the past 30 years, as well as the present status and future direction of the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Radioaerosol imaging of the lung. An IAEA [CRP] group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Whee Bahk; Isawa, Toyoharu

    1994-01-01

    of the BARC nebulizer, already published in 1979, are described in much greater detail with many blue-print diagrams. The efficacy of and easy access to the nebulizer have been tested and established against commercially available nebulizers. The comparative studies have been conducted on aerosol lung scan images using the BARC and other nebulizers. The results of extended clinical applications are presented: the diseases investigated include COPD, bronchial obstruction, compensatory overinflation, acute pneumonia, tuberculosis, focal and diffuse interstitial fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, lung edema and bronchogenic carcinoma and metastasis. Of these, COPD was used as a model disease group, in which an analytical interpretation of scan alterations has been attempted to establish a differential diagnostic scheme of clinically related but pathologically different diseases. It was aimed at emphasizing the potential role of aerosol scan in making specific diagnosis of the individual diseases on the basis of both anatomical and physiological alterations as they are portrayed in aerosol lung scans. More clinical applications are described in association with embolism, inhalation bums and glue-sniffing. In regard with the aerosol scan technique, a modification has been introduced to improve scan image quality with enhanced resolution by maximally avoiding background noise so that the scan may provide more graphic information. The tests that examine nonrespiratory lung functions such as mucociliary transport and lung permeability are also discussed in this monograph for the future study. In order to epitomize the ready practicability, economical aspect and excellent reproducibility of radioaerosol lung scan by using the BARC nebulizer, a forum is provided for case presentation of those who have enthusiastically participated in this CRP group study during the past 5 years. Because of the limits in space, the number of cases presented are squeezed to a mininium. It is

  16. Functional renormalization group study of fluctuation effects in fermionic superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Andreas

    2013-03-22

    This thesis is concerned with ground state properties of two-dimensional fermionic superfluids. In such systems, fluctuation effects are particularly strong and lead for example to a renormalization of the order parameter and to infrared singularities. In the first part of this thesis, the fermionic two-particle vertex is analysed and the fermionic renormalization group is used to derive flow equations for a decomposition of the vertex in charge, magnetic and pairing channels. In the second part, the channel-decomposition scheme is applied to various model systems. In the superfluid state, the fermionic two-particle vertex develops rich and singular dependences on momentum and frequency. After simplifying its structure by exploiting symmetries, a parametrization of the vertex in terms of boson-exchange interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels is formulated, which provides an efficient description of the singular momentum and frequency dependences. Based on this decomposition of the vertex, flow equations for the effective interactions are derived on one- and two-loop level, extending existing channel-decomposition schemes to (i) the description of symmetry breaking in the Cooper channel and (ii) the inclusion of those two-loop renormalization contributions to the vertex that are neglected in the Katanin scheme. In the second part, the superfluid ground state of various model systems is studied using the channel-decomposition scheme for the vertex and the flow equations. A reduced model with interactions in the pairing and forward scattering channels is solved exactly, yielding insights into the singularity structure of the vertex. For the attractive Hubbard model at weak coupling, the momentum and frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex and the frequency dependence of the self-energy are determined on one- and two-loop level. Results for the suppression of the superfluid gap by fluctuations are in good agreement with the literature

  17. Constant round group key agreement protocols: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makri, E.; Konstantinou, Elisavet

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to review and evaluate all constant round Group Key Agreement (GKA) protocols proposed so far in the literature. We have gathered all GKA protocols that require 1,2,3,4 and 5 rounds and examined their efficiency. In particular, we calculated each protocol’s computation and

  18. Synthesis and structural study of platinum group metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    als by a number of ways yielding mono and dinu- clear compounds. It can also coordinate through pyri- dine and pyrazolyl nitrogens or nitrogens of pyrimidine and pyrazolyl group to form mono and dinuclear com- plexes. However, in the ..... This downfield chemical shift of phosphorus nucleus indicates the formation of ...

  19. Enhancing Student Engagement: A Group Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Aakash

    2014-01-01

    Computing professionals work in groups and collaborate with individuals having diverse backgrounds and behaviors. The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) characterizes that a computing program must enable students to attain the ability to analyze a problem, design and evaluate a solution, and work effectively on teams to…

  20. Age groups related glioblastoma study based on radiomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeju; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2017-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis. Radiomics is a newly emerging and promising technique to reveal the complex relationships between high-throughput medical image features and deep information of disease including pathology, biomarkers and genomics. An approach was developed to investigate the internal relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and the age-related origins of glioblastomas based on a quantitative radiomics method. A fully automatic image segmentation method was applied to segment the tumor regions from three dimensional MRI images. 555 features were then extracted from the image data. By analyzing large numbers of quantitative image features, some predictive and prognostic information could be obtained by the radiomics approach. 96 patients diagnosed with glioblastoma pathologically have been divided into two age groups (age groups (T test, p age difference (T test, p= .006). In conclusion, glioblastoma in different age groups present different radiomics-feature patterns with statistical significance, which indicates that glioblastoma in different age groups should have different pathologic, protein, or genic origins.

  1. Meaning making in cancer survivors: a focus group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, N.; Vos, J.; van Uden-Kraan, C.F.; Breitbart, W.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Cuijpers, P.; de Leeuw, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Confrontation with a life-threatening disease like cancer can evoke existential distress, which can trigger a search for meaning in people after having survived this disease.Methods:In an effort to gain more insight in the meaning making process, we conducted four focus groups with 23

  2. Children Displaced by Hurricane Katrina: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Houston, J. Brian; Wyche, Karen Fraser; Van Horn, Richard L.; Reyes, Gilbert; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; North, Carol S.

    2008-01-01

    Focus groups were conducted with 23 children and adolescents, aged 9 to 17 years, who relocated from Louisiana to Texas following Hurricane Katrina to explore their disaster, evacuation, and resettlement experiences. The resilience described by some was remarkable and, despite evidence of cultural disparity and stigma, many identified positive…

  3. A case study of a Postgraduate student's group expe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    presentations and assignments, and the quality of their end-product and their .... group activities as all decisions are made in a rather ad-hoc fashion without any ... dangerous if it leads to exaggerated rivalry or competition like it can happen in sports. However, groupthink can also lead to a high degree of cosines whereby.

  4. A Numerical Study of Renormalization Group Transformations on Multiscale Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jiqun; Mawhinney, Robert

    2018-03-01

    The RBC and UKQCD Collaborations have shown that light hadron masses and meson decay constants measured on 2+1 flavor Mobius DWF ensembles generated with the Iwasaki gauge action and a dislocation suppressing determinant ratio (DSDR) term show few percent O(a2) scaling violations for ensembles with a-1 = 1 GeV. We call this combination the ID+MDWF action and this scaling implies that, to a good approximation, these ensembles lie on a renormalization group trajectory, where the form of the action is unchanged and only the bare parameters need to be tuned to stay on the trajectory. Here we investigate whether a single-step APE-like blocking kernel can reproduce this trajectory and test its accuracy via measurements of the light hadron spectrum and non-perturbative renormalization. As we report, we find close matching to the renormalization group trajectory from this simple blocking kernel.

  5. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Susan G.; Morrow, Emma; van Vreeswijk, Michiel; Reid, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential, and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioral change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropp...

  6. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G Simpson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviours, whilst providing a de-stigmatising and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  7. Geochemical studies of Guarani ethnic groups pottery with XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facetti-Masulli, J.F.; Romero de Gonzalez, V.; Zulma de Diaz; Kump, P.

    2010-01-01

    Artefacts of pottery belonging to the Guarani ethnic group were investigated by XRF techniques. The Tupi-Guarani, is one of the three main representatives of the Neolithic culture in the Amazonian scope. Such an ethnic group dispersed towards the South; in the Paraguayan area between the Paraguay and the Parana Rivers several Guarani ethnic movements by both rivers and their tributaries are perceived. The lithology and ceramics typology have contributed to support that perception. The archaeological findings help to clarify prehistoric cultural aspects and dispersal areas. In that context, the knowledge of the chemical composition of the found ceramic devices, in particular of the rare earth elements (REE) and other refractory ones provide information on this dispersion and its expansion. Selected trace elements (Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, Ce, and Nd) were determined in samples from thirteen archaeological sites with XRF using an Am-241 source. Their spidergrams have allowed identifying four different sets of samples according to their areas of provenance. (author)

  8. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres in Australasia for TROG 09.02 (Chisel), a Phase III clinical trial on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy of early stage lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Chesson, Brent; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Crain, Melissa; Clements, Natalie; Burns, Mark; Ball, David

    2018-03-06

    A randomised clinical trial comparing stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) with conventional radiotherapy for early stage lung cancer has been conducted in Australia and New Zealand under the auspices of the TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (NCT01014130). We report on the technical credentialing program as prerequisite for centres joining the trial. Participating centres were asked to develop treatment plans for two test cases to assess their ability to create plans according to protocol. Dose delivery in the presence of inhomogeneity and motion was assessed during a site visit using a phantom with moving inserts. Site visits for the trial were conducted in 16 Australian and 3 New Zealand radiotherapy facilities. The tests with low density inhomogeneities confirmed shortcomings of the AAA algorithm for dose calculation. Dose was assessed for a typical treatment delivery including at least one non-coplanar beam in a stationary and moving phantom. This end-to-end test confirmed that all participating centres were able to deliver stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy with the required accuracy while the planning study demonstrated that they were able to produce acceptable plans for both test cases. The credentialing process documented that participating centres were able to deliver dose as required in the trial protocol. It also gave an opportunity to provide education about the trial and discuss technical issues such as four-dimensional CT, small field dosimetry and patient immobilisation with staff in participating centres. Advances in knowledge: Credentialing is an important quality assurance tool for radiotherapy trials using advanced technology. In addition to confirming technical competence, it provides an opportunity for education and discussion about the trial.

  9. Chromosomal study for prognostic grouping in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junaid, A.; Rao, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of various cytogenetic aberrations in newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, and their detection rate by cytogenetic and fluorescent In situ hybridization (FISH) technique separately. Analysis was made on 100 diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. Cytogenetics and FISH technique were performed on blood or bone marrow samples. Nineteen out of 100 cases (19%) showed karyotype abnormalities; whereas 55 showed abnormalities using the CLL - specific FISH probes. The most frequent abnormality detected by standard cytogenetics was trisomy 12. The most common abnormality detected by FISH was a deletion of 13q14 (40 out of 55 cases; 72% of the abnormal). For prognostic grouping of CLL patients, FISH must always be requested which may even replace standard karyotyping. These chromosomal markers help in choosing the therapeutic options. (author)

  10. Medication errors in home care: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Astrid; Bentsen, Signe Berit

    2017-11-01

    To explore registered nurses' experiences of medication errors and patient safety in home care. The focus of care for older patients has shifted from institutional care towards a model of home care. Medication errors are common in this situation and can result in patient morbidity and mortality. An exploratory qualitative design with focus group interviews was used. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 20 registered nurses in home care. The data were analysed using content analysis. Five categories were identified as follows: lack of information, lack of competence, reporting medication errors, trade name products vs. generic name products, and improving routines. Medication errors occur frequently in home care and can threaten the safety of patients. Insufficient exchange of information and poor communication between the specialist and home-care health services, and between general practitioners and healthcare workers can lead to medication errors. A lack of competence in healthcare workers can also lead to medication errors. To prevent these, it is important that there should be up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers during the transfer of patients from specialist to home care. Ensuring competence among healthcare workers with regard to medication is also important. In addition, there should be openness and accurate reporting of medication errors, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medicines. To prevent medication errors in home care, up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers is important when patients are transferred from specialist to home care. It is also important to ensure adequate competence with regard to medication, and that there should be openness when medication errors occur, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Using Focus Groups to Study ALN Faculty Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltz, Starr Roxanne; Shea, Peter; Kim, Eunhee

    2010-01-01

    What are the most significant factors that motivate and inhibit faculty with regard to teaching in online environments? And what are the specific kinds of experiences that underlie and explain the importance of these factors? One goal of this study was to add to understanding of these issues, but the primary purpose of this study is determining…

  12. NASBE Study Group Surveys State Leadership Development Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bobbi; Hull, Robert

    2015-01-01

    State board members, working in partnership with the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted an in-depth study of states' school leadership development policies and practices. Data from this study are being analyzed to determine ways that states can create systems and structures for…

  13. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  14. In-depth Cultural Studies in Multicultural Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliņa-Jasjukeviča Gunta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is much research and educational practices at all levels of education on how to deal with promoting acceptance and understanding between different cultures. A cultural study forms an important part of shaping intercultural understanding. The aim of the research is to analyze an innovative way of incorporating cultural studies in teacher education program from the perspective of encouraging multinational students to reveal common values within diverse manifestations of different cultures. The present article describes a qualitative study of multinational students’ experiences in international project related to the learning about Nordic and Baltic cultural traditions. In the conclusion of the article, the efficiency of the structure of content and the process of in-depth cultural studies are analyzed. The discussion contains problems for further research of this topic.

  15. Consumers' preferences for fresh yam: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlagne, Carla; Cornet, Denis; Blazy, Jean-Marc; Diman, Jean-Louis; Ozier-Lafontaine, Harry

    2017-01-01

    In West and Central Africa and in the Caribbean, yam is one of the most important sources of carbohydrates and has a great potential to improve food security. The yam production sector is, however, now challenged by the satisfaction of evolving consumers' preferences. Since little is known about consumers' preferences regarding yams' characteristics, product quality, and the drivers of yam purchase, six focus group discussions were conducted (for a total of 31 participants). Among the purchasing criteria, price was considered more important than the others. It was followed by the external damage, the origin, and the size of the tuber. The most frequently cited consumption criteria were the taste, the texture, and color of flesh after cooking. Taste was considered more important than the other criteria. Three consumers' profiles were established reflecting heterogeneity in preferences, especially as concerns the willingness to pay for yam and consumption habits. They were designated as the Hedonistic, the Thrifty and the Flexible. Our results suggest that innovations can be implemented to sustain and stimulate the development of the yam sector in Guadeloupe. Two main development paths were identified. The first path is the valorization of the great existing diversity of yam varieties and the increase in the level of information for consumers about product attributes such as the cooking mode, the origin, and the mode of production. Building a marketing strategy based on the valorization of this diversity can help maintain and preserve yam's agro-biodiversity and the satisfaction of rapidly evolving consumption habits. The second path is the definition of yam ideotypes that suit consumers' needs. We expect that tailoring the production to consumers' needs will have a positive impact on global food security in the Caribbean region.

  16. Peer Group Status of Gender Dysphoric Children: A Sociometric Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallien, M.S.C.; Veenstra, R.; Kreukels, B.P.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    In this sociometric study, we aimed to investigate the social position of gender-referred children in a naturalistic environment. We used a peer nomination technique to examine their social position in the class and we specifically examined bullying and victimization of gender dysphoric children. A

  17. Final Recommendations of the Community College Financing Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, John A.; Heller, Henry B.

    This report presents findings and recommendations from a study conducted by the Maryland General Assembly examining options for increasing state formula aid and changing the distribution of aid to the state's 18 community colleges. Following a letter of transmittal providing background information on community college financing, the report…

  18. Plantar pitted keratolysis: a study from non-risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Feride Kaptanoglu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pitted keratolysis is an acquired, superficial bacterial infection of the skin which is characterized by typical malodor and pits in the hyperkeratotic areas of the soles. It is more common in barefooted people in tropical areas, or those who have to wear occlusive shoes, such as soldiers, sailors and athletes. In this study, we evaluated 41 patients who had been diagnosed with plantar pitted keratolysis. The patients were of high socioeconomic status, were office-workers, and most had a university degree. Malodor and plantar hyperhydrosis were the most frequently reported symptoms. The weight-bearing metatarsal parts of the feet were those most affected. Almost half the women in the study gave a history of regular pedicure and foot care in a spa salon. Mean treatment duration was 19 days. All patients were informed about the etiology of the disease, predisposing factors and preventive methods. Recurrences were observed in only 17% of patients during the one year follow-up period. This study emphasizes that even malodorous feet among non-risk city dwellers may be a sign of plantar pitted keratolysis. A study of the real incidence of the disease in a large population-based series is needed.

  19. Structure and function studies on enzymes with a catalytic carboxyl group(s): from ribonuclease T1 to carboxyl peptidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAKAHASHI, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    A group of enzymes, mostly hydrolases or certain transferases, utilize one or a few side-chain carboxyl groups of Asp and/or Glu as part of the catalytic machinery at their active sites. This review follows mainly the trail of studies performed by the author and his colleagues on the structure and function of such enzymes, starting from ribonuclease T1, then extending to three major types of carboxyl peptidases including aspartic peptidases, glutamic peptidases and serine-carboxyl peptidases. PMID:23759941

  20. 34 CFR 664.13 - What is a group research or study project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is a group research or study project? 664.13... Projects Does the Secretary Assist Under This Program? § 664.13 What is a group research or study project? (a)(1) A group research or study project is designed to permit a group of faculty of an institution...

  1. Final Report of the West Point Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-27

    and their potential to encourage undesirable beha - viors. (See also the Corps of Cadets, Itm 131). (pp. 64, 111-113) 38. Reorganize the cadet chain of...all aspects of cadet life as policy decisions are implemented. Wa also sought to ensure the primacy of the o- ademic program during the school year...study and planning by the Academy. Hence, the most important recommendations to improve the ;• ademic program are those which "restructure the

  2. Energetically self-sufficient robot group study kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rovbo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the project of educational and research software and hardware kit designed for use in case-based educational project activities based on the theme of energetically autonomous robots. An important feature of the complex is its interdisciplinarity since robotics combines many fields of science and technology — mechanical design, electronics, programming, elements of artificial intelligence, energy science and others. Students can receive basic knowledge in these areas as well as gain practical skills in solving real problems that require a convergent approach. The kit serves as an experimental basis that allows to study intricacies of robot control and its hardware and software design while making structural changes, including using different power units: solar, fuel, thermoelectric and others. Power units (converters and the various sources of renewable energy may be considered both from the theoretical point of view, i.e. from the principles of their functioning and from the practical aspect — studying their practical application in real systems. Another important aspect of the system is the development of software architecture for a robot and for a team of robots as well as studying the interactions between them. In addition to performing the target task, ancillary tasks such as maintaining the battery level, communication with other team members in a multi-agent system, should be considered in the control algorithm of the robot, which allows to study the distribution of priorities between these objectives, as shown in the example of multicriteria optimization. The prototype of the kit and its usage according to the described approach have been partially validated by conducting computational experiments with algorithms based on different search methods (random search, closest source and multi-criteria optimization methods, multi-agent paradigm and adaptive control which show a variety of possible approaches and

  3. Studies of an artificially shock-loaded H group chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, D. W.; Ashworth, J. R.; Broadbent, C. P.; Bevan, A. W. R.

    1984-01-01

    SEM and TEM, together with thermoluminescence (TL), are used to study five samples of the naturally unshocked Kernouve (H6) meteorite that were shock-loaded to pressures of 70, 165, 270, and 390 kbar. Attention is given to olivine and orthopyroxene deformation mechanisms at these pressure levels. The microhardness of the kamacite in the samples increases with shock pressure, and it is noted that annealed kamacite displays incipient crystallinity, while alpha-martensite and taenite sometimes contain slip lines. At pressures over 200 kbar, there was a systematic decrease in both natural TL and TL sensitivity. Changes in the ratio of these two values for various regions of the TL glow curve suggest that two processes were effective during shock: thermal drainage of electron traps and a reduction in the effective trap density. Thermal effects with widespread annealing are noted in the case of a sample subjected to shock pulse.

  4. Galaxy evolution in Local Group analogs. I. A GALEX study of nearby groups dominated by late-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A.; Bianchi, L.; Rampazzo, R.; Buson, L. M.; Bettoni, D.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Understanding the astrophysical processes acting within galaxy groups and their effects on the evolution of the galaxy population is one of the crucial topics of modern cosmology, as almost 60% of galaxies in the Local Universe are found in groups. Aims: We aim at learning about galaxy evolution within nearby groups dominated by late-type galaxies, specifically by studying their ultraviolet-emitting stellar population. Methods: We imaged in the far (FUV, λ_eff = 1539 Å) and near ultraviolet (NUV, λ_eff = 2316 Å) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) three nearby groups, namely LGG 93, LGG 127 and LGG 225. We obtained the UV galaxy surface photometry and, for LGG 225, the only group covered by the SDSS, the photometry in u, g, r, i, z bands. We discuss galaxy morphologies looking for interaction signatures and we analyze the spectral energy distribution of galaxies to infer their luminosity-weighted ages. The UV and optical photometry was also used to perform a luminosity-weighted kinematical and dynamical analysis of each group and to evaluate the stellar mass. Results: A few member galaxies in LGG 225 show a distorted UV morphology due to ongoing interactions. (FUV-NUV) colors suggest that spirals in LGG 93 and LGG 225 host stellar populations in their outskirts younger than that of M 31 and M 33 in the Local Group or with less extinction. The irregular interacting galaxy NGC 3447A has a significantly younger stellar population (a few Myr old) than the average of the other irregular galaxies in LGG 225 suggesting that the encounter triggered star formation. The early-type members of LGG 225, NGC 3457 and NGC 3522, have masses of the order of a few 10^9~M_⊙, comparable to the Local Group ellipticals. For the most massive spiral in LGG 225, we estimate a stellar mass of ≈4 × 1010~M_⊙, comparable to M 33 in the Local Group. Ages of stellar populations range from a few to ≈7 Gyr for the galaxies in LGG 225. The kinematical and dynamical

  5. a Study of the AGB in Local Group Bulge Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, R.

    1994-01-01

    We propose to survey the bolometric luminosities, colors, and space distribution of the most luminous asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the bulges of M31, M32, and M33. We seek to discover whether the bulges of these galaxies are relatively young, of order 10 Gyr rather than 15 Gyr. We will use WFPC2 and the R, I, and F1042M (1 micron) filters. Knowing that F1042M falls on the first continuum point of M giants, we have shown that we can use 1.04 micron fluxes to reliably calculate bolometric magnitudes for these very red stars. Color information from R and I will permit (1) comparison with Galactic bulge M giants, (2) an estimate of the spread of abundance and (3) increase the accuracy of the bolometric magnitudes. Frames with the damaged HST show signs of resolution to within 3" of the M31 nucleus; Red images with the aberrated HST show a red star cluster associated with the nucleus. Ground-based studies of M32 find an intermediate-age population from spectroscopy and infrared photometry. The repaired HST should resolve stars close to the nuclei of these galaxies. We will measure bolometric luminosity functions to determine if the populations are intermediate age, and attempt to measure the abundance range for stars near the nuclei of these galaxies. If metals have been lost due to winds, theory predicts that we should see a substantial spread of abundances even near the nucleus.

  6. Attitudes of older adults in a group-based exercise program towards a blended intervention; a focus-group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Mehra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise programs, older adults participating in such interventions often do not meet the frequency, intensity or duration of exercises needed to gain health benefits. An exercise program that combines the advantages of group-based exercises led by an instructor with tailored home-based exercises can increase the effectiveness. Technology can assist in delivering a personalized program. The aim of the study was to determine the susceptibility of older adults currently participating in a nationwide group-based exercise program to such a blended exercise program. Eight focus-groups were held with adults of 55 years of age or older. Two researchers coded independently the remarks of the 30 participants that were included in the analysis according to the three key concepts of the Self Determination Theory: autonomy, competence and relatedness. The results show that maintaining self-reliance and keeping in touch with others were the main motives to participate in the weekly group-based exercises. Participants recognized benefits of doing additional home-based exercises, but had concerns regarding guidance, safety and motivation. Furthermore, some participants strongly rejected the idea to use technology to support them in doing exercises at home, but the majority was open to it. Insights are discussed how these findings can help design novel interventions that can increase the wellbeing of older adults and preserve an independent living.

  7. "It's not like a fat camp" - A focus group study of adolescents' experiences on group-based obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Anna; Abildsnes, Eirik; Mildestvedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The health burden related to obesity is rising among children and adolescents along with the general population worldwide. For the individual as well as the society this trend is alarming. Several factors are driving the trend, and the solution seems to be multifaceted because long-lasting treatment alternatives are lacking. This study aims to explore adolescents' and young adults' motivation for attending group-based obesity treatment and social and environmental factors that can facilitate or hinder lifestyle change. In this study, we arranged three focus groups with 17 participants from different obesity treatment programs in the west and south of Norway. The content in these programs differed, but they all used Motivational Interviewing as a teaching method. We conducted a data-driven analysis using systematic text condensation. Self-determination theory has been used as an explanatory framework. We identified four major themes: 1) motivation, 2) body experience and self-image, 3) relationships and sense of belonging, and 4) the road ahead. Many of the participants expressed external motivation to participate but experienced increasing inner motivation and enjoyment during the treatment. Several participants reported negative experiences related to being obese and appreciated group affiliation and sharing experiences with other participants. Motivation may shift during a lifestyle course. Facilitating factors include achieving and experiencing positive outcomes as well as gaining autonomy support from other course participants and friends. Obstacles to change were a widespread obesogenic environment as well as feelings of guilt, little trust in personal achievements and non-supporting friends.

  8. Education of Disadvantaged Groups and Multiple Class Teaching: Studies and Innovative Approaches. Report of a Study Group Meeting (Jakarta, November 17-26, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    Participants from India, Korea, Maldives, Nepal, Thailand, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia met to formulate strategies and develop alternative methods of teaching multiple classes and educating disadvantaged groups. Activities of the Study Group Meeting included four phases: presentation and discussion of country experiences relating to…

  9. Mentoring First Year Study Groups--Benefits from the Mentors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrberg, Nadia Rahbek; Michelsen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    The "study group concept" at the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) was implemented to aid first year students' transitional challenges. A mentor (an older student) is affiliated each study group to facilitate productive group work, bring awareness to study habits, and share his/her own experiences with life as a student. The study…

  10. The utility of e-Learning to support training for a multicentre bladder online adaptive radiotherapy trial (TROG 10.01-BOLART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Bressel, Mathias; Tongs, David; Rolfo, Aldo; Styles, Colin; Gill, Suki; Kron, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: An e-Learning programme appeared useful for providing training and information regarding a multi-centre image guided radiotherapy trial. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the utility of this e-Learning programme. Materials and methods: Modules were created on relevant pelvic anatomy, Cone Beam CT soft tissue recognition and trial details. Radiation therapist participants’ knowledge and confidence were evaluated before, at the end of, and after at least 6 weeks of e-Learning (long term). Results: One hundred and eighty-five participants were recruited from 12 centres, with 118 in the first, and 67 in the second cohort. One hundred and forty-six participants had two tests (pre and post e-Learning) and 39 of these had three tests (pre, post, and long term). There was an increase confidence after completion of modules (p < 0.001). The first cohort pre scores increased from 67 ± 11 to 79 ± 8 (p < 0.001) post. The long term same question score was 73 ± 14 (p = 0.025, comparing to pre-test), and different questions’ score was 77 ± 13 (p = 0.014). In the second cohort, pre-test scores were 64 ± 10, post-test same question score 78 ± 9 (p < 0.001) and different questions’ score 81 ± 11 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: e-Learning for a multi-centre clinical trial was feasible and improved confidence and knowledge

  11. The utility of e-Learning to support training for a multicentre bladder online adaptive radiotherapy trial (TROG 10.01-BOLART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Bressel, Mathias; Tongs, David; Rolfo, Aldo; Styles, Colin; Gill, Suki; Kron, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    An e-Learning programme appeared useful for providing training and information regarding a multi-centre image guided radiotherapy trial. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the utility of this e-Learning programme. Modules were created on relevant pelvic anatomy, Cone Beam CT soft tissue recognition and trial details. Radiation therapist participants' knowledge and confidence were evaluated before, at the end of, and after at least 6 weeks of e-Learning (long term). One hundred and eighty-five participants were recruited from 12 centres, with 118 in the first, and 67 in the second cohort. One hundred and forty-six participants had two tests (pre and post e-Learning) and 39 of these had three tests (pre, post, and long term). There was an increase confidence after completion of modules (pLearning for a multi-centre clinical trial was feasible and improved confidence and knowledge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety of the use of group A plasma in trauma: the STAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Nancy M; Yazer, Mark H

    2017-08-01

    Use of universally ABO-compatible group AB plasma for trauma resuscitation can be challenging due to supply limitations. Many centers are now using group A plasma during the initial resuscitation of traumatically injured patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of this practice on mortality and hospital length of stay (LOS). Seventeen trauma centers using group A plasma in trauma patients of unknown ABO group participated in this study. Eligible patients were group A, B, and AB trauma patients who received at least 1 unit of group A plasma. Data collected included patient sex, age, mechanism of injury, Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) probability of survival, and number of blood products transfused. The main outcome of this study was in-hospital mortality differences between group B and AB patients compared to group A patients. Data on early mortality (≤24 hr) and hospital LOS were also collected. There were 354 B and AB patients and 809 A patients. The two study groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, TRISS probability of survival, and total number of blood products transfused. The use of group A plasma during the initial resuscitation of traumatically injured patients of unknown ABO group was not associated with increased in-hospital mortality, early mortality, or hospital LOS for group B and AB patients compared to group A patients. These results support the practice of issuing thawed group A plasma for the initial resuscitation of trauma patients of unknown ABO group. © 2017 AABB.

  13. Experiences of participating in return-to-work group programmes for people with musculoskeletal disorders: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamnes, Bente; Rønningen, Aud; Skarbø, Åse

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed to explore the experiences of individuals with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) who had participated in return-to-work group programmes (RTW-GPs) and to assess whether the programmes had had an impact on their work disability. Three focus group interviews and one individual interview were conducted involving 17 women (mean age = 47) with MSDs who had completed RTW-GPs. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analyses. Participant experiences were categorised into three main themes: changed way of thinking, the importance of being able to work, and a changed lifestyle. The respondents said that participation in the RTW-GPs had enabled them to shift their focus from problems to opportunities. They had become more aware of strategies to enhance their energy levels and continue working. Several participants had reduced their work hours to achieve a better balance between work and daily life. Many participants had also changed their lifestyle habits, which had led to weight reduction, more energy and less pain. The study participants had attained a heightened awareness of what they could do to continue working. Many participants had introduced changes in their daily lives, with consequences for employment, social life and lifestyle. The findings suggest that RTW-GPs can help people with MSDs to remain in employment and prevent absenteeism. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Study groups and peer roles in mediated academic literacy events in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KATEVG

    This paper explores the role of study groups in mediating academic writing, particularly among multilingual black students at the University of the Western Cape (UWC). Using data from questionnaires, focus groups, and interviews, as well as academic texts generated by study groups, the paper focuses on the efficacy of ...

  15. Distribution of ABO and Rh Blood Groups in Patients With Keratoconus: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderan, Mohammad; Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Shoar, Saeed; Kamaleddin, Mohammad Amin; Naderan, Morteza; Rezagholizadeh, Farzaneh; Zolfaghari, Masoome; Pahlevani, Rozhin

    2015-07-01

    Association of keratoconus (KC) with genetic predisposition and environmental factors has been well documented. However, no single study has investigated the possible relationship between ABO and Rh blood groups and KC. A case-control study was designed in a university hospital enrolling 214 patients with KC in the case group and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects in the control group. Primary characteristics, ABO blood group, and Rh factors were compared between the two groups. Topographic findings of KC eyes and the severity of the diseases were investigated according to the distribution of the blood groups. Blood group O and Rh(+) phenotype were most frequent in both groups. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of ABO blood groups or Rh factors. Mean keratometery (K), central corneal thickness, thinnest corneal thickness, flat K, steep K, sphere and cylinder, spherical equivalent, and uncorrected visual acuity were all similar between ABO blood groups and Rh(+) and Rh(-) groups. However, the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) had the highest value in AB blood group (0.35 ± 0.22 logMAR, P=0.005). Moreover, the blood group AB revealed the highest frequency for grade 3 KC, followed by grades 1, 2, and 4 (P=0.003). We observed no significant excess of any particular blood group among KC cases compared with healthy subjects. Except BCVA, none of the keratometric or topographic findings was significantly different between blood groups.

  16. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1993 Annual Meeting (York, Ontario, Canada, May 28-June 1, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the 1993 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are presented in four sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; and (4) ad hoc groups. Papers include: (1) "What is a Square Root? A Study of Geometrical Representation in Different…

  17. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1994 Annual Meeting (Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, June 3-7, 1994).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers from the 1994 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are divided into the following sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; (4) ad hoc groups; and (5) reports on ICMI (International Committee on Mathematical Instruction) studies. Papers include: (1)…

  18. Correlation of ABO Blood Group Phenotype and Rhesus Factor with Periodontal Disease: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Anju; Mittal, Neelam; Singh, T B; Srivastava, Ruchi; Verma, Pushpendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of the ABO blood group phenotype of the patients and their correlation with the periodontal disease maybe important in the development of early treatment strategies, and it would be helpful to target non-responding areas to periodontal therapy of the susceptible individuals. The present study was conducted to determine whether there was any correlation between periodontal diseases and ABO blood groups and Rh factor. This study was carried out on 537 subjects attending Faculty of Dental Sciences OPD in BHU. Subjects were divided into three groups: group I (healthy subjects), group II (subjects with gingivitis), and group III (subjects with periodontitis) based on periodontal examination (Gingival index, Bleeding Index, Probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level). ABO Blood grouping were done and correlated with the periodontal status of study subjects. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using the statistical software namely Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 16, IBM Analytics) and Systat 8.0. In this study, there was a greater prevalence of gingivitis in blood group O and periodontitis in blood group B. The blood group AB showed the least prevalence of periodontal diseases. Similarly gingivitis and peridontitis were significantly higher among Rhesus positive groups when compared with Rhesus negative groups. Considering the results of this study, it can be concluded that ABO blood groups and Rh factor could be a risk factor for the development of periodontal disease.

  19. Human studies of prepulse inhibition of startle: normal subjects, patient groups, and pharmacological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braff, D L; Geyer, M A; Swerdlow, N R

    2001-07-01

    Since the mid-1970s, cross-species translational studies of prepulse inhibition (PPI) have increased at an astounding pace as the value of this neurobiologically informative measure has been optimized. PPI occurs when a relatively weak sensory event (the prepulse) is presented 30-500 ms before a strong startle-inducing stimulus, and reduces the magnitude of the startle response. In humans, PPI occurs in a robust, predictable manner when the prepulse and startling stimuli occur in either the same or different modalities (acoustic, visual, or cutaneous). This review covers three areas of interest in human PPI studies. First, we review the normal influences on PPI related to the underlying construct of sensori- (prepulse) motor (startle reflex) gating. Second, we review PPI studies in psychopathological disorders that form a family of gating disorders. Third, we review the relatively limited but interesting and rapidly expanding literature on pharmacological influences on PPI in humans. All studies identified by a computerized literature search that addressed the three topics of this review were compiled and evaluated. The principal studies were summarized in appropriate tables. The major influences on PPI as a measure of sensorimotor gating can be grouped into 11 domains. Most of these domains are similar across species, supporting the value of PPI studies in translational comparisons across species. The most prominent literature describing deficits in PPI in psychiatrically defined groups features schizophrenia-spectrum patients and their clinically unaffected relatives. These findings support the use of PPI as an endophenotype in genetic studies. Additional groups of psychopathologically disordered patients with neuropathology involving cortico-striato-pallido-pontine circuits exhibit poor gating of motor, sensory, or cognitive information and corresponding PPI deficits. These groups include patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, Tourette's syndrome

  20. Group unconscious common orientation: exploratory study at the Basque Foundation for the investigation of mental health group training for therapists

    CERN Document Server

    Trojaola Zapirain, Begona; Carminati, Federico; Gonzalez Torres, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez de Mendivil, Ernesto; Fouassier, Claire; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Martin, Francois; Labarere, Jose; Demongeot, Jacques; Lorincz, Erika Nora

    2014-01-01

    Group phenomena have been used since antiquity in therapeutic, social, economic and political domains. According to Bion, the interactions between group members generate a ``group unconscious'' and its behavior is governed and oriented by Bion's ``basic assumptions.'' The present work has been conducted during group analysis training at the Basque Foundation for the Investigation of Mental Health (OMIE) at Bilbao, consisting of eleven sessions. The participants are presented with an ``absurd questionnaire'' proposing 50 pairs of images, in each of which one image has to be chosen. The results are used to search for evidence in favor of the influence of group dynamics on individual choices of the images proposed in the questionnaire. Our analysis finds some evidence for an effect of group dynamics both on the initial choice of the pictures and on the evolution of the number of changes (swaps) of picture choices across the eleven sessions. We interpret these effects in the light of Bion's view of group dynamics...

  1. Sex and marriage with members of other ethnic groups : A study in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, A.P.; Dijkstra, Pieternella

    2017-01-01

    Given the importance of interethnic intimate relationships for the integration of minority groups, the present study examined attitudes toward marriages and sexual relationships with in-group and out-group members among young second-generation immigrants in the Netherlands compared with the Dutch. A

  2. Effects of Group Therapy on Female Adolescent Survivors of Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Debra; Sims, Patricia L.; Adams, Mary Ann; Webb, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Explores treatment interventions for female sexual abuse survivors through a pilot study examining the relationship between group treatment and adolescent self-image. Results revealed that participants who received group therapy increased in levels of impulse control and that the experimental group had a decrease in self-reliance whereas the…

  3. Suitable computerized maintenance management system selection using grey group TOPSIS and fuzzy group VIKOR: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Zare

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is developing a method to choose an appropriate Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS using Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MADM for a dairy company. Among different methods, the grey group TOPSIS and fuzzy group VIKOR methods were selected. TOPSIS is a Technique for order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution and VIKOR technique is a method based on compromise programming. The data in this article were gathered using the interviews with the company’s managers and elites in the field of maintenance. Then, out of five types of maintenance software, the best ones were selected using these two techniques and finally the results were compared with each other. In the selection process, 13 sub-criteria were introduced under 5 main criteria. These criteria were selected out of a huge number of criteria using the studies of others and by consulting with the company’s managers and experts. We have tried to make the choices in a way that the majority of aspects could be considered. This paper helps the maintenance managers in decision-making related to choosing the CMMS software in uncertainty environment. Using two different fuzzy and grey approaches and comparing the results can lead to appropriate selection and improve the confidence in decision-making. Maintenance planning issues are among the important issues in industrial production systems. Maintenance systems have basically made remarkable progress in recent years. The increase of companies’ competitive pressure on the one hand and the close relationship between maintenance activities and companies’ core activities, on the other hand, have encouraged companies to use the software in order to manage their maintenance activities.

  4. Final report of the group research. Studies on elucidation of bioregulation mechanisms against radiation. First research group (Bioregulation Research Group of NIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report concerns investigations on bio-effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals (FR) conducted by the Group of Pharmaceutical and Chemical-Pharmacological departments of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period of April 1995-March 2001. The report involves the organization of research teams; summary reports of teams for bioradical research, expression of bioregulator gene, radiation effects on endocrine systems and explorative study of bioregulator substances; and selected papers published. Significant results are as follows: Syntheses of novel bioregulator chemicals and elucidation of their eliminating activities against ROS and FR by electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method; Development of spin trapping agents of nitric oxide; and Discovery of protection of curcumin (a component of galenical Ukon) against radiation carcinogenesis. Conclusion is that findings will contribute not only for the progress of FR research but also for better understanding of anti-oxidants and radio-protection in biodefense mechanism against radiation and other environmental stress. (N.I.)

  5. Armed Groups and Intra State Conflict: A Study on the Egyptian Case

    OpenAIRE

    Ghzlan Mahmoud Abdel Aziz

    2016-01-01

    This case study aims to identify the intrastate conflicts between the nation state and armed groups. Nowadays, most wars weaken states against armed groups. Thus, it is very important to negotiate with such groups in order to reinforce the law for the protection of victims. These armed groups are the cause of conflicts and they are related with many of humanitarian issues that result out of conflicts. In this age of rivalry; terrorists, insurgents, or transnational criminal parties have surfa...

  6. P-R-R Study Technique, Group Counselling And Gender Influence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Read-Recall (P-R-R) study technique and group counselling on the academic performance of senior secondary school students. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of Group Counselling combined with P-R-R study ...

  7. Friendship Group Influences on Body Dissatisfaction and Dieting Among Adolescent Girls: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woelders, C.S.; Larsen, J.K.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although some studies among adolescent girls found that friends within friendship groups were rather similar on dieting and/or body image constructs, these studies were limited by their cross-sectional designs. The current prospective study is the first to examine friendship group

  8. Relationship between Ecological Species Groups and Environmental Factors (Case Study: Vezg Region in Southeast of Yasouj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aghaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In applied studies, identification and study of vegetation, for management and protection of natural ecosystems, are very important. This study was carried out in Vezg forest with an area of 308 hectares located in southeast of Yasouj city. The purpose of this study was to classify ecological species groups and survey their relation to soil physic-chemical properties and physiographic attributes. For this purpose, the field data were obtained using 52 sample plots (15m×30m in a systematic random grid. In each sample plot, the cover percentage of tree, shrub and grass species type were recorded, by using Braun-Blanquet method. The TWINSPAN method and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA were used for the definition of ecological species groups and determintion of the relationship between ecological species groups and environmental properties. Results showed that, there were four ecological species groups in the study area. The First group included: Anchusa italic-Quercus brantii, the second group: Heteranthelium piliferum-Avena clauda, the third group: Teucrium polium and the fourth group: Salvia reautreana. The first group was in an area, where there was a higher percentage of Persian oak litter. The second group was located in site a with higher grass cover than the site of other groups in the area. The third and fourth groups, were located in the higher elevation and steep points. Results of CCA showed that soil properties were not in significant relation with ecological species groups. But, the relationships of ecological species groups with other environmental factors such as litter, altitude, grass cover and slope were significant. So, we can conclude that these properties are effective in the separation and distribution of ecological groups.

  9. Outcomes of Children With and Without Hepatic Encephalopathy From the Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Vicky L; Li, Ruosha; Loomes, Kathleen M; Leonis, Mike A; Rudnick, David A; Belle, Steven H; Squires, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is challenging to identify in children with acute liver failure and was not a requirement for enrollment into the Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group (PALFSG). The outcomes of PALFSG participants presenting with and without HE are presented. PALFSG participants were classified based on daily assessment of HE during the first 7 days following study enrollment: group 1-never developed HE; group 2-no HE at enrollment with subsequent HE development; and group 3-HE at study enrollment. Clinical and biochemical parameters and outcomes of death, spontaneous recovery, or liver transplantation were compared between groups. Data from 769 PALFSG (54% boys; median age 4.2 years; range 0-17.9 years) participants were analyzed, with 277 in group 1 (36%), 83 in group 2 (11%), and 409 in group 3 (53%). Mortality occurred in 11% of all participants and was highest among group 3 participants who demonstrated persistent grade III-IV HE (55%) or showed progression of HE (26%). Eleven (4%) group 1 participants died within 21 days of enrollment. Spontaneous recovery was highest in group 1 (79%) and lowest in group 2 (25%; P pediatric acute liver failure prognostication schema are needed.

  10. Group antenatal care: new pedagogic method for antenatal care--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedin, Kathe; Molin, Johan; Crang Svalenius, Elizabeth L

    2010-08-01

    to investigate how women who attended group antenatal care experienced the information they received, compared with women who attended traditional antenatal care, and their satisfaction with the form of care. The aim was also to determine the effect of group antenatal care on women's social networks compared with traditional antenatal care. a pilot study with an intervention group (group antenatal care) and a control group (traditional antenatal care). Both groups were selected through informed choice. A questionnaire and a follow-up telephone call, using a structured questionnaire, were used to evaluate both groups. for each woman who had chosen to be in the intervention group, two women who had chosen traditional antenatal care were selected from the same antenatal clinic and given the same questionnaire. 35/45 (77%) women in the intervention group returned a completed questionnaire, compared with 40/85 (48%) women in the control group. There was little difference in satisfaction with information between the two groups, and overall satisfaction was high. at six months post partum, the women who attended group antenatal care still met others from the group more regularly than the women who attended traditional antenatal care. group antenatal care is well accepted by women, and can better utilise midwives' time. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The perceived value of team players : A longitudinal study of how group identification affects status in work groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, L.; van Dijk, J.

    2016-01-01

    Theory and research on status attainment in work groups primarily focuses on members’ abilities and characteristics that make them appear competent as predictors of their status in the group. We complement the abilities perspective with a social identity perspective by arguing that another important

  12. Population studies in groups and clusters of galaxies. III. A catalog of galaxies in five nearby groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, H.C.; Sandage, A.

    1990-01-01

    Five nearby groups of galaxies have been surveyed using large-scale plates from the 2.5 m duPont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Catalogs of galaxies brighter than B(T) = 20 are presented for the Leo, Dorado, NGC 1400, NGC 5044, and Antlia groups. A total of 1044 galaxies are included, from visual inspection of 14 plates, covering 31 deg square. Galaxies have been classified in the extended Hubble system, and group memberships have been assigned based on velocity (where available) and morphology. About half the galaxies listed are likely members of one of the nearby groups. The catalogs are complete to B(T) = 18, although the completeness limits vary slightly from group to group. Based on King model fits to the surface density profiles, the core radii of the groups range from 0.3 to 1 Mpc, and central densities range from 120 to 1900 galaxies Mpc exp-3 brighter than M(BT) = -12.5. Dynamical analysis indicates that all of the groups are likely to be gravitationally bound. 64 refs

  13. A comparative study between met & unmet need groups of contraception in rural area of Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha M Solanki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To compare met & unmet need groups of contraception with socio-economic, demographic, accessibility & family Planning (FP related factors. Methods Community based cross-sectional, comparative study was conducted among 363 married women of reproductive age groups in rural area selected by stratified simple random technique. After collecting preliminary information, the study population then divided into two groups based on their contraceptive use i.e. MET Group & UNMET NEED Groups. Then the role of socio-economic, demographic, accessibility & family Planning (FP related factors were studies to determine contraceptive use between these groups. Results Mean age of study subjects was 24.12 ± 4.45 years & average number of children per women was 2.02. Males were more literate than females (69.1% Vs 47.2%. 51.8% women were belonging to lower socio-economic status. Early marriages were still prevalent in this study (53.7%. Prevalence of met group of contraception was 59.2% & that of unmet need for contraception was 44.1%. Met groups were mainly from 20-29 years age group (46.6%; most of them (46.8% were literate & were from high socio-economic group (30.9% compared to unmet need groups. On comparison to unmet groups, most of the met group (33.9% got married after 18 years of age, residing within 5km area (26.4%, had visited to FP centre (49.0% & ever visited by FP staff (43.3%. Conclusion Education, income, marriage age, accessibility, FP staff related factors definitely has role among met & unmet need groups in their contraceptive use.

  14. Handicraft or interactional groups: a comparative outcome study of neurotic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, H; Fornes, G; Kruger, M B; Grendahl, G; Kolset, M

    1990-11-01

    A comparative outcome study of 2 contrasting activity-based groups with 80 hospitalized nonpsychotic patients is described. One group focused on activities designed to evoke emotional or interpersonal reactions followed by a subsequent reflection. The other focused on handicrafts and non-emotionally challenging activities. Ego strength was also measured with an instrument developed in conjunction with the study. The 2 groups were demonstrated to be consistent with the preconditions and significantly different by independent scoring of videotaped sessions. There was a greater rated therapeutic gain in the interactional group at discharge, but patient ratings did not differ between groups. There were no differences at follow-up between the groups. Measured ego strength strongly predicted outcome after correcting for the initial symptom levels. Ego strength did not interact with activity type. Clinical diagnosis did not predict differential outcome. The groups had no differential effects on specific symptom clusters or social functioning.

  15. A Study of Thumb Print Patterns and ABO Blood Group Distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish a possible relationship between thumb print pattern and ABO blood group distribution. The study involves two hundred and nine-two volunteers comprising 159 female and 133 male. The blood group and finger print patterns were determined using standard techniques. Results ...

  16. Learning to Love Reading: A Self-Study on Fostering Students' Reading Motivation in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between small, differentiated reading groups and fourth-grade students' reading motivation. Using self-study methodology, the author examined her own process of implementing these reading groups through two cycles of action research. Data were analyzed from two different administrations of the Motivations for…

  17. Group Work and the Learning of Critical Thinking in the Hong Kong Secondary Liberal Studies Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis; Howe, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a one-year longitudinal study that investigated the impact of group work on the development of students' critical thinking in Hong Kong secondary schools. It explores whether the participation of teachers in a group-based teaching intervention adapted from an earlier study conducted in the United Kingdom (UK)…

  18. Any sleep is a dream far away: a nominal group study assessing how gout affects sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A

    2018-02-23

    There are no qualitative studies of sleep in gout; the aim of this study was to examine the impact of gout on sleep. Nine nominal groups were conducted, oversampling for African-Americans and women with gout. Patients discussed and rank-ordered their concerns. Nine nominal groups with 46 gout patients were conducted with mean age, 61 years (s.d. 10.6) and gout duration, 14.9 years (s.d. 12); 63% were men, 46% African-American, 52% married, 46% retired and 63% were allopurinol users. The most frequently cited highly ranked concerns could be divided into three categories. The first category, character of sleep interruption, included the concerns: severe and complete sleep interruption by gout flare pain (nine groups); and inability to get rapid eye movement sleep (one group). The second category, causes of sleep interruption, included: inability to get into a comfortable position during sleep (six groups); anxiety and depression associated with severe gout pain (seven groups); sleep interruption by moderate chronic joint pain (three groups); frequent trips to the bathroom interfering with sleep (two groups); gout medication side effects (four groups); frequent trips to the emergency room (one group); joint swelling with physical/functional deficit interfering with sleep (two groups); and flare pain interfering with sleep apnoea management (two groups). The final category, consequences of sleep interruption, included: effect on daily functioning (two groups); worsens other health conditions, which then affect sleep (four groups); and cumulative effect on sleep (one group). Gout has significant impact on sleep quantity, quality and architecture. Sleep disruption due to gout has several pathways and significant consequences.

  19. ABO blood groups and oral premalignancies: A clinical study in selected Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhateja, S; Arora, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ABO blood group antigens are present on the surface of red blood cells and various epithelial cells. As the majority of human cancers are derived from epithelial cells, changes in blood group antigens constitute an important aspect of human cancers. The aim of the study was to establish clinical usefulness of ABO blood group as a predisposing factor in early diagnosis and management of patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 50 control and 50 oral precancer (25 leukoplakia and 25 Oral Submucous Fibrosis) confirmed by histopathologic examination. All samples were subjected to blood group testing and their prevalence was compared by Z-test using STATA version 8. Results: The "A" blood group was prevalent among the precancerous group. Significant differences on prevalences of blood groups were found (P blood group. Conclusion: Blood group type should be considered along with other risk factors to understand the individual patient's risk and further studies in larger samples with inclusion of Rh factor is needed to elucidate the relationship with ABO blood group types.

  20. A pilot study of the experience of participating in a Therapeutic Touch practice group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Theresa; Ting, Brigid; Rossiter-Thornton, Maria

    2008-09-01

    This pilot study explored the experience of participating in a Therapeutic Touch practice group. A qualitative descriptive-exploratory method was used, involving 12 members of practice groups in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada. Analysis of the data using an extraction-synthesis process yielded four themes: (a) learning with others through sharing and hands-on experience is valued; (b) connecting with a network of supportive relationships that sustain self and Therapeutic Touch practice; (c) comfort-discomfort arising with self, others, or ideas; and (d) meaningful changes emerge while experiencing group energy and Therapeutic Touch. The findings expand current knowledge about the positive aspects of participating in practice groups and provide a beginning understanding of member discomfort, which had not been previously reported. This knowledge will be useful to Therapeutic Touch organizations, practice group leaders, and group members. It will also guide health care agencies and practitioners of other healing modalities who may be considering establishing practice groups.

  1. Recommendations by Cochrane Review Groups for assessment of the risk of bias in studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing the risk of bias in individual studies in a systematic review can be done using individual components or by summarizing the study quality in an overall score. METHODS: We examined the instructions to authors of the 50 Cochrane Review Groups that focus on clinical interventions...... for recommendations on methodological quality assessment of studies. RESULTS: Forty-one of the review groups (82%) recommended quality assessment using components and nine using a scale. All groups recommending components recommended to assess concealment of allocation, compared to only two of the groups recommending...... scales (P analysis. Only 28 groups (56%) had specific recommendations for using the quality assessment of studies analytically in reviews, with sensitivity...

  2. Individual and group antecedents of job satisfaction: a one-lab multilevel study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Martínez

    Full Text Available This study examines the simultaneous effect of individual (selfefficacy and group variables (cohesion and gender diversity on satisfaction. A laboratory study was conducted involving 373 college students randomly distributed across 79 small groups, who performed a laboratory task in about five hours. Two-level Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM method was used. Results show the main effect from individual selfefficacy to satisfaction (both level 1, the cross-level effect from group cohesion (level 2 to individual satisfaction (level 1, and the interaction effect between self-efficacy and gender diversity to satisfaction. These results suggest that in a work group, satisfaction has a background in individual and group variables. Group cohesion and gender diversity have important effects on satisfaction. The article concludes with practical strategies and with limitations and suggestions for future research.

  3. Efficient knot group identification as a tool for studying entanglements of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Marc L

    2007-12-28

    A technique is presented for the identification of the knot group of knots, links, and other embedded graphs as a tool in numerical studies of entanglements of polymers. With this technique, the knot group is simultaneously more discriminating and easier to calculate than the knot invariants that have been used in such studies in the past. It can be applied even in cases of very complex knot projections with hundreds of crossings. Starting from an arbitrary projection of an embedded graph, we generate a sequence of representations, any one of which is a full and complete representation of the knot group. Any two knot groups are isomorphic if they have identical representations. Therefore, we compare the sequence of representations of any given knot or link against a previously determined lookup table, and if the group of the knot or link is represented in this table we eventually find a match and identify the knot group.

  4. Containing psychotic patients with fragile boundaries: a single-session group case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavarenne, Anaïs; Segal, Emily; Sigman, Maxine

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a single group psychotherapy session of six individuals suffering from schizophrenia or schizoaffective illness, which was characterized by numerous manifestations of fragile Ego boundaries. Based on these illustrations of fragile Ego boundaries, we explore some of the group's core therapeutic actions against psychosis. We discuss how the group (1) provides access to a structuring auxiliary Ego, (2) acts as a containing object by establishing firm boundaries and by mentalizing patients' psychotic productions, and (3) may become a solid object representation introjected by individuals wrestling with porous Ego boundaries and a poor sense of self. We conclude that, in addition to the known role of group therapy in increasing mature defenses, developing insight and providing social support, the group promotes healthier Ego boundaries, and eventually improves self-differentiation, and also tolerance to interpersonal proximity. This case study clarifies group therapy dynamics with individuals suffering from psychosis.

  5. Improving recruitment to pharmacological trials for illicit opioid use: findings from a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne; Tompkins, Charlotte N E; McDonald, Rebecca; Strang, John

    2018-01-22

    To explore potential study participants' views on willingness to join clinical trials of pharmacological interventions for illicit opioid use to inform and improve future recruitment strategies. Qualitative focus group study [six groups: oral methadone (two groups); buprenorphine tablets (two groups); injectable opioid agonist treatment (one group); and former opioid agonist treatment (one group)]. Drug and alcohol services and a peer support recovery service (London, UK). Forty people with experience of opioid agonist treatment for heroin dependence (26 males, 14 females; aged 33-66 years). Data collection was facilitated by a topic guide that explored willingness to enrol in clinical pharmacological trials. Groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Transcribed data were analysed inductively via Iterative Categorization. Participants' willingness to join pharmacological trials of medications for opioid dependence was affected by factors relating to study burden, study drug, study design, study population and study relationships. Participants worried that the trial drug might be worse than, or interfere with, their current treatment. They also misunderstood aspects of trial design despite the researchers' explanations. Recruitment of participants for clinical trials of pharmacological interventions for illicit opioid use could be improved if researchers became better at explaining clinical trials to potential participants, dispelling misconceptions about trials and increasing trust in the research process and research establishment. A checklist of issues to consider when designing pharmacological trials for illicit opioid use is proposed. © 2018 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk ? A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Ullum, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Background Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail. Methods We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden...

  7. Prevalence, serologic and genetic studies of high expressers of the blood group A antigen on platelets*

    OpenAIRE

    Sant?Anna Gomes, B M; Estalote, A C; Palatnik, M; Pimenta, G; Pereira, B de B; do Nascimento, E M

    2010-01-01

    Objective/Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of the platelet blood group A antigenicity in Euro-Brazilians (EUBs) and Afro-Brazilians (AFBs). Background: A small but significant proportion of individuals express high levels of A or B antigen on their platelets corresponding to the erythrocyte ABO group. The mechanism of increased antigen expression has not been elucidated. Material/Methods: A cohort of 241 blood group A donors was analysed by flow cytometry. Although m...

  8. Correlates of Regular Participation in Sports Groups among Japanese Older Adults: JAGES Cross–Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakita, Mitsuya; Kanamori, Satoru; Kondo, Naoki; Kondo, Katsunori

    2015-01-01

    Background Participation in a sports group is key for the prevention of incident functional disability. Little is known about the correlates of older adults’ participation in sports groups, although this could assist with the development of effective health strategies. The purpose of this study was to identify the demographic and biological, psychosocial, behavioral, social and cultural, and environmental correlates of sports group participation among Japanese older adults. Methods Data were obtained from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation study, which was a population–based cohort of people aged ≥65 years without disability enrolled from 31 municipalities across Japan (n = 78,002). Poisson regression analysis was used to determine the associations between the factors and participation in sports groups. Results Non-regular participation in sports groups was associated with lower educational level, being employed, and working the longest in the agricultural/forestry/fishery industry among the demographic and biological factors and poor self-rated health and depression among the psychosocial factors. Of the behavioral factors, current smoking was negatively associated and current drinking was positively associated with regular participation in sports groups. Among the social and cultural factors, having emotional social support and participating in hobby clubs, senior citizen clubs, or volunteer groups were associated with a high prevalence of participation in sports groups. Perceptions of the presence of parks or sidewalks, good access to shops, and good accessibility to facilities were positively associated with participation in sports groups among the environmental factors. Conclusions Our study suggests that the promotion of activities that could increase older adults’ participation in sports groups should consider a broad range of demographic and biological, psychosocial, behavioral, social and cultural, and environmental factors. Although future

  9. Genetic predisposition to chikungunya ? a blood group study in chikungunya affected families

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarsanareddy, Lokireddy; Sarojamma, Vemula; Ramakrishna, Vadde

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of CHIKV virus infected Aedes mosquitoes. During monsoon outbreak of chikungunya fever, we carried out the genetic predisposition to chikungunya in disease affected 100 families by doing blood group (ABO) tests by focusing on individuals who were likely to have a risk of chikungunya and identified the blood group involved in susceptibility/resistance to chikungunya. In the present study, based on blood group antig...

  10. The Differences between Novice and Expert Group-Piano Teaching Strategies: A Case Study and Comparison of Beginning Group Piano Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2014-01-01

    This case study compares the teaching strategies employed by a novice and an expert instructor of two beginning children's group-piano classes. In the United States, there is a century-long tradition of teaching piano to children in groups, and group teaching is championed in pedagogy texts and at professional educator conferences throughout…

  11. Attitudes of Older Adults in a Group-Based Exercise Program Toward a Blended Intervention : A Focus-Group Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehra, S.; Dadema, T.; Kröse, B.J.A.; Visser, B.; Engelbert, R.H.H.; Van Den Helder, J.; Weijs, P.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise

  12. Attitudes of older adults in a group-based exercise program toward a blended intervention: a focus-group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehra, Sumit; Dadema, Tessa; Kröse, Ben J A; Visser, Bart; Engelbert, Raoul H H; Van Den Helder, Jantine; Weijs, Peter J M

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise

  13. Alcohol prevention at sporting events: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbeej, Natalie; Elgán, Tobias H; Jalling, Camilla; Gripenberg, Johanna

    2016-06-06

    Alcohol intoxication and overserving of alcohol at sporting events are of great concern, given the relationships between alcohol consumption, public disturbances, and violence. During recent years this matter has been on the agenda for Swedish policymakers, authorities and key stakeholders, with demands that actions be taken. There is promising potential for utilizing an environmental approach to alcohol prevention as a strategy to reduce the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at sporting events. Examples of prevention strategies may be community mobilization, Responsible Beverage Service training, policy work, and improved controls and sanctions. This paper describes the design of a quasi-experimental control group study to examine the effects of a multi-component community-based alcohol intervention at matches in the Swedish Premier Football League. A baseline assessment was conducted during 2015 and at least two follow-up assessments will be conducted in 2016 and 2017. The two largest cities in Sweden are included in the study, with Stockholm as the intervention area and Gothenburg as the control area. The setting is Licensed Premises (LP) inside and outside Swedish football arenas, in addition to arena entrances. Spectators are randomly selected and invited to participate in the study by providing a breath alcohol sample as a proxy for Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). Actors are hired and trained by an expert panel to act out a standardized scene of severe pseudo-intoxication. Four types of cross-sectional data are generated: (i) BAC levels among ≥ 4 200 spectators, frequency of alcohol service to pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to purchase alcohol at LP (ii) outside the arenas (≥200 attempts) and (iii) inside the arenas (≥ 200 attempts), and (iv) frequency of security staff interventions towards pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to enter the arenas (≥ 200 attempts). There is an urgent need nationally and internationally to

  14. Using Web-Based, Group Communication Systems to Support Case Study Learning at a Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Rourke

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the capacity of Web-based, group communication systems to support case-based teaching and learning. Eleven graduate students studying at a distance were divided into three groups to collaborate on a case study using either a synchronous voice, an asynchronous voice, or a synchronous text communication system. Participants kept a detailed log of the time they spent on various activities, wrote a 1,500-word reflection on their experience, and participated in a group interview. Analysis of these data reveals that each group supplemented the system that had been assigned to them with additional communication systems in order to complete the project. Each of these systems were used strategically: email was used to share files and arrange meetings, and synchronous voice systems were used to brainstorm and make decisions. Learning achievement was high across groups and students enjoyed collaborating with others on a concrete task.

  15. Interprofessional education in U.S. and Canadian dental schools: an ADEA Team Study Group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J; Andrieu, Sandra C; Buchanan, Judith A; Childs, Gail Schneider; Gibbs, Micaela; Inglehart, Marita R; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Pyle, Marsha A; D'Abreu, Kim; Evans, Lauren

    2012-09-01

    The state of interprofessional education (IPE) in U.S. and Canadian dental schools was studied by the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Team Study Group on Interprofessional Education. The study group reviewed the pertinent IPE literature, examined IPE competencies for dental students, surveyed U.S. and Canadian dental schools to determine the current and planned status of IPE activities, and identified best practices. Members of the study group prepared case studies of the exemplary IPE programs of six dental schools, based on information provided by those schools; representatives from each school then reviewed and approved its case study. Six reviewers critiqued a draft of the study group's report, and study group members and reviewers met together to prepare recommendations for schools. This report identifies four domains of competence for student achievement in IPE and summarizes responses to the survey (which had an 86 percent response rate). It also includes the case descriptions of six schools' IPE programs and the study group's recommendations for dental schools. The report concludes that there is general recognition of the goals of IPE across U.S. and Canadian dental schools, but a wide range of progress in IPE on the various campuses. Challenges to the further development of IPE are discussed.

  16. Group physical therapy during inpatient rehabilitation for acute spinal cord injury: findings from the SCIRehab Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Jeanne M; Natale, Audrey; Labarbera, Jacqueline; Schroeder, Sally Taylor; Gassaway, Julie; Backus, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation for spinal cord injury (SCI) includes the use of both individual and group physical therapy sessions. A greater understanding of group physical therapy use will help in the evaluation of the appropriateness of its use and contribute to the development of standards of practice. This report describes the extent to which group physical therapy is being used in inpatient rehabilitation for SCI, identifies group physical therapy interventions being delivered, and examines patterns in the types of activities being used for people with different levels and completeness of injury (ie, injury groups). The SCIRehab Study is a 5-year, multicenter investigation that uses practice-based evidence research methodology. Data on characteristics of participants and treatments provided were collected through detailed chart review and customized research documentation completed by clinicians at the point of care. The analyses described here included data from 600 participants enrolled during the first year of the project. Most of the participants (549/600) spent time in group physical therapy, and 23% of all documented physical therapy time was spent in group sessions. The most common group physical therapy activities were strengthening, manual wheelchair mobility, gait training, endurance activities, and range of motion/stretching. Time spent in group physical therapy and the nature of activities performed varied among the injury groups. Physical therapy use patterns observed in the 6 participating centers may not represent all facilities providing inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Research documentation did not include all factors that may affect group physical therapy use, and some sessions were not documented. The majority of physical therapy was provided in individual sessions, but group physical therapy contributed significantly to total physical therapy time. Group physical therapy time and activities differed among the injury groups in patterns

  17. Day Reporting Center and Recidivism: Comparing Offender Groups in a Western Pennsylvania County Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, David R.; Harvey, Patrick J.; Schanz, Youngyol Yim

    2011-01-01

    In this study the authors report on an investigation comparing the recidivism and other variables of two similar offender populations in a western Pennsylvania county. The two groups were comparable in offense type, size (N = 63 for each) and other variables such as sex, race and age range. One group represented offenders who received a sentence…

  18. Data-driven intensity normalization of PET group comparison studies is superior to global mean normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Aanerud, Joel; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global mean (GM) normalization is one of the most commonly used methods of normalization in PET and SPECT group comparison studies of neurodegenerative disorders. It requires that no between-group GM difference is present, which may be strongly violated in neurodegenerative disorders....

  19. A Cross-Cultural Study of Group Process and Development in Online Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Charlotte N.; Nolla, Ana C.; Wilson, Penne L.; Lopez-Islas, Jose R.; Ramirez-Angel, Noemi; Megchun-Alpizar, Rosa M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a study that used survey and focus group data to examine differences in perception of online group process and development between college students in Mexico and the United States. Discusses language, power distance, gender differences, collectivist versus individualist tendencies, conflict, social presence, time frame, and technical…

  20. Listening to Voices of Children with a Visual Impairment: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Jyoti; Ryan, Barbara; Margrain, Tom H.; Woodhouse, J. Margaret; Davies, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the educational, social and leisure activities and issues that matter to school children and young people with a visual impairment and to compare their lifestyle with fully sighted counterparts. Thirteen focus groups were conducted and the groups were stratified by age, gender, visual status and school…

  1. A Mindfulness-Based Group for Young People with Learning Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Victoria; Williamson, Rachel; Cooke, Bronwen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mindfulness is becoming increasingly reported as an effective way to support well-being and reduce mental health difficulties. Materials and Methods: This study reports on the development and pilot of a mindfulness-based group for young people with learning disabilities and their carers. Results: Group participants reported that the…

  2. Nonparametric and group-based person-fit statistics : a validity study and an empirical example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.R.

    1994-01-01

    In person-fit analysis, the object is to investigate whether an item score pattern is improbable given the item score patterns of the other persons in the group or given what is expected on the basis of a test model. In this study, several existing group-based statistics to detect such improbable

  3. Measurement Error Correction Formula for Cluster-Level Group Differences in Cluster Randomized and Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is frequently used to detect cluster-level group differences in cluster randomized trial and observational studies. Group differences on the outcomes (posttest scores) are detected by controlling for the covariate (pretest scores) as a proxy variable for unobserved factors that predict future attributes. The pretest and…

  4. Organometallic nucleoside analogues with ferrocenyl linker groups: synthesis and cancer cell line studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy V; Sallustrau, Antoine; Balzarini, Jan; Bedford, Matthew R; Eden, John C; Georgousi, Niki; Hodges, Nikolas J; Kedge, Jonathan; Mehellou, Youcef; Tselepis, Chris; Tucker, James H R

    2014-07-10

    Examples of organometallic compounds as nucleoside analogues are rare within the field of medicinal bioorganometallic chemistry. We report on the synthesis and properties of two chiral ferrocene derivatives containing a nucleobase and a hydroxyalkyl group. These so-called ferronucleosides show promising anticancer activity, with cytostatic studies on five different cancer cell lines indicating that both functional groups are required for optimal activity.

  5. ABO blood group and risk of coronary heart disease in two prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meian; Wolpin, Brian; Rexrode, Kathy; Manson, Joann E; Rimm, Eric; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-09-01

    Epidemiological data regarding the association between ABO blood groups and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) have been inconsistent. We sought to investigate the associations between ABO blood group and CHD risk in prospective cohort studies. Two large, prospective cohort studies (the Nurses' Health Study [NHS] including 62 073 women and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study [HPFS] including 27 428 men) were conducted with more than 20 years of follow-up (26 years in NHS and 24 years in HPFS). A meta-analysis was performed to summarize the associations from the present study and previous studies. In NHS, during 1 567 144 person-years of follow-up, 2055 participants developed CHD; in HPFS, 2015 participants developed CHD during 517 312 person-years of follow-up. ABO blood group was significantly associated with the risk of developing CHD in both women and men (log-rank test; P=0.0048 and 0.0002, respectively). In the combined analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, compared with participants with blood group O, those with blood groups A, B, or AB were more likely to develop CHD (adjusted hazard ratios [95% CI] for incident CHD were 1.06 [0.99-1.15], 1.15 [1.04-1.26], and 1.23 [1.11-1.36], respectively). Overall, 6.27% of the CHD cases were attributable to inheriting a non-O blood group. Meta-analysis indicated that non-O blood group had higher risk of CHD (relative risk =1.11; 95% CI, 1.05-1.18; P=0.001) compared with O blood group. These data suggest that ABO blood group is significantly associated with CHD risk. Compared with other blood groups, those with the blood type O have moderately lower risk of developing CHD.

  6. Innovation in the teaching of astrophysics and space science - spacecraft design group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, C

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how the design of a scientific satellite can be used to provide both a stimulating and effective subject for a physics based group study. The group study divides the satellite into distinct subsystems and small teams of two or three students carry out the detailed design of each subsystem. The aim is to produce a complete satellite system design along with the choice of launch vehicle, orbit and communications system so that all the mission requirements can be met. An important feature of the group study is that it is a student led activity with staff acting as mentors. The development of key skills and important learning outcomes from the group study is discussed along with the method for assessment, structuring and resourcing the study

  7. Balint groups in family medicine residency programs: a follow-up study from 1990--2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Vanessa A; Chessman, Alexander; Johnson, Alan H; Brock, Clive D; Gavin, Jennifer K

    2015-05-01

    Balint groups have been part of residency education for decades. This study updates our understanding of the organization, purpose, and leadership of Balint groups within US family medicine residency programs. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved family medicine residency training programs (n=453) were contacted to complete a questionnaire, similar to ones performed in 1990 and 2000. This survey included questions regarding Balint groups, including their composition, management, and goals. More than half (54%) of respondent programs (n=159) have at least one Balint group, compared to 19% in 1990 and 60% in 2000. Of programs without Balint, 24% would like to have a Balint group, and 6% plan to initiate one within the following year. The proportion of groups meeting weekly decreased over time (80.9% in 1990 versus 40.4% in 2000 versus 11.7% in 2010). The proportion of peer only groups decreased (45.2% versus 53.6% versus 35.1%) while the proportion of groups with > 11 members increased (11.1% versus 15.8% versus 27.2%). Less than half of Balint group leaders reported going to formal training at the American Balint Society Leader's Intensive Workshop (41%). "Understanding the patient as a person" was seen as the main objective of Balint groups. Balint groups are still commonly occurring, but their implementation is changing. Groups are meeting less frequently and are more likely to be larger and heterogeneous. This trend and lack of formally trained/certified leaders may be decreasing the benefit to residents involved in Balint groups.

  8. The scientific basis of tobacco product regulation: second report of a WHO study group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    ...; and, cigarette machine smoking regimens. The study group intends this new set of recommendations to be useful to WHO member states, and national policymakers and regulators in shaping tobacco control policy.--Publisher's description.

  9. Update on International Cooperative Groups Studies in Thoracic Malignancies: The Emergence of Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Navika D; Salahudeen, Ameen A; Taylor, Gregory A; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Vokes, Everett E; Goss, Glenwood D; Decker, Roy H; Kelly, Karen; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Mok, Tony S; Wakelee, Heather A

    2018-03-17

    Cancer cooperative groups have historically played a critical role in the advancement of non-small-cell lung cancer therapy. Representatives from cooperative groups worldwide convene at the International Lung Cancer Congress annually. The International Lung Cancer Congress had its 17th anniversary in the summer of 2016. The present review highlights the thoracic malignancy studies discussed by presenters. The included studies are merely a sample of the trials of thoracic malignancies ongoing globally. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Histopathological Study of Central Nervous System Lesions: Emphasizing Association of Neoplasms with ABO Blood Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarguru, B N; Pallavi, P; Sunila; Manjunath, G V; Vasan, T S; Rajalakshmi, B R

    2017-04-01

    The Central Nervous System (CNS) lesions show considerable geographic and racial variations with respect to the incidence and the pattern of distribution of lesions. The ABO blood status is a readily accessible factor in genetic constitution of the patients. It has been shown to be associated with many diseases. But the influence of blood group status on the pathogenesis of brain tumours is still unclear. To study various histopathological patterns of CNS lesions and to evaluate the association of CNS tumours with the distribution of ABO blood groups in documented cases. In the present study, 147 cases were analyzed. It was an analytical type of study, done at JSS Medical College, Mysore, over a period of 2 years and 8 months from January 2009 to August 2011. Histopathology slides were routinely stained by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain. Special stains were performed in selected cases. Blood group of the patients and the control group were documented. Blood group distribution pattern was assessed in relation to histopathological diagnosis of various CNS tumours. Histopathological diagnosis of 147 cases included neoplastic lesions (84.35%) and non-neoplastic lesions (15.64%). Neoplastic lesions (84.35%) constituted the majority, which included neuroepithelial tumours (29.25%) as predominant pattern. Non-neoplastic lesions constituted only 15.64%, which included inflammatory lesion (8.16%) as the predominant pattern. ABO blood group data was available in 92 cases (84.4%) of neoplastic lesions, which included 71 cases (48.29%) of primary CNS neoplasms categorized according to WHO grades. The control group constituted 21,067 healthy voluntary donors. Blood group O was the most frequent blood group in neoplastic lesions (40.21%) and primary CNS neoplasms categorized according to WHO grades (45.07%). The association between the CNS neoplasms and ABO blood groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). But a definite change in the pattern of distribution of ABO

  11. Experiences of older adults in a group physiotherapy program at a rehabilitation hospital: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Melissa J; Burge, Angela T; Soh, Sze-Ee; Jeffs, Kimberley J; Winter, Adele; Holland, Anne E

    2016-05-01

    Physiotherapy delivered in a group setting has been shown to be effective in a variety of populations. However, little is known about the attitudes of older adults toward participating in group physiotherapy. The objectives of this study were to explore older inpatients' perceptions and experiences of group physiotherapy using qualitative methods. Twelve hospitalized adults aged ≥65 years who were involved in a larger randomized controlled trial undertook individual semistructured interviews regarding their experiences in group physiotherapy. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and line by line, iterative thematic analysis was undertaken. Descriptive codes were developed, compared, and grouped together to create themes. Analysis revealed 6 major themes and 10 subthemes. All participants reported feeling happy to attend group sessions, a satisfactory alternative to individual physiotherapy. Participants described physical benefits that increased their motivation, and comparisons with their peers either motivated them or made them feel gratitude for their own health. Perceived attentiveness of group instructors contributed to participants reporting that treatment was individualized and similar to individual physiotherapy. Motivation and camaraderie with peers contributed to their enjoyment of group physiotherapy. Hospitalized older adults enjoyed exercising with their peers and valued the physical and social benefits of group physiotherapy. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:358-362. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. Grouping of sequential sounds--an event-related potential study comparing musicians and nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuijen, Titia L; Sussman, Elyse; Winkler, István; Näätänen, Risto; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2004-03-01

    It is believed that auditory processes governing grouping and segmentation of sounds are automatic and represent universal aspects of music perception (e.g., they are independent of the listener's musical skill). The present study challenges this view by showing that musicians and nonmusicians differ in their ability to preattentively group consecutive sounds. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) from professional musicians and nonmusicians who were presented with isochronous tone sequences that they ignored. Four consecutive tones in a sequence could be grouped according to either pitch similarity or good continuation of pitch. Occasionally, the tone-group length was violated by a deviant tone. The mismatch negativity (MMN) was elicited to the deviants in both subject groups when the sounds could be grouped based on pitch similarity. In contrast, MMN was only elicited in musicians when the sounds could be grouped according to good continuation of pitch. These results suggest that some forms of auditory grouping depend on musical skill and that not all aspects of auditory grouping are universal.

  13. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Ullum, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail. We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models. Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3,615 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors aged 70 years or older except for a slight, but significantly decreased risk of all dementia combined in subjects with blood group A (IRR, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.98), compared to those with blood group O. Our results provide no evidence that ABO blood group influences the risk of dementia.

  14. Group cognitive-behavioral therapy in insomnia: a cross-sectional case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongjing; Ji, Yutian; Xu, You; Tang, Guangzheng; Yu, Zhenghe; Xu, Lianlian; Shen, Chanchan; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) might meet the considerable treatment demand of insomnia, but its effectiveness needs to be addressed. This study recruited 27 insomnia patients treated with 16-weeks of zolpidem (zolpidem group), 26 patients treated with 4-weeks of zolpidem and also treated with 12-weeks of GCBT (GCBT group), and 31 healthy control volunteers. Before treatment and 16 weeks after intervention, participants were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaires (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 [PHQ-15]), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-16 (DBAS-16), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Compared to the zolpidem and healthy control groups, the scale scores of PHQ-9, PHQ-15, DBAS-16 and PSQI were significantly reduced after intervention in the GCBT group. Regarding the score changes, there were correlations between PSQI, DBAS-16, PHQ-9, and PHQ-15 scales in the zolpidem group, but there were limited correlations between PSQI and some DBAS-16 scales in the GCBT group. Our results indicate that GCBT is effective to treat insomnia by improving sleep quality and reducing emotional and somatic disturbances; thus, the study supports the advocacy of applying group psychotherapy to the disorder.

  15. Nutritional status assessment during Alzheimer's disease: results after one year (the REAL French Study Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, O; Soto, M E; Brocker, P; Robert, P H; Benoit, M; Vellas, B

    2005-01-01

    Weight loss and malnutrition are frequent and serious complications of Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the present article was to describe the cognitive and behavioural characteristics of the test population within the frame of the PHRC REAL.FR cohort (for Réseau sur la Maladie d'Alzheimer Français), depending on their nutritional state, and to consider their evolution one year after the original inclusion. The study population' stratification was done in three groups according to their Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) score: malnutrition group (MNA nutritional status group (MNA > or = 23.5). 561 patients were evaluated at inclusion time, 393 at one year. The evaluation included the following scales: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities Daily Living (IADL), Neuro Psychiatric Inventory (NPI) and Zarit scale (ZARIT). Comparison and descriptive analysis for each MNA group at baseline and at one year has been performed. at baseline, the well-nourished and the malnutrition risk groups are significantly different concerning age, IADL and NPI; the well-nourished and undernutrition groups are different concerning MMSE, NPI and Zarit; the malnutrition risk and undernutrition groups are only different concerning NPI. At one year, the well-nourished and the malnutrition risk and undernutrition groups are different concerning one lonely variable, the NPI, in a significant way. The comparison of the three groups between baseline and one-year evaluation demonstrate for the well-nourished group an aggravation of MMSE, ADL, IADL, NPI, for the malnutrition risk group of MMSE and IADL, and for the undernutrition group of MMSE, IADL and NPI. Among the patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, the most malnutritioned worsen highly on cognitive and functional capacities. Furthermore, the nutritional aggravation seems strongly linked to behavioural disorders aggravation. The improvement of

  16. Improving the Reading Ability of Science Students through Study Groups and Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Tunde; Okebukola, Foluso

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the effects of appropriate pedagogical skills (study groups and multiple intelligences) on students' efficiencies in reading skills. It employed a factorial design using three variables. A sample of 90 science students choosing from three intact classes were involved in the study. Data analyses were carried out using mean,…

  17. A Band of Sisters: The Impact of Long-Term Small Group Participation--Forty Years in a Women's Prayer and Bible Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Kevin E.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on a case study of a women's prayer and Bible study group that has met for over forty years. The report focuses on factors contributing to the group's longevity and vitality over time, how it changed over the years, and its impact on the lives of the women who participated in it. It also addresses how this long-term group…

  18. A Dermatoglyphic Study: Association of Fingerprint Patterns Among ABO Blood Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Panjiasih Susmiarsih

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprints are probably the most common biometric technique used in personal identification. The potential of fingerprints to determine sex and human identification has been well exhibited. However, very few studies have been conducted correlating finger prints with blood groups. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of fingerprint patterns based on ABO blood groups. The total sample consisted of 302 medical students of YARSI University Jakarta comprising of 187 females and 115 males. The fingerprint patterns were classified into arches, loops (ulnar and radial, whorls. counted and comprised triradius and total ridge count. The data analysis used Chi Square and Student-T test.The study results indicated that there were fourth especially pattern type. Significantly (p<0.05, frequency of loop types (60.36% was highest in B blood, whorl type was highest in O blood (40.45% and arches in AB blood was higher (5.12% as compared to other groups. Dankmeijer indices of O and AB blood were 3.78 and 11.34, respectively. There were indicated significantly (p<0.05 difference of average ridge count total among ABO blood groups. This study implied an association between dermatoglyphics and blood groups.How to CiteSusmiarsih, T. P., Mustofa, M. S., & Mirfat, M. (2016. A Dermatoglyphic Study: Association of Fingerprint Patterns Among ABO Blood Groups. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 294-300. 

  19. The Effect of Positive Group Psychotherapy and Motivational Interviewing on Smoking Cessation: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Jin

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process and evaluate the effect of positive group psychotherapy and motivational interviewing as an intervention for smoking cessation. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted at a university in South Korea. Positive group psychotherapy and motivational interviewing were attended by 36 smokers for 1 hour once a week, for 6 hours. A recorded exit interview was conducted after the intervention. The resulting transcripts were analyzed with content analysis and thematic analysis. Among the 36 study participants, the importance of stopping smoking was rated higher in the successful cessation (defined as those who ceased smoking for at least 3 months; hereafter, success group) group (8.6 ± 0.4, n = 10) than in the failed cessation (defined as those who did not cease smoking for at least 3 months; hereafter, failure group) group (7.75 ± 0.3, n = 26; p Motivational interviewing increased motivations, whereas positive group psychotherapy increased positive thoughts and confidence.

  20. Effect of Acetyl Group on Mechanical Properties of Chitin/Chitosan Nanocrystal: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhe Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitin fiber is the load-bearing component in natural chitin-based materials. In these materials, chitin is always partially deacetylated to different levels, leading to diverse material properties. In order to understand how the acetyl group enhances the fracture resistance capability of chitin fiber, we constructed atomistic models of chitin with varied acetylation degree and analyzed the hydrogen bonding pattern, fracture, and stress-strain behavior of these models. We notice that the acetyl group can contribute to the formation of hydrogen bonds that can stabilize the crystalline structure. In addition, it is found that the specimen with a higher acetylation degree presents a greater resistance against fracture. This study describes the role of the functional group, acetyl groups, in crystalline chitin. Such information could provide preliminary understanding of nanomaterials when similar functional groups are encountered.

  1. Effect of Acetyl Group on Mechanical Properties of Chitin/Chitosan Nanocrystal: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Junhe; Yu, Zechuan; Lau, Denvid

    2016-01-05

    Chitin fiber is the load-bearing component in natural chitin-based materials. In these materials, chitin is always partially deacetylated to different levels, leading to diverse material properties. In order to understand how the acetyl group enhances the fracture resistance capability of chitin fiber, we constructed atomistic models of chitin with varied acetylation degree and analyzed the hydrogen bonding pattern, fracture, and stress-strain behavior of these models. We notice that the acetyl group can contribute to the formation of hydrogen bonds that can stabilize the crystalline structure. In addition, it is found that the specimen with a higher acetylation degree presents a greater resistance against fracture. This study describes the role of the functional group, acetyl groups, in crystalline chitin. Such information could provide preliminary understanding of nanomaterials when similar functional groups are encountered.

  2. Facebook Groups as a Powerful and Dynamic Tool in Medical Education: Mixed-Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidbauer, Moritz; Gradel, Maximilian; Ferch, Sabine; Antón, Sofía; Hoppe, Boj; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Pinilla, Severin; Fischer, Martin; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Background Social networking sites, in particular Facebook, are not only predominant in students’ social life but are to varying degrees interwoven with the medical curriculum. Particularly, Facebook groups have been identified for their potential in higher education. However, there is a paucity of data on user types, content, and dynamics of study-related Facebook groups. Objective The aim of this study was to identify the role of study-related Facebook group use, characterize medical students that use or avoid using Facebook groups (demographics, participation pattern, and motivation), and analyze student posting behavior, covered topics, dynamics, and limitations in Facebook groups with regards to educational usage. Methods Using a multi-method approach (interviews, focus groups, and qualitative and quantitative analysis of Facebook posts), we analyzed two representative Facebook groups of medical preclinical semesters at Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich. Facebook primary posts and replies over one semester were extracted and evaluated by using thematic content analysis. We developed and applied a coding scheme for studying the frequency and distribution of these posts. Additionally, we interviewed students with various degrees of involvement in the groups, as well as “new minorities,” students not registered on Facebook. Results Facebook groups seem to have evolved as the main tool for medical students at LMU to complement the curriculum and to discuss study-related content. These Facebook groups are self-organizing and quickly adapt to organizational or subject-related challenges posed by the curriculum. A wide range of topics is covered, with a dominance of organization-related posts (58.35% [6916/11,853] of overall posts). By measuring reply rates and comments per category, we were able to identify learning tips and strategies, material sharing, and course content discussions as the most relevant categories. Rates of adequate replies in these

  3. Friendship group influences on body dissatisfaction and dieting among adolescent girls: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelders, Lieke C S; Larsen, Junilla K; Scholte, Ron H J; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2010-11-01

    Although some studies among adolescent girls found that friends within friendship groups were rather similar on dieting and/or body image constructs, these studies were limited by their cross-sectional designs. The current prospective study is the first to examine friendship group influences on eating disorder risk factors, including body dissatisfaction, weight concerns, dietary restraint, and dieting in adolescent girls. Design was a two-wave prospective study with 1-year interval. Of 863 girls (mean age = 13.8, SD = .7), 344 were members of one of the 103 reciprocal friendship groups identified using social network analysis. Reciprocal friends were similar with respect to body image and dieting constructs. However, initial friendship group levels of body dissatisfaction, weight concerns, dietary restraint, and dieting did not predict individual body image and dieting variables 1 year later. The current findings attest to the significance of reciprocal friendship group correlates of eating disorder risk factors, but suggest that during early-to-mid-adolescence, levels of body image concerns and dieting within reciprocal friendship groups do not influence adolescents' own body image concerns and dieting over 1 year of time. Copyright © 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. PENGARUH GROUP INVESTIGATION BERBASIS OUTDOOR STUDY TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR ANALITIS SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriana Rasweda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research is to find out the Group Investigation outdoor study-based having an affect on student’s analytichal thinking ability. The type of research is PretestPosttest Control Group Design. The research was conducted at Lawang 1st Public Senior High School Malang Regency with experiment class X-IIS 1 and control class X-IIS 2. The data is an analytichal thinking ability. Data analysis was done by comparing the gain score student’s analytichal thinking ability using SPSS 17.0 for Windows. The results showed that Group Investigation outdoor study-based having an affect on student’s analytichal thinking ability.  Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui apakah model Group Investigation berbasis outdoor study berpengaruh terhadap kemampuan berpikir analitis siswa. Penelitian ini merupakan jenis penelitian eksperimen semu (quasi experiment yang termasuk penelitian kuantitatif. Rancangan penelitian yang dikembangkan adalah Pretest-Posttest Control Group Design. Penelitian dilaksanakan di SMA Negeri 1 Lawang Kabupaten Malang. Kelas ekperimen ialah kelas X-IIS 1 dan kelas kontrol ialah kelas X-IIS 2. Data yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah kemampuan berpikir analitis. Analisis data dilakukan dengan membandingkan gain score kemampuan berpikir analitis siswa menggunakan bantuan program SPSS 17.0 for Windows. Hasil dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa model Group Investigation berbasis outdoor study berpengaruh terhadap kemampuan berpikir analitis siswa.

  5. A study of group reminiscence therapy and emotional intelligence among elderly members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Bazooband

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effects of group reminiscence therapy on elderly’s emotional intelligence. A quasi-experimental research with a pre-test-post-test control group was conducted in July 2015, with a sample of 40 elderly members referring to an (anonymous Community Center in the city of Shiraz, Iran. A predesigned instrument, i.e., the Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire developed by Schering, was applied to collect data. SPSS Statistics v. 22.0 (Released 2013; IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA was used to analyze data, with a 95% confidence level and a measurement error of α=0.05. Hypothesis tests were mainly conducted to examine whether group reminiscence therapy correlates with emotional intelligence among the respondents. Findings revealed that the applied intervention i.e., group reminiscence therapy significantly associates with various dimensions of emotional intelligence including self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation, empathy and social skills in the older adults within the experiment group; i.e., the mean scores of the variables for the post-test administered on the experimental group were significantly higher than those on the control group. Group reminiscence therapy has the potential to enhance emotional intelligence in the elderly by helping them control their thoughts and emotions and learn problem-solving skills.

  6. The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health: Using Focus Groups to Inform Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavener, Meredith; Mooney, Rosemary; Thomson, Clare; Loxton, Deborah

    2016-02-22

    Recruitment and retention of participants to large-scale, longitudinal studies can be a challenge, particularly when trying to target young women. Qualitative inquiries with members of the target population can prove valuable in assisting with the development of effective recruiting techniques. Researchers in the current study made use of focus group methodology to identify how to encourage young women aged 18-23 to participate in a national cohort online survey. Our objectives were to gain insight into how to encourage young women to participate in a large-scale, longitudinal health survey, as well as to evaluate the survey instrument and mode of administration. The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health used focus group methodology to learn how to encourage young women to participate in a large-scale, longitudinal Web-based health survey and to evaluate the survey instrument and mode of administration. Nineteen groups, involving 75 women aged 18-23 years, were held in remote, regional, and urban areas of New South Wales and Queensland. Focus groups were held in 2 stages, with discussions lasting from 19 minutes to over 1 hour. The focus groups allowed concord to be reached regarding survey promotion using social media, why personal information was needed, strategies to ensure confidentiality, how best to ask sensitive questions, and survey design for ease of completion. Recruitment into the focus groups proved difficult: the groups varied in size between 1 and 8 participants, with the majority conducted with 2 participants. Intense recruitment efforts and variation in final focus group numbers highlights the "hard to reach" character of young women. However, the benefits of conducting focus group discussions as a preparatory stage to the recruitment of a large cohort for a longitudinal Web-based health survey were upheld.

  7. Cardiovascular disease and ABO blood-groups in Africans. Are blood-group A individuals at higher risk of ischemic disease?: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Djibril Marie; Sow, Mamadou Saidou; Diack, Aminata; Dia, Khadidiatou; Mboup, Mouhamed Cherif; Fall, Pape Diadie; Fall, Moussa Daouda

    2017-12-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group system by Karl Landsteiner in 1901, several reports have suggested an important involvement of the ABO blood group system in the susceptibility to thrombosis. Assessing that non-O blood groups in particular A blood group confer a higher risk of venous and arterial thrombosis than group O.Epidemiologic data are typically not available for all racial and ethnics groups.The purpose of this pilot study was to identify a link between ABO blood group and ischemic disease (ID) in Africans, and to analyze whether A blood group individuals were at higher risk of ischemic disease or not. A total of 299 medical records of patients over a three-year period admitted to the cardiology and internal medicine department of military hospital of Ouakam in Senegal were reviewed. We studied data on age, gender, past history of hypertension, diabetes, smoking, sedentarism, obesity, hyperlipidemia, use of estrogen-progestin contraceptives and blood group distribution.In each blood group type, we evaluated the prevalence of ischemic and non-ischemic cardiovascular disease. The medical records were then stratified into two categories to evaluate incidence of ischemic disease: Group 1: Patients carrying blood-group A and Group 2: Patients carrying blood group non-A (O, AB and B). Of the 299 patients whose medical records were reviewed, 92 (30.8%) were carrying blood group A, 175 (58.5%) had blood group O, 13 (4.3%) had blood group B, and 19 (6.4%) had blood group AB.The diagnosis of ischemic disease (ID) was higher in patients with blood group A (61.2%) than in other blood groups, and the diagnosis of non-ischemic disease (NID) was higher in patients with blood group O (73.6%) compared to other groups. In patients with blood group B or AB compared to non-B or non-AB, respectively there was no statistically significant difference in ID incidence.Main risk factor for ID was smoking (56.5%), hypertension (18.4%) and diabetes (14.3%).In our study

  8. Polycystic ovary syndrome, blood group & diet: A correlative study in South Indian females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pal, Pratik Kumar Chatterjee, Poulomi Chatterjee, Vinodini NA, PrasannaMithra, Sourjya Banerjee, Suman VB2, Sheila R. Pai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To find out the co-relation between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS with blood group & diet in South Indian females, between the age-group of (20-30 years. Objectives: Correlative analysis of ABO & Rh system, dietary habits & alcohol consumption with PCOS. Materials & Methods: 100 patients between (20-30 years, diagnosed with PCOS were selected. A standard PCOS questionnaire was given. Blood group & dietary status data were collected. Patients were grouped according to ABO & Rh system considering their diet & alcohol intake (p≤0.05 significant. Result: Our data revealed that the highest risk of PCOS was observed in females with blood group ‘O’ positive followed by ‘B’ positive who were on mixed diet & used to consume alcohol. Our study also suggests that Rh negative individuals didn’t show any association with PCOS. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that ‘O’ positive females, are more prone to PCOS. Though the relative frequency of B positive individuals are more in India, females with blood group O positive are more susceptible to PCOS, contributing factors being mixed diet & alcohol intake. So, early screening of ‘O’ positive &‘B’ positive females of reproductive age-group in South-India, could be used as a measure for timely diagnosis of PCOS, better management &also prevention of complications. However, further research should be done to investigate the multifaceted mechanisms triggering these effects.

  9. The group matters: an explorative study of group cohesion and quality of life in cancer patients participating in physical exercise intervention during treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Julie Midtgaard; Rørth, Mikael Rahbek; Stelter, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    A series of studies have shown that physical activity improves cancer patients functional capacity and quality of life (QOL). Few of these studies have included physical exercise carried out in a group setting. However, patient's experience with the in-group processes remains unexplored. This study...... investigated group cohesion and changes in QOL in 55 cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy who participated in a 9 h weekly group exercise programme for 6 weeks. The study used a method triangulation component design. Seven qualitative group interviews were conducted post-intervention. QOL (SF-36; EORTC QLQ...... that forms a valuable basis for a larger randomized controlled trial to conclude whether the observed changes are a result of this specific intervention....

  10. Group cohesion and social support in exercise classes: results from a danish intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Schmidt, Lone; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the formation of group cohesion and social support in exercise classes among former sedentary adults, participating in a Danish community-based intervention. Furthermore, the aim is to analyze the impact of this process on exercise activity among the participants. A multimethod...... approach was used, analyzing both survey data and 18 personal interviews collected among 87 participants who completed the intervention project. Analysis was performed according to the grounded theory method. The formation of group cohesion was conditioned by the social composition of the group...

  11. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Group Support Decrease Stress in Adolescents with Cardiac Diagnoses: A Randomized Two-Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, Vicki A; Hinds, Pamela S; Friedmann, Erika

    2017-10-01

    Adolescents with cardiac diagnoses face unique challenges that can cause psychosocial distress. This study compares a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program to a video online support group for adolescents with cardiac diagnoses. MBSR is a structured psycho-educational program which includes yoga, meditation, cognitive restructuring, and group support. A published feasibility study by our group showed significant reduction in anxiety following this intervention. Participants were randomized to MBSR or video online support group, and completed measures of anxiety, depression, illness-related stress, and coping pre- and post-6-session interventions. Qualitative data were obtained from post-intervention interviews. A total of 46 teens participated (mean 14.8 years; 63% female). Participants had congenital heart disease and/or cardiac device (52%), or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (48%). Illness-related stress significantly decreased in both groups. Greater use of coping skills predicted lower levels of depression in both groups post-study completion. Higher baseline anxiety/depression scores predicted improved anxiety/depression scores in both groups. Each group reported the benefits of social support. The MBSR group further expressed benefits of learning specific techniques, strategies, and skills that they applied in real-life situations to relieve distress. Both the MBSR intervention and video support group were effective in reducing distress in this sample. Qualitative data elucidated the added benefits of using MBSR techniques to manage stress and symptoms. The video group format is useful for teens that cannot meet in person but can benefit from group support. Psychosocial interventions with stress management techniques and/or group support can reduce distress in adolescents with cardiac diagnoses.

  12. Educational Psychologists Experience of Taking Part in Group Supervision: A Phenomenological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rawlings, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This study offers an insight into eight educational psychologists’ (EPs) experiences of being supervised in a group. Two males, six females (aged between 29 and 64), working as EPs in one of two local authorities in England took part in semi-structured interviews. Their experience as EPs ranged from one year to 36 however they all had a minimum of one year of experience of group supervision.\\ud Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), a...

  13. Gamblers Anonymous in Israel: a participant observation study of a self-help group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromer, G

    1978-10-01

    This participant observation study of the first Gamblers Anonymous group in Israel is designed to show (1) the ways in which the group helps it members rehabilitate themselves, (2) the three stages through which they must go in order to ensure success, and (3) the reason why some participants fail to do so. The article concludes with a number of observations concerning the extent of gambling in Israel and the different ways that should be developed for dealing with the problem.

  14. Group dialectical behavior therapy adapted for obese emotional eaters; a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Roosen, M. A.; Safer, D.; Adler, S.; Cebolla i Martí, Ausiàs Josep; Van Strien, T.

    2012-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown to effectively target binge eating disorder (BED). This study pilots the effectiveness of group DBT for obese "emotional eaters" to reduce eating psychopathology and achieve weight maintenance. Thirty-five obese male and female emotional eaters receiving 20 group psychotherapy sessions of DBT adapted for emotional eating were assessed at end-of-treatment and 6 month follow-up for reductions in eating psychopathology and weight maintenance. DBT...

  15. Optimal caliper width for propensity score matching of three treatment groups: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongji; Cai, Hongwei; Li, Chanjuan; Jiang, Zhiwei; Wang, Ling; Song, Jiugang; Xia, Jielai

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score matching is a method to reduce bias in non-randomized and observational studies. Propensity score matching is mainly applied to two treatment groups rather than multiple treatment groups, because some key issues affecting its application to multiple treatment groups remain unsolved, such as the matching distance, the assessment of balance in baseline variables, and the choice of optimal caliper width. The primary objective of this study was to compare propensity score matching methods using different calipers and to choose the optimal caliper width for use with three treatment groups. The authors used caliper widths from 0.1 to 0.8 of the pooled standard deviation of the logit of the propensity score, in increments of 0.1. The balance in baseline variables was assessed by standardized difference. The matching ratio, relative bias, and mean squared error (MSE) of the estimate between groups in different propensity score-matched samples were also reported. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that matching using a caliper width of 0.2 of the pooled standard deviation of the logit of the propensity score affords superior performance in the estimation of treatment effects. This study provides practical solutions for the application of propensity score matching of three treatment groups.

  16. Parametric analyses of summative scores may lead to conflicting inferences when comparing groups: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asaduzzaman; Chien, Chi-Wen; Bagraith, Karl S

    2015-04-01

    To investigate whether using a parametric statistic in comparing groups leads to different conclusions when using summative scores from rating scales compared with using their corresponding Rasch-based measures. A Monte Carlo simulation study was designed to examine between-group differences in the change scores derived from summative scores from rating scales, and those derived from their corresponding Rasch-based measures, using 1-way analysis of variance. The degree of inconsistency between the 2 scoring approaches (i.e. summative and Rasch-based) was examined, using varying sample sizes, scale difficulties and person ability conditions. This simulation study revealed scaling artefacts that could arise from using summative scores rather than Rasch-based measures for determining the changes between groups. The group differences in the change scores were statistically significant for summative scores under all test conditions and sample size scenarios. However, none of the group differences in the change scores were significant when using the corresponding Rasch-based measures. This study raises questions about the validity of the inference on group differences of summative score changes in parametric analyses. Moreover, it provides a rationale for the use of Rasch-based measures, which can allow valid parametric analyses of rating scale data.

  17. Group cognitive–behavioral therapy in insomnia: a cross-sectional case-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao H

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hongjing Mao,1,* Yutian Ji,2,* You Xu,1 Guangzheng Tang,1 Zhenghe Yu,1 Lianlian Xu,1 Chanchan Shen,2 Wei Wang1,2 1Department of Psychosomatic Disorders, The Seventh People’s Hospital, Mental Health Center, 2Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Group cognitive–behavioral therapy (GCBT might meet the considerable treatment demand of insomnia, but its effectiveness needs to be addressed.Participants: This study recruited 27 insomnia patients treated with 16-weeks of zolpidem (zolpidem group, 26 patients treated with 4-weeks of zolpidem and also treated with 12-weeks of GCBT (GCBT group, and 31 healthy control volunteers.Methods: Before treatment and 16 weeks after intervention, participants were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaires (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 [PHQ-15], the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-16 (DBAS-16, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI.Results: Compared to the zolpidem and healthy control groups, the scale scores of PHQ-9, PHQ-15, DBAS-16 and PSQI were significantly reduced after intervention in the GCBT group. Regarding the score changes, there were correlations between PSQI, DBAS-16, PHQ-9, and PHQ-15 scales in the zolpidem group, but there were limited correlations between PSQI and some DBAS-16 scales in the GCBT group.Conclusion: Our results indicate that GCBT is effective to treat insomnia by improving sleep quality and reducing emotional and somatic disturbances; thus, the study supports the advocacy of applying group psychotherapy to the disorder. Keywords: cognitive–behavioral therapy, group psychotherapy, insomnia 

  18. Extension Study Group Members View Their Clubs and Extension Home Economists. ANREI Publication No. 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mason E.

    The data presented in this report were selected from a 1972 study of Michigan Extension Study Group (ESG) members. Included are data descriptive of the women themselves and their situation (area and type of home, age, income, ESG experience, and especially their attitudes toward their ESG and their Extension Home Economists). Selected findings are…

  19. Participation, Interaction and Social Presence: An Exploratory Study of Collaboration in Online Peer Review Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huahui; Sullivan, Kirk P. H.; Mellenius, Ingmarie

    2014-01-01

    A key reason for using asynchronous computer conferencing in instruction is its potential for supporting collaborative learning. However, few studies have examined collaboration in computer conferencing. This study examined collaboration in six peer review groups within an asynchronous computer conferencing. Eighteen tertiary students participated…

  20. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  1. Evaluating cross-organizational ERP requirements engineering practices: a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Ahituv, Niv; Loucoloulos, P.; Cavarero, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    This focus group study presents our first validation of practices for engineering the coordination requirements in cross-organizational Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects. The study evaluates 13 practices addressing a variety of coordination aspects crucial to ERP projects. These practices

  2. Study Circles at the Pharmacy--A New Model for Diabetes Education in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, Anna; Rosenqvist, Urban

    1999-01-01

    Tests the feasibility of a one-year group education model for patients with type 2 diabetes in Sweden. Within study circles led by pharmacists, participants learned to self-monitor glucose, to interpret the results and to act upon them. Results show that study circles held at pharmacies are a feasible way of education persons with type 2 diabetes.…

  3. Pilot Study of Community-Based Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents with Social Phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Susan; Garland, E. Jane

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for adolescents with social phobia, simplified both in terms of time and labor intensity from a previously studied program (Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children and Adolescents) to be more appropriate for a community outpatient psychiatric…

  4. Literacy Practices and Linguistic Choices: A Sociocultural Study of a Multilingual Adult Literacy Student Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Stephen R.; Thorp, Kay

    The report describes a study of a multilingual group of six adult literacy students, five women and one man, enrolled in an English literacy class at an Australian college. Subjects' countries of origin include Afghanistan, Indonesia/China, Lebanon, Iran, and China. The study examined factors affecting subjects' daily literacy practices and…

  5. Development of German energy consumption: A deterministic study of energy-relevant customer groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, M.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed study of the characteristic features of group-specific energy consumption was conducted (identification of the factors determining energy consumption of the productive sector, private households and private mobility demand). The question of who shall determine energy consumption in the future is analysed. This question is answered in a demand-specific study of consumption patterns and -effects. (orig./UA) [de

  6. Facilitating Group Analysis of Two Case Studies Utilising Peer Tutoring: Comparison of Tasks and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Lin Siew

    2016-01-01

    Peer-tutoring sessions of two groups of advanced diploma in financial accounting students with mixed proficiency were analysed thoroughly in this study. Numerous studies in peer tutoring have produced favourable results to both tutors and tutees due to the scaffolding process which promotes effective learning. However, there is a lack of studies…

  7. Children's Experiences and Meaning Construction on Parental Divorce: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Sofie D. J.; De Mol, Jan; Buysse, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The global aim of this study was to explore children's narratives of parental divorce. A convenience sample, composed of 11- and 14-year-old children, was recruited. A total of 22 children (12 male, 10 female) participated in this focus group study. The findings show that two components seem to be really important for children during the divorce…

  8. Weight Loss as a Primary Objective of Therapeutic Groups for Obese Women: Two Preliminary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckroyd, Julia; Rother, Sharon; Stott, David

    2006-01-01

    The studies reported here explored whether therapeutic groups for women who eat compulsively can demonstrate weight loss as a primary result as well as the improvements in emotional functioning reported by other investigators. In both studies questionnaire data showed little change in self-esteem or attitudes as measured by the Rosenberg…

  9. Splenectomy in children with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura : A prospective study of 134 children from the Intercontinental Childhood ITP Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehne, Thomas; Blanchette, Victor; Buchanan, George R.; Ramenghi, Ugo; Donato, Hugo; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; Rischewski, Johannes; Berchtold, Willi; Imbach, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Background. Splenectomy is an effective procedure for children and adults with severe or refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Data regarding pediatric patients are limited. Procedure. Sixty-eight Intercontinental Childhood ITP Study Group (ICIS) investigators from 57 institutions in

  10. Regular group exercise contributes to balanced health in older adults in Japan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Hiroko; Yagasaki, Kaori; Saito, Yoshinobu; Oguma, Yuko

    2017-08-22

    While community-wide interventions to promote physical activity have been encouraged in older adults, evidence of their effectiveness remains limited. We conducted a qualitative study among older adults participating in regular group exercise to understand their perceptions of the physical, mental, and social changes they underwent as a result of the physical activity. We conducted a qualitative study with purposeful sampling to explore the experiences of older adults who participated in regular group exercise as part of a community-wide physical activity intervention. Four focus group interviews were conducted between April and June of 2016 at community halls in Fujisawa City. The participants in the focus group interviews were 26 older adults with a mean age of 74.69 years (range: 66-86). The interviews were analysed using the constant comparative method in the grounded theory approach. We used qualitative research software NVivo10® to track the coding and manage the data. The finding 'regular group exercise contributes to balanced health in older adults' emerged as an overarching theme with seven categories (regular group exercise, functional health, active mind, enjoyment, social connectedness, mutual support, and expanding communities). Although the participants perceived that they were aging physically and cognitively, the regular group exercise helped them to improve or maintain their functional health and enjoy their lives. They felt socially connected and experienced a sense of security in the community through caring for others and supporting each other. As the older adults began to seek value beyond individuals, they gradually expanded their communities beyond geographical and generational boundaries. The participants achieved balanced health in the physical, mental, and social domains through regular group exercise as part of a community-wide physical activity intervention and contributed to expanding communities through social connectedness and

  11. Motivational interviewing in internet groups: a pilot study for weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Kelly H; Tate, Deborah F; Quintiliani, Lisa M

    2008-06-01

    Motivational interviewing is a technique for developing and maintaining motivation. This pilot study examined the feasibility and acceptability of motivational interviewing in online weight-loss treatment groups. Twenty women participated in the 8-week minimal contact intervention, received weekly e-mailed lessons, and were randomized to two online groups using motivational interviewing, either with or without a discussion of values. Acceptability of format and content was measured following the second online group. Self-reported weight and motivation were measured at baseline and 8 weeks. Qualitative analysis of group transcripts examined self-motivational statements uttered by participants during online groups. Eighty-four percent of participants reported willingness to participate again and were comfortable with the discussion topics. The average number of self-motivational statements uttered by participants did not differ by group (P=0.85) and was correlated with an increase in autonomous motivation during the 8 weeks (r=0.58, P=0.05). Higher autonomous motivation at follow-up was associated with greater weight loss (r=0.51, Pmotivational interviewing techniques are acceptable and may be useful for targeting and maintaining motivation in online weight-loss groups.

  12. Social skills group training in high-functioning autism: A qualitative responder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choque Olsson, Nora; Rautio, Daniel; Asztalos, Jenny; Stoetzer, Ulrich; Bölte, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Systematic reviews show some evidence for the efficacy of group-based social skills group training in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, but more rigorous research is needed to endorse generalizability. In addition, little is known about the perspectives of autistic individuals participating in social skills group training. Using a qualitative approach, the objective of this study was to examine experiences and opinions about social skills group training of children and adolescents with higher functioning autism spectrum disorder and their parents following participation in a manualized social skills group training ("KONTAKT"). Within an ongoing randomized controlled clinical trial (NCT01854346) and based on outcome data from the Social Responsiveness Scale, six high responders and five low-to-non-responders to social skills group training and one parent of each child (N = 22) were deep interviewed. Interestingly, both high responders and low-to-non-responders (and their parents) reported improvements in social communication and related skills (e.g. awareness of own difficulties, self-confidence, independence in everyday life) and overall treatment satisfaction, although more positive intervention experiences were expressed by responders. These findings highlight the added value of collecting verbal data in addition to quantitative data in a comprehensive evaluation of social skills group training. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1995 Annual Meeting (Ontario, Canada, May 26-30, 1995).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothier, Yvonne M., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at the 1995 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are organized into four sections: (1) plenary lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic sessions; and (4) ad hoc sessions. Papers include: (1) "The Role of Epistemology in the Analysis of Teaching/Learning…

  14. More on deindividuation, power relations between groups and the expression of social identity : Three studies on the effects of visibility to the in-group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reicher, S; Levine, RM; Gordijn, E

    The studies reported in this paper address the predictions of the social identity model of deindividuation phenomena, or SIDE (Reicher, Spears & Postmes, 1995), concerning the strategic effects of visibility to the in-group: increasing the visibility of in-group members to each other increases their

  15. The impact of instructor grouping strategies on student efficacy in inquiry science labs: A phenomenological case study of grouping perceptions and strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathaniel J.

    Abundant educational research has integrated Albert Bandura's concepts of self-efficacy and collective efficacy within educational settings. In this phenomenological case study, the investigation sought to capture the manifestation of self-efficacy and collective efficacy within inquiry-based science laboratory courses. Qualitative data was derived from student efficacy surveys, direct classroom observations, and three-tiered interviews with teacher participants. Four high school science instructors and their students from two school districts in Northern Illinois were selected to participate in the study. This study sought to identify instructor strategies or criteria used to formulate student laboratory groups and the impact of such groupings on student self-efficacy and collective efficacy. Open coding of interview transcripts, observation logs, and student surveys led to the development of eight emerging themes. These themes included the purpose of science laboratory activities, instructor grouping strategies, instructor roles, instructor's perceptions, science laboratory assessment, student interactions, learner self-perceptions, and grouping preferences. Results from the study suggest that some students were innately inclined to assume leadership roles, smaller groupings had greater participation from all group members, students had a strong preference for working collaboratively in groups, and students desired to maintain stable laboratory groups in lieu of periodically changing laboratory partners. As with all case study methodologies, the findings of the study were limited to the individual participants at research sites and were not generalizable to all science classrooms. Additional research in the realms of group size, group autonomy, and student interviews would provide even greater insights into the observed phenomena.

  16. Systematic study of simple-leaved group of Astragalus sect. Incani DC. in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Ranjbar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, morphological pollen characteristics of different populations of 5 species belonging to simple-leaved group of Astragalus sect. Incani DC. in Iran were studied. Results showed that all studied taxa formed two groups. In addition, chromosome number and meiotic behavior were studied in 3 populations belonging to two species of this group. All taxa were diploid and had the basic chromosome number of 2n = 2x = 16. Although the taxa represented regular meiosis, but some abnormalities such as laggard and fragmented chromosomes in anaphase/telophase I and II and diakinesis/methaphase I, cytomixis in anaphase/telophase I and II, multipolar cells in telophase II, binucleouli cells in prophase I and bridges in anaphase I and telophase II were obseved.

  17. American Indian Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs About Smokeless Tobacco: A Comparison of Two Focus Group Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Kathryn; Lewis, Charley; Goeckner, Ryan; Pacheco, Joseph; Smith, T Edward; Hale, Jason; Daley, Sean Makosky; Choi, Won S; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2017-12-01

    Though smokeless tobacco (SLT) use has decreased in many communities, concern for American Indian (AI) SLT use remains, as this population continues to be disproportionally affected by SLT-related diseases. Tobacco has cultural significance to many AI tribes, therefore tobacco cessation messages portraying tobacco as entirely negative may be ineffective. As a part of our formative research for an SLT cessation intervention, we sought to gain a better understanding of the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about SLT among AI community members. We describe two independent focus group studies conducted in Montana (ten focus groups, 54 participants) and Kansas (six focus groups, 27 participants). Predominant themes emerged from three major topic areas (SLT use, program development, and recreational SLT use) during the discussions from both studies. The formative approach and data from these studies will allow us to more appropriately address SLT-related health disparities across multiple AI communities.

  18. The impacts of racial group membership on people's distributive justice: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Deng, Yuqin

    2014-04-16

    How individuals and societies distribute benefits has long been studied by psychologists and sociologists. Previous work has highlighted the importance of social identity on people's justice concerns. However, it is not entirely clear how racial in-group/out-group relationship affects the brain activity in distributive justice. In this study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants made their decisions about donation allocation. Behavioral results showed that racial in-group factor affected participants' decisions on justice consideration. Participants were more likely to make relatively equity decisions when racial in-group factor was congruent with equity compared with the corresponding incongruent condition. Moreover, this incongruent condition took longer response times than congruent condition. Meanwhile, less equity decisions were made when efficiency was larger in the opposite side to equity than it was equal between the two options. Scalp event-related potential analyses revealed that greater P300 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited by the incongruent condition compared with the congruent condition. These findings suggest that the decision-making of distributive justice could be modulated by racial group membership, and greater attentional resources or cognitive efforts are required when racial in-group factor and equity conflict with each other.

  19. The MATISSE study: a randomised trial of group art therapy for people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Killaspy, Helen; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Patterson, Sue; Soteriou, Tony; O'Neill, Francis A; Clayton, Katie; Maratos, Anna; Barnes, Thomas R; Osborn, David; Johnson, Tony; King, Michael; Tyrer, Peter; Waller, Diana

    2010-08-27

    Art Therapy has been promoted as a means of helping people who may find it difficult to express themselves verbally engage in psychological treatment. Group Art Therapy has been widely used as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia but there have been few attempts to examine its effects and cost effectiveness has not been examined. The MATISSE study aims to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of group Art Therapy for people with schizophrenia. The MATISSE study is a three-arm, parallel group, pragmatic, randomised, controlled trial of referral to group Art Therapy plus standard care, referral to an attention control 'activity' group plus standard care, or standard care alone. Study participants were recruited from inpatient and community-based mental health and social care services at four centres in England and Northern Ireland. Participants were aged over 18 years with a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, confirmed by an examination of case notes using operationalised criteria. Participants were then randomised via an independent and remote telephone randomisation service using permuted stacked blocks, stratified by site. Art Therapy and activity groups were made available to participants once a week for up to 12 months. Outcome measures were assessed by researchers masked to allocation status at 12 and 24 months after randomisation. Participants and care givers were aware which arm of the trial participants were allocated to. The primary outcomes for the study are global functioning (measured using the Global Assessment of Functioning scale) and mental health symptoms (measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) assessed at 24 months. Secondary outcomes were assessed at 12 and 24 months and comprise levels of group attendance, social function, satisfaction with care, mental wellbeing, and costs. We believe that this is the first large scale pragmatic trial of Art Therapy for people with schizophrenia. Current Controlled

  20. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Ullum, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined...... the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail. METHODS: We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient...... and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3...

  1. Group cognitive behavior therapy for chronic posttraumatic stress disorder: an initial randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, J Gayle; Coffey, Scott F; Foy, David W; Keane, Terence M; Blanchard, Edward B

    2009-03-01

    Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to a serious motor vehicle accident were randomly assigned to either group cognitive behavioral treatment(GCBT) or a minimum contact comparison group (MCC).Compared to the MCC participants (n=16), individuals who completed GCBT (n=17) showed significant reductions in PTSD symptoms, whether assessed using clinical interview or a self-report measure. Among treatment completers, 88.3% of GCBT participants did not satisfy criteria for PTSD at posttreatment assessment, relative to31.3% of the MCC participants. Examination of anxiety,depression, and pain measures did not show a unique advantage of GCBT. Treatment-related gains were maintained over a 3-month follow-up interval. Patients reported satisfaction with GCBT, and attrition from this treatment was comparable with individually administered CBTs.Results are discussed in light of modifications necessitated by the group treatment format, with suggestions for future study of this group intervention.

  2. EFL student teachers’ learning in a peer-tutoring research study group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jairo Viafara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to become peer-tutors in a B.A program in Modern Languages, a group of EFL (English as a Foreign Language student teachers attended a study and research group in a university. Throughout their participation, prospective teachers collaborated and reflected by means of tasks completion and dialogue to learn the theory and practice of tutoring and research. Additionally, participants provided survey, journal and interview data to contribute with the exploration of how their group membership shaped them academically and personally. Results suggested that student teachers increased their knowledge of English due to their use of real-life group dynamics, among others. Furthermore, they updated and expanded their competencies to monitor pedagogical situations, design strategies and solve problems.

  3. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil K Vasan

    Full Text Available Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail.We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models.Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3,615 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors aged 70 years or older except for a slight, but significantly decreased risk of all dementia combined in subjects with blood group A (IRR, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.98, compared to those with blood group O.Our results provide no evidence that ABO blood group influences the risk of dementia.

  4. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk – A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Ullum, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Background Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail. Methods We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models. Results Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3,615 cases of Alzheimer’s disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors aged 70 years or older except for a slight, but significantly decreased risk of all dementia combined in subjects with blood group A (IRR, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.98), compared to those with blood group O. Conclusions Our results provide no evidence that ABO blood group influences the risk of dementia. PMID:26042891

  5. General practitioners and tutors' experiences with peer group academic detailing: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindbæk Morten

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Prescription Peer Academic Detailing (Rx-PAD project is an educational intervention study aiming at improving GPs' competence in pharmacotherapy. GPs in CME peer groups were randomised to receive a tailored intervention, either to support a safer prescription practice for elderly patients or to improve prescribing of antibiotics to patients with respiratory tract infections. The project was based on the principles of peer group academic detailing, incorporating individual feedback on GPs' prescription patterns. We did a study to explore GPs and tutors' experiences with peer group academic detailing, and to explore GPs' reasons for deviating from recommended prescribing practice. Methods Data was collected through nine focus group interviews with a total of 39 GPs and 20 tutors. Transcripts from the interviews were analyzed by two researchers according to a procedure for thematic content analysis. Results A shared understanding of the complex decision-making involved in prescribing in general practice was reported by both GPs and tutors as essential for an open discussion in the CME groups. Tutors experienced that CME groups differed regarding structure and atmosphere, and in some groups it was a challenge to run the scheme as planned. Individual feedback motivated GPs to reflect on and to improve their prescribing practice, though feedback reports could cause distress if the prescribing practice was unfavourable. Explanations for inappropriate prescriptions were lack of knowledge, factors associated with patients, the GP's background, the practice, and other health professionals or health care facilities. Conclusions GPs and tutors experienced peer group academic detailing as a suitable method to discuss and learn more about pharmacotherapy. An important outcome for GPs was being more reflective about their prescriptions. Disclosure of inappropriate prescribing can cause distress in some doctors, and tutors must be

  6. WAYFINDING STUDY IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS: THE ELDERLY VS. THE YOUNGER-AGED GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghae Lee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the impact of architectural wayfinding aids on wayfinding performances in comparison of the elderly group and the younger aged group. An ambulatory healthcare facility was simulated using Virtual Reality (VR to develop two levels of wayfinding aids for the same environments. The base model included minimal wayfinding aids, and the design model included more wayfinding aids. The VR environment was presented in the form of video in order to test wayfinding performances at three different wayfinding decision points. Results showed that age and wayfinding aids impacted wayfinding performances. The younger-aged group performed wayfinding better compared to the elderly group. Participants who were tested in the design model were more successful in wayfinding compared to the elderly group. The elderly group reported that more salient wayfinding aids such as a big logo and paint colors helped their wayfinding while the younger-aged group reported less salient aids such as door designs as helpful wayfinding aids. When there were minimal wayfinding aids, the elderly participants needed to rely mostly on memory recall by remembering turns or paying close attention. When participants felt that the wayfinding test was difficult, their performances were less successful. Findings in this study suggest that wayfinding design for the elderly should consider the limited ability of recall and therefore, design wayfinding aids more frequently with more salient aids to avoid confusion. The elderly group needed to rely on their limited cognitive ability when there were not enough wayfinding aids, which make them experience difficulties in wayfinding.

  7. Synthesis and electrical conductivity studies of metal chloro and nitroxide group containing styrene butadiene rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, T.; Ramesan, M. T.

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of different functional group in SBR was done by a simple reaction between sodium nitrite and mercuric chloride in the presence of phase transfer catalyst. The attachment of chlorine and NO2 functional group in the double bond of the butadiene was monitored by FTIR and UV spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of chloro nitro SBR was studied by SEM and XRD. Flame retardency studies revealed that the chemical modification imparts better flame resistance to chemically modified SBR. AC conductivity and dielectric properties of chloro- nitro SBR was higher than that of SBR and conductivity increases with the level of chemical modification.

  8. Pattern of clustering of menopausal problems: A study with a Bengali Hindu ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Doyel; Pal, Baidyanath; Ray, Subha

    2016-01-01

    We attempted to find out how menopausal problems cluster with each other. The study was conducted among a group of women belonging to a Bengali-speaking Hindu ethnic group of West Bengal, a state located in Eastern India. We recruited 1,400 participants for the study. Information on sociodemographic aspects and menopausal problems were collected from these participants with the help of a pretested questionnaire. Results of cluster analysis showed that vasomotor, vaginal, and urinary problems cluster together, separately from physical and psychosomatic problems.

  9. A study of group constant generation method in fast reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki

    1983-05-01

    The methods of generating group constants have been studied to predict accurately the nuclear characteristics of fast reactors. In resonance energy region, the accuracy of the group constants was investigated, which were calculated by the approximate weighting spectrum used for a conventional standards group constant set such as ABBN. It was shown that the basic assumption of constant collision density for group constant calculation was not always satisfactory. Moreover, a multilevel formula was derived without losing the useful characteristics of the Breit-Wigner single level formula. Using this formula, the interference effect between resonances was examined. In addition, the mutual interference between different resonant nuclides was calculated. The cause of a systematic dependence of effective multiplication factors on U-238 concentration ratio was studied, and the cross section adjustment was performed. In the unresolved resonance region, the average resonance parameters were searched. As a result, the JFS-2 set was generated, and several studies were performed to advance the concept of the group constant set JFS-2. (Kako, I.)

  10. Corneal clarity measurements in healthy volunteers across different age groups: Observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Khaled; Carley, Fiona; Brahma, Arun; Morley, Debbie; Hillarby, M Chantal

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to standardize and investigate the changes in corneal clarity with age. Densitometry software for the Oculus Pentacam was used to examine corneal clarity at different age groups.A total of 192 eyes from 97 healthy participants were included in this cohort comparative nonrandomized, cross-sectional study. An Oculus Pentcam was used to image the cornea of healthy participants grouped by age (between 10 and 70 years old). Data from the densitometry output have been used to determine clarity in concentric zones and different depths of the cornea.Corneal densitometry (CD) across all ages showed significant differences between groups when divided into the following layers: anterior, central, and posterior or divided into 0 to 2, 2 to 6, and 6 to 10 mm concentric zones (P age in all 3 layers of the periphery (6-10 mm) (P age group had lower clarity than the 20 to 30-age group (P age is differed when the cornea is divided into layers and zones. This study suggests that there are other factors that may play an essential role in corneal clarity as well as age.

  11. Correlative Studies in Clinical Trials: A Position Statement From the International Thyroid Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Cote, Gilbert J; Demeure, Michael J; Elisei, Rossella; Jhiang, Sissy; Ringel, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Patients with progressive thyroid cancer in distant metastatic sites represent a population with a need for new therapeutic options. Aspiring to improve the treatment of such patients, the objective of this position statement from the International Thyroid Oncology Group (ITOG) is to clarify the importance of incorporating high-quality correlative studies into clinical trials. ITOG was formed to develop and support high-quality multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical trials for patients with aggressive forms of thyroid cancer. The Correlative Sciences Committee of the ITOG focuses on the quality and types of correlative studies included in ITOG-associated clinical trials. This document represents expert consensus from ITOG regarding this issue based on extensive collective experience in clinical and translational trials informed by basic science. The Correlative Studies Committee identified an international writing group representative of diverse specialties, including basic sciences. Drafts were reviewed by all members of the writing group, the larger committee, and the ITOG board. After consideration of all comments by the writing group and modification of the document, the final document was then approved by the authors and the ITOG board. High-quality correlative studies, which include variety in the types of correlates, should be intrinsic to the design of thyroid cancer clinical trials to offer the best opportunity for each study to advance treatment for patients with advanced and progressive thyroid cancer.

  12. Yoga Plus Talk Therapy for Depression: A Case Study of a Six Week Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Foulkrod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoga is increasingly becoming a popular method of addressing mental health symptoms. While there is research to support the use of yoga for depression, there is limited literature examining yoga in combination with talk therapy groups as a treatment for depression. The results of this case study series (n=4 provide support for the clinical efficacy of yoga in combination with talk therapy. Treatment consisted of 6 weeks of group sessions (90-min sessions each week with weekly home practice. Each group consisted of yoga, meditation, breathwork, and emotional processing. Decreases in depressive symptoms and increases in self-compassion were found. The findings of the case study are relevant because growing numbers of clients are presenting with depression and seeking alternative treatments.

  13. Photophysical studies of oxicam group of NSAIDs: piroxicam, meloxicam and tenoxicam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rona; Chakraborty, Hirak; Sarkar, Munna

    2003-04-01

    Oxicam group of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been chosen as a prototype molecular group that shows diverse biological functions and dynamic structural features. Photophysical studies of three drugs from this group viz., piroxicam, meloxicam and tenoxicam have been carried out in different solvents with varying polarity, H-bond character and viscosity. The spectral responses of different prototropic forms of these drugs towards varying solvent parameters have been studied, with the aim to characterize their interaction in biomimetic environment non-invasively. The nature of the lowest transition has been identified. The extinction coefficient, quantum yield and viscosity dependence on the nature of the solvents, all indicate the extreme sensitivity of these drugs to their microenvironment.

  14. Development of a harmonized food grouping system for between-country comparisons in the TEDDY Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslowski, Gesa; Yang, Jimin; Aronsson, Carin Andrén; Ahonen, Suvi; Butterworth, Martha; Rautanen, Jenna; Norris, Jill M; Virtanen, Suvi M; Uusitalo, Ulla

    2017-10-01

    The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) is an international study aiming to investigate associations between dietary and other environmental factors and the risk of developing islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. Dietary intake was assessed using a 24-hour recall and repeated 3-day food records and analyzed using country-specific food composition databases (FCDBs) in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the U.S. with respective in-house calculation programs. A food grouping harmonization process between four country-specific FCDBs was conducted to evaluate and achieve comparability on food group definitions and quantification of food consumption across the countries. Systematic review revealed that the majority of existing food groups of the TEDDY FCDBs were not comparable. Therefore, a completely new classification system of 15 mutually exclusive main food groups (e.g. vegetables) and 89 subgroups (e.g. root vegetables, leafy vegetables) was developed. Foods and beverages were categorized into basic foods (single ingredient) and composite dishes (multiple ingredients). Composite dishes were broken down to ingredients using food composition data available in the FCDBs or generic recipes created for the harmonization effort. The daily consumption of every food group across FCDBs was quantified consistently as either raw or prepared weight depending on the food group to achieve maximal comparability.

  15. The Bobath concept in stroke rehabilitation: a focus group study of the experienced physiotherapists' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, S; Ashburn, A

    2000-10-15

    The Bobath concept, usually known as neuro-developmental treatment (NDT) in America, is one of the major approaches used to rehabilitate patients following stroke; however since the last publication of Bobath (1990), the concept has been taught via an oral tradition on postgraduate courses. This study therefore aimed to explore with experienced therapists firstly how the Bobath concept had changed since 1990, and secondly what they considered its main theoretical assumptions to be using a focus group research design. Eight peer-nominated expert physiotherapists agreed to participate in two focus groups organized according to specialist interest in either neurology (group A) or elderly care (group B). Therapists were asked to discuss six topics based on a review of published literature. Data analysis involved several readings of verbatim transcriptions, from which key themes and concepts were developed. All therapists agreed on the following core themes defining Bobath: analysis of normal movement, control of tone and facilitation of movement. Neuroplasticity was described as the primary rationale for treatment with therapists using afferent information to target the damaged central nervous system. In addition group A discussed motor learning, whereas group B discussed patient focused goals and relating treatment to function. This study highlighted changes in theory, terminology, and techniques. Tone remained a major problem in the rehabilitation management of the hemiplegic patient; however much attention was also directed towards the musculoskeletal system. Both facilitation of normal movement components and task specific practice using specific manual guidance were considered critical elements of the Bobath concept. For Bobath therapists, physiotherapy has an important impact on both the performance components of movement and functional outcomes. In view of the small numbers involved in this preliminary study, further studies are now needed to determine if these

  16. [Lead intakes by different age-sex population groups from Chinese total diet study in 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Gao, Junquan; Li, Xiaowei

    2007-07-01

    To estimate the dietary lead intakes by different age-sex population groups in China. The lead concentrations of food sample from 3rd Chinese total diet study were determined, and then were combined with the food consumption by population of ten age-sex groups, The lead intakes, and its distribution and dietary sources were obtained. It was found that the mean and median concentrations of lead in all food samples were 0.118 and 0.052mg/kg, respectively. The highest concentration of individual sample and mean concentrations of lead in preserved egg were 8.964mg/kg and 2.577mg/kg, respectively. The vegetable samples in Hubei Province were heavily contaminated. The lead intakes by different age-sex groups were estimated to be 54.9-112.7microg/day. The average dietary lead intakes by 2-7 years old group could reach 86.1% of PTWI, and individual lead intakes by about 30% children in this group exceed PTWI. But the average dietary lead intakes of other age-sex population groups ranged from 42.8% to 86.1% of PTWI. The main sources of dietary lead were cereals and vegetables in ten age-sex population groups, and could reach 72%-80% of total lead intakes. Although the dietary lead intakes by different age-sex population groups are all lower than PTWI, it should be decreased to a lower level. Moreover, the dietary exposures to lead are higher enough for 2-7 years old children and population in some provinces to be considered seriously.

  17. Comparison of 12-step groups to mutual help alternatives for AUD in a large, national study: Differences in membership characteristics and group participation, cohesion, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemore, Sarah E; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Mericle, Amy; Hemberg, Jordana

    2017-02-01

    Many studies suggest that participation in 12-step groups contributes to better recovery outcomes, but people often object to such groups and most do not sustain regular involvement. Yet, research on alternatives to 12-step groups is very sparse. The present study aimed to extend the knowledge base on mutual help group alternatives for those with an alcohol use disorder (AUD), sampling from large, active, abstinence-focused groups including Women for Sobriety (WFS), LifeRing, and SMART Recovery (SMART). This paper presents a cross-sectional analysis of this longitudinal study, using baseline data to describe the profile and participation characteristics of attendees of these groups in comparison to 12-step members. Data from participants 18 and over with a lifetime AUD (N=651) were collected using Web-based surveys. Members of alternative 12-step groups were recruited in collaboration with group directors, who helped publicize the study by emailing meeting conveners and attendees and posting announcements on social media. A comparison group of current (past-30-day) 12-step attendees was recruited from an online meeting hub for recovering persons. Interested parties were directed to a Webpage where they were screened, and eligible participants completed an online survey assessing demographic and clinical variables; in-person and online mutual help involvement; and group satisfaction and cohesion. Analyses involved comparing those identifying WFS, SMART, and LifeRing as their primary group to 12-step members on the above characteristics. Compared to 12-step members, members of the mutual help alternatives were less religious and generally higher on education and income. WFS and LifeRing members were also older, more likely to be married, and lower on lifetime drug and psychiatric severity; meanwhile, LifeRing and SMART members were less likely to endorse the most stringent abstinence goal. Finally, despite lower levels of in-person meeting attendance, members of all

  18. [A study on breakfast and school performance in a group of adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero Lozano, R; Fillat Ballesteros, J C

    2006-01-01

    TO know the relationship between breakfast, from a qualitative perspective, and school performance. The study was performed in 141 students (70 males and 71 females) with ages ranging 12-13 years, of 1st grade of Mandatory Secondary Education (ESO) from an institute of Saragossa, by means of recalling the breakfast of the day before. Breakfast quality has been assessed according to criteria of the Kid study: GOOD QUALITY: contains at least one food from each one of dairy, cereals, or fruit groups. IMPROVABLE QUALITY: lacks one of the groups. INSUFFICIENT QUALITY: lacks two groups. POOR QUALITY: does not have breakfast. We considered that quality was improved only when a mid-morning snack with a different food from those taken with breakfast was added. Average mark at the end of the school year has been the criterion used to assess school performance. Statistical analysis of data gathered for the present study has been done with SPSS software. This analysis comprises descriptive and inferential statistics. For analysis of global significance between the differences the Analysis of Variance method has been applied, followed by post hoe tests with Bonferroni's and Turkey's methods to detect specific groups explaining global significance. Average mark systematically increases as breakfast quality increases from an average score of 5.63 in the group with poor quality breakfast to 7.73 average score in the group with a good quality breakfast. An analysis of variance has been performed to study the statistical significance of the mean differences between both groups. The outcomes yield significant global differences between groups (p value = 0.001), i.e., the average mark significantly varies according to breakfast quality. When pooled quality of breakfast and mid-morning snack is analyzed, the average mark systematically increases as breakfast-snack quality increases, from an average mark of 5,77 in the group with poor or insufficient quality up to 7.61 in the group with

  19. Relative Risk of Various Head and Neck Cancers among Different Blood Groups: An Analytical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Khushboo; Kote, Sunder; Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Singh, Shilpi; Kundu, Hansa; Jain, Swati

    2014-04-01

    Cancer is a unique disease characterized by abnormal growth of cells which have the ability to invade the adjacent tissues and sometimes even distant organs. The limited and contrasting evidence regarding the association of ABO blood groups with the different types of head and neck cancers in the Indian population warrants the need for the present study. To assess the relative risk of various Head & Neck cancers among different blood groups. Three hundred sixty two diagnosed cases of different type of head and neck cancers and 400 controls were selected from four hospitals of New Delhi, India. The information regarding the type of head and neck cancer was obtained from the case sheets of the patients regarding their socio demographic profile, dietary history using a structured performa. The information regarding type of cancer (cases only), ABO blood group was collected. Statistical Tests: The data was analysed using the SPSS 19 version. Chi square test and odd ratios were calculated. The level of significance was fixed at 5%. The O blood group was found to be most prevalent followed by B, A and AB among the cases as well as the controls. Oral cancer patients showed maximum number in blood group O followed by B, A and AB. Significant pattern of distribution was seen among the patients of esophageal cancer, laryngeal cancer and salivary gland cancer as well (p= 0.003, p=0.000 p=0.112 respectively. The present study reveals that there is an inherited element in the susceptibility or protection against different types of head and neck cancers. Blood group A was found to be a potential risk factor for the development of oral cancers, esophageal cancers and salivary gland cancers while blood group B was found to be a potential risk factor for laryngeal cancers.

  20. Ethnic density, urbanicity and psychosis risk for migrant groups - A population cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Peter; Thygesen, Malene; Das-Munshi, Jay; Becares, Laia; Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth; Pedersen, Carsten; Agerbo, Esben

    2017-12-01

    Rates of psychotic disorder are raised for many migrant groups. Understanding the role played by the social context in which they live may help explain why. This study investigates the effect of both neighbourhood ethnic density and urbanicity on the incidence of non-affective psychosis for migrant groups. Population based cohort of all those born 1965 or later followed from their 15th birthday (2,224,464 people) to 1st July 2013 (37,335,812 person years). Neighbourhood exposures were measured at age 15. For all groups incidence of non-affective psychosis was greater in lower ethnic density neighbourhoods. For migrants of African origin there was a 1.94-fold increase (95% CI, 1.17-3.23) comparing lowest and highest density quintiles; with similar effects for migrants from Europe (excluding Scandinavia): incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.99 (95% CI, 1.56-2.54); Asia: IRR 1.63 (95% CI, 1.02-2.59); and the Middle East: IRR 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19-2.38). This initial analysis found no evidence for an urbanicity effect for migrant groups. Adjusting for ethnic density revealed a positive association between level of urbanicity and psychosis for two groups, with a statistically significant linear trend (average effect of a one quintile increase) for migrants from Europe: IRR 1.09 (95% CI, 1.02-1.16) and the Middle East: IRR 1.12 (95% CI, 1.01-1.23). In this first nationwide population-based study of ethnic density, urbanicity and psychosis we show that lower ethnic density is associated with increased incidence of non-affective psychosis for different migrant groups; masking urban/rural differences in psychosis for some groups. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Medico-legal reasoning in disability assessment: A focus group and validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rus M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decisions on disability pensions are based, among others, on medical reports. The way these medical assessments are performed is largely unclear. The aim of the study was to determine which grounds are used by social insurance physicians (SIPs in these assessments and to determine if the identification of these grounds can help improve the quality of assessments in social insurance practice. The article describes a focus group study and a questionnaire study with SIPs in four different countries. Method Using focus group discussions of SIPs discussing the same case in Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway and Slovenia (N = 29 we determined the arguments and underlying grounds as used by the SIP's. We used a questionnaire study among other SIPs (N = 60 in the same countries to establish a first validation of these grounds. Results Grounds in the focus groups were comparable between the countries studied. The grounds were also recognized by SIPs who had not participated in the focus groups. SIPs agreed most on grounds with regard to the claimant's health condition, and about the claimant's duty to explore rehabilitation and work resumption, but less on accepting permanent incapacity when all options for treatment were exhausted. Conclusion Grounds that SIPs use refer to a limited group of key elements of disability evaluation. SIPs interpret disability in social insurance according to the handicapped role and strive at making their evaluation fair trials. ICF is relevant with regard to the health condition and to the process of evaluation. Identification of grounds is a valuable instrument for controlling the quality of disability evaluation. The grounds also appear to be internationally comparable which may enhance scientific study in this area.

  2. Courtesy stigma--a focus group study of relatives of schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermeyer, Matthias C; Schulze, Beate; Dietrich, Sandra

    2003-10-01

    Stigmatization of people with mental illness has been investigated in numerous studies. Little research, however, has been done to explore how relatives of people with schizophrenia perceive and experience stigmatization and how they can fight such stigmatization. Aiming to explore stigma from the perspective of relatives of people with schizophrenia, focus group interviews were conducted with 122 members of advocacy groups from different parts of Germany. Focus group sessions were tape- and video-recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were coded using an inductive method, generating categories (domains) from the material. The analysis of focus group data shows that, contrary to previous research findings, discrimination and disadvantages encountered by relatives of schizophrenia patients reach far beyond the spheres of direct social interaction and access to social roles. Our study revealed two additional domains in which relatives encounter stigmatization: structural discrimination and public images of mental illness. Furthermore, psychiatry has been identified as one important source of stigma. Relatives also suggested numerous anti-stigma interventions. These can be grouped into five main categories: communication measures, support for the ill and their relatives, changes in mental health care, education and training, and control and supervision. Based on our findings,ways of how relatives of schizophrenia patients and mental health professionals can fight against stigma are discussed.

  3. Bullying and Difference: A Case Study of Peer Group Dynamics in One School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Roz; Smith, Peter; Jenks, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Why are students who have special educational needs at greater risk of bullying than their peers when educated in mainstream settings? This case study of one mainstream secondary school describes the various facets of the peer group dynamics that underpinned social aggression and exclusion towards students who were hearing impaired. These students…

  4. Considering Community Literacies in the Secondary Classroom: A Collaborative Teacher and Researcher Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Paula M.; Reynolds, Rema E.

    2013-01-01

    A year long study group brought teachers and researchers working in urban contexts in US public schools together to examine literacy practices incorporating students' community literacies into schooled tasks. The goal was to provide teacher development in making connections across their students' community literacies and the academic literacy they…

  5. Conceptions of happiness and life satisfaction: An exploratory study in 14 national groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshanloo, Mohsen; Rizwan, Muhammad; Khilji, Imran Ahmed; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Poon, Wai-Ching; Sundaram, Suresh; Ho, Lok Sang; Yeung, Victoria Wai Lan; Han, Gyuseog; Bae, Jaechang; Demir, Meliksah; Achoui, Mustapha; Pang, Joyce S.; Jiang, Ding-Yu; Lamers, S.M.A.; Turan, Yücel; Lepshokova, Zarina Kh.; Panyusheva, Tatiana; Natalia, Amerkhanova; Asano, Ryosuke; Igarashi, Tasuku; Tsukamoto, Saori

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between 4 conceptions of happiness and life satisfaction in a sample of 2715 university students across 14 national groups. The 4 conceptions were self-transcendence, self-directed hedonism, conservation, and self-enhancement, which emerged from a principal

  6. An Exploratory Study of Group Therapy for Sexually Abused Adolescents and Nonoffending Guardians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda P.; Kelly, Adrian B.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent survivors of sexual abuse frequently report severe trauma, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. While cognitive-behavioral group interventions show promise, interpreting efficacy is problematic due to commonly high attrition. This article reports promising exploratory study findings relating to a 12-week multimodal abuse-specific…

  7. Individual Development of Professionalism in Educational Peer Group Supervision: A Multiple Case Study of GPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holge-Hazelton, B.; Tulinius, Anne-Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    of professionalism within the individual are, however, difficult to assess. Aim. On the basis of a multiple case study, this paper describes the process of professional learning and challenges for individual GPs, as they take part in supervision groups focusing on children cases. Methods and Results. By using a two...

  8. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment was to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport. A number of working group observations, using the results of TTX methodologies, are noted in the report.

  9. Kell blood group antigen in Port Harcourt, Nigeria-a pilot study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The Kell blood group system is important and should be considered in blood transfusion practice in this environment. The data emanating from this study could be utilized in the planning and running of an efficient blood transfusion service and better management of our maternal and child unit. Keywords: Kell ...

  10. Group Cohesion and Social Support in Exercise Classes: Results from a Danish Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulla; Schmidt, Lone; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the formation of group cohesion and social support in exercise classes among former sedentary adults, participating in a Danish community-based intervention. Furthermore, the aim is to analyze the impact of this process on exercise activity among the participants. A multimethod approach was used, analyzing both survey data and…

  11. Career Repertoires of IT Students: A Group Counselling Case Study in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Leena; Vesisenaho, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainty about future career prospects has increased enormously for students enrolled in higher education Information Technology (IT) programs. However, many computer science programmes pay little attention to career counselling. This article reports the results of a pilot study intended to develop group counselling for IT students to promote…

  12. Collaborative Learning in Online Study Groups: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiong, Raymond; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Educational benefits of online collaborative group work have been confirmed in numerous research studies. Most frequently cited advantages include the development of skills of critical thinking and problem solving as well as skills of self-reflection and co-construction of knowledge and meaning. However, the establishment and maintenance of active…

  13. Group dialectical behavior therapy adapted for obese emotional eaters; a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosen, M.A.; Safer, D.; Adler, S.; Cebolla, A.; Strien, T. van

    2012-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown to effectively target binge eating disorder (BED). This study pilots the effectiveness of group DIVE for obese "emotional eaters" to reduce eating psychopathology and achieve weight maintenance. Thirty-five obese male and female emotional eaters

  14. Group dialectical behavior therapy adapted for obese emotional eaters; a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosen, M A; Safer, D; Adler, S.N.; Cebolla, A.; van Strien, T

    2012-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown to effectively target binge eating disorder (BED). This study pilots the effectiveness of group DBT for obese "emotional eaters" to reduce eating psychopathology and achieve weight maintenance. Thirty-five obese male and female emotional eaters

  15. Emotional coping differences among breast cancer patients from an online support group: A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, A.E.; Das, H.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous research on the effects of online peer support on psychological well-being of patients with cancer showed mixed findings. There is a need for longitudinal studies explaining if and when online peer-led support groups are beneficial. How patients cope with emotions that come

  16. Developing Reflective Dispositions through Collaborative Knowledge-Building during Small Group Bible Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tze Keong; Koh, Joyce Hwee Ling; Chai, Ching Sing

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the use of a constructivist pedagogical approach to cultivate reflective dispositions during small group Bible study. Conducted in a local church Bible class setting (n = 12), the instructional design emulated the reflective thinking process, while adopting collaborative knowledge-building as its pedagogical framework.…

  17. Teen Perceptions of the Promotion of Safer Sexual Practices: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W.; Kelley, Andrea; Haigh, Katherine M.

    2017-01-01

    Teens' own thoughts on fostering safe sexual practice are important perspectives in promoting adolescent sexual health yet are relatively absent in the literature. This focus group study explored teens' perceptions about the supports and challenges that exist as teens strive to engage in healthy sexual practices. Seventy-five teens participated in…

  18. An Empirical Study of Hospitality Management Student Attitudes toward Group Projects: Instructional Factors and Team Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngsoo; Ro, Heejung

    2012-01-01

    The development of positive attitudes in team-based work is important in management education. This study investigates hospitality students' attitudes toward group projects by examining instructional factors and team problems. Specifically, we examine how the students' perceptions of project appropriateness, instructors' support, and evaluation…

  19. Communicating the Nature of Science through "The Big Bang Theory": Evidence from a Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rashel; Orthia, Lindy A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a little-studied means of communicating about or teaching the nature of science (NOS)--through fiction television. We report some results of focus group research which suggest that the American sitcom "The Big Bang Theory" (2007-present), whose main characters are mostly working scientists, has influenced…

  20. Cryptographic Research and NSA: Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davida, George I.

    1981-01-01

    The Public Cryptography Study Group accepted the claim made by the National Security Agency that some information in some publications concerning cryptology could be inimical to national security, and is allowing the establishment of a voluntary mechanism, on an experimental basis, for NSA to review cryptology manuscripts. (MLW)

  1. Human genetic studies in areas of high natural radiation VI. Genetical load and ethnic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Maia, A.

    1974-01-01

    The load of mutations disclosed by inbreeding, according to the ethnic group of the parents, has been analyzed in our data. Besides the total of the population, a sample with no alien ancestrals has also been analyzed. Genetic load has been studied for absortions, still births, pos-natal mortality, total mortality, anomalies, total mortality + anomalies, and abnormalities in general [pt

  2. Identifying target groups for the prevention of depression in early adolescence: The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monshouwer, K.; Smit, H.F.E.; Ruiter, M.; Ormel, H.; Verhulst, F.; Vollebergh, w.; Oldehinkel, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with long-term adverse consequences. The aim of the present study is to identify target groups at increased risk of developing depression in early adolescence, such that prevention is associated with the largest health benefit at population-level

  3. Identifying target groups for the prevention of depression in early adolescence : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monshouwer, K.; Smit, F.; Ruiter, M.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, F.; Vollebergh, W.; Oldehinkel, T.

    Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with long-term adverse consequences. The aim of the present study is to identify target groups at increased risk of developing depression in early adolescence, such that prevention is associated with the largest health benefit at population-level

  4. Paclitaxel for malignant pleural mesothelioma : A phase II study of the EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanMeerbeeck, J; Debruyne, C; vanZandwijk, N; Postmus, PE; Pennucci, MC; vanBreukelen, F; Galdermans, D; Groen, H; Pinson, P; vanGlabbeke, M; vanMarck, E; Giaccone, G

    The EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group undertook a phase II study of paclitaxel in 25 chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Paclitaxel was given intravenously at a dose of 200 mg m(-2), as a 3 h infusion every 3 weeks, after standard premedication with corticosteroids and

  5. Increasing International and Domestic Student Interaction through Group Work: A Case Study from the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Ken; Chen, Honglin; Warren, Stan

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the use of group work strategies to increase student interaction and learning. Despite the growing linguistic and cultural diversity in tertiary institutions, there is strong evidence of minimal interaction between "domestic" and "international" students in classrooms and in wider university contexts. This study investigates…

  6. Multicultural Contacts in Education: A Case Study of an Exchange Project between Different Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitema, Jaap; Veugelers, Wiel

    2011-01-01

    One important aim of citizenship education is learning to deal with cultural diversity. To this end, schools organise exchange projects to bring students into contact with different social and cultural groups. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of intergroup contact in educational settings and to understand what the most…

  7. A Focus Group Study of Child Nutrition Professionals' Attitudes about Food Allergies and Current Training Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Ming; Kwon, Junehee; Sauer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore child nutrition professionals' (CNPs) attitudes about food allergies, current practices of food allergy training, and operational issues related to food allergy training in school foodservice operations. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 CNPs with managerial…

  8. The selection and use of control groups in epidemiologic studies of radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.; Friedenreich, C.M.; Howe, P.D.

    1990-09-01

    Current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer are based on epidemiologic studies of humans exposed to high doses of radiation. A critical feature of such studies is the selection of an appropriate control group. This report presents a detailed examination of the principles underlying the selection and use of control groups in such epidemiologic studies. It is concluded that the cohort study is the preferred design, because of the rarity of exposure to high levels of radiation in the general population and because the cohort design is less susceptible to bias. This report also assesses potential bias in current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer due to inappropriate choice and use of control groups. Detailed summaries are presented for those epidemiologic studies on which the BEIR IV risk estimates are based. It is concluded that confounding is by far the major potential concern. Bias is probably negligible in risk estimates for breast cancer. For lung cancer, risk estimates may be underestimated by about 30 percent for males and 10 percent for females due to confounding of smoking and radiation exposure. For leukemia and cancers of the thyroid and bone, the absence of established non-radiation risk factors with a high prevalence in the population under study suggests that there is unlikely to be any substantial confounding radiation risk estimates. Finally, lifetime excess mortality risks have been estimated for several of the cancers of interest following exposure to radiation based on Canadian age-, sex- and cause-specific mortality rates. It is concluded that errors in measurement exposure, uncertainty in extrapolating the results of high dose studies to low doses and low dose rates, and sampling variation in the epidemiologic studies contribute far more to uncertainty in current risk estimates than do any biases in the epidemiologic studies introduced by inappropriate selection and use of control groups. (161 refs., 19 tabs.)

  9. Outcomes of cataract surgery in diabetic patients: results of the Pan American Collaborative Retina Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Berrocal, Maria; Wu, Lihteh; Maia, Mauricio; Serrano, Martín; Alezzandrini, Arturo; Arévalo, J Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the visual and anatomical outcomes after cataract surgery in diabetic patients with different intraoperative therapeutic strategies. The research design comprised of a multicentric, retrospective, interventional study conducted at 6 centers in Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Spain, and Venezuela. We included 138 diabetic patients with at least 6-month follow-up following phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central subfield thickness were collected at baseline and at 1-, 2-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. Of these, 42 cases were not treated with any intraoperative coadjuvant medication (Group 1), 59 patients received intraoperative bevacizumab (Group 2) and 37 patients received intraoperative triamcinolone (4 mg/0.1 ml) (Group 3). The mean logMAR [± standard deviation (SD)] BCVA improved from 0.82 (± 0.43) at baseline, to 0.14 (± 0.23) at 6-month follow-up (p<0.001) in Group 1; from 0.80 (± 0.48) to 0.54 (± 0.45) (p<0.001) in Group 2; and from 1.0 (± 0.40) to 0.46 (± 0.34) (p<0.001) in Group 3. The mean central subfield thickness increased from 263.57 µm (± 35.7) at baseline to 274.57 µm (± 48.7) at 6-month follow-up (p=0.088) in Group 1; from 316.02 µm (± 100.4) to 339.56 µm (± 145.3) (p=0.184) in Group 2; and from 259.18 µm (± 97.9) to 282.21 µm (± 87.24) (p=0.044) in Group 3. Diabetic patients may significantly benefit from cataract surgery. This study provides evidence to support the use of intravitreal triamcinolone or bevacizumab at the time of cataract surgery in cases with pre-existent diabetic macular edema or moderate-severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  10. Self-help group and the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis - Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Eliášová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The goal of the pilot study was to compare the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis in the Presov region with or without the support of a self-help group. Design: The character of this pilot study on patients with MS was related to the use of self-help groups and their impact on the assessment of the quality of life of the respondents, with the help of a questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF. Methods: The research was carried out in the Prešov region with the help of the standardized WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Ninety-one patients with MS participated in the pilot study (46 respondents attended a self-help group and 35 did not. Results: The groups, when compared, aided by the statistically evaluated WHOQOL-BREF domains, were found to show significant differences in their evaluation of quality of life in three domains: domain one: physical health; domain two: surviving; domain three: social relations. Better scores were achieved in these domains by those who attended a group. In the physical sphere, we noticed significant differences in sleep quality, and sexual satisfaction (p < 0.001, while in social and economic areas, there were significant differences in satisfaction with personal relationships (p < 0.001, and economic circumstances (p < 0.01, self-contentment (p < 0.01, and coping with negative feelings (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Patients with multiple sclerosis can live normal lives provided they are supported by their families, friends, health care professionals, and self-help groups.

  11. Sero-epidemiological study of Lyme disease among high-risk population groups in eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zákutná, Ľubica; Dorko, Erik; Mattová, Eva; Rimárová, Kvetoslava

    2015-01-01

    IIntroduction and objective. The aim of the presented cross-sectional sero-epidemiological study was to determine the current presence of antibodies against B. burgdorferi s.l. in the high-risk groups of the Slovak population, and to identify potential risk factors to LB infections. A group of 277 agricultural and forestry workers - persons with frequent stay in the countryside and employees of State Border and Customs Police - from years 2011-2012 in the Eastern Slovakia were examined in order to assess the seroprevalence of anti-Borrelia antibodies. Sera were screened by commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The study subjects completed a questionnaires with general demographic, epidemiological and clinical data. The results were evaluated statistically. A 25.3% presence of positive and 8.7% presence of borderline IgG antibodies was detected in all investigated groups. The seroprevalence of B. burgdorferi s.l. was significantly higher (P<0.05) among the agricultural and forestry workers when compared to employees of State Border and Customs Police. Higher seropositivity was observed in older subjects over 30 years of age (P=0.004) than those who were younger, and also in males (P=0.045). A significant number of persons with rheumatologic conditions was statistically higher (P=0.020) in the group with seropositivity than in the group with seronegativity. The presented study confirms the higher risk of Borrelia infection in individuals with frequent exposure to ticks in eastern Slovakia. The seropositivity tests confirmed the highest seropositivity in agriculture and forestry workers, middle positivity was confirmed among other sector workers, and lowest positivity in policemen and employees of the Customs and Border Inspection. The outputs also simultaneously filling the gap of missing seroprevalence data among these exposed groups.

  12. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization: A Study of Prevalence and Etiology in a Group of Iranian Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Rahil; Ramazani, Nahid; Nourinasab, Rahmatollah

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) and its relationship with systemic conditions in a group of Iranian children. Methods The study population comprised of 433 7-9 year olds, from four schools in Zahedan, Iran. Subjects were evaluated clinically by one examiner, and at a separate session, their mothers completed a coded medical history questionnaire. Hypo-mineralized molars and incisors were recorded based on DDE (develop...

  13. Children’s experiences and meaning construction on parental divorce: A focus group study

    OpenAIRE

    Maes, Sofie DJ; De Mol, Jan; Buysse, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The global aim of this study was to explore children's narratives of parental divorce. A convenience sample, composed of 11- and 14-year-old children, was recruited. A total of 22 children (12 male, 10 female) participated in this focus group study. The findings show that two components seem to be really important for children during the divorce process: the ability to construct meaning about their parents' decision to divorce and their feeling to count in the process of family transition. Ch...

  14. Toxoplasma Infection in Schizophrenia Patients: A Comparative Study with Control Group

    OpenAIRE

    Alipour, A; Shojaee, S; Mohebali, M; Tehranidoost, M; Abdi Masoleh, F; Keshavarz, H

    2011-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a serious, chronic, and often debilitating neuropsychiatric disor­der. Its causes are still poorly understood. Besides genetic and non-genetic (environmental) fac­tors are thought to be important as the cause of the structural and functional deficits that character­ize schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare Toxoplasma gondii infection between schizo­phrenia patients and non-schizophrenia individuals as control group.Methods: A case-control study was designed i...

  15. Experiences of the gender climate in clinical training ? a focus group study among Swedish medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Kristoffersson, Emelie; Andersson, Jenny; Bengs, Carita; Hamberg, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Background Research shows that medical education is characterized by unequal conditions for women and men, but there is a lack of qualitative studies investigating the social processes that enable and maintain gender inequalities that include both male and female students. In this focus group study, we therefore explored male as well as female medical students? experiences of the gender climate ? i.e., how beliefs, values, and norms about gender were communicated ? during clinical training an...

  16. Dietary study and whole body measurements in selected groups in Norway 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerlie, A.A.; Boee, E.; Selnaes, T.D.

    1994-12-01

    This study is a continuation of a study that started in 1987. The main sources to the radiocesium intake in the different groups are almost the same compared to the previous years. The radiation dose burden to which the Norwegian population is subjected shows great variations and is dependent on the types of foods eaten. The consumption of reindeer meat and freshwater fish is of major importance. 6 refs., 9 figs., 13 tabs

  17. Facebook Groups as a Powerful and Dynamic Tool in Medical Education: Mixed-Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Leo; Schmidbauer, Moritz; Gradel, Maximilian; Ferch, Sabine; Antón, Sofía; Hoppe, Boj; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Pinilla, Severin; Fischer, Martin; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2017-12-22

    Social networking sites, in particular Facebook, are not only predominant in students' social life but are to varying degrees interwoven with the medical curriculum. Particularly, Facebook groups have been identified for their potential in higher education. However, there is a paucity of data on user types, content, and dynamics of study-related Facebook groups. The aim of this study was to identify the role of study-related Facebook group use, characterize medical students that use or avoid using Facebook groups (demographics, participation pattern, and motivation), and analyze student posting behavior, covered topics, dynamics, and limitations in Facebook groups with regards to educational usage. Using a multi-method approach (interviews, focus groups, and qualitative and quantitative analysis of Facebook posts), we analyzed two representative Facebook groups of medical preclinical semesters at Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich. Facebook primary posts and replies over one semester were extracted and evaluated by using thematic content analysis. We developed and applied a coding scheme for studying the frequency and distribution of these posts. Additionally, we interviewed students with various degrees of involvement in the groups, as well as "new minorities," students not registered on Facebook. Facebook groups seem to have evolved as the main tool for medical students at LMU to complement the curriculum and to discuss study-related content. These Facebook groups are self-organizing and quickly adapt to organizational or subject-related challenges posed by the curriculum. A wide range of topics is covered, with a dominance of organization-related posts (58.35% [6916/11,853] of overall posts). By measuring reply rates and comments per category, we were able to identify learning tips and strategies, material sharing, and course content discussions as the most relevant categories. Rates of adequate replies in these categories ranged between 78% (11/14) and

  18. A CASE STUDY OF PROSODIC PHRASAL GROUPING AND INTONATIONAL PROMINENCE IN LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In language acquisition, children use prosody in their comprehension and production of utterances. In line with that, as a case study in this research, I analyze two particular aspects of prosody in a child’s language acquisition, i.e. prosodic phrasal grouping and intonational prominence. In the first aspect, I investigate whether the child uses prosodic phrases to group words together into interpretable units. In the second aspect, I analyze whether the child uses intonational prominence to focus marking prosody. The result indicates that both aspects are used by the child.

  19. Teaching Emotional Intelligence: A Control Group Study of a Brief Educational Intervention for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Gorgas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional Intelligence (EI is defined as an ability to perceive another’s emotional state combined with an ability to modify one’s own. Physicians with this ability are at a distinct advantage, both in fostering teams and in making sound decisions. Studies have shown that higher physician EI’s are associated with lower incidence of burn-out, longer careers, more positive patient-physician interactions, increased empathy, and improved communication skills. We explored the potential for EI to be learned as a skill (as opposed to being an innate ability through a brief educational intervention with emergency medicine (EM residents. Methods: This study was conducted at a large urban EM residency program. Residents were randomized to either EI intervention or control groups. The intervention was a two-hour session focused on improving the skill of social perspective taking (SPT, a skill related to social awareness. Due to time limitations, we used a 10-item sample of the Hay 360 Emotional Competence Inventory to measure EI at three time points for the training group: before (pre and after (post training, and at six-months post training (follow up; and at two time points for the control group: pre- and follow up. The preliminary analysis was a four-way analysis of variance with one repeated measure: Group x Gender x Program Year over Time. We also completed post-hoc tests. Results: Thirty-three EM residents participated in the study (33 of 36, 92%, 19 in the EI intervention group and 14 in the control group. We found a significant interaction effect between Group and Time (p<0.05. Post-hoc tests revealed a significant increase in EI scores from Time 1 to 3 for the EI intervention group (62.6% to 74.2%, but no statistical change was observed for the controls (66.8% to 66.1%, p=0.77. We observed no main effects involving gender or level of training. Conclusion: Our brief EI training showed a delayed but statistically significant

  20. A mindful eating group as an adjunct to individual treatment for eating disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Natasha S

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential benefits of a Mindful Eating Group as an adjunct to long-term treatment for a variety of eating disorders. Individuals (N = 33) attending treatment at an outpatient treatment facility participated in the 10-week intervention designed to enhance awareness around hunger and satiety cues. Disordered eating symptoms were assessed pre- and post-intervention using the EAT-26. Significant reductions were found on all subscales of the EAT-26 with large effect sizes. No significant differences were identified between eating disorder diagnoses. Results suggest potential benefits of an adjunct mindfulness group intervention when treating a variety of eating disorders. Limitations are discussed.

  1. Primary adrenal insufficiency in adult population: a Portuguese Multicentre Study by the Adrenal Tumours Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lia; Silva, João; Garrido, Susana; Bello, Carlos; Oliveira, Diana; Simões, Hélder; Paiva, Isabel; Guimarães, Joana; Ferreira, Marta; Pereira, Teresa; Bettencourt-Silva, Rita; Martins, Ana Filipa; Silva, Tiago; Fernandes, Vera; Pereira, Maria Lopes

    2017-11-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) is a rare but severe and potentially life-threatening condition. No previous studies have characterized Portuguese patients with PAI. To characterize the clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, treatment and follow-up of Portuguese patients with confirmed PAI. This multicentre retrospective study examined PAI patients in 12 Portuguese hospitals. We investigated 278 patients with PAI (55.8% were females), with a mean age of 33.6 ± 19.3 years at diagnosis. The most frequent presenting clinical features were asthenia (60.1%), mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation (55.0%) and weight loss (43.2%); 29.1% of the patients presented with adrenal crisis. Diagnosis was established by high plasma ACTH and low serum cortisol in most patients (43.9%). The most common aetiology of PAI was autoimmune adrenalitis (61.0%). There were 38 idiopathic cases. Autoimmune comorbidities were found in 70% of the patients, the most frequent being autoimmune thyroiditis (60.7%) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (17.3%). Seventy-nine percent were treated with hydrocortisone (mean dose 26.3 ± 8.3 mg/day) mostly in three (57.5%) or two (37.4%) daily doses. The remaining patients were treated with prednisolone (10.1%), dexamethasone (6.2%) and methylprednisolone (0.7%); 66.2% were also on fludrocortisone (median dose of 100 µg/day). Since diagnosis, 33.5% of patients were hospitalized for disease decompensation. In the last appointment, 17.2% of patients had complaints (7.6% asthenia and 6.5% depression) and 9.7% had electrolyte disturbances. This is the first multicentre Portuguese study regarding PAI. The results emphasize the need for standardization in diagnostic tests and etiological investigation and provide a framework for improving treatment. © 2017 The authors.

  2. Adolescent substance use groups: antecedent and concurrent personality differences in a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Elizabeth M; Keyes, Margaret; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2012-06-01

    This study attempted to extend Shedler and Block's (1990) influential study, which found that adolescent drug experimenters had the healthiest personality functioning compared to abstainers and frequent users. Using a prospective design, we examined the relationship between antecedent and concurrent personality and age-18 substance use in a community sample of 1,298 twins (96% Caucasian, 49% male). Personality measures at ages 11 and 18 assessed positive emotionality (agentic and communal), negative emotionality, and constraint. Substance use groups-abstainers, experimenters, and problem users-were created at age 18. Age-18 substance use groups differed in age-11 and age-18 constraint such that problem users were lower than experimenters, who were lower than abstainers. Age-18 substance use groups did not differ in age-18 positive emotionality. However, abstainers were significantly lower than experimenters in communal positive emotionality, whereas female abstainers scored higher in agentic positive emotionality than female experimenters, who scored higher than female problem users. Experimenters were significantly lower in negative emotionality than problem users. Our findings are inconsistent with the notion that experimenters had the healthiest personality functioning and instead suggest different strengths and weaknesses for each group. Future studies should examine agentic and communal positive emotionality separately. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A STUDY ON PREVALENCE AND CAUSES OF CORNEAL BLINDNESS IN PAEDIATRIC AGE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ramadevi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Corneal disease is responsible for less than 2% of blindness in children in industrialised countries. In poor countries of the world, corneal scarring occurs due to vitamin A deficiency, measles and ophthalmia neonatorum. Thus, corneal disease is an important cause of blindness among children living in developing nations, which already carry a major burden of blindness. The aim of the study is to study the1. Prevalence of corneal blindness in the paediatric age group. 2. Causes of corneal blindness in the paediatric age group. 3. Morbidity of corneal blindness in the paediatric age group. MATERIALS AND METHODS It was cross-sectional observational study. Study Period- December 2014 to August 2016. Study Done- Government General Hospital, Kakinada. Sample Size- 50 patients. Inclusion Criteria- Children of age group 6 to 12 years with corneal blindness who have attended the outpatient department during the study period. Exclusion Criteria- Children with childhood blindness other than corneal pathology. Study Tools- Predesigned, semi-structured questionnaire regarding age, sex and age of onset of visual loss, laterality, history of ocular injury, vitamin A immunisation, family history of consanguinity and place of residence and socioeconomic status was taken. Visual acuity was measured using an E optotype and Landolt broken C chart with best corrected vision. Visual loss was classified according to the WHO categories of visual impairment. Ophthalmic examination was done by slit lamp and B scan. RESULTS Ocular trauma and corneal ulcers are most common cause of corneal blindness. 84% of corneal blindness cases were preventable and curable. CONCLUSION Trauma was the commonest cause of corneal blindness followed by infectious keratitis. 84% of corneal blindness was preventable and curable. Most causes of corneal blindness were avoidable.

  4. Systematic group-specific trends for point defects in bcc transition metals: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Dudarev, S.L.; Horsfield, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the systematic trends of point defect behaviours in bcc transition metals. We found that in all non-magnetic bcc transition metals, the most stable self-interstitial atom (SIAs) defect configuration has the symmetry. The calculated formation energy differences between the dumbbell and the lowest-energy configuration of metals in group 5B (V, Nb, Ta) are consistently larger than those of the corresponding element in group 6B (Cr, Mo, W). The predicted trends of SIA defects are fundamentally different from those in ferromagnetic α-Fe and correlate very well with the pronounced group-specific variation of thermally activated migration of SIAs under irradiation depending on the position of bcc metals in the periodic table

  5. Reference group theory with implications for information studies: a theoretical essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Murell Dawson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role and implications of reference group theory in relation to the field of library and information science. Reference group theory is based upon the principle that people take the standards of significant others as a basis for making self-appraisals, comparisons, and choices regarding need and use of information. Research that applies concepts of reference group theory to various sectors of library and information studies can provide data useful in enhancing areas such as information-seeking research, special populations, and uses of information. Implications are promising that knowledge gained from like research can be beneficial in helping information professionals better understand the role theory plays in examining ways in which people manage their information and social worlds.

  6. A method for studying decision-making by guideline development groups

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    Michie Susan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidisciplinary guideline development groups (GDGs have considerable influence on UK healthcare policy and practice, but previous research suggests that research evidence is a variable influence on GDG recommendations. The Evidence into Recommendations (EiR study has been set up to document social-psychological influences on GDG decision-making. In this paper we aim to evaluate the relevance of existing qualitative methodologies to the EiR study, and to develop a method best-suited to capturing influences on GDG decision-making. Methods A research team comprised of three postdoctoral research fellows and a multidisciplinary steering group assessed the utility of extant qualitative methodologies for coding verbatim GDG meeting transcripts and semi-structured interviews with GDG members. A unique configuration of techniques was developed to permit data reduction and analysis. Results Our method incorporates techniques from thematic analysis, grounded theory analysis, content analysis, and framework analysis. Thematic analysis of individual interviews conducted with group members at the start and end of the GDG process defines discrete problem areas to guide data extraction from GDG meeting transcripts. Data excerpts are coded both inductively and deductively, using concepts taken from theories of decision-making, social influence and group processes. These codes inform a framework analysis to describe and explain incidents within GDG meetings. We illustrate the application of the method by discussing some preliminary findings of a study of a National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE acute physical health GDG. Conclusion This method is currently being applied to study the meetings of three of NICE GDGs. These cover topics in acute physical health, mental health and public health, and comprise a total of 45 full-day meetings. The method offers potential for application to other health care and decision

  7. ABO and Rh (D group distribution and gene frequency; the first multicentric study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The study was undertaken with the objective to provide data on the ABO and Rh(D blood group distribution and gene frequency across India. Materials and Methods: A total of 10,000 healthy blood donors donating in blood banks situated in five different geographical regions of the country (North, South, East and Center were included in the study. ABO and Rh (D grouping was performed on all these samples. Data on the frequency of ABO and Rh(D blood groups was reported in simple numbers and percentages. Results: The study showed that O was the most common blood group (37.12% in the country closely followed by B at 32.26%, followed by A at 22.88% while AB was the least prevalent group at 7.74%. 94.61% of the donor population was Rh positive and the rest were Rh negative. Regional variations were observed in the distribution. Using the maximum likelihood method, the frequencies of the I A , I B and I O alleles were calculated and tested according to the Hardy Weinberg law of Equilibrium. The calculated gene frequencies are 0.1653 for I A (p, 0.2254 for I B (q and 0.6093 for I O (r. In Indian Population, O (r records the highest value followed by B (q and A (p; O > B > A. Conclusion: The study provides information about the relative distribution of various alleles in the Indian population both on a pan-India basis as well as region-wise. This vital information may be helpful in planning for future health challenges, particularly planning with regards to blood transfusion services.

  8. A method for studying decision-making by guideline development groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benjamin; Davidson, Rosemary; McAteer, John; Michie, Susan

    2009-08-05

    Multidisciplinary guideline development groups (GDGs) have considerable influence on UK healthcare policy and practice, but previous research suggests that research evidence is a variable influence on GDG recommendations. The Evidence into Recommendations (EiR) study has been set up to document social-psychological influences on GDG decision-making. In this paper we aim to evaluate the relevance of existing qualitative methodologies to the EiR study, and to develop a method best-suited to capturing influences on GDG decision-making. A research team comprised of three postdoctoral research fellows and a multidisciplinary steering group assessed the utility of extant qualitative methodologies for coding verbatim GDG meeting transcripts and semi-structured interviews with GDG members. A unique configuration of techniques was developed to permit data reduction and analysis. Our method incorporates techniques from thematic analysis, grounded theory analysis, content analysis, and framework analysis. Thematic analysis of individual interviews conducted with group members at the start and end of the GDG process defines discrete problem areas to guide data extraction from GDG meeting transcripts. Data excerpts are coded both inductively and deductively, using concepts taken from theories of decision-making, social influence and group processes. These codes inform a framework analysis to describe and explain incidents within GDG meetings. We illustrate the application of the method by discussing some preliminary findings of a study of a National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) acute physical health GDG. This method is currently being applied to study the meetings of three of NICE GDGs. These cover topics in acute physical health, mental health and public health, and comprise a total of 45 full-day meetings. The method offers potential for application to other health care and decision-making groups.

  9. Using archetypes to create user panels for usability studies: Streamlining focus groups and user studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakos, S-K; Ahmed-Kristensen, S; Goldman, T

    2016-09-01

    Designers at the conceptual phase of products such as headphones, stress the importance of comfort, e.g. executing comfort studies and the need for a reliable user panel. This paper proposes a methodology to issue a reliable user panel to represent large populations and validates the proposed framework to predict comfort factors, such as physical fit. Data of 200 heads was analyzed by forming clusters, 9 archetypal people were identified out of a 200 people's ear database. The archetypes were validated by comparing the archetypes' responses on physical fit against those of 20 participants interacting with 6 headsets. This paper suggests a new method of selecting representative user samples for prototype testing compared to costly and time consuming methods which relied on the analysis of human geometry of large populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutrient adequacy during weight loss interventions: a randomized study in women comparing the dietary intake in a meal replacement group with a traditional food group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovee Vicki

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe and effective weight control strategies are needed to stem the current obesity epidemic. The objective of this one-year study was to document and compare the macronutrient and micronutrient levels in the foods chosen by women following two different weight reduction interventions. Methods Ninety-six generally healthy overweight or obese women (ages 25–50 years; BMI 25–35 kg/m2 were randomized into a Traditional Food group (TFG or a Meal Replacement Group (MRG incorporating 1–2 meal replacement drinks or bars per day. Both groups had an energy-restricted goal of 5400 kJ/day. Dietary intake data was obtained using 3-Day Food records kept by the subjects at baseline, 6 months and one-year. For more uniform comparisons between groups, each diet intervention consisted of 18 small group sessions led by the same Registered Dietitian. Results Weight loss for the 73% (n = 70 completing this one-year study was not significantly different between the groups, but was significantly different (p ≤ .05 within each group with a mean (± standard deviation weight loss of -6.1 ± 6.7 kg (TFG, n = 35 vs -5.0 ± 4.9 kg (MRG, n = 35. Both groups had macronutrient (Carbohydrate:Protein:Fat ratios that were within the ranges recommended (50:19:31, TFG vs 55:16:29, MRG. Their reported reduced energy intake was similar (5729 ± 1424 kJ, TFG vs 5993 ± 2016 kJ, MRG. There was an improved dietary intake pattern in both groups as indicated by decreased intake of saturated fat (≤ 10%, cholesterol ( Conclusion In this one-year university-based intervention, both dietitian-led groups successfully lost weight while improving overall dietary adequacy. The group incorporating fortified meal replacements tended to have a more adequate essential nutrient intake compared to the group following a more traditional food group diet. This study supports the need to incorporate fortified foods and/or dietary supplements while following an energy

  11. Assessing handwriting intervention effectiveness in elementary school students: a two-group controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Tsu-Hsin; Roston, Karen Laurie; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hinojosa, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of two approaches used in elementary schools to improve children's handwriting. Participants were 72 New York City public school students from the first and second grades. A nonequivalent pretest-posttest group design was used in which students engaged in handwriting activities using two approaches: intensive handwriting practice and visual-perceptual-motor activities. Handwriting speed, legibility, and visual-motor skills were examined after a 12-wk Handwriting Club using multivariate analysis of variance. The results showed that students in the intensive handwriting practice group demonstrated significant improvements in handwriting legibility compared with students in the visual-perceptual-motor activity group. No significant effects in handwriting speed and visual-motor skills were found between the students in intensive handwriting practice group and the students in visual-perceptual-motor activities group. The Handwriting Club model is a natural intervention that fits easily into existing school curriculums and can be an effective short-term intervention (response to intervention Tier II). Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  12. A prospective study of group cohesiveness in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in psychological distress and social participation in adults diagnosed with clinical depression during and after participating in a therapeutic horticulture programme, and to investigate if the changes covaried with levels of group cohesiveness during the intervention. An intervention with a single-group design was repeated with different samples in successive years (pooled n = 46). In each year, five groups of 3-7 participants went through the intervention. Data were collected before, twice during, and immediately after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture programme, as well as at 3-months' follow up. Mental health assessments included the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Subscale of Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Positive Affect Scale from the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Therapeutic Factors Inventory-Cohesiveness Scale. The analysis of the pooled data confirmed significant beneficial change in all mental health variables during the intervention. Change from baseline in depression severity persisted at 3-months' follow up. Increased social activity after the intervention was reported for 38% of the participants. The groups quickly established strong cohesiveness, and this continued to increase during the intervention. The average level of group cohesiveness correlated positively, but not significantly, with change in all mental health outcome variables. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. Mapping extragalactic dark matter annihilation with galaxy surveys: A systematic study of stacked group searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2018-03-01

    Dark matter in the halos surrounding galaxy groups and clusters can annihilate to high-energy photons. Recent advancements in the construction of galaxy group catalogs provide many thousands of potential extragalactic targets for dark matter. In this paper, we outline a procedure to infer the dark matter signal associated with a given galaxy group. Applying this procedure to a catalog of sources, one can create a full-sky map of the brightest extragalactic dark matter targets in the nearby Universe (z ≲0.03 ), supplementing sources of dark matter annihilation from within the local group. As with searches for dark matter in dwarf galaxies, these extragalactic targets can be stacked together to enhance the signals associated with dark matter. We validate this procedure on mock Fermi gamma-ray data sets using a galaxy catalog constructed from the DarkSky N -body cosmological simulation and demonstrate that the limits are robust, at O (1 ) levels, to systematic uncertainties on halo mass and concentration. We also quantify other sources of systematic uncertainty arising from the analysis and modeling assumptions. Our results suggest that a stacking analysis using galaxy group catalogs provides a powerful opportunity to discover extragalactic dark matter and complements existing studies of Milky Way dwarf galaxies.

  14. Profile of Nigerians with diabetes mellitus - Diabcare Nigeria study group (2008: Results of a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes Mellitus is the commonest endocrine-metabolic disorder in Nigeria similar to the experience in other parts of the world. The aim was to assess the clinical and laboratory profile, and evaluate the quality of care of Nigerian diabetics with a view to planning improved diabetes care. Materials and Methods: In a multicenter study across seven tertiary health centers in Nigeria, the clinical and laboratory parameters of diabetic out-patients were evaluated. Clinical parameters studied include type of diabetes, anthropometry, and blood pressure (BP status, chronic complications of diabetes, and treatment types. Laboratory data assessed included fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2-h post-prandial (2-HrPP glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, urinalysis, serum lipids, electrolytes, urea, and creatinine. Results: A total of 531 patients, 209 (39.4% males and 322 (60.6% females enrolled. The mean age of the patients was 57.1 ± 12.3 years with the mean duration of diabetes of 8.8 ± 6.6 years. Majority (95.4% had type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM compared to type 1 DM (4.6%, with P < 0.001. The mean FPG, 2-HrPP glucose, and HbA1c were 8.1 ± 3.9 mmol/L, 10.6 ± 4.6 mmol/L, and 8.3 ± 2.2%, respectively. Only 170 (32.4% and 100 (20.4% patients achieved the ADA and IDF glycemic targets, respectively. Most patients (72.8% did not practice self-monitoring of blood glucose. Hypertension was found in 322 (60.9%, with mean systolic BP 142.0 ± 23.7 mmHg, and mean diastolic BP 80.7 ± 12.7 mmHg. Diabetic complications found were peripheral neuropathy (59.2%, retinopathy (35.5%, cataracts (25.2%, cerebrovascular disease (4.7%, diabetic foot ulcers (16.0%, and nephropathy (3.2%. Conclusion: Most Nigerian diabetics have suboptimal glycemic control, are hypertensives, and have chronic complications of DM. Improved quality of care and treatment to target is recommended to reduce diabetes-related morbidity and mortality.

  15. Genome-wide association study of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND): A CHARTER group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming; Hulgan, Todd; Bush, William S; Samuels, David C; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Heaton, Robert K; Ellis, Ronald J; Schork, Nicholas; Marra, Christina M; Collier, Ann C; Clifford, David B; Gelman, Benjamin B; Sacktor, Ned; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M; McCutchan, J Allen; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Franklin, Donald R; Rosario, Debralee; Letendre, Scott L; Grant, Igor; Kallianpur, Asha R

    2017-06-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) often complicates HIV infection despite combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) and may be influenced by host genomics. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of HAND in 1,050 CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) Study participants. All participants underwent standardized, comprehensive neurocognitive, and neuromedical assessments to determine if they had cognitive impairment as assessed by the Global Deficit Score (GDS), and individuals with comorbidities that could confound diagnosis of HAND were excluded. Neurocognitive outcomes included GDS-defined neurocognitive impairment (NCI; binary GDS, 366 cases with GDS ≥ 0.5 and 684 controls with GDS < 0.5, and GDS as a continuous variable) and Frascati HAND definitions that incorporate assessment of functional impairment by self-report and performance-based criteria. Genotype data were obtained using the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 platform. Multivariable logistic or linear regression-based association tests were performed for GDS-defined NCI and HAND. GWAS results did not reveal SNPs meeting the genome-wide significance threshold (5.0 × 10 -8 ) for GDS-defined NCI or HAND. For binary GDS, the most significant SNPs were rs6542826 (P = 8.1 × 10 -7 ) and rs11681615 (1.2 × 10 -6 ), both located on chromosome 2 in SH3RF3. The most significant SNP for continuous GDS was rs11157436 (P = 1.3 × 10 -7 ) on chromosome 14 in the T-cell-receptor alpha locus; three other SNPs in this gene were also associated with binary GDS (P ≤ 2.9 × 10 -6 ). This GWAS, conducted among ART-era participants from a single cohort with robust neurological phenotyping, suggests roles for several biologically plausible loci in HAND that deserve further exploration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dietary patterns, food groups and telomere length: a systematic review of current studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, N; Golpour Hamedani, S; Barak, F; Safavi, S M; Miraghajani, M

    2017-02-01

    Telomere length (TL) is recognized as a biomarker of aging and shorter telomeres are linked with shorter lifespan. Inter-individual variability in telomere length is highly heritable. However, there has been a resurgence of interest in the controversial relationship between diet and TL. Evaluating the impact of diet at the food group and dietary pattern level will provide greater insight into the effect of diet on TL dynamics, which are of significant importance in health and longevity. This article reports the first systematic review of the relation between food groups, dietary patterns and TL in human populations based on PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Science Direct, The Cochrane Library and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for all relevant studies, up to November 2015. Among the 17 included studies, 3 and 10 of them were regarding the effect of dietary patterns and various food groups on TL, respectively. Also, in 4 studies, both dietary patterns and different food groups were assessed in relation to TL. Mediterranean dietary pattern was related to longer TL in 3 studies. Five studies indicated beneficial effect of fruits or vegetables on TL. In 7 studies, a reverse association between TL and intake of cereals, processed meat, and fats and oils was reported. Our systematic review supports the health benefits of adherence to Mediterranean diet on TL. Except for the fruits and vegetables, which showed positive association with TL, results were inconsistent for other dietary factors. Also, certain food categories including processed meat, cereals and sugar-sweetened beverages may be associated with shorter TLs. However, additional epidemiological evidence and clinical trials should be considered in future research in order to develop firm conclusions in this regard.

  17. Change of International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale subscales with treatment and placebo: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell UH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike H Mitchell,1 Sterling C Hilton2 1Brigham Young University, Department of Exercise Sciences, 2Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations, Provo, UT, USA Background: In 2003, the 10-question International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale (IRLS was developed as a means of assessing the severity of restless legs syndrome. Two subscales were identified: symptom severity (SS 1 and symptom impact (SS 2. Only one study has investigated the subscales' responsiveness to a 12-week treatment with ropinirole. This current study was undertaken to assess the impact of a 4-week, non-pharmaceutical treatment on the two subscales and to explore whether or not both subscales were impacted by the observed placebo effect. Methods: The pooled data from questionnaires of 58 patients (41 from both treatment groups and 17 from the sham treatment control group, who participated in two clinical studies, were reviewed. Their change in score over a 4-week trial was computed. The average change in both subscales in both groups was computed and t-tests were performed. Results: In the treatment group, the average scores of both subscales changed significantly from baseline to week 4 (P<0.005 for both. Compared to the control, SS 1 changed (P<0.001, but not SS 2 (P=0.18. In the sham treatment group, the scores for SS 1 changed significantly (P=0.002, but not for SS 2 (P=0.2. Conclusion: This study corroborated findings from an earlier study in which both subscales changed with a 12-week drug treatment. It also showed that the observed placebo effect is attributed to a small but significant change in symptom severity, but not symptom impact. Keywords: restless legs syndrome, RLS severity scale, IRLS subscales, symptom impact, symptom severity

  18. Online Self-Tracking Groups to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Intake: A Small-Scale Study on Mechanisms of Group Effect on Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo; Peng, Wei; Shin, Soo Yun; Chung, Minwoong

    2017-03-06

    Web-based interventions with a self-tracking component have been found to be effective in promoting adults' fruit and vegetable consumption. However, these interventions primarily focus on individual- rather than group-based self-tracking. The rise of social media technologies enables sharing and comparing self-tracking records in a group context. Therefore, we developed an online group-based self-tracking program to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. This study aims to examine (1) the effectiveness of online group-based self-tracking on fruit and vegetable consumption and (2) characteristics of online self-tracking groups that make the group more effective in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption in early young adults. During a 4-week Web-based experiment, 111 college students self-tracked their fruit and vegetable consumption either individually (ie, the control group) or in an online group characterized by a 2 (demographic similarity: demographically similar vs demographically diverse) × 2 (social modeling: incremental change vs ideal change) experimental design. Each online group consisted of one focal participant and three confederates as group members or peers, who had their demographics and fruit and vegetable consumption manipulated to create the four intervention groups. Self-reported fruit and vegetable consumption were assessed using the Food Frequency Questionnaire at baseline and after the 4-week experiment. Participants who self-tracked their fruit and vegetable consumption collectively with other group members consumed more fruits and vegetables than participants who self-tracked individually (P=.01). The results did not show significant main effects of demographic similarity (P=.32) or types of social modeling (P=.48) in making self-tracking groups more effective in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption. However, additional analyses revealed the main effect of performance discrepancy (ie, difference in fruit and vegetable consumption

  19. Nano structures of group 13-15 mixed heptamer clusters: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Afshan; Ebadi, Mahsa

    2012-05-10

    The structural and thermodynamic characteristics of lowest-energy structures of group 13-15 mixed heptamers in two distinct series [(HM)(k)(HM')(l)(NH)(7)] (M, M' = B, Al, Ga and k + l = 7) and [(HGa)(7)(YH)(m)(Y'H)(n)] (Y,Y' = N, P, As and m + n = 7) have been systematically investigated using the density functional approach. Our main goal is to get knowledge of the preferential bonding patterns of the first three rows of group 13-15 elements for the construction of mixed heptameric clusters. Structural parameters, thermodynamic properties of oligomerization reaction, band gaps, and dipole moments of the 18 lowest-energy structures of the studied heptamers in each series are compared to their corresponding binary parents, that is, [(HM)(7)(NH)(7)] and [(HGa)(7)(YH)(7)]. The stability of different isomer structures is discussed to reveal the competitiveness of group 13 and 15 bonding. Mixed heptamers are predicted to be thermodynamically more stable compared to a mixture of monomers. However, the favorability for the generation of mixed heptamers strongly depends on the nature of inserted metal and nonmetal pairs of group 13-15. Moreover, it is found that among all studied heptamers the smaller band gaps correspond to arsenic containing species which are close to the semiconducting regime, around 4.62-4.98 eV.

  20. Studies with group treatments required special power calculations, allocation methods, and statistical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faes, Miriam C; Reelick, Miriam F; Perry, Marieke; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Borm, George F

    2012-02-01

    In some trials, the intervention is delivered to individuals in groups, for example, groups that exercise together. The group structure of such trials has to be taken into consideration in the analysis and has an impact on the power of the trial. Our aim was to provide optimal methods for the design and analysis of such trials. We described various treatment allocation methods and presented a new allocation algorithm: optimal batchwise minimization (OBM). We carried out a simulation study to evaluate the performance of unrestricted randomization, stratification, permuted block randomization, deterministic minimization, and OBM. Furthermore, we described appropriate analysis methods and derived a formula to calculate the study size. Stratification, deterministic minimization, and OBM had considerably less risk of imbalance than unrestricted randomization and permuted block randomization. Furthermore, OBM led to unpredictable treatment allocation. The sample size calculation and the analysis of the study must be based on a multilevel model that takes the group structure of the trial into account. Trials evaluating interventions that are carried out in subsequent groups require adapted treatment allocation, power calculation, and analysis methods. From the perspective of obtaining overall balance, we conclude that minimization is the method of choice. When the number of prognostic factors is low, stratification is an excellent alternative. OBM leads to better balance within the batches, but it is more complicated. It is probably most worthwhile in trials with many prognostic factors. From the perspective of predictability, a treatment allocation method, such as OBM, that allocates several subjects at the same time, is superior to other methods because it leads to the lowest possible predictability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Comparative study of some clinical and laboratory indicators in a group of patients using wells as source of drinking water and a control group using safe water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, L; Ciochină, D A

    2011-01-01

    In time, well water, as a source of drinking and coking water, with physical-chemical, bacteriological, and biological indicators suggestive of alteration in water potability, determines complex, sometimes irreversible, metabolic disorders. Sixty individuals residing in a rural community were divided into 2 groups: study group -30 subjects using well water, and control group--30 subjects using safe water. For the study group the selection criteria were: age, sex, use of well water as drinking and cooking water, history suggestive of chronic poisoning (pregnancy course, birth weight, susceptibility to infectious agents, and current chronic diseases). In the study group, gestosis, prematurity, and altered body mass index are more frequent as compared to the subjects in the control group. The identified laboratory changes indicate moderate anemia, hepatic cytolysis, dyslipidemia, presence of nitrites in urine, and positive urine cultures. Long-term use of water with mineral constituents in excess, absent, or inadequate, the direct biological and chemical water pollution, or most frequently the indirect pollution through the soil determine, in time, complex, sometimes irreversible, metabolic disorders.

  2. Black Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Diabetes: A Church-Affiliated Barbershop Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balls-Berry, Joyce; Watson, Christopher; Kadimpati, Sandeep; Crockett, Andre; Mohamed, Essa A; Brown, Italo; Soto, Miguel Valdez; Sanford, Becky; Halyard, Michele; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Dacy, Lea; Davis, Olga Idriss

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and disproportionately affects racial and ethnic minorities. These disparities persist despite educational efforts to reduce the prevalence of diabetes. Receptiveness of educational efforts for Black men needs to be studied. This study assesses Black men's receptiveness to a barbershop-based program focused on diabetes prevention and awareness in a church-affiliated barbershop in Rochester, Minnesota. The pastor and barber of a church-affiliated barbershop and academic medical researchers designed a community-engaged research study to determine Black men's perception of diabetes. Recruitment for the 90-minute focus group included flyers (n=60), email, and in-person. Units of analysis included focus-group audio recording, transcripts, and field notes. Using traditional content analysis, we categorized data into themes and sub-themes. Thirteen Black men participated (Group 1, n=6; Group 2, n=7) having a mean age of 40.3 years (range 19 to 65), and employed full-time (77%). Themes included diabetes prevention, treatment, prevalence, risks, and health education. Participants identified diet and exercise as essential components of diabetes prevention. Additionally, participants mentioned that family history contributes to diabetes. Participants agreed that barbershops are an appropriate setting for data collection and health education on diabetes for Black men. Findings indicate that Black men are generally aware of diabetes. The community-engaged research process allowed for development of a culturally appropriate research study on diabetes. This study is the foundation for developing a culturally appropriate health education program on diabetes for Black men.

  3. Morphological study of extrauterine length of the fallopian tube at different age group in Bangladeshi people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Z G; Islam, M S; Sultana, S Z; Mannan, S; Zaman, U K; Rahman, M M; Sen, S

    2010-01-01

    This cross sectional descriptive study was done to see the length of the right & left fallopian tube in Bangladeshi female and to increase the knowledge regarding variational anatomy in our country. Sixty post mortem specimens containing uterus, uterine tube, ureter and surrounding structures were collected by non random or purposive sampling technique from cadavers of different age groups and fixed in 10% formol saline solution. This study was carried out in the department of Anatomy of Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh from July 2006 to June 2007. Gross and fine dissection was carried out to study the length of fallopian tube (right & left). In this study our findings were compared with those of the standard text books. Maximum length of fallopian tube was found in middle age group (B = 13 to 45 years). It is about 9.19 cm in right side and 8.82 cm in left side. It is also important to note that more kinking was observed in middle age group.

  4. Narratives of empowerment and compliance: studies of communication in online patient support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzer, Helle S; Bygholm, Ann

    2013-12-01

    New technologies enable new forms of patient participation in health care. The article discusses whether communication in online patient support groups is a source of individual as well as collective empowerment or to be understood within the tradition of compliance. The discussion is based on a qualitative analysis of patient communication in two online groups on the Danish portal sundhed.dk, one for lung patients and one for women with fertility problems. The object of study is the total sum of postings during a specific period of time - a total of 4301 posts are included. The textmaterial was analyzed according to the textual paradigm of Paul Ricoeur, and the three steps of critical interpretation. Thus, the analysis moves from describing communicative characteristics of the site to a thorough semantic analysis of its narrative structure of construing meaning, interaction and collective identity, and finally as a source of collective action. The meta-narratives of the two groups confirm online patient support groups for individual empowerment, for collective group identity, but not for collective empowerment. The collective identities of patienthood on the two sites are created by the users (patients) through specific styles of communication and interaction, referred to as 'multi-logical narratives'. In spite of the potential of online communities of opening up health care to the critical voice of the public, the analysis points to a synthesis of the otherwise opposite positions of empowerment and compliance in patient care. On a collective level, the site is empowering the individual users to comply with 'doctor's recommendations' as a group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-esteem: a comparative study of adolescents from mainstream and minority religious groups in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Ayub, Nadia

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the level of self-esteem among religious minority adolescents (Christians and Hindus) by making a comparison with their dominant counterparts (Muslims) in Pakistan. It was hypothesized that adolescents of religious minorities would have lower level of self-esteem than their dominant counterparts. In the present study 320 adolescents participated, in which 160 adolescents belonged to minority religious groups (i.e. 76 Christians and 84 Hindus) and 160 adolescents belonged to dominant religious group i.e. Muslims. To assess self-esteem of the participants, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg in Society and the adolescent self image, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1965) was used. One Way Analysis of Variance reveals that religious minority adolescents (Christians and Hindus) inclined to have lower self-esteem as compared to their dominant counterpart (Muslim adolescents).

  6. Study of Spatial Pattern of Indicator Plant Species in Ecological Species Groups (Case Study: Manesht Protected Area, Ilam Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heydari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The key factor in understanding the forest ecosystems is forest structure. Spatial arrangement and location of trees are both one of the main components of forest stand structure. This study was carried out in Manesht protected area, Ilam province. In order to determine the ecological groups and spatial patterns of indicator species, we used fixed-area plots method. For data collection, 125 square sampling plots with an area of 400 m2 were selected based on a systematically random method. The plants were classified using TWINSPAN analysis and then spatial pattern was analyzed by indices of ratio of average to variance, Morisata and standardized Morisata. Four ecological groups were specified and all dispersion indices showed clumped pattern for indicator species of the ecological groups. The results of this study could provide useful information to describe the sustainability of this valuable ecosystem and monitoring protective and rehabilitative practices.

  7. Supporting self-management by Community Matrons through a group intervention; an action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkham, Abigail M; Ersser, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility and impact of a group intervention by Community Matrons to support those living with multiple long-terms conditions. Little evidence exists as to how the role of the Community Matron (CM) should be delivered to effectively enhance disease self-management and levels of self-efficacy for the service users. This qualitative participatory action research study explored the use of group work as a method of intervention by CMs. A purposive sample of 29 participants was recruited. Each patient group had 8-10 participants, led by a CM working in both the researcher and practitioner role, operating over 12-month period. Data were collected by participant observation, researcher reflexive account and interviews. Grounded theory method was used to systematically analyse the data. Three main data categories emerged: (i) comparison by patients that leads to re-motivation of the self; (ii) learning, leading to enhanced self-management techniques, through storytelling and understanding of each other's experiences; and (iii) ownership that resulted in the self-awareness, cognisance and insight into the role of the support group they were based in and how it benefited them. The core category of 'Taking back the self - understanding the whole,' conveyed the impact that this care delivery method had upon readjusting the balance of power between health professional and service users and its consequence in refreshing and improving their self-management and the patients' self-efficacy. It was concluded that CM intervention using a model of group learning can lead to more effective and efficient support, through improving self-efficacy and patients' related self-management ability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Targeting pneumococcal vaccination to high-risk groups: a feasibility study in one general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, A N

    1999-04-01

    The Department of Health recommends pneumococcal vaccination opportunistically or when immunising against influenza. This was a study in one general practice to assess the feasibility of targeting patients for pneumococcal vaccination in primary care. We also examined the rate of uptake of pneumococcal vaccine in identified risk groups after one year of a pneumococcal vaccination programme. A self-administered questionnaire was given to patients attending for influenza vaccine between September and December 1996. A total of 551/747 (73.8%) patients returned completed questionnaires. Few patients receiving influenza vaccination (133/509, 26%) were aware of pneumococcal vaccine. Only 55/108 (51%) of those given influenza vaccination were in a clinical risk group for pneumococcal vaccine. Attitudes towards vaccination were more positive and intention to take up pneumococcal vaccination significantly greater in high-risk patients compared to those who were not in a risk group. A targeted vaccination campaign directed at high-risk patients, both opportunistically and those attending for influenza vaccination over one year, resulted in the following proportions of patients in at-risk groups being vaccinated: coronary disease 144/312 (46%), diabetes 79/132 (60%), splenectomy 2/2 (100%), chronic obstructive airways disease and asthma 135/700 (19%), and chronic renal failure 5/9 (56%). Most doses of pneumococcal vaccine (336/463; 73%) were delivered to patients in high-risk groups. We conclude that a well-organised pneumococcal vaccination campaign can improve coverage of at-risk patients in general practice. Programmes to increase patient awareness of the vaccine, improved availability of vaccine, and practice guidelines, would help to target the vaccine to at-risk patients. Patients with chronic lung disease and asthma were particularly difficult to define and target in this study. A review of the UK guidelines, aligning those for pneumococcal and influenza vaccination

  9. Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case Study of BSCI Implementation at Best Friend Group Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    With the current polarized debate over CSR issues worldwide, ever increasing number of companies believe that incorporating ethical values into the business operation is an attractive option to upgrade the brand value, maintain the competitive advantage and cater for the social demand of various stakeholders. Business Social Compliance Initiative, a division of FTA, serves as a platform to assist companies in achieving the goal. The study was commissioned by Best Friend Group Oy, a medium...

  10. Results of a Phase II Study of the Italian Group on Rare Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Santoro

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The prognosis of advanced soft tissue sarcoma is poor, only a few drugs showing some activity with response rates around 15– 25%. Consequently drug development seems mandatory to improve treatment outcome. Following previous favourable EORTC experience, the Italian Group on Rare Tumors started a phase II study with docetaxel to confirm the activity of this drug in soft tissue sarcoma.

  11. Geochemical studies of the sediments of Barreiras group, Itaborai region-RJ, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.C.G.P.

    1983-01-01

    It is purpused to study the lead, copper, chromium, manganese, vanadium and zinc geochemical bahavior of the clays obtained from outcrop samples of Barreiras group and weathered Pre-Cambriam situated at Itaborai region, in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Field and laboratory description, grain size analyses, X-ray diffraction, emission spectrography, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption, transmission electronic microscopy and pH tests were applied to twenty-two samples selected. (Author) [pt

  12. Report of the Study Group on the History of Fish and Fisheries (SGHIST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The Study Group on the History of Fish and Fisheries (SGHIST) brings together fish-eries scientists, historians and marine biologists working on multidecadal to centen-nial changes in the marine environment, and aims at improving the understanding of the long term dynamics of fish populations, fi......, fishing fleets, and fishing technologies. The results are used for setting baselines for management, restoration and conserva-tion of marine resources and ecosystems....

  13. Study of otoacoustic emissions in workers of various professional groups of the coal industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shydlovska T.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Noise influence takes one of the leading roles in the development of sensorineural hearing loss (SHL. At the same time professional deafness steadily occupies the 5th place in the structure of occupational diseases in Ukraine over the past few years. Of special importance is the problem of pre-clinical and early diagnosis of occupational hearing deterioration, in sense of timely prophylactic and rehabilitation measures in “risk group” workers. The objective research methods play an important role in the diagnosis of auditory analyzer state. Many scientific studies have shown the diagnostic effectiveness of method of otoacoustic emissions recording in the early diagnosis of lesions of receptor part of auditory analyzer. It is known that SHL of noise genesis largely affects the receptor part of the auditory analyzer, for which the OAE method has great practical diagnostic significance. Objective: to study informativity indicators of otoacoustic emission for the diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss in various occupational groups of coal workers in Ukrainian mines. Materials and Methods: Auditory function of 87 workers of the coal industry (drifters, miners and longwall miners with different levels of industrial noise and hygienic conditions in their workplaces was: 28 studied drifters (group 1, 25 miners (group 2 and 34 longwall miners (group 3. Work experience in noise in these groups was 17,9±1,0; 23,1±1,0 and 22,2±2,0 accordingly. Noise ratio in drifters was 93,6±4,9 dBA, in miners – 92,9±5,5 dBA and in longwall miners – 86,5±6,04 dBA accordingly, while the maximum permitted level is 80 dBA. The research was conducted on the analyzing system "Eclipse" "Interacoustics" (Denmark. All patients underwent registratiov of the caused OAE at frequency distortion product (DPOAE at frequencies 1-6 kHz. The results were rated using variation statistics Student's test. Results: The most prominent violation of the receptor part of the

  14. Is the representation about social groups distinct from that of other concepts? A neuropsychological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Piretti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally neuropsychological observations have constrained the view that semantic knowledge is organized in categories: animals, plants or tools (Warrington & Shallice, 1984; Caramazza & Shelton, 1998; Tyler & Moss, 2001. Recently it has suggested that social groups, defined as categories of individuals that share category-relevant characteristics and/or features (Mason & Macrae, 2004,could have a representation of their own. Rumiati et al. (2014 documented double dissociations on word sorting tasks between living things, non-living things and social groups in patients with primary dementia. Consistently with this neuropsychological finding, a neuroimaging study showed that, relatively to non-social concepts, concepts about social groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and the temporo-parietal junction (Contreras et al., 2012. In the present study we tested whether social groups, such as “Muslims” or “fat people”, are represented independently of the other concepts and, if so, what are their brain correlates. Twenty-nine patients with temporal and frontal brain tumors, either in the left or right hemisphere, and 19 healthy controls matched for age and education (all p> .05 were tested on three tasks (picture naming, word-to-picture-matching, and picture sorting using stimuli that belonged to three categories: living things (animals and plants, N=15, non-living things (artifacts, N=15 and social groups (N=15. The stimuli belonging to the three categories were matched for letter length and frequency (all p> .05. Results showed that left-brain tumor patients (lBTP were found to be worse than both healthy controls (HC and right-brain tumor patients (rBTP on naming non-living things (p<.05 and social groups (p<.01. lBTP performed significantly worse on naming non-living things than living things and social groups, while rBTP performed as well as healthy controls. Moreover lBTP made significantly more semantic

  15. Initial experience with a group presentation of study results to research participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite ethical imperatives, informing research participants about the results of the studies in which they take part is not often performed. This is due, in part, to the costs and burdens of communicating with each participant after publication of the results. Methods Following the closeout and publication of a randomized clinical trial of saw palmetto for treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, patients were invited back to the research center to participate in a group presentation of the study results. Results Approximately 10% of participants attended one of two presentation sessions. Reaction to the experience of the group presentation was very positive among the attendees. Conclusion A group presentation to research participants is an efficient method of communicating study results to those who desire to be informed and was highly valued by those who attended. Prospectively planning for such presentations and greater scheduling flexibility may result in higher attendance rates. Trial Registration Number Clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00037154

  16. Improving learning and confidence through small group, structured otoscopy teaching: a prospective interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Peng; Chahine, Saad; Husein, Murad

    2017-12-28

    Otologic diseases are common and associated with significant health care costs. While accurate diagnosis relies on physical exam, existing studies have highlighted a lack of comfort among trainees with regards to otoscopy. As such, dedicated otoscopy teaching time was incorporated into the undergraduate medical curriculum in the form of a small group teaching session. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of a small-group, structured teaching session on medical students' confidence with and learning of otoscopic examination. Using a prospective study design, an otolaryngologist delivered an one-hour, small group workshop to medical learners. The workshop included introduction and demonstration of otoscopy and pneumatic otoscopy followed by practice with peer feedback. A survey exploring students' confidence with otoscopy and recall of anatomical landmarks was distributed before(T1), immediately after(T2), and 1 month following the session(T3). One hundred and twenty five learners participated from February 2016 to February 2017. Forty nine participants with complete data over T1-T3 demonstrated significant improvement over time in confidence (Wilk's lambda = .09, F(2,48) = 253.31 p learning (Wilk's lambda = 0.34, F(2,47) = 24.87 p confidence with otoscopy and identification of otologic landmarks. Dedicated otoscopy teaching sessions may be a beneficial addition to the undergraduate medical curriculum.

  17. Community responses to communication campaigns for influenza A (H1N1: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Lesley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This research was a part of a contestable rapid response initiative launched by the Health Research Council of New Zealand and the Ministry of Health in response to the 2009 influenza A pandemic. The aim was to provide health authorities in New Zealand with evidence-based practical information to guide the development and delivery of effective health messages for H1N1 and other health campaigns. This study contributed to the initiative by providing qualitative data about community responses to key health messages in the 2009 and 2010 H1N1 campaigns, the impact of messages on behavioural change and the differential impact on vulnerable groups in New Zealand. Methods Qualitative data were collected on community responses to key health messages in the 2009 and 2010 Ministry of Health H1N1 campaigns, the impact of messages on behaviour and the differential impact on vulnerable groups. Eight focus groups were held in the winter of 2010 with 80 participants from groups identified by the Ministry of Health as vulnerable to the H1N1 virus, such as people with chronic health conditions, pregnant women, children, Pacific Peoples and Māori. Because this study was part of a rapid response initiative, focus groups were selected as the most efficient means of data collection in the time available. For Māori, focus group discussion (hui is a culturally appropriate methodology. Results Thematic analysis of data identified four major themes: personal and community risk, building community strategies, responsibility and information sources. People wanted messages about specific actions that they could take to protect themselves and their families and to mitigate any consequences. They wanted transparent and factual communication where both good and bad news is conveyed by people who they could trust. Conclusions The responses from all groups endorsed the need for community based risk management including information dissemination. Engaging

  18. Factors affecting research productivity of production and operations management groups: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies factors that promote research productivity of production and operations management (POM groups of researchers in US business schools. In this study, research productivity of a POM group is defined as the number of articles published per POM professor in a specific period of time. The paper also examines factors that affect research quality, as measured by the number of articles published per POM professor in journals, which have been recognized in the POM literature as an elite set. The results show that three factors increase both the research productivity and the quality of the articles published by professors of a POM group. These factors are (a the presence of a POM research center, (b funding received from external sources for research purposes, and (c better library facilities. Doctoral students do assist in improving research quality and productivity, but they are not the driving force. These results have important implications for establishing policy guidelines for business schools. For example, real-world problems are funded by external sources and have a higher probability of publication. Furthermore, schools could place more emphasis on external funding, as most engineering schools do, since groups receiving external funding are more productive in terms of research.

  19. Energy efficiency advocacy groups: A study of selected interactive efforts and independent initiatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

    1994-03-01

    Non-utility groups participate in a myriad of activities--initiated by themselves and others--aimed at influencing the policies and actions of utilities and their regulators related to Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) and Demand-Side Management (DSM). Some of these activities are not directed toward a particular regulatory body or utility but are designed to influence public knowledge and acceptance of IRP and DSM. Other activities involve interaction with a particular utility or regulatory body. The traditional forum for this interaction is an adversarial debate (i.e., litigation or regulatory intervention) over the merits of a utility`s plan or proposed action. However, an increasingly common forum is one in which non-utility groups and utilities cooperatively develop plans, policies, and/or programs. Arrangements of this type are referred to in this report as ``interactive efforts``. This report presents the findings derived from ten case studies of energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAG) activities to influence the use of cost-effective DSM and to promote IRP; nine of these ten cases involve some form of interactive effort and all of them also include other EEAG activities. The goal of this research is not to measure the success of individual activities of the various groups, but to glean from a collective examination of their activities an understanding of the efficacy of various types of interactive efforts and other EEAG activities and of the contextual and procedural factors that influence their outcomes.

  20. Functional groups in phytoecology: an application to the study of isolated plant communities in Mediterranean France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Médail, Frédéric; Roche, Philip; Tatoni, Thierry

    1998-05-01

    The main objective of this study is to compare functional patterns versus plant composition in holm-oak forest isolates from two sites of Provence (Mediterranean France), on siliceous (Maures) or calcareous substrates (Luberon). In order to define plant functional groups, 9 traits out of a total of 71 attributes, were used. Twenty functional groups were defined with predominantly vegetative traits. Within each site, edges and forested core areas refer to different functional groups, in relation to the isolate structure and disturbance effects. In siliceous Provence, a higher structural and functional diversity occurs inside isolates, whereas on calcareous substrate, the diversity of plant functional groups which characterizes edges, is as important as in internal parts of isolates. Functional diversity does not necessarily follow the same patterns as the specific diversity, which is always greater in edges. Thus, the use of some sets of attributes, resulting from evolutionary trade-off between plants and their environment, can provide a better understanding of ecological consequences of disturbances.

  1. Performance Anxiety at English PBL Groups Among Taiwanese Medical Students: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Sheng Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Students' performance anxiety can impact negatively on the effectiveness of medical education reform, including performance in problem-based learning (PBL and in using English in discussion. This study aimed to investigate the nature of performance anxiety among Taiwanese medical students in an English-language PBL group. Eighteen Taiwanese, one American and four Asian medical students who were attending an international PBL workshop were enrolled. A questionnaire seeking demographic data and experience in use of PBL and eight questions evaluating performance anxiety were administered. The performance anxiety of Taiwanese medical students was compared to that of the Asians and the one American. Frequencies of each performance anxiety were calculated. The results suggested that the Taiwanese students showed more anxiety than the one student from the United States, but less than other Asian students. The acts of giving a report, being the center of attention, and talking in the PBL group were the most common situations related to anxiety in PBL groups. Using English and working in a new PBL environment are possible sources of anxiety. The presence of anxiety among the Taiwanese medical students in English PBL groups implies the necessity for developing an effective strategy to deal with students' performance anxiety.

  2. Performance anxiety at English PBL groups among Taiwanese medical students: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Lu, Peih-Ying; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Chiang, Hung-Che; Huang, In-Ting; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2008-03-01

    Students' performance anxiety can impact negatively on the effectiveness of medical education reform, including performance in problem-based learning (PBL) and in using English in discussion. This study aimed to investigate the nature of performance anxiety among Taiwanese medical students in an English-language PBL group. Eighteen Taiwanese, one American and four Asian medical students who were attending an international PBL workshop were enrolled. A questionnaire seeking demographic data and experience in use of PBL and eight questions evaluating performance anxiety were administered. The performance anxiety of Taiwanese medical students was compared to that of the Asians and the one American. Frequencies of each performance anxiety were calculated. The results suggested that the Taiwanese students showed more anxiety than the one student from the United States, but less than other Asian students. The acts of giving a report, being the center of attention, and talking in the PBL group were the most common situations related to anxiety in PBL groups. Using English and working in a new PBL environment are possible sources of anxiety. The presence of anxiety among the Taiwanese medical students in English PBL groups implies the necessity for developing an effective strategy to deal with students' performance anxiety.

  3. Walking, sustainability and health: findings from a study of a Walking for Health group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gordon; Machaczek, Kasia; Pollard, Nick; Allmark, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Not only is it tacitly understood that walking is good for health and well-being but there is also now robust evidence to support this link. There is also growing evidence that regular short walks can be a protective factor for a range of long-term health conditions. Walking in the countryside can bring additional benefits, but access to the countryside brings complexities, especially for people with poorer material resources and from different ethnic communities. Reasons for people taking up walking as a physical activity are reasonably well understood, but factors linked to sustained walking, and therefore sustained benefit, are not. Based on an ethnographic study of a Walking for Health group in Lincolnshire, UK, this paper considers the motivations and rewards of group walks for older people. Nineteen members of the walking group, almost all with long-term conditions, took part in tape-recorded interviews about the personal benefits of walking. The paper provides insights into the links between walking as a sustainable activity and health, and why a combination of personal adaptive capacities, design elements of the walks and relational achievements of the walking group are important to this understanding. The paper concludes with some observations about the need to reframe conventional thinking about adherence to physical activity programmes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The role of walkers' needs and expectations in supporting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: a longitudinal multi-perspective study of walkers and walk group leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; French, David P

    2015-01-01

    There is good evidence that when people's needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers' needs and walk leaders' actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research. Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a) eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b) eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders. Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers' personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers' needs. Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers' maintenance at walking groups. This should result in greater retention of walkers in walking groups, thereby

  5. The Role of Walkers’ Needs and Expectations in Supporting Maintenance of Attendance at Walking Groups: A Longitudinal Multi-Perspective Study of Walkers and Walk Group Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; French, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is good evidence that when people’s needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers’ needs and walk leaders’ actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research. Methods Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a) eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b) eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders. Results Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers’ personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers’ needs. Conclusions Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers’ maintenance at walking groups. This should result in

  6. The role of walkers' needs and expectations in supporting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: a longitudinal multi-perspective study of walkers and walk group leaders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Kassavou

    Full Text Available There is good evidence that when people's needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers' needs and walk leaders' actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research.Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders.Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers' personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers' needs.Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers' maintenance at walking groups. This should result in greater retention of walkers in walking

  7. [On the Way to Culture-Sensitive Patient Information Materials: Results of a Focus Group Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Zivile; Frank, Fabian; Bermejo, Isaac; Kalaitsidou, Chariklia; Zill, Jördis; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Bengel, Jürgen; Hölzel, Lars

    2017-09-28

    Aim This study was part of a double-blind randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effects of culture-sensitive patient information materials (PIM) compared with standard translated material. The study aimed to obtain the data for the development of culture sensitive PIM about unipolar depression for the 4 largest migrant groups in Germany (Turkish, Polish, Russian and Italian migration background). Method A qualitative study using 4 manual-based focus groups (FG), one for each migrant group, with 29 participants (9 with a Turkish (TüG), 8 with a Polish (PoG), 5 with a Russian (RuG) and 7 with an Italian (ItG) migration background) was conducted. The discussions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results 7 categories were identified. For the (1.) development of a good culture-sensitive PIM an easy language, a clear structure, an assessable extent of information and the avoidance of stereotypes were highlighted cross-culturally in all four FG. RuG and PoG had the largest (2.) lack of information about the German health care system. Concerning the (3.) illness perception RuG named problems with recognizing and understanding depression. PoG, RuG and TüG thematized (4.) feared consequences of the illness and of professional helpseeking. ItG, PoG, RuG had fears concerning (5.) psychotropic drugs as a result from insufficient knowledge about medication. For (6.) doctor-patient relationship cultural specifics were identified in RuG and TüG and for (7.) migration or culture specific reasons for depression in RuG, ItG and TüG. Conclusion Although the identified categories were relevant for all or for the majority of migrant groups, for most categories specific cultural aspects were discovered. These findings show the importance of a culture sensitive adaptation of PIM. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Group-IV nanosheets with vacancies: a tight-binding extended Hückel study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Adriano de Souza; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical study of the electronic properties of group-IV element nanosheets, namely graphene, silicene, germanene and the corresponding hydrogenated structures for the two latter, silicane and germanane. We compare the results of two different calculation methods, Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Extended Hückel Theory (EHT), for both pristine sheets and sheets of silicene and germanene with a single-atom vacancy. We show that EHT offers a remarkably reliable description of the electronic structure of these materials for all cases, thus offering an affordable way for studying large systems for which DFT calculations would be expensive and lengthy. (paper)

  9. The postoperative handover: a focus group interview study with nurse anaesthetists, anaesthesiologists and PACU nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randmaa, Maria; Engström, Maria; Swenne, Christine Leo; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2017-08-04

    To investigate different professionals' (nurse anaesthetists', anaesthesiologists', and postanaesthesia care unit nurses') descriptions of and reflections on the postoperative handover. A focus group interview study with a descriptive design using qualitative content analysis of transcripts. One anaesthetic clinic at two hospitals in Sweden. Six focus groups with 23 healthcare professionals involved in postoperative handovers. Each group was homogeneous regarding participant profession, resulting in two groups per profession: nurse anaesthetists (n=8), anaesthesiologists (n=7) and postanaesthesia care unit nurses (n=8). Patterns and five categories emerged: (1) having different temporal foci during handover, (2) insecurity when information is transferred from one team to another, (3) striving to ensure quality of the handover, (4) weighing the advantages and disadvantages of the bedside handover and (5) having different perspectives on the transfer of responsibility. The professionals' perceptions of the postoperative handover differed with regard to temporal foci and transfer of responsibility. All professional groups were insecure about having all information needed to ensure the quality of care. They strived to ensure quality of the handover by: focusing on matters that deviated from the normal course of events, aiding memory through structure and written information and cooperating within and between teams. They reported that the bedside handover enhances their control of the patient but also that it could threaten the patient's privacy and that frequent interruptions could be disturbing. The present findings revealed variations in different professionals' views on the postoperative handover. Healthcare interventions are needed to minimise the gap between professionals' perceptions and practices and to achieve a shared understanding of postoperative handover. Furthermore, to ensure high-quality and safe care, stakeholders/decision makers need to pay attention

  10. Prevalence, serologic and genetic studies of high expressers of the blood group A antigen on platelets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna Gomes, B M; Estalote, A C; Palatnik, M; Pimenta, G; Pereira, B de B; do Nascimento, E M

    2010-01-01

    Objective/Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of the platelet blood group A antigenicity in Euro-Brazilians (EUBs) and Afro-Brazilians (AFBs). Background: A small but significant proportion of individuals express high levels of A or B antigen on their platelets corresponding to the erythrocyte ABO group. The mechanism of increased antigen expression has not been elucidated. Material/Methods: A cohort of 241 blood group A donors was analysed by flow cytometry. Although mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) is a typical continuous variable, platelets were screened and divided into two categories: low expressers (LEs) and high expressers (HEs). A three-generation family was investigated looking for an inheritance mechanism. Results: The prevalence of the HE platelet phenotype among group A1 donors was 2%. The mean of MFI on platelets of A1 subgroup of EUBs differs from that of AFBs (P = 0·0115), whereas the frequency of the HE phenotype was similar between them (P = 0·5251). A significant difference was found between sexes (P = 0·0039). Whereas the serum glycosyltransferase from HE family members converted significantly more H antigen on group O erythrocytes into A antigens compared with that in LE serum, their ABO, FUT1 and FUT2 genes were consensus. The theoretically favourable, transcriptionally four-repeat ABO enhancer was not observed. Conclusion: The occurrence of HE in several members suggests familial aggregation. Indeed, in repeated measures, stability of the MFI values is suggesting an inherited condition. Factors outside the ABO locus might be responsible for the HE phenotype. Whether the real mechanism of inheritance is either of a polygenic or of a discrete Mendelian nature remains to be elucidated. PMID:20553427

  11. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Ann Skewes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group Schema Therapy (ST-g with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, behavioural, and experiential techniques. Specific schema-based strategies were chosen for a diagnostically mixed group of personality disorder clients. Six participants attended until end of treatment and two dropped-out before mid-treatment. All outcome measures showed changes with large effect sizes in avoidant personality disorder symptom severity, depression and anxiety levels between pre-therapy and follow-up. Four participants achieved a loss of personality disorder diagnosis at the end of therapy. By follow-up, five participants had achieved a loss of diagnosis, suggesting that participants derived ongoing benefits from the group even after treatment ended. Six participants no longer met criteria for depression at the end of treatment and this was maintained for all participants at six-month follow-up. At follow-up, the majority of participants showed clinically significant change on the GSI. For the SMI maladaptive modes, the majority of participants showed improvement at follow-up. At follow-up 40% of participants showed clinically significant change on the SMI adaptive modes. Qualitative feedback indicates that the group helps to normalize participants’ psychological experiences and difficulties and promotes self-expression and self-disclosure, while reducing disinhibition. Preliminary results suggest that short-term ST-g may benefit those with mixed personality disorders, but generalizability is limited by the small sample size and lack

  12. Developing a culturally tailored stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sarah E; Kwon, Ivy; Chang, Emiley; Araiza, Daniel; Thorpe, Carol Lee; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2016-12-01

    To gain better understanding of (i) beliefs and knowledge about stroke; (ii) attitudes about walking for stroke prevention; and (iii) barriers and facilitators to walking among Korean seniors for the cultural tailoring of a stroke prevention walking programme. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for stroke. Korean immigrant seniors are one of the most sedentary ethnic groups in the United States. An explorative study using focus group data. Twenty-nine Korean immigrant seniors (64-90 years of age) who had been told by a doctor at least once that their blood pressure was elevated participated in 3 focus groups. Each focus group consisted of 8-11 participants. Focus group audiotapes were transcribed and analysed using standard content analysis methods. Participants identified physical and psychological imbalances (e.g. too much work and stress) as the primary causes of stroke. Restoring 'balance' was identified as a powerful means of stroke prevention. A subset of participants expressed that prevention may be beyond human control. Overall, participants acknowledged the importance of walking for stroke prevention, but described barriers such as lack of personal motivation and unsafe environment. Many participants believed that providing opportunities for socialisation while walking and combining walking with health information sessions would facilitate participation in and maintenance of a walking programme. Korean immigrant seniors believe strongly that imbalance is a primary cause of stroke. Restoring balance as a way to prevent stroke is culturally special among Koreans and provides a conceptual base in culturally tailoring our stroke prevention walking intervention for Korean immigrant seniors. A stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors may have greater impact by addressing beliefs about stroke causes and prevention such as physical and psychological imbalances and the importance of maintaining emotional well-being. © 2016 John

  13. Psychosexual distress in women with gynecologic cancer: a feasibility study of an online support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Catherine C; Chivers, Meredith L; Urowitz, Sara; Barbera, Lisa; Wiljer, David; O'Rinn, Susan; Ferguson, Sarah E

    2013-04-01

    The psychosexual concerns of gynecologic cancer patients are often unaddressed and there are limited resources available for women to deal with this highly sensitive topic. This feasibility study examines the participation rates and preliminary outcomes for an online support group designed specifically for women who are sexually distressed subsequent to gynecologic cancer treatment A 12-week online intervention was developed to address the psychosexual impact of gynecologic cancer. This intervention included a professionally moderated, asynchronous discussion forum as well as the provision of psycho-educational materials addressing the psychosexual impact of gynecologic cancer. Each week, a new topic was introduced and relevant material was posted on the website. Women were encouraged to share their experiences related to the topic. Twenty-seven, sexually distressed, remitted gynecologic cancer patients were randomly assigned to immediate treatment or a waitlist control condition. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline, 4-month and 8-month follow-ups assessing sexual distress as the primary outcome as well as anxiety, depression, and illness intrusiveness. Participation rates differed between the two groups, with greater participation occurring in the second group. Exit interviews indicated that the majority of the participants were satisfied with the intervention. Intent-to-treat analyses suggest a small effect for reduction in sexual distress This feasibility study suggests that women find this intervention acceptable. Further research is required to determine efficacy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Study on occupational therapy groups for caregivers of families with schizophrenia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica da Silva Araujo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know the main aspects featuring the experience of caring for a family member who is schizophrenic and discuss the possible therapeutic benefits which arise from the participation of caregivers in occupational therapy groups. Methodological procedures: Qualitative-descriptive study, performed in a mental health ambulatory at a general hospital in the state of São Paulo. Data was collected through audio-recording in occupational therapy groups which counted on the participation of 10 family-caregivers of schizophrenic patients with follow-up treatment at this ambulatory. The data were analyzed through the thematic content analysis of Lawrence Bardin. Results: Caregivers of schizophrenic patients face daily difficulties arising from living together with their beloved ones and coping with their behaviors. These caregivers stress the importance of groups as a possible opportunity to have contact with other experiences of people under similar conditions, which not only enables them to clear doubts concerning the illness and the provided care, but also to reflect on the importance of taking care of themselves. Conclusions: There is great need for new studies that address this issue and develop continuous therapeutic interventions that offer caregivers the possibility to be heard about their experiences and to share information, aiming to prepare them to offer a more effective care for the schizophrenic family member and others with mental disorders. The importance of evaluating such interventions is therefore highlighted.

  15. Breastfeeding Practices and Opinions of Latina Mothers in an Urban Pediatric Office: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloand, Elizabeth; Lowe, Victoria; Pennington, Amy; Rose, Linda

    2018-01-17

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore beliefs about breastfeeding among Latina mothers. The focus groups were part of a sequential mixed methods study. Two focus groups were conducted. Participants were Spanish-speaking mothers with infants younger than 12 months. Focus groups were conducted in Spanish and audiorecorded. The researchers performed open coding of the data, compared and converged codes, and identified common themes and relationships among the themes. Mothers described concerns about adequacy of breastfeeding for their infants' needs, the continued goodness of breast milk, and weaning. They expressed lack of knowledge about using breast pumps and other assists that could help them breastfeed. Culturally tailored breastfeeding education and support have not been adequately implemented in this urban clinic and likely in other similar settings. More targeted attention to this population could improve exclusive breastfeeding of infants and ultimately result in better child health. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of pharmaceutical counselling on antimicrobial use in surgical wards: intervention study with historical control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Eva; Weber, Alexandra; Lohmann, Stefanie; Vetter-Kerkhoff, Cornelia; Strobl, Ralf; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of pharmaceutical consulting on the quality of antimicrobial use in a surgical hospital department in a prospective controlled intervention study. Patients receiving pharmaceutical intervention (intervention group, IG, n = 317) were compared with a historical control group (control group, CG, n = 321). During the control period, antimicrobial use was monitored without intervention. During the subsequent intervention period, a clinical pharmacist reviewed the prescriptions and gave advice on medication. Intervention reduced the length of antimicrobial courses (IG = 10 days, CG = 11 days, incidence rate ratio for i.v. versus o.p. = 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 0.93) and shortened i.v. administration (IG = 8 days, CG = 10 days, hazard rate = 1.76 in favour of switch from i.v. to p.o., 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 2.52). Intervention also helped to avoid useless combination therapy and reduced total costs for antimicrobials. A clinical pharmacist who reviews prescriptions can promote an increase in efficiency, for example, by shortening the course of treatment. Counselling by ward-based clinical pharmacists was shown to be effective to streamline antimicrobial therapy in surgical units and to increase drug safety. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Geochronological study of the metaconglomerates of the Sao Roque Group, Sao Paulo State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassinari, C.C.G.; Kawashita, K.; Kikuchi, R.K.P. de

    1985-01-01

    This work deals with the geochronological study of the metaconglomerates of the Sao Roque Group by Rb-Sr whole rock measurements and K-Ar method in minerals concentrate. The granite-gneissic pebbles from the metaconglomerates have been analysed by Rb-Sr isochronic method and yelded an age of 1200+100 Ma. with a 87 Sr/ 86 Sr intercept of 0.737 +- 0.003. In our view this age might be associated to the metamorphic episode affecting the pre-existent granitic rocks before the epoch of the Sao Roque group sedimentation, or to the original age of the pebbles. The analytical points from the conglomerate matrix seem to define a linear array with 800Ma. This age, probably, represents the epoch of the main metamorphic event on the Sao Roque Group. The K-Ar micas determinations on rocks of the unit in study are concordant in ages, with values around 620.. These ages represent the tectonic estabilization epoch of the Pico de Jaragua region. (Author) [pt

  18. Patient participation in general practice based undergraduate teaching: a focus group study of patient perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sophie E; Allfrey, Caroline; Jones, Melvyn M; Chana, Jasprit; Abbott, Ciara; Faircloth, Sofia; Higgins, Nicola; Abdullah, Laila

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients make a crucial contribution to undergraduate medical education. Although a national resource is available for patients participating in research, none is as yet available for education. Aim This study aimed to explore what information patients would like about participation in general practice based undergraduate medical education, and how they would like to obtain this information. Design and setting Two focus groups were conducted in London-based practices involved in both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Method Patients both with and without teaching experience were recruited using leaflets, posters, and patient participation groups. An open-ended topic guide explored three areas: perceived barriers that participants anticipated or had experienced; patient roles in medical education; and what help would support participation. Focus groups were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Results Patients suggested ways of professionalising the teaching process. These were: making information available to patients about confidentiality, iterative consent, and normalising teaching in the practice. Patients highlighted the importance of relationships, making information available about their GPs’ involvement in teaching, and initiating student–patient interactions. Participants emphasised educational principles to maximise exchange of information, including active participation of students, patient identification of student learner needs, and exchange of feedback. Conclusion This study will inform development of patient information resources to support their participation in teaching and access to information both before and during general practice based teaching encounters. PMID:28360073

  19. Effectiveness of an emotion regulation group training for adolescents--a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppert, H Marieke; Giesen-Bloo, Josephine; van Gemert, Tonny G; Wiersema, Herman M; Minderaa, Ruud B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Nauta, Maaike H

    2009-01-01

    Emotion Regulation Training (ERT) was developed for adolescents with symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. ERT is an adaptation of the Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS) programme. This paper describes the background of the programme, and gives an outline of the treatment programme. The effectiveness of ERT was examined in a randomized controlled pilot study with 43 youth (aged 14-19 years) in five mental health centres in the Netherlands. Subjects were assessed before and after random assignment to ERT plus treatment as usual (TAU) (n = 23) or to TAU alone (n = 20). Outcome measures included assessment of BPD symptoms, locus of control, and internalizing and externalizing behaviour. Both groups showed equal reductions in BPD symptoms over time. The group receiving ERT plus TAU (and not the TAU-only group) had a significant increase in internal locus of control: ERT participants reported more sense of control over their own mood swings, and attributed changes in mood swings not only to external factors. The study was complicated by a high attrition. The implications of the findings are discussed, including the difficulties inherent in treating and researching an adolescent population, and the need for researchers to develop age-appropriate assessments.

  20. A national study of the psychological impact of bank robbery with a randomized control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark

    of bank employees exposed to robbery (response rate: 73.6 %). Several related factors were also investigated including prior traumatic exposure, anxiety, and general traumatic symptoms. The results were compared to a randomized control group of bank employees never exposed to robbery (N= 303......Despite, numerous annual bank robberies worldwide, research on the psychological sequelae of bank robberies is limited. We studied the prevalence of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) (N = 458) and the prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (n = 378) in a Danish national questionnaire survey...... but surprisingly significantly higher than the follow-up robbery group. The results are discussed in relation to existing research and the effect of other factors such as prior traumatic exposure. In conclusion bank robberies are a traumatizing event for the employees, especially when disregarding avoidance...

  1. Nonperturbative renormalization group study of the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    We study the renormalization group flow of the average action of the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation with power-law forcing. Using Galilean invariance, we introduce a nonperturbative approximation adapted to the zero-frequency sector of the theory in the parametric range of the Hölder exponent 4-2ε of the forcing where real-space local interactions are relevant. In any spatial dimension d, we observe the convergence of the resulting renormalization group flow to a unique fixed point which yields a kinetic energy spectrum scaling in agreement with canonical dimension analysis. Kolmogorov's -5/3 law is, thus, recovered for ε = 2 as also predicted by perturbative renormalization. At variance with the perturbative prediction, the -5/3 law emerges in the presence of a saturation in the ε dependence of the scaling dimension of the eddy diffusivity at ε = 3/2 when, according to perturbative renormalization, the velocity field becomes infrared relevant.

  2. Studies on the Development of Interest Group Populations in Corporative Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Helene Marie

    moderate the effects of these variables, thereby stabilizing and limiting the population. The results indicate that corporative structures may play a role for population development with respect to formation, political representation, and disbandment. Both societal factors and population mechanisms have...... are important questions with implications for the quality of democracy. The answers can indicate the degree of bias and diversity in interest group populations. Earlier studies have especially focused on snapshots of the composition of interest group populations and not on the dynamics and development...... an impact on these three development concepts. The analyses further suggest that the corporative institutions may moderate these effects and thereby contribute to stabilizing and limiting the population. As expected, the corporative structures appear to structure and limit the population, which possibly...

  3. Change talk and relatedness in group motivational interviewing: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C; Martino, Steve; Lamb, Kayla E; LaRowe, Steven D; Santa Ana, Elizabeth J

    2015-04-01

    Change talk (CT), or client speech in favor of change, is a hypothesized mechanism of action in motivational interviewing (MI) for substance use disorders. Although group-based treatment is the primary treatment modality for the majority of clients seeking substance use treatment, limited research has examined group motivational interviewing (GMI) among this population, and no study has examined CT within GMI. Therefore, in the current study we examined both standard CT (e.g., desire, ability, reason, need) and a novel phenomenon involving CT which we termed 'relatedness,' or the synergistic exchange of CT between and among group members. Data were utilized from an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT) examining the effectiveness of GMI relative to a treatment control condition (TCC) among U.S. veteran outpatients with a primary alcohol use disorder at a Veterans Affairs hospital. A subsample of participants (n = 52) from the RCT were randomly assigned to receive GMI or TCC. The majority of participants in the subsample had co-existing psychiatric (88%) and dual diagnosis drug use disorders (38%). Two of four treatment sessions were coded by trained raters for CT and relatedness. Analyses demonstrated that CT and relatedness occurred with greater frequency in GMI compared to TCC, with effect sizes in the large range for each difference. Results held after controlling for number of group members in treatment sessions. Findings suggest that GMI is associated with more frequent CT and relatedness than TCC, consistent with the broader literature demonstrating the influence of MI on CT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Study of Personality in Addicts and Normal Group with Due Attention to Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Mirfakhraei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was the comparison of personality traits in addicts and normal group whit due attention to gender. Materials & Methods: The design of the present study was a causal comparative that has been done on the 90 people (60 men and 30 women addicts with the range of age=20-40 of the referrers to the welfare centers and outpatient addiction treatment centers in different parts of Tabriz and Marand in1388. They were selected through the accessible sampling method. This group suffered the substance abuse or dependence on Amphetamine substance on basic of the diagnosis criterions DSM-IV-TR. The other group, 60 men and 30 women with non-addicted who were among the relatives, neighbors and friends. The number of all members was 180 people. An assembling instrument was questionnaire of NEO-FFI. Analysis of the data was based on the multiple-analysis of variance (MANOVA and LSD post-hock test. Results: The results revealed that there was significant difference between addicts and normal group in personality traits. Addicted scores were high neuroticism (P<0.001, less openness to experiences (P<0.001, less agreeableness (P<0.001, less conscientiousness (P0.05. Also, the results revealed that women scores were higher in neuroticism (P<0.05, agreeableness (P<0.05, and conscientiousness (P<0.001, than men and men score was higher in openness to experiences.  Conclusion: Addiction as a social pathology will not be eradicate completely, but it can be controlled through thinking, devotedly attempts. An assessment of personality traits in addicts contributes important information for a better definition and recognition of addicts and has implications for their treatment.

  5. Higgs Working Group Report of the Snowmass 2013 Community Planning Study

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, S; Logan, H; Qian, J; Tully, C; Van Kooten, R; Ajaib, A; Anastassov, A; Anderson, I; Bake, O; Barger, V; Barklow, T; Batell, B; Battaglia, M; Berge, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Brau, J; Brownson, E; Cahill-Rowley, M; Calancha-Paredes, C; Chen, C -Y; Chou, W; Clare, R; Cline, D; Craig, N; Cranmer, K; de Gruttola, M; Elagin, A; Essig, R; Everett, L; Feng, E; Fujii, K; Gainer, J; Gao, Y; Gogoladze, I; Gori, S; Goncalo, R; Graf, N; Grojean, C; Guindon, S; Han, T; Hanson, G; Harnik, R; Heinemann, B; Heinemeyer, S; Heintz, U; Hewett, J; Ilchenko, Y; Ismail, A; Jain, V; Janot, P; Kawada, S; Kehoe, R; Klute, M; Kotwal, A; Krueger, K; Kukartsev, G; Kumar, K; Kunkle, J; Lewis, I; Li, Y; Linssen, L; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Liss, T; List, J; Liu, T; Liu, Z; Low, I; Ma, T; Mackenzie, P; Mellado, B; Melnikov, K; Moortgat-Pick, G; Mourou, G; Narain, M; Nielsen, J; Okada, N; Okawa, H; Olsen, J; Onyisi, P; Parashar, N; Peskin, M; Petriello, F; Plehn, T; Pollard, C; Potter, C; Prokofiev, K; Rauch, M; Rizzo, T; Robens, T; Rodriguez, V; Roloff, P; Ruiz, R; Sanz, V; Sayre, J; Shafi, Q; Shaughnessy, G; Sher, M; Simon, F; Solyak, N; Stupak, J; Su, S; Tanabe, T; Tajima, T; Telnov, V; Tian, J; Thomas, S; Thomson, M; Un, C; Velasco, M; Wagner, C; Wang, S; Whitbeck, A; Yao, W; Yokoya, H; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zhang, Y; Zhou, Y

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $C\\!P$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).

  6. Group Study of Simulated Driving fMRI Data by Multiset Canonical Correlation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Ou; Adalı, Tulay; Calhoun, Vince D

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we apply a novel statistical method, multiset canonical correlation analysis (M-CCA), to study a group of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets acquired during simulated driving task. The M-CCA method jointly decomposes fMRI datasets from different subjects/sessions into brain activation maps and their associated time courses, such that the correlation in each group of estimated activation maps across datasets is maximized. Therefore, the functional activations across all datasets are extracted in the order of consistency across different dataset. On the other hand, M-CCA preserves the uniqueness of the functional maps estimated from each dataset by avoiding concatenation of different datasets in the analysis. Hence, the cross-dataset variation of the functional activations can be used to test the hypothesis of functional-behavioral association. In this work, we study 120 simulated driving fMRI datasets and identify parietal-occipital regions and frontal lobe as the most consistently engaged areas across all the subjects and sessions during simulated driving. The functional-behavioral association study indicates that all the estimated brain activations are significantly correlated with the steering operation during the driving task. M-CCA thus provides a new approach to investigate the complex relationship between the brain functions and multiple behavioral variables, especially in naturalistic tasks as demonstrated by the simulated driving study.

  7. Attitudes to participating in a birth cohort study, views from a multiethnic population: a qualitative study using focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neeru; Round, Thomas P; Daker-White, Gavin; Bower, Peter; Griffiths, Chris J

    2017-02-01

    Recruitment to birth cohort studies is a challenge. Few studies have addressed the attitudes of women about taking part in birth cohort studies particularly those from ethnic minority groups. To seek the views of people from diverse ethnic backgrounds about participation in a proposed birth cohort examining the impact of infections. Eight focus groups of pregnant women and mothers of young children took place in GP surgeries and community centres in an ethnically diverse area of east London. Purposeful sampling and language support ensured representation of people from ethnic minority groups. Audio recordings were taken and transcripts were analysed using the Framework approach. The views of participants about taking part in the proposed birth cohort study, in particular concerning incentives to taking part, disincentives and attitudes to consenting children. There was more convergence of opinion than divergence across groups. Altruism, perceived health gains of participating and financial rewards were motivating factors for most women. Worries about causing harm to their child, inconvenience, time pressure and blood sample taking as well as a perceived lack of health gains were disincentives to most. Mistrust of researchers did not appear to be a significant barrier. The study indicates that ethnicity and other demographic factors influence attitudes to participation. To recruit better, birth cohort studies should incorporate financial and health gains as rewards for participation, promote the altruistic goals of research, give assurances regarding the safety of the participating children and sensitive data, avoid discomfort and maximize convenience. Ethnicity influences attitudes to participation in many ways, and researchers should explore these factors in their target population. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Short-Term Cognitive-Behavioural Group Treatment for Hoarding Disorder: A Naturalistic Treatment Outcome Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulding, Richard; Nedeljkovic, Maja; Kyrios, Michael; Osborne, Debra; Mogan, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    The study aim was to test whether a 12-week publically rebated group programme, based upon Steketee and Frost's Cognitive Behavioural Therapy-based hoarding treatment, would be efficacious in a community-based setting. Over a 3-year period, 77 participants with clinically significant hoarding were recruited into 12 group programmes. All completed treatment; however, as this was a community-based naturalistic study, only 41 completed the post-treatment assessment. Treatment included psychoeducation about hoarding, skills training for organization and decision making, direct in-session exposure to sorting and discarding, and cognitive and behavioural techniques to support out-of-session sorting and discarding, and nonacquiring. Self-report measures used to assess treatment effect were the Savings Inventory-Revised (SI-R), Savings Cognition Inventory, and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales. Pre-post analyses indicated that after 12 weeks of treatment, hoarding symptoms as measured on the SI-R had reduced significantly, with large effect sizes reported in total and across all subscales. Moderate effect sizes were also reported for hoarding-related beliefs (emotional attachment and responsibility) and depressive symptoms. Of the 41 participants who completed post-treatment questionnaires, 14 (34%) were conservatively calculated to have clinically significant change, which is considerable given the brevity of the programme judged against the typical length of the disorder. The main limitation of the study was the moderate assessment completion rate, given its naturalistic setting. This study demonstrated that a 12-week group treatment for hoarding disorders was effective in reducing hoarding and depressive symptoms in an Australian clinical cohort and provides evidence for use of this treatment approach in a community setting. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. A 12-week group programme delivered in a community setting was effective for helping with

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV bronchiolitis: comparative study of RSV groups A and B infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selir M. Straliotto

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The grouping characteristics of 29 respiratory syncitial virus (RSV present in nasopharyngeal cells collectedfrom hospitalized children with bronchiolitis during the 1990RSVseason in Porto Alegre, RS, were analysed. Twenty-two were grouped as belonging to group A and 7 to group B. Cyanosis, oxigen therapy, cough, lenght of hospitalization and atelectasis were observed to be more frequently found within group B infected children. Other clinical signs and symptoms were similarly found in both groups.

  10. Quantum Einstein gravity. Advancements of heat kernel-based renormalization group studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, Kai

    2012-10-01

    The asymptotic safety scenario allows to define a consistent theory of quantized gravity within the framework of quantum field theory. The central conjecture of this scenario is the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point of the theory's renormalization group flow, that allows to formulate renormalization conditions that render the theory fully predictive. Investigations of this possibility use an exact functional renormalization group equation as a primary non-perturbative tool. This equation implements Wilsonian renormalization group transformations, and is demonstrated to represent a reformulation of the functional integral approach to quantum field theory. As its main result, this thesis develops an algebraic algorithm which allows to systematically construct the renormalization group flow of gauge theories as well as gravity in arbitrary expansion schemes. In particular, it uses off-diagonal heat kernel techniques to efficiently handle the non-minimal differential operators which appear due to gauge symmetries. The central virtue of the algorithm is that no additional simplifications need to be employed, opening the possibility for more systematic investigations of the emergence of non-perturbative phenomena. As a by-product several novel results on the heat kernel expansion of the Laplace operator acting on general gauge bundles are obtained. The constructed algorithm is used to re-derive the renormalization group flow of gravity in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation, showing the manifest background independence of the results. The well-studied Einstein-Hilbert case is further advanced by taking the effect of a running ghost field renormalization on the gravitational coupling constants into account. A detailed numerical analysis reveals a further stabilization of the found non-Gaussian fixed point. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the case of higher derivative gravity including all curvature squared interactions. This establishes an improvement of

  11. Quantum Einstein gravity. Advancements of heat kernel-based renormalization group studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Kai

    2012-10-15

    The asymptotic safety scenario allows to define a consistent theory of quantized gravity within the framework of quantum field theory. The central conjecture of this scenario is the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point of the theory's renormalization group flow, that allows to formulate renormalization conditions that render the theory fully predictive. Investigations of this possibility use an exact functional renormalization group equation as a primary non-perturbative tool. This equation implements Wilsonian renormalization group transformations, and is demonstrated to represent a reformulation of the functional integral approach to quantum field theory. As its main result, this thesis develops an algebraic algorithm which allows to systematically construct the renormalization group flow of gauge theories as well as gravity in arbitrary expansion schemes. In particular, it uses off-diagonal heat kernel techniques to efficiently handle the non-minimal differential operators which appear due to gauge symmetries. The central virtue of the algorithm is that no additional simplifications need to be employed, opening the possibility for more systematic investigations of the emergence of non-perturbative phenomena. As a by-product several novel results on the heat kernel expansion of the Laplace operator acting on general gauge bundles are obtained. The constructed algorithm is used to re-derive the renormalization group flow of gravity in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation, showing the manifest background independence of the results. The well-studied Einstein-Hilbert case is further advanced by taking the effect of a running ghost field renormalization on the gravitational coupling constants into account. A detailed numerical analysis reveals a further stabilization of the found non-Gaussian fixed point. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the case of higher derivative gravity including all curvature squared interactions. This establishes an improvement

  12. Perencanaan Strategis dengan Pendekatan Balance Scorecard pada Perusahaan Properti (Studi Kasus : Elang Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Wulandari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the strategic factors of the internal and external environments, analyze alternative strategies, to develop strategic targets and strategic maps, set key performance indicator (KPI, and determine the weight of each balanced scorecard perspective (BSC, and weight of each KPI. The research methods used were SWOT and BSC analysis. The business environment identification conducted at Elang Group resulted in eight internal factors and five external factors that influence the company's strategy to survive and to become more competitive. Following this, the process of SWOT analysis was carried out. There are four alternative strategies that can be implemented by Elang Group in improving its performance. The result of SWOT analysis was then translated into 15 strategic targets that form a causal relationship. The design of key performance indicators (KPI determined 25 KPI divided into four Balanced Scorecard perspectives. In the financial perspective, the highest average KPI weight for return on investment (ROI is 41,4 percent.Keywords: balance scorecard, SWOT, key performance indicators, property, Elang groupABSTRAKTujuan dari penelitian ini adalah menetapkan faktor–faktor strategis dari lingkungan internal dan eksternal; menganalisis alternatif strategi; menyusun sasaran strategis dan peta strategis; menetapkan key performance indicator (KPI; dan menetapkan bobot dari masing-masing perspektif balanced Scorecard (BSC, dan bobot dari masing-masing KPI. Metode penelitian yang digunakan adalah analisis SWOT dan BSC. Hasil identifikasi lingkungan bisnis yang dilakukan di Elang Group terdapat delapan faktor internal di perusahaan, dan lima faktor external perusahaan yang berpengaruh terhadap strategi perusahaan untuk dapat bertahan dan semakin kompetitif. Dari hasil identifikasi kemudian dilakukan proses analisis SWOT. Terdapat empat alternatif strategi yang dapat dilakukan oleh Elang Group dalam meningkatkan

  13. Defining fitness to practise in Australian radiation therapy: A focus group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Caroline A.; Jolly, Brian; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal E.; Baird, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to investigate how Australian radiation therapists define fitness to practise. Method: A qualitative approach was taken to data collection with focus groups being employed to gather the data. Analysis was informed by grounded theory. Following ethics approval, three homogeneous focus groups were conducted comprising a total of 21 participants, with 5-8 participants per group. The discussions were transcribed, verified by the researcher and participants, then unitised, coded and a sample checked by a second coder. Findings: There was no consensus on the definition of fitness to practise. The terms professionalism and competence were used interchangeably in some definitions. Four themes emerged from the data, these were; fitness as a continuum (individual differences and longevity in the profession), fitness as behaviour and conduct (professionalism and competence), fitness as a state of mind (attitudes and intangible elements) and fitness as being qualified (course completion means fitness to practise). Three concepts which were not raised were illegal behaviour, impaired practice and dose errors. Conclusion: There is no consensus among radiation therapists about fitness to practise. There was confusion with how Fitness to practise relates to professionalism and competence with little mention of how impairment is interwoven into the notion of fitness to practise. Without an unambiguous definition and robust criteria, making the 'judgement call' as to whether a practitioners' fitness to practise is impaired will continue to be a challenge for educators, departmental managers and registration boards.

  14. Beliefs, Behaviors, and Contexts of Adolescent Caffeine Use: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludden, Alison B; O'Brien, Elizabeth M; Pasch, Keryn E

    2017-07-29

    Caffeinated products are widely available to adolescents, and consumption of caffeine products-energy drinks and coffee in particular-is on the rise in this age group (Branum, Rossen, & Schoendorf, 2014). Yet, little is known about the psychosocial context of caffeine use. Previous studies on adolescent caffeine use have focused on caffeine's acute physiological effects, rather than the psychosocial contexts and beliefs regarding different types of caffeinated beverages (e.g., coffee, energy drinks, soda). The current research examines the contexts and beliefs associated with adolescents' use of caffeinated beverages (e.g., coffee, energy drinks, soda) using a focus group approach. Eleven focus group interviews (49 total participants) addressed adolescents' motivations for and patterns of caffeine use; they were transcribed and axial coding was used to identify common themes. Coffee and energy drinks were perceived to be the most popular caffeinated beverages. Reasons for consuming caffeine included the effect of caffeine as a stimulant, the pleasant feelings experienced when drinking it, and the fact that caffeine was available. As for contexts, coffee was consumed in more diverse social contexts than other caffeinated beverages. Friends and sports were the most popular contexts for energy drink use. The present findings inform adolescent health promotion efforts and provide researchers and practitioners alike detailed information in adolescents' own words about how and why they use caffeine. Adolescents' beliefs about caffeinated products are not uniform; the reasons adolescents articulate regarding their use of coffee, soda, and energy drinks are different across contexts and beverage type.

  15. Changes and events over life course: a comparative study between groups of older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luípa Michele; Silva, Antônia Oliveira; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel; Moreira, Maria Adelaide Silva Paredes; Nogueira, Jordana Almeida; Cavalli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the changes which had occurred over the last year in the life of older adults, as well as the values attributed to these changes. METHOD: this is a multicentric, cross-sectional study, of the inquiry type, undertaken in three cities of the Brazilian Northeast, investigating two distinct groups of older adults. RESULTS: among the 236 older adults interviewed, it was observed that 30.0% reported health as the main change in their life course in the last year, this category being the most significant response among the older adults aged between 80 and 84 years old (37.7%). Changes in the family were mentioned by 11.5% of the older adults; death (9.6%) and alterations in routine activities (9.6%). In relation to the value attributed to these changes, it was ascertained that for 64.7% of the older adults aged between 65 and 69 years old, these changes were positive. In the older group, 49.4% of the older adults believe that their changes were related to losses. CONCLUSION: the knowledge of the changes mentioned, the value attributed to these changes, and the self-evaluation of health provide information which assists in formulating actions which are more specific to the real needs of these age groups. They also provide the health professionals with a better understanding of how some experiences are experienced in the life trajectories of these older adults. PMID:25806625

  16. Changes and events over life course: a comparative study between groups of older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luípa Michele Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the changes which had occurred over the last year in the life of older adults, as well as the values attributed to these changes.METHOD: this is a multicentric, cross-sectional study, of the inquiry type, undertaken in three cities of the Brazilian Northeast, investigating two distinct groups of older adults.RESULTS: among the 236 older adults interviewed, it was observed that 30.0% reported health as the main change in their life course in the last year, this category being the most significant response among the older adults aged between 80 and 84 years old (37.7%. Changes in the family were mentioned by 11.5% of the older adults; death (9.6% and alterations in routine activities (9.6%. In relation to the value attributed to these changes, it was ascertained that for 64.7% of the older adults aged between 65 and 69 years old, these changes were positive. In the older group, 49.4% of the older adults believe that their changes were related to losses.CONCLUSION: the knowledge of the changes mentioned, the value attributed to these changes, and the self-evaluation of health provide information which assists in formulating actions which are more specific to the real needs of these age groups. They also provide the health professionals with a better understanding of how some experiences are experienced in the life trajectories of these older adults.

  17. Impact of group-singing on older adult health in senior living communities: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Musetta C; Belza, Basia; Nguyen, Huong; Logsdon, Rebecca; Demorest, Steven

    2018-02-23

    Participating in a group-singing program may be beneficial to healthy aging through engaging in active music-making activities and breathing exercises. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a 12-week group singing program on cognitive function, lung health and quality of life (QoL) of older adults. A pre and post-test quasi-experimental design evaluated the impact of a group-singing program on older adult health. The intervention consisted of pre-singing exercises, song-singing and learning, and socialization. Classes were 75 min/week for 12 weeks. Inclusion criteria were age ≥60, no self-reported diagnosis of dementia, and able to hear conversations within 2 feet. Participants were recruited from 3 senior living communities. Outcome measures included cognition, lung function, QoL, and program feasibility and acceptability. A paired t-test with 2-sided alpha level at 0.05 was used to test the null hypotheses. We enrolled 49 participants (mean age 83.6). Forty-two (86%) completed the posttests and exit survey. At the 12th week there was significant improvement in phonological (p Recall Test (p memory, language, speech information processing, executive function, and respiratory muscle strength in older adults. The program was feasible and well-accepted. A clinical trial with a larger sample is indicated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. TDS exposure project: relevance of the total diet study approach for different groups of substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin, Karine; Papadopoulos, Alexandra; Cubadda, Francesco; Aureli, Federica; Oktay Basegmez, Hatice Imge; D'Amato, Marilena; De Coster, Sam; D'Evoli, Laura; López Esteban, María Teresa; Jurkovic, Martina; Lucarini, Massimo; Ozer, Hayrettin; Fernández San Juan, Pedro Mario; Sioen, Isabelle; Sokolic, Darja; Turrini, Aida; Sirot, Véronique

    2014-11-01

    A method to validate the relevance of the Total Diet Study (TDS) approach for different types of substances is described. As a first step, a list of >2800 chemicals classified into eight main groups of relevance for food safety (natural components, environmental contaminants, substances intentionally added to foods, residues, naturally occurring contaminants, process contaminants, contaminants from packaging and food contact materials, other substances) has been established. The appropriateness of the TDS approach for the different substance groups has then been considered with regard to the three essential principles of a TDS: representativeness of the whole diet, pooling of foods and food analyzed as consumed. Four criteria were considered for that purpose (i) the substance has to be present in a significant part of the diet or predominantly present in specific food groups, (ii) a robust analytical method has to be available to determine it in potential contributors to the dietary exposure of the population, and (iii) the dilution impact of pooling and (iv) the impact of everyday food preparation methods on the concentration of the substance are assessed. For most of the substances the TDS approach appeared to be relevant and any precautions to be taken are outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Seroprevalence study of anti diphtheria antibodies in two age-groups of Romanian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Coldea, Ileana-Luminiţa; Ilie, Anamaria; Stănescu, Aurora; Ungureanu, Vasilica; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Diphtheria represents a serious infectious disease with high epidemic potential. It is a vaccine preventable disease (a minimum vaccine coverage of 95% for children of 1 year and 90% in adults could prevent the disease). Diphtheria vaccination is included in the National Immunization Program (NIP). Complete vaccination for children consists in DTaP (diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine) vaccine administration from the age of 2 months until 4 years and dT vaccine (tetanus toxoid and a reduced dose of diphtheria toxoid) at 14 years old. The aim of this paper was to highlight the protection against diphtheria of an age segment of the Romanian adult population (20 to 39 years old) using a seroprevalence study. The Romanian subjects were selected from two age groups: 20-29 years (n = 219) and 30-39 years (n = 229), representative for all counties of Romania. The commercial kit Anti-Diphtheria Toxoid ELISA (IgG) (EUROIMMUN) was used to detect the antibodies of IgG class against diphtheria toxoid in the sera obtained from our subjects. We detected a 56.6% rate of positive sera (> 0.1 IU/ml--protection level) for the 20-29 age group and 31.7% positivity for the 30-39 age group. These data show a low protection level against diphtheria of the Romanian adult population, which decreases with age. The serologic data on preventable vaccine diseases are useful in order to evaluate the success of the immunization programs.

  20. Mind-body group treatment for women coping with infertility: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaros, Christina; Kagan, Leslee; Shifren, Jan L; Willett, Jessica; Jacquart, Jolene; Alert, Marissa D; Macklin, Eric A; Styer, Aaron K; Denninger, John W; LaRoche, Katie L; Park, Elyse R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a 10-week mind-body intervention (MBI) for women coping with fertility challenges, examine the impact of an MBI on psychological distress and cortisol levels, and assess adherence to MBI skills 12-months after completion of the intervention. Prospective open pilot study of 51 women with infertility enrolled in a group MBI. Psychological variables and salivary cortisol levels were obtained pre- and post-intervention; a 12-month follow-up survey assessed MBI skill adherence. Participants completed practice logs throughout the intervention. Participants attended an average of eight sessions (SD = 2.0), and practiced mind-body techniques which elicited the relaxation response (RR) an average of 5.9 (SD = 0.8) days/week and 20.1 (SD = 9.9) min/day; 80% completed the post-treatment assessment. The intervention resulted in a significant increase in perceived social support and a decrease in depressive symptoms and perceived stress; however, there were no significant changes in cortisol levels. Sixty-eight percent of the participants completed the 12-month follow-up, with 51% reporting continuation of RR-eliciting practice. This group of women with infertility provided with an MBI showed decreased symptoms of depression and stress and increased perceived social support. The protocol was feasible and participants reported a high degree of adherence and maintenance to the skills taught during the intervention. The findings indicate the value of appropriate evaluation against a control group.

  1. The discourse around usefulness, morality, risk and trust: a focus group study on prenatal genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetti, Monica; Montali, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Giorgia

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the underlying values and beliefs that guide women's reasoning on prenatal genetic test (PGT) uptake, as framed by their own words, during a group discussion, in a Catholic country such as Italy. Women's reasoning was explored by means of five focus group consisting of seven pregnant women and 13 new mothers. The focus group material content was analysed using the Nudist software. The discourse around PGT was rooted into four frames of reference: The usefulness dimension was used to express the positions in favour of PGT, whereas morality, risk and trust were used to express negative evaluations on such a technology. Participants advocated for themselves the choice of being tested, besides giving some credit to the partner's opinion. Moreover, participants reported little knowledge on PGT. The research shed some light on the frames of reference used by participants to build their positions on PGT uptake, confirming the public's ability to translate scientific accounts into personally meaningful information. A more complete understanding of the reasons for decisions to test would help counsellors to better communicate with women and couples, and to better assist them to make a better informed testing decision. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Tolerability and suitability of brief group mindfulness-oriented interventions in psychiatric inpatients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolitch, Katerina; Laliberté, Vincent; Yu, Ching; Strychowsky, Natalie; Segal, Marilyn; Looper, Karl J; Rej, Soham

    2016-09-01

    Mindfulness-oriented therapies have a positive impact on patients' overall well-being and alleviate many psychiatric conditions. However, little is known about their use in people with severe mental illness. We aimed to identify which clinical and sociodemographic factors are associated with suitability/tolerability of a brief group mindfulness-oriented therapy. This retrospective study examines pre-/post-data from 40 psychiatric inpatients who underwent one session of a 10-min mindfulness-oriented group intervention between January and March 2014. The main outcome was 'suitability for and tolerating the brief mindfulness-oriented group intervention'. We assessed potential correlates of the main outcome, including female gender, shorter hospitalisation, the absence of psychosis and good pre-morbid functioning. The intervention was well tolerated (92.5%) and 50% of patients met both of our relatively stringent suitability and tolerability criteria. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were not associated with suitability/tolerability. Tai chi was the most suitable/tolerable compared to body scan and mindful eating (76.5% vs. 35.7% vs. 22.2%, Fisher's exact p = 0.01, Bonferroni p mindfulness therapy interventions are very well tolerated and often suitable for acutely hospitalised psychiatric inpatients, including those with acute psychosis. Mindfulness-oriented intervention with an active component (e.g., tai chi, mindful walking) may potentially be best suited for this population.

  3. Implementing evidence-based medicine in general practice: a focus group based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannes, Karin; Leys, Marcus; Vermeire, Etienne; Aertgeerts, Bert; Buntinx, Frank; Depoorter, Anne-Marie

    2005-09-09

    Over the past years concerns are rising about the use of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) in health care. The calls for an increase in the practice of EBM, seem to be obstructed by many barriers preventing the implementation of evidence-based thinking and acting in general practice. This study aims to explore the barriers of Flemish GPs (General Practitioners) to the implementation of EBM in routine clinical work and to identify possible strategies for integrating EBM in daily work. We used a qualitative research strategy to gather and analyse data. We organised focus groups between September 2002 and April 2003. The focus group data were analysed using a combined strategy of 'between-case' analysis and 'grounded theory approach'. Thirty-one general practitioners participated in four focus groups. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants. A basic classification model documents the influencing factors and actors on a micro-, meso- as well as macro-level. Patients, colleagues, competences, logistics and time were identified on the micro-level (the GPs' individual practice), commercial and consumer organisations on the meso-level (institutions, organisations) and health care policy, media and specific characteristics of evidence on the macro-level (policy level and international scientific community). Existing barriers and possible strategies to overcome these barriers were described. In order to implement EBM in routine general practice, an integrated approach on different levels needs to be developed.

  4. A comparative study of cerebral atrophy in various alcoholic groups, based on CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tomoyuki

    1983-01-01

    The alcoholics were diagnosed and classified based on the criteria, offered at the Alcoholism Diagnostic Conference (1977) which was held under the auspices of the Ministry of Welfare, Japan. Grade of cerebral atrophy was estimated. Measurement items on the Computed Tomography (CT Scan) which contributed to discrimination among these groups were investigated simultaneously. The study consisted of seventy-five alcoholic patients and control group of ninety-four who were devoid of any evidence for alcoholism. Influential factors which were involved in cerebral atrophy of the alcoholic groups were investigated and factorial analysis was completed. There was a definite increase in cerebral atrophy during the aging process in patients with long term durations of drinking alcohol. There was a close correlation between age and duration of drinking alcohol. After the results of canonical discriminant analysis against 9 CT items, the Ventricle index definitely contributed both in the discrimination between the alcoholics and the controls and in the discrimination between alcoholic dementia and other alcoholic psychoses. Furthermore, the horizontal diameter of the third ventricle contributed to the latter discrimination, while the Evans' index contributed to the former discrimination. Therefore, the Ventricle index and the Evans' index turn out as the most valuable diagnostic criteria, as well as the CT index against cerebral atrophy in the alcoholics; however, the horizontal diameter of the third ventricle is useful in comparing among alcoholic psychoses. (J.P.N.)

  5. A spectroscopy study of nearby late-type stars, possible members of stellar kinematic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Eiroa, C.; Montes, D.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Nearby late-type stars are excellent targets for seeking young objects in stellar associations and moving groups. The origin of these structures is still misunderstood, and lists of moving group members often change with time and also from author to author. Most members of these groups have been identified by means of kinematic criteria, leading to an important contamination of previous lists by old field stars. Aims: We attempt to identify unambiguous moving group members among a sample of nearby-late type stars by studying their kinematics, lithium abundance, chromospheric activity, and other age-related properties. Methods: High-resolution echelle spectra (R ~ 57 000) of a sample of nearby late-type stars are used to derive accurate radial velocities that are combined with the precise Hipparcos parallaxes and proper motions to compute galactic-spatial velocity components. Stars are classified as possible members of the classical moving groups according to their kinematics. The spectra are also used to study several age-related properties for young late-type stars, i.e., the equivalent width of the lithium Li i 6707.8 Å line or the R'HK index. Additional information like X-ray fluxes from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey or the presence of debris discs is also taken into account. The different age estimators are compared and the moving group membership of the kinematically selected candidates are discussed. Results: From a total list of 405 nearby stars, 102 have been classified as moving group candidates according to their kinematics. i.e., only ~25.2% of the sample. The number reduces when age estimates are considered, and only 26 moving group candidates (25.5% of the 102 candidates) have ages in agreement with the star having the same age as an MG member. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andaluc

  6. Learning to create new solutions together: A focus group study exploring interprofessional innovation in midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate students can learn how to be innovative in partnerships with health care institutions and private enterprises. This study portrays how a three phase innovation model was applied in an interprofessional health education context at a Danish university college. The aim of the study was to explore midwifery, nutrition and health as well physiotherapy students' perceptions of participating in a real-life innovation project situated in antenatal care. A total of eighteen students participated in five focus group interviews. Thematic analysis was used to interpret data findings. Data analysis revealed three themes: 'Navigating in uncertainty', 'Being part of a team' and 'Impact of project learning'. Students found project learning to be the most relevant with regards to their clinical practice. Furthermore, study findings suggest that innovation is promoted by teamwork, interprofessional participation, mentor support and external partnerships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adolescent Substance Use Groups: Antecedent and Concurrent Personality Differences in a Longitudinal Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliva, E. M.; Keyes, M.; Iacono, W. G.

    2012-01-01

    personality and age-18 substance use in a community sample of 1,298 twins (96% Caucasian, 49% male). Personality measures at ages 11 and 18 assessed positive emotionality (agentic and communal), negative emotionality, and constraint. Substance use groupsabstainers, experimenters, and problem userswere created......This study attempted to extend Shedler and Block's () influential study, which found that adolescent drug experimenters had the healthiest personality functioning compared to abstainers and frequent users. Using a prospective design, we examined the relationship between antecedent and concurrent...... with the notion that experimenters had the healthiest personality functioning and instead suggest different strengths and weaknesses for each group. Future studies should examine agentic and communal positive emotionality separately....

  8. GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Yvonne M; Koenen, Julia M; de Ruijter, Wouter; van Dijk-van Dijk, D J Annemarie; van der Weele, Gerda M; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Reis, Ria; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2012-11-01

    Preventive care traditionally aims to prevent diseases or injuries. For older people, different aims of prevention, such as maintenance of independence and wellbeing, are increasingly important. To explore GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people. Qualitative study comprising six focus groups with GPs in the Netherlands. The focus-group discussions with 37 GPs were analysed using the framework analysis method. Whether or not to implement preventive care for older people depends on the patient's individual level of vitality, as perceived by the GP. For older people with a high level of vitality, GPs confine their role to standardised disease-oriented prevention on a patient's request; when the vitality levels in older people fall, the scope of preventive care shifts from prevention of disease to prevention of functional decline. For older, vulnerable people, GPs expect most benefit from a proactive, individualised approach, enabling them to live as independently as possible. Based on these perspectives, a conceptual model for preventive care was developed, which describes GPs' different perspectives toward older people who are vulnerable and those with high levels of vitality. It focuses on five main dimensions: aim of care (prevention of disease versus prevention of functional decline), concept of care (disease model versus functional model), initiator (older persons themselves versus GP), target groups (people with requests versus specified risk groups), and content of preventive care (mainly cardiovascular risk management versus functional decline). GPs' perspectives on preventive care are determined by their perception of the level of vitality of their older patients. Preventive care for older people with high levels of vitality may consist of a standardised disease-oriented approach; those who are vulnerable will need an individualised approach to prevent functional decline.

  9. A comparative study of Dermatoglyphic patterns in patients with myocardial infarction and control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalali F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is the most important cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The knowledge of major risk factos can be useful in prevention of CAD. There is no known major risk factof in many patients with myocardial infarction (MI. the dermatoglyphic pattern in patients with myocardial infarction is an interesting matter and little information is available about this relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate the relation between the dermatoglyphic pattern as indication of genetic susceptibility in the incidence of myocardial infarction.We conducted a multi-center cross-sectional study of 900 patients with diagnosis of myocardial infarction admitted or refereed to six hospitals in three large cities in the north of Iran. The control group consisted of 900 subjects who were selected form those who were referred to police information system at the time when cases had been diagnosed. The dermatoglyphic pattern of finger lines was determined using classic categorization by supervision of experts in Identification Diagnosis Administration office. For each subject 10 fingerprints had been derived. Overall, 9000 fingerprints for cases and 9000 fingerprints for control group were obtained for cases and 9000 fingerprints for control group were obtained for analysis. The findings show that 55.3% of cases were male and 44.7% were female and 70.6% of patients had, Q-wave and 29.6% had non-Q wave MI. in patients group, the distribution of dermatoglyphic pattern was 7.2% arch type, 46.8% loop type, and 46% whorl type of fingerprints. In contrast, in the control group, there were 3.7%, 50.7% and 45.5% respectively. The odds ratio (OR of arch type vs whorl type was 1.89 (P<0.0001 and odds ratio of loop type vs whorl type was 1.23 (P<0.0001. This result shows a statistical significant increase in the rate of arch type fingerprints in patients with MI roughly two times. Also, in subgroup analysis, the percentage of arch type

  10. Population-based, risk-stratified genetic testing for ovarian cancer risk: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, S F; Side, L; Fraser, L; Gessler, S; Wardle, J; Lanceley, A

    2013-01-01

    A population-based risk stratification programme for ovarian cancer (OC) may improve OC survival by identifying women at increased risk and implementing an appropriate risk management strategy. The present study explored attitudes towards an OC risk stratification programme incorporating predictive genetic testing and risk-stratified screening as part of a larger study investigating OC screening. Focus groups consisting of 56 members of the general public (mean age 45 years; 34% non-white) were conducted using a hypothetical scenario. The group sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework Analysis. There was strong support for the proposed programme. Genetic testing and risk-stratified screening was thought to raise awareness, offer reassurance and offer opportunities for early intervention. Anxiety was only mentioned in relation to receiving a diagnosis of OC and not with screening per se. Perhaps because lay models of cancer already embrace both environmental and genetic factors, a low-risk result was not anticipated to result in a false sense of immunity. Unexpectedly, participants also wanted to receive cancer prevention advice in conjunction with genetic testing; screening alone was not regarded as sufficient. The encouraging results from this small study warrant further large-scale research into risk-stratified OC screening. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Magnetostratigraphy of reef limestones -a case study in Ryukyu Group, Okinawa, Japan-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anai, C.; Shibuya, H.; Mochizuki, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Ryukyu Group in Ryukyu islands consists of reef limestones of Pleistocene in age, and records regression-transgression cycles of the age. It has great importance for providing the precise sea level changes around Middle-Pleistocene climate transition from 40kyr cycle to 100kyr. In order to assign a geochronological marker in the age of the transition, we investigate the magnetostratigraphical studies of the Ryukyu Group in Miyakojima island. Paleomagnetic samples were collected at 20 sites from all of 5 sequence-stratigraphic units appeared in Miyakojima island (MY-Unit 1 to 5 in ascending order). The conventional thermal demagnetization procedure provides reliable polarity only in 7 sites. For remaining 13 sites, we applied a novel technique of reductive chemical demagnetization (RCD) in addition to the conventional alternating field demagnetization. This hybrid technique successfully erased the overprinting magnetic components and unveiled the primary component. Paleomagnetic directions of 20 sites show that the studied sequence records a polarity transition from reversed to normal, and the transition is at the lowest part of the MY-Unit 4. Previous calcareous nannofossil studies show that the reversal corresponds to the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary. It enables us to correlate the Ryukyu limestones with the timing of the climate transition.

  12. The Operating Room Experiences of Nursing Students: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz van Giersbergen, Meryem; Ozsaker, Esma; Dirimese, Elif; Alcan, Aliye Okgun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate operating room (OR) experiences of student nurses. The focus group interview from qualitative research methods was used. This study was carried out between February and March 2011 in an OR practice at a university school of nursing. The grounded theory method was used to collect and analyze semistructured interview. Interviews were held with a total of 26 students in three focus group interviews. Each interview was tape recorded and was supported by taking notes. The audiotapes were listened and relistened by the researchers and transcribed. Four themes were determined as a result of this study. These are information, determination of career preference, period of internship and/or rotation, and fear and/or anxiety. The students stated that the period of OR practice was insufficient, the opportunities for being able to implement were limited, they mostly observed, and they experienced feelings of being alone and fear in the OR. Despite all of these, the students stated that the OR practice provided a major contribution to their education and was effective in the determination of their career preferences after graduation. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dealing with workplace violence in emergency primary health care: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morken, Tone; Johansen, Ingrid H; Alsaker, Kjersti

    2015-05-01

    Prevention and management of workplace violence among health workers has been described in different health care settings. However, little is known about which phenomena the emergency primary health care (EPC) organization should attend to in their strategies for preventing and managing it. In the current study, we therefore explored how EPC personnel have dealt with threats and violence from visitors or patients, focusing on how organizational factors affected the incidents. A focus group study was performed with a sample of 37 nurses and physicians aged 25-69 years. Eight focus group interviews were conducted, and the participants were invited to talk about their experiences of violence in EPC. Analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation, searching for themes describing the participants' experiences. Four main themes emerged for anticipating or dealing with incidents of threats or violence within the system: (1) minimizing the risk of working alone, (2) being prepared, (3) resolving the mismatch between patient expectations and the service offered, and (4) supportive manager response. Our study shows a potential for development of better organizational strategies for protecting EPC personnel who are at risk from workplace violence.

  14. Use of Class Facebook Groups to Disseminate Evidence-Based Study Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina J Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this preliminary project was to determine the effectiveness of college administrators using Facebook® (FB to disseminate information on study methods. Innovation: Eleven study tips in the format of riddles were posted in class FB groups as memes with links that lead to the riddle answers. Between 3.2-39.7% of students clicked on the links that accessed riddle answers. In a survey, 53.8% of respondents found the memes at least somewhat useful and 57.6% reported that they somewhat liked, liked, or liked them a lot. The average score on a study method knowledge assessment increased from 50% to 64%. Critical Analysis: The ratings of usefulness and likeability varied. However, students’ knowledge about the topic increased. Administrators considering using FB to share academic advice should post sparingly, begin posting when groups are initially formed and post early during the academic term. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Note  

  15. Metacommunity versus biogeography: a case study of two groups of neotropical vegetation-dwelling arthropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gonçalves-Souza

    Full Text Available Biogeography and metacommunity ecology provide two different perspectives on species diversity. Both are spatial in nature but their spatial scales do not necessarily match. With recent boom of metacommunity studies, we see an increasing need for clear discrimination of spatial scales relevant for both perspectives. This discrimination is a necessary prerequisite for improved understanding of ecological phenomena across scales. Here we provide a case study to illustrate some spatial scale-dependent concepts in recent metacommunity studies and identify potential pitfalls. We presented here the diversity patterns of Neotropical lepidopterans and spiders viewed both from metacommunity and biogeographical perspectives. Specifically, we investigated how the relative importance of niche- and dispersal-based processes for community assembly change at two spatial scales: metacommunity scale, i.e. within a locality, and biogeographical scale, i.e. among localities widely scattered along a macroclimatic gradient. As expected, niche-based processes dominated the community assembly at metacommunity scale, while dispersal-based processes played a major role at biogeographical scale for both taxonomical groups. However, we also observed small but significant spatial effects at metacommunity scale and environmental effects at biogeographical scale. We also observed differences in diversity patterns between the two taxonomical groups corresponding to differences in their dispersal modes. Our results thus support the idea of continuity of processes interactively shaping diversity patterns across scales and emphasize the necessity of integration of metacommunity and biogeographical perspectives.

  16. Educational Films as Part of Study Materials for Vulnerable Target Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Javrh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents theoretical approaches to special, didactically augmented visual and audio study materials for adults. We also define the narrow sense of the concept of an educational film as a well-rounded visual material that is structured didactically and contains inherent educational goals both in its design and application. The use of the word “film” instead of “video” is legitimized by fulfilling the condition of being a semantically complete and well-rounded product. In the conclusion, we present the findings obtained in Slovenia through experience and practice in the education of vulnerable groups of adults by employing such didactic materials.

  17. Factors influencing GPs’ choice between drugs in a therapeutic drug group. A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buusman, Allan; Andersen, Morten; Merrild, Camilla Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To explore how GPs choose between drugs in a therapeutic drug group. Design. A qualitative study based on semi-structured ethnographic interviews. Setting and subjects. General practitioners from the counties of both Funen and West Zealand in Denmark. A total of 15 general practitioners...... as it was a recurring theme during all interviews. External factors outside the GP's control such as governmental regulation on prescribing and the pharmaceutical industry influenced most GPs. Internal factors related to the actual consultation included characteristics of the GP and the patient, drug characteristics...

  18. Study of Longeot's test of formal operational thinking in a group of Italian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, A; Magro, T

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes a study of development of formal logical thought in 230 Italian adolescents by applying Longeot's Echelle de la Pensée Logique (Scale of Logical Thought). For age groups 11 to 13 and 14 to 18 years, change from preformal to formal thought and acquisition of such thought could be influenced by experience, sex, social-cultural level. The Echelle de la Pensée Logique should produce some special aspects to be compared with other classical intelligence tests.

  19. Renormalization-group studies of antiferromagnetic chains. I. Nearest-neighbor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The real-space renormalization-group method introduced by workers at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is used to study one-dimensional antiferromagnetic chains at zero temperature. Calculations using three-site blocks (for the Heisenberg-Ising model) and two-site blocks (for the isotropic Heisenberg model) are compared with exact results. In connection with the two-site calculation a duality transformation is introduced under which the isotropic Heisenberg model is self-dual. Such duality transformations can be defined for models other than those considered here, and may be useful in various block-spin calculations

  20. Comparative study of oral and intramuscular atropine sulphate as a premedicant in paediatric age group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari L

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of atropine sulphate in the paediatric age group as a premedicant orally in a dosage of 0.02 mg/kg body weight 70 minutes prior to surgery was found to be as effective as atropine sulphate given intramuscularly 35 minutes prior to surgery in a dosage of 0.01 mg/kg body weight. This avoids the unpleasant memory of needle prick; The duration of effect as studied in the normal healthy children not subjected to surgery was found to be 2 1/2-3 hours.

  1. Renormalization group study of the one-dimensional quantum Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solyom, J.; Pfeuty, P.

    1981-01-01

    The phase transition of the classical two-dimensional Potts model, in particular the order of the transition as the number of components q increases, is studied by constructing renormalization group transformations on the equivalent one-dimensional quatum problem. It is shown that the block transformation with two sites per cell indicates the existence of a critical qsub(c) separating the small q and large q regions with different critical behaviours. The physically accessible fixed point for q>qsub(c) is a discontinuity fixed point where the specific heat exponent α=1 and therefore the transition is of first order. (author)

  2. Experiences of sickness absence, marginality and Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms - A focus group study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E.L., Werner; A, Aamland; Malterud, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) form a major cause of sickness absence. The purpose of this study was to explore factors which may influence further marginalization among patients with MUPS on long-term sickness absence. METHODS: Two focus-group discussions were conducted...... with a purposive sample of 12 participants, six men and six women, aged 24-59 years. Their average duration of sickness absence was 10.5 months. Participants were invited to share stories about experiences from the process leading to the ongoing sickness absence, with a focus on the causes being medically...

  3. Effects of Group 1 versus Group 2 carbapenems on the susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii to carbapenems: a before and after intervention study of carbapenem-use stewardship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Kyung Yoon

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been proposed for reducing bacterial resistance in the hospital environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a carbapenem-use stewardship program on the susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii to Group 2 carbapenems. METHODS: A before and after intervention study was conducted at a university hospital from September 2008 to February 2013. Three study periods were defined: Phase I, pre-intervention (months 1-18; Phase II, a postintervention period during which ertapenem use was mandated but carbapenem use was not restricted (months 19-36; and Phase III, a postintervention period during which Group 2 carbapenem use was restricted (months 37-54. RESULTS: During the study period, intervention resulted in diminished consumption of Group 2 carbapenems (antimicrobial use density (AUD: 21.3±6.0 in Phase I, 18.8±6.0 in Phase II, 16.1±4.4 in Phase III; P = 0.028 and increased consumption of ertapenem (AUD: 2.7±1.7 in Phase I, 7.2±4.5 in Phase II, 9.1±5.3 in Phase III; P<0.001. The use of autoregressive-error models showed that in contrast with ertapenem use, the use of Group 2 carbapenem during the previous one month was positively and significantly associated with a subsequent increase in the proportion of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB (P = 0.031. CONCLUSIONS: Implementing a carbapenem-use stewardship program featuring the preferential use of ertapenem for treating appropriate indications of infection resulted in reduced use of Group 2 carbapenems and had a positive impact on the susceptibility of A. baumannii to carbapenems. This approach could be integrated into CRAB-control strategies in hospitals.

  4. Impact of grouping complications on mortality in traumatic brain injury: A nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Han Ho

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an important health issue with high mortality. Various complications of physiological and cognitive impairment may result in disability or death after TBI. Grouping of these complications could be treated as integrated post-TBI syndromes. To improve risk estimation, grouping TBI complications should be investigated, to better predict TBI mortality. This study aimed to estimate mortality risk based on grouping of complications among TBI patients. Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database was used in this study. TBI was defined according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes: 801-804 and 850-854. The association rule data mining method was used to analyze coexisting complications after TBI. The mortality risk of post-TBI complication sets with the potential risk factors was estimated using Cox regression. A total 139,254 TBI patients were enrolled in this study. Intracerebral hemorrhage was the most common complication among TBI patients. After frequent item set mining, the most common post-TBI grouping of complications comprised pneumonia caused by acute respiratory failure (ARF and urinary tract infection, with mortality risk 1.55 (95% C.I.: 1.51-1.60, compared with those without the selected combinations. TBI patients with the combined combinations have high mortality risk, especially those aged <20 years with septicemia, pneumonia, and ARF (HR: 4.95, 95% C.I.: 3.55-6.88. We used post-TBI complication sets to estimate mortality risk among TBI patients. According to the combinations determined by mining, especially the combination of septicemia with pneumonia and ARF, TBI patients have a 1.73-fold increased mortality risk, after controlling for potential demographic and clinical confounders. TBI patients aged<20 years with each combination of complications also have increased mortality risk. These results could provide physicians and caregivers with

  5. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Turkey: Results from the ACTHIV-IST Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz Sevgi, Dilek; Gunduz, Alper; Altuntas Aydin, Ozlem; Mete, Bilgul; Sargin, Fatma; Kumbasar Karaosmanoglu, Hayat; Uzun, Nuray; Yemisen, Mucahit; Dokmetas, Ilyas; Tabak, Fehmi

    2017-12-01

    Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for optimizing the management of HIV infection. The aim of this study is to explore ART adherence rates in Turkey. Included in this study were a total of 263 HIV-infected patients followed up by the ACTHIV-IST (ACTion against HIV in Istanbul) Study Group affiliated with four tertiary hospitals. The study population included patients 18 years of age or older who were on ART for over 12 months. Adherence was assessed by the medication possession ratio (MPR) calculated for each patient using data (a list of all drugs dispensed within the previous year for that patient) obtained from pharmacy medication records. In addition, patients completed a self-report questionnaire addressing missed doses and the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) adherence questionnaire. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty. Patient ages ranged from 19 to 71 years. Two hundred and thirty-one patients were male (88%). Two hundred and twenty-four patients (85%) had optimal adherence (MPR ≥95%). During the course of ART, 236 patients (90%) reported no missed doses in the past 4 days of their treatment, whereas 206 patients (78%) reported no missed doses in the past month. Simply forgetting was the most common reason for nonadherence. MPR was associated with virologic rebound. Major factors affecting adherence were being female, taking antituberculosis drugs, having an opportunistic infection, being able to take all or most of the medication as directed, and being aware of the need to take medication exactly as instructed to prevent the development of drug resistance. Adherence to ART measured by MPR and self-report surveys is relatively high in Turkey when compared with other countries, which probably led to high ART success rates.

  6. Mental health-care provision for marginalized groups across Europe: findings from the PROMO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, Stefan; Matanov, Aleksandra; Barros, Henrique; Canavan, Reamonn; Gabor, Edina; Greacen, Tim; Holcnerová, Petra; Kluge, Ulrike; Nicaise, Pablo; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Díaz-Olalla, José Manuel; Strassmayr, Christa; Schene, Aart H.; Soares, Joaquim J. F.; Tulloch, Simon; Gaddini, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Providing mental health care to socially marginalized groups is a challenge. There is limited evidence on what form of mental health-care generic (i.e. not targeting a specific social group) and group-specific services provide to socially marginalized groups in Europe. To describe the

  7. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus...

  8. Educational Progress of Looked-After Children in England: A Study Using Group Trajectory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Alastair G; Gardiner, Julian; Melhuish, Edward

    2017-09-01

    Looked-after children in local authority care are among the most disadvantaged, and measures of their well-being, including educational outcomes, are poorer than other children's. The study sample consisted of all children in England born in academic years 1993 to 1994 through 1997 to 1998 who were in local authority care at any point during the academic years 2005 to 2006 through 2012 to 2013 and for whom results of national tests in literacy and numeracy were available at ages 7, 11, and 16 ( N = 47 500). Group trajectory analysis of children's educational progress identified 5 trajectory groups: low achievement, late improvement, late decline, predominant, and high achievement. Being looked after earlier was associated with a higher probability of following a high achievement trajectory and a lower probability of following a late decline trajectory. For children first looked after between ages 7 and 16, having a longer total time looked after by age 16 was associated with a higher probability of following a high achievement trajectory. For children with poor outcomes at ages 7 and 11, being looked after by age 16 was associated with an increased chance of educational improvement by age 16. This study provides evidence that early entry into care can reduce the risk of poor educational outcomes. It also establishes group trajectory analysis as an effective method for analyzing the educational progress of looked-after children, with the particular strength that it allows factors associated with a late decline or improvement in educational progress to be identified. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Food groups and the risk of colorectal cancer: results from a Jordanian case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Mweis, Suhad S; Tayyem, Reema F; Shehadah, Ihab; Bawadi, Hiba A; Agraib, Lana M; Bani-Hani, Kamal E; Al-Jaberi, Tareq; Al-Nusairr, Majed

    2015-07-01

    The role of diet in colorectal cancer (CRC) in Jordan has not been studied previously. This study aimed at examining the association between food groups (including grains, fruits, vegetables, milk, and meat and legumes) and CRC risk in Jordan. We compared intakes of the different food groups among CRC patients (n=167) and matched controls (n=240) by age, sex, occupation, and marital status. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of quartiles of intakes of the different food groups with CRC risk. In addition, the association of selected food items with CRC risk was examined. Odds ratios (ORs) for the fourth versus the first quartile of intake were 2.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-6.08] for grains, 1.66 (95% CI: 0.81-3.40) for vegetables, 0.55 (95% CI: 0.26-1.16) for fruits, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.46-1.97) for milk, and 1.43 (95% CI: 0.68-2.98) for meat and legumes. In a comparison of the highest with the lowest weekly frequency of consumption, there was a direct association between the risk of CRC and the frequency of consumption of chicken (OR=2.52, 95% CI: 1.33-4.77). An increase in risk was observed with increased consumption of white bread (OR=3.13, 95% CI: 1.18-9.25), whereas consumption of whole bread was associated with a decreased risk for CRC (OR=0.32, 95% CI: 0.12-0.84). Our results support a role of diet in CRC. Direct associations were found for grains, white bread, and chicken, whereas an inverse relation was reported for whole bread.

  10. Communities and Cultures of Women: A Study of Neighbourhood Groups and Gated Communities in Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Sakira Sahin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to tease out the factors and forces that enable women to form communities of women and the circumstances within which they act. In addition, the research aims to observe into their activities to see if there is a germination of gender consciousness even if in a nascent form. Taking off from a historical vantage point of women coming together for various kinds of social and political action, the paper tries to delve into the epistemological dilemma encountered by feminist politics, where the subject of feminist politics i.e., women, is presented as a problematic category. Gender is understood not as a sole defining category but one that exists alongside other constituents of identities intersecting with it like class, caste, race, ethnicity etc. Given such an understanding the paper is based on a micro-level qualitative study conducted in an urban set-up of Guwahati city where two different kinds of locality-based women’s communities are taken as case studies, one of which is an all-women local neighbourhood development committee and the other a women’s forum within a gated community. The interesting contrasts as well as complexities of the groups in their membership as well their cultures are analysed to raise questions on whether such groups serve patriarchal interests or whether they present themselves as potential sites through which social change towards a more gender-conscious society can be made possible.

  11. Preclinical Safety Studies of Enadenotucirev, a Chimeric Group B Human-Specific Oncolytic Adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Illingworth

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev is an oncolytic group B adenovirus identified by a process of bio-selection for the ability to selectively propagate in and rapidly kill carcinoma cells. It is resistant to inactivation by human blood components, potentially enabling intravenous dosing in patients with metastatic cancer. However, there are no known permissive animal models described for group B adenoviruses that could facilitate a conventional approach to preclinical safety studies. In this manuscript, we describe our tailored preclinical strategy designed to evaluate the key biological properties of enadenotucirev. As enadenotucirev does not replicate in animal cells, a panel of primary human cells was used to evaluate enadenotucirev replication selectivity in vitro, demonstrating that virus genome levels were >100-fold lower in normal cells relative to tumor cells. Acute intravenous tolerability in mice was used to assess virus particle-mediated toxicology and effects on innate immunity. These studies showed that particle toxicity could be ameliorated by dose fractionation, using an initial dose of virus to condition the host such that cytokine responses to subsequent doses were significantly attenuated. This, in turn, supported the initiation of a phase I intravenous clinical trial with a starting dose of 1 × 1010 virus particles given on days 1, 3, and 5.

  12. An assessment of the integrity of PWR pressure vessels. A U.K. study group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1977-01-01

    As part of the discussions held in 1973/4 over the choice of reactor system for the next stage of Britain's nuclear power programme, a Study Group of experts, chaired by Dr W. Marshall (the Member for Research, U.K. Atomic Energy Authority) set out to review the factors determining the integrity of LWR pressure vessels. The resulting report was sent to the U.K. Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations in June, 1976, who agreed that a summary document - 'An Assessment of the Integrity of PWR Vessels', Report of a Study Group under the Chairmanship of Dr. W. Marshall, CBE, FRS, published by U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, Charles II Street, London. 1st October 1976 - should be prepared and published as an aid to public understanding. This document reviewed the material properties and their variation, detailed the various reactor transient conditions and assessed a typical design against the possbilities of ductile and non-ductile failure. Critical crack sizes were assessed for all design conditions and special consideration was given to such reactor fault conditions as loss of coolant and steam-line break. A careful assessment was made of the rate of crack growth to be expected in service due to fatigue and corrosion effects. The role of the cold hydro pressure test iin preventing vessels entering service with significant defects was discussed

  13. Classroom management of situated group learning: A research study of two teaching strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeh, Kathy; Fawns, Rod

    2000-06-01

    Although peer-based work is encouraged by theories in developmental psychology and although classroom interventions suggest it is effective, there are grounds for recognising that young pupils find collaborative learning hard to sustain. Discontinuities in collaborative skill during development have been suggested as one interpretation. Theory and research have neglected situational continuities that the teacher may provide in management of formal and informal collaborations. This experimental study, with the collaboration of the science faculty in one urban secondary college, investigated the effect of two role attribution strategies on communication in peer groups of different gender composition in three parallel Year 8 science classes. The group were set a problem that required them to design an experiment to compare the thermal insulating properties of two different materials. This presents the data collected and key findings, and reviews the findings from previous parallel studies that have employed the same research design in different school settings. The results confirm the effectiveness of social role attribution strategies in teacher management of communication in peer-based work.

  14. Maternal genital tract colonisation by group-b streptococcus: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmi, N.; Sikandar, R.; Zuberi, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of Group B Streptococcus genital tract infection in pregnant women and to determine the risk factors for its colonisation. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi and Sobhraj Hospital, Karachi, from May to August 2007. Pregnant women at 35-37 weeks gestation attending antenatal clinic at these hospitals constituted the study population. Based on stratified sampling, 405 patients were recruited. High vaginal swabs of these patients were taken in order to calculate the prevalence of infection at each hospital. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the risk factor association. SPSS 11.5 was used for statistical analysis. Results: The overall prevalence of colonisation was 17% (n=69) (95% CI: 13.4-20.7). Of the 155(38.27%) women at the Aga Khan Hospital, 35(22.6%) were positive, while among the 250 (61.72%) women at Sobhraj Hospital, the prevalence was 13.6% (n=34). The colonisation was found to be significantly associated inversely with the body mass index of the patient (OR 0.91; 95% CI: 0.08-1.0). Conclusion: Group B Streptococcus screening should be an integral part of antenatal care and should be offered to all pregnant women. (author)

  15. Program experiences of adults with autism, their families, and providers: Findings from a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffer Miller, Kaitlin H; Mathew, Mary; Nonnemacher, Stacy L; Shea, Lindsay L

    2017-02-01

    A growing number of individuals with autism spectrum disorder are aging into adulthood. In the United States, Medicaid is the primary payer for services for adults with autism spectrum disorder, yet there are few funded programs that provide dedicated supports to this population. This study examined the experiences of adults with autism spectrum disorder in two Medicaid-funded programs in Pennsylvania through focus groups. Researchers conducted 20 focus groups with a total of 36 adults with autism spectrum disorder, 32 family members, 32 direct care staff, and 20 program administrators. Using thematic analysis, we identified three themes: training needs, community engagement and socialization, and employment. There was a need for additional training to meet the varying needs of program participants including co-occurring diagnoses, sexuality, and long-term planning. Adults with autism spectrum disorder prioritized more individualized community activities based on their interests. Finally, barriers to and strategies for successful employment were discussed. It will be crucial for policy makers to utilize the findings to inform program improvement and development based on the experiences of individuals impacted by these services and systems directly. Additionally, researchers should use the findings from this study to design interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorder as it includes their voices.

  16. Molar incisor hypomineralization: a study of prevalence and etiology in a group of Iranian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Rahil; Ramazani, Nahid; Nourinasab, Rahmatollah

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) and its relationship with systemic conditions in a group of Iranian children. The study population comprised of 433 7-9 year olds, from four schools in Zahedan, Iran. Subjects were evaluated clinically by one examiner, and at a separate session, their mothers completed a coded medical history questionnaire. Hypo-mineralized molars and incisors were recorded based on DDE (developmental defects of enamel) index and DMFT (number of decayed, filled and missing teeth) was determined. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square and independent sample t-tests. Fifty-five (12.7%) children showed MIH. The overall mean number of affected teeth was 0.2. The mean value of DMFT in MIH children was greater than in normal children. Demarcated opacities were the most frequent (76%) enamel defect. Mother's and child's medical problems during prenatal, perinatal and post natal period were significantly remarkable in MIH children. The prevalence of MIH in a group of Iranian children was 12.7%. Prenatal, perinatal and post natal medical conditions were more prevalent in children affected by MIH.

  17. Exploring the Black Box in Brazilian Work Groups: a Study of Diversity, Conflict and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Sobral

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, several studies have been conducted to examine the complex relationships betweenteam diversity and individual and organizational outcomes. Although, in theory, team diversity can fosterpositive organizational synergies by increasing the variance of perspectives and approaches to work differentmembers can bring, the same idiosyncratic characteristics can also engender significant difficulties resultingfrom problems in coordination, communication and conflict. This study used a sample of 44 work groups toexamine the influence of five types of diversity on team outcomes and the mediating role of task and relationalconflict on this relationship. A survey of 279 team members and interviews with the 44 team managers wereused to examine these relationships. Findings suggest that different forms of diversity impact task conflict indifferent ways, which in turn is negatively associated with job satisfaction and team performance. Results furthershow that diversity is unrelated to relational conflict; however, this type of conflict seems to hinder both jobsatisfaction and team performance. Overall, these patterns suggest a complex link between team diversity andhow work groups function.

  18. Healthcare Engagement and Encounters in a Rural State: A Focus Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rural populations have many barriers to quality health care including lack of access to primary care and specialty care and a greater likelihood to be underinsured or uninsured. They are also less likely to use preventive screening, or to participate in self-care and engage in their health when compared to urban residents. The purpose of this paper was to describe patients’ healthcare experiences in a rural western state focusing on their healthcare expectations and engagement. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using a focus group protocol to elicit rural patients’ healthcare experiences. A purposeful sample of English speaking adult residents from a single county who were willing to discuss their healthcare experiences was included. Patients and community members (21 years and older were recruited through a local hospital as well as via flyers posted throughout the community. Each audio-recorded group took about two hours. A total of 15 focus groups were conducted to obtain sufficient text for theoretical saturation and thematic analysis. Each group had a range of 3-8 participants. A $25 visa gift card and lunch were provided for each participant as an incentive. Results: ‘Encounters with Healthcare Professionals’ and ‘Engagement in Health’ were the two dominant dimensions with two themes each. Themes centered around what characterized the best or worst encounters. Trust and Communication - both were based on time spent with the provider and establishment of rapport with the providers. The best encounters were those with health care providers or pharmacists who had sufficient time, adequately explained a diagnosis and new medications did not dismiss patient concerns, and treated individuals with respect. Typical responses describing the worst encounters included examples of misdiagnosis, dismissing patient’s symptoms, healthcare professionals whose attention was not focused on the patient, pushing too

  19. Comparative study of patellar subluxation syndrome and normal group using axial radiography and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Mamoru; Tomonaga, Kunio; Egawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Gotoh, Shoji; Mihara, Shigeru (Nagasaki Municipal Hospital (Japan))

    1989-10-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the 20 knees of 10 females with normal knee joints (age, 22-35 years) and on 7 knees of 7 patients with subluxation syndrome (age, 15-24 years), using axial radiography and CT. In axial radiography where the angle of knee flexion was 30 deg or 60 deg, no significant difference was recognized between the two groups with respect to tilting angle, patellofemoral angle, congruence angle and lateral shift. However, a significant difference was found using CT. Thus, CT was considered useful for diagnosis. Because of these results, all 7 cases underwent surgery for detachment of the lateral side and tightening of the medial side. Three cases underwent shifting of the tibial tuberosity to the anteromedial side, resulting in a favourable outcome. Here, we report the study. (author).

  20. The XPS study of physical and chemical forms of neptunium group on the surface of minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption behavior and the physical and chemical forms of neptunium on the surface of minerals of the two chlorate samples, biotite and kaolin, with different contents of Fe(II was studied. The liquid-liquid extraction and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to identify the valence forms of neptunium. On the basis of the obtained data the quantitative elemental composition of the surface of the studied minerals, as well as the ionic composition of the formed neptunium complexes was determined. It was shown that the Np(IV and Np(VI containing compounds did not form, while the complexes Np(VO+ -hydroxyl did form on the surface. The oxygen ions bonded with iron and oxygen belonging to water and/or of carboxyl were suggested to be present in the equatorial plane of the neptunyl group NpO+.

  1. H I studies of the Sculptor group galaxies. V. NGC 253

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puche, D.; Carignan, C.; Van Gorkom, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the H I properties and mass distribution of the Sculptor group galaxy NGC 253, from VLA obserations, is presented. The detected H I disk is fairly small with a diameter of about 0.8 D HO. The rotation curve, derived from the velocity field using a full tilted ring model, is still rising at the last observed point. The maximum observed rotation velocity is 224 km/s at a radius of 8.5 kpc. From this analysis, a systematic velocity of 245 km/s, a mean inclination of 72 deg, and a mean position angle of 229 deg are derived. The study of the mass distribution shows that a two-component (luminous and dark) mass model is needed to explain the observed rotation curve over the whole radius range. 24 refs

  2. Comparative study of patellar subluxation syndrome and normal group using axial radiography and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Mamoru; Tomonaga, Kunio; Egawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Gotoh, Shoji; Mihara, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the 20 knees of 10 females with normal knee joints (age, 22-35 years) and on 7 knees of 7 patients with subluxation syndrome (age, 15-24 years), using axial radiography and CT. In axial radiography where the angle of knee flexion was 30 deg or 60 deg, no significant difference was recognized between the two groups with respect to tilting angle, patellofemoral angle, congruence angle and lateral shift. However, a significant difference was found using CT. Thus, CT was considered useful for diagnosis. Because of these results, all 7 cases underwent surgery for detachment of the lateral side and tightening of the medial side. Three cases underwent shifting of the tibial tuberosity to the anteromedial side, resulting in a favourable outcome. Here, we report the study. (author)

  3. Basic human values in a young group: advances in exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian R. Daset Carreto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of a wide area of Study, developed since 1998 and focused on Childhood and Adolescence. At first, the aim was to research the psychopathological profile of adolescents, with sociodemographic variables. Further on Competence, Coping and Values were added for an approach from the Positive Psychology (Dahlsgaard, Peterson & Seligman, 2005. This article presents the preliminar results of a youth sample of secondary level students (n=152, aged 12 to 18, male and female, belonging to a medium socioeconomical status. The instrument used for the study is the Basic Values Questionnaire, developed by Valdiney V. Gouveia (1998, based on the studies of S. Schwartz and W. Bilsky (1987, 1990, 2004. Once the performance of this instrument was tested with our Spanish speaking population, some linguistic adaptations were implemented. To obtain the profile of the interviewed adolescents, descriptive statistic is used. The results show to statistically significant difference between girls and boys in Experimenting and Realization Values (Personnel Values Group; as well in Existence (Central Category Value and in Normative (Social Value, with bigger M quantity in Suprapersonnel Value (Central Value and Interaction (Social Category Value. In response to open questions about the most and the least important values, subjects have chosen Interaction (Social Value and Existence Values (Central Value as the most important ones, and Realization Values (Personal Value and the Normative Values (Central Value Category, as the least important ones. The study shows the importance of some groups of Values, what would require an analysis in relation to the behaviours with those that are expressed and their cultural relevance. The conclusions open the debate, from the own expression of the value and their relationship with the psychopathology and on the other hand with the well-being. 

  4. A small-group functional balance intervention for individuals with Alzheimer disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Julie D; Drake, Jamie Michelle; Marino, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD) have a higher risk of falls than their cognitively intact peers. This pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a small-group balance exercise program for individuals with AD in a day center environment. Seven participants met the inclusion criteria: diagnosis of AD or probable AD, medical stability, and ability to walk (with or without assistive device). We used an exploratory pre- and post-test study design. Participants engaged in a functional balance exercise program in two 45-minute sessions each week for eight weeks. Balance activities were functional and concrete, and the intervention was organized into constant, blocked, massed practice. Outcome measures included Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and gait speed (GS; self-selected and fast assessed by an instrumented walkway). Data were analyzed by comparing individual change scores with previously identified minimal detectable change scores at the 90% confidence level (MDC90). Pre- and post-test data were acquired for five participants (two participants withdrew). The BBS improved in all five participants, and improved > or = 6.4 points (the MDC90 for the BBS in three participants. Four participants improved their performance on the TUG, and three participants improved > or = 4.09 seconds (the MDC90 for the TUG). Self-selected GS increased > or = 9.44 cm/sec (the MDC90 for gait speed) in three participants. Two participants demonstrated post-test self-selected GS comparable with their pretest fast GS. This pilot study suggests that a small-group functional balance intervention for individuals with AD is feasible and effective. Although participants had no explicit memory of the program, four of five improved in at least two outcome measures. Larger scale functional balance intervention studies with individuals with AD are warranted.

  5. Unrecorded alcohol use: a global modelling study based on nominal group assessments and survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Charlotte; Manthey, Jakob; Merey, Aaron; Rylett, Margaret; Rehm, Jürgen

    2018-01-27

    Alcohol use is among the most important risk factors for burden of disease globally. An estimated quarter of the total alcohol consumed globally is unrecorded. However, due partly to the challenges associated with its assessment, evidence concerning the magnitude of unrecorded alcohol use is sparse. This study estimated country-specific proportions of unrecorded alcohol used in 2015. A statistical model was developed for data prediction using data on the country-specific proportion of unrecorded alcohol use from nominal group expert assessments and secondary, nationally representative survey data and country-level covariates. Estimates were calculated for the country level, for four income groups and globally. A total of 129 participants from 49 countries were included in the nominal group expert assessments. The survey data comprised 66 538 participants from 16 countries. Experts completed a standardized questionnaire assessing the country-specific proportion of unrecorded alcohol. In the national surveys, the number of standard drinks of total and unrecorded alcohol use was assessed for the past 7 days. Based on predictions for 167 countries, a population-weighted average of 27.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.4-44.9%] of the total alcohol consumed in 2015 was unrecorded. The proportion of unrecorded alcohol was lower in high (9.4%, 95% CI = 2.4-16.4%) and upper middle-income countries (18.3%, 95% CI = 9.0-27.6%) and higher in low (43.1%, 95% CI = 26.5-59.7%) and lower middle-income countries (54.4%, 95% CI = 38.1-70.8%). This corresponded to 0.9 (high-income), 1.2 (upper middle-income), 3.2 (lower middle-income) and 1.8 (low-income) litres of unrecorded alcohol per capita. A new method for modelling the country-level proportion of unrecorded alcohol use globally showed strong variation among geographical regions and income groups. Lower-income countries were associated with a higher proportion of unrecorded alcohol than higher-income countries

  6. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  7. Pharmacist-Physician Collaboration at a Family Medicine Residency Program: A Focus Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri Hager

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to transforming healthcare and pursuit of the Triple Aim, many health systems have added team members to expand the capabilities and effectiveness of the team to facilitate these aims. The objective of this study was to explore knowledge and perceptions of pharmacist-physician collaboration among family medicine residents (FMR, family medicine faculty (FMF, and pharmacist faculty and residents in a practice where clinical pharmacy services were relatively new. Understanding the nuances of pharmacist-physician interactions will provide insight into how to improve FMR education to prepare learners for patient-centered, team-based practice. Methods: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study design was used to articulate perceptions of professional roles and team-based care in an interprofessional family medicine community-based clinical practice. Five, 60-minute focus groups were conducted in a clinical training setting that focuses on preparing family medicine physicians for collaborative rural primary care practice. Results: Twenty-one FMRs, eight FMF, and six clinical pharmacists participated. Three themes emerged from the focus groups and were consistent across the groups: 1 roles of pharmacists recognized by physicians in different settings, 2 benefits to collaboration, and 3 keys to successful pharmacist-physician collaboration which include a developing the relationship, b optimizing communication, c creating beneficial clinical workflow, d clarifying roles and responsibilities, and e increasing opportunities for meaningful interactions. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that by co-locating physicians and pharmacists in the same environment, and providing a basic structure for collaboration, a collaborative working relationship can be initiated. Practices looking to have more effective collaborative working relationships should strive to increase the frequency of interactions of the professions, help the

  8. A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Group Intervention for Hypersexual Disorder: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Jonas; Kaldo, Viktor; Arver, Stefan; Dhejne, Cecilia; Öberg, Katarina Görts

    2017-07-01

    The proposed criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition for hypersexual disorder (HD) included symptoms reported by patients seeking help for excessive and out-of-control non-paraphilic sexual behavior, including sexual behaviors in response to dysphoric mood states, impulsivity, and risk taking. Although no prior studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of HD have been performed, CBT has been found effective for dysphoric mood states and impulsivity. To investigate the feasibility of a CBT manual developed for HD explored through symptom decrease, treatment attendance, and clients' treatment satisfaction. Ten men with a diagnosis of HD took part in the CBT group program. Measurements were taken before, during, and at the end of treatment and 3 and 6 months after treatment. The primary outcome was the Hypersexual Disorder: Current Assessment Scale (HD:CAS) score that measured the severity of problematic hypersexual symptoms and secondary outcomes were the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) score, the proportion of attended sessions, and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8) score. Main results were significant decreases of HD symptoms from before to after treatment on HD:CAS and HDSI scores and a decrease in the number of problematic sexual behaviors during the course of therapy. A high attendance rate of 93% and a high treatment satisfaction score on CSQ-8 also were found. The CBT program seemed to ameliorate the symptoms of HD and therefore might be a feasible treatment option. This study provides data from a CBT program for the treatment of the specific proposed criteria of HD. Because of the small sample and lack of a control group, the results can be considered only preliminary. Although participants reported decreased HD symptoms after attending the CBT program, future studies should evaluate the treatment program with a larger sample and a randomized controlled procedure

  9. Activity report for feasibility study on PKI authentication method with IC card in authentication system sub group of J-PARC information system group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Naoya; Aoyagi, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Kiyoharu; Manabe, Atsushi; Yuasa, Fukuko

    2009-06-01

    The Authentication System Sub Group of J-PARC Information System Group completed the mapping of the several authentication methods in terms of the level of security. Of the methods, the PKI authentication method with IC card provides the Super High Security Level and will be adopted as the authentication method of several J-PARC Information Systems. We study the feasibility of this method with following four examples; (1) 'The EAP-TLS wireless LAN authentication method'. (2) 'The Web-SSL client authentication method in SSL-VPN connection'. (3) 'The PKI authentication method with a certificate issued by NAREGI-CA software stored in IC card.' (4) 'The PKI authentication method with Dual interface FeliCa card'. In each example, we confirmed the feasibility of the method in a practical way. In this report we present the details of the study. (author)

  10. Target design activities for the European study group: heavy ion ignition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S.; Lutz, K.J.; Maruhn, J.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Rickert, A.; Ramis, R.; Ramirez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Target studies are an essential part of the activity of the study group proposed by several European institutions in order to assess the feasibility of heavy-ion-driven inertial confinement fusion ignition with beam energy below 2 MJ. The reference targets are two-side illuminated hohlraums enclosing a spherical fusion capsule. At present several codes are used to study various aspects of target evolution: hohlraum energetics and capsule implosion are studied by 1D radiation hydrocodes, symetrization in the hohlraum by viewfactor codes and implosion symmetry and stability aspects by 2D hydrodynamics simulations. It is found that achievment of ignition at the above energy level requires shaped radiation pulses (at least three steps) and good control of instabilities and that a crucial uncertainty concerns the trade-off between symmetrization and energy transfer in the hohlraum. Another essential aspect is the compatibility of the beam focusing scheme with the radiation converters. The study of such aspects requires the development of an integrated code that can simulate the entire evolution of a target with complex structure. The first steps for the construction of such a code are outlined. Results on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and on the physics of ignition and burn are also summarized. (orig.)

  11. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaberi Dasgupta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2 prevention program. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. RESULTS: Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. CONCLUSIONS: Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  12. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Da Costa, Deborah; Pillay, Sabrina; De Civita, Mirella; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Leong, Aaron; Bacon, Simon; Stotland, Stephen; Chetty, V Tony; Garfield, Natasha; Majdan, Agnieszka; Meltzer, Sara

    2013-01-01

    We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM) diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevention program. Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  13. Patient input into the development and enhancement of ED discharge instructions: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Barbara A; McCarthy, Danielle M; Forth, Victoria E; Tanabe, Paula; Schmidt, Michael J; Adams, James G; Engel, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    Previous research indicates that patients have difficulty understanding ED discharge instructions; these findings have important implications for adherence and outcomes. The objective of this study was to obtain direct patient input to inform specific revisions to discharge documents created through a literacy-guided approach and to identify common themes within patient feedback that can serve as a framework for the creation of discharge documents in the future. Based on extensive literature review and input from ED providers, subspecialists, and health literacy and communication experts, discharge instructions were created for 5 common ED diagnoses. Participants were recruited from a federally qualified health center to participate in a series of 5 focus group sessions. Demographic information was obtained and a Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) assessment was performed. During each of the 1-hour focus group sessions, participants reviewed discharge instructions for 1 of 5 diagnoses. Participants were asked to provide input into the content, organization, and presentation of the documents. Using qualitative techniques, latent and manifest content analysis was performed to code for emergent themes across all 5 diagnoses. Fifty-seven percent of participants were female and the average age was 32 years. The average REALM score was 57.3. Through qualitative analysis, 8 emergent themes were identified from the focus groups. Patient input provides meaningful guidance in the development of diagnosis-specific discharge instructions. Several themes and patterns were identified, with broad significance for the design of ED discharge instructions. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Group 1 versus Group 2 carbapenems on the susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii to carbapenems: a before and after intervention study of carbapenem-use stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Kyung; Yang, Kyung Sook; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Min Ja

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been proposed for reducing bacterial resistance in the hospital environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a carbapenem-use stewardship program on the susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii to Group 2 carbapenems. A before and after intervention study was conducted at a university hospital from September 2008 to February 2013. Three study periods were defined: Phase I, pre-intervention (months 1-18); Phase II, a postintervention period during which ertapenem use was mandated but carbapenem use was not restricted (months 19-36); and Phase III, a postintervention period during which Group 2 carbapenem use was restricted (months 37-54). During the study period, intervention resulted in diminished consumption of Group 2 carbapenems (antimicrobial use density (AUD): 21.3±6.0 in Phase I, 18.8±6.0 in Phase II, 16.1±4.4 in Phase III; P = 0.028) and increased consumption of ertapenem (AUD: 2.7±1.7 in Phase I, 7.2±4.5 in Phase II, 9.1±5.3 in Phase III; Pcarbapenem during the previous one month was positively and significantly associated with a subsequent increase in the proportion of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) (P = 0.031). Implementing a carbapenem-use stewardship program featuring the preferential use of ertapenem for treating appropriate indications of infection resulted in reduced use of Group 2 carbapenems and had a positive impact on the susceptibility of A. baumannii to carbapenems. This approach could be integrated into CRAB-control strategies in hospitals.

  15. Interprofessional collaboration regarding patients' care plans in primary care: a focus group study into influential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; Lenzen, Stephanie Anna; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia; Daniëls, Ramon; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna

    2016-05-28

    The number of people with multiple chronic conditions demanding primary care services is increasing. To deal with the complex health care demands of these people, professionals from different disciplines collaborate. This study aims to explore influential factors regarding interprofessional collaboration related to care plan development in primary care. A qualitative study, including four semi-structured focus group interviews (n = 4). In total, a heterogeneous group of experts (n = 16) and health care professionals (n = 15) participated. Participants discussed viewpoints, barriers, and facilitators regarding interprofessional collaboration related to care plan development. The data were analysed by means of inductive content analysis. The findings show a variety of factors influencing the interprofessional collaboration in developing a care plan. Factors can be divided into 5 key categories: (1) patient-related factors: active role, self-management, goals and wishes, membership of the team; (2) professional-related factors: individual competences, domain thinking, motivation; (3) interpersonal factors: language differences, knowing each other, trust and respect, and motivation; (4) organisational factors: structure, composition, time, shared vision, leadership and administrative support; and (5) external factors: education, culture, hierarchy, domain thinking, law and regulations, finance, technology and ICT. Improving interprofessional collaboration regarding care plan development calls for an integral approach including patient- and professional related factors, interpersonal, organisational, and external factors. Further, the leader of the team seems to play a key role in watching the patient perspective, organising and coordinating interprofessional collaborations, and guiding the team through developments. The results of this study can be used as input for developing tools and interventions targeted at executing and improving interprofessional

  16. Taking action against malnutrition in Asian healthcare settings: an initiative of a Northeast Asia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takashi; Arai, Hidenori; Claytor, Ling Hui; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Kotani, Joji; Lee, Shyh-Dye; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Nogami, Tetsushi; Peng, Nanhai

    2017-03-01

    Malnutrition is common in Asia, especially among people who are critically ill and/or older. Study results from China, Japan, and Taiwan show that malnutrition or risk of malnutrition is found in up to 30% of communitydwelling people and as much as 50% of patients admitted to hospitals-with prevalence even higher among those older than 70 years. In Asia, malnutrition takes substantial tolls on health, physical function, and wellbeing of people affected, and it adds huge financial burdens to healthcare systems. Attention to nutrition, including protein intake, can help prevent or delay disease- and age-related disabilities and can speed recovery from illness or surgery. Despite compelling evidence and professional guidelines on appropriate nutrition care in hospital and community settings, patients' malnutrition is often overlooked and under-treated in Asian healthcare, as it is worldwide. Since the problem of malnutrition continues to grow as many Asian populations become increasingly "gray", it is important to take action now. A medical education (feedM.E.) Global Study Group developed a strategy to facilitate best-practice hospital nutrition care: screen-intervene-supervene. As members of a newly formed feedM.E. Northeast Asia Study Group, we endorse this care strategy, guiding clinicians to screen each patient's nutritional status upon hospital admission or at initiation of care, intervene promptly when nutrition care is needed, and supervene or follow-up routinely with adjustment and reinforcement of nutrition care plans, including post-discharge. To encourage best-practice nutrition in Asian patient care settings, our paper includes a simple, stepwise Nutrition Care Pathway (NCP) in multiple languages.

  17. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression among adults in Japanese clinical settings: a single-group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for treating Japanese patients with major depression is lacking, therefore, a feasibility study of CBT for depression in Japanese clinical settings is urgently required. Findings A culturally adapted, 16-week manualized individual CBT program for Japanese patients with major depressive disorder was developed. A total of 27 patients with major depression were enrolled in a single-group study with the purpose of testing the feasibility of the program. Twenty six patients (96% completed the study. The mean total score on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II for all patients (Intention-to-treat sample improved from 32.6 to 11.7, with a mean change of 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 17.0 to 24.8. Within-group effect size at the endpoint assessment was 2.64 (Cohen's d. Twenty-one patients (77.7% showed treatment response and 17 patients (63.0% achieved remission at the end of the program. Significant improvement was observed in measurement of subjective and objective depression severity (assessed by BDI-II, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, dysfunctional attitude (assessed by Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, global functioning (assessed by Global Assessment of Functioning of DSM-IV and subjective well-being (assessed by WHO Subjective Well-being Inventory (all p values Conclusions Our manualized treatment comprised of a 16-week individual CBT program for major depression appears feasible and may achieve favorable treatment outcomes among Japanese patients with major depression. Further research involving a larger sample in a randomized, controlled trial design is warranted. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002542.

  18. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression among adults in Japanese clinical settings: a single-group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating Japanese patients with major depression is lacking, therefore, a feasibility study of CBT for depression in Japanese clinical settings is urgently required. Findings A culturally adapted, 16-week manualized individual CBT program for Japanese patients with major depressive disorder was developed. A total of 27 patients with major depression were enrolled in a single-group study with the purpose of testing the feasibility of the program. Twenty six patients (96%) completed the study. The mean total score on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) for all patients (Intention-to-treat sample) improved from 32.6 to 11.7, with a mean change of 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 17.0 to 24.8). Within-group effect size at the endpoint assessment was 2.64 (Cohen's d). Twenty-one patients (77.7%) showed treatment response and 17 patients (63.0%) achieved remission at the end of the program. Significant improvement was observed in measurement of subjective and objective depression severity (assessed by BDI-II, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), dysfunctional attitude (assessed by Dysfunctional Attitude Scale), global functioning (assessed by Global Assessment of Functioning of DSM-IV) and subjective well-being (assessed by WHO Subjective Well-being Inventory) (all p values < 0.001). Conclusions Our manualized treatment comprised of a 16-week individual CBT program for major depression appears feasible and may achieve favorable treatment outcomes among Japanese patients with major depression. Further research involving a larger sample in a randomized, controlled trial design is warranted. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002542. PMID:20529252

  19. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN, an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted.

  20. Undergraduate student nurses' perceptions of two practice learning models: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxburgh, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Phase 1 of this study examined student, mentor and clinical manager's perceptions of a 'Hub and Spoke' practice learning model in year 1 of an undergraduate nursing programme. Findings from Phase 1 suggested that the model had significant educational merit in orientating students to clinical learning and emphasising the primacy of the mentor relationship in developing and supporting students. Following the students through year 2 of their programme, wherein they experienced a 'rotational' practice learning model, which provided an opportunity to explore student perceptions of both models. To explore undergraduate nurses' perceptions of two experienced practice learning models: hub and spoke model, and the classical rotational model. In a previous study the hub and spoke model appeared to develop 1st year students' sense of belongingness, continuity and quality of practice learning, there for it was important to understand what students reported about these issues when recounting their 2nd year experience in the clinical setting that was organised according to a classical rotational model. Qualitative approach utilising focus groups. 10 under-graduate student nurses at the end of 2nd year. Focus group interviews. Students responded in ways that indicate they believed the experiences of year 1 had raised their faith in their ability to cope with the practice learning and educational demands of nursing. They saw themselves as being better prepared for year 2 as a result of their exposure to hubs and spokes. The study has identified traits of resilience, continued belongingness and self-confidence in orientation to learning in clinical practice in hub and spoke experienced students. The student nurses found the hub and spoke model valid in 1st year, whilst stating that for 2nd year the rotational model can be valid. This supports earlier findings that student nurses require a structured and supportive 1st year learning environment to enable development of resilience

  1. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  2. Clinical and genetic characteristics in a group of 45 patients with Turner syndrome (monocentric study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucerzan, Simona; Miclea, Diana; Popp, Radu; Alkhzouz, Camelia; Lazea, Cecilia; Pop, Ioan Victor; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen a shift in perspective on Turner syndrome, as it is no longer considered a significant disability due to therapeutic advances. The delay of diagnosis and the underdiagnosis are common in Turner syndrome, especially because of the great phenotypic variability and lack of firm diagnostic criteria. Our first aim was to assess the clinical and the cytogenetic characteristics and growth rate in growth hormone (GH)-treated patients as compared to those with spontaneous growth. The second aim was to analyze the Y chromosomal sequences. We analyzed 45 patients diagnosed with Turner syndrome in Genetic Pathology Centre of Cluj Emergency Children's Hospital. We carried out a study of the clinical features, the correlations between the karyotype and the phenotype, and we also made a research of Y chromosome sequences. The average age at diagnosis was 8.9±5.4 years. A significant association was observed between the number of external phenotypical abnormalities and internal malformations ( r =0.45), particularly the cardiovascular ones ( r =0.44). Patients treated with GH showed improvement in growth rate, with final stature significantly better than in untreated patients; benefits following treatment were greater if diagnosis was made before the age of 5 years. Thirteen percent of patients experienced spontaneous and complete puberty, whereas 30% experienced incomplete puberty. Patients with the 45,X genotype had a greater stature deficit and a higher incidence of cardiac malformations, compared with patients with 45,X/46,XX mosaic karyotype. Y chromosome sequences were found in only one patient, who subsequently underwent gonadectomy. The importance of this study resides, to the best of our knowledge, in the fact that the largest group of patients in Romania was analyzed and assessed. To draw firm conclusions on the most valuable clinical indicators for Turner syndrome diagnosis in clinical practice, studies on large groups of patients should be

  3. Effect of age and exposure group on the onset of AIDS in heterosexual and homosexual HIV-infected patients. SEROCO Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, N; Deveau, C; Belanger, F; Boufassa, F; Persoz, A; Jadand, C; Rouzioux, C; Delfraissy, J F; Bucquet, D

    1994-06-01

    To analyse the influence of age at seroconversion and sexual exposure group on the progression of HIV disease. This multicentre prospective cohort study involved 443 subjects whose date of HIV infection was known to within +/- 1 year. Individuals whose sexual behaviour was exclusively heterosexual after HIV infection constituted the heterosexual group (n = 131). AIDS-free survival was compared with that of men (n = 312) infected through homosexual sex and who continued homosexual activity after HIV infection. They constituted the homosexual group. The end-point was the onset of an AIDS-defining illness listed in the 1987 revised Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, AIDS-free survival curves were plotted for three age categories ( or = 40 years). A Cox model was used to quantify the effect of age and to assess the influence of exposure group on AIDS onset after adjustment for age. Because of the high incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) among homosexual men, a disease that can be an early AIDS-defining illness, multivariate analysis was performed with and without consideration of the occurrence of KS. Patients aged > or = 40 years at seroconversion progressed more rapidly to AIDS than younger patients (P difference [P = 0.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.77]. After adjustment for age, the relative risk of developing AIDS (CDC criteria) was 2.42 (P = 0.008; 95% CI, 1.18-4.97) among the homosexual men (AIDS cases, n = 56). All cases of KS (n = 19) involved the homosexual group. Excluding KS as a first manifestation of AIDS, homosexual or bisexual subjects had a risk of AIDS of 1.92 (P = 0.07; 95% CI, 0.92-4.03) compared with heterosexual subjects. The risk of AIDS increases with age at seroconversion. The more rapid progression towards AIDS in the homosexual group than in the heterosexual group persisted after adjustment for age. Further studies are required to determine the possible role of repeated exposure

  4. Features of effective medical knowledge resources to support point of care learning: a focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Cook

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Health care professionals access various information sources to quickly answer questions that arise in clinical practice. The features that favorably influence the selection and use of knowledge resources remain unclear. We sought to better understand how clinicians select among the various knowledge resources available to them, and from this to derive a model for an effective knowledge resource. METHODS: We conducted 11 focus groups at an academic medical center and outlying community sites. We included a purposive sample of 50 primary care and subspecialist internal medicine and family medicine physicians. We transcribed focus group discussions and analyzed these using a constant comparative approach to inductively identify features that influence the selection of knowledge resources. RESULTS: We identified nine features that influence users' selection of knowledge resources, namely efficiency (with sub-features of comprehensiveness, searchability, and brevity, integration with clinical workflow, credibility, user familiarity, capacity to identify a human expert, reflection of local care processes, optimization for the clinical question (e.g., diagnosis, treatment options, drug side effect, currency, and ability to support patient education. No single existing resource exemplifies all of these features. CONCLUSION: The influential features identified in this study will inform the development of knowledge resources, and could serve as a framework for future research in this field.

  5. Mandatory Nap Times and Group Napping Patterns in Child Care: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Sally L; Smith, Simon S; Hurst, Cameron; Pattinson, Cassandra L; Thorpe, Karen J

    2017-01-01

    Policy provision for naps is typical in child care settings, but there is variability in the practices employed. One practice that might modify children's early sleep patterns is the allocation of a mandatory nap time in which all children are required to lie on their beds without alternate activity permitted. There is currently limited evidence of the effects of such practices on children's napping patterns. This study examined the association between duration of mandatory nap times and group-level napping patterns in child care settings. Observations were undertaken in a community sample of 113 preschool rooms with a scheduled nap time (N = 2,114 children). Results showed that 83.5% of child care settings implemented a mandatory nap time (range = 15-145 min) while 14.2% provided alternate activities for children throughout the nap time period. Overall, 31% of children napped during nap times. Compared to rooms with ≤ 30 min of mandatory nap time, rooms with 31-60 min and > 60 min of mandatory nap time had a two-and-a-half and fourfold increase, respectively, in the proportion of children napping. Nap onset latency did not significantly differ across groups. Among preschool children, exposure to longer mandatory nap times in child care may increase incidence of napping.

  6. Pediatric Early Warning Score Systems, Nurses Perspective - A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Nielsen, Pia Bonde; Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Kirkegaard, Hans; Aagaard, Hanne

    2018-02-14

    Pediatric early warning score (PEWS) systems are used to monitor pediatric patients' vital signs and facilitate the treatment of patients at risk of deteriorating. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about nurses' experiences with PEWS and to highlight factors facilitating and impeding the use of PEWS tools in clinical practice. An exploratory qualitative design was chosen using focus group interviews to gain a deeper understanding of nurses' experiences with PEWS. A total of five focus group interviews were conducted at three hospitals, and a qualitative meaning condensation analysis as described by Kvale and Brinkmann was performed. Seven themes were identified, including i) lack of interdisciplinary awareness, ii) clinical judgment and PEWS-a multi-faceted approach, iii) PEWS supports a professional language, iv) monitoring the patient's - a challenge, v) PEWS helps to visualize the need for escalating care, vi) an inflexible and challenging tool, and vii) supportive tools enhance the nurses' experiences of PEWS positively. Our findings suggest that attention should be given to nurses' perceptions of how both clinical judgment and PEWS should be seen as essential in providing nurses with information about the patients' conditions. If not, the risk of failing to recognize patients' deteriorating conditions will remain as this can have an impeding influence on nurses' use of PEWS. From the nurses' perspective, medical doctors seemed unaware of their role in using PEWS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Technology Solutions to Support Care Continuity in Home Care: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn W; Russell, David; Onorato, Nicole; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2017-09-01

    Elevated hospital readmission rates from home care are an indicator of poor care quality, and rates are particularly high for patients with heart failure. Readmissions may be avoided by optimizing continuity of care. To explore perceptions among home care clinicians of the barriers they face and the information they need to improve care continuity for patients with heart failure. Focus groups were conducted with teams of home care clinicians at a large certified home healthcare agency in the Northeastern United states. In total, there were 61 participants across 6 focus groups. Three overarching themes emerged: continuity of care and communication on care transitions, maintaining continuity of care during a home care episode (with subthemes tracking signs and symptoms and patient teaching), and health information technology (HIT) characteristics to support communication and care continuity. Our study highlights areas of improvement for HIT solutions that could support care delivery for patients with heart failure in a home care setting. Home care agencies planning to introduce technology can use these findings to assess if and how potential systems can support nurses to provide continuity of care across healthcare organizations and home care visits.

  8. Study on technology for utilization of the comprehensive functions of human group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, Masayoshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukuto, Junji; Mitomo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Keiko; Matsukura, Hiroshi; Ando, Hirotomo

    1998-01-01

    This study was made aiming to prevent misoperation in intellectual works during plant operation. Development of a tool to support various operations in a nuclear plant was attempted using multi-media projection system and transmission head-mount display. A geometric resemblance model of fast breeder reactor plant was constructed in 3D-VR space to express the quantity of state, and tools for surveillance support and group operation support were also produced experimentally. The efficacies of these tools were examined. When used in combination with support tools such as FTA, ETA, on-line manual, etc., 3D-VR spatial representation was considered useful to avoid human errors in judgement and operation. If a plant operation in group is regarded as a multi-agent consisting of a plant and humans, it was thought possible to make a modeling for sharing of roles and information exchange among agents in different intellectual levels. Thus, 3D-VR display was found useful for information exchange among highly intelligent operators. (M.N.)

  9. A study of clinical, histopathological and direct immunofluorescence diagnosis in pemphigus group Utility of direct immunofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabovska, Z; Jautova, J; Hrabovsky, V

    2017-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accordance between histopathological and direct immunofluorescence diagnosis of patients with autoimmune vesiculobullous skin diseases. The term pemphigus refers to a group of autoimmune blistering diseases mediated by auto-antibodies directed against desmoglein proteins. The differentiation between the various bullous diseases is important for treatment and prognosis. Direct immunofluorescence microscopy is still the gold standard in differentiating these diseases. Patients with clinical diagnosis of vesiculobullous dermatitis from pemphigus group were included in the study. We retrospectively analyzed histopathologic and direct immunofluorescence results from skin or mucosal samples over 15-year period. 81 patients were included. The accordance was good in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus herpetiformis, but low in pemphigus vegetans, pemphigus foliaceus and pemphigus erythematosus. No accordance was in Hailey-Hailey disease and Grover´s disease. Uncommon result in our analysis included: intraepidermal IgG and IgM depositions at DIF in one Grover´s disease patient. Our results confirmed the relevance of direct immunofluorescence assays as a necessary diagnostic method for the definitive diagnosis of autoimmune blistering disease in the case, where the clinical feature and the results of histopathology are not clear (Tab. 4, Fig. 5, Ref. 26).

  10. Managing Indigenous Minority Groups in the Tourism Industry: An Exploratory Case Study in Southern Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuwahara Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism-based employment has been promoted for reducing poverty in the least developed countries (LDCs. However, for employing the poor sustainably, particularly, indigenous minority groups, management has to cope with the socioeconomic disadvantages in these environments. This study aims to explore the challenges and practical strategies for human resource management (HRM of indigenous minority groups in the tourism sectors of LDCs; specifically, those identified as “best practice” in southern Laos. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the managing director of the project regarding training, compatibility with family life, benefits and incentives, and leadership and teamwork. A qualitative analysis was applied to the interview data and hypothetical HRM strategies were derived. Then, to examine the validity of these strategies within the project, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a half of the employees. The results suggest significance for the following HRM strategies: a social orientation toward tourism industry hygiene standards; a flexible leave system that allows employees to participate in family events and family-operated farming; and nonfinancial benefits such as food, clothing, and housing.

  11. Synthesis, algal inhibition activities and QSAR studies of novel gramine compounds containing ester functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yu, Liangmin; Jiang, Xiaohui; Xia, Shuwei; Zhao, Haizhou

    2009-05-01

    2,5,6-Tribromo-1-methylgramine (TBG), isolated from bryozoan Zoobotryon pellucidum was shown to be very efficient in preventing recruitment of larval settlement. In order to improve the compatibility of TBG and its analogues with other ingredients in antifouling paints, structural modification of TBG was focused mainly on halogen substitution and N-substitution. Two halogen-substitute gramines and their derivatives which contain ester functional groups at N-position of gramines were synthesized. Algal inhibition activities of the synthesized compounds against algae Nitzschia closterium were evaluated and the Median Effective Concentration (EC50) range was 1.06-6.74 μg ml-1. Compounds that had a long chain ester group exhibited extremely high antifouling activity. Quantitive Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies with multiple linear regression analysis were applied to find correlation between different calculated molecular descriptors and biological activity of the synthesized compounds. The results show that the toxicity (log (1/EC50)) is correlated well with the partition coefficient log P. Thus, these products have potential function as antifouling agents.

  12. Should body image programs be inclusive? A focus group study of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciao, Anna C; Ohls, Olivia C; Pringle, Kevin D

    2018-01-01

    Most evidence-based body image programs for college students (e.g., the Body Project) are designed for female-only audiences, although body dissatisfaction is not limited to female-identified individuals. Furthermore, programs do not explicitly discuss diversity, although individuals with marginalized gender, racial, and sexual identities may be particularly vulnerable to body image disturbances. Making programs more inclusive may increase their disseminability. This qualitative study examined the feasibility of adapting the Body Project for universal and inclusive use with college students. Participants (N = 36; M age = 21.66 years; 73% female-identified; 20% sexual minority; 23% racial minority) attended one of five semi-structured focus groups to explore the inclusivity of appearance-based cultural norms using adapted Body Project activities and discuss the feasibility of universal and inclusive interventions. Inductive qualitative content analysis with three-rater consensus identified focus group themes. There was consensus that inclusive interventions could have a positive impact (broadening perspectives, normalizing body image concerns, increasing awareness) despite potential barriers (poor diversity representation, vulnerability). There was strong consensus regarding advice for facilitating inclusive interventions (e.g., skilled facilitation, education, increasing diversity). Results suggest that inclusive body image programs are desirable and provide a framework for creating the EVERYbody Project, a program for more universal audiences. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ligand exchange reactions of the heme group in hemoglobin and myoglobin as studied by pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raap, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis, the kinetic aspects of the ligand exchange reactions of hemoglobin are studied using the pulse radiolysis technique, in particular, the reactions of hydrated electrons with methemoglobin. A hitherto unobserved transient state of the heme group is observed which appears immediately after the rapid reduction process. The absorption spectrum of this new species has the characteristics of a ferrous low-spin state and can therefore be ascribed to the formation of a hemochrome non-equilibrium state. The subsequent relaxation of this intermediate structure into a deoxy-conformation is dependent on the amount of proton activity in the solution and on the presence of organic and inorganic phosphate anions. The final absorption spectrum of the heme group is shown to correspond to a ferrous high-spin state in the relaxed quaternary conformation. This is in agreement with the kinetics observen the binding of carbon monoxide and oxygen to partially reduced methemoglobin. At reduction degrees of methemoglobin as well as of valncy 8ybrids where there is an important contribution from species with two reduced subunits, the binding of carbon monoxide to hemoglobin occurs with on-rate constants characteristic for the tensed quaternary conformation. It is argued that this conformational change of hemoglobin (the R-to-T transition) takes place very rapidly, which suggests the participation of an activated relaxed conformation. In addition, it is found that there is a distinct heterogeneity in the binding of oxygen to partially reduced methemoglobin even at low degrees of reduction

  14. An observational study of cross-cultural communication in short-term, diverse professional learning groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Leslie; Hogg, Peter; Higgins, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the evaluation of a European funded 3-week summer school which took place in 2013 involving 60 staff and students from five universities. The evaluation looked at one group in detail using a qualitative approach to consider whether students and teachers can work together in multicultural groups in order to achieve their goal. Method: One group was observed during 2 two-hour sessions of group activity; at the beginning and end of the summer school task. Video data was analysed using the Rapport Management framework, a model of cross-cultural communication, to determine what motivated this group's interactions. Results: As the group's deadline became imminent ‘face-threatening acts’ (FTAs) were more apparent. These were tolerated in this group because of the development of a strong social bond. There was inequity in participation with members of the group falling into either high- or low-involvement categories. This was also well-tolerated but meant some students may not have gained as much from the experience. The group lacked guidance on managing group dynamics. Conclusion: Cultural differences in communication were not the main threat to multi-cultural working groups. Potential problems can arise from failing to provide the group with a framework for project and team management. An emphasis on ground rules and the allocation of formal roles is important as is the encouragement of socialisation which supports the group during challenging times

  15. A Computational Study of Nasal Spray Deposition Pattern in Four Ethnic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Jarrod A; Patki, Aniruddha; Woodard, Charles R; Frank-Ito, Dennis O

    2016-04-01

    Very little is known about the role of nasal morphology due to ethnic variation on particle deposition pattern in the sinonasal cavity. This preliminary study utilizes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to investigate sinonasal airway morphology and deposition patterns of intranasal sprayed particles in the nose and sinuses of individuals from four different ethnic groups: African American (Black); Asian; Caucasian; and Latin American. Sixteen subjects (four from each ethnic group) with "normal" sinus protocol computed tomography (CT) were selected for CFD analysis. Three-dimensional reconstruction of each subject's sinonasal cavity was created from their personal CT images. CFD simulations were carried out in ANSYS Fluent(™) in two phases: airflow phase was done by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations for steady state laminar inhalation; and particle dispersed phase was solved by tracking injected (sprayed) particles through the calculated airflow field. A total of 10,000 particle streams were released from each nostril, 1000 particles per diameter ranging from 5 μm to 50 μm, with size increments of 5 μm. As reported in the literature, Caucasians (5.31 ± 0.42 cm(-1)) and Latin Americans (5.16 ± 0.40cm(-1)) had the highest surface area to volume ratio, while African Americans had highest nasal index (95.91 ± 2.22). Nasal resistance (NR) was highest among Caucasians (0.046 ± 0.008 Pa.s/mL) and Asians (0.042 ± 0.016Pa.s/mL). Asians and African Americans had the most regions with particle deposition for small (5 μm-15 μm) and large (20 μm-50 μm) particle sizes, respectively. Asians and Latin Americans individuals had the most consistent regional particle deposition pattern in the main nasal cavities within their respective ethnic groups. Preliminary results from these ethnic groups investigated showed that Caucasians and Latin Americans had the least patent nasal cavity. Furthermore, Caucasians

  16. Observation of Interactions in Adolescent Group Therapy: A Mixed Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulàlia Arias-Pujol

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Group psychotherapy is a useful clinical practice for adolescents with mental health issues.