WorldWideScience

Sample records for group testing solution

  1. Sharing solutions - The users' group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, G.; Winter, K.

    1991-01-01

    Regulatory compliance, operating efficiency, and plant-life extension are common goals shared by all nuclear power plants. To achieve these goals, nuclear utilities must be proactive and responsive to the regulatory agencies, work together with each other in the sharing of operating experiences and solution to problems, and develop long-term working relationships with an even smaller number of quality suppliers. Users' and owners' groups are one of the most effective means of accomplishing these objectives. Users' groups facilitate communication between nuclear power plants and provide an interactive vendor interface. Both the utilities and suppliers benefit through shared information and improved customer feedback. This paper describes the evolution and experiences of the Sorrento Electronics (SE) Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) Users' Group. The authors highlight the group's past successes and plans for the future

  2. Solution of differential equations by application of transformation groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, C. N., Jr.; Gallaher, L. J.; Martin, R. H., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Report applies transformation groups to the solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. Lies theorem finds an integrating factor for appropriate invariance group or groups can be found and can be extended to partial differential equations.

  3. Group-decoupled multi-group pin power reconstruction utilizing nodal solution 1D flux profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Lulin; Lu, Dong; Zhang, Shaohong; Wang, Dezhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A direct fitting multi-group pin power reconstruction method is developed. • The 1D nodal solution flux profiles are used as the condition. • The least square fit problem is analytically solved. • A slowing down source improvement method is applied. • The method shows good accuracy for even challenging problems. - Abstract: A group-decoupled direct fitting method is developed for multi-group pin power reconstruction, which avoids both the complication of obtaining 2D analytic multi-group flux solution and any group-coupled iteration. A unique feature of the method is that in addition to nodal volume and surface average fluxes and corner fluxes, transversely-integrated 1D nodal solution flux profiles are also used as the condition to determine the 2D intra-nodal flux distribution. For each energy group, a two-dimensional expansion with a nine-term polynomial and eight hyperbolic functions is used to perform a constrained least square fit to the 1D intra-nodal flux solution profiles. The constraints are on the conservation of nodal volume and surface average fluxes and corner fluxes. Instead of solving the constrained least square fit problem numerically, we solve it analytically by fully utilizing the symmetry property of the expansion functions. Each of the 17 unknown expansion coefficients is expressed in terms of nodal volume and surface average fluxes, corner fluxes and transversely-integrated flux values. To determine the unknown corner fluxes, a set of linear algebraic equations involving corner fluxes is established via using the current conservation condition on all corners. Moreover, an optional slowing down source improvement method is also developed to further enhance the accuracy of the reconstructed flux distribution if needed. Two test examples are shown with very good results. One is a four-group BWR mini-core problem with all control blades inserted and the other is the seven-group OECD NEA MOX benchmark, C5G7

  4. Solutions of group IV elements in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadd, A.T.; Hubberstey, P.; Roberts, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    The solubilities of tin (0.00 = 22 Sn 5 . A simple thermochemical cycle is used to demonstrate that, whereas carbon dissolves endothermically in both liquid lithium and liquid sodium, the heavier Group IV elements dissolve exothermically. A similar cycle is used to derive solvation enthalpies (for the neutral gaseous species) for all Group IV elements in the two solvents. The trend in solvation enthalpy: C > Si > Ge > Sn > Pb is indicative of a diminishing affinity of solvent for solute and is attributed to the increasing metallic character of the solute as the Group is descended. (author)

  5. Field evaporation test of uranium tailings solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, B.L.; Shepard, T.A.; Stewart, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to observe the effect on evaporation rate of a uranium tailings impoundment pond water as salt concentration of the water increased. The duration of the experiment was long enough to cause maximum salt concentration of the water to be attained. The solution used in the experiment was tailings pond water from an inactive uranium tailings disposal site in the initial stages of reclamation. The solution was not neutralized. The initial pH was about 1.0 decreasing to a salt gel at the end of the test. The results of the field experiment show a gradual and slight decrease in evaporation efficiency. This resulted as salt concentrations increased and verified the practical effectiveness of evaporation as a water removal method. In addition, the physical and chemical nature of the residual salts suggest that no long-term stability problem would likely result due to their presence in the impoundment during or after reclamation

  6. Dual Solutions for Nonlinear Flow Using Lie Group Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Awais

    Full Text Available `The aim of this analysis is to investigate the existence of the dual solutions for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM fluid over a porous shrinking wall. We have employed the Lie group analysis for the simplification of the nonlinear differential system and computed the absolute invariants explicitly. An efficient numerical technique namely the shooting method has been employed for the constructions of solutions. Dual solutions are computed for velocity profile of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM fluid flow. Plots reflecting the impact of dual solutions for the variations of Deborah number, Hartman number, wall mass transfer are presented and analyzed. Streamlines are also plotted for the wall mass transfer effects when suction and blowing situations are considered.

  7. Computing group cardinality constraint solutions for logistic regression problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Kwon, Dongjin; Pohl, Kilian M

    2017-01-01

    We derive an algorithm to directly solve logistic regression based on cardinality constraint, group sparsity and use it to classify intra-subject MRI sequences (e.g. cine MRIs) of healthy from diseased subjects. Group cardinality constraint models are often applied to medical images in order to avoid overfitting of the classifier to the training data. Solutions within these models are generally determined by relaxing the cardinality constraint to a weighted feature selection scheme. However, these solutions relate to the original sparse problem only under specific assumptions, which generally do not hold for medical image applications. In addition, inferring clinical meaning from features weighted by a classifier is an ongoing topic of discussion. Avoiding weighing features, we propose to directly solve the group cardinality constraint logistic regression problem by generalizing the Penalty Decomposition method. To do so, we assume that an intra-subject series of images represents repeated samples of the same disease patterns. We model this assumption by combining series of measurements created by a feature across time into a single group. Our algorithm then derives a solution within that model by decoupling the minimization of the logistic regression function from enforcing the group sparsity constraint. The minimum to the smooth and convex logistic regression problem is determined via gradient descent while we derive a closed form solution for finding a sparse approximation of that minimum. We apply our method to cine MRI of 38 healthy controls and 44 adult patients that received reconstructive surgery of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) during infancy. Our method correctly identifies regions impacted by TOF and generally obtains statistically significant higher classification accuracy than alternative solutions to this model, i.e., ones relaxing group cardinality constraints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactor group constants and benchmark test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    The evaluated nuclear data files such as JENDL, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2 are validated by analyzing critical mock-up experiments for various type reactors and assessing applicability for nuclear characteristics such as criticality, reaction rates, reactivities, etc. This is called Benchmark Testing. In the nuclear calculations, the diffusion and transport codes use the group constant library which is generated by processing the nuclear data files. In this paper, the calculation methods of the reactor group constants and benchmark test are described. Finally, a new group constants scheme is proposed. (author)

  9. The Effect of Solution-Focused Brief Group Counseling upon the Perceived Social Competences of Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of solution-focused brief group counseling upon the perceived social competences of teenagers was investigated. The study group included 24 volunteer students who took lower scores rather than the ones obtained from perceived social competence scale pre-test measurements out of 227 students studying at a high school in…

  10. Bogolyubov renormalization group and symmetry of solution in mathematical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkov, D.V.; Kovalev, V.F.

    2000-01-01

    Evolution of the concept known in the theoretical physics as the Renormalization Group (RG) is presented. The corresponding symmetry, that has been first introduced in QFT in mid-fifties, is a continuous symmetry of a solution with respect to transformation involving parameters (e.g., of boundary condition) specifying some particular solution. After short detour into Wilson's discrete semi-group, we follow the expansion of QFT RG and argue that the underlying transformation, being considered as a reparametrization one, is closely related to the self-similarity property. It can be treated as its generalization, the Functional Self-similarity (FS). Then, we review the essential progress during the last decade of the FS concept in application to boundary value problem formulated in terms of differential equations. A summary of a regular approach recently devised for discovering the RG = FS symmetries with the help of the modern Lie group analysis and some of its applications are given. As a main physical illustration, we give application of a new approach to solution for a problem of self-focusing laser beam in a nonlinear medium

  11. Parallel solutions of the two-group neutron diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, K.S.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Recent efforts to adapt various numerical solution algorithms to parallel computer architectures have addressed the possibility of substantially reducing the running time of few-group neutron diffusion calculations. The authors have developed an efficient iterative parallel algorithm and an associated computer code for the rapid solution of the finite difference method representation of the two-group neutron diffusion equations on the CRAY X/MP-48 supercomputer having multi-CPUs and vector pipelines. For realistic simulation of light water reactor cores, the code employees a macroscopic depletion model with trace capability for selected fission product transients and critical boron. In addition to this, moderator and fuel temperature feedback models are also incorporated into the code. The validity of the physics models used in the code were benchmarked against qualified codes and proved accurate. This work is an extension of previous work in that various feedback effects are accounted for in the system; the entire code is structured to accommodate extensive vectorization; and an additional parallelism by multitasking is achieved not only for the solution of the matrix equations associated with the inner iterations but also for the other segments of the code, e.g., outer iterations

  12. Cold moderator test facilities working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Guenter S.; Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The working group meeting was chaired by Bauer and Lucas.Testing is a vital part of any cold source development project. This applies to specific physics concept verification, benchmarking in conjunction with computer modeling and engineering testing to confirm the functional viability of a proposed system. Irradiation testing of materials will always be needed to continuously extend a comprehensive and reliable information database. An ever increasing worldwide effort to enhance the performance of reactor and accelerator based neutron sources, coupled with the complexity and rising cost of building new generation facilities, gives a new dimension to cold source development and testing programs. A stronger focus is now being placed on the fine-tuning of cold source design to maximize its effectiveness in fully exploiting the facility. In this context, pulsed spallation neutron sources pose an extra challenge due to requirements regarding pulse width and shape which result from a large variety of different instrument concepts. The working group reviewed these requirements in terms of their consequences on the needs for testing equipment and compiled a list of existing and proposed facilities suitable to carry out the necessary development work.

  13. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion phase, when students are given a "number-free" version of the problem. This phase allows students to digest the story-like problem, explore solution ideas, and alleviate some test anxiety. After 10-15 minutes of discussion, students inform the instructor of their readiness for the individual part of the test. What follows next is a pedagogical phase change from lively group discussion to quiet individual work. The group work test is a natural continuation of the group work in our daily physics classes and helps reinforce the importance of collaboration. This method has met with success at York Mills Collegiate Institute, in Toronto, Ontario, where it has been used consistently for unit tests and the final exam of the grade 12 university preparation physics course.

  14. Test Blanket Working Group's recent activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The ITER Test Blanket Working Group (TBWG) has continued its activities during the period of extension of the EDA with a revised charter on the co-ordination of the development work performed by the Parties and by the JCT leading to a co-ordinated test programme on ITER for a DEMO-relevant tritium breeding blanket. This follows earlier work carried out until July 1998, which formed part of the ITER Final Design Report (FDR), completed in 1998. Whilst the machine parameters for ITER-FEAT have been significantly revised compared to the FDR, testing of breeding blanket modules remains a main objective of the test programme and the development of a reactor-relevant breeding blanket to ensure tritium fuel self-sufficiency is recognized a key issue for fusion. Design work and R and D on breeding blanket concepts, including co-operation with the other Contacting Parties of the ITER-EDA for testing these concepts in ITER, are included in the work plans of the Parties

  15. Neutron radiography working group test programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1989-03-01

    Scope and results of the Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group Test Program are described. Seven NR centers from six European Community countries have performed this investigation using eleven NR facilities. Four test items were neutron radiographed using 30 different film/converter combinations. From film density measurements neutron beam components were determined. Radiographic sensitivity was assessed from visual examinations of the radiographs. About 25,000 dimensional measurements were made and were used for the assessment of accuracies of dimensional measurements from neutron radiographs. The report gives a description of the test items used for the Test Program, the film density and dimensional measurements, and concentrates on the assessment of the measuring results. The usefulness of the beam purity and sensitivity indicators was assessed with the conclusion that they are not suitable for neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel. Ample information is included in the report about measuring accuracies which can be reached in dimensional measurements of fuel pins. After a general comparison of measuring accuracies is discussed. Results from different NR facilities are treated separately as are the different kinds of dimensions of the fuel pins. Finally human and instrument factors are discussed. After presenting final conclusions (which take into account the above-mentioned factors) results of other investigations about dimensional measurements are shortly reviewed

  16. Effect of acid Lugol solution as preservative on two representative chitineous and gelatinous zooplankton groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaspers, Cornelia; Carstensen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of biomass from body lengths to carbon regressions is a common approach in plankton research. Several different chemicals for sample preservation are in use, and conversion factors to account for shrinkage effects exist, but to our knowledge the consequences of using potassium......-iodide and iodine (Lugol solution) as preservative on body sizes of different mesozooplankton groups have not been investigated. We tested the effect of 2% acidified Lugol solution on body sizes over time on two major marine mesozooplankton groups, namely larvaceans and copepods, which are representatives...

  17. Effect of Solution Focused Group Counseling for High School Students in Order to Struggle with School Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of solution focused group counseling upon high school students struggling with school burnout was analyzed. The research was an experimental study in which a pre-test post-test control group random design was used, depending upon the real experimental model. The study group included 30 students that volunteered from…

  18. Project NEO Specific Impulse Testing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffa, Bill

    2018-01-01

    The Neo test stand is currently configured to fire a horizontally mounted rocket motor with up to 6500 lbf thrust. Currently, the Neo test stand can measure flow of liquid propellant and oxidizer, pressures residing in the closed system up to the combustion chamber. The current configuration does not have the ability to provide all data needed to compute specific impulse. This presents three methods to outfit the NEO test fixture with instrumentation allowing for calculation of specific impulse.

  19. Future mobility solutions of the BMW group; Zukuenftige Mobilitaetsloesungen der BMW Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langen, Peter [BMW Group, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Offers for individual mobility face globally changing requirements which pose major challenges to automobile manufacturers. The objective of the BMW Group, which is consistently pursued, is to be the leading manufacturer of premium vehicles and supplier of premium mobility services. In this regard, the sustainability of the product offers is particularly important. In the next few decades, conventional powertrains will remain an important pillar of the solution portfolio although their limitations make the introduction of alternatives necessary. This includes primarily electrification and, in the long term, also alternative fuels such as hydrogen. Especially with the internal combustion engines with BMW TwinPower Turbo, the BMW Group already possesses impressive technology suitable for the brand and competition on the market which will also form the basis of the next engine generation. The successful introduction to electrification by the BMW Group was implemented by means of the BMW ActiveHybrid technology offer in core vehicle series. This will be continued with the new sub-brand BMW i, whose unique selling point is the consistent orientation to sustainability and whose ''born electric'' concept is oriented towards the electrification and integration of innovative powertrain solutions. The BMW Group also looks beyond vehicles. With mobility services in conjunction with but also independent of the vehicle, we are already introducing trailblazing mobility solutions to the market. The infrastucture provision for ensuring electric mobility, or the long-term development of a hydrogen infrastructure, is supported by the BMW Group by means of cross-industry initiatives. (orig.)

  20. Solution of two energy-group neutron diffusion equation by triangular elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia Filho, A.

    1981-01-01

    The application of the triangular finite elements of first order in the solution of two energy-group neutron diffusion equation in steady-state conditions is aimed at. The EFTDN (triangular finite elements in neutrons diffusion) computer code in FORTRAN IV language is developed. The discrete formulation of the diffusion equation is obtained applying the Galerkin method. The power method is used to solve the eigenvalues' problem and the convergence is accelerated through the use of Chebshev polynomials. For the equation systems solution the Gauss method is applied. The results of the analysis of two test-problems are presented. (Author) [pt

  1. Testing Solutions for Adult Film Performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zachary R

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the nation's adult films are produced in California, and within California, most production occurs in Los Angeles. In order to regulate that content, the County of Los Angeles passed the Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry Act (Measure B) by way of referendum in November 2012. Measure B requires that adult film producers wishing to film in Los Angeles County obtain permits from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and it also mandates that adult film performers use condoms while filming and "engaging in anal or vaginal sexual intercourse." Nevertheless, between August 2013 and January 2014, several adult film performers in California tested positive for HIV, and the threat of infection remains. Although Measure B is not the best way forward for Los Angeles County, elements of the ordinance should be incorporated into future legislative efforts. Given the economic ramifications of industry flight due to more localized regulations, this Note concludes that California should pass statewide comprehensive reform. Any such new legislation must treat "independent contractors," the classification generally used for adult film performs, as if they were regular employees. Legislation should also couple mandatory testing mechanisms with provisions granting performers the right to choose whether they use condoms. Finally, legislation must include mechanisms that ensure performers' preferences are not improperly tainted by outside forces and pressures. While there will always be risks associated with the production of adult content, if undertaken, these reforms could significantly mitigate those hazards.

  2. 76 FR 13666 - Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ...., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Guidant... workers and former workers of Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management Division, Engineering... reviewed the certification to clarify the subject worker group's identity. Additional information revealed...

  3. 't Hooft's solution for arbitrary semisimple Lie group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leznov, A.N.; Mukhtarov, M.A.

    1990-07-01

    The generalization of the 't Hooft's A 1 solution for every semisimple Lie algebra is found. The solution depends on r-independent chains of linear self-dual systems (Δ s α ) z = (Δ s+1 α ) y -bar, (Δ s α ) y -bar = -(Δ s+1 α ) z (1 ≤ α ≤ r); the length of α chain is equal to 2ω α + 1, where ω α are the indexes of the semisimple algebra and r is its rank. In the special case the O(4)-invariant solutions with instanton number equal to one arises. (author). 6 refs

  4. Test procedure for anion exchange testing with Argonne 10-L solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Four anion exchange resins will be tested to confirm that they will sorb and release plutonium from/to the appropriate solutions in the presence of other cations. Certain cations need to be removed from the test solutions to minimize adverse behavior in other processing equipment. The ion exchange resins will be tested using old laboratory solutions from Argonne National Laboratory; results will be compared to results from other similar processes for application to all plutonium solutions stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant

  5. An improved technique for oral administration of solutions of test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicut intravenous cannula as an improvised oral cannula to administer solutions of drugs and test substances to experimental rats. Techniques of handling and manipulating the rat with the goal of having the eosophagus as straight as possible ...

  6. Group Vicarious Desensitization of Test Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmaier, Elizabeth Mitchell; Woodward, Margaret

    1981-01-01

    Studied test-anxious college students (N=43) who received either vicarious desensitization, study skills training, or both treatments; there was also a no-treatment control condition. Self-report measures indicated that vicarious desensitization resulted in lower test and trait anxiety than study skills training alone or no treatment. (Author)

  7. Validation of the Arabic Version of the Group Personality Projective Test among university students in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musawi, Nu'man M

    2003-04-01

    Using confirmatory factor analytic techniques on data generated from 200 students enrolled at the University of Bahrain, we obtained some construct validity and reliability data for the Arabic Version of the 1961 Group Personality Projective Test by Cassel and Khan. In contrast to the 5-factor model proposed for the Group Personality Projective Test, a 6-factor solution appeared justified for the Arabic Version of this test, suggesting some variance between the cultural groups in the United States and in Bahrain.

  8. Preparation of working calibration and test materials: uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, S.S.; Spraktes, F.W.; Baldwin, J.M.; Hand, R.L.; Lash, R.P.

    1977-05-01

    Reliable working calibration and test materials (WCTMs) are essential to a meaningful analytical measurements quality assurance program. This report describes recommended methods for the preparation of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs for testing analytical methods, for calibrating methods, and for testing personnel. Uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs can be synthesized from characterized starting materials or prepared from typical plant materials by thorough characterization with reference to primary or secondary reference calibration and test materials (PRCTMs or SRCTMs). Recommended starting materials are described along with detailed procedures for (a) preparing several widely-used types of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs, (b) packaging the WCTMs, (c) analyzing the WCTMs to establish the reference values or to confirm the synthesis, and (d) statistically evaluating the analytical data to assign reference values and to assess the accuracy of the WCTMs

  9. Privacy Threats and Practical Solutions for Genetic Risk Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Barman, Ludovic; El Graini, Mohammed-Taha; Raisaro, Jean Louis; Ayday, Erman; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several solutions have been proposed to address the complex challenge of protecting individuals’ genetic data during personalized medicine tests. In this short paper, we analyze different privacy threats and propose simple countermeasures for the generic architecture mainly used in the literature. In particular, we present and evaluate a new practical solution against a critical attack of a malicious medical center trying to actively infer raw genetic information of patients.

  10. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  11. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases

  12. Work Group report: oral food challenge testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna; Assa'ad, Amal H; Bahna, Sami L; Bock, S Allan; Sicherer, Scott H; Teuber, Suzanne S

    2009-06-01

    Oral food challenges are procedures conducted by allergists/immunologists to make an accurate diagnosis of immediate, and occasionally delayed, adverse reactions to foods. The timing of the challenge is carefully chosen based on the individual patient history and the results of skin prick tests and food specific serum IgE values. The type of the challenge is determined by the history, the age of the patient, and the likelihood of encountering subjective reactions. The food challenge requires preparation of the patient for the procedure and preparation of the office for the organized conduct of the challenge, for a careful assessment of the symptoms and signs and the treatment of reactions. The starting dose, the escalation of the dosing, and the intervals between doses are determined based on experience and the patient's history. The interpretation of the results of the challenge and arrangements for follow-up after a challenge are important. A negative oral food challenge result allows introduction of the food into the diet, whereas a positive oral food challenge result provides a sound basis for continued avoidance of the food.

  13. Characterization of aqueous silver nitrate solutions for leakage tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ferreira Costa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the pH over a period of 168 h and the ionic silver content in various concentrations and post-preparation times of aqueous silver nitrate solutions. Also, the possible effects of these factors on microleakage test in adhesive/resin restorations in primary and permanent teeth were evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A digital pHmeter was used for measuring the pH of the solutions prepared with three types of water (purified, deionized or distilled and three brands of silver nitrate salt (Merck, Synth or Cennabras at 0, 1, 2, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h after preparation, and storage in transparent or dark bottles. Ionic silver was assayed according to the post-preparation times (2, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168 h and concentrations (1, 5, 25, 50% of solutions by atomic emission spectrometry. For each sample of each condition, three readings were obtained for calculating the mean value. Class V cavities were prepared with enamel margins on primary and permanent teeth and restored with the adhesive systems OptiBond FL or OptiBond SOLO Plus SE and the composite resin Filtek Z-250. After nail polish coverage, the permanent teeth were immersed in 25% or 50% AgNO3 solution and the primary teeth in 5% or 50% AgNO3 solutions for microleakage evaluation. ANOVA and the Tukey's test were used for data analyses (α=5%. RESULTS: The mean pH of the solutions ranged from neutral to alkaline (7.9±2.2 to 11.8±0.9. Mean ionic silver content differed depending on the concentration of the solution (4.75±0.5 to 293±15.3 ppm. In the microleakage test, significant difference was only observed for the adhesive system factor (p=0.000. CONCLUSIONS: Under the tested experimental conditions and based on the obtained results, it may be concluded that the aqueous AgNO3 solutions: have neutral/alkaline pH and service life of up to 168 h; the level of ionic silver is proportional to the concentration of the solution; even at 5% concentration, the solutions were

  14. A sustainable storage solution for the Science Museum Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Leskard

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Museums in recent years have sought ways to reduce the environmental impact of their operations. One approach has been to look at ways to cut back on the energy required to stabilise storage conditions, particularly relative humidity, through passive moisture control rather than mechanical systems of heating and air conditioning. To this end the Science Museum Group employed hemp in the form of hemp-lime concrete, to construct a new storage facility for its collections, drawing on research into the buffering ability of hygroscopic natural building materials. The objective was to reduce energy use, to decrease reliance on mechanical systems and to produce very stable levels of relative humidity, in order to ensure the preservation of significant heritage collections. Although a prototype, to date, this building has performed as anticipated despite some initial construction snags and mechanical system malfunctions. The results encourage further investigation into hygroscopic construction materials to design even more energy-saving ways of providing stable storage conditions for museums.

  15. An Overview of medical solution business of Hitachi group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninomiya, Ken; Tao, Ryuji; Umegaki, Kikuo; Hashizume, Akihide; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    Hitachi is promoting the medicare business in the medical fields of imaging diagnosis, external diagnosis, medical information, treatment support and medical service with the concept that advancement of medical technology is essential for health and this paper describes its major details including research/development. In imaging diagnosis, Hitachi has apparatuses for MRI, X-ray radiography, X-CT, ultrasonography and PET, which are being subject to continuous technological improvement for patients (the principle, Patient Friendly). Clinical laboratory test equipments are in external diagnosis, where ''LABOSPECT series'', a support system for clinical chemistry, has been recently marketed. Medical information involves the total health-care system of people to connect the medical facilities (e.g., POMR, problem oriented medical record) and national medical institutions (e.g., IHE-J, integrating the healthcare enterprise-Japan). One of topics of Hitachi's res/dev is the molecular imaging like PET equipped with high magnetic field MRI and semi-conductor detector and, the other, targeting therapy with proton accelerator already operating in Tsukuba University and to be operated in The University of Texas. Hitachi is working for turning the dream of healthy and safe society into reality through technology. (T.I.)

  16. High sensitivity pyrogen testing in water and dialysis solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Wendel, Albrecht; Hartung, Thomas; von Aulock, Sonja

    2008-07-20

    The dialysis patient is confronted with hundreds of litres of dialysis solution per week, which pass the natural protective barriers of the body and are brought into contact with the tissue directly in the case of peritoneal dialysis or indirectly in the case of renal dialysis (hemodialysis). The components can be tested for living specimens or dead pyrogenic (fever-inducing) contaminations. The former is usually detected by cultivation and the latter by the endotoxin-specific Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate Assay (LAL). However, the LAL assay does not reflect the response of the human immune system to the wide variety of possible pyrogenic contaminations in dialysis fluids. Furthermore, the test is limited in its sensitivity to detect extremely low concentrations of pyrogens, which in their sum result in chronic pathologies in dialysis patients. The In vitro Pyrogen Test (IPT) employs human whole blood to detect the spectrum of pyrogens to which humans respond by measuring the release of the endogenous fever mediator interleukin-1beta. Spike recovery checks exclude interference. The test has been validated in an international study for pyrogen detection in injectable solutions. In this study we adapted the IPT to the testing of dialysis solutions. Preincubation of 50 ml spiked samples with albumin-coated microspheres enhanced the sensitivity of the assay to detect contaminations down to 0.1 pg/ml LPS or 0.001 EU/ml in water or saline and allowed pyrogen detection in dialysis concentrates or final working solutions. This method offers high sensitivity detection of human-relevant pyrogens in dialysis solutions and components.

  17. The development of an open platform to test ITS solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahrmann, Harry; Agerholm, Niels; Juhl, Jens

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the ITS Platform Northern Denmark, which is an open platform to test ITS solutions. The platform consists of a new developed GNSS/GPRS On Board Unit installed in nearly 500 cars, a backend server and a specially designed digital road map for ITS applications. The platform is o...... is open for third part application. This paper presents the platform’s potentials and explains a series of test applications, which are developed on the plat- form. Moreover, a number of new projects, which are planned for ITS Platform is introduced.......This paper presents the ITS Platform Northern Denmark, which is an open platform to test ITS solutions. The platform consists of a new developed GNSS/GPRS On Board Unit installed in nearly 500 cars, a backend server and a specially designed digital road map for ITS applications. The platform...

  18. Color test for selective detection of secondary amines on resin and in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Ulrik; Mirsharghi, Sahar

    2014-11-21

    Resins for solid-phase synthesis give orange to red-brown resin beads selectively when secondary amines are present on the resin when treated with a solution of acetaldehyde and an Fmoc-amino acid in NMP. The method shows good specificity and gives colorless beads when exposed to a variety of other functional groups. Furthermore, the acetaldehyde/Fmoc amino acid method can be used as a selective colorimetric test for secondary amines in solution.

  19. The Effects of Group Members' Personalities on a Test Taker's L2 Group Oral Discussion Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockey, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    The second language group oral is a test of second language speaking proficiency, in which a group of three or more English language learners discuss an assigned topic without interaction with interlocutors. Concerns expressed about the extent to which test takers' personal characteristics affect the scores of others in the group have limited its…

  20. Students' views of cooperative learning and group testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Today's radiologic technology students must learn to collaborate and communicate to function as part of the health care team. Innovative educational techniques such as cooperative learning (working collectively in small groups) and group testing (collaborating on tests) can foster these skills. Assess students' familiarity with and opinions about cooperative learning and group testing before and after participation in a semester-long course incorporating these methods. Twenty-eight students enrolled in a baccalaureate-level radiologic technology program in Louisiana were surveyed at the beginning and end of the semester. Results showed that students were more knowledgeable about and more accepting of cooperative learning and group testing after participating in the course. However, some students continued to prefer independent learning. Students are open to new learning methods such as cooperative learning and group testing. These techniques can help them develop the skills they will need to function collaboratively in the workplace.

  1. Empowering Adolescent Survivors of Sexual Abuse: Application of a Solution-Focused Ericksonian Counseling Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Victoria E.; Hoffman, Rachel M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a solution-focused and Ericksonian group counseling model that can be used with adolescent girls who have been sexually abused. An overview of the components of this approach is provided. A postintervention focus group provided additional results and ideas for the future development of the group counseling model.

  2. Lie Group Classifications and Non-differentiable Solutions for Time-Fractional Burgers Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guocheng

    2011-01-01

    Lie group method provides an efficient tool to solve nonlinear partial differential equations. This paper suggests Lie group method for fractional partial differential equations. A time-fractional Burgers equation is used as an example to illustrate the effectiveness of the Lie group method and some classes of exact solutions are obtained. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  3. Homotopy analysis solutions of point kinetics equations with one delayed precursor group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qian; Luo Lei; Chen Zhiyun; Li Haofeng

    2010-01-01

    Homotopy analysis method is proposed to obtain series solutions of nonlinear differential equations. Homotopy analysis method was applied for the point kinetics equations with one delayed precursor group. Analytic solutions were obtained using homotopy analysis method, and the algorithm was analysed. The results show that the algorithm computation time and precision agree with the engineering requirements. (authors)

  4. The Impact of Solution-Focused Brief Group Psychological Counseling on University Students’ Burnout Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi Bayram Ilbay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was done to analyze the effects of Coping with Burnout Program, developed on the basis of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy on the burnout levels of university students. To select the subjects that would participate in the research, Maslach Burnout Inventory­­–Student Survey was applied on 461 university students from the University of Sakarya. As a result of pre-interviews, 24 students who had experienced student burnout voluntarily participated in a Coping with Burnout Program. The students were randomly appointed to one of the experimental and control groups. At this stage, a six-session Coping with Burnout Program developed by the researcher was applied on the students from the experimental group. No application was performed on the students from the control group. A 2x3 design (experimental/ control groups X pretest/ posttest/ follow up was used in the research. The scores from the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Student Survey formed the dependent variable of the research, and the application of Coping with Burnout Program formed the independent variable of the research. The scale used in the research was applied on the groups as pretest two weeks before the sessions started, and as posttest two weeks after the sessions ended, and as follow-up two months after the posttest in order to determine the resistance of the experimental process. In the analysis of the data obtained through these processes, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to determine whether or not there was a significant difference between groups and the survey. The data obtained through the research proved that the Coping with Burnout Program decreased the burnout levels of the students in the experimental group as were determined with the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Student Survey, and follow up tests showed that the situation remained the same. It was seen that there was no significant difference between the scores of the participants of the control

  5. 40 CFR 86.1827-01 - Test group determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Administrator, a manufacturer of electric vehicles must create separate test groups based on the... electric motor. ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General...

  6. Group differences in the heritability of items and test scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.; Johnson, W.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to understand potential sources of group differences in the heritability of intelligence test scores. On the basis of a basic item response model we argue that heritabilities which are based on dichotomous item scores normally do not generalize from one sample to the next. If groups

  7. LIE GROUPS AND NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS: INVARIANT DISCRETIZATION VERSUS DIFFERENTIAL APPROXIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decio Levi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review two different methods of applying Lie group theory in the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. On specific examples we show how the symmetry preserving discretization provides difference schemes for which the “first differential approximation” is invariant under the same Lie group as the original ordinary differential equation.

  8. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen.

  9. Bayesian inference for disease prevalence using negative binomial group testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Nicholas A.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Group testing, also known as pooled testing, and inverse sampling are both widely used methods of data collection when the goal is to estimate a small proportion. Taking a Bayesian approach, we consider the new problem of estimating disease prevalence from group testing when inverse (negative binomial) sampling is used. Using different distributions to incorporate prior knowledge of disease incidence and different loss functions, we derive closed form expressions for posterior distributions and resulting point and credible interval estimators. We then evaluate our new estimators, on Bayesian and classical grounds, and apply our methods to a West Nile Virus data set. PMID:21259308

  10. Group Centric Networking: Large Scale Over the Air Testing of Group Centric Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Large Scale Over-the-Air Testing of Group Centric Networking Logan Mercer, Greg Kuperman, Andrew Hunter, Brian Proulx MIT Lincoln Laboratory...performance of Group Centric Networking (GCN), a networking protocol developed for robust and scalable communications in lossy networks where users are...devices, and the ad-hoc nature of the network . Group Centric Networking (GCN) is a proposed networking protocol that addresses challenges specific to

  11. Solution of two group neutron diffusion equation by using homotopy analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavdar, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM), proposed in 1992 by Shi Jun Liao and has been developed since then, is based on differential geometry as well as homotopy which is a fundamental concept in topology. It has proved to be useful for obtaining series solutions of many such problems involving algebraic, linear/non-linear, ordinary/partial differential equations, differential-integral equations, differential-difference equations, and coupled equations of them. Briefly, through HAM, it is possible to construct a continuous mapping of an initial guess approximation to the exact solution of the equation of concern. An auxiliary linear operator is chosen to construct such kind of a continuous mapping and an auxiliary parameter is used to ensure the convergence of series solution. We present the solutions of two-group neutron diffusion equation through HAM in this work. We also compare the results with that obtained by other well-known solution analytical and numeric methods.

  12. Spray drying test of simulated borated waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Hongxiang; Zhou Lianquan; Fan Zhiwen; Sun Qi; Lin Xiaolong

    2007-01-01

    Performance and the effecting factors of spray drying of simulated borated waste solutions is studied for three contaeting methods between the atomized beads and the heated air, in which boron concentration is around 21000 ppm. The contacting modes are centrifugal atomizing co-current flow, pneumatic atomizing co-current flow and mixed flow. The results show that a free-flowing product in all these tests when the temperature of the solutions is between 62 degree C and 64 degree C, the inlet temperature of the spray drying chamber is between 210 degree C and 220 degree C, the temperature of the outlet of the spray drying chamber is between 110 and 120 degree C, the flow rate of the pressure air is 8.0 m 3 /h, the rotational speed of the centrifugal atomizer is 73.0 m/s. The diameters of the powder product which account for 95% of the feed range from 0.356 mm to 0.061 mm. The production capacity and water content in the powder increase in the order of pneumatic atomizing co-current flow, mixed flow and centrifugal atomizing co-current flow. The volume reduction coeffecient of spray drying is in the ranged of 0.22 and 0.27. (authors)

  13. Group Differences in Test-Taking Behaviour: An Example from a High-Stakes Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Eklöf, Hanna; Lyrén, Per-Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether different groups of test-takers vary in their reported test-taking behaviour in a high-stakes test situation. A between-group design (N = 1129) was used to examine whether high and low achievers, as well as females and males, differ in their use of test-taking strategies, and in level of reported test anxiety and…

  14. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel, E-mail: teodor.chelaru@upb.ro [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest - Research Center for Aeronautics and Space, Str. Ghe Polizu, nr. 1, Bucharest, Sector 1 (Romania); Cristian, Barbu, E-mail: barbucr@mta.ro [Military Technical Academy, Romania, B-dul. George Coşbuc, nr. 81-83, Bucharest, Sector 5 (Romania); Chelaru, Adrian, E-mail: achelaru@incas.ro [INCAS -National Institute for Aerospace Research Elie Carafoli, B-dul Iuliu Maniu 220, 061126, Bucharest, Sector 6 (Romania)

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital

  15. An analytical solution for the two-group kinetic neutron diffusion equation in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Julio Cesar L.; Vilhena, Marco Tullio; Bodmann, Bardo Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Recently the two-group Kinetic Neutron Diffusion Equation with six groups of delay neutron precursor in a rectangle was solved by the Laplace Transform Technique. In this work, we report on an analytical solution for this sort of problem but in cylindrical geometry, assuming a homogeneous and infinite height cylinder. The solution is obtained applying the Hankel Transform to the Kinetic Diffusion equation and solving the transformed problem by the same procedure used in the rectangle. We also present numerical simulations and comparisons against results available in literature. (author)

  16. Lie group classification and exact solutions of the generalized Kompaneets equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii Patsiuk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study generalized Kompaneets equations (GKEs with one functional parameter, and using the Lie-Ovsiannikov algorithm, we carried out the group classification. It is shown that the kernel algebra of the full groups of the GKEs is the one-dimensional Lie algebra. Using the direct method, we find the equivalence group. We obtain six non-equivalent (up to transformations from the equivalence group GKEs that allow wider invariance algebras than the kernel one. We find a number of exact solutions of the non-linear GKE which has the maximal symmetry properties.

  17. Innovative testing and measurement solutions for smart grid

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Qi; Yi, Jianbo; Zhen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Focuses on sensor applications and smart meters in the newly developing interconnected smart grid Focuses on sensor applications and smart meters in the newly developing interconnected smart grid Presents the most updated technological developments in the measurement and testing of power systems within the smart grid environment Reflects the modernization of electric utility power systems with the extensive use of computer, sensor, and data communications technologies, providing benefits to energy consumers and utility companies alike The leading author heads a group of researchers focusing on

  18. Deriving Oral Assessment Scales across Different Tests and Rater Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive the criteria/dimensions underlying learners' second-language oral ability scores across three tests: an oral interview, a narration, and a read-aloud. A stimulus tape of 18 speech samples was presented to 3 native speaker rater groups for evaluation. Results indicate that researchers might need to reconsider…

  19. A randomised, parallel-group comparison study of diquafosol ophthalmic solution in patients with dry eye in China and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lan; Sun, Xinghuai; Ma, Zhizhong; Wang, Qinmei; Xu, Xun; Chen, Xiaoming; Shao, Yan; Yao, Ke; Tang, Luosheng; Gu, Yangshun; Yuan, Huiping; Chua, Wei Han; Chuan, Jacob Cheng Yen; Tong, Louis

    2015-07-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution with those of 0.1% sodium hyaluronate ophthalmic solution in patients with dry eye in China and Singapore. A total of 497 patients with dry eye (Schirmer's test, 5 mm; fluorescein and RB score, 3 points) from China and Singapore were randomised to receive either diquafosol ophthalmic solution (diquafosol) or sodium hyaluronate ophthalmic solution (HA) at 1:1 ratio. The fluorescein staining scores and rose bengal (RB) subjective symptom scores and tear film breakup time were evaluated before treatment and 2 and 4 weeks after start of treatment. In the diquafosol group, changes in fluorescein and RB scores compared with baseline at week 4 or at the time of discontinuation were -2.1±1.5 and -2.5±2.0, respectively. Compared with the HA group, changes in fluorescein score were non-inferior and changes in RB score were superior (p=0.019). In addition, diquafosol and HA improved tear film breakup time by 1.046±1.797 and 0.832±1.775 s, respectively (no significant intergroup difference). Adverse event onset rates were 16.3% (40 of 246 subjects) and 10.0% (25 of 251 subjects) in the diquafosol group and HA group, respectively, with borderline significant intergroup differences (p=0.046), while adverse drug reaction incidence rates were 12.2% (30 of 246 subjects) and 6.0% (15 of 251 subjects), respectively (p=0.019). Only mild adverse drug reactions (>2%) in the form of eye discharge, itching or irritation were observed. Diquafosol improved fluorescein staining score in a manner similar to HA, and significantly improved RB score compared with HA. NCT01101984. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Singular solutions of renormalization group equations and the symmetry of the lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, D.I.; Shirokov, D.V.

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of solution of the differential renormalization group equations the method is proposed for finding out the Lagrangians possessing some king of internal symmetry. It is shown that in the phase space of the invariant charges the symmetry corresponds to the straight-line singular solution of these equations remaining straight-line when taking into account the higher order corrections. We have studied the model of scalar fields with quartic couplings, as well as the set of models containing scalar, pseudoscalar and spinor fields with Yukawa and quartic interactions. Straight-line singular solutions in the first case correspond to isotopic symmetry only. For the second case they correspond to supersymmetry. No other symmetries have been discovered. For the model containing the gauge fields the solution corresponding to supersymmetry is obtained and it is shown that this is also the only symmetry that can be realized in the given set of fields

  1. A standard for test reliability in group research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jules L

    2013-03-01

    Many authors adhere to the rule that test reliabilities should be at least .70 or .80 in group research. This article introduces a new standard according to which reliabilities can be evaluated. This standard is based on the costs or time of the experiment and of administering the test. For example, if test administration costs are 7 % of the total experimental costs, the efficient value of the reliability is .93. If the actual reliability of a test is equal to this efficient reliability, the test size maximizes the statistical power of the experiment, given the costs. As a standard in experimental research, it is proposed that the reliability of the dependent variable be close to the efficient reliability. Adhering to this standard will enhance the statistical power and reduce the costs of experiments.

  2. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    moderator pot was driving the MSLD out of range. Since it was very difficult to locate the leak by Tracer Probe Method, some other technique was ventured to solve the problem of leak location. Finally, it was possible to locate the leak by observing the change in Helium background reading of MSLD during masking/unmasking of the welded joints. This paper, in general describes the design and leak testing aspects of cryogenic components of Cold Neutron Source and in particular, the problems and solutions for leak testing of transfer lines and moderator pot.

  3. EDISON-WMW: Exact Dynamic Programing Solution of the Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Marx

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In many research disciplines, hypothesis tests are applied to evaluate whether findings are statistically significant or could be explained by chance. The Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney (WMW test is among the most popular hypothesis tests in medicine and life science to analyze if two groups of samples are equally distributed. This nonparametric statistical homogeneity test is commonly applied in molecular diagnosis. Generally, the solution of the WMW test takes a high combinatorial effort for large sample cohorts containing a significant number of ties. Hence, P value is frequently approximated by a normal distribution. We developed EDISON-WMW, a new approach to calculate the exact permutation of the two-tailed unpaired WMW test without any corrections required and allowing for ties. The method relies on dynamic programing to solve the combinatorial problem of the WMW test efficiently. Beyond a straightforward implementation of the algorithm, we presented different optimization strategies and developed a parallel solution. Using our program, the exact P value for large cohorts containing more than 1000 samples with ties can be calculated within minutes. We demonstrate the performance of this novel approach on randomly-generated data, benchmark it against 13 other commonly-applied approaches and moreover evaluate molecular biomarkers for lung carcinoma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We found that approximated P values were generally higher than the exact solution provided by EDISON-WMW. Importantly, the algorithm can also be applied to high-throughput omics datasets, where hundreds or thousands of features are included. To provide easy access to the multi-threaded version of EDISON-WMW, a web-based solution of our algorithm is freely available at http://www.ccb.uni-saarland.de/software/wtest/.

  4. Some aspects of preparation and testing of group constants group constant system ABBN-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, M.N.; Tsiboulia, A.M.; Manturov, G.N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of activities performed to prepare and test the group constants ABBN-90. The ABBN-90 set is designed for application calculations of fast, intermediate and thermal nuclear reactors. The calculations of subgroup parameters are discussed. The processing code system GRUCON is mentioned in comparison to the NJOY code system. Proposals are made for future activities. (author). Figs, tabs

  5. Separation of compounds with multiple -OH groups from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with organoboronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Tina Kuo Fung [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-05-01

    The complexing extractant agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA) in its anionic form (NPB). NPBA and Aliquat 336 (quaternary amine) is dissolved in 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, and the extractant is contacted with aq. NaOH. Solutes investigated were 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, fructose, sorbitol and lactic acid. Batch extraction experiments were performed at 25°C. Partition coefficients, distribution ratios and loadings are reported for varying concentrations of solute and NPB. All solutes complexed with NPB-, with all complexes containing only one NPB- per complex. The 1:1 complexation constants for the solutes glycerol, fructose and sorbitol follow trends similar to complexation with B(OH)4- (aq.), i.e. the complexation constants increase with increasing number of -OH groups available for complexation. Assumption of 1:1 complex is not valid for 1, 2-propanediol, which showed overloading (more than one mole of solute complexed to one mole NPB-) at higher concentrations. The -OH group on the NPB- which is left uncomplexed after one solute molecule had bound to the other two -OH groups may be responsible for the overloading. Overloading is also observed in extraction of tactic acid, but through a different mechanism. It was found that TOMA+ can extract lactic acid to an extent comparable to the uptake of lactic acid by NPB-. The complexation is probably through formation of an acid-base ion pair. Losses of NPBA into the aqueous phase could lead to problems, poor economics in industrial separation processes. One way of overcoming this problem would be to incorporate the NPBA onto a solid support.

  6. On the Cut-off Point for Combinatorial Group Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Klasner, N.; Wegener, I.

    1999-01-01

    is answered by 1 if Q contains at least one essential object and by 0 otherwise. In the statistical setting the objects are essential, independently of each other, with a given probability p combinatorial setting the number k ... group testing is equal to p* = 12(3 - 5), i.e., the strategy of testing each object individually minimizes the average number of queries iff p >= p* or n = 1. In the combinatorial setting the worst case number of queries is of interest. It has been conjectured that the cut-off point of combinatorial...

  7. On the spectral analysis of iterative solutions of the discretized one-group transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the Fourier-mode technique used for the spectral analysis of iterative solutions of the one-group discretized transport equation. We introduce a direct spectral analysis for the iterative solution of finite difference approximations for finite slabs composed of identical layers, providing thus a complementary analysis that is more appropriate for reactor applications. Numerical calculations for the method of characteristics and with the diamond difference approximation show the appearance of antisymmetric modes generated by the iteration on boundary data. We have also utilized the discrete Fourier transform to compute the spectrum for a periodic slab containing N identical layers and shown that at the limit N → ∞ one obtains the familiar Fourier-mode solution

  8. Microculture Plaque Neutralization Test for California Group Arboviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seawright, Gary L.; Harding, Gherry; Thomas, Frederick C.; Hanson, Robert P.

    1974-01-01

    A microculture plaque neutralization test is described for California-group arboviruses that is as precise and quantitative as the standard test conducted in 60-mm petri dishes. It was shown that there was no significant between-panel or between-day variation in determinations and that a single pipette could be used for all serum-dilution levels within a titration without inoculum carry-over effect. The experimental protocol and statistical methods used produce 50% neutralization end points that meet the assumptions of parametric statistics. This permits the power and versatility of the analysis of variance to be exploited in testing for treatment effects in serological and immunological studies with viruses. Images PMID:4216288

  9. Group-invariant solutions of nonlinear elastodynamic problems of plates and shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhupanov, V.A.; Vassilev, V.M.; Dzhondzhorov, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    Plates and shells are basic structural components in nuclear reactors and their equipment. The prediction of the dynamic response of these components to fast transient loadings (e.g., loadings caused by earthquakes, missile impacts, etc.) is a quite important problem in the general context of the design, reliability and safety of nuclear power stations. Due to the extreme loading conditions a more adequate treatment of the foregoing problem should rest on a suitable nonlinear shell model, which would allow large deflections of the structures regarded to be taken into account. Such a model is provided in the nonlinear Donnell-Mushtari-Vlasov (DMV) theory. The governing system of equations of the DMV theory consists of two coupled nonlinear fourth order partial differential equations in three independent and two dependent variables. It is clear, as the case stands, that the obtaining solutions to this system directly, by using any of the general analytical or numerical techniques, would involve considerable difficulties. In the present paper, the invariance of the governing equations of DMV theory for plates and cylindrical shells relative to local Lie groups of local point transformations will be employed to get some advantages in connection with the aforementioned problem. First, the symmetry of a functional, corresponding to the governing equations of DMV theory for plates and cylindrical shells is studied. Next, the densities in the corresponding conservation laws are determined on the basis of Noether theorem. Finally, we study a class of invariant solutions of the governing equations. As is well known, group-invariant solutions are often intermediate asymptotics for a wider class of solutions of the corresponding equations. When such solutions are considered, the number of the independent variables can be reduced. For the class of invariant solutions studied here, the system of governing equations converts into a system of ordinary differential equations

  10. Solution of the within-group multidimensional discrete ordinates transport equations on massively parallel architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Robert Joseph

    2011-12-01

    The integral transport matrix method (ITMM) has been used as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells and between the cells and boundary surfaces. The main goals of this work were to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and performance of the developed methods for increasing number of processes. This project compares the effectiveness of the ITMM with the SI scheme parallelized with the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. The primary parallel solution method involves a decomposition of the domain into smaller spatial sub-domains, each with their own transport matrices, and coupled together via interface boundary angular fluxes. Each sub-domain has its own set of ITMM operators and represents an independent transport problem. Multiple iterative parallel solution methods have investigated, including parallel block Jacobi (PBJ), parallel red/black Gauss-Seidel (PGS), and parallel GMRES (PGMRES). The fastest observed parallel solution method, PGS, was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN code. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method without acceleration/preconditioning is not competitive for any problem parameters considered. The best comparisons occur for problems that are difficult for SI DSA, namely highly scattering and optically thick. SI DSA execution time curves are generally steeper than the PGS ones. However, until further testing is performed it cannot be concluded that SI DSA does not outperform the ITMM with PGS even on several thousand or tens of

  11. Deliverable 3.3.2 Specification of tests and test groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth; Mitseva, Anelia; Harpur, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Deliverable 3.3.2: Specification of tests and test groups One of the main goals of the ISISEMD project is to offer innovative ICT services to improve the quality of life of elderly persons with cognitive problems or mild dementia and their informal and formal caregivers who provide every day care...... for them. This will be done via integrating intelligent scalable ICT services which will be tested for a period of 12 months under realistic conditions. Offering the services could not be complete without evaluating quality of life improvement, user acceptance and user satisfaction with a representative...... group of the target user groups. This document is devoted to describing important aspects of services evaluation such as: who the test participants will be, inclusion and exclusion criterion, selection standards, how the test participants will be recruited, ethical considerations, etc. Test methodology...

  12. Volumetric behaviour of amino acids and their group contributions in aqueous lactose solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Amalendu; Chauhan, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    Densities, ρ, for glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine [(0.05 to 0.30) m] in aqueous lactose solutions ranging from pure water to 6 mass% lactose were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. The density was used to compute apparent molar volume, V φ , partial molar volume at infinite dilution, V φ o , and experimental slope, S V were obtained and interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions. These data were used to calculate the (∂V φ 0 /∂T) P values. The partial molar volume of transfer, ΔV φ 0 from water to aqueous lactose solutions at infinite dilution has also been calculated. In addition to this, the linear correlation of V φ 0 with number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of amino acids was utilized to determine the respective contributions of NH 3 + COO - , and CH 2 groups to V φ 0 .

  13. Volumetric behaviour of amino acids and their group contributions in aqueous lactose solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Amalendu, E-mail: palchem@sify.co [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India); Chauhan, Nalin [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Densities, {rho}, for glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine [(0.05 to 0.30) m] in aqueous lactose solutions ranging from pure water to 6 mass% lactose were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. The density was used to compute apparent molar volume, V{sub {phi}}, partial molar volume at infinite dilution, V{sub {phi}}{sup o}, and experimental slope, S{sub V} were obtained and interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions. These data were used to calculate the ({partial_derivative}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} values. The partial molar volume of transfer, {Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0} from water to aqueous lactose solutions at infinite dilution has also been calculated. In addition to this, the linear correlation of V{sub {phi}}{sup 0} with number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of amino acids was utilized to determine the respective contributions of NH{sub 3}{sup +}COO{sup -}, and CH{sub 2} groups to V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}.

  14. On the exact solution for the multi-group kinetic neutron diffusion equation in a rectangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, C.Z.; Vilhena, M.T.M.B. de; Bodmann, B.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we consider the two-group bi-dimensional kinetic neutron diffusion equation. The solution procedure formalism is general with respect to the number of energy groups, neutron precursor families and regions with different chemical compositions. The fast and thermal flux and the delayed neutron precursor yields are expanded in a truncated double series in terms of eigenfunctions that, upon insertion into the kinetic equation and upon taking moments, results in a first order linear differential matrix equation with source terms. We split the matrix appearing in the transformed problem into a sum of a diagonal matrix plus the matrix containing the remaining terms and recast the transformed problem into a form that can be solved in the spirit of Adomian's recursive decomposition formalism. Convergence of the solution is guaranteed by the Cardinal Interpolation Theorem. We give numerical simulations and comparisons with available results in the literature. (author)

  15. A generalised solution for step-drawdown tests including flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2001-07-03

    Jul 3, 2001 ... interpreted as the theoretical solution of the groundwater flow equation for the .... and gravity force the water to flow from the rock matrix to the fracture. ..... Computational Mechanics Publications, Southampton. CLOOT AHJ ...

  16. Dial-A-Decon Solution Chemistry GAP Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    M25, Ml00, M250 , Ml000). The pipette size used was determined by the amount of extraction solution to be delivered. The analytical GC vials used...dilutions were prepared using Gilson Microman positive displacement pipettes (Gilson product numbers MIO, M25, Ml00, M250 , Ml000). The pipette size

  17. Testing problem-solving capacities: differences between individual testing and social group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikova, Anastasia; Schneider, Jutta M

    2014-09-01

    Testing animals individually in problem-solving tasks limits distractions of the subjects during the test, so that they can fully concentrate on the problem. However, such individual performance may not indicate the problem-solving capacity that is commonly employed in the wild when individuals are faced with a novel problem in their social groups, where the presence of a conspecific influences an individual's behaviour. To assess the validity of data gathered from parrots when tested individually, we compared the performance on patterned-string tasks among parrots tested singly and parrots tested in social context. We tested two captive groups of orange-winged amazons (Amazona amazonica) with several patterned-string tasks. Despite the differences in the testing environment (singly vs. social context), parrots from both groups performed similarly. However, we found that the willingness to participate in the tasks was significantly higher for the individuals tested in social context. The study provides further evidence for the crucial influence of social context on individual's response to a challenging situation such as a problem-solving test.

  18. A permutation testing framework to compare groups of brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sean L; Lyday, Robert G; Hayasaka, Satoru; Marsh, Anthony P; Laurienti, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Brain network analyses have moved to the forefront of neuroimaging research over the last decade. However, methods for statistically comparing groups of networks have lagged behind. These comparisons have great appeal for researchers interested in gaining further insight into complex brain function and how it changes across different mental states and disease conditions. Current comparison approaches generally either rely on a summary metric or on mass-univariate nodal or edge-based comparisons that ignore the inherent topological properties of the network, yielding little power and failing to make network level comparisons. Gleaning deeper insights into normal and abnormal changes in complex brain function demands methods that take advantage of the wealth of data present in an entire brain network. Here we propose a permutation testing framework that allows comparing groups of networks while incorporating topological features inherent in each individual network. We validate our approach using simulated data with known group differences. We then apply the method to functional brain networks derived from fMRI data.

  19. The "Common Solutions" Strategy of the Experiment Support group at CERN for the LHC Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Girone, M; Barreiro Megino, F H; Campana, S; Cinquilli, M; Di Girolamo, A; Dimou, M; Giordano, D; Karavakis, E; Kenyon, M J; Kokozkiewicz, L; Lanciotti, E; Litmaath, M; Magini, N; Negri, G; Roiser, S; Saiz, P; Saiz Santos, M D; Schovancova, J; Sciabà, A; Spiga, D; Trentadue, R; Tuckett, D; Valassi, A; Van der Ster, D C; Shiers, J D

    2012-01-01

    After two years of LHC data taking, processing and analysis and with numerous changes in computing technology, a number of aspects of the experiments' computing, as well as WLCG deployment and operations, need to evolve. As part of the activities of the Experiment Support group in CERN's IT department, and reinforced by effort from the EGI-InSPIRE project, we present work aimed at common solutions across all LHC experiments. Such solutions allow us not only to optimize development manpower but also offer lower long-term maintenance and support costs. The main areas cover Distributed Data Management, Data Analysis, Monitoring and the LCG Persistency Framework. Specific tools have been developed including the HammerCloud framework, automated services for data placement, data cleaning and data integrity (such as the data popularity service for CMS, the common Victor cleaning agent for ATLAS and CMS and tools for catalogue/storage consistency), the Dashboard Monitoring framework (job monitoring, data management m...

  20. Basic studies for the solution of the criticality equation: two groups of energy and one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britto Aghina, L.O. de.

    1994-12-01

    This work collects six basic studies for the numerical solution of the criticality equation for thermal reactors. Use is made of the diffusion theory for two groups of energy and one dimension, applicable to bare reactors, bare equivalent, infinite bare equivalent and reflected reactors. These studies were written in Mathcad 4.0/WIN programming, a practical form for use by the researchers and operators working with the Argonaut Reactor at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN). (author). 11 refs, 20 figs, 8 tabs

  1. Macro testing for group constant library TPLIB-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Dong; Zeng Daogui; Liu Jingbo; Wang Yingming; Li Huiyun

    1996-04-01

    A macro test of the group constant library TPLIB-95 was introduced. The TPLIB-95 is an updated group constant library created by China Nuclear Data Center for LWR fuel assembly calculation program package TPFAP based on the JENDL-3.1 evaluation nuclear data library. The calculations and analyses were carried out by using five thermal reactor benchmark issues, a set of PWR zero-power critical experiments, the first cycle reactor core of 300 MW Qinshan NPP as well as the first cycle reactor core of 900 MW Daya Bay NPP. The calculation results for the thermal reactor benchmark issues showed that the maximum deviation between the calculated and measured values for spectrum indexes is large, like 6.7% for ρ 28 of BAPL-2. However, the maximum deviation for k eff is only 0.29% for TRX-2. The calculation results for zero-power critical experiments showed that the calculated value of k eff obtained by using TPLIB-95 is closer to the measured value compared with the one obtained by using the original library TPLIB. The agreement between the calculated and measured values for critical boron concentration in the first cycle reactor cores in Qinshan NPP and Daya Bay NPP is quite good. The maximum deviation for the critical boron concentration is only 15 x 10 -6 /L. (8 figs., 5 tabs.)

  2. Hydrogen bonding analysis of hydroxyl groups in glucose aqueous solutions by a molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cong; Li, Wei Zhong; Song, Yong Chen; Weng, Lin Dong; Zhang, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate hydrogen bonding characteristics of hydroxyl groups in glucose aqueous solutions with different concentrations. The hydrogen bonding abilities and strength of different O and H atom types have been calculated and compared. The acceptor/donor efficiencies have been predicted and it has been found that: (1) O2-HO2 and O3-HO3 are more efficient intramolecular hydrogen bonding acceptors than donors; (2) O1-HO1, O4-HO4 and O6-HO6 are more efficient intramolecular hydrogen bonding donors than acceptors; (5) O1-HO1 and O6-HO6 are more efficient intermolecular hydrogen bonding acceptors than donors while hydroxyl groups O2-HO2 and O4-HO4 are more efficient intermolecular hydrogen bonding donors than acceptors. The hydrogen bonding abilities of hydroxyl groups revealed that: (1) the hydrogen bonding ability of OH2-H w is larger than that of hydroxyl groups in glucose; (2) among the hydroxyl groups in glucose, the hydrogen bonding ability of O6-HO6 is the largest and the hydrogen bonding ability of O4-HO4 is the smallest; (3) the intermolecular hydrogen bonding ability of O6-HO6 is the largest; (4) the order for intramolecular hydrogen bonding abilities (from large to small) is O2-HO2, O1-HO1, O3-HO3, O6-HO6 and O4-HO4

  3. Rippled shock front solutions for testing hydrodynamic stability simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The response of a shock front to arbitrary small perturbations can be calculated analytically. Such rippled shock front solutions are useful for determining the accuracy of hydrodynamic simulation codes such as LASNEX [Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 2, 51 (1977)], which are used to compute perturbation growth in inertial fusion targets. The LASNEX fractional errors are of order κ 2 L 2 , where κ is the transverse wavenumber of the perturbation, and L is the largest zone dimension. Numerical errors are about 25% for a calculation using 26 zones per transverse wavelength

  4. Redox reactions for group 5 elements, including element 105, in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionova, G.V.; Pershina, V.; Johnson, E.; Fricke, B.; Schaedel, M.

    1992-08-01

    Standard redox potentials Edeg(M z+x /M z+ ) in acidic solutions for group 5 elements including element 105 (Ha) and the actinide, Pa, have been estimated on the basis of the ionization potentials calculated via the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. Stability of the pentavalent state was shown to increase along the group from V to Ha, while that of the tetra- and trivalent states decreases in this direction. Our estimates have shown no extra stability of the trivalent state of hahnium. Element 105 should form mixed-valence complexes by analogy with Nb due to the similar values of their potentials Edeg(M 3+ /M 2+ ). The stability of the maximum oxidation state of the elements decreases in the direction 103 > 104 > 105. (orig.)

  5. Above-Level Test Item Functioning across Examinee Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Russell T.; Doty, Kristine J.; Malbica, Anne Marie; Angeles, Victor R.; Innes, Scott; Hall, Jared; Masterson-Nixon, Kelli

    2016-01-01

    "Above-level testing" (also called "above-grade testing," "out-of-level testing," and "off-level testing") is the practice of administering to a child a test that is designed for an examinee population that is older or in a more advanced grade. Above-level testing is frequently used to help educators design…

  6. Test plan for demonstrating plutonium extraction from 10-L solutions using EIChrom extraction chromatographic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Corrosive plutonium solutions stored in 10-L containers at the Plutonium Finishing Plant must be treated to convert the plutonium to a safe, solid form for storage and to remove the americium so that radiation exposure can be reduced. Extraction chromatographic resins will be tested for separating plutonium from these solutions in the laboratory. Separation parameters will be developed during the testing for large scale processing of the 10-L solutions and solutions of similar composition. Use of chromatographic resins will allow plutonium separation with minimum of chemical addition to the feed and without the need for plutonium valence adjustment. The separated plutonium will be calcined to plutonium oxide by direct solution calcination

  7. An accurate solution of point reactor neutron kinetics equations of multi-group of delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamoah, S.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Nyarko, B.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical solution is proposed to solve the point reactor kinetics equations (PRKE). ► The method is based on formulating a coefficient matrix of the PRKE. ► The method was applied to solve the PRKE for six groups of delayed neutrons. ► Results shows good agreement with other traditional methods in literature. ► The method is accurate and efficient for solving the point reactor kinetics equations. - Abstract: The understanding of the time-dependent behaviour of the neutron population in a nuclear reactor in response to either a planned or unplanned change in the reactor conditions is of great importance to the safe and reliable operation of the reactor. In this study, an accurate analytical solution of point reactor kinetics equations with multi-group of delayed neutrons for specified reactivity changes is proposed to calculate the change in neutron density. The method is based on formulating a coefficient matrix of the homogenous differential equations of the point reactor kinetics equations and calculating the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors of the coefficient matrix. A small time interval is chosen within which reactivity relatively stays constant. The analytical method was applied to solve the point reactor kinetics equations with six-groups delayed neutrons for a representative thermal reactor. The problems of step, ramp and temperature feedback reactivities are computed and the results compared with other traditional methods. The comparison shows that the method presented in this study is accurate and efficient for solving the point reactor kinetics equations of multi-group of delayed neutrons

  8. Solutions for acceleration measurement in vehicle crash tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, D. S.; Covaciu, D.

    2017-10-01

    Crash tests are useful for validating computer simulations of road traffic accidents. One of the most important parameters measured is the acceleration. The evolution of acceleration versus time, during a crash test, form a crash pulse. The correctness of the crash pulse determination depends on the data acquisition system used. Recommendations regarding the instrumentation for impact tests are given in standards, which are focused on the use of accelerometers as impact sensors. The goal of this paper is to present the device and software developed by authors for data acquisition and processing. The system includes two accelerometers with different input ranges, a processing unit based on a 32-bit microcontroller and a data logging unit with SD card. Data collected on card, as text files, is processed with a dedicated software running on personal computers. The processing is based on diagrams and includes the digital filters recommended in standards.

  9. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Brand, D. Cautley, D. Bohac, P. Francisco, L. Shen, and S. Gloss

    2015-12-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives.

  10. Solution of the diffusion equations for several groups by the finite elements method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo S, C.

    1975-01-01

    The code DELFIN has been implemented for the solution of the neutrons diffusion equations in two dimensions obtained by applying the approximation of several groups of energy. The code works with any number of groups and regions, and can be applied to thermal reactors as well as fast reactor. Providing it with the diffusion coefficients, the effective sections and the fission spectrum we obtain the results for the systems multiplying constant and the flows of each groups. The code was established using the method of finite elements, which is a form of resolution of the variational formulation of the equations applying the Ritz-Galerkin method with continuous polynomial functions by parts, in one case of the Lagrange type with rectangular geometry and up to the third grade. The obtained results and the comparison with the results in the literature, permit to reach the conclusion that it is convenient, to use the rectangular elements in all the cases where the geometry permits it, and demonstrate also that the finite elements method is better than the finite differences method. (author)

  11. Solution of spatially homogeneous model Boltzmann equations by means of Lie groups of transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroutan, A.

    1992-05-01

    The essential mathematical challenge in transport theory is based on the nonlinearity of the integro-differential equations governing classical thermodynamic systems on molecular kinetic level. It is the aim of this thesis to gain exact analytical solutions to the model Boltzmann equation suggested by Tjon and Wu. Such solutions afford a deeper insight into the dynamics of rarefied gases. Tjon and Wu have provided a stochastic model of a Boltzmann equation. Its transition probability depends only on the relative speed of the colliding particles. This assumption leads in the case of two translational degrees of freedom to an integro-differential equation of convolution type. According to this convolution structure the integro-differential equation is Laplace transformed. The result is a nonlinear partial differential equation. The investigation of the symmetries of this differential equation by means of Lie groups of transformation enables us to transform the originally nonlinear partial differential equation into ordinary differential equation into ordinary differential equations of Bernoulli type. (author)

  12. Solution to the Diffusion equation for multi groups in X Y geometry using Linear Perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugica R, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Diverse methods exist to solve numerically the neutron diffusion equation for several energy groups in stationary state among those that highlight those of finite elements. In this work the numerical solution of this equation is presented using Raviart-Thomas nodal methods type finite element, the RT0 and RT1, in combination with iterative techniques that allow to obtain the approached solution in a quick form. Nevertheless the above mentioned, the precision of a method is intimately bound to the dimension of the approach space by cell, 5 for the case RT0 and 12 for the RT1, and/or to the mesh refinement, that makes the order of the problem of own value to solve to grow considerably. By this way if it wants to know an acceptable approach to the value of the effective multiplication factor of the system when this it has experimented a small perturbation it was appeal to the Linear perturbation theory with which is possible to determine it starting from the neutron flow and of the effective multiplication factor of the not perturbed case. Results are presented for a reference problem in which a perturbation is introduced in an assemble that simulates changes in the control bar. (Author)

  13. On salting in effect of the second group metal rhodanides on aqueous-amine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupatkin, I.L.; Ostrovskaya, E.M.; Vorob'eva, L.D.; Kamyshnikova, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    The ''salting in'' effect of rhodanides of Group 2 metals (magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium) on aqueous-amine solutions (water-aniline, and water-o-toluidine systems) is studied. The solubility in these systems has been determined by the isothermal method at 25 deg C. Compositions of the co-existing liquid phases have been determined by refractometry. The phase diagrams of water-aniline-rhodanide of magnesium, calcium and strontium systems have the same qualitative view. These rhodanides ''salt in'' the water-aniline system so strongly that the systems are completely homogenized. According to the decreasing homogenization effect on the water-aniline and water-o-toluidine systems the salts may be arranged into the following series Mg(NCS) 2 >Ca(NCS) 2 >Sr(NCS) 2 >Ba(NCS) 2 . The ''salting in'. effect is weaker in the water-o-toluidine system rather than in the water-aniline one

  14. Numerical solution of multi group-Two dimensional- Adjoint equation with finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursalehi, N.; Khalafi, H.; Shahriari, M.; Minoochehr

    2008-01-01

    Adjoint equation is used for perturbation theory in nuclear reactor design. For numerical solution of adjoint equation, usually two methods are applied. These are Finite Element and Finite Difference procedures. Usually Finite Element Procedure is chosen for solving of adjoint equation, because it is more use able in variety of geometries. In this article, Galerkin Finite Element method is discussed. This method is applied for numerical solving multi group, multi region and two dimensional (X, Y) adjoint equation. Typical reactor geometry is partitioned with triangular meshes and boundary condition for adjoint flux is considered zero. Finally, for a case of defined parameters, Finite Element Code was applied and results were compared with Citation Code

  15. S-Adenosylmethionine conformations in solution and in protein complexes: Conformational influences of the sulfonium group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markham, George D.; Norrby, Per-Ola; Bock, Charles W.

    2002-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and other sulfonium ions play central roles in the metabolism of all organisms. The conformational preferences of AdoMet and two other biologically important sulfonium ions, S-methylmethionine and dimethylsulfonioproprionic acid, have been investigated by NMR...... and computational studies. Molecular mechanics parameters for the sulfonium center have been developed for the AMBER force field to permit analysis of NMR results and to enable comparison of the relative energies of the different conformations of AdoMet that have been found in crystal structures of complexes...... with proteins. S-Methylmethionine and S-dimethylsulfonioproprionate adopt a variety of conformations in aqueous solution; a conformation with an electrostatic interaction between the sulfonium sulfur and the carboxylate group is not noticeably favored, in contrast to the preferred conformation found by in vacuo...

  16. Hyperfunction solutions of the zero rest mass equations and representations of LIE groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, hyperfunctions have arisen in an essential way in separate results in mathematical physics and in representation theory. In the setting of the twistor program, Wells, with others, has extended the Penrose transform to hyperfunction solutions of the zero rest mass equations, showing that the fundamental isomorphisms hold for this larger space. Meanwhile, Schmid has shown the existence of a canonical globalization of a Harish-Chandra module, V, to a representation of the group. This maximal globalization may be realized as the completion of V in a locally convex vector space in the hyperfunction topology. This thesis shows that the former is a particular case of the latter where the globalization can be done by hand. This explicit globalization is then carried out for a more general case of the Radon transform on homogeneous spaces

  17. Vectorized and multitasked solution of the few-group neutron diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, S.K.; Turinsky, P.J.; Shayer, Z.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical algorithm with parallelism was used to solve the two-group, multidimensional neutron diffusion equations on computers characterized by shared memory, vector pipeline, and multi-CPU architecture features. Specifically, solutions were obtained on the Cray X/MP-48, the IBM-3090 with vector facilities, and the FPS-164. The material-centered mesh finite difference method approximation and outer-inner iteration method were employed. Parallelism was introduced in the inner iterations using the cyclic line successive overrelaxation iterative method and solving in parallel across lines. The outer iterations were completed using the Chebyshev semi-iterative method that allows parallelism to be introduced in both space and energy groups. For the three-dimensional model, power, soluble boron, and transient fission product feedbacks were included. Concentrating on the pressurized water reactor (PWR), the thermal-hydraulic calculation of moderator density assumed single-phase flow and a closed flow channel, allowing parallelism to be introduced in the solution across the radial plane. Using a pinwise detail, quarter-core model of a typical PWR in cycle 1, for the two-dimensional model without feedback the measured million floating point operations per second (MFLOPS)/vector speedups were 83/11.7. 18/2.2, and 2.4/5.6 on the Cray, IBM, and FPS without multitasking, respectively. Lower performance was observed with a coarser mesh, i.e., shorter vector length, due to vector pipeline start-up. For an 18 x 18 x 30 (x-y-z) three-dimensional model with feedback of the same core, MFLOPS/vector speedups of --61/6.7 and an execution time of 0.8 CPU seconds on the Cray without multitasking were measured. Finally, using two CPUs and the vector pipelines of the Cray, a multitasking efficiency of 81% was noted for the three-dimensional model

  18. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghi Kim

    2015-01-01

    The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data.

  19. Distributed training, testing, and decision aids within one solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strini, Robert A.; Strini, Keith

    2002-07-01

    Military air operations in the European theater require U.S. and NATO participants to send various mission experts to 10 Combined Air Operations Centers (CAOCs). Little or no training occurs prior to their arrival for tours of duty ranging between 90 days to 3 years. When training does occur, there is little assessment of its effectiveness in raising CAOC mission readiness. A comprehensive training management system has been developed that utilizes traditional and web based distance-learning methods for providing instruction and task practice as well as distributed simulation to provide mission rehearsal training opportunities on demand for the C2 warrior. This system incorporates new technologies, such as voice interaction and virtual tutors, and a Learning Management System (LMS) that tracks trainee progress from academic learning through procedural practice and mission training exercises. Supervisors can monitor their subordinate's progress through synchronous or asynchronous methods. Embedded within this system are virtual tutors, which provide automated performance measurement as well as tutoring. The training system offers a true time management savings for current instructors and training providers that today must perform On the Job Training (OJT) duties before, during and after each event. Many units do not have the resources to support OJT and are forced to maintain an overlap of several days to minimally maintain unit readiness. One CAOC Commander affected by this paradigm has advocated supporting a beta version of this system to test its ability to offer training on-demand and track the progress of its personnel and unit readiness. If successful, aircrew simulation devices can be connected through either Distributed Interactive Simulation or High Level Architecture methods to provide a DMT-C2 air operations training environment in Europe. This paper presents an approach to establishing a training, testing and decision aid capability and means to assess

  20. Cold and semi-hot tests of 4-group partitioning process at NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yasuji; Yamaguchi, Isoo; Fujiwara, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Mizoguchi, Kenichi [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kubota, Masumitsu [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    The 4-Group Partitioning Process was tested in the Partitioning Test Facility installed in a hot cell at NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) using simulated high-level liquid waste (HLLW) or the simulated HLLW added with a small amount of real HLLW and Tc. Behavior of each element was examined in a series of the following separation steps: pretreatment for HLLW to prepare the feed solution to extraction step, extraction with diisodecylphosphoric acid for the separation of transuranium elements, precipitation by denitration and adsorption step with active carbon for the separation of Tc and platinum group metals, and adsorption with inorganic ion exchangers for the separation of Sr and Cs. It was confined that each element behaved as expected. More than 99.99% of Am were extracted with DIDPA and 99.92% of Am were back-extracted with 4 M nitric acid. In the precipitation step by denitration, ratio of Tc precipitated was 96.2%. The present tests confined the expected performance of each equipment in the Partitioning Test Facility for the separation of elements and gave useful data for the comparison of element behavior with a result of a partitioning test using real HLLW. (author)

  1. [Randomized parallel group study of 0.0015% tafluprost ophthalmic solution in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (comparison with 0.005% latanoprost ophthalmic solution)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Li, Xiaoxin; Sun, Xinghuai; He, Xiangge; Zhang, Hong

    2015-02-01

    To confirm the non-inferiority of the IOP-lowering effect of the 0.0015% Tafluprost ophthalmic solution to the 0.005% Latanoprost ophthalmic solution in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.Safety was also compared between two groups. This study was conducted from August 2008 to December 2009, at five clinical trial sites in China. Patients of this study population was diagnosed with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension in both eyes.Subjects were randomized into 0.0015% Tafluprost group or 0.005% Latanoprost group.Intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement by Goldmann applanation tonometer, slit-lamp microscopy, Gonioscopy, Fundascopy, Visual acuity test, Perimetry, Blood pressure and pulse rate, Subjective symptoms were compered between two groups at Week 0, Week 2 and Week 4.For main effectiveness evaluation index adopt the bad effect evaluation, safety evaluation index by Fisher's exact test probability method. The 246 subjects/246 eyes were randomized (Tafluprost group:122 subjects/122 eyes, Latanoprost group:124 subjects/ 124 eyes). Change in the IOP at 17:00 of Week 2 is (8.8 ± 3.8) mmHg and (8.9 ± 4.4) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) in Tafluprost group and Latanoprost group. Percent change in the IOP at 17:00 of Week 2 is (33.2 ± 12.8)% and (34.4 ± 14.1)% in Tafluprost group and Latanoprost group. Change in the IOP at 17:00 at the end of treatment is (9.8 ± 4.0) mmHg and (9.2 ± 4.1) mmHg in Tafluprost group and Latanoprost group. Percent change in the IOP at 17:00 at the end of treatment is 37.2% ± 13.4% group and 35.7% ± 13.0% in Tafluprost and Latanoprost group.In addition, distribution of subjects with percentage decrease of IOP > 30% was 72.5% in Tafluprost group higher than 63.8% in Latanoprost group. The major adverse reactions were conjunctival hyperemia, eye irritation, eye pain and foreign body sensation. The incidence of adverse reactions is 31.7% in Tafluprost group and 20.8% in Latanoprost group. The inter-group

  2. On the use of the Lie group technique for differential equations with a small parameter: Approximate solutions and integrable equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burde, G.I.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to the use of the Lie group technique for partial and ordinary differential equations dependent on a small parameter is developed. In addition to determining approximate solutions to the perturbed equation, the approach allows constructing integrable equations that have solutions with (partially) prescribed features. Examples of application of the approach to partial differential equations are given

  3. DiagTest3Grp: An R Package for Analyzing Diagnostic Tests with Three Ordinal Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqin Luo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical researchers endeavor to identify potentially useful biomarkers to develop marker-based screening assays for disease diagnosis and prevention. Useful summary measures which properly evaluate the discriminative ability of diagnostic markers are critical for this purpose. Literature and existing software, for example, R packages nicely cover summary measures for diagnostic markers used for the binary case (e.g., healthy vs. diseased. An intermediate population at an early disease stage usually exists between the healthy and the fully diseased population in many disease processes. Supporting utilities for three-group diagnostic tests are highly desired and important for identifying patients at the early disease stage for timely treatments. However, application packages which provide summary measures for three ordinal groups are currently lacking. This paper focuses on two summary measures of diagnostic accuracy—volume under the receiver operating characteristic surface and the extended Youden index, with three diagnostic groups. We provide the R package DiagTest3Grp to estimate, under both parametric and nonparametric assumptions, the two summary measures and the associated variances, as well as the optimal cut-points for disease diagnosis. An omnibus test for multiple markers and a Wald test for two markers, on independent or paired samples, are incorporated to compare diagnostic accuracy across biomarkers. Sample size calculation under the normality assumption can be performed in the R package to design future diagnostic studies. A real world application evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of neuropsychological markers for Alzheimer’s disease is used to guide readers through step-by-step implementation of DiagTest3Grp to demonstrate its utility.

  4. A demonstration test of 4-group partitioning process with real high-level liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Y.; Yamaguchi, I.; Fujiwara, T.; Koizumi, H.; Tachimori, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-Mura, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The demonstration test of 4-Group Partitioning Process with concentrated real high-level liquid waste (HLLW) was carried out in the Partitioning Test Facility installed in a hot cell. More than 99.998% of Am and Cm were extracted from the HLLW with the organic solvent containing 0.5 M DIDPA - 0.1 M TBP, and more than 99.98% of Am and Cm were back-extracted with 4 M nitric acid. Np and Pu were extracted simultaneously, and more than 99.93% of Np and more than 99.98% of Pu were back-extracted with oxalic acid. In the denitration step for the separation of Tc and platinum group metals, more than 90% of Rh and more than 97% of Pd were precipitated. About half of Ru were remained in the de-nitrated solution, but the remaining Ru were quantitatively precipitated by neutralization of the de-nitrated solution to pH 6.7. In the adsorption step, both Sr and Cs were separated effectively. Decontamination factors for Cs and Sr were more than 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 4} respectively in all effluent samples. (authors)

  5. Medical Physics: Forming and testing solutions to clinical problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapaki, Virginia; Bayford, Richard

    2015-11-01

    According to the European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (EFOMP) policy statement No. 13, "The rapid advance in the use of highly sophisticated equipment and procedures in the medical field increasingly depends on information and communication technology. In spite of the fact that the safety and quality of such technology is vigorously tested before it is placed on the market, it often turns out that the safety and quality is not sufficient when used under hospital working conditions. To improve safety and quality for patient and users, additional safeguards and related monitoring, as well as measures to enhance quality, are required. Furthermore a large number of accidents and incidents happen every year in hospitals and as a consequence a number of patients die or are injured. Medical Physicists are well positioned to contribute towards preventing these kinds of events". The newest developments related to this increasingly important medical speciality were presented during the 8th European Conference of Medical Physics 2014 which was held in Athens, 11-13 September 2014 and hosted by the Hellenic Association of Medical Physicists (HAMP) in collaboration with the EFOMP and are summarized in this issue. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with delay: some theorems, test problems, exact and numerical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanin, A. D.; Sorokin, V. G.

    2017-12-01

    The paper deals with nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with one or several delays. We formulate theorems that allow constructing exact solutions for some classes of these equations, which depend on several arbitrary functions. Examples of application of these theorems for obtaining new exact solutions in elementary functions are provided. We state basic principles of construction, selection, and use of test problems for nonlinear partial differential equations with delay. Some test problems which can be suitable for estimating accuracy of approximate analytical and numerical methods of solving reaction-diffusion equations with delay are presented. Some examples of numerical solutions of nonlinear test problems with delay are considered.

  7. A semi-analytical solution for slug tests in an unconfined aquifer considering unsaturated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    A semi-analytical solution considering the vertical unsaturated flow is developed for groundwater flow in response to a slug test in an unconfined aquifer in Laplace space. The new solution incorporates the effects of partial penetrating, anisotropy, vertical unsaturated flow, and a moving water table boundary. Compared to the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) model, the new solution can significantly improve the fittings of the modeled to the measured hydraulic heads at the late stage of slug tests in an unconfined aquifer, particularly when the slug well has a partially submerged screen and moisture drainage above the water table is significant. The radial hydraulic conductivities estimated with the new solution are comparable to those from the KGS, Bouwer and Rice, and Hvorslev methods. In addition, the new solution also can be used to examine the vertical conductivity, specific storage, specific yield, and the moisture retention parameters in an unconfined aquifer based on slug test data.

  8. A solution to the collective action problem in between-group conflict with within-group inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Fortunato, Laura

    2014-03-26

    Conflict with conspecifics from neighbouring groups over territory, mating opportunities and other resources is observed in many social organisms, including humans. Here we investigate the evolutionary origins of social instincts, as shaped by selection resulting from between-group conflict in the presence of a collective action problem. We focus on the effects of the differences between individuals on the evolutionary dynamics. Our theoretical models predict that high-rank individuals, who are able to usurp a disproportional share of resources in within-group interactions, will act seemingly altruistically in between-group conflict, expending more effort and often having lower reproductive success than their low-rank group-mates. Similar behaviour is expected for individuals with higher motivation, higher strengths or lower costs, or for individuals in a leadership position. Our theory also provides an evolutionary foundation for classical equity theory, and it has implications for the origin of coercive leadership and for reproductive skew theory.

  9. Interim report of the LASL nondestructive testing group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.; Bryant, L.

    1979-01-01

    Topics discussed include: high-pressure diamond cell work; x-ray fluorescence analysis; shroud of turin; laser fusion target inspection; and scanning electron microscope. Organization charts for the M-1 group are included

  10. The small displacement elastic solution to the ball-on-ring testing method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2012-01-01

    The ball-on-ring experiment is used for testing of the biaxial strength of ceramics. In this work the solution for the stress distribution and displacements of the disc specimen in the ball-on-ring experiment are determined on closed form. The solution comprises the displacement field and its...

  11. Solution of the neutron diffusion equation at two groups of energy by method of triangular finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia Filho, A.

    1981-04-01

    The Neutron Diffusion Equation at two groups of energy is solved with the use of the Finite - Element Method with first order triangular elements. The program EFTDN (Triangular Finite Elements on Neutron Diffusion) was developed using the language FORTRAN IV. The discrete formulation of the Diffusion Equation is obtained with the application of the Galerkin's Method. In order to solve the eigenvalue - problem, the Method of the Power is applied and, with the purpose of the convergence of the results, Chebshev's polynomial expressions are applied. On the solution of the systems of equations Gauss' Method is applied, divided in two different parts: triangularization of the matrix of coeficients and retrosubstitution taking in account the sparsity of the system. Several test - problems are solved, among then two P.W.R. type reactors, the ZION-1 with 1300 MWe and the 2D-IAEA - Benchmark. Comparision of results with standard solutions show the validity of application of the EFM and precision of the results. (Author) [pt

  12. Fast numerical solution of KKR-CPA equations: Testing new algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, E.; Florio, G.M.; Ginatempo, B.; Giuliano, E.S. (Universita di Messina (Italy))

    1994-04-01

    Some numerical methods for the solution of KKR-CPA equations are discussed and tested. New, efficient, computational algorithms are proposed, allowing a remarkable reduction of computing time and a good reliability in evaluating spectral quantities. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Coastal Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics Imager Pointing Line-of-Sight Solution Development and Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A stable pointing line of sight solution is developed and tested in support of the Coastal Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics Imager for the GEOstationary Coastal and Air...

  14. Field Test of Driven Pile Group under Lateral Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorska, Karolina; Rybak, Jaroslaw; Wyjadlowski, Marek

    2017-12-01

    All the geotechnical works need to be tested because the diversity of soil parameters is much higher than in other fields of construction. Horizontal load tests are necessary to determine the lateral capacity of driven piles subject to lateral load. Various load tests were carried out altogether on the test field in Kutno (Poland). While selecting the piles for load tests, different load combinations were taken into account. The piles with diverse length were chosen, on the basis of the previous tests of their length and integrity. The subsoil around the piles consisted of mineral soils: clays and medium compacted sands with the density index ID>0.50. The pile heads were free. The points of support of the “base” to which the dial gauges (displacement sensors) were fastened were located at the distance of 0.7 m from the side surface of the pile loaded laterally. In order to assure the independence of measurement, additional control (verifying) geodetic survey of the displacement of the piles subject to the load tests was carried out (by means of the alignment method). The trial load was imposed in stages by means of a hydraulic jack. The oil pressure in the actuator was corrected by means of a manual pump in order to ensure the constant value of the load in the on-going process of the displacement of the pile under test. On the basis of the obtained results it is possible to verify the numerical simulations of the behaviour of piles loaded by a lateral force.

  15. Coarse-grain parallel solution of few-group neutron diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarsour, H.N.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a parallel numerical algorithm for the solution of the finite difference representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equations. The targeted architectures are multiprocessor computers with shared memory like the Cray Y-MP and the IBM 3090/VF, where coarse granularity is important for minimizing overhead. Most of the work done in the past, which attempts to exploit concurrence, has concentrated on the inner iterations of the standard outer-inner iterative strategy. This produces very fine granularity. To coarsen granularity, the authors introduce parallelism at the nested outer-inner level. The problem's spatial domain was partitioned into contiguous subregions and assigned a processor to solve for each subregion independent of all other subregions, hence, processors; i.e., each subregion is treated as a reactor core with imposed boundary conditions. Since those boundary conditions on interior surfaces, referred to as internal boundary conditions (IBCs), are not known, a third iterative level, the recomposition iterations, is introduced to communicate results between subregions

  16. Thermal reactor benchmark testing of 69 group library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng; Wang Yaoqing; Liu Ping; Zhang Baocheng

    1994-01-01

    Using a code system NSLINK, AMPX master library in WIMS 69 groups structure are made from nuclides relating to 4 newest evaluated nuclear data libraries. Some integrals of 10 thermal reactor benchmark assemblies recommended by the U.S. CSEWG are calculated using rectified PASC-1 code system and compared with foreign results, the authors results are in good agreement with others. 69 group libraries of evaluated data bases in TPFAP interface file are generated with NJOY code system. The k ∞ values of 6 cell lattice assemblies are calculated by the code CBM. The calculated results are analysed and compared

  17. A Binomial Test of Group Differences with Correlated Outcome Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Levin, Joel R.; Ferron, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Building on previous arguments for why educational researchers should not provide effect-size estimates in the face of statistically nonsignificant outcomes (Robinson & Levin, 1997), Onwuegbuzie and Levin (2005) proposed a 3-step statistical approach for assessing group differences when multiple outcome measures are individually analyzed…

  18. Grouping of Environments for Testing Navy Bean in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kassaye

    bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines was tested in a multi-environment variety trial ... of methods available for the analysis of GEI and stability. .... parameters in the kth bilinear term are obtained as the kth component of the .... AMMI ANOVA of grain yield for 16 navy bean lines at fourteen environments during 2010 – 2011 main ...

  19. Decision-making framework for testing and grouping of nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A ‘multiple perspective’ framework for the grouping of nanomaterials Robert Landsiedel presenting the results of the ECETOC Nano Task Force (Josje H.E. Arts a, Mackenzie Hadi b, Athena M. Keene c, Reinhard Kreiling d, Delina Lyon e, Monika Maier f, Karin Michel g, Thomas Petry h, Ursula G. Sauer i, David Warheit j, Karin Wiench k, Robert Landsiedel k) a AkzoNobel, Technology and Engineering, Arnhem, Netherlands b Shell Health, Shell International B.V., The Hague, Netherlands...

  20. Solutions of the Noh Problem for Various Equations of State Using Lie Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    A method for developing invariant equations of state for which solutions of the Noh problem will exist is developed. The ideal gas equation of state is shown to be a special case of the general method. Explicit solutions of the Noh problem in planar, cylindrical and spherical geometry are determined for a Mie-Gruneisen and the stiff gas equation of state

  1. The Langer-Improved Wald Test for DIF Testing with Multiple Groups: Evaluation and Comparison to Two-Group IRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carol M.; Cai, Li; Wang, Mian

    2013-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when the probability of responding in a particular category to an item differs for members of different groups who are matched on the construct being measured. The identification of DIF is important for valid measurement. This research evaluates an improved version of Lord's chi [superscript 2]…

  2. Effects Of Group Counseling and Behavior Therapy On The Academic Achievement Of Test-Anxious Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kenneth R.; Ng, Kim T.

    1972-01-01

    Results indicated that only significant reductions on test anxiety were obtained for groups given desensitization, but for groups given combinations of desensitization and counseling, improvement occurred in both test anxiety and study skills. (Author)

  3. Baecklund transformation for supersymmetric self-dual theories for semisimple gauge groups and a hierarchy of A1 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devchand, C.

    1994-01-01

    We present a Baecklund transformation (a discrete symmetry transformation) for the self-duality equations for supersymmetric gauge theories in N-extended super-Minkowski space M 4vertical stroke 4N for an arbitrary semisimple gauge group. For the case of an A 1 gauge algebra we integrate the transformation starting with a given solution and iterating the process we construct a hierarchy of explicit solutions. (orig.)

  4. Focus group testing for the vehicle scrappage program : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-15

    Canada's national vehicle scrappage program was designed to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) and smog-forming emissions by removing personal vehicles with model years of 1995 and older from Canadian road systems. The program will also promote sustainable transportation alternatives and recycling programs to prevent the release of other toxic substances into the environment. Incentives designed to encourage Canadians to scrap older vehicles may include cash incentives and rebates towards the purchase of a new vehicle, free transit passes, and other options designed to support sustainable transportation. This paper discussed a research program conducted to assess target audience responses to the programs and its proposed incentives. The survey was conducted with a series of 20 focus groups located in major cities across Canada. Sessions were comprised of between 6 to 10 participants from lower-income and higher-income households. All groups responded negatively to both the overall policy as well as to specific program elements. The study showed that most participants were not aware that older vehicles emit significantly higher levels of harmful emissions. The research audience did not understand distinctions between smog-producing emissions and GHG emissions. Participants also believed that personal vehicles had a minor negative impact on the environment compared to trucks, industry, and vehicle fleets. Participants felt a sense of pride in the ways in which they had maintained their older vehicles, and also perceived them as safer than newer vehicles. It was concluded that many participants were resistant to facts presented to them about older vehicles, and felt that the incentives were insufficient to trigger action. The effectiveness of advertising materials designed to promote the program was also assessed. 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  5. All-in-One Wafer-Level Solution for MMIC Automatic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an all-in-one wafer-level solution for MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit automatic testing. The OSL (open short load two tier de-embedding, the calibration verification model, the accurate PAE (power added efficiency testing, and the optimized vector cold source NF (noise figure measurement techniques are integrated in this solution to improve the measurement accuracy. A dual-core topology formed by an IPC (industrial personal computer and a VNA (vector network analyzer, and an automatic test software based on a three-level driver architecture, are applied to enhance the test efficiency. The benefit from this solution is that all the data of a MMIC can be achieved in only one contact, which shows state-of-the-art accuracy and efficiency.

  6. Testing Group Mean Differences of Latent Variables in Multilevel Data Using Multiple-Group Multilevel CFA and Multilevel MIMIC Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sook; Cao, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Considering that group comparisons are common in social science, we examined two latent group mean testing methods when groups of interest were either at the between or within level of multilevel data: multiple-group multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MG ML CFA) and multilevel multiple-indicators multiple-causes modeling (ML MIMIC). The performance of these methods were investigated through three Monte Carlo studies. In Studies 1 and 2, either factor variances or residual variances were manipulated to be heterogeneous between groups. In Study 3, which focused on within-level multiple-group analysis, six different model specifications were considered depending on how to model the intra-class group correlation (i.e., correlation between random effect factors for groups within cluster). The results of simulations generally supported the adequacy of MG ML CFA and ML MIMIC for multiple-group analysis with multilevel data. The two methods did not show any notable difference in the latent group mean testing across three studies. Finally, a demonstration with real data and guidelines in selecting an appropriate approach to multilevel multiple-group analysis are provided.

  7. Exact solutions of the population balance equation including particle transport, using group analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubiao; Meleshko, Sergey V.; Flood, Adrian E.

    2018-06-01

    The population balance equation (PBE) has received an unprecedented amount of attention in recent years from both academics and industrial practitioners because of its long history, widespread use in engineering, and applicability to a wide variety of particulate and discrete-phase processes. However it is typically impossible to obtain analytical solutions, although in almost every case a numerical solution of the PBEs can be obtained. In this article, the symmetries of PBEs with homogeneous coagulation kernels involving aggregation, breakage and growth processes and particle transport in one dimension are found by direct solving the determining equations. Using the optimal system of one and two-dimensional subalgebras, all invariant solutions and reduced equations are obtained. In particular, an explicit analytical physical solution is also presented.

  8. Renormalization group equation and scaling solutions for f(R) gravity in exponential parametrization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Nobuyoshi; Percacci, Roberto; Vacca, Gian Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We employ the exponential parametrization of the metric and a ''physical'' gauge fixing procedure to write a functional flow equation for the gravitational effective average action in an f(R) truncation. The background metric is a four-sphere and the coarse-graining procedure contains three free parameters. We look for scaling solutions, i.e. non-Gaussian fixed points for the function f. For a discrete set of values of the parameters, we find simple global solutions of quadratic polynomial form. For other values, global solutions can be found numerically. Such solutions can be extended in certain regions of parameter space and have two relevant directions. We discuss the merits and the shortcomings of this procedure. (orig.)

  9. 21 CFR 864.9175 - Automated blood grouping and antibody test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. An automated blood grouping and antibody test system is a device used to group erythrocytes (red blood cells) and to detect antibodies to blood group antigens. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated blood grouping and antibody test system...

  10. Classification of the Group Invariant Solutions for Contaminant Transport in Saturated Soils under Radial Uniform Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Potsane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport of chemicals through soils to the groundwater or precipitation at the soils surfaces leads to degradation of these resources. Serious consequences may be suffered in the long run. In this paper, we consider macroscopic deterministic models describing contaminant transport in saturated soils under uniform radial water flow backgrounds. The arising convection-dispersion equation given in terms of the stream functions is analyzed using classical Lie point symmetries. A number of exotic Lie point symmetries are admitted. Group invariant solutions are classified according to the elements of the one-dimensional optimal systems. We analyzed the group invariant solutions which satisfy the physical boundary conditions.

  11. Soil solution extraction techniques for microbial ecotoxicity testing: a comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiensing, T; Preston, S; Strachan, N; Paton, G I

    2001-02-01

    The suitability of two different techniques (centrifugation and Rhizon sampler) for obtaining the interstitial pore water of soil (soil solution), integral to the ecotoxicity assessment of metal contaminated soil, were investigated by combining chemical analyses and a luminescence-based microbial biosensor. Two different techniques, centrifugation and Rhizon sampler, were used to extract the soil solution from Insch (a loamy sand) and Boyndie (a sandy loam) soils, which had been amended with different concentrations of Zn and Cd. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), major anions (F- , CI-, NO3, SO4(2-)) and major cations (K+, Mg2+, Ca2+) in the soil solutions varied depending on the extraction technique used. Overall, the concentrations of Zn and Cd were significantly higher in the soil solution extracted using the centrifugation technique compared with that extracted using the Rhizon sampler technique. Furthermore, the differences observed between the two extraction techniques depended on the type of soil from which the solution was being extracted. The luminescence-based biosensor Escherichia coli HB101 pUCD607 was shown to respond to the free metal concentrations in the soil solutions and showed that different toxicities were associated with each soil, depending on the technique used to extract the soil solution. This study highlights the need to characterise the type of extraction technique used to obtain the soil solution for ecotoxicity testing in order that a representative ecotoxicity assessment can be carried out.

  12. Transient drawdown solution for a constant pumping test in finite two-zone confined aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-T. Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The drawdown solution has been widely used to analyze pumping test data for the determination of aquifer parameters when coupled with an optimization scheme. The solution can also be used to predict the drawdown due to pumping and design the dewatering system. The drawdown solution for flow toward a finite-radius well with a skin zone in a confined aquifer of infinite extent in radial direction had been developed before. To our best knowledge, the drawdown solution in confined aquifers of finite extent with a skin zone so far has never before been presented in the groundwater literature. This article presents a mathematical model for describing the drawdown distribution due to a constant-flux pumping from a finite-radius well with a skin zone in confined aquifers of finite extent. The analytical solution of the model is developed by applying the methods of Laplace transforms, Bromwich contour integral, and residue theorem. This solution can be used to investigate the effects of finite boundary and conductivity ratio on the drawdown distribution. In addition, the inverse relationship between Laplace- and time-domain variables is used to develop the large time solution which can reduce to the Thiem solution if there is no skin zone.

  13. Methodically finding solutions of equipments for carrying out experiments in materials testing and research. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findeisen, D.; Nachtweide, D.; Kuntze, G.

    1983-01-01

    In comparison with the development of industrial products the development of test equipments is of special kind, which is demonstrated by methodical proceeding for finding solutions and by potentialities for technical design and production of test equipment engineering. Some general principles are turned out and explained by several realized examples of design belonging to the sphere of materials testing in den Federal Institute of Materials Testing (BAM) representative of other problems. User are large scientific institutes independent of university, scientific institutes as members of university just as test stands and quality control offices of industrial works. (orig.) [de

  14. A decision-making framework for the grouping and testing of nanomaterials (DF4nanoGrouping).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Josje H E; Hadi, Mackenzie; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Keene, Athena M; Kreiling, Reinhard; Lyon, Delina; Maier, Monika; Michel, Karin; Petry, Thomas; Sauer, Ursula G; Warheit, David; Wiench, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-03-15

    The European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) 'Nano Task Force' proposes a Decision-making framework for the grouping and testing of nanomaterials (DF4nanoGrouping) that consists of 3 tiers to assign nanomaterials to 4 main groups, to perform sub-grouping within the main groups and to determine and refine specific information needs. The DF4nanoGrouping covers all relevant aspects of a nanomaterial's life cycle and biological pathways, i.e. intrinsic material and system-dependent properties, biopersistence, uptake and biodistribution, cellular and apical toxic effects. Use (including manufacture), release and route of exposure are applied as 'qualifiers' within the DF4nanoGrouping to determine if, e.g. nanomaterials cannot be released from a product matrix, which may justify the waiving of testing. The four main groups encompass (1) soluble nanomaterials, (2) biopersistent high aspect ratio nanomaterials, (3) passive nanomaterials, and (4) active nanomaterials. The DF4nanoGrouping aims to group nanomaterials by their specific mode-of-action that results in an apical toxic effect. This is eventually directed by a nanomaterial's intrinsic properties. However, since the exact correlation of intrinsic material properties and apical toxic effect is not yet established, the DF4nanoGrouping uses the 'functionality' of nanomaterials for grouping rather than relying on intrinsic material properties alone. Such functionalities include system-dependent material properties (such as dissolution rate in biologically relevant media), bio-physical interactions, in vitro effects and release and exposure. The DF4nanoGrouping is a hazard and risk assessment tool that applies modern toxicology and contributes to the sustainable development of nanotechnological products. It ensures that no studies are performed that do not provide crucial data and therefore saves animals and resources. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Development of a coarse mesh code for the solution of two group static diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, R.C. de.

    1985-01-01

    This new coarse mesh code designed for the solution of 2 and 3 dimensional static diffusion problems, is based on an alternating direction method which consists in the solution of one dimensional problem along each coordinate direction with leakage terms for the remaining directions estimated from previous interactions. Four versions of this code have been developed: AD21 - 2D - 1/4, AD21 - 2D - 4/4, AD21 - 3D - 1/4 and AD21 - 3D - 4/4; these versions have been designed for 2 and 3 dimensional problems with or without 1/4 symmetry. (Author) [pt

  16. Use of the Fox derivatives in the solution of the word problem for groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1988-09-01

    Applying Fox's free partial derivative, the word problem of a finitely presented group has been reduced to the problem of finding an algorithm for determining the existence of a root of a system of linear equations over the integral group ring. The solubility of the word problem for torsion-free one-relator groups and torsion-free polycyclic-by-finite groups has been deduced. (author). 10 refs

  17. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Wetzels; H.T.G. Weffers; A.M.C. Dooremalen; Joost van Hoof; Eveline Wouters

    2014-01-01

    Buildings with innovative technologies and architectural solutions are needed as a means of support for future nursing homes alongside adequate care services. This study investigated how various groups of stakeholders from healthcare and technology envision the nursing home of the future in the

  18. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    OpenAIRE

    Dooremalen, A.M.C.; van Hoof, J.; Weffers, H.T.G.; Wetzels, M.H.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in Science & Technology 1(3): 90-105

  19. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.C. Dooremalen; J. van Hoof; H.T.G. Weffers; M.H. Wetzels; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in

  20. So ware-Defined Network Solutions for Science Scenarios: Performance Testing Framework and Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settlemyer, Bradley [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kettimuthu, R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Boley, Josh [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Katramatos, Dimitrios [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Rao, Nageswara S. [ORNL; Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Liu, Qiang [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    High-performance scientific work flows utilize supercomputers, scientific instruments, and large storage systems. Their executions require fast setup of a small number of dedicated network connections across the geographically distributed facility sites. We present Software-Defined Network (SDN) solutions consisting of site daemons that use dpctl, Floodlight, ONOS, or OpenDaylight controllers to set up these connections. The development of these SDN solutions could be quite disruptive to the infrastructure, while requiring a close coordination among multiple sites; in addition, the large number of possible controller and device combinations to investigate could make the infrastructure unavailable to regular users for extended periods of time. In response, we develop a Virtual Science Network Environment (VSNE) using virtual machines, Mininet, and custom scripts that support the development, testing, and evaluation of SDN solutions, without the constraints and expenses of multi-site physical infrastructures; furthermore, the chosen solutions can be directly transferred to production deployments. By complementing VSNE with a physical testbed, we conduct targeted performance tests of various SDN solutions to help choose the best candidates. In addition, we propose a switching response method to assess the setup times and throughput performances of different SDN solutions, and present experimental results that show their advantages and limitations.

  1. Comparative scrub solution tests for decontamination of transuranic radionuclides from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.R.; Kochen, R.L.; Rutherford, D.W.; Riordan, G.A.; Delaney, I.C.

    1982-08-01

    Soil decontamination tests were done using three scrubbing solutions on five different transuranic-contaminated soils from Department of Energy sites. The soils came from Rocky Flats, Colorado; Hanford, Washington; Mound Facility, Ohio; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. Decontamination was effected by physical and chemical means. A pH 12.5 scrub effected decontamination by serving as a hydraulic grading and attrition scrub medium; this solution did not solubilize the actinide contamination. A 2% HNO 3 , 0.2% HF, 2% pine oil, and 5% Calgon solution effected decontamination by physical and chemical means; this solution solubilized particulate actinide and actinide dispersed on the surface of soil particles. A 2N HCl scrub was also used to effect decontamination by physical and chemical means; this reagent solubilized soil constituents, removing contamination that had migrated into mineral surfaces. Only Rocky Flats soil was effectively decontaminated by the high pH solution although all soils had an enrichment of the activity in the -150 mesh fraction. Attrition scrubbing with both acid solutions had a better decontamination ability for the +150 mesh fraction for Hanford, INEL, and LANL soils. In addition, the acid solutions solubilized some of the plutonium and had a decontamination effect on the fine fractions

  2. Challenges and solutions for high-volume testing of silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polster, Robert; Dai, Liang Yuan; Oikonomou, Michail; Cheng, Qixiang; Rumley, Sebastien; Bergman, Keren

    2018-02-01

    The first generation of silicon photonic products is now commercially available. While silicon photonics possesses key economic advantages over classical photonic platforms, it has yet to become a commercial success because these advantages can be fully realized only when high-volume testing of silicon photonic devices is made possible. We discuss the costs, challenges, and solutions of photonic chip testing as reported in the recent research literature. We define and propose three underlying paradigms that should be considered when creating photonic test structures: Design for Fast Coupling, Design for Minimal Taps, and Design for Parallel Testing. We underline that a coherent test methodology must be established prior to the design of test structures, and demonstrate how an optimized methodology dramatically reduces the burden when designing for test, by reducing the needed complexity of test structures.

  3. Grouped to Achieve: Are There Benefits to Assigning Students to Heterogeneous Cooperative Learning Groups Based on Pre-Test Scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Arman Karl

    Cooperative learning has been one of the most widely used instructional practices around the world since the early 1980's. Small learning groups have been in existence since the beginning of the human race. These groups have grown in their variance and complexity overtime. Classrooms are getting more diverse every year and instructors need a way to take advantage of this diversity to improve learning. The purpose of this study was to see if heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student achievement can be used as a differentiated instructional strategy to increase students' ability to demonstrate knowledge of science concepts and ability to do engineering design. This study includes two different groups made up of two different middle school science classrooms of 25-30 students. These students were given an engineering design problem to solve within cooperative learning groups. One class was put into heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student's pre-test scores. The other class was grouped based on random assignment. The study measured the difference between each class's pre-post gains, student's responses to a group interaction form and interview questions addressing their perceptions of the makeup of their groups. The findings of the study were that there was no significant difference between learning gains for the treatment and comparison groups. There was a significant difference between the treatment and comparison groups in student perceptions of their group's ability to stay on task and manage their time efficiently. Both the comparison and treatment groups had a positive perception of the composition of their cooperative learning groups.

  4. Eye Irritation Test of Bovis Calculus Pharmacopuncture Solutions for Eye Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-sik Seo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was done to investigate the safety of Bovis Calculus pharmacopuncture solution manufactured with freezing dryness method to use eye drop. Methods : The eye irritation test of this material was performed according to the Regulation of Korea Food & Drug Administration (2005. 10. 21, KFDA 2005-60. After Bovis Calculus pharmacopuncture solution was medicated in the left eye of the rabbits, the auther observed eye irritation of the cornea, iris, conjunctiva at 1, 2, 3, 4 & 7day. Results : 1. After Bovis Calculus pharmacopuncture solution was medicated in the left eye of the rabbits, there wasn’t physical problem at 9 rabbits. 2. After Bovis Calculus pharmacopuncture solutionwas medicated in the left eye of the rabbits, there wasn’t eye irritation of the cornea, iris, conjunctiva at 1, 2, 3, 4 & 7day. Conclusions : I suggested that Bovis Calculus pharmacopuncture solution didn’t induced eye irritation in rabbits.

  5. Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory-based testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M; Hampton, Robert R

    2013-05-01

    Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory-housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch-screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching-to-sample memory test. Despite the differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments.

  6. Interoperable Solution for Test Execution in Various I&T Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young H.; Bareh, Magdy S.

    2006-01-01

    When there is spacecraft collaboration between several industry partners, there is an inherent difference in integration and test (I&T) methodologies, which creates a challenge for verifying flight systems during the development phase. To converge the differing I&T methodologies, considerations were required for multiple project areas such as Flight System Testbed (FST), Assembly, Test, and Launch Operations (ATLO), and Spacecraft Simulator environments. This paper details the challenges and approaches of the JPL's effort in engineering a solution to testing the flight system with the Mission Operations Ground System while maintaining the comparability with testing methods of the industry partners.

  7. 77 FR 70484 - Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ...-1294, ``Preoperational Testing of On-Site Electric Power Systems to Verify Proper Load Group... entitled ``Preoperational Testing of On- Site Electric Power Systems to Verify Proper Load Group... Electric Power Systems to Verify Proper Load Group Assignments, Electrical Separation, and Redundancy...

  8. DISCRIMINATIVE ANALYSIS OF TESTS FOR EVALUATING SITUATIONMOTORIC ABILITIES BETWEEN TWO GROUPS OF BASKETBALL PLAYERS SELECTED BY THE TEST OF SOCIOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Elezi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining differences between the two groups of basketball players selected with the modified sociometric test (Paranosić and Lazarević in some tests for assessing situation-motor skills, was the aim of this work. The test sample was consisted of 20 basketball players who had most positive points and 20 basketball players who had most negative points, in total- 40 players. T-test was applied to determine whether there are differences between the two groups of basketball players who had been elected with the help of the sociometric test. Analyses were made with the program SPSS 8.0. The discriminative analysis has determined that the differences in the arithmetic means between the groups of basketball players who had most positive points and the group of basketball players who had most negative points in some tests for assessing situation-motor abilities do not exist

  9. An investigation into the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions used for cough reflex testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, James R; Wu, Zimei; Lau, Hugo; Suen, Joanna; Wang, Lucy; Pottinger, Sarah; Lee, Elaine; Alazawi, Nawar; Kallesen, Molly; Gargiulo, Derryn A; Swift, Simon; Svirskis, Darren

    2014-10-01

    Citric acid is used in cough reflex testing in clinical and research settings to assess reflexive cough in patients at risk of swallowing disorders. To address a lack of knowledge in this area, this study investigated the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions. Triplicate solutions of citric acid (0.8 M) in isotonic saline were stored at 4 ± 2 °C for up to 28 days and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbiological sterility of freshly prepared samples and bulk samples previously used for 2 weeks within the hospital was determined using a pour plate technique. Microbial survival in citric acid was determined by inoculating Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Candida albicans into citric acid solution and monitoring the number of colony-forming units/mL over 40 min. Citric acid solutions remained stable at 4 °C for 28 days (98.4 ± 1.8 % remained). The freshly prepared and clinical samples tested were sterile. However, viability studies revealed that citric acid solution allows for the survival of C. albicans but not for S. aureus or E. coli. The microbial survival study showed that citric acid kills S. aureus and E. coli but has no marked effect on C. albicans after 40 min. Citric acid samples at 0.8 M remained stable over the 4-week testing period, with viable microbial cells absent from samples tested. However, C. albicans has the ability to survive in citric acid solution if inadvertently introduced in practice. For this reason, in clinical and research practice it is suggested to use single-use aliquots prepared aseptically which can be stored for up to 28 days at 4 °C.

  10. Separation of compounds with multiple -OH groups from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with organoboronate. [1,2-propanediol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Tina Kuo Fung.

    1992-05-01

    The complexing extractant agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA) in its anionic form (NPB). NPBA and Aliquat 336 (quaternary amine) is dissolved in 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, and the extractant is contacted with aq. NaOH. Solutes investigated were 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, fructose, sorbitol and lactic acid. Batch extraction experiments were performed at 25{degree}C. Partition coefficients, distribution ratios and loadings are reported for varying concentrations of solute and NPB. All solutes complexed with NPB{sup {minus}}, with all complexes containing only one NPB{sup {minus}} per complex. The 1:1 complexation constants for the solutes glycerol, fructose and sorbitol follow trends similar to complexation with B(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} (aq.), i.e. the complexation constants increase with increasing number of {minus}OH groups available for complexation. Assumption of 1:1 complex is not valid for 1, 2-propanediol, which showed overloading (more than one mole of solute complexed to one mole NPB{sup {minus}}) at higher concentrations. The {minus}OH group on the NPB{sup {minus}} which is left uncomplexed after one solute molecule had bound to the other two {minus}OH groups may be responsible for the overloading. Overloading is also observed in extraction of tactic acid, but through a different mechanism. It was found that TOMA{sup +} can extract lactic acid to an extent comparable to the uptake of lactic acid by NPB{sup {minus}}. The complexation is probably through formation of an acid-base ion pair. Losses of NPBA into the aqueous phase could lead to problems, poor economics in industrial separation processes. One way of overcoming this problem would be to incorporate the NPBA onto a solid support.

  11. Quality assessment in in vivo NMR spectroscopy: III. Clinical test objects: design, construction, and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J.; Keevil, S

    1995-01-01

    /Perspex interface produced minimum susceptibility effects. The design of the objects has been evaluated in trials on different magnetic resonance instruments, with size and loading being adjusted to allow use on currently available equipment. Appropriate test solutions for 31P and 1H measurements have been...

  12. On a revisit to the Painlevé test for integrability and exact solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the same equations and keeping the singularity manifold completely general in nature. It has been found that the equations, in real form, pass the Painlevé test for integrability. The truncation procedure of the same analysis leads to non-trivial exact solutions obtained previously and auto-Backlund transformation between ...

  13. Transparent conducting oxide films of group V doped titania prepared by aqueous chemical solution deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elen, Ken; Capon, Boris; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Dewulf, Daan; Peys, Nick; Detavernier, Christophe; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K.

    2014-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films of titania doped with vanadium (V), niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) are obtained by aqueous Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD). The effect of the dopant on the crystallization and microstructure of the resulting films is examined by means of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. During annealing of the thin films, in-situ characterization of the crystal structure and sheet resistance is carried out. Niobium doped anatase films, obtained after annealing in forming gas, show a resistivity of 0,28 Ohm cm, which is the lowest resistivity reported for a solution deposited anatase-based TCO so far. Here, we demonstrate that aqueous CSD may provide a strategy for scalable TCO production in the future. - Highlights: • Aqueous chemical solution deposition of doped titanium dioxide • Doping delays the phase transition from anatase to rutile • Lowest resistivity after doping with niobium and annealing in Forming Gas • Transparency higher than 80% in the visible range of optical spectrum

  14. Transparent conducting oxide films of group V doped titania prepared by aqueous chemical solution deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elen, Ken [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Strategisch Initiatief Materialen (SIM), SoPPoM Program (Belgium); Capon, Boris [Strategisch Initiatief Materialen (SIM), SoPPoM Programm (Belgium); Coating and Contacting of Nanostructures, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Dobbelaere, Christopher [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Dewulf, Daan [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Peys, Nick [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Detavernier, Christophe [Coating and Contacting of Nanostructures, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Hardy, An [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Van Bael, Marlies K., E-mail: marlies.vanbael@uhasselt.be [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw division IMOMEC, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2014-03-31

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films of titania doped with vanadium (V), niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) are obtained by aqueous Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD). The effect of the dopant on the crystallization and microstructure of the resulting films is examined by means of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. During annealing of the thin films, in-situ characterization of the crystal structure and sheet resistance is carried out. Niobium doped anatase films, obtained after annealing in forming gas, show a resistivity of 0,28 Ohm cm, which is the lowest resistivity reported for a solution deposited anatase-based TCO so far. Here, we demonstrate that aqueous CSD may provide a strategy for scalable TCO production in the future. - Highlights: • Aqueous chemical solution deposition of doped titanium dioxide • Doping delays the phase transition from anatase to rutile • Lowest resistivity after doping with niobium and annealing in Forming Gas • Transparency higher than 80% in the visible range of optical spectrum.

  15. Lie groups and differential equations: symmetries, conservation laws and exact solutions of mathematical models in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheftel', M.B.

    1997-01-01

    The basics of modern group analysis of different equations are presented. The group analysis produces in a natural way the variables, which are most suitable for a problem of question, and also the associated differential-geometric structures, such as pseudo Riemann geometry, connections, Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formalism

  16. Group Work Education in Social Work: A Review of the Literature Reveals Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocque, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the growing concerns in the literature that traditional group work education in social work is not providing the foundational knowledge, skills, evidence-based practice, professional uses of self, and adherence to practice standards necessary for effective group practice. An exploration of the best available evidence on group…

  17. Design and fabrication of test apparatuses for investigation on corrosivity of aqueous molybdate solution for structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Koji; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko

    2010-02-01

    In the solution irradiation method, which is proposed as new 99 Mo production method, the molybdate solution of an irradiation target flows in a capsule. However, the compatibility between the flowing aqueous molybdate solution and the structural materials of capsules and pipes was not clear. Therefore, test apparatuses for the investigation of the compatibility were designed and fabricated. Preliminary tests with the test apparatuses were also carried out, and it was confirmed that planed tests could be carried out. (author)

  18. Group additivity calculations of the thermodynamic properties of unfolded proteins in aqueous solution: a critical comparison of peptide-based and HKF models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakin, A W; Hedwig, G R

    2001-02-15

    A recent paper in this journal [Amend and Helgeson, Biophys. Chem. 84 (2000) 105] presented a new group additivity model to calculate various thermodynamic properties of unfolded proteins in aqueous solution. The parameters given for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state for all the constituent groups of unfolded proteins can be used, in principle, to calculate the partial molar heat capacity, C(o)p.2, and volume, V2(0), at infinite dilution of any polypeptide. Calculations of the values of C(o)p.2 and V2(0) for several polypeptides have been carried out to test the predictive utility of the HKF group additivity model. The results obtained are in very poor agreement with experimental data, and also with results calculated using a peptide-based group additivity model. A critical assessment of these two additivity models is presented.

  19. Preferred Tone of Nutrition Text Messages for Young Adults: Focus Group Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Young adults are a particularly hard to reach group using conventional health promotion practices as they do not see nutrition messages as personally relevant to them. Text messaging (short message service, SMS) offers an innovative approach to reaching young adults to support and promote dietary behavior change. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and test tonal preferences for nutrition text messages among young adults using focus groups. Methods A total of 39 young adults aged 18-30 years residing in Perth, Western Australia participated in four focus groups. Participants briefly discussed their perception of healthy eating and their responses to messages about increasing fruit and vegetables, and reducing “junk food” and alcohol intake. They ranked their preference for 15 nutrition messages across 3 dietary behaviors (fruit and vegetables, junk food, and alcohol) with 5 different message tones (authoritative, empathetic, generation Y, solutions, and substitutions) and identified the messages most likely to persuade young adults to change their diet. A 5-point ranking of the nutrition messages was from the most likely to least likely to persuade (1-5). The focus groups were conducted by a trained facilitator and observer and were recorded. Data driven content analysis was used to explore themes. Tonal preferences and potential motivators were collated and frequencies presented. Results Participants ranked offering substitutes (29%, 11/39) and using empathy (22%, 9/39) as the most persuasive message techniques in improving diets of young adults, with low responses for Generation Y (17%, 7/39), solutions (17%, 7/39), and authoritative (15%, 6/39) tones. Females were more likely to consider substitution messages persuasive (35%, 7/20) compared with males (22%, 4/19). A greater proportion of males compared with females considered authoritative messages persuasive: (22%, 4/19) compared with (7%, 1/20). There is a strong preference for a

  20. Designing and Testing a Mathematics Card Game for Teaching and Learning Elementary Group Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the viability and development of the first edition of the researcher's mathematical card game, Groups, as a learning tool for elementary group theory, a topic in abstract algebra. "Groups" was play-tested by six undergraduate students in late 2016 who provided feedback on "Groups" from both utility-centric…

  1. Systematic Desensitization Of Test Anxiety: A Comparison Of Group And Individual Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scissons, Edward H.; Njaa, Lloyd J.

    1973-01-01

    The results indicate the effectiveness of both individual desensitization and group desensitization in the treatment of high test anxiety. More research is needed in comparing the effectiveness of group desensitization and individual desensitization with intratreatment variables. (Author)

  2. A bandwidth correction to the Allegri-Zhang solution for accelerated random vibration testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benasciutti Denis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, Allegri and Zhang published a study [Int. J. Fatigue. 2008, 30(6:967-977] in which they provided an exact analytical solution to the inverse scaling law for accelerated vibration tests of linear systems submitted to stationary Gaussian excitations By combining finite element analysis with multiaxial spectral methods defined in the frequency-domain, their solution generalised the simple inverse power law model suggested in some standards. The solution adopted the “equivalent von Mises stress” multiaxial criterion combined with the narrow-band damage expression. This work aims to propose a bandwidth correction to the original Allegri-Zhang solution to account for the actual spectral banwidth of the local multiaxial stress. The corrected Allegri-Zhang solution is also extended to another multiaxial spectral method, namely the “Projection-by-Projection” criterion. A numerical example is finally discussed, in which the corrected solution is applied to an L-shaped beam submitted to random accelerations.

  3. Testing the renormalisation group theory of cooperative transitions at the lambda point of helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, J. A.; Li, Q.; Chui, T. C. P.; Marek, D.

    1988-01-01

    The status of high resolution tests of the renormalization group theory of cooperative phase transitions performed near the lambda point of helium is described. The prospects for performing improved tests in space are discussed.

  4. Testing device for pipeline groups and control method for testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Shinji; Kajiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Tsuchida, Kenji; Tachibana, Yukio; Shigehiro, Katsuya; Mahara, Yoichi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a testing device main body disposed to a rail, a movable mechanism positioning from a reference point, a circumferential direction scanning mechanism, an axial direction scanning mechanism, a posture control mechanism, and a testing probe. Upon testing of pipelines, the detection device main body and auxiliary members are moved from a reference point previously set on a rail for numerical control toward pipelines to be tested in a state where the axial direction scanning mechanism and the testing probe are suspended in the axial direction. The testing is conducted by controlling the position of the testing probe in the axial direction of the pipeline by means of the axial direction scanning mechanism, and scanning the testing probe to the outer circumference of the pipeline along the circumferential track by way of the circumferential direction scanning mechanism. The device can be extremely reduced in the thickness, and can be moved with no interference with pipelines and other obstacles by remote operation even under such undesired condition as the pipelines being crowded, so that non-destructive testing can be conducted accurately. (N.H.)

  5. Design and feasibility testing of a novel group intervention for young women who binge drink in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Linda; Crombie, Iain K; Swanson, Vivien; Dimova, Elena D; Melson, Ambrose J; Fraser, Tracey M; Barbour, Rosaline; Rice, Peter M; Allan, Sheila

    2018-01-01

    Young women frequently drink alcohol in groups and binge drinking within these natural drinking groups is common. This study describes the design of a theoretically and empirically based group intervention to reduce binge drinking among young women. It also evaluates their engagement with the intervention and the acceptability of the study methods. Friendship groups of women aged 18-35 years, who had two or more episodes of binge drinking (>6 UK units on one occasion; 48g of alcohol) in the previous 30 days, were recruited from the community. A face-to-face group intervention, based on the Health Action Process Approach, was delivered over three sessions. Components of the intervention were woven around fun activities, such as making alcohol free cocktails. Women were followed up four months after the intervention was delivered. The target of 24 groups (comprising 97 women) was recruited. The common pattern of drinking was infrequent, heavy drinking (mean consumption on the heaviest drinking day was UK 18.1 units). Process evaluation revealed that the intervention was delivered with high fidelity and acceptability of the study methods was high. The women engaged positively with intervention components and made group decisions about cutting down. Twenty two groups set goals to reduce their drinking, and these were translated into action plans. Retention of individuals at follow up was 87%. This study successfully recruited groups of young women whose patterns of drinking place them at high risk of acute harm. This novel approach to delivering an alcohol intervention has potential to reduce binge drinking among young women. The high levels of engagement with key steps in the behavior change process suggests that the group intervention should be tested in a full randomised controlled trial.

  6. DISCRIMINATIVE ANALYSIS OF TESTS FOR EVALUATING SITUATIONMOTORIC ABILITIES BETWEEN TWO GROUPS OF BASKETBALL PLAYERS SELECTED BY THE TEST OF SOCIOMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla Elezi; Nazim Myrtaj; Florian Miftari

    2011-01-01

    Determining differences between the two groups of basketball players selected with the modified sociometric test (Paranosić and Lazarević) in some tests for assessing situation-motor skills, was the aim of this work. The test sample was consisted of 20 basketball players who had most positive points and 20 basketball players who had most negative points, in total- 40 players. T-test was applied to determine whether there are differences between the two groups of basketball players who had bee...

  7. Series expansion solution of the Wegner-Houghton renormalisation group equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaritis, A.; Odor, G.; Patkos, A.

    1987-11-01

    The momentum independent projection of the Wegner-Houghton renormalisation group equation is solved with power series expansion. Convergence rate is analyzed for the n-vector model. Further evidence is presented for the first order nature of the chiral symmetry restoration at finite temperature in QCD with 3 light flavors. (author) 16 refs

  8. An approximate solution of the two-group critical problem for reflected slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Y.; Garcia, R.D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new approximation is developed to solve two group slab problems involving two media where one of the media is infinite. The method consists in combining the P sub(L) approximation with invariance principles. Several numerical results are reported for the critical slab problem [pt

  9. Three-dimensional eddy current solution of a polyphase machine test model (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahner, Uwe; Belmans, Ronnie; Ostovic, Vlado

    1994-05-01

    This abstract describes a three-dimensional (3D) finite element solution of a test model that has been reported in the literature. The model is a basis for calculating the current redistribution effects in the end windings of turbogenerators. The aim of the study is to see whether the analytical results of the test model can be found using a general purpose finite element package, thus indicating that the finite element model is accurate enough to treat real end winding problems. The real end winding problems cannot be solved analytically, as the geometry is far too complicated. The model consists of a polyphase coil set, containing 44 individual coils. This set generates a two pole mmf distribution on a cylindrical surface. The rotating field causes eddy currents to flow in the inner massive and conducting rotor. In the analytical solution a perfect sinusoidal mmf distribution is put forward. The finite element model contains 85824 tetrahedra and 16451 nodes. A complex single scalar potential representation is used in the nonconducting parts. The computation time required was 3 h and 42 min. The flux plots show that the field distribution is acceptable. Furthermore, the induced currents are calculated and compared with the values found from the analytical solution. The distribution of the eddy currents is very close to the distribution of the analytical solution. The most important results are the losses, both local and global. The value of the overall losses is less than 2% away from those of the analytical solution. Also the local distribution of the losses is at any given point less than 7% away from the analytical solution. The deviations of the results are acceptable and are partially due to the fact that the sinusoidal mmf distribution was not modeled perfectly in the finite element method.

  10. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe [Departamento de Química, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo [Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Km 15.5, carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, Las Agujas, C.P. 45020 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km 107 carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22830 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Gomez-Salazar, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.gomez@cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Cr{sup +} ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. {sup 13}C, {sup 29}Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level.

  11. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain; Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe; Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel; Gomez-Salazar, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH 3 COO) 2 Cr + ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. 13 C, 29 Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level

  12. Grafted wood pulp containing quaternary ammonium group and its application in the removal of different anions from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokker, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    Network wood pulp based on acrylonitrile has been chemically modified through different reactions to obtain group capable of anion exchange. Graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile onto wood pulp was carried out by using gamma-radiation 60 Co. Factors affecting the grafting process e.g radiation dose and monomer concentration were investigated.The chemical modification of cyano groups were carried out by reaction with ethanol amine producing oxazoline group followed by quaternization of tertiary amine by reaction with benzyl chloride producing quaternary ammonium salt. The grafted and modified wood pulp were characterized by FTIR, SEM and TGA.Qualitative experiments of adsorption were conducted to evaluate the modified wood pulp on fixing sulfate, phosphate,nitrate and dichromate from aqueous solution using batch extractions. Based on the results obtained, it may be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically wood pulp containing cyano groups by different routes for its usage as anion exchanger

  13. 77 FR 17457 - Work Group on Alternative Test Methods for Commercial Measuring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Work Group on Alternative... Work Group (WG) to examine alternative methods for testing the accuracy of commercial measuring devices... participates to promote uniformity among the states in laws, regulations, methods, and testing equipment that...

  14. Group Systematic Desensitization Versus Covert Positive Reinforcement in the Reduction of Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Marion P.; Galassi, John P.

    1974-01-01

    The study compared modified versions of systematic desensitization and covert positive reinforcement to a no-treatment control condition in the reduction of test anxiety. On an anagrams performance test, the covert reinforcement and control groups were superior to the desensitization group. (Author)

  15. Estimation of the common cause failure probabilities on the component group with mixed testing scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Meejeong; Kang, Dae Il

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper presents a method to estimate the common cause failure probabilities on the common cause component group with mixed testing schemes. ► The CCF probabilities are dependent on the testing schemes such as staggered testing or non-staggered testing. ► There are many CCCGs with specific mixed testing schemes in real plant operation. ► Therefore, a general formula which is applicable to both alternate periodic testing scheme and train level mixed testing scheme was derived. - Abstract: This paper presents a method to estimate the common cause failure (CCF) probabilities on the common cause component group (CCCG) with mixed testing schemes such as the train level mixed testing scheme or the alternate periodic testing scheme. In the train level mixed testing scheme, the components are tested in a non-staggered way within the same train, but the components are tested in a staggered way between the trains. The alternate periodic testing scheme indicates that all components in the same CCCG are tested in a non-staggered way during the planned maintenance period, but they are tested in a staggered way during normal plant operation. Since the CCF probabilities are dependent on the testing schemes such as staggered testing or non-staggered testing, CCF estimators have two kinds of formulas in accordance with the testing schemes. Thus, there are general formulas to estimate the CCF probability on the staggered testing scheme and non-staggered testing scheme. However, in real plant operation, there are many CCCGs with specific mixed testing schemes. Recently, Barros () and Kang () proposed a CCF factor estimation method to reflect the alternate periodic testing scheme and the train level mixed testing scheme. In this paper, a general formula which is applicable to both the alternate periodic testing scheme and the train level mixed testing scheme was derived.

  16. Two-energy group solution of the diffusion equation by the multidimensional nodal polynomial expansion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, R.D.M.; Vellozo, S.O.; Botelho, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The EPON computer code based in a Nodal Polynomial Expansion Method, wrote in Fortran IV, for steady-state, square geometry, one-dimensional or two-dimensional geometry and for one or two-energy group is presented. The neutron and power flux distributions for nuclear power plants were calculated, comparing with codes that use similar or different methodologies. The availability, economy and speed of the methodology is demonstrated. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Numerical solution of multi groups point kinetic equations by simulink toolbox of Matlab software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadad, K.; Mohamadi, A.; Sabet, H.; Ayobian, N.; Khani, M.

    2004-01-01

    The simulink toolbox of Matlab Software was employed to solve the point kinetics equation with six group delayed neutrons. The method of Adams-Bash ford showed a good convergence in solving the system of simultaneous equations and the obtained results showed good agreements with other numerical schemes. The flexibility of the package in changing the system parameters and the user friendly interface makes this approach a reliable educational package in revealing the affects of reactivity changes on power incursions

  18. A confining and asymptotically free solution for the renormalization group invariant charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellett, B.H.

    1978-01-01

    The central role of the invariant charge in applications of the renormalization group to quantum chromodynamics is discussed. The general structure of the invariant charge is examined, and it is shown to be a non-singular function of q 2 for all finite non-zero q 2 . At q 2 = 0 and q 2 = +or- infinity shows that QCD is asymptotically free. Some applications of these general results are discussed

  19. Pilot-scale decontamination solution test results HGTP-93-0702-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Allen, R.P.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Fetrow, L.K.

    1993-05-01

    Decontamination solution testing constitutes a task of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The HGTP provides technical support to the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Grout Disposal Program. Cementitious grout has been identified as the waste form for low-level radioactive waste. Grout processing equipment, including mixers, pumps, and piping, will require periodic maintenance. Decontamination of components is needed to reduce radiation dose to maintenance workers. The purpose of this work was to develop and test methods for decontaminating grout processing equipment. The proposed method of decontamination is to use a mild chemical solution, such as a 6 N citric acid to dissolve the grout. The method should effectively remove grout without causing degradation of grout processing equipment

  20. Expert and Advocacy Group Consensus Findings on the Horizon of Public Health Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Modell

    2016-01-01

    buy-in of Tier 1 programs. Groups differed on funding strategies, with alternative options such as large-scale federal funding and smaller scale, incremental funding solutions proposed. Piggybacking on existing federal breast and colorectal cancer control programs was suggested. Public health departments need to assess what information is now being collected by their state cancer registries. The groups advised that information on cascade screening of relatives be included in toolkits for use by states. Participants stressed incorporation of family history into health department breast cancer screening programs, and clinical HBOC data into state surveillance systems. The carrying out of universal LS screening of tumors in those with colorectal cancer was reviewed. Expansion of universal screening to include endometrial tumors was discussed, as was the application of guidelines recommending cholesterol screening of children 9–11 years old. States more advanced in terms of Tier 1 testing could serve as models and partners with other states launching screening and surveillance programs. A multidisciplinary team of screening program champions was suggested as a means of raising awareness among the consumer and health care communities. Participants offered multiple recommendations regarding use of electronic health records, including flagging of at-risk family members and utilization of state-level health information exchanges. The paper contains an update of policy developments and happenings for all three Tier 1 conditions, as well as identified gaps. Conclusions: Implementation of cascade screening of family members for HBOC and FH, and universal screening for LS in CRC tumors has reached a point of readiness within the U.S., with creative solutions at hand. Facilitating factors such as screening coverage through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and state health information exchanges can be tapped. Collaboration is needed between public health

  1. Comparing Treatment and Control Groups on Multiple Outcomes: Robust Procedures for Testing a Directional Alternative Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M.; Deering, Kathleen N.; Fouladi, Rachel T.; Manivong, Phongsack

    2009-01-01

    This study considers the problem of testing the difference between treatment and control groups on m [greater than or equal to] 2 measures when it is assumed a priori that the treatment group will perform better than the control group on all measures. Two procedures are investigated that do not rest on the assumptions of covariance homogeneity or…

  2. Development of Temperature Control Solutions for Non-Instrumented Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests (NINAAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Pardy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification tests (NINAAT are a novel paradigm in portable molecular diagnostics. They offer the high detection accuracy characteristic of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT in a self-contained device, without the need for any external instrumentation. These Point-of-Care tests typically employ a Lab-on-a-Chip for liquid handling functionality, and perform isothermal nucleic acid amplification protocols that require low power but high accuracy temperature control in a single well-defined temperature range. We propose temperature control solutions based on commercially available heating elements capable of meeting these challenges, as well as demonstrate the process by which such elements can be fitted to a NINAAT system. Self-regulated and thermostat-controlled resistive heating elements were evaluated through experimental characterization as well as thermal analysis using the finite element method (FEM. We demonstrate that the proposed solutions can support various NAAT protocols, as well as demonstrate an optimal solution for the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP protocol. Furthermore, we present an Arduino-compatible open-source thermostat developed for NINAAT applications.

  3. A SAS macro for testing differences among three or more independent groups using Kruskal-Wallis and Nemenyi tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuewei; Chen, Weihong

    2012-02-01

    As a nonparametric method, the Kruskal-Wallis test is widely used to compare three or more independent groups when an ordinal or interval level of data is available, especially when the assumptions of analysis of variance (ANOVA) are not met. If the Kruskal-Wallis statistic is statistically significant, Nemenyi test is an alternative method for further pairwise multiple comparisons to locate the source of significance. Unfortunately, most popular statistical packages do not integrate the Nemenyi test, which is not easy to be calculated by hand. We described the theory and applications of the Kruskal-Wallis and Nemenyi tests, and presented a flexible SAS macro to implement the two tests. The SAS macro was demonstrated by two examples from our cohort study in occupational epidemiology. It provides a useful tool for SAS users to test the differences among three or more independent groups using a nonparametric method.

  4. Asymptotic formulae for solutions of the two-group integral neutron-transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duracz, T.

    1976-01-01

    The steady-state, two-group integral neutron-transport equation is considered for two cases. First, for plane geometry, formulae for the asymptotic flux are obtained, under assumptions of homogeneous medium with isotropic scattering, extended to infinity (whole space and half-space), with sources vanishing at infinity as 0(esup(-IXI)). Next, for spherical geometry, the Milne problem is considered and formulae for the asymptotic flux are obtained. These formulae have the form of asymptotic expansions for small and large radii of the black sphere. (orig.) [de

  5. Classic tests of General Relativity described by brane-based spherically symmetric solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuzinatto, R.R. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Pompeia, P.J. [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto de Fomento e Coordenacao Industrial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); De Montigny, M. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Campus Saint-Jean, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Khanna, F.C. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of Victoria, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO box 1700, Victoria, BC (Canada); Silva, J.M.H. da [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We discuss a way to obtain information about higher dimensions from observations by studying a brane-based spherically symmetric solution. The three classic tests of General Relativity are analyzed in detail: the perihelion shift of the planet Mercury, the deflection of light by the Sun, and the gravitational redshift of atomic spectral lines. The braneworld version of these tests exhibits an additional parameter b related to the fifth-coordinate. This constant b can be constrained by comparison with observational data for massive and massless particles. (orig.)

  6. 78 FR 34423 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Airman Testing Standards and Training Working Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... the relevance, reliability, validity, and effectiveness of the FAA's aeronautical testing and training... Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Airman Testing Standards and Training Working Group (ATSTWG) AGENCY... Certification Standards (ACS) documents developed by the Airman Testing Standards and Training WG for the...

  7. Learning to create new solutions together: A focus group study exploring interprofessional innovation in midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate students can learn how to be innovative in partnerships with health care institutions and private enterprises. This study portrays how a three phase innovation model was applied in an interprofessional health education context at a Danish university college. The aim of the study was to explore midwifery, nutrition and health as well physiotherapy students' perceptions of participating in a real-life innovation project situated in antenatal care. A total of eighteen students participated in five focus group interviews. Thematic analysis was used to interpret data findings. Data analysis revealed three themes: 'Navigating in uncertainty', 'Being part of a team' and 'Impact of project learning'. Students found project learning to be the most relevant with regards to their clinical practice. Furthermore, study findings suggest that innovation is promoted by teamwork, interprofessional participation, mentor support and external partnerships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Asymptotic behavior of solutions of diffusion-like partial differential equations invariant to a family of affine groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.

    1990-07-01

    This report deals with the asymptotic behavior of certain solutions of partial differential equations in one dependent and two independent variables (call them c, z, and t, respectively). The partial differential equations are invariant to one-parameter families of one-parameter affine groups of the form: c' = λ α c, t' = λ β t, z' = λz, where λ is the group parameter that labels the individual transformations and α and β are parameters that label groups of the family. The parameters α and β are connected by a linear relation, Mα + Nβ = L, where M, N, and L are numbers determined by the structure of the partial differential equation. It is shown that when L/M and N/M are L/M t -N/M for large z or small t. Some practical applications of this result are discussed. 8 refs

  9. Branched multifunctional polyether polyketals: variation of ketal group structure enables unprecedented control over polymer degradation in solution and within cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoi, Rajesh A; Narayanannair, Jayaprakash K; Hamilton, Jasmine L; Lai, Benjamin F L; Horte, Sonja; Kainthan, Rajesh K; Varghese, Jos P; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2012-09-12

    Multifunctional biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials incorporating specific degradable linkages that respond to various stimuli and with defined degradation profiles are critical to the advancement of targeted nanomedicine. Herein we report, for the first time, a new class of multifunctional dendritic polyether polyketals containing different ketal linkages in their backbone that exhibit unprecedented control over degradation in solution and within the cells. High-molecular-weight and highly compact poly(ketal hydroxyethers) (PKHEs) were synthesized from newly designed α-epoxy-ω-hydroxyl-functionalized AB(2)-type ketal monomers carrying structurally different ketal groups (both cyclic and acyclic) with good control over polymer properties by anionic ring-opening multibranching polymerization. Polymer functionalization with multiple azide and amine groups was achieved without degradation of the ketal group. The polymer degradation was controlled primarily by the differences in the structure and torsional strain of the substituted ketal groups in the main chain, while for polymers with linear (acyclic) ketal groups, the hydrophobicity of the polymer may play an additional role. This was supported by the log P values of the monomers and the hydrophobicity of the polymers determined by fluorescence spectroscopy using pyrene as the probe. A range of hydrolysis half-lives of the polymers at mild acidic pH values was achieved, from a few minutes to a few hundred days, directly correlating with the differences in ketal group structures. Confocal microscopy analyses demonstrated similar degradation profiles for PKHEs within live cells, as seen in solution and the delivery of fluorescent marker to the cytosol. The cell viability measured by MTS assay and blood compatibility determined by complement activation, platelet activation, and coagulation assays demonstrate that PKHEs and their degradation products are highly biocompatible. Taken together, these data

  10. The “Common Solutions" Strategy of the Experiment Support group at CERN for the LHC Experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    After two years of LHC data taking, processing and analysis and with numerous changes in computing technology, a number of aspects of the experiments’ computing as well as WLCG deployment and operations need to evolve. As part of the activities of the Experiment Support group in CERN’s IT department, and reinforced by effort from the EGI-InSPIRE project, we present work aimed at common solutions across all LHC experiments. Such solutions allow us not only to optimize development manpower but also offer lower long-term maintenance and support costs. The main areas cover Distributed Data Management, Data Analysis, Monitoring and the LCG Persistency Framework. Specific tools have been developed including the HammerCloud framework, automated services for data placement, data cleaning and data integrity (such as the data popularity service for CMS, the common Victor cleaning agent for ATLAS and CMS and tools for catalogue/storage consistency), the Dashboard Monitoring framework (job monitoring, data management...

  11. Theoretical predictions of hydrolysis and complex formation of group-4 elements Zr, Hf and Rf in HF and HCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershina, V.; Trubert, D.; Le Naour, C.; Kratz, J.V.

    2002-01-01

    Fully relativistic molecular density-functional calculations of the electronic structures of hydrated, hydrolyzed and fluoride/chloride complexes have been performed for group-4 elements Zr, Hf, and element 104, Rf. Using the electronic density distribution data, relative values of the free energy change for hydrolysis and complex formation reactions were defined. The results show the following trend for the first hydrolysis step of the cationic species: Zr>Hf>Rf in agreement with experiments. For the complex formation in HF solutions, the trend to a decrease from Zr to Hf is continued with Rf, provided no hydrolysis takes place. At pH>0, further fluorination of hydrolyzed species or fluoro-complexes has an inversed trend in the group Rf≥Zr>Hf, with the difference between the elements being very small. For the complex formation in HCl solutions, the trend is continued with Rf, so that Zr>Hf>Rf independently of pH. A decisive energetic factor in hydrolysis or complex formation processes proved to be a predominant electrostatic metal-ligand interaction. Trends in the K d (distribution coefficient) values for the group-4 elements are expected to follow those of the complex formation

  12. Management and storage of spent nuclear fuel at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work continues on appropriate solutions. The future of nuclear research, with its many benefits to mankind, is in jeopardy in some countries, especially countries without nuclear power programmes, because effective solutions for extended interim storage and final disposition of spent research reactor fuels are not yet available. An advisory Group meeting was convened in Vienna to consider a Database on the Management and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Research and Test Reactors. Sixteen experts from sixteen different countries participated in the Advisory Group meeting and presented country reports, which together represent an overview of the technologies used in spent fuel management and storage at research and test reactors world-wide. The sixteen country reports together with the database summary are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. The generation, validation and testing of a coupled 219-group neutron 36-group gamma ray AMPX-II library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, G.C.; Siciliano, F.; Lioi, A.

    1987-01-01

    The main characteristics of a P 3 coupled 219-group neutron 36-group gamma-ray library in the AMPX-II Master Interface Format obtained processing ENDF/B-IV data by means of various AMPX-II System modules are presented in this note both for the more reprocessing aspects and features of the generated component files-neutrons, photon and secondary gamma-ray production cross sections. As far as the neutron data are concerned there is the avaibility of 186 data sets regarding most significant fission products. Results of the additional validation of the neutron data pertaining to eighteen benchmark experiments are also given. Some calculational tests on both neutron and coupled data emphasize the important role of the secondary gamma-ray data in nuclear criticality safety calculations

  14. Glass-surface area to solution-volume ratio and its implications to accelerated leach testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; McVay, G.L.; Riddle, B.L.

    1982-10-01

    The value of glass surface area to solution volume ratio (SA/V) can strongly influence the leaching rate of PNL 76-68 glass. The leaching rate is largely governed by silicon solubility constraints. Silicic acid in solution reduced the elemental release of all glass components. No components are leached to depths greater than that of silicon. The presence of the reaction layer had no measurable effect on the rate of leaching. Accelerated leach testing is possible since PNL 76-68 glass leaching is solubility-controlled (except at very low SA/V values). A series of glasses leached with SA/V x time = constant will yield identical elemental release

  15. Evaluation of SCC test methods for Inconel 600 in low temperature aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.C.; Roberge, R.; Bandy, R.

    1982-04-01

    In late 1981, widespread leakage was encountered in Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing at the Three Mile Island Unit 1 nuclear power plant. The phenomenon was identified as low-temperature intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) initiated from the inner surfaces of the tubes exposed to the primary coolant. A testing program was initiated to examine the material and environmental factors relevant to these failures, which were found to be associated with sensitization of the material and contamination of the coolant by air and sodium thiosulfate. The test solutions contained 1.3% boric acid with various additions of sulfur compounds and lithium hydroxide. Constant extension rate testing was used as the primary tool to examine environmental effects such as the inhibition of cracking by lithium hydroxide. Important effects of crack-initiation frequency on the specimen potential (and therefore crack velocity) are demonstrated

  16. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  17. Selection of dissolution process for spent fuels and preparation of corrosion test solution simulated to dissolver (contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Terakado, Shogo; Koya, Toshio; Hamada, Shozo; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2001-03-01

    In order to evaluate the reliability of reprocessing equipment materials used in the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, we have proceeded a mock-up test and laboratory tests for getting corrosion parameters. In a dissolver made of zirconium, the simulation of test solutions to the practical solution which includes the high concentration of radioactive elements such as FP and TRU is one of the important issues with respect to the life prediction. On this experiment, the dissolution process of spent fuels and the preparation of test solution for evaluating the corrosion resistance of dissolver materials were selected. These processes were tested in the No.3 cell of WASTEF. The test solution for corrosion tests was prepared by adjusting the uranium and nitric acid concentrations. (author)

  18. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  19. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : surveys, interviews, and focus groups test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the test plan for developing, conducting, and analyzing surveys, interviews, and focus groups for evaluating the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Prog...

  20. Relationships between the group-theoretic and soliton-theoretic techniques for generating stationary axisymmetric gravitational solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosgrove, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    We investigate the precise interrelationships between several recently developed solution-generating techniques capable of generating asymptotically flat gravitational solutions with arbitrary multipole parameters. The transformations we study in detail here are the Lie groups Q and Q of Cosgrove, the Hoenselaers--Kinnersley--Xanthopoulos (HKX) transformations and their SL(2) tensor generalizations, the Neugebauer--Kramer discrete mapping, the Neugebauer Baecklund transformations I 1 and I 2 , the Harrison Baecklund transformation, and the Belinsky--Zakharov (BZ) one- and two-soliton transformations. Two particular results, among many reported here, are that the BZ soliton transformations are essentially equivalent to Harrison transformations and that the generalized HKX transformation may be deduced as a confluent double soliton transformation. Explicit algebraic expressions are given for the transforms of the Kinnersley--Chitre generating functions under all of the above transformations. In less detail, we also study the Kinnersley--Chitre β transformations, the non-null HKX transformations, and the Hilbert problems proposed independently by Belinsky and Zakharov, and Hauser and Ernst. In conclusion, we describe the nature of the exact solutions constructible in a finite number of steps with the available methods

  1. 412th Test Engineering Group Vision for Future Knowledge Management (KM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-17

    Presentation 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 May 2018 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 412th Test Engineering Group Vision for Future Knowledge Management (KM... Engineering Group 307 E. Popson Ave Edwards AFB, CA 93523 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 412TW-PA...centers for the TENG test customers to allow the data to be readily available within minutes of a flight, for the data to be organized so that the engineer

  2. On an analytical representation of the solution of the one-dimensional transport equation for a multi-group model in planar geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Julio C.L.; Vilhena, Marco T.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.br, E-mail: mtmbvilhena@gmail.com, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada; Dulla, Sandra; Ravetto, Piero, E-mail: sandra.dulla@polito.it, E-mail: piero.ravetto@polito.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Torino, Piemonte (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    In this work we generalize the solution of the one-dimensional neutron transport equation to a multi- group approach in planar geometry. The basic idea of this work consists in consider the hierarchical construction of a solution for a generic number G of energy groups, starting from a mono-energetic solution. The hierarchical method follows the reasoning of the decomposition method. More specifically, the additional terms from adding energy groups is incorporated into the recursive scheme as source terms. This procedure leads to an analytical representation for the solution with G energy groups. The recursion depth is related to the accuracy of the solution, that may be evaluated after each recursion step. The authors present a heuristic analysis of stability for the results. Numerical simulations for a specific example with four energy groups and a localized pulsed source. (author)

  3. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdenes-Pijl, Miranda; Dondorp, Wybo J; Timmermans, Danielle Rm; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2011-07-05

    This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3) and without (n = 1) a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2), and diabetes patients (n = 2). All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment (DNA test or obtaining family history) and also differ from

  4. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Methods Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3 and without (n = 1 a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2, and diabetes patients (n = 2. All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Results Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. Conclusion The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment

  5. Specific wavelength colorimeter. [for measuring given solute concentration in test sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, C. C.; Mcdavid, L. S.; Walsh, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A self contained, specific wavelength, single beam colorimeter is described for direct spectrophotometric measurement of the concentration of a given solute in a test sample. An electrical circuit employing a photoconductive cell converts the optical output into a linear, directly readable meter output. The colorimeter is simple to operate and is adapted for use in zero gravity conditions. In a specific application, the colorimeter is designed to analyze the concentration of iodine in potable water carried aboard a space vehicle such as the 4B stage of Skylab.

  6. Reevaluation of the case, de Hoffman, and Placzek one-group neutron transport benchmark solution in plane geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    In a course on neutron transport theory and also in the analytical neutron transport theory literature, the pioneering work of Case et al. (CdHP) is often referenced. This work was truly a monumental effort in that it treated the fundamental mathematical properties of the one-group neutron Boltzmann equation in detail as well as the numerical evaluation of most of the resulting solutions. Many mathematically and numerically oriented dissertations were based on this classic monograph. In light of the considerable advances made both in numerical methods and computer technology since 1953, when the historic CdHP monograph first appeared, it seems appropriate to reevaluate the numerical benchmark solutions found therein with present-day computational technology. In most transport theory courses, the subject of proper benchmarking of numerical algorithms and transport codes is seldom addressed at any great length. This may be the reason that the benchmarking procedure is so rarely practiced in the nuclear community and when practiced is improperly applied. In this presentation, the development of a new benchmark for the one-group neutron flux in an infinite medium will be detailed with emphasis placed on the educational aspects of the benchmarking activity

  7. DIF Testing with an Empirical-Histogram Approximation of the Latent Density for Each Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    This research introduces, illustrates, and tests a variation of IRT-LR-DIF, called EH-DIF-2, in which the latent density for each group is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters as an empirical histogram (EH). IRT-LR-DIF is used to evaluate the degree to which items have different measurement properties for one group of people versus…

  8. Testing the Neoclassical Migration Model: Overall and Age-Group Specific Results for German Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo; Reinkowski, Janina

    as for age-group specific estimates. Thereby, the impact of labor market signals is tested to be of greatest magnitude for workforce relevant age-groups and especially young cohorts between 18 to 25 and 25 to 30 years. This latter result underlines the prominent role played by labor market conditions...

  9. Attitudes Toward Breast Cancer Genetic Testing in Five Special Population Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J; Muñoz, Edgar; Holden, Alan E; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Smith, Selina A; Wong-Kim, Evaon; Wyatt, Stephen W; Suarez, Lucina

    2015-01-01

    This study examined interest in and attitudes toward genetic testing in 5 different population groups. The survey included African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, and Appalachian women with varying familial histories of breast cancer. A total of 49 women were interviewed in person. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical techniques were used to assess ethnic group differences. Overall, interest in testing was high. All groups endorsed more benefits than risks. There were group differences regarding endorsement of specific benefits and risks: testing to "follow doctor recommendations" (p=0.017), "concern for effects on family" (p=0.044), "distrust of modern medicine" (p=0.036), "cost" (p=0.025), and "concerns about communication of results to others" (p=0.032). There was a significant inverse relationship between interest and genetic testing cost (p<0.050), with the exception of Latinas, who showed the highest level of interest regardless of increasing cost. Cost may be an important barrier to obtaining genetic testing services, and participants would benefit by genetic counseling that incorporates the unique cultural values and beliefs of each group to create an individualized, culturally competent program. Further research about attitudes toward genetic testing is needed among Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Appalachians for whom data are severely lacking. Future study of the different Latina perceptions toward genetic testing are encouraged.

  10. The impact of cognitive testing on the welfare of group housed primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Whitehouse

    Full Text Available Providing cognitive challenges to zoo-housed animals may provide enriching effects and subsequently enhance their welfare. Primates may benefit most from such challenges as they often face complex problems in their natural environment and can be observed to seek problem solving opportunities in captivity. However, the extent to which welfare benefits can be achieved through programmes developed primarily for cognitive research is unknown. We tested the impact of voluntary participation cognitive testing on the welfare of a socially housed group of crested macaques (Macaca nigra at the Macaque Study Centre (Marwell Zoo. First, we compared the rate of self-directed and social behaviours on testing and non-testing days, and between conditions within testing days. Minimal differences in behaviour were found when comparing testing and non-testing days, suggesting that there was no negative impact on welfare as a result of cognitive testing. Lipsmacking behaviours were found to increase and aggressive interaction was found to decrease in the group as a result of testing. Second, social network analysis was used to assess the effect of testing on associations and interactions between individuals. The social networks showed that testing subjects increased their association with others during testing days. One interpretation of this finding could be that providing socially housed primates with an opportunity for individuals to separate from the group for short periods could help mimic natural patterns of sub-group formation and reunion in captivity. The findings suggest, therefore, that the welfare of captive primates can be improved through the use of cognitive testing in zoo environments.

  11. Results of the 2015 Relationship Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Susanne Lunøe; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo Thisted

    2015-01-01

    Annually, members of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics are invited to participate in a Relationship Testing Workshop. In 2015, 64 laboratories participated. Here, we present the results from the 2015 workshop, which included relationship testing...

  12. Evaluation of MIMIC-Model Methods for DIF Testing with Comparison to Two-Group Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test or questionnaire has different measurement properties for 1 group of people versus another, irrespective of mean differences on the construct. This study focuses on the use of multiple-indicator multiple-cause (MIMIC) structural equation models for DIF testing, parameterized as item…

  13. Comparative Model Tests of SDP and CFA Pile Groups in Non-Cohesive Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasiński, Adam; Kusio, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    The research topic relates to the subject of deep foundations supported on continuous flight auger (CFA) piles and screw displacement piles (SDP). The authors have decided to conduct model tests of foundations supported on the group of piles mentioned above and also the tests of the same piles working as a single. The tests are ongoing in Geotechnical Laboratory of Gdaňsk University of Technology. The description of test procedure, interpretation and analysis of the preliminary testing series results are presented in the paper.

  14. Comparative Model Tests of SDP and CFA Pile Groups in Non-Cohesive Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasiński Adam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The research topic relates to the subject of deep foundations supported on continuous flight auger (CFA piles and screw displacement piles (SDP. The authors have decided to conduct model tests of foundations supported on the group of piles mentioned above and also the tests of the same piles working as a single. The tests are ongoing in Geotechnical Laboratory of Gdaňsk University of Technology. The description of test procedure, interpretation and analysis of the preliminary testing series results are presented in the paper.

  15. A Generalized Kruskal-Wallis Test Incorporating Group Uncertainty with Application to Genetic Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Acar, Elif F.; Sun, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by genetic association studies of SNPs with genotype uncertainty, we propose a generalization of the Kruskal-Wallis test that incorporates group uncertainty when comparing k samples. The extended test statistic is based on probability-weighted rank-sums and follows an asymptotic chi-square distribution with k-1 degrees of freedom under the null hypothesis. Simulation studies confirm the validity and robustness of the proposed test in finite samples. Application to a genome-wide asso...

  16. Testing the biocompatibility of a glutathione-containing intra-ocular irrigation solution by using an isolated perfused bovine retina organ culture model - an alternative to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januschowski, Kai; Zhour, Ahmad; Lee, Albert; Maddani, Ramin; Mueller, Sebastien; Spitzer, Martin S; Schnichels, Sven; Schultheiss, Maximilian; Doycheva, Deshka; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Szurman, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The effects of a glutathione-containing intra-ocular irrigation solution, BSS Plus©, on retinal function and on the survival of ganglion cells in whole-mount retinal explants were studied. Evidence is provided that the perfused ex vivo bovine retina can serve as an alternative to in vivo animal testing. Isolated bovine retinas were prepared and perfused with an oxygen-saturated standard irrigation solution, and an electroretinogram was recorded to assess retinal function. After stable b-waves were detected, the isolated retinas were perfused with BSS Plus for 45 minutes. To investigate the effects of BSS Plus on photoreceptor function, 1mM aspartate was added to the irrigation solution in order to obtain a-waves, and the ERG trace was monitored for 75 minutes. For histological analysis, isolated whole retinal mounts were stored for 24 hours at 4°C, in the dark. The percentages of cell death in the retinal ganglion cell layer and in the outer and inner nuclear layers were estimated by using an ethidium homodimer-1 stain and the TUNEL assay. General swelling of the retina was examined with high-resolution optical coherence tomography. During perfusion with BSS Plus, no significant changes in a-wave and b-wave amplitudes were recorded. Retinas stored for 24 hours in BSS Plus showed a statistically significant smaller percentage (52.6%, standard deviation [SD] = 16.1%) of cell death in the retinal ganglion cell layer compared to the control group (69.6%, SD = 3.9, p = 0.0031). BSS Plus did not seem to affect short-term retinal function, and had a beneficial effect on the survival of retinal ganglion cells. This method for analysing the isolated perfused retina represents a valuable alternative for testing substances for their retinal biocompatibility and toxicity. 2012 FRAME.

  17. A General Semi-Analytical Solution for Three Types of Well Tests in Confined Aquifers with a Partially Penetrating Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw-Yang Yang Hund-Der Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This note develops a general mathematical model for describing the transient hydraulic head response for constant-head test, constant-flux test, and slug test in a radial confined aquifer system with a partially penetrating well. The Laplace-domain solution for the model is derived by applying the Laplace transform with respect to time and finite Fourier cosine transform with respect to the z-direction. This new solution has been shown to reduce to the constant-head test when discounting the wellbore storage and maintaining a constant well water level. This solution can also be reduced to the constant-flux test solution when discounting the wellbore storage and keeping a constant pumping rate in the well. Moreover, the solution becomes the slug test solution when there is no pumping in the well. This general solution can be used to develop a single computer code to estimate aquifer parameters if coupled with an optimization algorithm or to assess the effect of well partial penetration on hydraulic head distribution for three types of aquifer tests.

  18. Patch testing in children from 2005 to 2012: results from the North American contact dermatitis group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zug, Kathryn A; Pham, Anh Khoa; Belsito, Donald V; DeKoven, Joel G; DeLeo, Vincent A; Fowler, Joseph F; Fransway, Anthony F; Maibach, Howard I; Marks, James G; Mathias, C G Toby; Pratt, Melanie D; Sasseville, Denis; Storrs, Frances J; Taylor, James S; Warshaw, Erin M; Zirwas, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is common in children. Epicutaneous patch testing is an important tool for identifying responsible allergens. The objective of this study was to provide the patch test results from children (aged ≤18 years) examined by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group from 2005 to 2012. This is a retrospective analysis of children patch-tested with the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 65- or 70-allergen series. Frequencies and counts were compared with previously published data (2001-2004) using χ statistics. A total of 883 children were tested during the study period. A percentage of 62.3% had ≥1 positive patch test and 56.7% had ≥1 relevant positive patch test. Frequencies of positive patch test and relevant positive patch test reaction were highest with nickel sulfate (28.1/25.6), cobalt chloride (12.3/9.1), neomycin sulfate (7.1/6.6), balsam of Peru (5.7/5.5), and lanolin alcohol 50% petrolatum vehicle (5.5/5.1). The ≥1 positive patch test and ≥1 relevant positive patch test in the children did not differ significantly from adults (≥19 years) or from previously tested children (2001-2004). The percentage of clinically relevant positive patch tests for 27 allergens differed significantly between the children and adults. A total of 23.6% of children had a relevant positive reaction to at least 1 supplemental allergen. Differences in positive patch test and relevant positive patch test frequencies between children and adults as well as test periods confirm the importance of reporting periodic updates of patch testing in children to enhance clinicians' vigilance to clinically important allergens.

  19. Hot test of a TALSPEAK procedure for separation of actinides and lanthanides using recirculating DTPA-lactic acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, G.; Svantesson, I.; Wingefors, S.; Liljenzin, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported from a hot test of a TALSPEAK type process for separation of higher actinides (Am, Cm) from lanthanides. Actinides and lanthanides are extracted by 1 M HDEHP and separated by selective strip of the actinides, using a mixture of DTPA and lactic acid (reversed TALSPEAK process). In order to minimize the generation of secondary waste, a procedure using recirculating DTPA-Lactic acid solution has been developed. A separation factor between Am and Eu of 132 was achieved. In regard to separations of Am and Cm from commercial HLLW (high level liquid wastes), the factor corresponds to 1.5% of the lanthanide group remaining with the actinides. The loss of Am was about 0.2%. 9 figures, 3 tables

  20. Accuracy, Precision, Ease-Of-Use, and Cost of Methods to Test Ebola-Relevant Chlorine Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Wells

    Full Text Available To prevent transmission in Ebola Virus Disease (EVD outbreaks, it is recommended to disinfect living things (hands and people with 0.05% chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies with 0.5% chlorine solution. In the current West African EVD outbreak, these solutions (manufactured from calcium hypochlorite (HTH, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC, and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl have been widely used in both Ebola Treatment Unit and community settings. To ensure solution quality, testing is necessary, however test method appropriateness for these Ebola-relevant concentrations has not previously been evaluated. We identified fourteen commercially-available methods to test Ebola-relevant chlorine solution concentrations, including two titration methods, four DPD dilution methods, and six test strips. We assessed these methods by: 1 determining accuracy and precision by measuring in quintuplicate five different 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions manufactured from NaDCC, HTH, and NaOCl; 2 conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and, 3 determining costs. Accuracy was greatest in titration methods (reference-12.4% error compared to reference method, then DPD dilution methods (2.4-19% error, then test strips (5.2-48% error; precision followed this same trend. Two methods had an accuracy of <10% error across all five chlorine solutions with good precision: Hach digital titration for 0.05% and 0.5% solutions (recommended for contexts with trained personnel and financial resources, and Serim test strips for 0.05% solutions (recommended for contexts where rapid, inexpensive, and low-training burden testing is needed. Measurement error from test methods not including pH adjustment varied significantly across the five chlorine solutions, which had pH values 5-11. Volunteers found test strip easiest and titration hardest; costs per 100 tests were $14-37 for test strips and $33-609 for titration

  1. Clinical patch test data evaluated by multivariate analysis. Danish Contact Dermatitis Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, J; Menné, T; Tanghøj, P

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of individual explanatory factors, such as sex, age, atopy, test time and presence of diseased skin, on clinical patch test results, by application of multivariate statistical analysis. The study population was 2166 consecutive patients...... patch tested with the standard series of the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) by members of the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group (DCDG) over a period of 6 months. For the 8 test allergens most often found positive (nickel, fragrance-mix, cobalt, chromate, balsam of Peru, carba......-mix, colophony, and formaldehyde), one or more individual factors were of significance for the risk of being sensitized, except for chromate and formaldehyde. It is concluded that patch test results can be compared only after stratification of the material or by multivariate analysis....

  2. Examination of changes in pathology tests ordered by Diagnosis-Related Group (DRGs) following CPOE introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Elia; Georgiou, Andrew; Toouli, George; Eigenstetter, Alex; Li, Ling; Wilson, Roger; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2013-01-01

    Electronic test ordering, via the Electronic Medical Record (EMR), which incorporates computerised provider order entry (CPOE), is widely considered as a useful tool to support appropriate pathology test ordering. Diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) are clinically meaningful categories that allow comparisons in pathology utilisation by patient groups by controlling for many potentially confounding variables. This study used DRG data linked to pathology test data to examine changes in rates of test ordering across four years coinciding with the introduction of an EMR in six hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. This method generated a list of high pathology utilisation DRGs. We investigated patients with a Chest pain DRG to examine whether tests rates changed for specific test groups by hospital emergency department (ED) pre- and post-EMR. There was little change in testing rates between EDs or between time periods pre- and post-EMR. This is a valuable method for monitoring the impact of EMR and clinical decision support on test order rates.

  3. Effect of carbonyl group on the lifetimes of pentafluoroacetophenone and pentafluorobenzaldehyde radical anions in aqueous solution: a pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoute, L.C.T.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrated electrons react with pentafluoroacetophenone (PFA) to form radical anion. Evidence for the formation of the radical anion was obtained from observation of intermolecular electron transfer from PFA .- to p-benzoquinone (Q) and methyl viologen (MV 2+ ) to form Q .- and MV .+ . The radical anion lose fluoride with a rate constant of 5x10 4 s -1 . The radical anion has a pK a =7.5. Radical anion of pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFB) was observed on reduction PFB with hydrated electron. It has a pK a =7.2. It loses fluoride with a rate constant of 1.2x10 5 s -1 . The studies show that substitution of a carbonyl group in the aromatic ring of a perfluorinated compound led to dramatic increase in the lifetime of the radical anion formed on electron addition due to decrease in the rate of fluoride elimination. This led to the possibility of observing their reactions with other solute present in the solution. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab

  4. Effect of substituted hydroxyl groups in the changes of solution turbidity in the oxidation of aromatic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, N; Jm, Lomas; Lm, Camarero

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the changes of turbidity that are generated in aqueous solutions of phenol when they are oxidized by using different Fenton technologies. Results revealed that if the Fenton reaction was promoted with UV light, the turbidity that was generated in the water doubled. Alternatively, the use of ultrasonic waves produced an increase in turbidity which initially proceeded slowly, reaching intensities eight times higher than in the conventional Fenton treatment. As well, the turbidity showed a high dependence on pH. It is therefore essential to control acidity throughout the reaction. The maximum turbidity was generated when operating at pH = 2.0, and it slowly decreased with increasing to a value of pH = 3.0, at which the turbidity was the lowest. This result was a consequence of the presence of ferric ions in solution. At pH values greater than 3.5, the turbidity increased almost linearly until at pH = 5.0 reached its maximum intensity. In this range, ferrous ions may generate an additional contribution of radicals that promote the degradation of the phenol species that produce turbidity. Turbidity was enhanced at ratios R = 4.0 mol H 2 O 2 /mol C 6 H 6 O. This value corresponds to the stoichiometric ratio that leads to the production of turbidity-precursor species. Therefore, muconic acid would be a species that generate high turbidity in solution according to its isomerism. Also, the results revealed that the turbidity is not a parameter to which species contribute additively since interactions may occur among species that would enhance their individual contributions to it. Analyzing the oxidation of phenol degradation intermediates, the results showed that meta-substituted compounds (resorcinol) generate high turbidity in the wastewater. The presence of polar molecules, such as muconic acid, would provide the structural features that are necessary for resorcinol to act as a clip between two carboxylic groups, thus establishing

  5. Testing Black Market vs. Official PPP: A Pooled Mean Group Estimation Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Gour Gobinda; Hossain, Mohammad Zariab

    2013-01-01

    Testing purchasing power parity (PPP) using black market exchange rate data has gained popularity in recent times. It is claimed that black market exchange rate data more often support the PPP than the official exchange rate data. In this study, to assess both the long run stability of exchange rate and the short run dynamics, we employ Pooled Mean Group (PMG) Estimation developed by Pesaran et al. (1999) on eight groups of countries based on different criteria. Using the famous Reinhart and ...

  6. Multiple group radiator and hybrid test heads, possibilities of combining the array technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenberg, H.

    1993-01-01

    This article is intended to show the important considerations, which led to the development of the multichannel group radiator technique. Trends in development and the advantages and disadvantages of the different possibilities are introduced, against the background of experience now available for these configurative variants of ultrasonic test heads. For this reason, a series of experiences and arguments is reported, from the point of view of the developer of the multi-channel group radiator technique. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Routine preoperative blood group and save testing is unnecessary for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, A.; Shahzad, K.; Nunes, Q.; Shrotri, M.; Lunevicius, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although the practice of preoperative testing of ABO group and Rh (D) type for elective cholecystectomy has deep historical roots, it is not evidence-based. We aimed to assess the preoperative blood group and save testing practice for a cohort of patients subjected to elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholecystolithiasis between January 2010 and October 2014. Methods: National Health Service (NHS) hospital based, surgical procedure-specific, retrospective study was conducted. A final group consisted of 2,079 adult patients. We estimated the incidence of perioperative blood transfusion attributable to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The results of eight other studies are presented. Results: A preoperative blood group and save test was performed in 907 patients (43.6%), whereas cross-matching was documented in 28 patients (3.1%). None required an intraoperative blood transfusion. Twelve patients (0.58%) underwent blood transfusion postoperatively following laparoscopic cholecystectomy, of which ten were transfused due to severe intra-abdominal bleeding (0.48%). There were no deaths. Conclusions: The likelihood of blood transfusion attributable to elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy is 1:200. A routine preoperative blood group and save testing is unnecessary. It neither alters the management of severe hypovolemia, secondary to perioperative bleeding, nor does it lead to better outcomes. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  9. A generalized Kruskal-Wallis test incorporating group uncertainty with application to genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Elif F; Sun, Lei

    2013-06-01

    Motivated by genetic association studies of SNPs with genotype uncertainty, we propose a generalization of the Kruskal-Wallis test that incorporates group uncertainty when comparing k samples. The extended test statistic is based on probability-weighted rank-sums and follows an asymptotic chi-square distribution with k - 1 degrees of freedom under the null hypothesis. Simulation studies confirm the validity and robustness of the proposed test in finite samples. Application to a genome-wide association study of type 1 diabetic complications further demonstrates the utilities of this generalized Kruskal-Wallis test for studies with group uncertainty. The method has been implemented as an open-resource R program, GKW. © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Media-fill simulation tests in manual and robotic aseptic preparation of injection solutions in syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Irene; Federici, Matteo; Kaiser, Vanessa; Thiesen, Judith

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contamination rate of media-fill products either prepared automated with a robotic system (APOTECAchemo™) or prepared manually at cytotoxic workbenches in the same cleanroom environment and by experienced operators. Media fills were completed by microbiological environmental control in the critical zones and used to validate the cleaning and disinfection procedures of the robotic system. The aseptic preparation of patient individual ready-to-use injection solutions was simulated by using double concentrated tryptic soy broth as growth medium, water for injection and plastic syringes as primary packaging materials. Media fills were either prepared automated (500 units) in the robot or manually (500 units) in cytotoxic workbenches in the same cleanroom over a period of 18 working days. The test solutions were incubated at room temperature (22℃) over 4 weeks. Products were visually inspected for turbidity after a 2-week and 4-week period. Following incubation, growth promotion tests were performed with Staphylococcus epidermidis. During the media-fill procedures, passive air monitoring was performed with settle plates and surface monitoring with contact plates on predefined locations as well as fingerprints. The plates got incubated for 5-7 days at room temperature, followed by 2-3 days at 30-35℃ and the colony forming units (cfu) counted after both periods. The robot was cleaned and disinfected according to the established standard operating procedure on two working days prior to the media-fill session, while on six other working days only six critical components were sanitized at the end of the media-fill sessions. Every day UV irradiation was operated for 4 h after finishing work. None of the 1000 media-fill products prepared in the two different settings showed turbidity after the incubation period thereby indicating no contamination with microorganisms. All products remained uniform, clear, and light

  11. Solution of the Chandler-Gibson equations for a three-body test problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, A.G.; Waters, A.J.; Berthold, G.H.; Chandler, C.

    1991-01-01

    The Chandler-Gibson (CG) N-body equations are tested by considering the problem of three nonrelativistic particles moving on a line and interacting through attractive delta-function potentials. In particular, the input Born and overlap matrix-valued functions are evaluated analytically, and the CG equations are solved using a B-spline collocation method. The computed scattering matrix elements are within 0.5% of the known exact solutions, and the corresponding scattering probabilities are within 0.001% of the exact probabilities, both below and above the 3-body breakup threshold. These results establish that the CG method is practical, as well as theoretically correct, and may be a valuable approach for solving certain more complicated N-body scattering problems

  12. Measurement test on creep strain rate of uranium-zirconium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Takanari; Akabori, Mitsuo; Ogawa, Toru

    1996-11-01

    In order to measure creep strain rate of a small specimen of U-Zr solid solution, authors proposed an estimation method which was based upon the stress relaxation after compression. It was applied to measurement test on creep strain rate of the U-10wt%Zr specimen in the temperature range of 757 to 911degC. It may be concluded that the proposed method is valid, provided that the strain is within the appropriate range and that sufficient amount of the load decrement is observed. The obtained creep rate of U-10wt%Zr alloy indicated significantly smaller value, compared to the experimental data for pure U metal and evaluated data for U-Pu-Zr alloy. However, more careful measurement is desired in future since the present data are thought to be influenced by the precipitations included in the specimen. (author)

  13. Large scale vibration tests on pile-group effects using blast-induced ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuichirou Hijikata; Hideo Tanaka; Takayuki Hashimoto; Kazushige Fujiwara; Yuji Miyamoto; Osamu Kontani

    2005-01-01

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for vibration tests. The main objective of this research is to investigate the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, in particular, pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated 4 m deep pit. Their test-structures were exactly the same. One structure had 25 steel piles and the other had 4 piles. The test pit was backfilled with sand of appropriate grain size distributions to obtain good compaction, especially between the 25 piles. Accelerations were measured at the structures, in the test pit and in the adjacent free field, and pile strains were measured. Dynamic modal tests of the pile-supported structures and PS measurements of the test pit were performed before and after the vibration tests to detect changes in the natural frequencies of the soil-pile-structure systems and the soil stiffness. The vibration tests were performed six times with different levels of input motions. The maximum horizontal acceleration recorded at the adjacent ground surface varied from 57 cm/s 2 to 1,683 cm/s 2 according to the distances between the test site and the blast areas. (authors)

  14. Group of scientific experts third technical test (GSETT-III) experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlman, O.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the established verification system is to provide confidence through adequate monitoring, deter clandestine activities and counteract 'false arms'. The task og the Group of Scientific Experts was to design and test the seismic verification system including designing og the international system, sharing knowledge from national programs, encouraging establishment of new monitoring facilities, development of data analysis procedures, conducting large scale testing and training of experts

  15. Preparation of carboxyl group-modified palladium nanoparticles in an aqueous solution and their conjugation with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhifei; Li, Hongying; Zhen, Shuang; He, Nongyue

    2012-05-01

    The use of nanomaterials in biomolecular labeling and their corresponding detection has been attracting much attention, recently. There are currently very few studies on palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) due to their lack of appropriate surface functionalities for conjugation with DNA. In this paper, we thus firstly present an approach to prepare carboxyl group-modified Pd NPs (with an average size of 6 nm) by the use of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) as a stabilizer in the aqueous solution. The effect of the various reducing reaction conditions on the morphology of the Pd NPs was investigated. The particles were further characterized by TEM, UV-vis, FT-IR and XPS techniques. DNA was finally covalently conjugated to the surface of the Pd NPs through the activation of the carboxyl group, which was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence analysis. The resulting Pd NPs-DNA conjugates show high single base pair mismatch discrimination capabilities. This work therefore sets a good foundation for further applications of Pd NPs in bio-analytical research.

  16. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes – such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study’s results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  17. An Improved Test Selection Optimization Model Based on Fault Ambiguity Group Isolation and Chaotic Discrete PSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Lv

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensor data-based test selection optimization is the basis for designing a test work, which ensures that the system is tested under the constraint of the conventional indexes such as fault detection rate (FDR and fault isolation rate (FIR. From the perspective of equipment maintenance support, the ambiguity isolation has a significant effect on the result of test selection. In this paper, an improved test selection optimization model is proposed by considering the ambiguity degree of fault isolation. In the new model, the fault test dependency matrix is adopted to model the correlation between the system fault and the test group. The objective function of the proposed model is minimizing the test cost with the constraint of FDR and FIR. The improved chaotic discrete particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm is adopted to solve the improved test selection optimization model. The new test selection optimization model is more consistent with real complicated engineering systems. The experimental result verifies the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Testing of the Safety and the Effectiveness of Using Samjeong Pharmacopuncture Solution as Eye drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hyung-Sik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This experimental study was designed to investigate the safety and the effectiveness of Samjeong pharmacopuncture solution (SPS manufactured by using a the lowtemperature extract on process. Methods: To identify the safety and the effectiveness of using SPS as eye drops, we performed applied eye irritation tests on rabbits and antibacterial tests for Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Candida albicans. The eye irritation test was performed according to the toxicity testing regulation of the Korea Food & Drug Administration (2009. 8. 24, KFDA 2009-116. After SPS had been applied on the left eye of the rabbits, eye irritation in the cornea, iris and conjunctiva was observed on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th & 7th day. After SPS had been dropped on bacterial species that cause keratitis, the minimum inhibition concentration and the size of the inhibition zone were measured. The anti-bacterial potency was also measured by taking the size of inhibition zone. Results: After SPS had been administered on the left eye of the rabbits, none of nine rabbits were found to show abnormal signs or weight changes. After SPS had been administered on the left eye of the rabbits, no eye irritation in the cornea, iris and conjunctiva was observed on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th & 7th day. No specific response was detected in MIC for bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Candida albicans after SPS had been applied. Conclusions: This study suggests that SPS is a non-toxic and non-irritant medicine that does not cause any of eye irritation in rabbits, but it has no antibacterial effects on bacterial species that are well known to cause keratitis. These results suggest that more research is required on extracts from herbal medicines for treating keratitis.

  19. Influence of disinfectant solutions on test materials used for the determination of masticatory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Silvério Campos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory function can be evaluated objectively as the capacity of an individual to fragment solid food after a fixed number of chewing cycles, the so-called masticatory performance (MP. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of four different test materials (Optosil, Optocal, Zetapuls, and Perfil and five disinfection protocols by aspersion and immersion (no disinfection, 2% glutaraldehyde, 2% chlorhexidine, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, and 70% alcohol on the MP, determined at three moments (24 hours, 15 and 60 days after storing the fragmented blocks. MP was evaluated by calculating X50 through the sieving technique and the Rosim-Ramler equation. The weight and microbiologic count (colony forming units, CFUs of chewed blocks were measured to identify any variations that would make MP determination unfeasible. Differences in MP were observed among the materials (p 0.05. The time and disinfection type had no influence on MP (p > 0.05. The number of CFUs differed between the nondisinfected group and all other disinfection groups at all time points (p < 0.01. No other significant difference in CFU count between disinfection groups was observed. In conclusion, disinfection did not alter the reliability of the test materials for the MP calculation for up to 60 days.

  20. 76 FR 1067 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Second Group of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... Mfg & NOES (number based criteria based criteria significant chemicals (lbs) industrial of workers... 2070-AD16 Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Second Group of Chemicals AGENCY... section 4(a)(1)(B) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to require manufacturers, importers, and...

  1. Students discussing their mathematical ideas: Group-tests and mind-maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijls, M.; de Kramer, D.; Maj, B.; Pytlak, M.; Swoboda, E.

    2008-01-01

    In an explorative research project, teachers experimented with new ideas to make their students discuss (i.e. show, explain, justify and reconstruct their work) their mathematical ideas with each other. Two kind of special tasks were developed: group tests and mind maps. Also, the role of the

  2. Testing Measurement Invariance of the Students' Affective Characteristics Model across Gender Sub-Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ergül

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to construct a significant structural measurement model comparing students' affective characteristics with their mathematic achievement. According to this model, the aim was to test the measurement invariances between gender sub-groups hierarchically. This study was conducted as basic and descriptive research. Secondary…

  3. Norms for creativity and implementation in healthcare teams: testing the group innovation inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract OBJECTIVE: To test to what extent the four-factor structure of the group innovation inventory (GII) is confirmed for improvement teams participating in a quality improvement collaborative. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental design with baseline and end-measurement after

  4. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  5. Known-Groups and Concurrent Validity of the Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Zhu

    Full Text Available The Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT is a new test designed to assess the tone identification abilities of children with hearing impairment (HI. Evidence for reliability and sensitivity has been reported. The present study aimed to evaluate the known-groups and concurrent validity of the MTIT.The MTIT and Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility test (MPSI were administered in quiet and in noise conditions. The known-groups validity was evaluated by comparing the performance of the MTIT on children with two different levels of HI. The MPSI was included to evaluate the concurrent validity of the MTIT.81 children with HI were recruited in the present study. They were Mandarin-speaking children with profound HI (mean age = 9; 0, n = 41 and with moderate to severe HI (mean age = 8; 9, n = 40.Scores on the MTIT differed between the two groups with different hearing levels suggesting good known-groups validity. A strong relationship between tone and sentence perception both in quiet and in noise provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity.The present study confirmed that the MTIT has good known-groups validity and provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity. The MTIT could be used to evaluate tone identification ability in children with HI with confidence.

  6. Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Bramson, J.P.; Farmer III, O.T.; Greenwood, L.R.; Hoopes, F.V.; Mann, M.A.; Steele, M.J.; Steele, R.T.; Swoboda, R.G.; Urie, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by K d measurements with SuperLigreg s ign 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section

  7. Australians' views on personal genomic testing: focus group findings from the Genioz study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Sylvia A; Hickerton, Chriselle; Savard, Jacqueline; Terrill, Bronwyn; Turbitt, Erin; Gaff, Clara; Gray, Kathleen; Middleton, Anna; Wilson, Brenda; Newson, Ainsley J

    2018-04-30

    Personal genomic testing provides healthy individuals with access to information about their genetic makeup for purposes including ancestry, paternity, sporting ability and health. Such tests are available commercially and globally, with accessibility expected to continue to grow, including in Australia; yet little is known of the views/expectations of Australians. Focus groups were conducted within a multi-stage, cross-disciplinary project (Genioz) to explore this. In mid-2015, 56 members of the public participated in seven focus groups, allocated into three age groups: 18-24, 25-49, and ≥50 years. Three researchers coded transcripts independently and generated themes. Awareness of personal genomic testing was low, but most could deduce what "personal genomics" might entail. Very few had heard of the term "direct-to-consumer" testing, which has implications for organisations developing information to support individuals in their decision-making. Participants' understanding of genetics was varied and drawn from several sources. There were diverse perceptions of the relative influence of genetics and environment on health, mental health, behavior, talent, or personality. Views about having a personal genomic test were mixed, with greater interest in health-related tests if they believed there was a reason for doing so. However, many expressed scepticisms about the types of tests available, and how the information might be used; concerns were also raised about privacy and the potential for discrimination. These exploratory findings inform subsequent stages of the Genioz study, thereby contributing to strategies of supporting Australians to understand and make meaningful and well-considered decisions about the benefits, harms, and implications of personal genomic tests.

  8. To Test or Not to Test: Barriers and Solutions to Testing African American College Students for HIV at a Historically Black College/University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Naomi M; Peterson, Jennifer; Johnson, Malynnda

    2014-01-01

    Young African Americans are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. The purpose was to identify reasons that African American college students at a historically Black college/university (HBCU) identified as barriers to HIV testing, and how these barriers can be removed. Fifty-seven heterosexual-identified undergraduate students (ages 18-25) attending an HBCU in the southeastern US participated in a mixed method study. Latent content analytic techniques were used to code the transcripts for themes and categories, and representative quotations were used in the findings. Quantitative data indicates high levels of perceived knowledge about HIV transmission, low perception of risk and concern of contracting HIV, yet continued sexual risk behavior. Qualitative data indicates three main themes used to avoid testing and three themes to encourage testing. Students were forthcoming in discussing the themes around avoidance of HIV testing (being scared to know, preferring not to know, and lack of discussion about HIV) and encouraging testing (group testing, increasing basic knowledge, and showing the reality of HIV). It is important for college healthcare professionals, researchers, and officials to identify appropriate ways to encourage HIV testing, and promote testing as part of overall health.

  9. Testing Solutions of the Protection Systems Provided with Delay Maximum Current Relays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia BALAN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Relay protection is one of the main forms of automation control of electro energy systems, having as primary aims fault detection and disconnection of the faulty element in order to avoid the extent of damages and the as fast as possible recovery to the normal operation regime for the rest of the system. Faults that occur in the electro energy system can be classified considering on one hand their causes and on the other their types, but in the vast majority of cases the causes of the faults are combined. Further, considering their nature, faults are classified in faults due to the insulation’s damage, in faults due to the destruction of the integrity of the circuits and faults determined by interruptions. With respect to their nature, faults are short circuits, earthing faults and phases interruptions. At the same time, considering their type, faults are divided in transversal and longitudinal ones. The paper presents a testing solution of the delayed maximal current relays using a T3000 ISA Test measuring equipment.

  10. Predicting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: testing constructs from three leading maintenance theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; Hamborg, Thomas; French, David P

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the processes and factors that account for maintenance, with several theories existing that have not been subject to many empirical tests. The aim of this study was to test how well theoretical constructs derived from the Health Action Process Approach, Rothman's theory of maintenance, and Verplanken's approach to habitual behavior predicted maintenance of attendance at walking groups. 114 participants, who had already attended walking groups in the community for at least 3 months, completed a questionnaire assessing theoretical constructs regarding maintenance. An objective assessment of attendance over the subsequent 3 months was gained. Multilevel modeling was used to predict maintenance, controlling for clustering within walking groups. Recovery self-efficacy predicted maintenance, even after accounting for clustering. Satisfaction with social outcomes, satisfaction with health outcomes, and overall satisfaction predicted maintenance, but only satisfaction with health outcomes significantly predicted maintenance after accounting for clustering. Self-reported habitual behavior did not predict maintenance despite mean previous attendance being 20.7 months. Recovery self-efficacy, and satisfaction with health outcomes of walking group attendance appeared to be important for objectively measured maintenance, whereas self-reported habit appeared not to be important for maintenance at walking groups. The findings suggest that there is a need for intervention studies to boost recovery self-efficacy and satisfaction with outcomes of walking group attendance, to assess impact on maintenance.

  11. Identifying Otosclerosis with Aural Acoustical Tests of Absorbance, Group Delay, Acoustic Reflex Threshold, and Otoacoustic Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Archer, Kelly L; Schmid, Kendra K; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Feeney, M Patrick; Hunter, Lisa L

    2017-10-01

    Otosclerosis is a progressive middle-ear disease that affects conductive transmission through the middle ear. Ear-canal acoustic tests may be useful in the diagnosis of conductive disorders. This study addressed the degree to which results from a battery of ear-canal tests, which include wideband reflectance, acoustic stapedius muscle reflex threshold (ASRT), and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), were effective in quantifying a risk of otosclerosis and in evaluating middle-ear function in ears after surgical intervention for otosclerosis. To evaluate the ability of the test battery to classify ears as normal or otosclerotic, measure the accuracy of reflectance in classifying ears as normal or otosclerotic, and evaluate the similarity of responses in normal ears compared with ears after surgical intervention for otosclerosis. A quasi-experimental cross-sectional study incorporating case control was used. Three groups were studied: one diagnosed with otosclerosis before corrective surgery, a group that received corrective surgery for otosclerosis, and a control group. The test groups included 23 ears (13 right and 10 left) with normal hearing from 16 participants (4 male and 12 female), 12 ears (7 right and 5 left) diagnosed with otosclerosis from 9 participants (3 male and 6 female), and 13 ears (4 right and 9 left) after surgical intervention from 10 participants (2 male and 8 female). Participants received audiometric evaluations and clinical immittance testing. Experimental tests performed included ASRT tests with wideband reference signal (0.25-8 kHz), reflectance tests (0.25-8 kHz), which were parameterized by absorbance and group delay at ambient pressure and at swept tympanometric pressures, and TEOAE tests using chirp stimuli (1-8 kHz). ASRTs were measured in ipsilateral and contralateral conditions using tonal and broadband noise activators. Experimental ASRT tests were based on the difference in wideband-absorbed sound power before and after

  12. Solute transport processes in a highly permeable fault zone of Lindau fractured rock test site (Germany)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmelsbach, T. [Ruhr-Univ., Bochum (Germany). Dept. of Applied Geology; Hoetzl, H. [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany). Dept. of Applied Geology; Maloszewski, P. [GSF-Inst. for Hydrology, Munich-Neuherberg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The results of field tracer experiments performed in the Lindau fractured rock test site (southern Black Forest, Germany) and subsequent modeling are presented. A vertical, hydrothermally mineralized fault zone, with a permeability much greater than the surrounding granite mass, lies beneath a planned dam site. A dense network of boreholes and tunnels were used to investigate scaling effects of solute transport processes in fractured rock. A series of tracer experiments using deuterium and dye tracers were performed over varying distances and under different testing procedures, resulting in different flow field conditions. Large-scale tracer experiments were performed under natural flow field conditions, while small-scale tracer experiments were performed under artificially induced radial-convergent and injection-withdrawal flow fields. The tracer concentration curves observed in all experiments were strongly influenced by the matrix diffusion. The curves were evaluated with the one-dimensional single fissure dispersion model (SFDM) adjusted for the different flow field conditions. The fitting model parameters found determined the fracture aperture, and matrix and fissure porosities. The determined fracture aperture varied between the sections having different hydraulic conductivity. The determined values of matrix porosity seemed to be independent of the scale of the experiment. The modeled matrix porosities agreed well with values determined in independent laboratory investigations of drill cores using mercury porosimetry. In situ fissure porosity, determined only in small-scale experiments, was independent of the applied geometry of the artificially induced flow fields. The dispersivities were found to be independent of the scale of experiment but dependent on the flow conditions. The values found in forced gradient tests lie between 0.2 and 0.3 m, while values in experiments performed under natural flow conditions were one order of magnitude higher.

  13. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups - bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2) - are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467

  14. The discourse around usefulness, morality, risk and trust: a focus group study on prenatal genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetti, Monica; Montali, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Giorgia

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the underlying values and beliefs that guide women's reasoning on prenatal genetic test (PGT) uptake, as framed by their own words, during a group discussion, in a Catholic country such as Italy. Women's reasoning was explored by means of five focus group consisting of seven pregnant women and 13 new mothers. The focus group material content was analysed using the Nudist software. The discourse around PGT was rooted into four frames of reference: The usefulness dimension was used to express the positions in favour of PGT, whereas morality, risk and trust were used to express negative evaluations on such a technology. Participants advocated for themselves the choice of being tested, besides giving some credit to the partner's opinion. Moreover, participants reported little knowledge on PGT. The research shed some light on the frames of reference used by participants to build their positions on PGT uptake, confirming the public's ability to translate scientific accounts into personally meaningful information. A more complete understanding of the reasons for decisions to test would help counsellors to better communicate with women and couples, and to better assist them to make a better informed testing decision. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Lie Group Solution for Free Convective Flow of a Nanofluid Past a Chemically Reacting Horizontal Plate in a Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rashidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM is employed to investigate the steady laminar incompressible free convective flow of a nanofluid past a chemically reacting upward facing horizontal plate in a porous medium taking into account heat generation/absorption and the thermal slip boundary condition. Using similarity transformations developed by Lie group analysis, the continuity, momentum, energy, and nanoparticle volume fraction equations are transformed into a set of coupled similarity equations. The OHAM solutions are obtained and verified by numerical results using a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method. The effect of the emerging flow controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle volume fraction have been presented graphically and discussed. Good agreement is found between analytical and numerical results of the present paper with published results. This close agreement supports our analysis and the accuracy of the numerical computations. This paper also includes a representative set of numerical results for reduced Nusselt and Sherwood numbers in a table for various values of the parameters. It is concluded that the reduced Nusselt number increases with the Lewis number and reaction parameter whist it decreases with the order of the chemical reaction, thermal slip, and generation parameters.

  16. A SKIN TEST FOR DETECTING GROUP C HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION CAUSING EPIZOOTIC LYMPHADENITIS IN GUINEA PIGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Johannes K.

    1936-01-01

    1. A skin test with a crude bacterial extract prepared from group C (Lancefield) hemolytic streptococci was used as a means of detecting possible carriers of the streptococcus causing epizootic lymphadenitis in guinea pigs. A positive test similar to a positive tuberculin reaction was considered presumptive evidence of present or recent infection with this streptococcus. 2. 20 positive reactors were found in 330 supposedly normal guinea pigs. 3. 195 negatively reacting animals were used as a breeding stock which yielded 1,296 progeny over a period of 15 months. None of the breeding stock or their progeny showed evidence of spontaneous lymphadenitis. Skin tests of 100 of the progeny were all negative. 4. The use of this skin test as a means of obtaining guinea pig breeding stock free of the streptococcus causing spontaneous lymphadenitis is suggested. PMID:19870552

  17. Optimization of the test intervals of a nuclear safety system by genetic algorithms, solution clustering and fuzzy preference assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, E.; Bazzo, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure is developed for identifying a number of representative solutions manageable for decision-making in a multiobjective optimization problem concerning the test intervals of the components of a safety system of a nuclear power plant. Pareto Front solutions are identified by a genetic algorithm and then clustered by subtractive clustering into 'families'. On the basis of the decision maker's preferences, each family is then synthetically represented by a 'head of the family' solution. This is done by introducing a scoring system that ranks the solutions with respect to the different objectives: a fuzzy preference assignment is employed to this purpose. Level Diagrams are then used to represent, analyze and interpret the Pareto Fronts reduced to the head-of-the-family solutions

  18. SHAM beyond clustering: new tests of galaxy–halo abundance matching with galaxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-27

    We construct mock catalogs of galaxy groups using subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) and undertake several new tests of the SHAM prescription for the galaxy-dark matter connection. All SHAM models we studied exhibit significant tension with galaxy groups observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The SHAM prediction for the field galaxy luminosity function (LF) is systematically too dim, and the group galaxy LF systematically too bright, regardless of the details of the SHAM prescription. SHAM models connecting r-band luminosity, Mr, to Vacc, the maximum circular velocity of a subhalo at the time of accretion onto the host, faithfully reproduce galaxy group abundance as a function of richness, g(N). However, SHAM models connecting Mr with Vpeak, the peak value of Vmax over the entire merger history of the halo, over-predict galaxy group abundance. Our results suggest that no SHAM model can simultaneously reproduce the observed g(N) and two-point projected galaxy clustering. Nevertheless, we also report a new success of SHAM: an accurate prediction for Phi(m12), the abundance of galaxy groups as a function of magnitude gap m12, defined as the difference between the r-band absolute magnitude of the two brightest group members. We show that it may be possible to use joint measurements of g(N) and Phi(m12) to tightly constrain the details of the SHAM implementation. Additionally, we show that the hypothesis that the luminosity gap is constructed via random draws from a universal LF provides a poor description of the data, contradicting recent claims in the literature. Finally, we test a common assumption of the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) formalism, that the satellite LF need only be conditioned by the brightness of the central galaxy. We find this assumption to be well-supported by the observed Phi(m12).

  19. Development of a Real-time PCR test for porcine group A rotavirus diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marconi, Elizabeth C.M.; Bernardes, Nara T.C.G.; Beserra, Laila A.R.; Silva, Fernanda D.F.; Gregori, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and several animal species. A SYBR-Green Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to diagnose RVA from porcine fecal samples, targeting amplification of a 137-bp fragment of nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5) gene using mRNA of bovine NADH-desidrogenase-5 as exogenous internal control. Sixty-five samples were tested (25 tested positive for conventional PCR and genetic sequencing). The overall agreement (...

  20. Selective auditory grouping by zebra finches: testing the iambic-trochaic law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Michelle; Hubert, Jeroen; Ten Cate, Carel

    2017-07-01

    Humans have a strong tendency to spontaneously group visual or auditory stimuli together in larger patterns. One of these perceptual grouping biases is formulated as the iambic/trochaic law, where humans group successive tones alternating in pitch and intensity as trochees (high-low and loud-soft) and alternating in duration as iambs (short-long). The grouping of alternations in pitch and intensity into trochees is a human universal and is also present in one non-human animal species, rats. The perceptual grouping of sounds alternating in duration seems to be affected by native language in humans and has so far not been found among animals. In the current study, we explore to which extent these perceptual biases are present in a songbird, the zebra finch. Zebra finches were trained to discriminate between short strings of pure tones organized as iambs and as trochees. One group received tones that alternated in pitch, a second group heard tones alternating in duration, and for a third group, tones alternated in intensity. Those zebra finches that showed sustained correct discrimination were next tested with longer, ambiguous strings of alternating sounds. The zebra finches in the pitch condition categorized ambiguous strings of alternating tones as trochees, similar to humans. However, most of the zebra finches in the duration and intensity condition did not learn to discriminate between training stimuli organized as iambs and trochees. This study shows that the perceptual bias to group tones alternating in pitch as trochees is not specific to humans and rats, but may be more widespread among animals.

  1. Vibration tests on pile-group foundations using large-scale blast excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hideo; Hijikata, Katsuichirou; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Kazushige; Kontani, Osamu; Miyamoto, Yuji; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for vibration tests. The main objective of this research is to investigate the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, in particular, pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated 4 m deep pit. One structure had 25 steel tubular piles and the other had 4 piles. The super-structures were exactly the same. The test pit was backfilled with sand of appropriate grain size distributions in order to obtain good compaction, especially between the 25 piles. Accelerations were measured at the structures, in the test pit and in the adjacent free field, and pile strains were measured. The vibration tests were performed six times with different levels of input motions. The maximum horizontal acceleration recorded at the adjacent ground surface varied from 57 cm/s 2 to 1683 cm/s 2 according to the distances between the test site and the blast areas. Maximum strains were 13,400 micro-strains were recorded at the pile top of the 4-pile structure, which means that these piles were subjected to yielding

  2. Effects of Land-Applied Ammonia Scrubber Solutions on Yield, Nitrogen Uptake, Soil Test Phosphorus, and Phosphorus Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jerry W; Moore, Philip A; Li, Hong; Ashworth, Amanda J; Miles, Dana M

    2018-03-01

    Ammonia (NH) scrubbers reduce amounts of NH and dust released from animal rearing facilities while generating nitrogen (N)-rich solutions, which may be used as fertilizers. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various NH scrubber solutions on forage yields, N uptake, soil-test phosphorus (P), and P runoff. A small plot study was conducted using six treatments: (i) an unfertilized control, (ii) potassium bisulfate (KHSO) scrubber solution, (iii) aluminum sulfate [Al(SO) ⋅14HO, alum] scrubber solution, (iv) sodium bisulfate (NaHSO) scrubber solution, (v) sulfuric acid (HSO) scrubber solution, and (vi) ammonium nitrate (NHNO) fertilizer. The scrubber solutions were obtained from ARS Air Scrubbers attached to commercial broiler houses. All N sources were applied at a rate of 112 kg N ha. Plots were harvested approximately every 4 wk and soil-test P measurements were made, then a rainfall simulation study was conducted. Cumulative forage yields were greater ( scrubber solutions than for alum (6.7 Mg ha) or HSO (6.5 Mg ha) scrubber solutions or for NHNO (6.9 Mg ha). All N sources resulted in higher yields than the control (5.1 Mg ha). The additional potassium in the KHSO treatment likely resulted in higher yields. Although Mehlich-III-extractable P was not affected, water-extractable P in soil was lowered by the alum-based scrubber solution, which also resulted in lower P runoff. This study demonstrates that N captured using NH scrubbers is a viable N fertilizer. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Ruggedising biomedical devices for field-testing in resource-constrained environments: Context, issues and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Schopman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Community Health Workers (CHWs are community members who address primary health challenges through education, prevention, and awareness initiatives. CHWs conduct home visits, provide treatment for simple common illnesses, and offer health education on numerous topics including nutrition, child health, and family planning. Since they serve on the frontlines of healthcare in rural communities, ruggedised and low-cost biomedical devices could improve the efficiency and efficacy of their caregiving efforts. However, the vast majority of biomedical devices used in sub-Saharan Africa are designed by engineers in Western countries who are not familiar with the distinct physical, environmental, socio-cultural, and economic environment of the context for which they are designing. Systemic challenges include long distances, poor transportation, unreliable infrastructure, harsh climate, and limited operator education. Specifically, three sets of hurdles to the adoption, sustainability and usability of devices by the CHWs include vibrations and wire strain, dust and water penetration, and device usability. This article discusses the operational context of CHWs and then delves into the specific problems encountered, and practical solutions applied, during four years of field-testing ruggedised biomedical devices in rural Kenya.

  4. Advisory group on transport package test standards. Vienna, 19-23 December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, P.; Taylor, W.R.

    1978-03-01

    The IAEA convened the Advisory Group to (1) consider any available data on transport accidents and any risk assessments performed in Member States, with a view to making a critical study of the continuing adequacy of the package test requirements included in the current version of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials (Safety Series No.6, 1973 Revised Edition), and (2) make recommendations concerning the future planning and conduct of this study. The reports and recommendations are presented of the four working groups assigned, i.e., Statistical Data on Accidents and ''Near Accidents'', Incidents of Accidents and Risk Assessments, Review Package Testing Requirements, and Review Basis for the Radiation Levels for Packages

  5. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  6. Norms for creativity and implementation in healthcare teams: testing the group innovation inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Strating, Mathilde M.H.; Nieboer, Anna P.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract OBJECTIVE: To test to what extent the four-factor structure of the group innovation inventory (GII) is confirmed for improvement teams participating in a quality improvement collaborative. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental design with baseline and end-measurement after intervention. SETTING: This study included quality improvement teams participating in the Care for Better improvement programme for home care, care for the handicapped and the elderly in the Netherlands between 20...

  7. Reliability and Validity of the New Tanaka B Intelligence Scale Scores: A Group Intelligence Test

    OpenAIRE

    Uno, Yota; Mizukami, Hitomi; Ando, Masahiko; Yukihiro, Ryoji; Iwasaki, Yoko; Ozaki, Norio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study evaluated the reliability and concurrent validity of the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale, which is an intelligence test that can be administered on groups within a short period of time. METHODS: The new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition were administered to 81 subjects (mean age ± SD 15.2 ± 0.7 years) residing in a juvenile detention home; reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and concurre...

  8. Shake table test of soil-pile groups-bridge structure interaction in liquefiable ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Ling, Xianzhang; Xu, Pengju; Gao, Xia; Wang, Dongsheng

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes a shake table test study on the seismic response of low-cap pile groups and a bridge structure in liquefiable ground. The soil profile, contained in a large-scale laminar shear box, consisted of a horizontally saturated sand layer overlaid with a silty clay layer, with the simulated low-cap pile groups embedded. The container was excited in three El Centro earthquake events of different levels. Test results indicate that excessive pore pressure (EPP) during slight shaking only slightly accumulated, and the accumulation mainly occurred during strong shaking. The EPP was gradually enhanced as the amplitude and duration of the input acceleration increased. The acceleration response of the sand was remarkably influenced by soil liquefaction. As soil liquefaction occurred, the peak sand displacement gradually lagged behind the input acceleration; meanwhile, the sand displacement exhibited an increasing effect on the bending moment of the pile, and acceleration responses of the pile and the sand layer gradually changed from decreasing to increasing in the vertical direction from the bottom to the top. A jump variation of the bending moment on the pile was observed near the soil interface in all three input earthquake events. It is thought that the shake table tests could provide the groundwork for further seismic performance studies of low-cap pile groups used in bridges located on liquefiable groun.

  9. Improved harmonization of eosin-5-maleimide binding test across different instruments and age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Archana M; Liew, Michael A; Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Sangle, Nikhil; Heikal, Nahla; Yaish, Hassan; Christensen, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The eosin-5'maleimide (EMA) binding test has been studied extensively for the detection of hereditary spherocytosis (HS). Its performance characteristics have been compared to NaCl-based or glycerol lysis-based red cell osmotic fragility tests and cryohemolysis. HS samples are also better identified when both mean channel fluorescence (MCF) of EMA relative to controls and the coefficient of variation (CV) are analyzed. We looked at 65 normal controls including 30 adults 25-65 years old and 35 newborns and 12 HS cases. In addition to the MCF and the CV, we used a side scatter (SSC) vs. EMA fluorescence gate or "footprint" to depict where normal erythrocytes should appear. Erythrocytes that have reduced band 3 protein appear outside of the footprint. In our study, newborn data did not cluster with the samples from working age individuals. The MCF and the CVs of normal newborns were higher than normal adult group. However, the footprint data of normal samples relative to their controls was around 99.5% for each group, because the footprint was moved to fit the pattern of the normal. The inclusion of footprint parameter will help in better standardization as well as implementation of this test across different age groups as well as different instruments. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  10. Multiloop integral system test (MIST): Final report, Inter-group comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloudemans, J.R.

    1989-07-01

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) was part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox-designed plants. MIST was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral system facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST and two other supporting facilities were specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the once-through integral system (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and the other facilities will be used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The individual tests are described in detail in Volumes 2 through 8 and Volume 11, and are summarized in Volume 1. Inter-group comparisons are addressed in this document, Volume 9. These comparisons are grouped as follows: mapping versus SBLOCA transients, SBLOCA, pump effects, and the effects of noncondensible gases. Appendix A provides an index and description of the microfiched plots for each test, which are enclosed with the corresponding Volumes 2 through 8. 147 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. PWR Users Group 10 CFR 61 Waste Form Requirements Compliance Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenlof, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    In January of 1984, a PWR Users Group was formed to initiate a 10 CFR 61 Waste Form Requirements Compliance Test Program on a shared cost basis. The original Radwaste Solidification Systems sold by ATCOR ENGINEERED SYSTEMS, INC. to the utilities were required to produce a free-standing monolith with no free water. None of the other requirements of 10 CFR 61 had to be met. Current regulations, however, have substantially expanded the scope of the waste form acceptance criteria. These new criteria required that generators of radioactive waste demonstrate the ability to produce waste forms which meet certain chemical and physical requirements. This paper will present the test program used and the results obtained to insure 10 CFR 61 compliance of the three (3) typical waste streams generated by the ATCOR PWR Users Group's plants. The primary objective of the PWR Users Group was not to maximize waste loading within the masonry cement solidification media, but to insure that the users Radwaste Solidification System is capable of producing waste forms which meet the waste form criteria of 10 CFR 61. A description of the laboratory small sample certification program and the actual full scale pilot plant verification approach used is included in this paper. Also included is a discussion of the development of a Process Control Program to ensure the reproducibility of the test results with actual waste

  12. A focus group study of consumer attitudes toward genetic testing and newborn screening for deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Sarah K; Withrow, Kara; Arnos, Kathleen S; Kalfoglou, Andrea L; Pandya, Arti

    2006-12-01

    Progress in identifying genes for deafness together with implementation of universal audiologic screening of newborns has provided the opportunity for more widespread use of molecular tests to detect genetic forms of hearing loss. Efforts to assess consumer attitudes toward these advances have lagged behind. Consumer focus groups were held to explore attitudes toward genetic advances and technologies for hearing loss, views about newborn hearing screening, and reactions to the idea of adding molecular screening for hearing loss at birth. Focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed. Five focus groups with 44 participants including hearing parents of deaf children, deaf parents and young deaf adults were held. Focus group participants supported the use of genetic tests to identify the etiology of hearing loss but were concerned that genetic information might influence reproductive decisions. Molecular newborn screening was advocated by some; however, others expressed concern about its effectiveness. Documenting the attitudes of parents and other consumers toward genetic technologies establishes the framework for discussions on the appropriateness of molecular newborn screening for hearing loss and informs specialists about potential areas of public education necessary prior to the implementation of such screening.

  13. Testing surrogacy assumptions: can threatened and endangered plants be grouped by biological similarity and abundances?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy P Che-Castaldo

    Full Text Available There is renewed interest in implementing surrogate species approaches in conservation planning due to the large number of species in need of management but limited resources and data. One type of surrogate approach involves selection of one or a few species to represent a larger group of species requiring similar management actions, so that protection and persistence of the selected species would result in conservation of the group of species. However, among the criticisms of surrogate approaches is the need to test underlying assumptions, which remain rarely examined. In this study, we tested one of the fundamental assumptions underlying use of surrogate species in recovery planning: that there exist groups of threatened and endangered species that are sufficiently similar to warrant similar management or recovery criteria. Using a comprehensive database of all plant species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and tree-based random forest analysis, we found no evidence of species groups based on a set of distributional and biological traits or by abundances and patterns of decline. Our results suggested that application of surrogate approaches for endangered species recovery would be unjustified. Thus, conservation planning focused on individual species and their patterns of decline will likely be required to recover listed species.

  14. Effect of non-normality on test statistics for one-way independent groups designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbie, Robert A; Fiksenbaum, Lisa; Keselman, H J; Wilcox, Rand R

    2012-02-01

    The data obtained from one-way independent groups designs is typically non-normal in form and rarely equally variable across treatment populations (i.e., population variances are heterogeneous). Consequently, the classical test statistic that is used to assess statistical significance (i.e., the analysis of variance F test) typically provides invalid results (e.g., too many Type I errors, reduced power). For this reason, there has been considerable interest in finding a test statistic that is appropriate under conditions of non-normality and variance heterogeneity. Previously recommended procedures for analysing such data include the James test, the Welch test applied either to the usual least squares estimators of central tendency and variability, or the Welch test with robust estimators (i.e., trimmed means and Winsorized variances). A new statistic proposed by Krishnamoorthy, Lu, and Mathew, intended to deal with heterogeneous variances, though not non-normality, uses a parametric bootstrap procedure. In their investigation of the parametric bootstrap test, the authors examined its operating characteristics under limited conditions and did not compare it to the Welch test based on robust estimators. Thus, we investigated how the parametric bootstrap procedure and a modified parametric bootstrap procedure based on trimmed means perform relative to previously recommended procedures when data are non-normal and heterogeneous. The results indicated that the tests based on trimmed means offer the best Type I error control and power when variances are unequal and at least some of the distribution shapes are non-normal. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins: studies in a group of patients with negative benzylpenicillin G skin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, H-L; Li, Z; Yang, J; Tian, X; Gao, N; Jia, L-J

    2009-06-01

    Although skin tests are usually employed to evaluate current penicillin allergy status, a negative result does not exclude hypersensitivity. There is a need for accurate in vitro tests to exclude hypersensitivity. A radioallergosorbent test (RAST) is a potentially good supplementary approach, but there is little information on the suitability of this method to diagnose penicillin hypersensitivity in subjects with a negative skin test to benzylpenicillin. A total of 133 patients with a negative skin test to benzylpenicillin G (PG) and all of whom developed allergic reactions to PG were studied. RAST was used to detect eight kinds of specific IgE antibodies to penicillins in serum, which included four kinds of major and minor antigenic determinants to four penicillin drugs. The combination sites for the specific IgE antibodies were studied by RAST inhibition test. The rate of positive reactions for the specific IgE antibodies was 59.40% (79/133). Of the eight kinds of antigenic determinants, the positive rates for specific IgE against the major and minor determinants were 39.10% (52) and 42.86% (57) respectively. Of the four drugs, positive cases only to PG were 10 (7.5%), were significantly fewer than the cross-reacting positive cases (36) to PG (P penicillins could induce specific responses with a variable degree of cross-reactivity among the different penicillins. Radioallergosorbent test is a good complementary test in persons who are skin-test negative with PG, and the sensitivity of RAST increases with increasing specificity of IgE antibodies to be detected. 6-APA and the groups, making part of the different side-chains on penicillins, all contributed to the cross-reactivity.

  16. Testing the effectiveness of group-based memory rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A; Radford, Kylie

    2014-01-01

    Memory complaints are common after stroke, yet there have been very few studies of the outcome of memory rehabilitation in these patients. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a new manualised, group-based memory training programme. Forty outpatients with a single-stroke history and ongoing memory complaints were enrolled. The six-week course involved education and strategy training and was evaluated using a wait-list crossover design, with three assessments conducted 12 weeks apart. Outcome measures included: tests of anterograde memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test: RAVLT; Complex Figure Test) and prospective memory (Royal Prince Alfred Prospective Memory Test); the Comprehensive Assessment of Prospective Memory (CAPM) questionnaire and self-report of number of strategies used. Significant training-related gains were found on RAVLT learning and delayed recall and on CAPM informant report. Lower baseline scores predicted greater gains for several outcome measures. Patients with higher IQ or level of education showed more gains in number of strategies used. Shorter time since onset was related to gains in prospective memory, but no other stroke-related variables influenced outcome. Our study provides evidence that a relatively brief, group-based training intervention can improve memory functioning in chronic stroke patients and clarified some of the baseline factors that influence outcome.

  17. Simulation analyses of vibration tests on pile-group effects using blast-induced ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayuki Hashimoto; Kazushige Fujiwara; Katsuichirou Hijikata; Hideo Tanaka; Kohji Koyamada; Atsushi Suzuki; Osamu Kontani

    2005-01-01

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site to promote better understanding of the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, especially pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated pit. One structure was supported on 25 tubular steel piles and the other on 4. The test pit was backfilled with sand of an appropriate grain size distribution to ensure good compaction. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for the tests. The 3D Finite Element Method (3D FEM)and a Genetic Algorithm (GA) were employed to identify the shear wave velocities and damping factors of the compacted sand, especially of the surface layer. A beam-interaction spring model was employed to simulate the test results of the piles and the pile-supported structures. The superstructure and pile foundation were modeled by a one-stick model comprising lumped masses and beam elements. The pile foundations were modeled just as they were, with lumped masses and beam elements to simulate the test results showing that, for the 25-pile structure, piles at different locations showed different responses. It was confirmed that the analysis methods employed were very useful for evaluating the nonlinear behavior of the soil-pile-structure system, even under severe ground motions. (authors)

  18. Evaluating Emergency Response Solutions for Sustainable Community Development by Using Fuzzy Multi-Criteria Group Decision Making Approaches: IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergency management is vital in implementing sustainable community development, for which community planning must include emergency response solutions to potential natural and manmade hazards. To help maintain such solution repository, we investigate effective fuzzy multi-criteria group decision making (FMCGDM approaches for the complex problems of evaluating alternative emergency response solutions, where weights for decision makers and criteria are unknown due to problem complexity. We employ interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy (IVDHF set to address decision hesitancy more effectively. Based on IVDHF assessments, we develop a deviation maximizing model to compute criteria weights and another compatibility maximizing model to calculate weights for decision makers. Then, two ideal-solution-based FMCGDM approaches are proposed: (i by introducing a synthesized IVDHF group decision matrix into TOPSIS, we develop an IVDHF-TOPSIS approach for fuzzy group settings; (ii when emphasizing both maximum group utility and minimum individual regret, we extend VIKOR to develop an IVDHF-VIKOR approach, where the derived decision makers’ weights are utilized to obtain group decision matrix and the determined criteria weights are integrated to reflect the relative importance of distances from the compromised ideal solution. Compared with aggregation-operators-based approach, IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR can alleviate information loss and computational complexity. Numerical examples have validated the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  19. Standard model group, QCD subgroup - dynamics isolating and testing the elementary QCD subprocess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    QCD to an experimentalist is the theory of interactions of quarks and gluons. Experimentalists like QCD because QCD is analogous to QED. Thus, following Drell and others who have for many years studied the validity of QED, one has a ready-made menu for tests of QCD. There are the static and long distance tests. These topics are covered by Peter LePage in the static properties group. In this report, dynamic and short distance tests of QCD will be discussed, primarily via reactions with large transverse momenta. This report is an introduction and overview of the subject, to serve as a framework for other reports from the subgroup. In the last two sections, the author has taken the opportunity to discuss his own ideas and opinions

  20. Development of a Real-time PCR test for porcine group A rotavirus diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C.M. Marconi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Rotavirus (RVA is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and several animal species. A SYBR-Green Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR was developed to diagnose RVA from porcine fecal samples, targeting amplification of a 137-bp fragment of nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5 gene using mRNA of bovine NADH-desidrogenase-5 as exogenous internal control. Sixty-five samples were tested (25 tested positive for conventional PCR and genetic sequencing. The overall agreement (kappa was 0.843, indicating 'very good' concordance between tests, presenting 100% of relative sensitivity (25+ Real Time PCR/25+ Conventional PCR and 87.5% of relative sensitivity (35- Real Time PCR/40- Conventional PCR. The results also demonstrated high intra- and inter-assay reproducibility (coefficient of variation ≤1.42%; thus, this method proved to be a fast and sensitive approach for the diagnosis of RVA in pigs.

  1. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  2. Solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation: Descendants of the six-vertex model from the Drinfeld doubles of dihedral group algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, P.E.; Dancer, K.A.; Isaac, P.S.; Links, J.

    2011-01-01

    The representation theory of the Drinfeld doubles of dihedral groups is used to solve the Yang-Baxter equation. Use of the two-dimensional representations recovers the six-vertex model solution. Solutions in arbitrary dimensions, which are viewed as descendants of the six-vertex model case, are then obtained using tensor product graph methods which were originally formulated for quantum algebras. Connections with the Fateev-Zamolodchikov model are discussed.

  3. The role of test-retest reliability in measuring individual and group differences in executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paap, Kenneth R; Sawi, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Studies testing for individual or group differences in executive functioning can be compromised by unknown test-retest reliability. Test-retest reliabilities across an interval of about one week were obtained from performance in the antisaccade, flanker, Simon, and color-shape switching tasks. There is a general trade-off between the greater reliability of single mean RT measures, and the greater process purity of measures based on contrasts between mean RTs in two conditions. The individual differences in RT model recently developed by Miller and Ulrich was used to evaluate the trade-off. Test-retest reliability was statistically significant for 11 of the 12 measures, but was of moderate size, at best, for the difference scores. The test-retest reliabilities for the Simon and flanker interference scores were lower than those for switching costs. Standard practice evaluates the reliability of executive-functioning measures using split-half methods based on data obtained in a single day. Our test-retest measures of reliability are lower, especially for difference scores. These reliability measures must also take into account possible day effects that classical test theory assumes do not occur. Measures based on single mean RTs tend to have acceptable levels of reliability and convergent validity, but are "impure" measures of specific executive functions. The individual differences in RT model shows that the impurity problem is worse than typically assumed. However, the "purer" measures based on difference scores have low convergent validity that is partly caused by deficiencies in test-retest reliability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. RELIABILITY OF THE ONE-REPETITION MAXIMUM TEST BASED ON MUSCLE GROUP AND GENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-il Seo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of muscle group location and gender on the reliability of assessing the one-repetition maximum (1RM test. Thirty healthy males (n = 15 and females (n = 15 who experienced at least 3 months of continuous resistance training during the last 2 years aged 18-35 years volunteered to participate in the study. The 1RM for the biceps curl, lat pull down, bench press, leg curl, hip flexion, triceps extension, shoulder press, low row, leg extension, hip extension, leg press and squat were measured twice by a trained professional using a standard published protocol. Biceps curl, lat pull down, bench press, leg curl, hip flexion, and squat 1RM's were measured on the first visit, then 48 hours later, subjects returned for their second visit. During their second visit, 1RM of triceps extension, shoulder press, low row, leg extension, hip extension, and leg press were measured. One week from the second visit, participants completed the 1 RM testing as previously done during the first and second visits. The third and fourth visits were separated by 48 hours as well. All four visits to the laboratory were at the same time of day. A high intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC > 0.91 was found for all exercises, independent of gender and muscle group size or location, however there was a significant interaction for muscle group location (upper body vs. lower body in females (p < 0.027. In conclusion, a standardized 1RM testing protocol with a short warm-up and familiarization period is a reliable measurement to assess muscle strength changes regardless of muscle group location or gender

  5. Development of the Nordic Bioeconomy: NCM reporting: Test centers for green energy solutions - Biorefineries and business needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Lene; Björnsdóttir, Bryndís; Brandt, Asbjørn

    In 2014 the Nordic Council of Ministers initiated a new bioeconomy project: “Test centers for green energy solutions – Biorefineries and Busi-ness needs”. The purpose was to strengthen green growth in the area of the bioeconomy by analyzing and mapping the current status of the bio-economy in the......In 2014 the Nordic Council of Ministers initiated a new bioeconomy project: “Test centers for green energy solutions – Biorefineries and Busi-ness needs”. The purpose was to strengthen green growth in the area of the bioeconomy by analyzing and mapping the current status of the bio...

  6. MAGNETO-FRICTIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELDS. I. TESTING WITH ANALYTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y.; Keppens, R. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xia, C. [Centre for mathematical Plasma-Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Valori, G., E-mail: guoyang@nju.edu.cn [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-10

    We report our implementation of the magneto-frictional method in the Message Passing Interface Adaptive Mesh Refinement Versatile Advection Code (MPI-AMRVAC). The method aims at applications where local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is essential to make follow-up dynamical modeling affordable. We quantify its performance in both domain-decomposed uniform grids and block-adaptive AMR computations, using all frequently employed force-free, divergence-free, and other vector comparison metrics. As test cases, we revisit the semi-analytic solution of Low and Lou in both Cartesian and spherical geometries, along with the topologically challenging Titov–Démoulin model. We compare different combinations of spatial and temporal discretizations, and find that the fourth-order central difference with a local Lax–Friedrichs dissipation term in a single-step marching scheme is an optimal combination. The initial condition is provided by the potential field, which is the potential field source surface model in spherical geometry. Various boundary conditions are adopted, ranging from fully prescribed cases where all boundaries are assigned with the semi-analytic models, to solar-like cases where only the magnetic field at the bottom is known. Our results demonstrate that all the metrics compare favorably to previous works in both Cartesian and spherical coordinates. Cases with several AMR levels perform in accordance with their effective resolutions. The magneto-frictional method in MPI-AMRVAC allows us to model a region of interest with high spatial resolution and large field of view simultaneously, as required by observation-constrained extrapolations using vector data provided with modern instruments. The applications of the magneto-frictional method to observations are shown in an accompanying paper.

  7. Opticofiber photoacoustic spectrometry in single-ray two-cell grouping for analytical determination of actinoids in solutions of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin'kov, S.I.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Kikhara, T.; Fuine, S.; Maeda, M.

    1996-01-01

    Single-ray two-cell version of photoacoustic spectrometry with laser excitation (Laser Induced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, LIPAS) for remote determination of actinoids ions in solutions is developed. The spectrometer characteristics were specified by means of uranium-containing solutions, including a great number of non-radioactive ions, the absorption bonds where of imitated the absorption of Pu(3) and Pu(4). The possibilities of the LIPAS technique were studied by analysis of ions, imitating plutonium within the range of 650-724 nm on synthetic solutions with high uranium(6) content and a great number of nonradioactive isotopes of fragmentation-type elements. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  8. Assessing group differences in biodiversity by simultaneously testing a user-defined selection of diversity indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallmann, Philip; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Hothorn, Ludwig A; Fischer, Christiane; Nacke, Heiko; Priesnitz, Kai U; Schork, Nicholas J

    2012-11-01

    Comparing diversities between groups is a task biologists are frequently faced with, for example in ecological field trials or when dealing with metagenomics data. However, researchers often waver about which measure of diversity to choose as there is a multitude of approaches available. As Jost (2008, Molecular Ecology, 17, 4015) has pointed out, widely used measures such as the Shannon or Simpson index have undesirable properties which make them hard to compare and interpret. Many of the problems associated with the use of these 'raw' indices can be corrected by transforming them into 'true' diversity measures. We introduce a technique that allows the comparison of two or more groups of observations and simultaneously tests a user-defined selection of a number of 'true' diversity measures. This procedure yields multiplicity-adjusted P-values according to the method of Westfall and Young (1993, Resampling-Based Multiple Testing: Examples and Methods for p-Value Adjustment, 49, 941), which ensures that the rate of false positives (type I error) does not rise when the number of groups and/or diversity indices is extended. Software is available in the R package 'simboot'. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Non destructive testing of uranium in solution using a portable optical fiber photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, Gilbert; Guillot, Philippe; Monier, Jean; Perez, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The portable instrument, called TELEPHOT 3 N, has be following main characteristics: - regulated light source, - optical fibers used as a light vector, - an optical probe fitted with a mirror immersed in the solution, - optical system with interference filters to balance the three measurement channels, - analog and digital absorbance measurement electronic, - associated microcomputer for automatic data acquisition and processing. The parameters and computer programs were determined by a series of measurements taken on reference solutions covering the target ranges. A mathematical model showing uranium complexes in solution leads to the solution of second degree equation. A first degree equation is sufficient for low acidities. This unit -hardware and programs- has been qualified on different uranyl nitrate solutions subject to nuclear materials control. The small minimum quantities of product required, about 25 ml, and the short response time of around 1 minute, wake at a highly practical instrument for check measurements during inspection proceedings. Similar remote measurements is planned during inspection for the glove box control of plutonium solutions. This spectrophotometry technique can be adapted for the process control of industrial solutions [fr

  10. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Erin M; Belsito, Donald V; Taylor, James S; Sasseville, Denis; DeKoven, Joel G; Zirwas, Matthew J; Fransway, Anthony F; Mathias, C G Toby; Zug, Kathryn A; DeLeo, Vincent A; Fowler, Joseph F; Marks, James G; Pratt, Melanie D; Storrs, Frances J; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-01-01

    Patch testing is an important diagnostic tool for determination of substances responsible for allergic contact dermatitis. This study reports the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) patch testing results from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010. At 12 centers in North America, patients were tested in a standardized manner with a screening series of 70 allergens. Data were manually verified and entered into a central database. Descriptive frequencies were calculated, and trends were analyzed using χ2 statistics. A total of 4308 patients were tested. Of these, 2614 (60.7%) had at least 1 positive reaction, and 2284 (46.3%) were ultimately determined to have a primary diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Four hundred twenty-seven (9.9%) patients had occupationally related skin disease. There were 6855 positive allergic reactions. As compared with the previous reporting period (2007-2008), the positive reaction rates statistically decreased for 20 allergens (nickel, neomycin, Myroxylon pereirae, cobalt, formaldehyde, quaternium 15, methydibromoglutaronitrile/phenoxyethanol, methylchlorisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone, potassium dichromate, diazolidinyl urea, propolis, dimethylol dimethylhydantoin, 2-bromo-2-nitro-1,3-propanediol, methyl methacrylate, ethyl acrylate, glyceryl thioglycolate, dibucaine, amidoamine, clobetasol, and dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneurea; P < 0.05) and statistically increased for 4 allergens (fragrance mix II, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, propylene glycol, and benzocaine; P < 0.05). Approximately one quarter of tested patients had at least 1 relevant allergic reaction to a non-NACDG allergen. Hypothetically, approximately one quarter of reactions detected by NACDG allergens would have been missed by TRUE TEST (SmartPractice Denmark, Hillerød, Denmark). These results affirm the value of patch testing with many allergens.

  11. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  12. Painlevé test for integrability and exact solutions for the field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - tion between two pairs of solutions. ... have been rediscovered. Keywords. Painlevé analysis; integrability; auto-Backlund transformations; exact solu- ..... [8] H Yoshida, Celestial Mechanics 81, 363 (1983). [9] H Yoshida, Celestial Mechanics ...

  13. Preliminary analysis of construction of the test drift in boom clay at Mol using plasticity solutions and finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, R.J.; Taylor, R.N.; Higgins, K.G.; Potts, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been undertaken on an advancing tunnel heading at great depth in a clay formation corresponding to the test drift construction at Mol. Belgium. Simplifying assumptions enable plasticity solutions to be used to model the behaviour of a tunnel heading in a linear elastic-perfectly plastic soil. Finite element analysis with the same soil model has been undertaken of the test drift construction, assuming axisymmetric conditions. The results are compared with the plasticity solutions and with the measurements of lining stresses, soil movements and pore pressures by SCK/CEN. Good agreement is obtained between the plasticity solutions and finite element analysis. The measured immediate build-up of stress on the linings is well-predicted and reasonable agreement is obtained between predicted and measured soil movements. The measured pore-pressure changes are poorly predicted by the analyses

  14. Comparison of thyroid function tests in alopecia totalis and universalis with control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Seirafi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alopecia areata (AA is a common cause of noncicatricial alopecia that occurs as a patchy, confluent or diffuse pattern. Exact etiologic factor of AA not yet recognized. Among many hypothesis, relationship between AA and autoimmune disease, especially thyroid disorders, was more interesting. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of thyroid test disorders in the patients with alopecia totalis and universalis in comparison with normal population.Methods: We analyzed medical records of 100 patients, including 44 male and 56 female in Tehran Razi Hospital from 1388 to 1389. The mean age was 24.1 years. Patients having totalis and universalis form of AA considered as case group while 100 normal person (42 male and 58 female with mean age of 26.1 who had not any form of AA considered as control group. Both groups had not any sign of thyroid disease at clinical examination according to their available medical records. Collected data were analyzed statistically in SPSS software 17th version. Results: In the majority of patients (54% the disease was manifested in the first two decades of life. History of atopia was seen in 9.8% of patient. Presence of the similar disease in first-degree family members was seen in 14.3% of patients. Abnormal T3, T4 and TSH were significantly higher in case group. Abnormal T3 uptake was higher in case group but not statistically significant. Conclusion: Paraclinical thyroid disorders were significantly higher in the alopecia areata patients than in normal population. There was no significant association between the age, sex and duration of disease and presence thyroid dysfunction.

  15. Preliminary Development of Conductivity based Test Method for Industrial Radiography Film Developer Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainuddin, N.S.; Manah, N.S.A.; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Noorhazleena Azaman

    2015-01-01

    The strength of industrial radiography film developer solution is one of the most important aspects in radiography film processing. The developer solution reacts with the exposed film to visualize the latent image through chemical-film reaction. As the developer is repeatedly used, the strength decreases until a point where it cannot yield the required film optical density value. This work attempts to investigate the developer solution strength through its conductivity. Obtained data are cross correlated to the required industrial radiography optical density range. Through the experiment, the conductivity of the developer solution decreased as the number of the film processed increase. Thus, the desired optical density of the film cannot be achieved. The conductivity of developer is measured and recorded at interval of six films developed. The optical density of every film is recorded to analyze the change in optical density as the conductivity decreases. Through the procedure, it is suggested that as the conductivity decreases, the optical density of film decreased. Ultimately, the strength level of the developer solution can be determined. (author)

  16. One- and two-channel Kondo model with logarithmic Van Hove singularity: A numerical renormalization group solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, A. K.; Anokhin, A. O.; Irkhin, V. Yu.

    2018-02-01

    Simple scaling consideration and NRG solution of the one- and two-channel Kondo model in the presence of a logarithmic Van Hove singularity at the Fermi level is given. The temperature dependences of local and impurity magnetic susceptibility and impurity entropy are calculated. The low-temperature behavior of the impurity susceptibility and impurity entropy turns out to be non-universal in the Kondo sense and independent of the s-d coupling J. The resonant level model solution in the strong coupling regime confirms the NRG results. In the two-channel case the local susceptibility demonstrates a non-Fermi-liquid power-law behavior.

  17. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Partitioning of PCBs in Dissolver Solution After Neutralization/Precipitation (Caustic Adjustment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Hoppe, E.W.; Mong, G.M.; Silvers, K.L.; Slate, S.O.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the work described in this report was to gain a better understanding of how PCB congeners present in a simulated K Basin sludge dissolver solution will partition upon neutralization and precipitation (i.e., caustic adjustment). In a previous study (Mong et al. 1998),the entire series of sludge conditioning steps (acid dissolution, filtration, and caustic adjustment) were examined during integrated testing. In the work described here, the caustic adjustment step was isolated to examine the fate of PCBs in more detail within this processing step. For this testing, solutions of dissolver simulant (containing no solids) with a known initial concentration of PCB congeners were neutralized with caustic to generate a clarified supernatant and a settled sludge phase. PCBs were quantified in each phase (including the PCBs associated with the test vessel rinsates), and material balance information was collected

  18. Inhibitory action of an heterocyclic organic compound containing amine group for copper corrosion in 5,0 M nitric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naggar, M.M.; Abdallah, M. [Benha Univ., Benha (Egypt). Chemistry Dept., Faculty of Science

    2000-10-01

    An heterocyclic organic compound containing amine group namely: 3-mercaptomethyl-4amino-5-hydroxy-1, 2, 4-triazole compound 1{sub a} was tested as a new inhibitor for copper corrosion in 5.0 M HNO{sub 3} solution. It proved to have a high value of inhibition efficiency (> 99.9%) at an inhibitor concentration of {>=} 2.5 x 10{sup -}3 M. A parallelism is established between the results obtained from weight loss, thermometric and galvanostatic polarization techniques. The high protective effect of compound I{sub a} is related to the decomposition of HNO{sub 2} formed through the autocatalytic cycle. The decomposition of HNO{sub 2} could be attributed to its reaction with the adsorbed inhibitor amine group. Furthermore, the results indicated that compound I{sub a} provides long-term protection and behaves as a mixed inhibitor type with a predominant cathodic effectiveness. [Italian] E' stato valutato, quale nuovo inibitore della corrosione del rame in soluzione 5.0 M di HNO{sub 3}, un composto organico eterociclico contenente un amino gruppo, chiamato: 3-mercaptometil-4amino-5-idrossi-1, 2, 4-triazolo composto I{sub a}. Questi, ad una concentrazione {>=} 2.5 x 10{sup -}3 M, ha dimostrato di possedere un elevato valore di efficienza di inibizione (> 99.9%). E' stato stabilito un parallelismo tra i risultati ottenuti dalla perdita di peso, da misure termometriche e di polarizzazione galvanostatica. L'elevato effetto protettivo del composto I{sub a} e' correlato alla decomposizione dell'HNO{sub 2} formatosi attraverso il ciclo autocatalitico. La decomposizione di HNO{sub 2} puo' essere attribuita alla sua reazione con il gruppo inibitore aminico adsorbito. Inoltre, i risultati indicano che il composto I{sub a} fornisce una protezione a lungo termine e si comporta come un inibitore di tipo misto con una predominante efficienza catodica.

  19. Color test for selective detection of secondary amines on resin and in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Mirsharghi, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Resins for solid-phase synthesis give orange to red-brown resin beads selectively when secondary amines are present on the resin when treated with a solution of acetaldehyde and an Fmoc-amino acid in NMP. The method shows good specificity and gives colorless beads when exposed to a variety of oth...

  20. Reliability and validity of the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale scores: a group intelligence test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yota Uno

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study evaluated the reliability and concurrent validity of the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale, which is an intelligence test that can be administered on groups within a short period of time. METHODS: The new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition were administered to 81 subjects (mean age ± SD 15.2 ± 0.7 years residing in a juvenile detention home; reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and concurrent validity was assessed using the one-way analysis of variance intraclass correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operating characteristic analysis for screening for individuals who have a deficit in intellectual function (an FIQ<70 was performed. In addition, stratum-specific likelihood ratios for detection of intellectual disability were calculated. RESULTS: The Cronbach's alpha for the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale IQ (BIQ was 0.86, and the intraclass correlation coefficient with FIQ was 0.83. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.96. In addition, the stratum-specific likelihood ratio for the BIQ≤65 stratum was 13.8 (95% CI: 3.9-48.9, and the stratum-specific likelihood ratio for the BIQ≥76 stratum was 0.1 (95% CI: 0.03-0.4. Thus, intellectual disability could be ruled out or determined. CONCLUSION: The present results demonstrated that the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale score had high reliability and concurrent validity with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition score. Moreover, the post-test probability for the BIQ could be calculated when screening for individuals who have a deficit in intellectual function. The new Tanaka B Intelligence Test is convenient and can be administered within a variety of settings. This enables evaluation of intellectual development even in settings where performing intelligence tests have previously been difficult.

  1. Reliability and validity of the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale scores: a group intelligence test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yota; Mizukami, Hitomi; Ando, Masahiko; Yukihiro, Ryoji; Iwasaki, Yoko; Ozaki, Norio

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the reliability and concurrent validity of the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale, which is an intelligence test that can be administered on groups within a short period of time. The new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition were administered to 81 subjects (mean age ± SD 15.2 ± 0.7 years) residing in a juvenile detention home; reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and concurrent validity was assessed using the one-way analysis of variance intraclass correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operating characteristic analysis for screening for individuals who have a deficit in intellectual function (an FIQIntelligence Scale IQ (BIQ) was 0.86, and the intraclass correlation coefficient with FIQ was 0.83. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.96). In addition, the stratum-specific likelihood ratio for the BIQ≤65 stratum was 13.8 (95% CI: 3.9-48.9), and the stratum-specific likelihood ratio for the BIQ≥76 stratum was 0.1 (95% CI: 0.03-0.4). Thus, intellectual disability could be ruled out or determined. The present results demonstrated that the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale score had high reliability and concurrent validity with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition score. Moreover, the post-test probability for the BIQ could be calculated when screening for individuals who have a deficit in intellectual function. The new Tanaka B Intelligence Test is convenient and can be administered within a variety of settings. This enables evaluation of intellectual development even in settings where performing intelligence tests have previously been difficult.

  2. A Generic analytical solution for modelling pumping tests in wells intersecting fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewandel, Benoît; Lanini, Sandra; Lachassagne, Patrick; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe

    2018-04-01

    The behaviour of transient flow due to pumping in fractured rocks has been studied for at least the past 80 years. Analytical solutions were proposed for solving the issue of a well intersecting and pumping from one vertical, horizontal or inclined fracture in homogeneous aquifers, but their domain of application-even if covering various fracture geometries-was restricted to isotropic or anisotropic aquifers, whose potential boundaries had to be parallel or orthogonal to the fracture direction. The issue thus remains unsolved for many field cases. For example, a well intersecting and pumping a fracture in a multilayer or a dual-porosity aquifer, where intersected fractures are not necessarily parallel or orthogonal to aquifer boundaries, where several fractures with various orientations intersect the well, or the effect of pumping not only in fractures, but also in the aquifer through the screened interval of the well. Using a mathematical demonstration, we show that integrating the well-known Theis analytical solution (Theis, 1935) along the fracture axis is identical to the equally well-known analytical solution of Gringarten et al. (1974) for a uniform-flux fracture fully penetrating a homogeneous aquifer. This result implies that any existing line- or point-source solution can be used for implementing one or more discrete fractures that are intersected by the well. Several theoretical examples are presented and discussed: a single vertical fracture in a dual-porosity aquifer or in a multi-layer system (with a partially intersecting fracture); one and two inclined fractures in a leaky-aquifer system with pumping either only from the fracture(s), or also from the aquifer between fracture(s) in the screened interval of the well. For the cases with several pumping sources, analytical solutions of flowrate contribution from each individual source (fractures and well) are presented, and the drawdown behaviour according to the length of the pumped screened interval of

  3. Testing a diagnosis-related group index for skilled nursing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Philip G.

    1986-01-01

    Interest in case-mix measures for use in nursing home payment systems has been stimulated by the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for short-term acute-care hospitals. Appropriately matching payment with care needs is important to equitably compensate providers and to encourage them to admit patients who are most in need of nursing home care. The skilled nursing facility (SNF) Medicare benefit covers skilled convalescent or rehabilitative care following a hospital stay. Therefore, it might appear that diagnosis-related groups (DRG's), the basis for patient classification in PPS, could also be used for the Medicare SNF program. In this study, a DRG-based case-mix index (CMI) was developed and tested to determine how well it explains cost differences among SNF's. The results suggest that a DRG-based SNF payment system would be highly problematic. Incentives of this system would appear to discourage placement of patients who require relatively expensive care. PMID:10311674

  4. Rapid antigen group A streptococcus test to diagnose pharyngitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily H Stewart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharyngitis management guidelines include estimates of the test characteristics of rapid antigen streptococcus tests (RAST using a non-systematic approach. OBJECTIVE: To examine the sensitivity and specificity, and sources of variability, of RAST for diagnosing group A streptococcal (GAS pharyngitis. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Cochrane Reviews, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Scopus, SciELO, CINAHL, guidelines, 2000-2012. STUDY SELECTION: Culture as reference standard, all languages. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Study characteristics, quality. MAIN OUTCOME(S AND MEASURE(S: Sensitivity, specificity. RESULTS: We included 59 studies encompassing 55,766 patients. Forty three studies (18,464 patients fulfilled the higher quality definition (at least 50 patients, prospective data collection, and no significant biases and 16 (35,634 patients did not. For the higher quality immunochromatographic methods in children (10,325 patients, heterogeneity was high for sensitivity (inconsistency [I(2] 88% and specificity (I(2 86%. For enzyme immunoassay in children (342 patients, the pooled sensitivity was 86% (95% CI, 79-92% and the pooled specificity was 92% (95% CI, 88-95%. For the higher quality immunochromatographic methods in the adult population (1,216 patients, the pooled sensitivity was 91% (95% CI, 87 to 94% and the pooled specificity was 93% (95% CI, 92 to 95%; however, heterogeneity was modest for sensitivity (I(2 61% and specificity (I(2 72%. For enzyme immunoassay in the adult population (333 patients, the pooled sensitivity was 86% (95% CI, 81-91% and the pooled specificity was 97% (95% CI, 96 to 99%; however, heterogeneity was high for sensitivity and specificity (both, I(2 88%. CONCLUSIONS: RAST immunochromatographic methods appear to be very sensitive and highly specific to diagnose group A streptococcal pharyngitis among adults but not in children. We could not identify sources of variability among higher quality studies. The

  5. Solution exchange corrosion testing with the glass-zeolite ceramic waste form in demineralized water at 900C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    A ceramic waste form of glass-bonded zeolite is being developed for the long-term disposition of fission products and transuranic elements in wastes from the U.S. Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. Solution exchange corrosion tests were performed on the ceramic waste form and its potential base constituents of glass, zeolite 5A, and sodalite as part of an effort to qualify the ceramic waste form for acceptance into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. Solution exchange tests were performed at 90 C by replacing 80 to 90% of the leachate with fresh demineralized water after set time intervals. The results from these tests provide information about corrosion mechanisms and the ability of the ceramic waste form and its constituent materials to retain waste components. The results from solution exchange tests indicate that radionuclides will be preferentially retained in the zeolites without the glass matrix and in the ceramic waste form, with respect to cations like Li, K, and Na. Release results have been compared for simulated waste from candidate ceramic waste forms with zeolite 5A and its constituent materials to determine the corrosion behavior of each component

  6. Prototype for Internet support of pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes: focus group testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfsson A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Annsofie Adolfsson,1,2 Malin Jansson1,21School of Life Sciences, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skovde, SwedenBackground: The aim of this study was to pilot test a prototype website called MODIAB-web designed to support pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes.Method: A focus group was undertaken and the results were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Eight subthemes were identified, comprising "blood glucose versus insulin," "application for smart phones," "the time aspect," "interface and technology," "forum," "direct link to the diabetes midwife," "ask the expert," and "lack of contact information." These subthemes were condensed into two main themes. The first theme was "easily understood interface, but in need of a more blood-glucose focused orientation" and the second theme was "forum for interaction with both equals and experts." Conclusion: The women in this study had positive impressions of several of the MODIAB-web functions, including a forum for pregnant mothers with type 1 diabetes and the possibility of being able to put their blood glucose levels into a diagram which could be sent directly to the diabetes midwife. Access to articles and information via the "fact" tab and the ability to ask questions of experts were also significantly helpful to women in the focus group. Pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes can gain support from such a Web-based self-help system.Keywords: type 1 diabetes, web support, pregnancy, focus group interview

  7. Testing postural control among various osteoporotic patient groups: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Maartje H; van der Jagt-Willems, Hanna C; van Campen, Jos P C M; Lems, Willem F; Lamoth, Claudine J C

    2012-10-01

    Osteoporosis can cause vertebral fractures, which might lead to a flexed posture, impaired postural control and consequently increased fall risk. Therefore, the aim of the present review was to examine whether postural control of patients with osteoporosis, vertebral fractures, thoracic kyphosis and flexed posture is affected. Furthermore, instruments measuring postural control were evaluated and examined for sensitivity and easy clinical use. Until February 2011, electronic databases were systematically searched for cross-sectional studies. Methodological quality was assessed with a modified Downs & Black scale. Of the 518 found studies, 18 studies were included. Postural control was generally affected for patients with vertebral fractures, thoracic kyphosis and flexed posture. Patients with osteoporosis had impaired postural control when assessed with computerized instruments. Easy performance-based tests did not show any impairments. There is evidence for an impaired postural control in all patient groups included. Impaired postural control is an important risk factor for falls. Functional performance tests are not sensitive and specific enough to detect affected postural control in patients with osteoporosis. To detect impaired postural control among osteoporotic patients and to obtain more insight into the underlying mechanisms of postural control, computerized instruments are recommended, such as easy-to-use ambulant motion-sensing (accelerometry) technology. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Geodesics of electrically and magnetically charged test particles in the Reissner-Nordstroem space-time: Analytical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunau, Saskia; Kagramanova, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    We present the full set of analytical solutions of the geodesic equations of charged test particles in the Reissner-Nordstroem space-time in terms of the Weierstrass weierp, σ, and ζ elliptic functions. Based on the study of the polynomials in the θ and r equations, we characterize the motion of test particles and discuss their properties. The motion of charged test particles in the Reissner-Nordstroem space-time is compared with the motion of neutral test particles in the field of a gravitomagnetic monopole. Electrically or magnetically charged particles in the Reissner-Nordstroem space-time with magnetic or electric charges, respectively, move on cones similar to neutral test particles in the Taub-NUT space-times.

  9. The differential item functioning and structural equivalence of a nonverbal cognitive ability test for five language groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Schaap

    2011-10-01

    Research purpose: The aim of the study was to determine the differential item functioning (DIF and structural equivalence of a nonverbal cognitive ability test (the PiB/SpEEx Observance test [401] for five South African language groups. Motivation for study: Cultural and language group sensitive tests can lead to unfair discrimination and is a contentious workplace issue in South Africa today. Misconceptions about psychometric testing in industry can cause tests to lose credibility if industries do not use a scientifically sound test-by-test evaluation approach. Research design, approach and method: The researcher used a quasi-experimental design and factor analytic and logistic regression techniques to meet the research aims. The study used a convenience sample drawn from industry and an educational institution. Main findings: The main findings of the study show structural equivalence of the test at a holistic level and nonsignificant DIF effect sizes for most of the comparisons that the researcher made. Practical/managerial implications: This research shows that the PIB/SpEEx Observance Test (401 is not completely language insensitive. One should see it rather as a language-reduced test when people from different language groups need testing. Contribution/value-add: The findings provide supporting evidence that nonverbal cognitive tests are plausible alternatives to verbal tests when one compares people from different language groups.

  10. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Examples for simple solutions in using manual ultrasonic testing with partial mechanisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestel, W.; Meyer, H.J.; Weiss, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fully automatic ultrasonic testing regarding test technique, manipulation and evaluation can only be used economically if one is either testing large number of parts or if manual testing of safety-related components is impossible because of inaccessibility, e.g.: for primary circuit components of nuclear powerstations. The described examples (multi-layer ceramic condensers, turbine rotors, cast steel components, central holes in forged shafts, weld seams and piston bolts) show that by individually designed and, where necessary, computer-aided part-mechanisation, ultrasonic testing is able to combine high probability of finding faults in the interests of the greatest possible operating safety and the requirement for the description or documentation of the fault suitable for the required case with the necessity for economical testing. (orig./MM) [de

  12. One size does not fit all: HIV testing preferences differ among high-risk groups in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Jan; Njau, Bernard; Mtuy, Tara; Brown, Derek S; Mühlbacher, Axel; Thielman, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In order to maximize the effectiveness of "Seek, Test, and Treat" strategies for curbing the HIV epidemic, new approaches are needed to increase the uptake of HIV testing services, particularly among high-risk groups. Low HIV testing rates among such groups suggest that current testing services may not align well with the testing preferences of these populations. Female bar workers and male mountain porters have been identified as two important high-risk groups in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. We used conventional survey methods and a discrete choice experiment (DCE), a preference elicitation method increasingly applied by economists and policy-makers to inform health policy and services, to analyze trade-offs made by individuals and quantify preferences for HIV testing services. Bivariate descriptive statistics were used to analyze differences in survey responses across groups. Compared to 486 randomly selected community members, 162 female bar workers and 194 male Kilimanjaro porters reported 2-3 times as many lifetime sexual partners (p porters preferred testing in venues where antiretroviral therapy was readily available. Both high-risk groups were less averse to traveling longer distances to test compared to their community counterparts. These results expose systematic differences in HIV testing preferences across high-risk populations compared to their community peers. Tailoring testing options to the preferences of high-risk populations should be evaluated as a means of improving uptake of testing in these populations.

  13. Mapping the surface (hydr)oxo-groups of titanium oxide and its interface with an aqueous solution: the state of the art and a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, George D; Petsi, Theano; Bourikas, Kyriakos; Garoufalis, Christos S; Tsevis, Athanassios; Spanos, Nikos; Kordulis, Christos; Lycourghiotis, Alexis

    2008-10-01

    In this article the "titanium oxide/electrolyte solution" interface is studied by taking in advantage the recent developments in the field of Surface and Interface Chemistry relevant to this oxide. Ab-initio calculations were performed in the frame of the DFT theory for estimating the charge of the titanium and oxygen atoms exposed on the anatase (1 0 1), (1 0 0), (0 0 1), (1 0 3)(f) and rutile (1 1 0) crystal faces. These orientations have smaller surface energy with respect to other ones and thus it is more probable to be the real terminations of the anatase and rutile nanocrystallites in the titania polycrystalline powders. Potentiometric titrations for obtaining "fine structured" titration curves as well as microelectrophoresis and streaming potential measurements have been performed. On the basis of ab-initio calculations, and taking into account the relative contribution of each crystal face to the whole surface of the nanocrystals involved in the titania aggregates of a suspension, the three most probable surface ionization models have been derived. These models and the Music model are then tested in conjunction with the "Stern-Gouy-Chapman" and "Basic Stern" electrostatic models. The finally selected surface ionization model (model A) in combination with each one of the two electrostatic models describes very well the protonation/deprotonation behavior of titania. The description is also very good if this model is combined with the Three Plane (TP) model. The application of the "A/(TP)" model allowed mapping the surface (hydr)oxo-groups [TiO(H) and Ti(2)O(H)] of titania exposed in aqueous solutions. At pH>pzc almost all terminal oxygens [TiO] are non-protonated whereas even at low pH values the non-protonated terminal oxygens predominate. The acid-base behavior of the bridging oxygens [Ti(2)O] is different. Thus, even at pH=10 the greater portion of them is protonated. The application of the "A/TP" model in conjunction with potentiometric titrations

  14. [Safety and efficacy of a new preservative-free levocabastine ophthalmic solution (Levofree®) using the conjunctival provocation test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, C; Siou-Mermet, R; Bassols, A

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of preservative-free levocabastine 0.05 % ophthalmic solution compared to placebo (vehicle) and to preserved levocabastine 0.05 % ophthalmic suspension in the prevention of allergic conjunctivitis induced by a conjunctival provocation test. Ninety-two subjects (18-50 years) with a previous history of allergic conjunctivitis to pollen were randomised to receive either preservative-free levocabastine solution in one eye and preserved levocabastine suspension in the fellow eye (n=69), or preservative-free levocabastine in one eye and placebo in the fellow eye (n=23). One drop of each product was administered 10 minutes (visit 3) and 4 hours (visit 4) prior to the provocation test. The primary efficacy criterion was the sum of the itching and conjunctival hyperemia scores assessed at 3, 5 and 10 minutes after the provocation test. The safety evaluation included adverse events, visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure and study drug drop sensation. The efficacy of the preservative-free solution was significantly higher than that of placebo at all time points (P≤0.01) with one exception at visit 4 (3 minutes after the provocation test). It was significantly higher than that of the preserved suspension at visit 3, and equivalent at visit 4. The incidence of adverse events was lower with the preservative-free solution than with the preserved suspension. 94.2 % and 95.7 % subjects rated preservative-free levocabastine drop sensation as "good" or "very good" at visits 3 and 4 respectively, whereas these rates were 68.1 % and 63.8 % with preserved levocabastine. This difference between the two formulations was highly statistically significant (Ppreservative-free levocabastine was superior to that of the placebo and of the preserved suspension at visit 3, at least as effective as the preserved suspension at visit 4, and better tolerated at each visit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Test and evaluation of the in-line plutonium solution K-absorption-edge densitometer at the Savannah River Plant. Phase I. Off-line testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Marks, T.; Johnson, S.S.

    1982-04-01

    An in-line, plutonium-solution, K-edge absorption densitometer has been developed at Los Alamos and is currently undergoing test and evaluation at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The first phase of the test and evaluation (off-line instrument calibration and solution assays) was completed, and preparations are under way to install the instrument in-line, as soon as process schedules permit. Calibration data in the design concentration range of 25 to 40 g Pu/L demonstrate routine achievement of densitometry assay precisions of 0.5% or better in 40 min. Plutonium assays at concentrations outside the calibration range were investigated in an effort to define better the limitations of the instrument and address other possible assay situations at SRP. Densitometry precisions obtained for 40-min assays range from 3% to 5 g Pu/L down to 0.4% at 70 g Pu/L. At higher plutonium concentrations, the precision deteriorated due to increasing gamma-ray absorption by the solution. In addition, with actinide concentrations above approximately 100 g/L, the assay accuracy also suffered because of enhanced small-angle scattering effects in the large sample cell. Measurements on mixed U/Pu solutions demonstrated the feasibility of accurate plutonium assays with correction for the large uranium matrix contributions being determined from the measurement data. The 239 240 Pu weight fractions and 241 Pu/ 239 Pu and 238 Pu/ 239 Pu isotopic ratios can be determined. In a mockup of the in-line solution plumbing system, all assay sequences, error conditions, and interlock criteria were exercised and verified to be working properly

  16. Reporting Diagnostic Scores in Educational Testing: Temptations, Pitfalls, and Some Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sandip; Puhan, Gautam; Haberman, Shelby J.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic scores are of increasing interest in educational testing due to their potential remedial and instructional benefit. Naturally, the number of educational tests that report diagnostic scores is on the rise, as are the number of research publications on such scores. This article provides a critical evaluation of diagnostic score reporting…

  17. Temperature gradient compatibility tests of some refractory metals and alloys in bismuth and bismuth--lithium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Cavin, O.B.

    1976-11-01

    Quartz, T-111, and Mo thermal-convection loop tests were conducted at temperatures up to 700 0 C (100 0 C ΔT) to determine the compatibility of several refractory metals/alloys with bismuth and bismuth-lithium solutions for molten salt breeder reactor applications. Methods of evaluation included weight change measurements, metallographic examination, chemical and electron microprobe analysis, and mechanical properties tests. Molybdenum, T-111, and TA--10 percent W appear to be the most promising containment materials, while niobium and iron-based alloys are unacceptable

  18. New error calibration tests for gravity models using subset solutions and independent data - Applied to GEM-T3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Chinn, D. S.; Chan, J. C.; Patel, G. B.; Klosko, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    A new method has been developed to provide a direct test of the error calibrations of gravity models based on actual satellite observations. The basic approach projects the error estimates of the gravity model parameters onto satellite observations, and the results of these projections are then compared with data residual computed from the orbital fits. To allow specific testing of the gravity error calibrations, subset solutions are computed based on the data set and data weighting of the gravity model. The approach is demonstrated using GEM-T3 to show that the gravity error estimates are well calibrated and that reliable predictions of orbit accuracies can be achieved for independent orbits.

  19. Development of a Population Balance Model of a pharmaceutical drying process and testing of solution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F.C.; Gernaey, Krist; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Drying is frequently used in the production of pharmaceutical tablets. Simulation-based control strategy development for such a drying process requires a detailed model. First, the drying of wet granules is modelled using a Population Balance Model. A growth term based on a reduced model was used......, which describes the decrease of the moisture content, to follow the moisture content distribution for a batch of granules. Secondly, different solution methods for solving the PBM are compared. The effect of grid size (discretization methods) is analyzed in terms of accuracy and calculation time. All...

  20. Neutrino oscillations in the Earth suggest a terrestrial test of solution to solar neutrino problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, A.; Mann, A.; Technicon-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa. Space Research Inst.)

    1987-01-01

    The verification of the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solution of the solar neutrino problem is discussed. One verification experiment concerns the detection of sizeable oscillations of atmospheric neutrinos in the earth, which can be detected with the massive underground proton decay detectors. Diurnal and seasonal modulations of the solar neutrino flux can perhaps be detected by the radiochemical Cl and Ga detectors. Moreover, neutrino oscillations in the Earth may modify the values of the oscillation parameters which can solve the solar neutrino problem and help determine their values. (UK)

  1. Supra maximal bicycle tests do not detect seasonable progress in groups of elite speed skaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen Schenau, G.J.; Bakker, F.C.; de Groot, G.; de Koning, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Seven female and eight male elite junior skaters performed cycle ergometer tests at four different times during the 1987/1988 season. The tests consisted of a Wingate-type 30-s sprint test and a 2.5-min supramaximal test. The subjects were tested in February, May and September 1987 and in January

  2. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Erin M; Maibach, Howard I; Taylor, James S; Sasseville, Denis; DeKoven, Joel G; Zirwas, Matthew J; Fransway, Anthony F; Mathias, C G Toby; Zug, Kathryn A; DeLeo, Vincent A; Fowler, Joseph F; Marks, James G; Pratt, Melanie D; Storrs, Frances J; Belsito, Donald V

    2015-01-01

    Patch testing is an important diagnostic tool for assessment of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). This study documents the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) patch-testing results from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012. At 12 centers in North America, patients were tested in a standardized manner with a series of 70 allergens. Data were manually verified and entered into a central database. Descriptive frequencies were calculated, and trends analyzed using χ statistics. Four thousand two hundred thirty-eight patients were tested; of these, 2705 patients (63.8%) had at least 1 positive reaction, and 2029 (48.0%) were ultimately determined to have a primary diagnosis of ACD. Four hundred eight patients (9.6%) had occupationally related skin disease. There were 7532 positive allergic reactions. As compared with previous reporting periods (2009-2010 and 2000-2010), positive reaction rates statistically increased for 6 allergens: methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (5.0%; risk ratios [RRs]: 2.01 [1.60-2.52], 1.87 [1.61-2.18]), lanolin alcohol (4.6%; RRs 1.83 [1.45-2.30], 2.10 [1.79-2.47]), cinnamic aldehyde (3.9%; 1.69 [1.32-2.15], 1.53 [1.28-1.82]), glutaral (1.5%; 1.67 [1.13-2.48], 1.31 [1.00-1.71]), paraben mix (1.4%; 1.77 [1.16-2.69], 1.44 [1.09-1.92]), and fragrance mix I (12.1%; RRs 1.42 [1.25-1.61], 1.24 [1.14-1.36]). Compared with the previous decade, positivity rates for all formaldehyde-releasing preservatives significantly decreased (formaldehyde 6.6%; RR, 0.82 [0.73, 0.93]; quaternium-15 6.4% RR 0.75 [0.66, 0.85]; diazolidinyl urea 2.1%; RR, 0.67 [0.54, 0.84]; imidazolidinyl urea 1.6%, 0.60 [0.47, 0.77]; bronopol 1.6%; RR, 0.60 [0.46, 0.77]; DMDM hydantoin 1.6%; RR, 0.59 [0.54, 0.84]). Approximately a quarter of patients had at least 1 relevant allergic reaction to a non-NACDG allergen. In addition, approximately one-fourth to one-third of reactions detected by NACDG allergens would have been hypothetically missed by T

  3. Development of explicit solution scheme for the MATRA-LMR code and test calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H. Y.; Ha, K. S.; Chang, W. P.; Kwon, Y. M.; Jeong, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    The local blockage in a subassembly of a liquid metal reactor is of particular importance because local sodium boiling could occur at the downstream of the blockage and integrity of the fuel clad could be threatened. The explicit solution scheme of MATRA-LMR code is developed to analyze the flow blockage in a subassembly of a liquid metal cooled reactor. In the present study, the capability of the code is extended to the analysis of complete blockage of one or more subchannels. The results of the developed solution scheme shows very good agreement with the results obtained from the implicit scheme for the experiments of flow channel without any blockage. The applicability of the code is also evaluated for two typical experiments in a blocked channel. Through the sensitivity study, it is shown that the explicit scheme of MATRA-LMR predicts the flow and temperature profile after blockage reasonably if the effect of wire is suitably modeled. The simple assumption in wire-forcing function is effective for the un-blocked case or for the case of blockage with lower velocity. A different type of wire-forcing function describing the velocity reduction after blockage or an accurate distributed resistance model is required for more improved predictions

  4. Porter's generic strategies, strategic groups and firm performance in the construction industry : a complementary test

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Azorín, José Francisco; Quer Ramón, Diego

    2003-01-01

    A central theme in the strategic groups literature is that there is a theoretical relationship between groups and firm performance. However, the empirical evidence is conflicting. The aim of this research is to study this linkage through two analysis. Thus, the analysis that has been traditionally used (performance differences between groups) is complemented with an analysis of performance differences within each group. In order to set up strategic groups, we carry out an analysis about the...

  5. Practicable group testing method to evaluate weight/weight GMO content in maize grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Junichi; Yanaka, Yuka; Ikezu, Yoko; Onishi, Mari; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Ninomiya, Kenji; Yotsuyanagi, Yuichi; Spiegelhalter, Frank; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Hino, Akihiro; Naito, Shigehiro; Koiwa, Tomohiro; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-07-13

    Because of the increasing use of maize hybrids with genetically modified (GM) stacked events, the established and commonly used bulk sample methods for PCR quantification of GM maize in non-GM maize are prone to overestimate the GM organism (GMO) content, compared to the actual weight/weight percentage of GM maize in the grain sample. As an alternative method, we designed and assessed a group testing strategy in which the GMO content is statistically evaluated based on qualitative analyses of multiple small pools, consisting of 20 maize kernels each. This approach enables the GMO content evaluation on a weight/weight basis, irrespective of the presence of stacked-event kernels. To enhance the method's user-friendliness in routine application, we devised an easy-to-use PCR-based qualitative analytical method comprising a sample preparation step in which 20 maize kernels are ground in a lysis buffer and a subsequent PCR assay in which the lysate is directly used as a DNA template. This method was validated in a multilaboratory collaborative trial.

  6. Evaluation of a 3% surf solution (surf field mastitis test) for the diagnosis of subclinical bovine and bubaline mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Naureen, Abeera; Asi, Muhammad Nadeem; Saqib, Muhammad; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate a 3% solution of household detergent viz., Surf Excel (Surf field mastitis test, SFMT) vis-à-vis California mastitis test (CMT), Whiteside test (WST), somatic cell counts (SCC; cut off limit = 5 x 10(5) cells per millilitre) and bacteriological cultures for the detection of subclinical mastitis in quarter foremilk samples (n=800) of dairy cows and buffaloes. Culture and SCC were used as gold standards. All tests were evaluated parallel and serial patterns. The sensitivities of SFMT, SCC, culture, CMT and WST in parallel testing were 72.82, 81.55, 87.38, 75.73 and 54.37%, respectively in cows, while 66.22, 79.73, 82.43, 70.27 and 50.00, respectively in buffaloes. SFMT was significantly (pnegative predictive values of SFMT (93.50 in cow; 96.35 in buffaloes) differed non-significantly from that of CMT (94.02 in cow; 96.15 in buffaloes). The kappa index between the tests was moderate to perfect both in parallel (0.54 to >0.80) and serial (0.58 to >0.8) testing. On the basis of closely similar diagnostic efficiency of SFMT to CMT in terms of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and kappa index together with inexpensive and ready availability of SFMT reagent, it tempting to suggest that SFMT can be use as a cheaper, user-friendly alternative animal-side subclinical mastitis diagnostic test in poor countries.

  7. The Importance of End Groups for Solution-Processed Small-Molecule Bulk-Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ruomeng; Cui, Yong; Zhao, Yanfei; Li, Chen; Chen, Long; Hou, Jianhui; Wagner, Manfred; Baumgarten, Martin; He, Chang; Müllen, Klaus

    2016-05-10

    End groups in small-molecule photovoltaic materials are important owing to their strong influence on molecular stability, solubility, energy levels, and aggregation behaviors. In this work, a series of donor-acceptor pentads (D2 -A-D1 -A-D2 ) were designed and synthesized, aiming to investigate the effect of the end groups on the materials properties and photovoltaic device performance. These molecules share identical central A-D1 -A triads (with benzodithiophene as D1 and 6-carbonyl-thieno[3,4-b]thiophene as A), but with various D2 end groups composed of alkyl-substituted thiophene (T), thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (TT), and 2,2'-bithiophene (BT). The results indicate a relationship between conjugated segment/alkyl chain length of the end groups and the photovoltaic performance, which contributes to the evolving molecular design principles for high efficiency organic solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Solution of the two dimensional diffusion and transport equations in a rectangular lattice with an elliptical fuel element using Fourier transform methods: One and two group cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.; Hall, S.K.; Eaton, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A rectangular reactor cell with an elliptical fuel element. • Solution of transport and diffusion equations by Fourier expansion. • Numerical examples showing convergence. • Two group cell problems. - Abstract: A method for solving the diffusion and transport equations in a rectangular lattice cell with an elliptical fuel element has been developed using a Fourier expansion of the neutron flux. The method is applied to a one group model with a source in the moderator. The cell flux is obtained and also the associated disadvantage factor. In addition to the one speed case, we also consider the two group equations in the cell which now become an eigenvalue problem for the lattice multiplication factor. The method of solution relies upon an efficient procedure to solve a large set of simultaneous linear equations and for this we use the IMSL library routines. Our method is compared with the results from a finite element code. The main drawback of the problem arises from the very large number of terms required in the Fourier series which taxes the storage and speed of the computer. Nevertheless, useful solutions are obtained in geometries that would normally require the use of finite element or analogous methods, for this reason the Fourier method is useful for comparison with that type of numerical approach. Extension of the method to more intricate fuel shapes, such as stars and cruciforms as well as superpositions of these, is possible

  9. A comparative study of 10% KOH solution and 5% imiquimod cream for the treatment of Molluscum contagiosum in the pediatric age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chathra, Namitha; Sukumar, D; Bhat, Ramesh M; Kishore, B Nanda; Martis, Jacintha; Kamath, Ganesh; Srinath, M K; Monteiro, Rochelle

    2015-01-01

    Although Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a self-limiting condition, active therapy could prevent further spread and improve cosmesis. Most of the available treatment modalities traumatize the lesions and have to be undertaken in the hospital, therefore evoking panic in children. In the quest for an alternative therapy, this study comparing 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution and 5% imiquimod cream was taken up. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of 10% KOH and 5% imiquimod in the treatment of MC. This comparative study was conducted over a period of 18 months from October 2011 to March 2013, 40 patients between the age group of 1-18 years with clinically diagnosed MC were divided into two groups (lottery method), 20 patients were treated with 5% imiquimod cream (Group A) and the other 20 were treated with 10% KOH solution (Group B). Patients were followed up on the 4(th), 8(th) and 12(th) week of treatment. At the end of 12 weeks, out of 20 patients who received 10% KOH, 17 patients showed complete disappearance, whereas out of 20 patients who received 5% imiquimod, only 10 patients showed total clearance of the lesions. Adverse events were more frequent with 10% KOH, pigmentary disturbances being the most common. With only minor adverse effects, 10% KOH is an inexpensive and efficient modality for the treatment of MC in the pediatric age group. Although 5% imiquimod was effective in clearing the lesions with minimal adverse effects, the longer duration required for its efficacy may deter its wider use.

  10. Tests of the TRAC code against known analytical solutions for stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.S.; Leslie, D.C.; Hewitt, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The area averaged equations for gas-liquid flow are briefly summarized and related, for the specific case of stratified flow, to the shallow water equations commonly used in hydraulics. These equations are then compared to the equations used in TRAC-PF/MOD1 and are shown to differ in their treatment of the gravity head terms. A modification of the TRAC code is therefore necessary to bring it into line with established shallow water theory. The corrected form of the code was compared with a number of specific cases, each of which throws further light on the code behavior. The following areas are discussed in the paper: (1) the dam break problem; (2) Kelvin-Helmholtz instability; (3) counter-current flow; and (4) slug flow. It is concluded that detailed comparisons of the code with known analytic solutions and with a number of the more complex phenomenological experiments can give useful insights into its behavior

  11. Storage management solutions and performance tests at the INFN Tier-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencivenni, M; Carbone, A; Chierici, A; D'Apice, A; Girolamo, D D; Dell'Agnello, L; Donatelli, M; Fella, A; Forti, A; Ghiselli, A; Italiano, A; Re, G L; Magnoni, L; Martelli, B; Mazzucato, M; Donvito, G; Furano, F; Marconi, U; Galli, D; Lanciotti, E

    2008-01-01

    Performance, reliability and scalability in data access are key issues in the context of HEP data processing and analysis applications. In this paper we present the results of a large scale performance measurement performed at the INFN-CNAF Tier-1, employing some storage solutions presently available for HEP computing, namely CASTOR, GPFS, Scalla/Xrootd and dCache. The storage infrastructure was based on Fibre Channel systems organized in a Storage Area Network, providing 260 TB of total disk space, and 24 disk servers connected to the computing farm (280 worker nodes) via Gigabit LAN. We also describe the deployment of a StoRM SRM instance at CNAF, configured to manage a GPFS file system, presenting and discussing its performances

  12. Assessment of cognition using the Rao's Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests on a group of Brazilian patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess the cognition of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS using the Rao's Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRB-N. METHOD: BRB-N was translated and adapted for control subjects. Subsequently, it was applied to a group of patients with relapsing-remitting (RR MS. RESULTS: The assessment on the healthy controls (n=47 showed that the correlation between tests on the same cognitive domain was high and that there was a five-factor solution that explained 90% of the total variance. Except for the Word List Generation subset of tests, the performance of patients with RRMS (n=39 was worse than that of the healthy controls. CONCLUSION: BRB-N is a relatively simple method to assess cognition of patients with MS in the daily clinic. It does not take long to apply and does not require special skills or equipment.

  13. Experimental test of depth dependence of solutions for time-resolved diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidevant, A.; Da Silva, A.; Moy, J.P.; Berger, M.; Dinten, J.M

    2004-07-01

    The determination of optical properties of a semi-infinite medium such as biological tissue has been widely investigated by many authors. Reflectance formulas can be derived from the diffusion equation for different boundary conditions at the medium-air interface. This quantity can be measured at the medium surface. For realistic objects, such as a mouse, tissue optical properties can realistically only be determined at the object surface. However, near the surface diffusion approximation is weak and boundary models have to be considered. In order to investigate the validity of the time resolved reflectance approach at the object boundary, we have estimated optical properties of a liquid semi-infinite medium by this method for different boundary conditions and different fiber's position beneath the surface. The time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique is used to measure the reflectance curve. Our liquid phantoms are made of water, Intra-lipid and Ink. Laser light is delivered by a pulsed laser diode. Measurements are then fitted to theoretical solutions expressed as a function of source and detector's depth and distance. By taking as reference the optical properties obtained from the infinite model for fibers deeply immersed, influence of the different boundary conditions and bias induced are established for different fibers' depth and a variety of solutions. This influence is analysed by comparing evolution of the reflectance models, as well as estimations of absorption and scattering coefficients. According to this study we propose a strategy for determining optical properties of a solid phantom where measurements can only be realized at the surface. (authors)

  14. Modernization of Physical Appearance and Solution Color Tests Using Quantitative Tristimulus Colorimetry: Advantages, Harmonization, and Validation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Brian W; Montgomery, Laura L; Hetrick, Evan M

    2015-10-01

    Color measurements, including physical appearance, are important yet often misunderstood and underappreciated aspects of a control strategy for drug substances and drug products. From a patient safety perspective, color can be an important control point for detecting contamination, impurities, and degradation products, with human visual acuity often more sensitive for colored impurities than instrumental techniques such as HPLC. Physical appearance tests and solution color tests can also serve an important role in ensuring that appropriate steps are taken such that clinical trials do not become unblinded when the active material is compared with another product or a placebo. Despite the importance of color tests, compendial visual tests are not harmonized across the major pharmacopoeias, which results in ambiguous specifications of little value, difficult communication of true sample color, and significant extra work required for global registration. Some pharmacopoeias have not yet recognized or adopted technical advances in the instrumental measurement of color and appearance, whereas others begin to acknowledge the advantage of instrumental colorimetry, yet leave implementation of the technology ambiguous. This commentary will highlight the above-mentioned inconsistencies, provide an avenue toward harmonization and modernization, and outline a scientifically sound approach for implementing quantitative technologies for improved measurement, communication, and control of color and appearance for both solutions and solids. Importantly, this manuscript, for the first time, outlines a color method validation approach that is consistent with the International Conference on Harmonization's guidance on the topic of method validation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. A cognitive-behavioral group treatment for test-anxious adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESSEL, Ineke; MERSCH, PPA

    1994-01-01

    Test anxiety is referring to distress experienced in formal test-taking and social-evaluative situations. Worrisome cognitions appear to be a key factor in test anxiety, and cognitive interference plays a major role in impairing academic performance in test-anxious persons. In the present study the

  16. Tests of microprocessor-based relay protection devices: Problems and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurevich Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the operational condition of relay protection devices is checked with specific settings used for the relay operation in a certain network point. In the author's opinion in order to verify the proper operation of complex multifunctional microprocessor-based protection devices (MPD at their inspection, start-up after repairs or during periodic tests there is no need to use the actual settings at which the relay is to be operated in a certain network's point. It should be tested for proper operation at several of its most critical preset characteristic points as well as in several preset characteristics constituting its most complicated (combined operation modes, including the dynamic operation modes with preset transition processes specific for standard power networks (not necessarily for a specific point. The proposed set of actions for the unification of software platforms of the modern, microprocessor-based relay protection test systems will enable examination of modern MPD in an absolutely new way. .

  17. A PC-based Flexible Solution for Virtual Instrumentation of a Multi-Purpose Test Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benatzky Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to give an overview of a test bed set up for lightweight flexible structures. The purpose of the test bed is to compare different concepts for suppressing structural vibrations. It is demonstrated that such a complex measurement and actuation task can be easily implemented on a single PC using standard software like Matlab/SIMULINK® with a minimum of custom hardware. With the help of this PC standard engineering tasks like measuring, identification of transfer functions, as well as controller design and implementation in soft real-time can be carried out easily (rapid prototyping. The resulting system is flexible and scalable, enabling an engineer to perform all the above mentioned tasks for a given test object within minimum time. Additionally, the utilization of Matlab/SIMULINK® facilitates the realization of a versatile virtual instrumentation system which is easy to use and may also be remote-controlled.

  18. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment

  19. Global calculation of PWR reactor core using the two group energy solution by the response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, C.F.S.; Watson, F.V.

    1991-01-01

    A computational code to solve a two energy group neutron diffusion problem has been developed base d on the Response Matrix Method. That method solves the global problem of PWR core, without using the cross sections homogenization process, thus it is equivalent to a pontwise core calculation. The present version of the code calculates the response matrices by the first order perturbative method and considers developments on arbitrary order Fourier series for the boundary fluxes and interior fluxes. (author)

  20. Uptake of faecal occult blood test colorectal cancer screening by different ethnic groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutekom, M.; van Rijn, A. F.; Dekker, E.; Blaauwgeers, H.; Stronks, K.; Fockens, P.; Essink-Bot, M.-L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the participation rates in CRC screening with a FOBT among various ethnic groups in the Netherlands. Individuals (n = 10 054) were invited by mail and grouped by country of birth. Overall participation rate was 49%. Participation among ethnic minority groups was significantly lower

  1. Safety and Immunogenicity Testing of an Intranasal Group B Meningococcal Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine in Healthy Volunteers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drabick, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An intranasal vaccine composed of native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) not exposed to detergent or denaturing agents was prepared from the group B meningococcal strain and tested in 32 healthy adult volunteers...

  2. Removal of Chromium(VI from Aqueous Solutions Using Fe3O4 Magnetic Polymer Microspheres Functionalized with Amino Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic polymer microspheres (MPMs using glycidylmethacrylate (GMA as a functional monomer were synthesized in the presence of Fe3O4 nanoparticles via dispersion polymerization. After polymerization, the magnetic polymer microbeads were modified with ethylenediamine (EDA. The obtained ethylenediamine-functionalized magnetic microspheres (EDA-MPMs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. Then the EDA-MPMs were applied as adsorbents for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution. Langmuir equation was appropriate to describe the experimental data. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained from the Langmuir model were 236.9, 242.1 and 253.2 mg/g at 298, 308 and 318 K, respectively. The Cr(VI adsorption equilibrium was established within 120 min and the adsorption kinetics was compatibly described by the pseudo-second order equation. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS° of the sorption process revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and was an endothermic process. The regeneration study demonstrated that the EDA-MPMs could be repeatedly utilized with no significant loss of adsorption efficiency.

  3. Genetic testing for retinal dystrophies and dysfunctions: benefits, dilemmas and solutions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenekoop, R.K.; Lopez, I.; Hollander, A.I. den; Allikmets, R.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Human retinal dystrophies have unparalleled genetic and clinical diversity and are currently linked to more than 185 genetic loci. Genotyping is a crucial exercise, as human gene-specific clinical trials to study photoreceptor rescue are on their way. Testing confirms the diagnosis at the molecular

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-11-01

    This case study by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Building Science Corporation is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, Florida; zone 2A), insulated with air-permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass).

  5. A new apparatus and method for mixing solutes for injection tests

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-07-17

    Jul 17, 2009 ... ISSN 1816-7950 (On-line) = Water SA Vol. 37 No. 2 April 2011 ... the push-pull test, a tracer is introduced to the standing water .... the assembly leak-proof. ..... ment of Rural Water Supply Management Strategies for Secondary.

  6. ADSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY DIFFERENT ADMIXTURES – A BATCH EQUILIBRIUM TEST STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. SHIVA PRASHANTH KUMAR

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wide variety of inorganic compounds such as nutrients and trace metals, organic chemicals, radioactive contaminants and pathogens are commonly present as contaminants in the groundwater. Migration of contaminants in soil involves important mechanisms such as molecular diffusion, dispersion under physical processes, adsorption, precipitation and oxidation - reduction under chemical processes and biodegradation under biological process. Cr (VI is a major and dangerous contaminant as per the ground water is concerned. There are numerous research work carried out with concentrated efforts by the researchers towards removal of Cr (VI contaminant from aqueous solutions. There are few studies relevant to Cr (VI removal with respect to utilization of low cost admixtures and also soil type. In the present study, different low cost admixtures like rice husk (RH, shredded tyre (ST and fly ash (FA are used to understand the performance in removal of Cr (VI from aqueous solution and also two different soil types are used along with the admixture. The results are discussed in terms of sorption capacity and performance of individual admixture and combination of admixture with soil in removal of contaminant. The fly ash, rice husk and shredded tyre admixtures are used and the results revealed that the shredded tyre showed higher performance in removal of contaminant concentration. Also, the soil which has more fine particle content (size<0.075 mm IS sieve showed reasonable reduction in concentration of contaminant at the lower levels of contaminant initial concentration. The sorption capacity results of Cr (VI contaminant, treated with various admixtures are further validated with the published work of other investigators. The shredded tyre (ST showed more adsorption capacity, i.e., 3.283 mg/g at pH of 4.8. For other admixtures, adsorption capacity value is varying in the range of 0.07 mg/g to 1.7 mg/g. Only in case of activated alumina and modified saw dust

  7. The great environmental restoration cost estimating shootout: A blind test of three DOE cost estimating groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemen, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The cost of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has increased steadily over the last three years and, in the process, has drawn increasing scrutiny from Congress, the public, and government agencies such as the Office of Management and Budget and the General Accounting Office. Programmatic costs have been reviewed by many groups from within the DOE as well as from outside agencies. While cost may appear to be a universally applicable barometer of project conditions, it is actually a single dimensional manifestation of a complex set of conditions. As such, variations in cost estimates can be caused by a variety of underlying factors such as changes in scope, schedule, performing organization, economic conditions, or regulatory environment. This paper will examine the subject of cost estimates by evaluating three different cost estimates prepared for a single project including two estimates prepared by project proponents and another estimate prepared by a review team. The paper identifies the reasons for cost growth as measured by the different estimates and evaluates the ability of review estimates to measure the validity of costs. The comparative technique used to test the three cost estimates will identify the reasons for changes in the estimated cost, over time, and evaluate the ability of an independent review to correctly identify the reasons for cost growth and evaluate the reasonableness of the cost proposed by the project proponents. Recommendations are made for improved cost estimates and improved cost estimate reviews. Conclusions are reached regarding the differences in estimate results that can be attributed to differences in estimating techniques, the implications of these differences for decision makers, and circumstances that are unique to environmental cost estimating. (author)

  8. Awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic testing for cancer risk among ethnic minority groups: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Katie E J; Freeman, Madeleine; Fraser, Lindsay; Waller, Jo; Sanderson, Saskia C; Rahman, Belinda; Side, Lucy; Gessler, Sue; Lanceley, Anne

    2017-05-25

    Genetic testing for risk of hereditary cancer can help patients to make important decisions about prevention or early detection. US and UK studies show that people from ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive genetic testing. It is important to understand various groups' awareness of genetic testing and its acceptability to avoid further disparities in health care. This review aims to identify and detail awareness, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards genetic counselling/testing for cancer risk prediction in ethnic minority groups. A search was carried out in PsycInfo, CINAHL, Embase and MEDLINE. Search terms referred to ethnicity, genetic testing/counselling, cancer, awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions. Quantitative and qualitative studies, written in English, and published between 2000 and 2015, were included. Forty-one studies were selected for review: 39 from the US, and two from Australia. Results revealed low awareness and knowledge of genetic counselling/testing for cancer susceptibility amongst ethnic minority groups including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanics. Attitudes towards genetic testing were generally positive; perceived benefits included positive implications for personal health and being able to inform family. However, negative attitudes were also evident, particularly the anticipated emotional impact of test results, and concerns about confidentiality, stigma, and discrimination. Chinese Australian groups were less studied, but of interest was a finding from qualitative research indicating that different views of who close family members are could impact on reported family history of cancer, which could in turn impact a risk assessment. Interventions are needed to increase awareness and knowledge of genetic testing for cancer risk and to reduce the perceived stigma and taboo surrounding the topic of cancer in ethnic minority groups. More detailed research is needed in countries other than the US and

  9. Group solution for unsteady free-convection flow from a vertical moving plate subjected to constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, M.

    2006-03-01

    The problem of heat and mass transfer in an unsteady free-convection flow over a continuous moving vertical sheet in an ambient fluid is investigated for constant heat flux using the group theoretical method. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equation governing the flow and the boundary conditions are transformed to a system of ordinary differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions. The obtained ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using the shooting method. The effect of Prandlt number on the velocity and temperature of the boundary-layer is plotted in curves. A comparison with previous work is presented.

  10. Quality control test solutions for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and health physics with PTW equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froescher, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In 1922 PTW-Freiburg was founded to produce and market a revolutionary new electromechanical component for measuring very small electrical charges. Today PTW is the specialist and one of the global market leaders for manufacturing and supplying high-quality products in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy and health physics. The quality control of X-ray images is influenced by a number of parameters. To maintain a consistent performance of X-ray installations, quality checks have to be conducted regularly. PTW offers a variety of diagnostic test tools for different X-ray devices, and therefore to reduce patient exposure and costs for X-ray departments. PTW's 'Code of Practice' defines in an easy and compact way how to perform quality control measurements on different diagnostic X-ray installations. The necessary equipment for measuring main parameters as well as acceptable limits are mentioned accordingly. The 'Code of Practice' bases on actual standards.

  11. Genetic testing for retinal dystrophies and dysfunctions: benefits, dilemmas and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenekoop, Robert K; Lopez, Irma; den Hollander, Anneke I; Allikmets, Rando; Cremers, Frans P M

    2007-07-01

    Human retinal dystrophies have unparalleled genetic and clinical diversity and are currently linked to more than 185 genetic loci. Genotyping is a crucial exercise, as human gene-specific clinical trials to study photoreceptor rescue are on their way. Testing confirms the diagnosis at the molecular level and allows for a more precise prognosis of the possible future clinical evolution. As treatments are gene-specific and the 'window of opportunity' is time-sensitive; accurate, rapid and cost-effective genetic testing will play an ever-increasing crucial role. The gold standard is sequencing but is fraught with excessive costs, time, manpower issues and finding non-pathogenic variants. Therefore, no centre offers testing of all currently 132 known genes. Several new micro-array technologies have emerged recently, that offer rapid, cost-effective and accurate genotyping. The new disease chips from Asper Ophthalmics (for Stargardt dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis [LCA], Usher syndromes and retinitis pigmentosa) offer an excellent first pass opportunity. All known mutations are placed on the chip and in 4 h a patient's DNA is screened. Identification rates (identifying at least one disease-associated mutation) are currently approximately 70% (Stargardt), approximately 60-70% (LCA) and approximately 45% (Usher syndrome subtype 1). This may be combined with genotype-phenotype correlations that suggest the causal gene from the clinical appearance (e.g. preserved para-arteriolar retinal pigment epithelium suggests the involvement of the CRB1 gene in LCA). As approximately 50% of the retinal dystrophy genes still await discovery, these technologies will improve dramatically as additional novel mutations are added. Genetic testing will then become standard practice to complement the ophthalmic evaluation.

  12. A Robotic Solution for Assisting People with MCI at Home: Preliminary Tests of the ENRICHME System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatino, Claudia; Pigini, Lucia; Van Kol, Marlies Maria Elisabeth; Gower, Valerio; Andrich, Renzo; Munaro, Giulia; Rosso, Roberto; Castellani, Angelo P; Farina, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Robots have the potential to support care and independence of older adults. The ENRICHME project is developing an integrated system composed of a robot, sensors and a networking care platform, aiming at assisting older adults with MCI in their home environment. This paper reports findings of the tests performed on a sample of MCI users and their caregivers, with the first version of the ENRICHME system, in a controlled environment.

  13. Solution of multi-group diffusion equation in x-y-z geometry by finite Fourier transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Keisuke

    1975-01-01

    The multi-group diffusion equation in three-dimensional x-y-z geometry is solved by finite Fourier transformation. Applying the Fourier transformation to a finite region with constant nuclear cross sections, the fluxes and currents at the material boundaries are obtained in terms of the Fourier series. Truncating the series after the first term, and assuming that the source term is piecewise linear within each mesh box, a set of coupled equations is obtained in the form of three-point equations for each coordinate. These equations can be easily solved by the alternative direction implicit method. Thus a practical procedure is established that could be applied to replace the currently used difference equation. This equation is used to solve the multi-group diffusion equation by means of the source iteration method; and sample calculations for thermal and fast reactors show that the present method yields accurate results with a smaller number of mesh points than the usual finite difference equations. (auth.)

  14. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  15. 76 FR 65385 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... Mutations: Bacterial Reverse Mutation Test (in vitro): 40 CFR 799.9510. b. Chromosomal Damage: In Vitro... alternate test. 6. Mammalian Toxicity--Repeated Dose/Reproduction/Developmental--a. Combined Repeated Dose Toxicity Study with the Reproduction/ Developmental Toxicity Screening Test: 40 CFR 799.9365. b...

  16. Brief report: effects of solution-focused brief therapy group-work on promoting post-traumatic growth of mothers who have a child with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Ting-ting; Du, Ya-song; Liu, Xiao-hong

    2014-08-01

    The study evaluated the impact of solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) group-work on the post-traumatic growth (PTG) of mothers who have a child with ASD. A quasi-experimental design was used in which 43 mothers participated. 18 mothers in 2 SFBT groups (n = 9 in each group) received a 6-session SFBT group therapy while 25 mothers in a control group received no treatment. The Post-traumatic Growth Inventory was used to measure the PTG levels of the participants at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up assessments. Mothers who attended SFBT group-work reported higher PTG scores both at post-treatment (t = 4.065, p = .001) and 6-month follow-up (t = 2.980, p = .006) assessments. Further investigations to prove whether SFBT in groups can increase the positivity of clients would promote the use of SFBT.

  17. The Relationship between Ethical Culture and Unethical Behavior in Work Groups: Testing the Corporate Ethical Virtues Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Kaptein (Muel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Corporate Ethical Virtues Model, which is a model for measuring the ethical culture of organizations, has not been tested on its predictive validity. This study tests the relationship between this model and observed unethical behavior in work groups. The sample consists of 301 triads

  18. Results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, C.; Langkjær, Rikke B.; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and an alleged father. The laboratories were encouraged to answer...

  19. Results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Susanne Lunøe; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo Thisted

    2009-01-01

    Here we present the results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and two alleged fathers. The laboratories were encouraged...

  20. The Effects of Psychodrama and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Group Work on Test Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Taspinar Goveci

    2017-04-01

    In the analyses relating to comparison; in terms of total exam anxiety, perception, delusion sublevel and trait anxiety points of the students, psychodrama techniques applied in the first group have been more affective with reference to the cognitive behavioral techniques applied in the second group. No meaningful difference has been detected when two experimental groups have been compared according to continuity anxiety points. [JCBPR 2017; 6(1.000: 22-30

  1. Lung preservation with Euro-Collins, University of Wisconsin, Wallwork, and low-potassium-dextran solution. Université++ Paris-Sud Lung Transplant Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L; Mazmanian, M; Chapelier, A R; Reignier, J; Weiss, M; Dartevelle, P G; Hervé, P

    1994-09-01

    Using isolated rat lungs, we compared prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injury provided by flushing the lungs with modified Euro-Collins solution (EC), University of Wisconsin solution (UW), low-potassium-dextran solution (LPD), or Wallwork solution (WA). After 4 hours' and 6 hours' cold ischemia, reperfusion injury was assessed on the basis of changes in filtration coefficients (Kfc) and pressure-flow curves, characterized by the slope of the curves (incremental resistance) and the extrapolation of this slope to zero flow (pulmonary pressure intercept [Ppi]). After 4 hours, Kfc and Ppi were higher with EC than with UW, LPD, and WA, and the incremental resistance was higher with EC and UW. After 6 hours, Kfc and incremental resistance Ppi were higher with LPD than with WA. Because ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with decreased endothelial synthesis of prostacyclin and nitric oxide, we tested whether the addition of prostacyclin or the nitric oxide precursor L-arginine to WA would improve preservation. The Kfc and Ppi were lower with both treatments. In conclusion, ischemia-reperfusion injury was best prevented by using WA. The favorable effect of prostacyclin or L-arginine emphasizes the role played by endothelial dysfunction in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  2. The Dysexecutive Questionnaire advanced: item and test score characteristics, 4-factor solution, and severity classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenburg, Sebastian; Dopslaff, Nina

    2008-01-01

    The Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX, , Behavioral assessment of the dysexecutive syndrome, 1996) is a standardized instrument to measure possible behavioral changes as a result of the dysexecutive syndrome. Although initially intended only as a qualitative instrument, the DEX has also been used increasingly to address quantitative problems. Until now there have not been more fundamental statistical analyses of the questionnaire's testing quality. The present study is based on an unselected sample of 191 patients with acquired brain injury and reports on the data relating to the quality of the items, the reliability and the factorial structure of the DEX. Item 3 displayed too great an item difficulty, whereas item 11 was not sufficiently discriminating. The DEX's reliability in self-rating is r = 0.85. In addition to presenting the statistical values of the tests, a clinical severity classification of the overall scores of the 4 found factors and of the questionnaire as a whole is carried out on the basis of quartile standards.

  3. Visualization test using piping group mock up specimen for evaluation of wastage phenomena in steam generator for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Keisuke; Yoshida, Atsuro; Arae, Kunihiko; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Kurihara, Akikazu

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for quantitative evaluation of wastage phenomena in steam generator for FBR. We focused attention on liquid droplet impingement erosion (LDIE) in wastage phenomena and performed basic study with piping group mock up specimen for quantitative evaluation of LDIE. First, we did visualization test of high pressure and high speed jet into the water. Test section mock up the crack of heat exchanger tube and neighboring heat exchanger tubes. We did the test under the following test conditions. Upstream pressure is 0.3MPa, vapor temperature is 300K, crack width is 0.1mm, and crack length is 40mm. (crack diameter is 0.2mm) Second, we did pressure and temperature measurement test in the same test conditions as before. We evaluated jet behavior at test section by those two tests. In addition, we did two phase flow analysis of the jet with TRAC code. (author)

  4. Acting in solidarity : Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach,

  5. Performance differentials of agglomeration and strategic groups: a test of incubation and new venture strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amezcua, A.S.; Ratinho, Tiago; Jayamohan, P.

    2013-01-01

    Our paper investigates how nascent firms ‘performance is affected by strategic group membership and industrial agglomeration. Agglomeration is defined using geographical concentration while strategic groups are measured as incubated firms that belong to the industry most highly represented within an

  6. International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA) recommendations for the construction of multilingual speech tests. ICRA Working Group on Multilingual Speech Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeroyd, Michael A; Arlinger, Stig; Bentler, Ruth A; Boothroyd, Arthur; Dillier, Norbert; Dreschler, Wouter A; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Lutman, Mark; Wouters, Jan; Wong, Lena; Kollmeier, Birger

    2015-01-01

    To provide guidelines for the development of two types of closed-set speech-perception tests that can be applied and interpreted in the same way across languages. The guidelines cover the digit triplet and the matrix sentence tests that are most commonly used to test speech recognition in noise. They were developed by a working group on Multilingual Speech Tests of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA). The recommendations are based on reviews of existing evaluations of the digit triplet and matrix tests as well as on the research experience of members of the ICRA Working Group. They represent the results of a consensus process. The resulting recommendations deal with: Test design and word selection; Talker characteristics; Audio recording and stimulus preparation; Masking noise; Test administration; and Test validation. By following these guidelines for the development of any new test of this kind, clinicians and researchers working in any language will be able to perform tests whose results can be compared and combined in cross-language studies.

  7. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics - Quasi-experimental Pre-test and Post-test Comparison Using Two Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D. R.; Majerich, D. M.; Luo, J.

    2014-11-01

    A flipped classroom approach has been implemented in an undergraduate fluid mechanics course. Students watch short on-line videos before class, participate in active in-class problem solving (in dyads), and complete individualized on-line quizzes weekly. In-class activities are designed to achieve a trifecta of: 1. developing problem solving skills, 2. learning subject content, and 3. developing inquiry skills. The instructor and assistants provide critical ``just-in-time tutoring'' during the in-class problem solving sessions. Comparisons are made with a simultaneous section offered in a traditional mode by a different instructor. Regression analysis was used to control for differences among students and to quantify the effect of the flipped fluid mechanics course. The dependent variable was the students' combined final examination and post-concept inventory scores and the independent variables were pre-concept inventory score, gender, major, course section, and (incoming) GPA. The R-square equaled 0.45 indicating that the included variables explain 45% of the variation in the dependent variable. The regression results indicated that if the student took the flipped fluid mechanics course, the dependent variable (i.e., combined final exam and post-concept inventory scores) was raised by 7.25 points. Interestingly, the comparison group reported significantly more often that their course emphasized memorization than did the flipped classroom group.

  8. Imitation of in-group versus out-group members' facial expressions of anger: a test with a time perception task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondillon, Laurie; Niedenthal, Paula M; Gil, Sandrine; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    This research investigated the automatic imitation of facial expressions of anger by in-group and out-group members, using a temporal estimation task. Individuals typically overestimate duration represented by angry faces, probably due to increases in arousal (Droit-Volet, Brunot, & Niedenthal, 2004). Overestimation is not observed when imitation of the facial expressions is inhibited, suggesting that embodied simulation mediates the changes in arousal (Effron, Niedenthal, Gil, & Droit-Volet, 2006). This method thus provides an implicit measure of imitation and was used to test the hypothesis that individuals imitate in-group, but not out-group members' facial expressions of emotion. In separate studies Chinese and French Caucasian participants were presented with short (400 ms) and long (1600 ms) standard durations in a temporal bisection task. They then categorized standard and intermediate durations, represented by angry and neutral faces, in terms of similarity to the short and long standard durations. Half of the face stimuli were Chinese, and half Caucasian. Results revealed a bias in the temporal perception of emotion for the Caucasian participants when they were presented with Caucasian facial expressions and not Chinese ones. In contrast, this bias in time perception was observed when Chinese individuals imitated faces of both in- and out-group members. The results of the Chinese participants are interpreted in terms of familiarity with and motivations to understand the emotional expressions of members of a host culture.

  9. Testing the Efficacy of a Kindergarten Mathematics Intervention by Small Group Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Clarke

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study used a randomized controlled trial design to investigate the ROOTS curriculum, a 50-lesson kindergarten mathematics intervention. Ten ROOTS-eligible students per classroom (n = 60 were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a ROOTS five-student group, a ROOTS two-student group, and a no-treatment control group. Two primary research questions were investigated as part of this study: What was the overall impact of the treatment (the ROOTS intervention as compared with the control (business as usual? Was there a differential impact on student outcomes between the two treatment conditions (two- vs. five-student group? Initial analyses for the first research question indicated a significant impact on three outcomes and positive but nonsignificant impacts on three additional measures. Results for the second research question, comparing the two- and five-student groups, indicated negligible and nonsignificant differences. Implications for practice are discussed.

  10. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moeys

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedotransfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved.

    Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42. Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = −0.26 due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72. Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is

  11. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeys, J.; Larsbo, M.; Bergström, L.; Brown, C. D.; Coquet, Y.; Jarvis, N. J.

    2012-07-01

    Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedo)transfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved. Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42). Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = -0.26) due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72). Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is probably more important than the

  12. Two parameters Lie group analysis and numerical solution of unsteady free convective flow of non-Newtonian fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Uddin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional unsteady laminar free convective heat and mass transfer fluid flow of a non-Newtonian fluid adjacent to a vertical plate has been analyzed numerically. The two parameters Lie group transformation method that transforms the three independent variables into a single variable is used to transform the continuity, the momentum, the energy and the concentration equations into a set of coupled similarity equations. The transformed equations have been solved by the Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg fourth-fifth order numerical method with shooting technique. Numerical calculations were carried out for the various parameters entering into the problem. The dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles were shown graphically and the skin friction, heat and mass transfer rates were given in tables. It is found that friction factor and heat transfer (mass transfer rate for methanol are higher (lower than those of hydrogen and water vapor. Friction factor decreases while heat and mass transfer rate increase as the Prandtl number increases. Friction (heat and mass transfer rate factor of Newtonian fluid is higher (lower than the dilatant fluid.

  13. Enhanced electrical properties in solution-processed InGaZnO thin-film transistors by viable hydroxyl group transfer process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Kyung; Jeong, Hyeon-Seok; Kwon, Hyeok Bin; Kim, Young-Rae; Kang, Shin-Won; Bae, Jin-Hyuk

    2018-05-01

    We propose a simple hydroxyl group transfer method to improve the electrical characteristics of solution-processed amorphous InGaZnO (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Tuned poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer, which has a hydroxyl group as a terminal chemical group, was adhered temporarily to an IGZO thin-film during the solidification step to transfer and supply sufficient hydroxyl groups to the IGZO thin-film. The transferred hydroxyl groups led to efficient hydrolysis and condensation reactions, resulting in a denser metal–oxygen–metal network being achieved in the IGZO thin-film compared to the conventional IGZO thin-film. In addition, it was confirmed that there was no morphological deformation, including to the film thickness and surface roughness. The hydroxyl group transferred IGZO based TFTs exhibited enhanced electrical properties (field-effect mobility of 2.21 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, and on/off current ratio of 106) compared to conventional IGZO TFTs (field-effect mobility of 0.73 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and on/off current ratio of 105).

  14. Uav Photogrammetric Solution Using a Raspberry pi Camera Module and Smart Devices: Test and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, M.; Grasso, N.; Jabbar, A. Abdul

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, smart technologies are an important part of our action and life, both in indoor and outdoor environment. There are several smart devices very friendly to be setting, where they can be integrated and embedded with other sensors, having a very low cost. Raspberry allows to install an internal camera called Raspberry Pi Camera Module, both in RGB band and NIR band. The advantage of this system is the limited cost (light weight and their simplicity to be used and embedded. This paper will describe a research where a Raspberry Pi with the Camera Module was installed onto a UAV hexacopter based on arducopter system, with purpose to collect pictures for photogrammetry issue. Firstly, the system was tested with aim to verify the performance of RPi camera in terms of frame per second/resolution and the power requirement. Moreover, a GNSS receiver Ublox M8T was installed and connected to the Raspberry platform in order to collect real time position and the raw data, for data processing and to define the time reference. IMU was also tested to see the impact of UAV rotors noise on different sensors like accelerometer, Gyroscope and Magnetometer. A comparison of the achieved results (accuracy) on some check points of the point clouds obtained by the camera will be reported as well in order to analyse in deeper the main discrepancy on the generated point cloud and the potentiality of these proposed approach. In this contribute, the assembling of the system is described, in particular the dataset acquired and the results carried out will be analysed.

  15. Reader reaction on the generalized Kruskal-Wallis test for genetic association studies incorporating group uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baolin; Guan, Weihua

    2015-06-01

    Acar and Sun (2013, Biometrics 69, 427-435) presented a generalized Kruskal-Wallis (GKW) test for genetic association studies that incorporated the genotype uncertainty and showed its robust and competitive performance compared to existing methods. We present another interesting way to derive the GKW test via a rank linear model. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  16. Reader Reaction On the generalized Kruskal-Wallis test for genetic association studies incorporating group uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Baolin; Guan, Weihua

    2014-01-01

    Acar and Sun (2013, Biometrics, 69, 427-435) presented a generalized Kruskal-Wallis (GKW) test for genetic association studies that incorporated the genotype uncertainty and showed its robust and competitive performance compared to existing methods. We present another interesting way to derive the GKW test via a rank linear model.

  17. Evaluation of an alternative in vitro test battery for detecting reproductive toxicants in a grouping context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, E.D.; Bosgra, S.; Buist, H.E.; Lewin, G.; Linden, S.C. van der; Man, H.Y.; Piersma, A.H.; Rorije, E.; Schulpen, S.H.W.; Schwarz, M.; Uibel, F.; Vugt-Lussenburg, B.M.A. van; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Burg, B. van der

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed a battery consisting of CALUX transcriptional activation assays, the ReProGlo assay, and the embryonic stem cell test, and zebrafish embryotoxicity assay as 'apical' tests to correctly predict developmental toxicity for 11 out of 12 compounds, and to explain the one false

  18. Getting to grips with poor comprehenders: stability of group membership across test conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Hanne Trebbien; Oakhill, Jane V.; Elbro, Carsten

    Reliable identification of poor comprehenders is difficult because reading comprehension tests do not measure the same thing (Keenan et al., 2014). In addition to different contents, differences in how the same test is administered may also cause instability of the definition of poor comprehenders....

  19. Modeling differential item functioning with group-specific item parameters: A computerized adaptive testing application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makransky, Guido; Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Many important decisions are made based on the results of tests administered under different conditions in the fields of educational and psychological testing. Inaccurate inferences are often made if the property of measurement invariance (MI) is not assessed across these conditions. The importance

  20. AP Trends: Tests Soar, Scores Slip--Gaps between Groups Spur Equity Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    More students are taking Advanced Placement tests, but the proportion of tests receiving what is deemed a passing score has dipped, and the mean score is down for the fourth year in a row. Data released here this week by the New York City-based nonprofit organization that owns the AP brand shows that a greater-than-ever proportion of students…

  1. Group SkSP-R sampling plan for accelerated life tests

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2017-09-15

    Sep 15, 2017 ... SkSP-R sampling; life test; Weibull distribution; producer's risk; ... designed a sampling plan under a time-truncated life test .... adjusted using an acceleration factor. ... where P is the probability of lot acceptance for a single.

  2. Infrared spectroscopic studies of uranyl(VI) species adsorbed from aqueous [UO2(CO3)3]4- solutions on to a polymer bearing amidoxime groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko; Seno, Manabu; Itagaki, Takaharu

    1987-01-01

    Infrared spectra of uranyl(VI) species adsorbed from aqeuous [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- solutions on to a polymer having amidoxime groups were examined in order to obtain information on the adsorption mechanism. The subtraction spectra in a region of 500-1 500 cm -1 exhibit only a distinct band at 886 cm -1 ascribed to the v 3 mode of the O=U=O moiety and no band assigned to carbonato ligands, suggesting the existence of a carbonato-free uranyl(VI) complex; this is consistent with the adsorption equilibrium reported previously. (author)

  3. A generalized Levene's scale test for variance heterogeneity in the presence of sample correlation and group uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, David; Sun, Lei

    2017-09-01

    We generalize Levene's test for variance (scale) heterogeneity between k groups for more complex data, when there are sample correlation and group membership uncertainty. Following a two-stage regression framework, we show that least absolute deviation regression must be used in the stage 1 analysis to ensure a correct asymptotic χk-12/(k-1) distribution of the generalized scale (gS) test statistic. We then show that the proposed gS test is independent of the generalized location test, under the joint null hypothesis of no mean and no variance heterogeneity. Consequently, we generalize the recently proposed joint location-scale (gJLS) test, valuable in settings where there is an interaction effect but one interacting variable is not available. We evaluate the proposed method via an extensive simulation study and two genetic association application studies. © 2017 The Authors Biometrics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Biometric Society.

  4. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockow, K; Garvey, L H; Aberer, W

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable...... indicator of true hypersensitivity.To promote and standardize reproducible skin testing with safe and nonirritant drug concentrations in the clinical practice, the European Network and European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Interest Group on Drug Allergy has performed a literature...... search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, we have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group...

  5. Experimental test of renormalization group theory on the uniaxial, dipolar coupled ferromagnet LiTbf4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1976-01-01

    The transverse correlation range ξ and the susceptibility in the critical region has been measured by neutron scattering. A special technique required to resolve the superdiverging longitudinal correlation range has been utilized. The results for ξ together with existing specific-heat data are in...... are in remarkable agreement with the renormalization group theory of systems with marginal dimensionality. The ratio between the susceptibility amplitudes above and below Tc was found to be 2 in accordance with renormalization-group and meanfield theory....

  6. Testing an empirically derived mental health training model featuring small groups, distributed practice and patient discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrihy, Rachael C; Byrne, Mitchell K; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2009-02-01

    Internationally, family doctors seeking to enhance their skills in evidence-based mental health treatment are attending brief training workshops, despite clear evidence in the literature that short-term, massed formats are not likely to improve skills in this complex area. Reviews of the educational literature suggest that an optimal model of training would incorporate distributed practice techniques; repeated practice over a lengthy time period, small-group interactive learning, mentoring relationships, skills-based training and an ongoing discussion of actual patients. This study investigates the potential role of group-based training incorporating multiple aspects of good pedagogy for training doctors in basic competencies in brief cognitive behaviour therapy (BCBT). Six groups of family doctors (n = 32) completed eight 2-hour sessions of BCBT group training over a 6-month period. A baseline control design was utilised with pre- and post-training measures of doctors' BCBT skills, knowledge and engagement in BCBT treatment. Family doctors' knowledge, skills in and actual use of BCBT with patients improved significantly over the course of training compared with the control period. This research demonstrates preliminary support for the efficacy of an empirically derived group training model for family doctors. Brief CBT group-based training could prove to be an effective and viable model for future doctor training.

  7. Community-Driven Hypothesis Testing: A Solution for the Tragedy of the Anticommons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Oliveira, José Manuel; Trump, Benjamin D; Wood, Matthew D; Linkov, Igor

    2018-03-01

    Shared ownership of property and resources is a longstanding challenge throughout history that has been amplifying with the increasing development of industrial and postindustrial societies. Where governments, project planners, and commercial developers seek to develop new infrastructure, industrial projects, and various other land-and resource-intensive tasks, veto power shared by various local stakeholders can complicate or halt progress. Risk communication has been used as an attempt to address stakeholder concerns in these contexts, but has demonstrated shortcomings. These coordination failures between project planners and stakeholders can be described as a specific kind of social dilemma that we describe as the "tragedy of the anticommons." To overcome such dilemmas, we demonstrate how a two-step process can directly address public mistrust of project planners and public perceptions of limited decision-making authority. This approach is examined via two separate empirical field experiments in Portugal and Tunisia, where public resistance and anticommons problems threatened to derail emerging industrial projects. In both applications, an intervention is undertaken to address initial public resistance to such projects, where specific public stakeholders and project sponsors collectively engaged in a hypothesis-testing process to identify and assess human and environmental health risks associated with proposed industrial facilities. These field experiments indicate that a rigorous attempt to address public mistrust and perceptions of power imbalances and change the pay-off structure of the given dilemma may help overcome such anticommons problems in specific cases, and may potentially generate enthusiasm and support for such projects by local publics moving forward. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  8. Recursive solutions for multi-group neutron kinetics diffusion equations in homogeneous three-dimensional rectangular domains with time dependent perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Claudio Z. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Capao do Leao (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Vilhena, Marco T. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Barros, Ricardo C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico

    2014-12-15

    In the present work we solve in analytical representation the three dimensional neutron kinetic diffusion problem in rectangular Cartesian geometry for homogeneous and bounded domains for any number of energy groups and precursor concentrations. The solution in analytical representation is constructed using a hierarchical procedure, i.e. the original problem is reduced to a problem previously solved by the authors making use of a combination of the spectral method and a recursive decomposition approach. Time dependent absorption cross sections of the thermal energy group are considered with step, ramp and Chebyshev polynomial variations. For these three cases, we present numerical results and discuss convergence properties and compare our results to those available in the literature.

  9. Testing principle working mechanisms of the health action process approach for subjective physical age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Kuhlmann, Tim; Fink, Sebastian; Hambrecht, Rainer; Lippke, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences in social-cognitive predictors and self-regulatory planning, as proposed by the health action process approach (HAPA), across three different subjective physical age groups for physical activity. With a cross-sectional design, 521 participants across the chronological age span from 25 to 86 years (M = 48.79; SD = 12.66) were separated into three groups: those who feel physically younger than they are in terms of chronological age, the same perceived and chronological age, and feeling physically older compared to their chronological age. Participants were assessed regarding their perceived vulnerability, outcome expectancies, general intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and stages of physical activity (non-intenders, intenders, and actors). Data were analysed via mean comparison and multigroup structural equation modelling. Mean differences for all but one construct were eminent in all groups, generally showing that those feeling physically younger also report better social-cognitive predictors of physical activity (e.g. lower perceived vulnerability) in comparison to those who feel the same age or older. The model showed that basic working mechanisms of the HAPA can be applied to all groups. With that, the results provide for the first time evidence that principle working mechanism of the HAPA can be applied to all subjective physical age groups. These may be used to tailor health promoting interventions according to participants' needs as a more suitable proxy than chronological age.

  10. Extent and effects of recurrent shortages of purified-protein derivative tuberculin skin test antigen solutions - United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    Two purified-protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin skin test (TST) antigen solutions are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): Tubersol (Sanofi Pasteur Limited) and Aplisol (JHP Pharmaceuticals, LLC). Tubersol was out of production in late 2012 through April 2013. Shortages of Aplisol have resulted from increased demand as practitioners have sought a substitute for Tubersol. Tubersol production resumed in May 2013, and supplies had been nearly restored by early June. However, in mid-July, state tuberculosis (TB) control officials notified CDC of difficulty obtaining Tubersol and Aplisol. Sanofi Pasteur notified FDA of a temporary delay in the availability of tuberculin in the 10-dose and 50-dose presentations. In mid-October, the 10-dose presentation was being returned to market, on allocation, which means that historical purchasing practices determine the amount that customers are allotted. In late October, the 50-dose presentation was being returned to market, also on allocation, one vial per historical customer per month. Supplies are forecast to approach normal during January 2014, after distributors have restored their supply chains. A compensatory surge in testing after deferment of testing during the periods of shortage might cause further temporary instability of supplies. In mid-August 2013, officials in 29 of 52 U.S. jurisdictions noted a shortage of at least one PPD TST antigen solution in health departments to the extent that it interrupted activities. This report includes a summary of the extent and effects of the shortages and a reiteration of advice on how to adapt to them.

  11. Anticedents to entrepreneurial intentions: Testing for measurement invariance for cultural values, attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs across ethnic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Urban

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Building on previous research on antecedents of entrepreneurial intentions, various measures were tested across different ethnic groups in South Africa. Factorial homogeneity is an important attribute for any scale intended for use in multicultural research, and since tests of equivalency are not routinely applied, this article hypothesised measurement invariance across ethnic groups. Theoretical discussions on Hofstede’s (2001 value survey module (VSM 94, attitudes towards and beliefs about entrepreneurial intentions, general self-efficacy (GSE, and entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE preceded the use of statistical analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis based on 210 respondents indicated that equivalence for the underlying factors across the different ethnic groups could not be established, and that the three groups demonstrated different underlying structures. In conclusion, stereotypic declarations of an integrated South African culture were not supported by this research in terms of entrepreneurial intentions and their antecedents.

  12. A Security Solution for IEEE 802.11's Ad-hoc Mode:Password-Authentication and Group Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanuel, Bresson; Olivier, Chevassut; David, Pointcheval

    2005-10-01

    The IEEE 802 standards ease the deployment of networkinginfrastructures and enable employers to accesscorporate networks whiletraveling. These standards provide two modes of communication calledinfrastructure and ad-hoc modes. A security solution for the IEEE802.11's infrastructure mode took several years to reach maturity andfirmware are still been upgraded, yet a solution for the ad-hoc modeneeds to be specified. The present paper is a first attempt in thisdirection. It leverages the latest developments in the area ofpassword-based authentication and (group) Diffie-Hellman key exchange todevelop a provably-secure key-exchange protocol for IEEE 802.11's ad-hocmode. The protocol allows users to securely join and leave the wirelessgroup at time, accommodates either a single-shared password orpairwise-shared passwords among the group members, or at least with acentral server; achieves security against dictionary attacks in theideal-hash model (i.e. random-oracles). This is, to the best of ourknowledge, the first such protocol to appear in the cryptographicliterature.

  13. Comparison of the influence of polyaspartic acid and polylysine functional groups on the adsorption at the Cr2O3-Aqueous polymer solution interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostolska, Iwona; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata

    2014-08-01

    Polyamino acids are a group of synthesized polymers obtained by polymerization of a given kind of amino acid monomer. Because of high biodegradability of this class of polymers, they can be used as flocculation or stabilization agents in the environmental aspects. Therefore determination of their influence on the stability of the aqueous suspension of metal oxides is important. An influence of different functional groups of polyamino acids, their molecular weight and concentration on the adsorption at the chromium (III) oxide (Cr2O3)-aqueous solution interface was determined. Experiments were carried out for four values of solution pH varying from 3 to 10 (3, 4, 7.6 and 10, respectively). Two polymers were used: anionic polyaspartic acid (ASP) of 6800 and 27,000 as well as polylysine (LYS) of 4900 and 33,000 molecular weights. Changes of surface charge density of colloidal Cr2O3 in the presence and in the absence of macromolecular substances were determined using potentiometric titration. In these studies the influence of the concentration and molecular weight of the ionic polymers on the pHpzc value was determined. Additionally, due to the lack of appropriate literature data, potentiometric titration of the selected polymers was performed to determine pKa values.

  14. [Patient-centered approaches to understanding, transformation and solution of team conflicts in the psychiatric clinic within the scope of the Balint group concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, A

    1987-08-01

    The working climate and therapeutic possibilities in a hospital are determined, among other factors, by emotional processes in everyday ward routine. Team conflicts and their solution are not infrequently reflections of the open-mindedness of a hospital towards the complexity of these processes. However, the complex interlocking of transference processes with rôle-specific and personality-conditioned behaviour patterns makes it more difficult to understand and make use of these emotional processes within the team. We present a specific attempt to working up emotional conflicts in a patient-centred approach via focussing on self-rating of the team workers in respect of mood, feeling tone and imagination. Specific internal Balint groups are the fulcrum. To distinguish this method from the theory of object-directed transference of emotions and constructions of relations, the theoretical basis of this group method is seen in the systemic paradigm with which patient-focussed solution functions are obtained in respect of process orientation and instrumental part functions of the team workers. In this connection it was explored to what extent the following factors can be interpreted as patient-induced phenomena: therapeutic and rôle behaviour, hospital structures and administrative squabbles, internal and external walls of a mental hospital.

  15. Occupational contact dermatitis in painters - an analysis of patch test data from the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Anja P; Lundov, Michael Dyrgaard; Zachariae, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Background. Painters are among the occupational groups that most commonly experience occupational contact dermatitis, but few investigations exist concerning this occupation. Objectives. To characterize painters with contact dermatitis and identify the most common allergens associated...... with the occupation. Materials and methods. All patch test results of 219 painters and 1095 matched controls registered by the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group between 2001 and 2010 were analysed. Results. Hand eczema (p contact dermatitis (p

  16. Students Working Online for Group Projects: A Test of an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eddie W. L.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model that specified factors affecting students' intentions to collaborate online for group work. Past behaviour, past experience and actual behavioural control were incorporated in the extended TPB model. The mediating roles of attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural…

  17. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  18. Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity. II: Report of the 2009 International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, A.M.; Guzzie, P.J.; Bauer, D.; Gocke, E.; Itoh, S.; Jacobs, A.; Krul, C.A.M.; Schepky, A.; Tanaka, N.; Kasper, P.

    2011-01-01

    A workshop to reappraise the previous IWGT recommendations for photogenotoxicity testing [E. Gocke, L. Muller, P.J. Guzzie, S. Brendler-Schwaab, S. Bulera, C.F. Chignell, L.M. Henderson, A. Jacobs, H. Murli, R.D. Snyder, N. Tanaka, Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity: report of the

  19. Equating Multidimensional Tests under a Random Groups Design: A Comparison of Various Equating Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the equating performance of various equating procedures for the multidimensional tests. To examine the various equating procedures, simulated data sets were used that were generated based on a multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) framework. Various equating procedures were examined, including…

  20. Prenatal Group B Streptococcus Test Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Feng Wei

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: It is necessary to perform a GBS test 4 weeks after an initial negative GBS culture at 35–37 weeks of gestation. RT-PCR provides a simple and rapid alternative method for detecting rectovaginal GBS colonization at the time of labor.

  1. Patch Testing To a Textile Dye Mix by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Ale, Iris; Andersen, Klaus E

    2015-01-01

    .2%. The most frequent dye allergen in the TDM-positive patients was D Orange 3. CONCLUSIONS: Over 30% of the TDM allergic patients had been missed if only the international baseline series was tested. Contact allergy to TDM could explain or contribute to dermatitis in over 20% of the patients. Textile dye mix...... should be considered for inclusion into the international baseline series....

  2. Patch testing to a textile dye mix by the international contact dermatitis research group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Ale, Iris; Andersen, Klaus E; Diepgen, Thomas; Goh, Chee-Leok; Goossens R, An; Jerajani, Hemangi; Maibach, Howard I; Sasseville, Denis; Bruze, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Disperse dyes are well-known contact sensitizers not included in the majority of commercially available baseline series. To investigate the outcome of patch testing to a textile dye mix (TDM) consisting of 8 disperse dyes. Two thousand four hundred ninety-three consecutive dermatitis patients in 9 dermatology clinics were patch tested with a TDM 6.6%, consisting of Disperse (D) Blue 35, D Yellow 3, D Orange 1 and 3, D Red 1 and 17, all 1.0% each, and D Blue 106 and D Blue 124, each 0.3%. 90 reacted positively to the TDM. About 92.2% of the patients allergic to the TDM were also tested with the 8 separate dyes. Contact allergy to TDM was found in 3.6% (1.3-18.2) Simultaneous reactivity to p-phenylenediamine was found in 61.1% of the TDM-positive patients. Contact allergy to TDM and not to other p-amino-substituted sensitizers was diagnosed in 1.2%. The most frequent dye allergen in the TDM-positive patients was D Orange 3. Over 30% of the TDM allergic patients had been missed if only the international baseline series was tested. Contact allergy to TDM could explain or contribute to dermatitis in over 20% of the patients. Textile dye mix should be considered for inclusion into the international baseline series.

  3. Perceived social structural relations and group stereotypes : A test of the Stereotype Content Model in Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Heleen; Verkuijten, Maykel; Khan, Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Using data from two studies, the current research tests the Stereotype Content Model (SCM) within a Malaysian context using Chinese and ethnic Malay participants. The aim of the research is to examine the theoretical underpinnings of the SCM in a new context by investigating the role of aspects of

  4. A modern artificial intelligence Playware art tool for psychological testing of group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2015-01-01

    and the psychological findings. We describe the modern artificial intelligence implementation of this instrument. Between an art piece and a psychological test, at a first cognitive analysis, it seems to be a promising research tool. In the discussion we speculate about potential industrial applications, as well....

  5. Multicenter Patch Testing With Methylisothiazolinone and Methylchloroisothiazolinone/Methylisothiazolinone Within the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Ale, Iris; Andersen, Klaus E; Elsner, Peter; Goh, Chee-Leok; Goossens, An; Jerajani, Hemangi; Matsunaga, Kayoko; McFadden, John; Bruze, Magnus

    The preservatives methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI) and MI are well-known contact sensitizers. Recently, an increase in the contact allergy frequency for MI 0.2% aqueous (aq) has been seen in many European countries paralleled with an increase in MCI/MI allergy. Many of the MI-allergic patients do not react to MCI/MI 0.01% or 0.02% because the concentration of MI in these preparations is too low (25 and 50 ppm, respectively) to elicit a positive patch test reaction. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of contact allergy to MI in the participating clinics representing various countries all over the world, to assess how many additional individuals with contact allergy are found by testing MI 0.2% aq in parallel with MCI/MI 0.02%, and to assess the clinical relevance of MI and MCI/MI allergies. In 9 dermatology clinics representing 9 countries, 3865 consecutive patients with dermatitis were patch tested with MI 0.2% aq and in parallel with MCI/MI 0.02% aq, provisionally included into the baseline series. An assessment of clinical relevance in those allergic to MI was also made. Contact allergy to MI was found in 284 patients (7.3%). The frequency of contact allergy varied from 0.8% to 10.9% in different centers. Simultaneous reactivity to 200 ppm of MCI/MI was found in 67.3% of the MI-positive patients. Contact allergy to MI alone without any simultaneous contact allergy to 200 ppm of MCI/MI was diagnosed in 93 patients (32.7%; 2.4% of all tested patients). The contact allergy to MI and/or MCI/MI could explain or contribute to dermatitis in more than 60% of the MI-allergic patients. Methylisothiazolinone of 2000 ppm needs to be patch tested on its own to not miss contact allergy.

  6. INTRAVAL Working group 2 summary report on Phase 2 analysis of the Finnsjoen test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Peter; Winberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive series of tracer tests on a relatively large scale have been performed by SKB at Finnsjoen, Sweden, to increase understanding of transport phenomena which govern migration of radionuclides in major fracture zones. The conducted experiments were subsequently selected as a test in the international INTRAVAL Project, in part because the tests at Finnsjoe invite to direct address of validation of geosphere models. This report summarizes the study of the Finnsjoe test case within INTRAVAL Phase 2, which has involved nine project teams from seven countries. Porous media approaches in two dimensions dominated, although some project teams utilized one-dimensional transport models, and even three-dimensional approaches on a larger scale. The dimensionality employed did not appear to be decisive for the ability to reproduce the observed field responses. It was also demonstrated that stochastic approaches can be used in a validation process. Only four out of nine project teams studied more than one process. The general conclusion drawn is that flow and transport in the studied zone is governed by advection and that hydrodynamic dispersion is needed to explain the breakthrough curves. Matrix diffusion is assumed to have small or negligible effect. The performed analysis is dominated by numerical approaches applied on scales on the order of a 1000m. Taking scale alone into account, the results of most teams are possible to compare. A variety of validation aspects have been considered. Five teams utilized a model calibrated on one test, to predict another, whereas the two teams utilizing stochastic continuum approaches addressed; 1) validity of extrapolation of a model calibrated on one transport scale to a larger scale, 2) performance assessment implications of choice of underlying distribution model for hydraulic conductivity, respectively. 37 refs

  7. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  8. Critical test of isotropic periodic sum techniques with group-based cut-off schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Takuma; Yasuoka, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazuaki Z

    2018-03-08

    Truncation is still chosen for many long-range intermolecular interaction calculations to efficiently compute free-boundary systems, macromolecular systems and net-charge molecular systems, for example. Advanced truncation methods have been developed for long-range intermolecular interactions. Every truncation method can be implemented as one of two basic cut-off schemes, namely either an atom-based or a group-based cut-off scheme. The former computes interactions of "atoms" inside the cut-off radius, whereas the latter computes interactions of "molecules" inside the cut-off radius. In this work, the effect of group-based cut-off is investigated for isotropic periodic sum (IPS) techniques, which are promising cut-off treatments to attain advanced accuracy for many types of molecular system. The effect of group-based cut-off is clearly different from that of atom-based cut-off, and severe artefacts are observed in some cases. However, no severe discrepancy from the Ewald sum is observed with the extended IPS techniques.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulations Comparing Fisher Exact Test and Unequal Variances t Test for Analysis of Differences Between Groups in Brief Hospital Lengths of Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Bayman, Emine O; Dexter, Elisabeth U

    2017-12-01

    We examined type I and II error rates for analysis of (1) mean hospital length of stay (LOS) versus (2) percentage of hospital LOS that are overnight. These 2 end points are suitable for when LOS is treated as a secondary economic end point. We repeatedly resampled LOS for 5052 discharges of thoracoscopic wedge resections and lung lobectomy at 26 hospitals. Unequal variances t test (Welch method) and Fisher exact test both were conservative (ie, type I error rate less than nominal level). The Wilcoxon rank sum test was included as a comparator; the type I error rates did not differ from the nominal level of 0.05 or 0.01. Fisher exact test was more powerful than the unequal variances t test at detecting differences among hospitals; estimated odds ratio for obtaining P < .05 with Fisher exact test versus unequal variances t test = 1.94, with 95% confidence interval, 1.31-3.01. Fisher exact test and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney had comparable statistical power in terms of differentiating LOS between hospitals. For studies with LOS to be used as a secondary end point of economic interest, there is currently considerable interest in the planned analysis being for the percentage of patients suitable for ambulatory surgery (ie, hospital LOS equals 0 or 1 midnight). Our results show that there need not be a loss of statistical power when groups are compared using this binary end point, as compared with either Welch method or Wilcoxon rank sum test.

  10. On the optimal systems of subalgebras for the equations of hydrodynamic stability analysis of smooth shear flows and their group-invariant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Jan-Niklas; Oberlack, Martin; Chagelishvili, George

    2017-04-01

    We present a unifying solution framework for the linearized compressible equations for two-dimensional linearly sheared unbounded flows using the Lie symmetry analysis. The full set of symmetries that are admitted by the underlying system of equations is employed to systematically derive the one- and two-dimensional optimal systems of subalgebras, whose connected group reductions lead to three distinct invariant ansatz functions for the governing sets of partial differential equations (PDEs). The purpose of this analysis is threefold and explicitly we show that (i) there are three invariant solutions that stem from the optimal system. These include a general ansatz function with two free parameters, as well as the ansatz functions of the Kelvin mode and the modal approach. Specifically, the first approach unifies these well-known ansatz functions. By considering two limiting cases of the free parameters and related algebraic transformations, the general ansatz function is reduced to either of them. This fact also proves the existence of a link between the Kelvin mode and modal ansatz functions, as these appear to be the limiting cases of the general one. (ii) The Lie algebra associated with the Lie group admitted by the PDEs governing the compressible dynamics is a subalgebra associated with the group admitted by the equations governing the incompressible dynamics, which allows an additional (scaling) symmetry. Hence, any consequences drawn from the compressible case equally hold for the incompressible counterpart. (iii) In any of the systems of ordinary differential equations, derived by the three ansatz functions in the compressible case, the linearized potential vorticity is a conserved quantity that allows us to analyze vortex and wave mode perturbations separately.

  11. Paleomagnetic tests for tectonic reconstructions of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Woyla Group, Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokaat, Eldert; Bongers, Mayke; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Rudyawan, Alfend; Marshal, Edo

    2017-04-01

    SE Asia consists of multiple continental blocks, volcanic arcs and suture zones representing remnants of closing ocean basins. The core of this mainland is called Sundaland, and was formed by accretion of continental and arc fragments during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. The former positions of these blocks are still uncertain but reconstructions based on tectonostratigraphic, palaeobiogeographic, geological and palaeomagnetic studies indicate the continental terranes separated from the eastern margin of Gondwana. During the mid-Cretaceous, more continental and arc fragments accreted to Sundaland, including the intra-oceanic Woyla Arc now exposed on Sumatra. These continental fragments were derived from Australia, but the former position of the Woyla Arc is unconstrained. Interpretations on the former position of the Woyla Arc fall in two end-member groups. The first group interprets the Woyla Arc to be separated from West Sumatra by a small back-arc basin. This back arc basin opened in the Late Jurassic, and closed mid-Cretaceous, when the Woyla Arc collided with West Sumatra. The other group interprets the Woyla Arc to be derived from Gondwana, at a position close to the northern margin of Greater India in the Late Jurassic. Subsequently the Woyla Arc moved northwards and collided with West Sumatra in the mid-Cretaceous. Since these scenarios predict very different plate kinematic evolutions for the Neotethyan realm, we here aim to place paleomagnetic constraints on paleolatitudinal evolution of the Woyla Arc. The Woyla Arc consists mainly of basaltic to andesitic volcanics and dykes, and volcaniclastic shales and sandstones. Associated limestones with volcanic debris are interpreted as fringing reefs. This assemblage is interpreted as remnants of an Early Cretaceous intra-oceanic arc. West Sumatra exposes granites, surrounded by quartz sandstones, shales and volcanic tuffs. These sediments are in part metamorphosed. This assemblage is interpreted as a Jurassic

  12. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2009-02-28

    This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

  13. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J.V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing

  14. Using Cochran's Z Statistic to Test the Kernel-Smoothed Item Response Function Differences between Focal and Reference Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yinggan; Gierl, Mark J.; Cui, Ying

    2010-01-01

    This study combined the kernel smoothing procedure and a nonparametric differential item functioning statistic--Cochran's Z--to statistically test the difference between the kernel-smoothed item response functions for reference and focal groups. Simulation studies were conducted to investigate the Type I error and power of the proposed…

  15. Equipment for testing a group of nuclear reactor fuel elements for damage to the cans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohm, F.

    1977-01-01

    Equipment is described for use in sodium cooled nuclear reactors, with which the fuel elements consisting of bundles of fuel and fertile rods can be examined for damage to the cans. Fission poducts occurring in the liquid coolant act as indicators. The coolant is sucked via pipelines which penetrate into the elements into a collecting container, and a special pipeline is available for every element of a group, where the highest points of individual pipelines at different hydrostatic heads are taken to the collecting container. This permits the checking of one line at a time due to pressure changes. (UWI) [de

  16. Acting in solidarity: Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    2015-09-01

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Based on two proposed functions of social identity performance (Klein, Spears, & Reicher, 2007), we distinguished between the efficacy of collective action at consolidating the identity of a protest movement and its efficacy at achieving social change (political efficacy). We expected identity consolidation efficacy to positively predict collective action tendencies directly and indirectly via political efficacy. We also expected collective action tendencies to be positively predicted by moral outrage and by sympathy in response to disadvantaged outgroup's suffering. These hypotheses were supported in two surveys examining intentions to protest for Palestine in Britain (Study 1), and intentions to attend the June 4th vigil in Hong Kong to commemorate the Tiananmen massacre among a sample of Hong Kong citizens (Study 2). The contributions of these findings to research on the dual pathway model of collective action and the different functions of collective action are discussed. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Long-term resource variation and group size: A large-sample field test of the Resource Dispersion Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morecroft Michael D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Resource Dispersion Hypothesis (RDH proposes a mechanism for the passive formation of social groups where resources are dispersed, even in the absence of any benefits of group living per se. Despite supportive modelling, it lacks empirical testing. The RDH predicts that, rather than Territory Size (TS increasing monotonically with Group Size (GS to account for increasing metabolic needs, TS is constrained by the dispersion of resource patches, whereas GS is independently limited by their richness. We conducted multiple-year tests of these predictions using data from the long-term study of badgers Meles meles in Wytham Woods, England. The study has long failed to identify direct benefits from group living and, consequently, alternative explanations for their large group sizes have been sought. Results TS was not consistently related to resource dispersion, nor was GS consistently related to resource richness. Results differed according to data groupings and whether territories were mapped using minimum convex polygons or traditional methods. Habitats differed significantly in resource availability, but there was also evidence that food resources may be spatially aggregated within habitat types as well as between them. Conclusions This is, we believe, the largest ever test of the RDH and builds on the long-term project that initiated part of the thinking behind the hypothesis. Support for predictions were mixed and depended on year and the method used to map territory borders. We suggest that within-habitat patchiness, as well as model assumptions, should be further investigated for improved tests of the RDH in the future.

  18. Expert group study on recommended practices for wind turbine testing and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljunggren, S; Gustafsson, A; Trenka, A R

    1984-01-01

    The major goal of this documents is to facilitate comparisons of noise measurements made in different countries by different investigators. The secondary goal is to provide an engineering data base for the development and validation of analytical acoustic prediction techniques. The evaluation of wind turbines must encompass all aspects of a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) ranging from: energy production, quality of power, reliability, durability and safety, through to cost effectiveness or economics, noise characteristics, impact on the environment and electromagnetic interference. The development of internationally agreements on evaluation procedures for each of these areas is needed now to aid in the development of the industry, while strengthening confidence and preventing chaos in the market. It is the purpose of the proposed recommendatons for wind turbine testing to address the development of internationally agreed upon test procedures which deal with each of the above noted aspects for characteizing WECS. The IEA expert committee will pursue this procedures in each of the following areas, power performance, cost of energy from WECS, fatigue evaluation, acountics, electromagnetic interference, safety and reliability and quality of power. This paper addresses the forth item - Acoustics. The expert committee will seek to gain approval of the procedures in each member country through the IEA agreements. The recommendations shall be regularly reviewed and areas in need of further investigation shall be identified. (AB).

  19. Point of care testing of phospholipase A2 group IIA for serological diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nathan J.; Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Mmesi, Jonas; Bentham, Andrew; Tyreman, Matthew; Abraham, Sonya; Stevens, Molly M.

    2016-02-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care.Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08423g

  20. Thermal quantitative sensory testing to assess the sensory effects of three local anesthetic solutions in a randomized trial of interscalene blockade for shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermeus, Luc A; Hans, Guy H; Schepens, Tom; Bosserez, Nathalie M-L; Breebaart, Margaretha B; Smitz, Carine J; Vercauteren, Marcel P

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether quantitative sensory testing (QST) with thermal stimulations can quantitatively measure the characteristics of an ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (US-ISB). This was a prospective randomized trial in patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia and US-ISB. Participants and observers were blinded for the study. We assigned the study participants to one of three groups: 0.5% levobupivacaine 15 mL, 0.5% levobupivacaine 15 mL with 1:200,000 epinephrine, and 0.75% ropivacaine 15 mL. We performed thermal QST within dermatomes C4, C5, C6, and C7 before infiltration and 30 min, six hours, ten hours, and 24 hr after performing the US-ISB. In addition, we used QST, a semi-objective quantitative testing method, to measure the onset, intensity, duration, extent, and functional recovery of the sensory block. We also measured detection thresholds for cold/warm sensations and cold/heat pain. Detection thresholds for all thermal sensations within the ipsilateral C4, C5, C6, and C7 dermatomes increased rapidly (indicating the development of a hypoesthetic state) and reached a steady state after 30 min. This lasted for approximately ten hours and returned to normal detection thresholds by 24 hr. There were no differences detected between the three groups at 24 hr when we compared warm sensation thresholds on one dermatome. Visual inspection of the pooled results per dermatome suggests the ability of QST to detect clinically relevant differences in block intensity per dermatome. Quantitative sensory testing can be useful as a method for detecting the presence and characteristics of regional anesthesia-induced sensory block and may be used for the evaluation of clinical protocols. The three local anesthetic solutions exhibited a similar anesthetic effect. The results support the use of QST to assess block characteristics quantitatively under clinical research conditions. This trial was registered at

  1. Electroless oxidation of diamond surfaces in ceric and ferricyanide solutions: An easy way to produce 'C-O' functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N., E-mail: nathalie.simon@uvsq.f [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180, Universite de Versailles-St-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, 78000 Versailles (France); Charrier, G.; Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180, Universite de Versailles-St-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, 78000 Versailles (France)

    2010-08-01

    Despite many works are devoted to oxidation of diamond surfaces, it is still a challenge, to successfully produce well defined 'C-O' functions, particularly for functionalization purposes. In this paper we describe and compare, for the first time, the 'electroless' oxidation of as-deposited polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD) films in ceric and ferricyanide solutions at room temperature. Both reactions efficiently generate oxygen functionalities on BDD surface. While a higher amount of 'C-O' moieties is produced with Ce{sup 4+} as oxidizing agent, the use of ferricyanide specie seems the most interesting to specifically generate hydroxyl groups. Additionally, this easy to perform oxidative method appears not damaging for diamond surfaces and adapted to conductive or non-conductive materials. The resulting surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle and capacitance-voltage analysis.

  2. Multiple Criteria Group Decision-Making Considering Symmetry with Regards to the Positive and Negative Ideal Solutions via the Pythagorean Normal Cloud Model for Application to Economic Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Pythagorean fuzzy sets are highly appealing in dealing with uncertainty as they allow for greater flexibility in regards to the membership and non-membership degrees by extending the set of possible values. In this paper, we propose a multi-criteria group decision-making approach based on the Pythagorean normal cloud. Some cloud aggregation operators are presented in this paper to facilitate the appraisal of the underlying utilities of the alternatives under consideration. The concept and properties of the Pythagorean normal cloud and its backward generation algorithm, aggregation operators and distance measurement are outlined. The proposed approach resembles the TOPSIS technique, which, indeed, considers the symmetry of the distances to the positive and negative ideal solutions. Furthermore, an example from e-commerce is presented to demonstrate and validate the proposed decision-making approach. Finally, the comparative analysis is implemented to check the robustness of the results when the aggregation rules are changed.

  3. Cellulose bearing Schiff base and carboxylic acid chelating groups: a low cost and green adsorbent for heavy metal ion removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, R; Ravikumar, L

    2016-10-01

    Chemically modified cellulose bearing metal binding sites like Schiff base and carboxylic acid groups was synthesized and characterized through Fourier transform infrared and solid state 13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The chemically modified cellulose (Cell-PA) adsorbent was examined for its metal ion uptake ability for Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. Kinetic and isotherm studies were carried out under optimum conditions. Pseudo-second-order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm fit well with the experimental data. Thermodynamic studies were also performed along with adsorption regeneration performance studies. The adsorbent (Cell-PA) shows high potential for the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) metal ions, and it shows antibacterial activity towards selected microorganisms.

  4. Experience with spent fuel storage at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 5-8 July 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work begins on appropriate solutions. To obtain an overall picture of the size and extent of these problems, an Advisory Group Meeting on Storage Experience with Spent Fuel from Research Reactors was convened in Vienna 5-8 July 1993, and attended by twelve participants and three observers representing thirteen different countries. These proceedings contain the country reports presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Experience with spent fuel storage at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 5-8 July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work begins on appropriate solutions. To obtain an overall picture of the size and extent of these problems, an Advisory Group Meeting on Storage Experience with Spent Fuel from Research Reactors was convened in Vienna 5-8 July 1993, and attended by twelve participants and three observers representing thirteen different countries. These proceedings contain the country reports presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs.

  6. Geometric classification of scalp hair for valid drug testing, 6 more reliable than 8 hair curl groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Mkentane

    Full Text Available Curly hair is reported to contain higher lipid content than straight hair, which may influence incorporation of lipid soluble drugs. The use of race to describe hair curl variation (Asian, Caucasian and African is unscientific yet common in medical literature (including reports of drug levels in hair. This study investigated the reliability of a geometric classification of hair (based on 3 measurements: the curve diameter, curl index and number of waves.After ethical approval and informed consent, proximal virgin (6cm hair sampled from the vertex of scalp in 48 healthy volunteers were evaluated. Three raters each scored hairs from 48 volunteers at two occasions each for the 8 and 6-group classifications. One rater applied the 6-group classification to 80 additional volunteers in order to further confirm the reliability of this system. The Kappa statistic was used to assess intra and inter rater agreement.Each rater classified 480 hairs on each occasion. No rater classified any volunteer's 10 hairs into the same group; the most frequently occurring group was used for analysis. The inter-rater agreement was poor for the 8-groups (k = 0.418 but improved for the 6-groups (k = 0.671. The intra-rater agreement also improved (k = 0.444 to 0.648 versus 0.599 to 0.836 for 6-groups; that for the one evaluator for all volunteers was good (k = 0.754.Although small, this is the first study to test the reliability of a geometric classification. The 6-group method is more reliable. However, a digital classification system is likely to reduce operator error. A reliable objective classification of human hair curl is long overdue, particularly with the increasing use of hair as a testing substrate for treatment compliance in Medicine.

  7. Testing Mean Differences among Groups: Multivariate and Repeated Measures Analysis with Minimal Assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, Arne C; Friedrich, Sarah; Pauly, Markus; Konietschke, Frank; Staffen, Wolfgang; Strobl, Nicolas; Höller, Yvonne

    2018-03-22

    To date, there is a lack of satisfactory inferential techniques for the analysis of multivariate data in factorial designs, when only minimal assumptions on the data can be made. Presently available methods are limited to very particular study designs or assume either multivariate normality or equal covariance matrices across groups, or they do not allow for an assessment of the interaction effects across within-subjects and between-subjects variables. We propose and methodologically validate a parametric bootstrap approach that does not suffer from any of the above limitations, and thus provides a rather general and comprehensive methodological route to inference for multivariate and repeated measures data. As an example application, we consider data from two different Alzheimer's disease (AD) examination modalities that may be used for precise and early diagnosis, namely, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and electroencephalogram (EEG). These data violate the assumptions of classical multivariate methods, and indeed classical methods would not have yielded the same conclusions with regards to some of the factors involved.

  8. Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series: retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Erin M; Wang, Michael Z; Maibach, Howard I; Belsito, Donald V; Zug, Kathryn A; Taylor, James S; Mathias, C G Toby; Sasseville, Denis; Zirwas, Matthew J; Fowler, Joseph F; DeKoven, Joel G; Fransway, Anthony F; DeLeo, Vincent A; Marks, James G; Pratt, Melanie D; Storrs, Frances J

    2013-01-01

    Both active and inactive ingredients in sunscreen may cause contact dermatitis. This study aimed to describe allergens associated with a sunscreen source. A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Of 23,908 patients patch tested, 219 (0.9%) had sunscreen coded as an allergen source. Patients who were male, with occupational dermatitis, or older (older than 40 years) had significantly lower rates of allergic reactions to sunscreens; the most commonly affected areas were the face and exposed sites (P Contact Dermatitis Group screening series of 65 to 70 allergens. A supplemental antigen series is important in detecting allergy to sunscreens.

  9. Summary of Group Development and Testing for Single Shell Tank Closure at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, John R.

    2005-01-01

    This report is a summary of the bench-scale and large scale experimental studies performed by Savannah River National Laboratory for CH2M HILL to develop grout design mixes for possible use in producing fill materials as a part of Tank Closure of the Single-Shell Tanks at Hanford. The grout development data provided in this report demonstrates that these design mixes will produce fill materials that are ready for use in Hanford single shell tank closure. The purpose of this report is to assess the ability of the proposed grout specifications to meet the current requirements for successful single shell tank closure which will include the contracting of services for construction and operation of a grout batch plant. The research and field experience gained by SRNL in the closure of Tanks 17F and 20F at the Savannah River Site was leveraged into the grout development efforts for Hanford. It is concluded that the three Hanford grout design mixes provide fill materials that meet the current requirements for successful placement. This conclusion is based on the completion of recommended testing using Hanford area materials by the operators of the grout batch plant. This report summarizes the regulatory drivers and the requirements for grout mixes as tank fill material. It is these requirements for both fresh and cured grout properties that drove the development of the grout formulations for the stabilization, structural and capping layers

  10. Genetic testing for colorectal carcinoma susceptibility: focus group responses of individuals with colorectal carcinoma and first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, A Y; DeVellis, B M; Skrzynia, C; Millikan, R

    2001-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) may be the most frequent form of hereditary cancer. Genetic counseling and testing for heritable CRC is a promising approach for reducing the high incidence and mortality rates associated with the disease. Patients with CRC or those with at least one family member with the disease are the most likely persons to request or be offered genetic testing in the clinical or research setting. Currently, however, little is known about the behavioral, psychosocial, ethical, legal, and economic outcomes of CRC genetic counseling and testing. Eight focus group interviews, four for CRC patients (n = 28) and four for first-degree relatives (n = 33), were conducted to obtain insights into attitudes, beliefs, and informational needs about genetic testing for hereditary CRC. Focus group interviews revealed a general lack of knowledge about cancer genetics and genetic testing; worry about confidentiality issues; strong concern for family members, particularly children; and a need for primary care providers to be informed about these issues. Major perceived advantages of genetic testing included improving health-related decisions, guiding physicians in making recommendations for surveillance, and informing relatives about risk potential. Disadvantages included potential discrimination, adverse psychologic effects, and financial costs associated with testing. As knowledge and media coverage of genetics continue to expand, it becomes increasingly important to continue efforts on behalf of, and in partnership with, those individuals most affected by genetic testing for hereditary cancer syndromes. These findings provide data needed to develop and implement informational, educational, counseling, and research-oriented programs that are sensitive to individuals' concerns and preferences. Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.

  11. Patch-testing North American lip dermatitis patients: data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zug, Kathryn A; Kornik, Rachel; Belsito, Donald V; DeLeo, Vincent A; Fowler, Joseph F; Maibach, Howard I; Marks, James G; Mathias, C G Toby; Pratt, Melanie D; Rietschel, Robert L; Sasseville, Denis; Storrs, Frances J; Taylor, James S; Warshaw, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    The most common differential diagnoses for patients presenting with lip dermatitis or inflammation include atopic, allergic, and irritant contact dermatitis. Patch testing can be performed to identify the allergic contact conditions. To report North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) patch-test results of patients who presented for patch testing with only lip involvement from 2001 to 2004. Patient characteristics, allergen frequencies, relevance, final diagnoses, and relevant allergic sources not in the NACDG screening series were evaluated. The NACDG 2001-2004 database was used to select patients presenting with only lip involvement. Of 10,061 patients tested, 2% (n = 196) had lips as the sole involved site. Most (84.2%) were women. After patch testing, 38.3% (n = 75) were diagnosed with allergic contact cheilitis. Fragrance mix, Myroxilon pereirae, and nickel were the most common relevant allergens. Of 75 patients, 27 (36%) had relevant positive patch-test reactions to items not on the NACDG series; lipstick and cosmetics were the predominant sources. Patch testing is valuable in the evaluation and identification of contact allergy in patients referred for lip dermatitis. The use of supplementary allergens based on history and exposure is important in the identification of additional relevant allergens. Over a third of patients with contact allergy had other factors, such as irritant dermatitis, considered relevant to their condition.

  12. Evaluation of the theory-based Quality Improvement in Physical Therapy (QUIP) programme: a one-group, pre-test post-test pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Geert M; Harting, Janneke; Bartholomew, L Kay; Schlief, Angelique; Oostendorp, Rob A B; de Vries, Nanne K

    2013-05-25

    Guideline adherence in physical therapy is far from optimal, which has consequences for the effectiveness and efficiency of physical therapy care. Programmes to enhance guideline adherence have, so far, been relatively ineffective. We systematically developed a theory-based Quality Improvement in Physical Therapy (QUIP) programme aimed at the individual performance level (practicing physiotherapists; PTs) and the practice organization level (practice quality manager; PQM). The aim of the study was to pilot test the multilevel QUIP programme's effectiveness and the fidelity, acceptability and feasibility of its implementation. A one-group, pre-test, post-test pilot study (N = 8 practices; N = 32 PTs, 8 of whom were also PQMs) done between September and December 2009. Guideline adherence was measured using clinical vignettes that addressed 12 quality indicators reflecting the guidelines' main recommendations. Determinants of adherence were measured using quantitative methods (questionnaires). Delivery of the programme and management changes were assessed using qualitative methods (observations, group interviews, and document analyses). Changes in adherence and determinants were tested in the paired samples T-tests and expressed in effect sizes (Cohen's d). Overall adherence did not change (3.1%; p = .138). Adherence to three quality indicators improved (8%, 24%, 43%; .000 ≤ p ≤ .023). Adherence to one quality indicator decreased (-15.7%; p = .004). Scores on various determinants of individual performance improved and favourable changes at practice organizational level were observed. Improvements were associated with the programme's multilevel approach, collective goal setting, and the application of self-regulation; unfavourable findings with programme deficits. The one-group pre-test post-test design limits the internal validity of the study, the self-selected sample its external validity. The QUIP programme has the potential to change physical

  13. Oscilacije nagibnog sklopa oruđa pri opaljenju / Oscillation of elevating group on artillery weapon during firing test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Ristić

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available U radu su opisane oscilacije nagibnog sklopa artiljerijskog oruđa koje nastaju pri opaljenju. Nagibni sklop prikazanje kao kruto telo sa jednim stepenom slobode kretanja (rotacija u vertikalnoj ravni. Model oscilovanja upoređenje sa eksperimentalnim rezultatima realnog modela oscilovanja oruđa (oscilacije nagibnog sklopa sa više stepeni slobode kretanja. Date su razlike između proračunskog i realnog modela oscilovanja i analiza njihovih parametara. / The oscillation of elevating group on artillery weapon during firing test are described in this paper. The elevation group is represented a rigid body of DOF (rotation in vertical plane. The model oscillation is compared -with the experimental results of real model oscillation (oscillations of elevating group with more degrees of freedom. A difference sizes among simplify and real model oscillation are given, and some of their parameters are analyzed.

  14. Solution processable 2-(trityloxy)ethyl and tert-butyl group containing amorphous molecular glasses of pyranylidene derivatives with light-emitting and amplified spontaneous emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, Elmars; Vembris, Aivars; Misina, Elina; Narels, Martins; Grzibovskis, Raitis; Kokars, Valdis

    2015-11-01

    Small organic molecules with incorporated 4H-pyran-4-ylidene (pyranylidene) fragment as the π-conjugation system which bonds the electron acceptor fragment (A) with electron donor part (D) in the molecule - also well known as derivatives of 4-(dicyano-methylene)-2-methyl-6-[p-(dimethylamino)styryl]-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye-have attracted considerable attention of scientists as potential new generation materials for organic photonics and molecular electronics due to their low-cost fabrication possibility, flexibility and low-weight. Six glassy derivatives of 4H-pyran-4-ylidene (pyranylidene) with attached bulky 2-(trityloxy)ethyl and tert-butyl groups are described in this report. Almost all of the synthesized compounds form good optical quality transparent amorphous films from volatile organic solvents and could be obtained in good yields up to 75%. Their light emission in solution and thin solid films is in the range of 600-700 nm, they are thermally stable and show glass transition in the range of 108-158 °C. The amplified spontaneous emission threshold values of the neat films of the glassy pyranylidene derivatives vary from 155 to 450 μJ/cm2 and their HOMO and LUMO energy levels are between of those of tris(8-hydroxy quinolinato) aluminum (Alq3). The photoluminescence quantum yields of the glassy compounds are in the range from 1% to about 7.7% and their electroluminescence properties have been investigated. Therefore, glassy pyranylidene derivatives could be a very potential low-cost solution processable materials for Alq3 hosted light-amplification and light-emitting application studies.

  15. Direct dosing of preweaning rodents in toxicity testing and research: deliberations of an ILSI RSI Expert Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Virginia C; Walls, Isabel; Zoetis, Tracey

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory animal studies designed to assess the effects of exposure of a test substance during postnatal development are commonly utilized in basic research and to evaluate potential hazard to children for chemical and pharmaceutical regulation. Direct dosing, defined here as the administration of a test substance directly to a preweaning mammal, has been identified as a useful tool that can be used in the conduct of such studies for regulatory purposes. The International Life Sciences Institute Risk Science Institute (ILSI RSI) convened an Expert Working Group to develop guidance on the design and implementation of direct dosing regulatory studies on preweaning mammals, which was published as an ILSI monograph in 2003 (Zoetis and Walls, Principles and Practices for Direct Dosing of Pre-Weaning Mammals in Toxicity Testing and Research, Washington, DC: ILSI Press, 2003). A summary of the Working Group conclusions regarding direct dosing studies with laboratory rodents are presented here, although the ILSI monograph also includes rabbits, canines, swine and nonhuman primates. Issues to be considered when designing the protocol include selection of the test species, the route of administration, dose levels, and the timing of dosing. Knowledge of the maturational status of the test species and information on critical windows of development are important in creating a valid study design. Most common routes of administration (e.g., oral, inhalation, injection) are possible with typical laboratory species; however, adjustments may be necessary due to practical considerations. Information on the pharmacokinetic profile in young animals versus adults and in the test species versus humans is very useful for determining dosing parameters. The conduct of the study and the interpretation of the data will be improved by an understanding of confounding factors as well as statistical and biological issues specific for postnatal studies. Ultimately, the success of the study will

  16. Influence of prey dispersion on territory and group size of African lions: a test of the resource dispersion hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeix, Marion; Loveridge, Andrew J; MacDonald, David W

    2012-11-01

    Empirical tests of the resource dispersion hypothesis (RDH), a theory to explain group living based on resource heterogeneity, have been complicated by the fact that resource patch dispersion and richness have proved difficult to define and measure in natural systems. Here, we studied the ecology of African lions Panthera leo in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe, where waterholes are prey hotspots, and where dispersion of water sources and abundance of prey at these water sources are quantifiable. We combined a 10-year data set from GPS-collared lions for which information of group composition was available concurrently with data for herbivore abundance at waterholes. The distance between two neighboring waterholes was a strong determinant of lion home range size, which provides strong support for the RDH prediction that territory size increases as resource patches are more dispersed in the landscape. The mean number of herbivore herds using a waterhole, a good proxy of patch richness, determined the maximum lion group biomass an area can support. This finding suggests that patch richness sets a maximum ceiling on lion group size. This study demonstrates that landscape ecology is a major driver of ranging behavior and suggests that aspects of resource dispersion limit group sizes.

  17. The Association of Race/Ethnicity and Patch Test Results: North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1998-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleo, Vincent Anthony; Alexis, Andrew; Warshaw, Erin M; Sasseville, Denis; Maibach, Howard I; DeKoven, Joel; Zug, Kathryn A; Belsito, Donald V; Fowler, Joseph F; Marks, James G; Mathias, C G Toby; Pratt, Melanie D; Rietschel, Robert L; Storrs, Frances J; Taylor, James S; Zirwas, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch tests patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to a broad series of screening allergens and publishes periodic reports. We have previously reported on the association of race and ethnicity with the rates of positive responses to standard patch test allergens. This report extends those observations. The aim of the study was to report the North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch testing results from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2006, comparing the frequency of positive reactions between white and black subjects. Standardized patch testing with 45 allergens was used at 13 centers in North America. χ analysis of results in black subjects as compared with whites was examined. A total of 19,457 patients were tested; 92.9% (17,803) were white and 7.1% (1,360) were black. The final diagnoses of ACD (whites, 45.9%; blacks, 43.6%) and irritant contact dermatitis (13.0%/13.3%) were similar in the 2 groups. The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis was less common in the white patients (8.9%) as compared with the black patients (13.3%). Positive patch test reactions rates were similar for most allergens. However, statistically, blacks reacted more frequently to p-phenylenediamine (7.0% vs 4.4%, P < 0.001), bacitracin (11.6% vs 8.3%, P = 0.0004), as well as specific rubber accelerators mercaptobenzothiazole (2.7% vs 1.8%), thiuram (6.2% vs 4.3%), and mercapto mix (1.9% vs 0.8%, P < 0.001). Whites had an increase in positive reactions to fragrances (12.12% vs 6.77%, P < 0.0001), formaldehyde (9.25% vs 5.45%, P < 0.0001), and some formaldehyde releaser preservatives used in personal care products and textile resins (9.80% vs 6.18%, P < 0.0001). There were statistically different rates of positive patch test reactions to specific allergens between black and white patients suspected of having ACD. The etiology of these differences is unclear but probably relates to culturally determined exposure patterns rather

  18. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Performance in Subelite Gaelic Football Players From Under Thirteen to Senior Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Mark; Malone, Shane

    2016-11-01

    Roe, M and Malone, S. Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test performance in subelite Gaelic football players from under thirteen to senior age groups. J Strength Cond Res 30 (11): 3187-3193, 2016-Gaelic football is indigenous to Ireland and has similar locomotion profiles to soccer and Australian Football. Given the increasing attention on long-term player development, investigations on age-related variation in Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-YoIR1) performance may provide useful information in talent identification, program design, and player monitoring. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate Yo-YoIR1 performance across Gaelic football age groups. Male participants (n = 355) were recruited from division one, Gaelic football teams. Participants were allocated to one of the 7 groups according to respective age groups from under 13 (U13), under 14, under 15 (U15), under 16 (U16), minor, under 21 (U21), to senior age groups. Total Yo-YoIR1 distance (m) increased progressively from U13 (885 ± 347 m) to U16 (1,595 ± 380 m) equating to a rate of change of 180.2%. In comparison to U13, total distance at minor (1,206 ± 327 m) increased by 136.4%. Subsequent increases were observed in U21 (1,585 ± 445 m) and senior players (2,365 ± 489). Minimum (800-880 m) and maximum (2,240-2,280 m) total distances were comparable for U15, U16, and U21 players. Differences in total distance (m) for all age groups were statistically significant when compared to U13 players (p age groups for total distance was deemed to be large (effect size > 0.8). Similar trends were observed for maximum velocity and estimated V[Combining Dot Above]O2max. The evolution of Yo-YoIR1 performance in Gaelic football players from adolescents to adulthood highlights how maturation may influence sport-related running ability. Changes in Yo-YoIR1 performance should be closely monitored to optimize interventions for individuals transitioning across age groups.

  19. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  20. Effects of land-applied ammonia scrubber solutions on yield, nitrogen uptake, soil test phosphorus and phosphorus runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia (NH3) scrubbers reduce amounts of NH3 and dust released from animal rearing facilities, while generating nitrogen (N) rich solutions, which may be used as fertilizer. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various NH3 scrubber solutions on yields, N uptake by forage, so...

  1. Test of the 'glymphatic' hypothesis demonstrates diffusive and aquaporin-4-independent solute transport in rodent brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J; Yao, Xiaoming; Dix, James A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-08-21

    Transport of solutes through brain involves diffusion and convection. The importance of convective flow in the subarachnoid and paravascular spaces has long been recognized; a recently proposed 'glymphatic' clearance mechanism additionally suggests that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels facilitate convective transport through brain parenchyma. Here, the major experimental underpinnings of the glymphatic mechanism were re-examined by measurements of solute movement in mouse brain following intracisternal or intraparenchymal solute injection. We found that: (i) transport of fluorescent dextrans in brain parenchyma depended on dextran size in a manner consistent with diffusive rather than convective transport; (ii) transport of dextrans in the parenchymal extracellular space, measured by 2-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, was not affected just after cardiorespiratory arrest; and (iii) Aqp4 gene deletion did not impair transport of fluorescent solutes from sub-arachnoid space to brain in mice or rats. Our results do not support the proposed glymphatic mechanism of convective solute transport in brain parenchyma.

  2. Revisiting measurement invariance in intelligence testing in aging research: Evidence for almost complete metric invariance across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Briana N; Hyun, Jinshil; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Invariance of intelligence across age is often assumed but infrequently explicitly tested. Horn and McArdle (1992) tested measurement invariance of intelligence, providing adequate model fit but might not consider all relevant aspects such as sub-test differences. The goal of the current paper is to explore age-related invariance of the WAIS-R using an alternative model that allows direct tests of age on WAIS-R subtests. Cross-sectional data on 940 participants aged 16-75 from the WAIS-R normative values were used. Subtests examined were information, comprehension, similarities, vocabulary, picture completion, block design, picture arrangement, and object assembly. The two intelligence factors considered were fluid and crystallized intelligence. Self-reported ages were divided into young (16-22, n = 300), adult (29-39, n = 275), middle (40-60, n = 205), and older (61-75, n = 160) adult groups. Results suggested partial metric invariance holds. Although most of the subtests reflected fluid and crystalized intelligence similarly across different ages, invariance did not hold for block design on fluid intelligence and picture arrangement on crystallized intelligence for older adults. Additionally, there was evidence of a correlated residual between information and vocabulary for the young adults only. This partial metric invariance model yielded acceptable model fit compared to previously-proposed invariance models of Horn and McArdle (1992). Almost complete metric invariance holds for a two-factor model of intelligence. Most of the subtests were invariant across age groups, suggesting little evidence for age-related bias in the WAIS-R. However, we did find unique relationships between two subtests and intelligence. Future studies should examine age-related differences in subtests when testing measurement invariance in intelligence.

  3. Collaborative-group testing improves learning and knowledge retention of human physiology topics in second-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-García, Mario

    2018-06-01

    The present study examined the relationship between second-year medical students' group performance and individual performance in a collaborative-learning environment. In recent decades, university professors in the scientific and humanistic disciplines have successfully put into practice different modalities of collaborative approaches to teaching. Essentially, collaborative approach refers to a variety of techniques that involves the joint intellectual effort of a small group of students, which encourages interaction and discussion among students and professors. The present results show the efficacy of collaborative learning, which, furthermore, allowed students to participate actively in the physiology class. Average student's grades were significantly higher when they engaged in single-best-response, multiple-choice tests as a student team, compared with taking the same examinations individually. The method improved notably knowledge retention, as learning is more effective when performed in the context of collaborative partnership. A selected subset of questions answered wrongly in an initial test, both individually and collectively, was used on a second test to examine student retention of studied material. Grade averages were significantly improved, both individually and groupwise, when students responded to the subset of questions a second time, 1, 2, or 3 wk after the first attempt. These results suggest that the collaborative approach to teaching allowed a more effective understanding of course content, which meant an improved capacity for retention of human physiology knowledge.

  4. Tackling Complex Emergency Response Solutions Evaluation Problems in Sustainable Development by Fuzzy Group Decision Making Approaches with Considering Decision Hesitancy and Prioritization among Assessing Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Zhao, Shu-Ping; Liang, Chang-Yong

    2017-10-02

    In order to be prepared against potential balance-breaking risks affecting economic development, more and more countries have recognized emergency response solutions evaluation (ERSE) as an indispensable activity in their governance of sustainable development. Traditional multiple criteria group decision making (MCGDM) approaches to ERSE have been facing simultaneous challenging characteristics of decision hesitancy and prioritization relations among assessing criteria, due to the complexity in practical ERSE problems. Therefore, aiming at the special type of ERSE problems that hold the two characteristics, we investigate effective MCGDM approaches by hiring interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy set (IVDHFS) to comprehensively depict decision hesitancy. To exploit decision information embedded in prioritization relations among criteria, we firstly define an fuzzy entropy measure for IVDHFS so that its derivative decision models can avoid potential information distortion in models based on classic IVDHFS distance measures with subjective supplementing mechanism; further, based on defined entropy measure, we develop two fundamental prioritized operators for IVDHFS by extending Yager's prioritized operators. Furthermore, on the strength of above methods, we construct two hesitant fuzzy MCGDM approaches to tackle complex scenarios with or without known weights for decision makers, respectively. Finally, case studies have been conducted to show effectiveness and practicality of our proposed approaches.

  5. Tackling Complex Emergency Response Solutions Evaluation Problems in Sustainable Development by Fuzzy Group Decision Making Approaches with Considering Decision Hesitancy and Prioritization among Assessing Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wen Qi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be prepared against potential balance-breaking risks affecting economic development, more and more countries have recognized emergency response solutions evaluation (ERSE as an indispensable activity in their governance of sustainable development. Traditional multiple criteria group decision making (MCGDM approaches to ERSE have been facing simultaneous challenging characteristics of decision hesitancy and prioritization relations among assessing criteria, due to the complexity in practical ERSE problems. Therefore, aiming at the special type of ERSE problems that hold the two characteristics, we investigate effective MCGDM approaches by hiring interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy set (IVDHFS to comprehensively depict decision hesitancy. To exploit decision information embedded in prioritization relations among criteria, we firstly define an fuzzy entropy measure for IVDHFS so that its derivative decision models can avoid potential information distortion in models based on classic IVDHFS distance measures with subjective supplementing mechanism; further, based on defined entropy measure, we develop two fundamental prioritized operators for IVDHFS by extending Yager’s prioritized operators. Furthermore, on the strength of above methods, we construct two hesitant fuzzy MCGDM approaches to tackle complex scenarios with or without known weights for decision makers, respectively. Finally, case studies have been conducted to show effectiveness and practicality of our proposed approaches.

  6. Driving the future. Volkswagen Group's solutions for sustainable mobility; Die Zukunft fest im Blick. Nachhaltige Mobilitaetskonzepte im Volkswagen Konzern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterkorn, Martin [Volkswagen AG (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Sustainable mobility must remain the automotive industry's top priority, even when the economic outlook changes. The Volkswagen Group is strongly committed to its ecological responsibilities and is working hard to reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions of its European fleet of new cars to 95 g/km by 2020. To do so, it is adopting a diverse strategy to enhance and improve the whole range of drive trains: from highly efficient TSI and TDI engines to natural-gas drive systems, from the plug-in hybrid to pure electric-drive systems. As far as the established technologies are concerned, there is still considerable potential to improve efficiency. For example, Volkswagen is currently working on a high-performance diesel engine and a new 10-speed dual-clutch gearbox. As far as alternative drive systems are concerned, the plug-in hybrid has the best change of market success in the medium term. Overall, the key to the success of sustainable mobility solutions is to focus on the customers and their needs. Because it is essential that customers accept the new technologies and, more importantly, are prepared to pay an adequate price for them. Cars such as the Golf BlueMotion, the Audi A3 e-tron, the Porsche Panamera E-Hybrid, and the Volkswagen eco up., which is powered by natural gas, all send a clear message: Automobiles must remain something that fascinates people, no matter which type of drive system they have. (orig.)

  7. [Effects of subliminal mere exposure to group members on intergroup evaluation: category evaluation measured in the Implicit Association Test (IAT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Naoaki; Yoshida, Fujio

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of subliminal mere exposure to ingroup or outgroup members on intergroup evaluation as measured in the Implicit Association Test (IAT). Participants first memorized the members of two groups. Then, they were assigned to either group by lot, and completed the IAT for intergroup evaluation (Time 1). In the next phase, half the participants were subliminally exposed to ingroup members and half to outgroup members. Upon completion of the exposure, the same IAT was administered at Time 2. The results showed that participants who were exposed to ingroup members evaluated the ingroup more positively at Time 2 than at Time 1. Participants who were exposed to outgroup members did not show an effect toward the outgroup. The finding that the mere exposure effect occurred only for the ingroup exposure condition suggests that unconscious awareness of the ingroup enhances the mere exposure effect.

  8. Building the Vocational Phase of the Computerized Motor Skills Testing System for Use in the Electronics and Electrical Engineering Group and Hospitality Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Chen, Jyun-Chen; Hong, Kunde

    2016-01-01

    Technical and vocational education emphasizes the development and training of hand motor skills. However, some problems exist in the current career and aptitude tests in that they do not truly measure the hand motor skills. This study used the Nintendo Wii Remote Controller as the testing device in developing a set of computerized testing tools to…

  9. Design and fabrication of a cryostat for low temperature mechanical testing for the Mechanical and Materials Engineering group at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Aviles Santillana, I; Gerardin, A; Guinchard, M; Langeslag, S A E; Sgobba, S

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical testing of materials at low temperatures is one of the cornerstones of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering (MME) group at CERN. A long tradition of more than 20 years and a unique know - how of such tests has been developed with an 18 kN double-walled cryostat. Large campaigns of material qualification have been carried out and the mechanical behaviour of materials at 4 K has been vastly studied in sub - size samples for projects like LEP, LHC and its experiments. With the aim of assessing the mechanical properties of materials of higher strength and/or issued from heavy gauge products for which testing standardized specimens of larger cross section might be more adapted, a new 100 kN cryostat capable of hosting different shapes of normalized samples has been carefully designed and fabricated inhouse together with the associated tooling and measurement instrumentation. It has been conceived to be able to adapt to different test frames both dynamic and static, which will be of paramount importa...

  10. Multicenter Patch Testing With a Resol Resin Based on Phenol and Formaldehyde Within the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Ale, Iris; Andersen, Klaus; Diepgen, Thomas; Elsner, Peter; Goossens, An; Goh, Chee-Leok; Jerajani, Hemangi; Maibach, Howard; Matsunaga, Kayoko; McFadden, John; Nixon, Rosemary; Sasseville, Denis; Bruze, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Contact allergy to phenol-formaldehyde resins (PFRs) based on phenol and formaldehyde is not detected by a p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin included in most baseline patch test series. The aims of this study were to investigate the contact allergy rate to PFR-2 in an international population and to investigate associated simultaneous allergic reactions. Thirteen centers representing the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group included PFR-2 into their patch test baseline series during a period of 6 months in 2012. Of 2259 patients tested, 28 (1.2%) reacted to PFR-2. Of those 28 individuals, one had a positive reaction to formaldehyde and 2 to p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin. Simultaneous allergic reactions were noted to colophonium in 3, to Myroxylon pereirae in 5, and to fragrance mix I in 8. The contact allergy frequency in the tested population (1.2%) merits its inclusion into the international baseline series and possibly also into other baseline series after appropriate investigations. Significantly, overrepresented simultaneous allergic reactions were noted for M. pereirae and fragrance mix I.

  11. Exploring general practitioners' experience of informing women about prenatal screening tests for foetal abnormalities: A qualitative focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiser Bettina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments have made screening tests for foetal abnormalities available earlier in pregnancy and women have a range of testing options accessible to them. It is now recommended that all women, regardless of their age, are provided with information on prenatal screening tests. General Practitioners (GPs are often the first health professionals a woman consults in pregnancy. As such, GPs are well positioned to inform women of the increasing range of prenatal screening tests available. The aim of this study was to explore GPs experience of informing women of prenatal genetic screening tests for foetal abnormality. Methods A qualitative study consisting of four focus groups was conducted in metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. A discussion guide was used and the audio-taped transcripts were independently coded by two researchers using thematic analysis. Multiple coders and analysts and informant feedback were employed to reduce the potential for researcher bias and increase the validity of the findings. Results Six themes were identified and classified as 'intrinsic' if they occurred within the context of the consultation or 'extrinsic' if they consisted of elements that impacted on the GP beyond the scope of the consultation. The three intrinsic themes were the way GPs explained the limitations of screening, the extent to which GPs provided information selectively and the time pressures at play. The three extrinsic factors were GPs' attitudes and values towards screening, the conflict they experienced in offering screening information and the sense of powerlessness within the screening test process and the health care system generally. Extrinsic themes reveal GPs' attitudes and values to screening and to disability, as well as raising questions about the fundamental premise of testing. Conclusion The increasing availability and utilisation of screening tests, in particular first trimester tests, has expanded GPs

  12. Equilibrium leach tests with cobalt in the system cemented waste form/container material/aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vejmelka, P.; Koester, R.; Lee, M. J.; Han, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium concentrations of Co in the system of cemented waste form/aqueous solutions were determined including the effect of the container material and its corrosion products under the respective conditions. The chemical conditions in the near field of the waste form were characterized by measurement of the pH and E h value. As disposal relevant solutions, saturated sodium chloride, Q-brine (main constituent MgCl 2 ) and a granitic type groundwater were used. For comparison, also experiments using deionized water were performed. In all systems investigated the cemented waste form itself has a strong influence on the chemical conditions in the near field. The pH and E h values are affected in all cases by the addition of the cemented waste form. There is no or only a slight difference between the E h values if iron powder or iron hydroxide is added to the cemented waste form/solution systems, but the E h is markedly decreased when iron powder is added to the solution free of cement. The Co concentration is decreased in all solutions by the addition of the cemented waste form, the largest effect is observed in Q-brine and this can be attributed either to the sorption of the Co-ions on the corrosion products of the cement or to the coprecipitation of Co-hydroxide and Mg-hydroxide. In the other solutions the Co concentration is decreased by precipitation of Co-hydroxide due to the high pH value of 12.5, and the concentrations are comparable for the different solutions

  13. Seeding Solutions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Crucible Group operates on the basis of good faith –– producing best effort non-consensus texts. ..... science and technology-based solutions to agricultural production constraints, it is ...... In 1997 researchers at Case Western Reserve Medical School in Ohio (US) ...... Is there a need to update the system-wide IP audit?

  14. Field-tested technology for gas compression: using high-speed induction motors to replace conventional solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Karina Velloso; Pradurat, Jean Francois [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine (INPL), Nancy (France). Converteam Rotating Machines Division

    2009-07-01

    Industry leaders are all concerned about rationalization of electric power use, increase of efficiency and flexibility, environmental impact, installations size and maintenance efforts diminution. The high-speed induction motors are a good solution when addressing these parameters. How this technology works and how using it can help pipelines operators meet growing operational and environmental challenges is the main subject of this paper, that also explain how it can be used to replace conventional solutions. As a conclusion the future opportunities of electric high-speed drive systems application in production, transport and storage for natural gas industry are going to be discussed. (author)

  15. Development and pilot-testing of a cognitive behavioral coping skills group intervention for patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Evon, Ph.D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic hepatitis C viral (HCV infection are needed to attenuate the impact of extrahepatic symptoms, comorbid conditions, and treatment side effects on HCV health outcomes. We adapted empirically-supported interventions for similar patient populations to develop a Cognitive Behavioral Coping Skills group intervention for HCV patients (CBCS-HCV undergoing treatment. The objectives of this paper are to describe the research activities associated with CBCS-HCV development and pilot testing, including: (1 formative work leading to intervention development; (2 preliminary study protocol; and (3 pilot feasibility testing of the intervention and study design. Formative work included a literature review, qualitative interviews, and adaption, development, and review of study materials. A preliminary study protocol is described. We evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT of the CBCS-HCV with 12 study participants in Wave 1 testing to examine: (a feasibility of intervention delivery; (b patient acceptability; (c recruitment, enrollment, retention; (d feasibility of conducting a RCT; (d therapist protocol fidelity; and (e feasibility of data collection. Numerous lessons were learned. We found very high rates of data collection, participant attendance, engagement, retention and acceptability, and therapist protocol fidelity. We conclude that many aspects of the CBCS-HCV intervention and study protocol were highly feasible. The greatest challenge during this Wave 1 pilot study was efficiency of participant enrollment due to changes in standard of care treatment. These findings informed two additional waves of pilot testing to examine effect sizes and potential improvements in clinical outcomes, with results forthcoming.

  16. A new and inexpensive non-bit-for-bit solution reproducibility test based on time step convergence (TSC1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hui; Zhang, Kai; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Chen, Xingyuan; Edwards, Jim

    2017-02-01

    A test procedure is proposed for identifying numerically significant solution changes in evolution equations used in atmospheric models. The test issues a fail signal when any code modifications or computing environment changes lead to solution differences that exceed the known time step sensitivity of the reference model. Initial evidence is provided using the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5.3 that the proposed procedure can be used to distinguish rounding-level solution changes from impacts of compiler optimization or parameter perturbation, which are known to cause substantial differences in the simulated climate. The test is not exhaustive since it does not detect issues associated with diagnostic calculations that do not feedback to the model state variables. Nevertheless, it provides a practical and objective way to assess the significance of solution changes. The short simulation length implies low computational cost. The independence between ensemble members allows for parallel execution of all simulations, thus facilitating fast turnaround. The new method is simple to implement since it does not require any code modifications. We expect that the same methodology can be used for any geophysical model to which the concept of time step convergence is applicable.

  17. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsch, J.; Katsube, T.J.; Sanford, W.E.; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN; Dugan, B.E.; Tourkow, L.M.

    1996-04-01

    Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method

  18. A comparison of face to face and group education on informed choice and decisional conflict of pregnant women about screening tests of fetal abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Masoumeh; Riyazi, Sahar; Lotfalizade, Marziyeh; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Suny, Hoseyn Jafari

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND GOAL: Screening of fetal anomalies is assumed as a necessary measurement in antenatal cares. The screening plans aim at empowerment of individuals to make the informed choice. This study was conducted in order to compare the effect of group and face-to-face education and decisional conflicts among the pregnant females regarding screening of fetal abnormalities. METHODS: This study of the clinical trial was carried out on 240 pregnant women at education course were held in two weekly sessions for intervention groups during two consecutive weeks, and the usual care was conducted for the control group. The rate of informed choice and decisional conflict was measured in pregnant women before education and also at weeks 20–22 of pregnancy in three groups. The data analysis was executed using SPSS statistical software (version 16), and statistical tests were implemented including Chi-square test, Kruskal–Wallis test, Wilcoxon test, Mann–Whitney U-test, one-way analysis of variance test, and Tukey's range test. The P education group, 64 members (80%) in group education class, and 20 persons (25%) in control group had the informed choice regarding screening tests, but there was no statistically significant difference between two individual and group education classes. Similarly, during the postintervention phase, there was a statistically significant difference in mean score of decisional conflict scale among pregnant women regarding screening tests in three groups (P = 0.001). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: With respect to effectiveness of group and face-to-face education methods in increasing the informed choice and reduced decisional conflict in pregnant women regarding screening tests, each of these education methods may be employed according to the clinical environment conditions and requirement to encourage the women for conducting the screening tests. PMID:29417066

  19. Effects of working memory capacity on metacognitive monitoring: A study of group differences using a listening span test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie eKomori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring is an executive function of working memory that serves to update novel information, focusing attention on task-relevant targets, and eliminating task-irrelevant noise. The present research used a verbal working memory task to examine how working memory capacity limits affect monitoring. Participants performed a Japanese listening span test that included maintenance of target words and listening comprehension. On each trial, participants responded to the target word and then immediately estimated confidence in recall performance for that word (metacognitive judgment. The results confirmed significant differences in monitoring accuracy between high and low capacity groups in a multi-task situation. That is, confidence judgments were superior in high versus low capacity participants in terms of absolute accuracy and discrimination. The present research further investigated how memory load and interference affect underestimation of successful recall. The results indicated that the level of memory load that reduced word recall performance and led to an underconfidence bias varied according to participants’ memory capacity. In addition, irreverent information associated with incorrect true/ false decisions (secondary task and word recall within the current trial impaired monitoring accuracy in both participant groups. These findings suggest that inference from unsuccessful decisions only influences low, but not high, capacity participants. Therefore, monitoring accuracy, which requires high working memory capacity, improves metacognitive abilities by inhibiting task-irrelevant noise and focusing attention on detecting task-relevant targets or useful retrieval cues, which could improve actual cognitive performance.

  20. Effects of Working Memory Capacity on Metacognitive Monitoring: A Study of Group Differences Using a Listening Span Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Mie

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring is an executive function of working memory that serves to update novel information, focusing attention on task-relevant targets, and eliminating task-irrelevant noise. The present research used a verbal working memory task to examine how working memory capacity limits affect monitoring. Participants performed a Japanese listening span test that included maintenance of target words and listening comprehension. On each trial, participants responded to the target word and then immediately estimated confidence in recall performance for that word (metacognitive judgment). The results confirmed significant differences in monitoring accuracy between high and low capacity groups in a multi-task situation. That is, confidence judgments were superior in high vs. low capacity participants in terms of absolute accuracy and discrimination. The present research further investigated how memory load and interference affect underestimation of successful recall. The results indicated that the level of memory load that reduced word recall performance and led to an underconfidence bias varied according to participants' memory capacity. In addition, irrelevant information associated with incorrect true/ false decisions (secondary task) and word recall within the current trial impaired monitoring accuracy in both participant groups. These findings suggest that interference from unsuccessful decisions only influences low, but not high, capacity participants. Therefore, monitoring accuracy, which requires high working memory capacity, improves metacognitive abilities by inhibiting task-irrelevant noise and focusing attention on detecting task-relevant targets or useful retrieval cues, which could improve actual cognitive performance.

  1. Profiles of orofacial dysfunction in different diagnostic groups using the Nordic Orofacial Test (NOT-S)--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergendal, Birgitta; Bakke, Merete; McAllister, Anita; Sjögreen, Lotta; Åsten, Pamela

    2014-11-01

    The Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) was developed as a comprehensive method to assess orofacial function. Results from the screening protocol have been presented in 11 international publications to date. This study reviewed these publications in order to compile NOT-S screening data and create profiles of orofacial dysfunction that characterize various age groups and disorders. NOT-S results of nine reports meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Seven of these studies not only provided data on the mean and range of total NOT-S scores, but also on the most common domains of orofacial dysfunction (highest rate of individuals with dysfunction scores), allowing the construction of orofacial dysfunction profiles based on the prevalence of dysfunction in each domain of NOT-S. The compiled data comprised 669 individuals, which included healthy control subjects (n = 333) and various patient groups (n = 336). All studies reported differences between individuals with diagnosed disorders and healthy control subjects. The NOT-S data could measure treatment effects and provided dysfunction profiles characterizing the patterns of orofacial dysfunction in various diagnoses. This review corroborates previous results that the NOT-S differentiates well between patients and healthy controls and can also show changes in individuals after treatment. NOT-S could be used as a standard instrument to assess orofacial dysfunction, evaluate the outcomes of oral habilitation and rehabilitation and improve comparability in clinical practice and research.

  2. Testing different brain metastasis grading systems in stereotactic radiosurgery: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group's RPA, SIR, BSBM, GPA, and modified RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, Toru; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Hirai, Tatsuo; Ono, Junichi; Saeki, Naokatsu; Miyakawa, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    The authors conducted validity testing of the 5 major reported indices for radiosurgically treated brain metastases- the original Radiation Therapy Oncology Group's Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA), the Score Index for Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases (SIR), the Basic Score for Brain Metastases (BSBM), the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA), and the subclassification of RPA Class II proposed by Yamamoto-in nearly 2500 cases treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS), focusing on the preservation of neurological function as well as the traditional endpoint of overall survival. The authors analyzed data from 2445 cases treated with GKS by the first author (T.S.), the primary surgeon. The patient group consisted of 1716 patients treated between January 1998 and March 2008 (the Chiba series) and 729 patients treated between April 2008 and December 2011 (the Tokyo series). The interval from the date of GKS until the date of the patient's death (overall survival) and impaired activities of daily living (qualitative survival) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, while the absolute risk for two adjacent classes of each grading system and both hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. For overall survival, there were highly statistically significant differences between each two adjacent patient groups characterized by class or score (all p values RPA appeared to be better than the original RPA and GPA. The modified RPA subclassification, proposed by Yamamoto, is well balanced in scoring simplicity with respect to case number distribution and statistical results for overall survival. However, a new or revised grading system is necessary for predicting qualitative survival and for selecting the optimal treatment for patients with brain metastasis treated by GKS.

  3. Distribution of 14 elements from two solutions simulating Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY (acid-dissolved sludge and acidified supernate) on four cation exchange resins and five anion exchange resins having different functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated a series of cation exchange and anion exchange resins for their ability to remove hazardous components from radioactive high-level waste (HLW). The anion exchangers were Reillex TM HPQ, a polyvinyl pyridine resin, and four strong-base polystyrene resins having trimethyl, tri ethyl, tri propyl, and tributyl amine as their respective functional groups. The cation exchange resins included Amberlyst TM 15 and Amberlyst tM XN-1010 with sulfonic acid functionality, Duolite TM C-467 with phosphonic acid functionality, and poly functional Diphonix TM with di phosphonic acid, sulfonic acid, and carboxylic acid functionalities. We measured the distributions of 14 elements on these resins from solutions simulating acid-dissolved sludge (pH 0.6) and acidified supernate (pH 3.5) from underground storage tank 102-SY at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, USA. To these simulants, we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U, Pu, and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr). For each of the 252 element/resin/solution combinations, distribution coefficients (Kds) were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 6 hours to obtain information about sorption kinetics from these complex media. Because we measured the sorption of many different elements, the tabulated results indicate which unwanted elements are most likely to interfere with the sorption of elements of special interest. On the basis of these 756 measured Kd values, we conclude that some of the tested resins appear suitable for partitioning hazardous components from Hanford HLW. (author). 10 refs., 11 tabs

  4. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL DATA OBTAINED WITHIN A CYCLE-RUN TRANSITION TEST IN AGE-GROUP TRIATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Vleck

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the validity and reliability of a sequential "Run-Bike-Run" test (RBR in age-group triathletes. Eight Olympic distance (OD specialists (age 30.0 ± 2.0 years, mass 75.6 ± 1.6 kg, run VO2max 63.8 ± 1.9 ml·kg-1·min-1, cycle VO2peak 56.7 ± 5.1 ml·kg-1·min-1 performed four trials over 10 days. Trial 1 (TRVO2max was an incremental treadmill running test. Trials 2 and 3 (RBR1 and RBR2 involved: 1 a 7-min run at 15 km·h-1 (R1 plus a 1-min transition to 2 cycling to fatigue (2 W·kg-1 body mass then 30 W each 3 min; 3 10-min cycling at 3 W·kg-1 (Bsubmax; another 1-min transition and 4 a second 7-min run at 15 km·h-1 (R2. Trial 4 (TT was a 30-min cycle - 20-min run time trial. No significant differences in absolute oxygen uptake (VO2, heart rate (HR, or blood lactate concentration ([BLA] were evidenced between RBR1 and RBR2. For all measured physiological variables, the limits of agreement were similar, and the mean differences were physiologically unimportant, between trials. Low levels of test-retest error (i.e. ICC <0.8, CV<10% were observed for most (logged measurements. However [BLA] post R1 (ICC 0.87, CV 25.1%, [BLA] post Bsubmax (ICC 0.99, CV 16.31 and [BLA] post R2 (ICC 0.51, CV 22.9% were least reliable. These error ranges may help coaches detect real changes in training status over time. Moreover, RBR test variables can be used to predict discipline specific and overall TT performance. Cycle VO2peak, cycle peak power output, and the change between R1 and R2 (deltaR1R2 in [BLA] were most highly related to overall TT distance (r = 0.89, p < 0. 01; r = 0.94, p < 0.02; r = 0.86, p < 0.05, respectively. The percentage of TR VO2max at 15 km·h-1, and deltaR1R2 HR, were also related to run TT distance (r = -0.83 and 0.86, both p < 0.05

  5. Applicability test of glass lining material for high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid in thermochemical water-splitting IS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsuki, Jin; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    A key issue for realizing the thermochemical IS process for hydrogen production is the selection of materials for working with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid. Glass lining material is a promising candidate, which is composed of steel having good strength and glass having good corrosion resistance. Since the applicability of glass lining material depends strongly on the service condition, corrosion tests using glass used in glass lining material and heat cycle tests using glass lining piping were carried out to examine the possibility of using the glass lining material with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid. It was confirmed that the glass lining materials exhibited sufficient corrosion resistance and heat resistance in high-temperature sulfuric acid of the IS process. (author)

  6. Lie group analysis, numerical and non-traveling wave solutions for the (2+1)-dimensional diffusion—advection equation with variable coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vikas; Gupta, R. K.; Jiwari, Ram

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the variable-coefficient diffusion—advection (DA) equation, which arises in modeling various physical phenomena, is studied by the Lie symmetry approach. The similarity reductions are derived by determining the complete sets of point symmetries of this equation, and then exact and numerical solutions are reported for the reduced second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Further, an extended (G'/G)-expansion method is applied to the DA equation to construct some new non-traveling wave solutions

  7. Mood and autonomic responses to repeated exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test for Groups (TSST-G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Maria; Sefidan, Sandra; Ehlert, Ulrike; Annen, Hubert; Wyss, Thomas; Steptoe, Andrew; La Marca, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    A group version of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST-G) was introduced as a standardized, economic and efficient tool to induce a psychobiological stress response simultaneously in a group of subjects. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of the TSST-G to repeatedly induce an affective and autonomic stress response while comparing two alternative protocols for the second examination. Healthy young male recruits participated twice in the TSST-G 10 weeks apart. In the first examination, the TSST-G consisted of a combination of mental arithmetic and a fake job interview (TSST-G-1st; n=294). For the second examination, mental arithmetic was combined with either (a) a defensive speech in response to a false shoplifting accusation (TSST-G-2nd-defence; n=105), or (b) a speech on a more neutral topic selected by the investigators (TSST-G-2nd-presentation; n=100). Affect ratings and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) were determined immediately before and after the stress test, while heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were measured continuously. TSST-G-1st resulted in a significant increase of negative affect, HR, and sAA, and a significant decrease in positive affect and HRV. TSST-G-2nd, overall, resulted in a significant increase of HR and sAA (the latter only in response to TSST-G-2nd-defence) and a decrease in HRV, while no significant affect alterations were found. When comparing both, TSST-G-2nd-defence and -2nd-presentation, the former resulted in a stronger stress response with regard to HR and HRV. The findings reveal that the TSST-G is a useful protocol to repeatedly evoke an affective and autonomic stress response, while repetition leads to affective but not necessarily autonomic habituation. When interested in examining repeated psychosocial stress reactivity, a task that requires an ego-involving effort, such as a defensive speech, seems to be significantly superior to a task using an impersonal speech. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  8. MCQ testing in higher education: Yes, there are bad items and invalid scores—A case study identifying solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    This is a lecture given at Umea University, Sweden in September 2017. It is based on the published study: Brown, G. T. L., & Abdulnabi, H. (2017). Evaluating the quality of higher education instructor-constructed multiple-choice tests: Impact on student grades. Frontiers in Education: Assessment, Testing, & Applied Measurement, 2(24).. doi:10.3389/feduc.2017.00024

  9. UNIQUAC interaction parameters for molecules with -OH groups on adjacent carbon atoms in aqueous solution determined by molecular mechanics - glycols, glycerol and glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Klein, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    UNIQUAC interaction parameters have been determined, using molecular mechanics calculations, for 1,2-ethanediol, 1,2-propanediol, glycerol and glucose with water in aqueous solution. Conformational space for individual pairs of molecules was explored using a stochastic method, the Boltzmann Jump...

  10. Implementing solutions to barriers to on-site HIV testing in substance abuse treatment: a tale of three facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Kristina B; Robertson, Angela A; Baird-Thomas, Connie

    2015-04-01

    Due to the scarcity of resources for implementing rapid on-site HIV testing, many substance abuse treatment programs do not offer these services. This study sought to determine whether addressing previously identified implementation barriers to integrating on-site rapid HIV testing into the treatment admissions process would increase offer and acceptance rates. Results indicate that it is feasible to integrate rapid HIV testing into existing treatment programs for substance abusers when resources are provided. Addressing barriers such as providing start-up costs for HIV testing, staff training, addressing staffing needs to reduce competing job responsibilities, and helping treatment staff members overcome their concerns about clients' reactions to positive test results is paramount for the integration and maintenance of such programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Using Automated Processes to Generate Test Items And Their Associated Solutions and Rationales to Support Formative Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Gierl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic item generation is the process of using item models to produce assessment tasks using computer technology. An item model is similar to a template that highlights the elements in the task that must be manipulated to produce new items. The purpose of our study is to describe an innovative method for generating large numbers of diverse and heterogeneous items along with their solutions and associated rationales to support formative feedback. We demonstrate the method by generating items in two diverse content areas, mathematics and nonverbal reasoning

  12. Differences in soil solution chemistry between soils amended with nanosized CuO or Cu reference materials: implications for nanotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Heather V A; Sunahara, Geoffrey I; Whalen, Joann K; Hendershot, William H

    2014-07-15

    Soil toxicity tests for metal oxide nanoparticles often include micrometer-sized oxide and metal salt treatments to distinguish between toxicity from nanometer-sized particles, non-nanometer-sized particles, and dissolved ions. Test result will be confounded if each chemical form has different effects on soil solution chemistry. We report on changes in soil solution chemistry over 56 days-the duration of some standard soil toxicity tests-in three soils amended with 500 mg/kg Cu as nanometer-sized CuO (nano), micrometer-sized CuO (micrometer), or Cu(NO3)2 (salt). In the CuO-amended soils, the log Cu2+ activity was initially low (minimum -9.48) and increased with time (maximum -5.20), whereas in the salt-amended soils it was initially high (maximum -4.80) and decreased with time (minimum -6.10). The Cu2+ activity in the nano-amended soils was higher than in the micrometer-amended soils for at least the first 11 days, and lower than in the salt-amended soils for at least 28 d. The pH, and dissolved Ca and Mg concentrations in the CuO-amended soils were similar, but the salt-amended soils had lower pH for at least 14 d, and higher Ca and Mg concentrations throughout the test. Soil pretreatments such as leaching and aging prior to toxicity tests are suggested.

  13. Modelling of bentonite-granite solutes transfer from an in situ full-scale experiment to simulate a deep geological repository (Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil, B.; Gomez, P.; Pena, J.; Garralon, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Escribano, A.; Sanchez, L.; Duran, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The FEBEX experiment is a 1:1 simulation of a high level waste disposal facility in crystalline rock according to the Spanish radwaste disposal concept. → Solute transfer processes occurrs at the bentonite-granite interface. → An increase of Cl and Na is observed in granitic water of the surrounding of the experiment. → Solute transfer does not affect the sealing and thermo-hydromechanical properties of the engineered barriers. → A diffusive transport of Cl and Na simulated by 1D transport modeling with an effective diffusion coefficient of D e ≅ 5.0 E-11 m 2 /s. - Abstract: The FEBEX experiment is a 1:1 simulation of a high level waste disposal facility in crystalline rock according to the Spanish radwaste disposal concept. This experiment has been performed in a gallery drilled in the underground laboratory Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland). Two boreholes parallel to the FEBEX drift were drilled 20 and 60 cm away from the granite-bentonite interface to provide data on potential bentonite-granite solutes transfer. Periodic sampling and analysis of the major ions showed: (a) the existence of solutes transfer from the bentonite porewater towards the granite groundwater, explaining the Cl - and Na + contents of the latter; (b) that the concentration of the natural tracers coming into the granite groundwater from the bentonite porewater increased over time. This bentonite-granite solutes transfer was modelled in order to predict the increase in the Cl - and Na + concentrations of the granite groundwater. The modelled results seem to confirm that the mechanism of solute migration in this scenario is that of diffusive transport. An effective diffusion coefficient of D e = 5 x 10 -11 m 2 /s was that which best fitted the data obtained.

  14. The impact of stigma, experience, and group referent on HIV risk assessments and HIV testing intentions in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel A; Morrison, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    People often perceive risks for others and themselves differently. This study examines whether personal beliefs about HIV and experience with those living with HIV influence personal risk assessments of contracting HIV in an interview sample of northern Namibians (N=400), but not others' assessments as explained by singular-distribution theory [Klar, Medding, & Sarel (1996). Nonunique invulnerability: Singular versus distributional probabilities and unrealistic optimism in comparative risk judgments. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 67, 229-245]. Findings indicate that personal risk perceptions decrease with more HIV stigmatizing beliefs and increase with greater experience, but that those characteristics had no impact on assessments for others' risk. The study also examines whether the size and characteristics of the referent group, peers and the general Namibian population, influence others' risk assessments. Optimistic biases for personal risk versus others' risk appear with the highest discrepancy emerging between personal and general population risk assessments. Further, we found that personal risk perceptions did not mediate the relationship between personal characteristics, beliefs and experiences, and intentions to seek HIV testing.

  15. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weddings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segarra, J. A.; Calderon, B.; Portoles, A.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior. (Author)

  16. Adsorptive removal of arsenate from aqueous solutions by biochar supported zero-valent iron nanocomposite: Batch and continuous flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shengsen; Gao, Bin; Li, Yuncong; Creamer, Anne Elise; He, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Biochar supported nZVI (nZVI/BC) was synthesized. • nZVI/BC showed excellent As(V) removal efficiency in batch and CMR experiments. • 100% removal efficiency was achieved in CMRs. • Surface adsorption was the dominant removal mechanism. - Abstract: Arsenate (As(V)) removal ability by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is compromised by aggregation of nZVI particles. In this work, pine derived biochar (PB) was used as a supporting material to stabilize nZVI for As(V) removal. The biochar supported nZVI (nZVI/BC) was synthesized by precipitating the nanoparticles on carbon surfaces. Experiments using batch and continuous flow, completely mixed reactors (CMRs) were carried out to investigate the removal of As(V) by the nZVI/BC from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments showed that nZVI/BC had high As(V) removal capacity in a wide range of pH (3–8). Kinetic data revealed that equilibrium was reached within 1 h and the isotherm data showed that the Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity of the nZVI/BC for As(V) at pH 4.1 was 124.5 g kg −1 . As(V) (100 mg L −1 ) adsorption in anoxic condition was about 8% more than in oxic conditions, where As(V) reduction was observed in anoxic condition. The performance of the nZVI/BC in flowing condition was evaluated in CMRs at influent As(V) concentrations of 2.1 and 5.5 mg L −1 and the adsorbent removed 100% and 90% of the As(V), respectively. Furthermore, the nZVI/BC composite is magnetic which facilitates collection from aqueous solutions.

  17. Adsorptive removal of arsenate from aqueous solutions by biochar supported zero-valent iron nanocomposite: Batch and continuous flow tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shengsen [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gao, Bin, E-mail: bg55@ufl.edu [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Li, Yuncong [Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031 (United States); Creamer, Anne Elise [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); He, Feng [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310014 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Biochar supported nZVI (nZVI/BC) was synthesized. • nZVI/BC showed excellent As(V) removal efficiency in batch and CMR experiments. • 100% removal efficiency was achieved in CMRs. • Surface adsorption was the dominant removal mechanism. - Abstract: Arsenate (As(V)) removal ability by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is compromised by aggregation of nZVI particles. In this work, pine derived biochar (PB) was used as a supporting material to stabilize nZVI for As(V) removal. The biochar supported nZVI (nZVI/BC) was synthesized by precipitating the nanoparticles on carbon surfaces. Experiments using batch and continuous flow, completely mixed reactors (CMRs) were carried out to investigate the removal of As(V) by the nZVI/BC from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments showed that nZVI/BC had high As(V) removal capacity in a wide range of pH (3–8). Kinetic data revealed that equilibrium was reached within 1 h and the isotherm data showed that the Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity of the nZVI/BC for As(V) at pH 4.1 was 124.5 g kg{sup −1}. As(V) (100 mg L{sup −1}) adsorption in anoxic condition was about 8% more than in oxic conditions, where As(V) reduction was observed in anoxic condition. The performance of the nZVI/BC in flowing condition was evaluated in CMRs at influent As(V) concentrations of 2.1 and 5.5 mg L{sup −1} and the adsorbent removed 100% and 90% of the As(V), respectively. Furthermore, the nZVI/BC composite is magnetic which facilitates collection from aqueous solutions.

  18. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging tests with sorbing tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4E and 4F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M.; Svensson, Haakan [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4E and 4F is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the tracer tests (STT-1, STT-1b and STT-2) performed within the TRUE-1 project using sorbing and non-sorbing tracers. The tests were made between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). Nine modelling teams representing eight organisations have performed predictive modelling of the tracer tests using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation, data from preliminary tracer tests performed with non-sorbing tracers and data on the experimental set-up of the sorbing tracer tests. Based on this information, model predictions were made of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. For the predictions of the STT-1b and STT-2 tests results from previous tracer tests with sorbing tracer were also available. The predictions of the sorbing tracer breakthrough in the initial tracer test (STT-1) generally underestimated the breakthrough time, suggesting the need to include additional processes and evaluate the application of the laboratory data. As a result of model calibration and modification the predictions were considerably improved for the latter tracer tests (STT-1b and STT-2). Task 4E and 4F have proved to be very valuable in increasing the understanding of non-sorbing tracer transport in fractured rock. There is a general consensus on the major processes responsible for

  19. Exploratory analysis of methods for automated classification of laboratory test orders into syndromic groups in veterinary medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C Dórea

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent focus on earlier detection of pathogen introduction in human and animal populations has led to the development of surveillance systems based on automated monitoring of health data. Real- or near real-time monitoring of pre-diagnostic data requires automated classification of records into syndromes--syndromic surveillance--using algorithms that incorporate medical knowledge in a reliable and efficient way, while remaining comprehensible to end users. METHODS: This paper describes the application of two of machine learning (Naïve Bayes and Decision Trees and rule-based methods to extract syndromic information from laboratory test requests submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. RESULTS: High performance (F1-macro = 0.9995 was achieved through the use of a rule-based syndrome classifier, based on rule induction followed by manual modification during the construction phase, which also resulted in clear interpretability of the resulting classification process. An unmodified rule induction algorithm achieved an F(1-micro score of 0.979 though this fell to 0.677 when performance for individual classes was averaged in an unweighted manner (F(1-macro, due to the fact that the algorithm failed to learn 3 of the 16 classes from the training set. Decision Trees showed equal interpretability to the rule-based approaches, but achieved an F(1-micro score of 0.923 (falling to 0.311 when classes are given equal weight. A Naïve Bayes classifier learned all classes and achieved high performance (F(1-micro= 0.994 and F(1-macro = .955, however the classification process is not transparent to the domain experts. CONCLUSION: The use of a manually customised rule set allowed for the development of a system for classification of laboratory tests into syndromic groups with very high performance, and high interpretability by the domain experts. Further research is required to develop internal validation rules in order to establish

  20. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs (Ref. 7) and Quiet Time Runs Program (described in Section 3.6). The Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs program involves a 12,000 gallon feed tank containing an agitator, a 4,000 gallon flush tank, a variable speed pump, associated piping and controls, and equipment within both the Filter and the Stripper Building

  1. Production and testing of the VITAMIN-B6 fine-group and the BUGLE-93 broad-group neutron/photon cross-section libraries derived from ENDF/B-VI nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Greene, N.M.; MacFarlane, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    A new multigroup cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI data has been produced and tested for light water reactor shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications. The broad-group library is designated BUGLE-93. The processing methodology is consistent with ANSI/ANS 6.1.2, since the ENDF data were first processed into a fine-group, ''pseudo problem-independent'' format and then collapsed into the final broad-group format. The fine-group library is designated VITAMIN-B6. An extensive integral data testing effort was also performed. In general, results using the new data show significant improvements relative to earlier ENDF data

  2. A Test of a Linear Programming Model as an Optimal Solution to the Problem of Combining Methods of Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, James W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Study reported here tested an application of the Linear Programming Model at the Reading Clinic of Drew University. Results, while not conclusive, indicate that this approach yields greater gains in speed scores than a traditional approach for this population. (Author)

  3. EGFR testing and clinical management of advanced NSCLC: a Galician Lung Cancer Group study (GGCP 048-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Vázquez,1 Joaquín Casal,2 Francisco Javier Afonso Afonso,3 José Luis Fírvida,4 Lucía Santomé,5 Francisco Barón,6 Martín Lázaro,7 Carolina Pena,7 Margarita Amenedo,8 Ihab Abdulkader,9 Carmen González-Arenas,10 Laura Fachal,11 Ana Vega11 On behalf of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP1Medical Oncology Department, Lucus Augusti University Hospital, Lugo, 2Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Pontevedra, 3Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ferrol, Ferrol, 4Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ourense, Ourense, 5Medical Oncology Department Povisa Hospital, Vigo, 6Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 7Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Complex of Pontevedra, Pontevedra, 8Medical Oncology Department, Oncology Center of Galicia, A Coruña, 9Anatomical Pathology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 10AstraZeneca, Madrid, 11Galician Public Foundation of Genomic Medicine-SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Purpose: This study aimed to assess the incidence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in the Galician region of Spain and the clinical management and outcome of patients carrying EGFR mutations. Patients and methods: All newly diagnosed advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients were screened for EGFR mutations in matched tumor samples (tissue or cytology specimens and serum samples. Results: Of 198 patients screened for EGFR mutations in tumor samples, 184 had evaluable data and, of these, 25 (13.6% had EGFR mutations (84% sensitizing mutations. EGFR mutation was found in serum in 14 (8.1% patients (of 174 evaluable. Compared to matched tumor tissue, serum EGFR mutation testing specificity and sensitivity were 99% and 52

  4. Simplifying consent for HIV testing is associated with an increase in HIV testing and case detection in highest risk groups, San Francisco January 2003-June 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola M Zetola

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Populations at highest risk for HIV infection face multiple barriers to HIV testing. To facilitate HIV testing procedures, the San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center eliminated required written patient consent for HIV testing in its medical settings in May 2006. To describe the change in HIV testing rates in different hospital settings and populations after the change in HIV testing policy in the SFDH medical center, we performed an observational study using interrupted time series analysis.Data from all patients aged 18 years and older seen from January 2003 through June 2007 at the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH medical care system were included in the analysis. The monthly HIV testing rate per 1000 had patient-visits was calculated for the overall population and stratified by hospital setting, age, sex, race/ethnicity, homelessness status, insurance status and primary language.By June 2007, the average monthly rate of HIV tests per 1000 patient-visits increased 4.38 (CI, 2.17-6.60, p<0.001 over the number predicted if the policy change had not occurred (representing a 44% increase. The monthly average number of new positive HIV tests increased from 8.9 (CI, 6.3-11.5 to 14.9 (CI, 10.6-19.2, p<0.001, representing a 67% increase. Although increases in HIV testing were seen in all populations, populations at highest risk for HIV infection, particularly men, the homeless, and the uninsured experienced the highest increases in monthly HIV testing rates after the policy change.The elimination of the requirement for written consent in May 2006 was associated with a significant and sustained increase in HIV testing rates and HIV case detection in the SFDPH medical center. Populations facing the higher barriers to HIV testing had the highest increases in HIV testing rates and case detection in response to the policy change.

  5. Radiochromic liquid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.; Culp, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A radiochromic solution which is sensitive to small dosages of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation is described. It consists of a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent with enough organic acid added to make the solution at least slightly acidic and responds to radiation by permanently changing color. Up to one half of the solution by weight can be replaced by a second solution of an aromatic solvent and an organic fluor. Another modification of the invention is a solution of a leucocyanide dye in a clear polar solvent having an aromatic group, an organic fluor, and enough organic acid to make the solution at least slightly acidic. (author)

  6. A report of the 2002-2008 paternity testing workshops of the English speaking working group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anni Rønfeldt; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo Thisted

    2009-01-01

    The English Speaking Working Group (ESWG) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) offers an annual Paternity Testing Workshop open to all members of the group. Blood samples, a questionnaire and a paper challenge are sent to the participants. Here, we present the results...

  7. A new technique to preserve raw materials of ancient monuments against the humidity and its test using 22Na labeled solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, G.L.; Navarrete, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Erosion caused by external factors such as wind, rain, sunlight and temperature changes is considerable in raw materials used to build pre-hispanic monuments. However, there does exist an internal destruction factor even stronger: the humidity coming from the soil, which goes up by capillarity, depositing soluble salts on the walls surface. Therefore, one way to find some figure related to the specific capillarity or porosity shown by each raw material, is to obtain small prism-shaped pieces cut out from the large debris fallen down spontaneously from ancient walls due to internal humidity. Once these small samples are placed in contact with a 22 Na labeled solution during a given time, at the same geometrical conditions, dried overnight, conditioned either in test tubes or wrapped into polyethylene and detected in a well type 3' x 3' scintillation detector, the counts accumulated per time and weight units are a measure of the relative porosity shown by each material. In order to pull down this porosity, the samples are impregnated with a gelatin solution (50 g/l) at 60-80 deg C plus food preservatives such as potassium sorbate (2.5%) and sodium benzoate (2.5%). When gelatin begins to be formed 3 hours later and the samples look humid and brilliant, they are impregnated with formaldehyde solution (38%), and their absorption rate is dramatically reduced overnight (75-100%), which can be proven when samples are tested by making use of the 22 Na labeled solution. This technique has been applied at real scale in some pre-hispanic monuments. Ancient raw materials seems to be much more compact and well preserved during one limited period of time (10 to 13 months). Treatment is unnoticeable and reversible, and it may be applied periodically. (author)

  8. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockow, K.; Garvey, L. H.; Aberer, W.; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M.; Barbaud, A.; Bilo, M. B.; Bircher, A.; Blanca, M.; Bonadonna, B.; Campi, P.; Castro, E.; Cernadas, J. R.; Chiriac, A. M.; Demoly, P.; Grosber, M.; Gooi, J.; Lombardo, C.; Mertes, P. M.; Mosbech, H.; Nasser, S.; Pagani, M.; Ring, J.; Romano, A.; Scherer, K.; Schnyder, B.; Testi, S.; Torres, M.; Trautmann, A.; Terreehorst, I.

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable

  9. Modern technical solutions of gas-fired heating devices of household and communal use and analysis of their testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodzon, L.; Radwan, W. [Oil Mining and Gas Engineering Institute, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    A review of technical solutions for gas-fired heating devices for household and communal use in Poland is presented. Based upon the analysis it is stated that the power output of Polish and foreign boilers ranges between 9 and 35 kW. The carbon monoxide content in flue gases reaches (on average) 0.005 vol.%, i.e., it is much lower than the maximum permissible level. Temperature of flue gases (excluding condensation boilers and those with air-tight combustion chamber) ranges between 150 and 200{degrees}C and their heating efficiency reaches 87-93%. The best parameters are given for condensation boilers, however they are still not widespread in Poland for the high cost of the equipment and assembling works. Among the heaters, the most safe are convection devices with closed combustion chamber; their efficiency is also the highest. Thus, it is concluded that a wide spectrum of high efficiency heating devices with good combustion parameters are available. The range of output is sufficient to meet household and communal requirement. They are however - predominantly - units manufactured abroad. It is difficult to formulate the program aimed at the improvement of the technique of heating devices made in Poland, and its implementation is uncertain because the production process is broken up into small handicraft workshops.

  10. Two experimental tests of relational models of procedural justice: non-instrumental voice and authority group membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platow, Michael J; Eggins, Rachael A; Chattopadhyay, Rachana; Brewer, Greg; Hardwick, Lisa; Milsom, Laurin; Brocklebank, Jacinta; Lalor, Thérèse; Martin, Rowena; Quee, Michelle; Vassallo, Sara; Welsh, Jenny

    2013-06-01

    In both a laboratory experiment (in Australia) using university as the basis of group membership, and a scenario experiment (in India) using religion as the basis of group membership, we observe more favourable respect and fairness ratings in response to an in-group authority than an out-group authority who administers non-instrumental voice. Moreover, we observe in our second experiment that reported likelihood of protest (herein called "social-change voice") was relatively high following non-instrumental voice from an out-group authority, but relatively low following non-instrumental voice from an in-group authority. Our findings are consistent with relational models of procedural justice, and extend the work by examining likely use of alternative forms of voice as well as highlighting the relative importance of instrumentality. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Standard test method for determining whether gas-leak-detector fluid solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking of brass alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers an accelerated test method for evaluating the tendency of gas leak detection fluids (LDFs) to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass components in compressed gas service. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. The use of new modified poly(acrylamide chelating resin with pendent benzothiazole groups containing donor atoms in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semmedu Selvaraj Kalaivani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption studies of poly(6-(ethoxybenzothiazole acrylamide (PEBTA, for Cu(II and Zn(II metal ions removal from an aqueous solution have been investigated, as a function of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. The chemical and structural characteristics of the adsorbent were determined by the FT-IR, 1H-NMR, TGA, SEM, and EDAX analysis. The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for Cu(II and Zn(II ions, as calculated from the Langmuir isotherm model, were 273.5 and 216.4 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetic studies show that the adsorption of Cu(II and Zn(II ions onto PEBTA follows the pseudo second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were also evaluated, and it has been found that the adsorption process is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Desorption studies were carried out using 0.3 N HCl, and it revealed that the adsorbed Cu(II and Zn(II ions can be easily removed. The adsorption–desorption process is reversible, and this indicates that PEBTA is an effective adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from an aqueous medium.

  13. Solutions for Dioctyl Phthalate (DOP) tested high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters destined for disposal at Hanford, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gablin, K.A.

    1992-11-01

    In January 1992, Argonne National Laboratory East, Environmental and Waste Management Program, learned that a chemical material used for testing of all HEPA filters at the primary source, Flanders Filter, Inc. in Washington, NC, was considered a hazardous chemical by Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations. These regulations are under the jurisdiction of the Washington Administration Code, Chapter 173-303, and therefore directly under impact the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria. Dioctyl Phthalate, ''DOP'' as it is referred to in chemical abbreviation form, is added in small test quantities at the factory, at three Department of Energy (DOE) operated HEPA filter test facilities, and in the installed duct work at various operating laboratories or production facilities. When small amounts of radioactivity are added to the filter media in operation, the result is a mixed waste. This definition would normally only develop in the state of Washington since their acceptance criteria is ten times more stringent then the US Environmental Protection Agencys' (US EPA). Methods of Processing will be discussed, which will include detoxification, physical separation, heat and vacuum separation, and compaction. The economic impact of a mixed waste definition in the State of Washington, and an Low Level Waste (LLW) definition in other locations, may lend this product to be a prime candidate for commercial disposal in the future, or a possible de-listing by the State of Washington

  14. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weldings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segarra, José A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS. The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior.En este artículo se ha investigado el comportamiento frente a la corrosión en medios acuosos salinos de chapas soldadas de aleación AZ31 mediante técnicas gravimétricas y ensayo en cámara de niebla salina. Las muestras estudiadas han sido soldadas mediante soldadura TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas y con diferentes materiales de aporte. En el estudio se ha empleado microscopía óptica para analizar la microestructura. Los ensayos de gravimetría y los ensayos de niebla salina indican que el empleo de materiales de aporte más nobles para soldar las muestras evitando la disminución del contenido en aluminio en los cordones, no implica un mejor comportamiento frente a la corrosión.

  15. Using DNA to test the utility of pellet-group counts as an index of deer counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. J. Brinkman; D. K. Person; W. Smith; F. Stuart Chapin; K. McCoy; M. Leonawicz; K. Hundertmark

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread use of fecal pellet-group counts as an index of ungulate density, techniques used to convert pellet-group numbers to ungulate numbers rarely are based on counts of known individuals, seldom evaluated across spatial and temporal scales, and precision is infrequently quantified. Using DNA from fecal pellets to identify individual deer, we evaluated the...

  16. Theoretical and experimental determination of matrix diffusion and related solute transport properties of fractured tuffs from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, G.R.

    1982-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the chemical and physical factors which affect molecular diffusion of dissolved substances from fractures into a tuffaceous rock matrix have been made on rocks from G-Tunnel and Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A variety of groundwater tracers, which may be useful in field tests at the NTS, have also been developed and tested. Although a number of physical/chemical processes may cause nonconvective transport of dissolved species from fractures into the tuff matrix, molecular diffusion seems to be the most important process. Molecular diffusion in these rocks is controlled by the composition of the groundwater through multicomponent effects and several rock properties. The porosities of the samples studied ranged from about 0.1 to 0.4. The constrictivity-tortuosity parameter ranged from 0.1 and 0.3 and effective matrix-diffusion coefficients were measured to be between 2 to 17. x 10 -7 c, 2 /s for sodium halides and sodium pentafluorobenzoate. Total porosity was found to be the principle factor accounting for the variation in effective diffusion coefficients. The constrictivity-tortuosity factor was found to have a fair correlation (r = 0.75) with the median pore diameters measured by mercury intrusion. Measurements of bulk-rock electrical impedance changes with frequency indicate that the constrictivity factor has a maximum value of 0.8 to 1, but may be smaller. If the larger values are correct, then the diffusion paths in tuff are more tortuous than in granular media. Computation of the full diffusion-coefficient matrix for various tracers in J-13 well water from the NTS indicates coupling of the diffusion fluxes of all ionic species. These effects are being incorporated into a numerical model of multicomponent-matrix diffusion

  17. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.K.

    1993-10-01

    In-Tank Precipitation is a process for removing radioactivity from the salt stored in the Waste Management Tank Farm at Savannah River. The process involves precipitation of cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) and adsorption of strontium and actinides on insoluble sodium titanate (ST) particles. The purpose of this report is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs Program. The primary objective of the filter-stripper test runs and quiet time runs program is to ensure that the facility will fulfill its design basis function prior to the introduction of radioactive feed. Risks associated with the program are identified and include hazards, both personnel and environmental, associated with handling the chemical simulants; the presence of flammable materials; the potential for damage to the permanenet ITP and Tank Farm facilities. The risks, potential accident scenarios, and safeguards either in place or planned are discussed at length

  18. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, M.K.

    1993-10-01

    In-Tank Precipitation is a process for removing radioactivity from the salt stored in the Waste Management Tank Farm at Savannah River. The process involves precipitation of cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) and adsorption of strontium and actinides on insoluble sodium titanate (ST) particles. The purpose of this report is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs Program. The primary objective of the filter-stripper test runs and quiet time runs program is to ensure that the facility will fulfill its design basis function prior to the introduction of radioactive feed. Risks associated with the program are identified and include hazards, both personnel and environmental, associated with handling the chemical simulants; the presence of flammable materials; the potential for damage to the permanenet ITP and Tank Farm facilities. The risks, potential accident scenarios, and safeguards either in place or planned are discussed at length.

  19. A Fast Solution of the Lindley Equations for the M-Group Regression Problem. Technical Report 78-3, October 1977 through May 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Ivo W.

    The technical problems involved in obtaining Bayesian model estimates for the regression parameters in m similar groups are studied. The available computer programs, BPREP (BASIC), and BAYREG, both written in FORTRAN, require an amount of computer processing that does not encourage regular use. These programs are analyzed so that the performance…

  20. Combination of micropreparative solution isoelectric focusing and high-performance liquid chromatography for differentiation of biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative Candida parapsilosis group from vascular catheter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vykydalová, Marie; Horká, Marie; Růžička, F.; Duša, Filip; Moravcová, Dana; Kahle, Vladislav; Šlais, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 812, Feb (2014), s. 243-249 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis group * biofilm * sonicate from vascular cathether * sIEF * HPLC Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.513, year: 2014 http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0230766