WorldWideScience

Sample records for group selection silviculture

  1. Intensive group selection silviculture in central hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon S. Minckler

    1989-01-01

    In 1947 conferences of Forest Service research people from Federal, Regional, and Research Center units met in Southern Illinois to set up in 1948 a whole rotation study on the Kaskaskia Experimental Forest involving 38 commercial compartments. The chief objectives were to evaluate the success, ability for sustained silviculture, and the costs and returns for a full...

  2. An approach to clarifying public preferences about silvicultural systems: A case study concerning group selection and clear-cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindhagen, A.

    1996-01-01

    To avoid large clear-cut areas in recreation areas, three experiments where group selection was used to transform even-aged stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) into uneven-aged stands were started. Two of these group selection stands were compared with adjacent forests managed by the clear-cut system on the basis of the opinion of seven voluntary groups. The respondents have given their judgement of the forest sites in a semantic differential test. All parties made assessments when visiting the forest sites. In addition, two of the groups made assessments of black and white photographs representing the forest sites. The methods used were found to be both reliable and valid. A very low correlation was obtained between the assessment of whole forest areas and the mean value of the assessments of the stands within the same area. According to this study, the group selection method is preferable to clear-cutting in even-aged stands of Norway spruce if the attitude of the voluntary groups are to be met. 31 refs, 4 figs, 9 tabs

  3. Proportional basal area method for implementing selection silviculture systems in longleaf pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale G. Brockway; Edward F. Loewenstein; Kenneth W. Outcalt

    2014-01-01

    Proportional basal area (Pro-B) was developed as an accurate, easy-to-use method for making uneven-aged silviculture a practical management option. Following less than 3 h of training, forest staff from a range of professional backgrounds used Pro-B in an operational-scale field study to apply single-tree selection and group selection systems in longleaf pine (Pinus...

  4. Applying group selection in upland hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary w. Miller; H. Clay Smith

    1991-01-01

    Interest in applying group selection in upland hardwoods has grown in recent years, primarily in response to public opposition to the aesthetic effects of clearcutting. Critics suggest that an uneven-aged silvicultural practice such as group selection might be a suitable compromise--drastically reducing negative visual effects of harvesting trees while continuing to...

  5. Soil biodiversity in artificial black pine stands one year after selective silvicultural treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocali, Stefano; Fabiani, Arturo; Landi, Silvia; Bianchetto, Elisa; Montini, Piergiuseppe; Samaden, Stefano; Cantiani, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    The decay of forest cover and soil erosion is a consequence of continual intensive forest exploitation, such as grazing and wild fires over the centuries. From the end of the eighteenth century up to the mid-1900s, black pine plantations were established throughout the Apennines' range in Italy, to improve forest soil quality. The main aim of this silvicultural treatment was to re-establish the pine as a first cover and pioneer species. A series of thinning activities were therefore planned by foresters when these plantations were designed. The project Selpibiolife (LIFE13 BIO/IT/000282) has the main objective to demonstrate the potential of an innovative silvicultural treatment to enhance soil and flora biodiversity and under black pine stands. The monitoring will be carried out by comparing selective and traditional thinning methods (selecting trees from below leaving well-spaced, highest-quality trees) to areas without any silvicultural treatments (e.g. weeding, cleaning, liberation cutting). The monitoring survey was carried out in Pratomagno and Amiata Val D'Orcia areas on the Appennines (Italy) and involved different biotic levels: microorganisms, mesofauna, nematodes and macrofauna (Coleoptera) and flora. The microbial (bacteria and fungi) diversity was assessed by both biochemical (microbial biomass, microbial respiration, metabolic quotient) and molecular (microbiota) approaches whereas QBS (Soil Biological Quality) index and diversity indexes were determined for mesofauna and other organisms, respectively, including flora. The overall results highlighted different a composition and activity of microbial communities within the two areas before thinning, and revealed a significant difference between the overall biodiversity of the two areas. Even though silvicultural treatments provided no significant differences at floristic level, microbial and mesofaunal parameters revealed to be differently affected by treatments. In particular, little but significant

  6. Use of group-selection and seed-tree cuts by three early-successional migratory species in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn E. Alterman; James C. Bednarz; Ronald E. Thill

    2005-01-01

    Silviculture in the Ouachita National Forest in Arkansas and Oklahoma has shifted in recent years from mostly even-aged management to a mix of even- and uneven-aged regeneration systems, including group-selection. Researchers have described presence/absence of early-successional bird species in forest openings created by even- and uneven-aged silviculture, but few have...

  7. Effects of basal area on survival and growth of longleaf pine when practicing selection silviculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Kara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Uneven-aged (UEA management systems can achieve multiple-use objectives, however, use of UEA techniques to manage longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill. forests are still open to question, because of the species’ intolerance of competition. It was our aim to examine the influence of different levels (9.2, 13.8 and 18.4 m2 ha-1 of residual basal area (RBA on longleaf pine seedling survival and growth following three growing seasons. Area of study: This study was conducted at the Escambia Experimental Forest, located on the Southern Coastal Plain of Alabama, in the southeastern United States. Material and Methods: Selection silviculture was implemented with the Proportional-Basal Area (Pro-B method. Prescribed burning was conducted before seed dispersal and in the second year after germination. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR was measured under the canopy in the study plots. Survival and growth of longleaf pine seedlings were observed for three growing seasons. Main results: An inverse relationship was found between the number of germinants and RBA, but the mortality of germinants and planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. At age three, an inverse relationship was observed between root-collar diameter (RCD growth of the germinants and RBA, but RCD growth of planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. Most of the study plots contained more than the projected number of seedlings needed to sustain the target diameter structure. Research highlights: Long-term continuous monitoring of seedling development and recruitment into canopy is required to determine the efficacy of UEA management. However, current data suggest that UEA methods may be a viable alternative to the use of even-aged (EA methods in longleaf ecosystems.

  8. Effects of basal area on survival and growth of longleaf pine when practicing selection silviculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, F.; Loewenstein, E.F.; Brockway, D.G.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study: Uneven-aged (UEA) management systems can achieve multiple-use objectives, however, use of UEA techniques to manage longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests are still open to question, because of the species’ intolerance of competition. It was our aim to examine the influence of different levels (9.2, 13.8 and 18.4 m2 ha-1) of residual basal area (RBA) on longleaf pine seedling survival and growth following three growing seasons. Area of study: This study was conducted at the Escambia Experimental Forest, located on the Southern Coastal Plain of Alabama, in the southeastern United States. Material and Methods: Selection silviculture was implemented with the Proportional-Basal Area (Pro-B) method. Prescribed burning was conducted before seed dispersal and in the second year after germination. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was measured under the canopy in the study plots. Survival and growth of longleaf pine seedlings were observed for three growing seasons. Main results: An inverse relationship was found between the number of germinants and RBA, but the mortality of germinants and planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. At age three, an inverse relationship was observed between root-collar diameter (RCD) growth of the germinants and RBA, but RCD growth of planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. Most of the study plots contained more than the projected number of seedlings needed to sustain the target diameter structure. Research highlights: Long-term continuous monitoring of seedling development and recruitment into canopy is required to determine the efficacy of UEA management. However, current data suggest that UEA methods may be a viable alternative to the use of even-aged (EA) methods in longleaf ecosystems.

  9. Effects of basal area on survival and growth of longleaf pine when practicing selection silviculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kara, F.; Loewenstein, E.F.; Brockway, D.G.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of study: Uneven-aged (UEA) management systems can achieve multiple-use objectives, however, use of UEA techniques to manage longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests are still open to question, because of the species’ intolerance of competition. It was our aim to examine the influence of different levels (9.2, 13.8 and 18.4 m2 ha-1) of residual basal area (RBA) on longleaf pine seedling survival and growth following three growing seasons. Area of study: This study was conducted at the Escambia Experimental Forest, located on the Southern Coastal Plain of Alabama, in the southeastern United States. Material and Methods: Selection silviculture was implemented with the Proportional-Basal Area (Pro-B) method. Prescribed burning was conducted before seed dispersal and in the second year after germination. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was measured under the canopy in the study plots. Survival and growth of longleaf pine seedlings were observed for three growing seasons. Main results: An inverse relationship was found between the number of germinants and RBA, but the mortality of germinants and planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. At age three, an inverse relationship was observed between root-collar diameter (RCD) growth of the germinants and RBA, but RCD growth of planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. Most of the study plots contained more than the projected number of seedlings needed to sustain the target diameter structure. Research highlights: Long-term continuous monitoring of seedling development and recruitment into canopy is required to determine the efficacy of UEA management. However, current data suggest that UEA methods may be a viable alternative to the use of even-aged (EA) methods in longleaf ecosystems.

  10. Influence of residual basal area on longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) first year germination and establishment under selection silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhat Kara; Edward F. Loewenstein

    2015-01-01

    Even-aged silvicultural methods have been successfully used to manage longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests for wood production; however, successful use of uneven-aged methods to manage this ecosystem is less well documented. In this study, the effects of varying levels of residual basal area (RBA) (9.2, 13.8, and 18.4 m2...

  11. Site quality in Appalachian hardwoods: the biological and economic response under selection silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orris D. McCauley; George R., Jr. Trimble

    1975-01-01

    The relative or percentage value response after 12 years of selective cutting practices on low- and high-quality sites in Appalachian hardwoods amounted to a 119-percent increase on the low-quality site and 145 percent on the high-quality site. The absolute value or actual dollar response, on the other hand, showed that the low-quality site increased in value only $76/...

  12. Concave 1-norm group selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dingfeng; Huang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Grouping structures arise naturally in many high-dimensional problems. Incorporation of such information can improve model fitting and variable selection. Existing group selection methods, such as the group Lasso, require correct membership. However, in practice it can be difficult to correctly specify group membership of all variables. Thus, it is important to develop group selection methods that are robust against group mis-specification. Also, it is desirable to select groups as well as individual variables in many applications. We propose a class of concave [Formula: see text]-norm group penalties that is robust to grouping structure and can perform bi-level selection. A coordinate descent algorithm is developed to calculate solutions of the proposed group selection method. Theoretical convergence of the algorithm is proved under certain regularity conditions. Comparison with other methods suggests the proposed method is the most robust approach under membership mis-specification. Simulation studies and real data application indicate that the [Formula: see text]-norm concave group selection approach achieves better control of false discovery rates. An R package grppenalty implementing the proposed method is available at CRAN. © Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Silvicultural madness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basnyat, Bijendra; Treue, Thorsten; Pokharel, R.K.

    2018-01-01

    of trees that users could harvest to around half of what the plans allow. Accordingly, forest user groups face a paradoxical forest administration that promotes timber harvesting according to so-called scientific principles, which it then brushes aside to satisfy bureaucratic demands. The study concludes...... that the concept of scientific forestry is merely used as a "brand" or a seemingly sound "narrative" in community forestry,while it is of little practical relevance because administrative decisions are more powerful in guiding forest management decisions. Hence, the study suggests a replacement of the current...

  14. A special issue of the Journal of Forestry---proceedings of the 2013 National Silviculture Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin; Marilyn A. Buford

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Forestry presents the Proceedings of the 2013 National Silviculture Workshop (NSW), which was held as one of the concurrent sessions of the 2013 national convention of the Society of American Foresters (SAF) and sponsored by the D-2 Silviculture Working Group. This marks the first time the NSW has been held in conjunction with the...

  15. ORGEST: Regional guidelines and silvicultural models for sustainable forest management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqué, Míriam; Vericat, Pau; Beltrán, Mario

    2017-11-01

    Aim of the study: To develop regional guidelines for sustainable forest management. Area of the study: Forests of Catalonia (NE Spain). Material and methods: The process of developing the forest management guidelines (FMG) started by establishing a thorough classification of forest types at stand level. This classification hinges on two attributes: tree species composition and site quality based on ecological variables, which together determine potential productivity. From there, the management guidelines establish certain objectives and silvicultural models for each forest type. The forest type classifications, like the silvicultural models, were produced using both existing and newly-built growth models based on data from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) and expert knowledge. The effort involved over 20 expert working groups in order to better integrate the expertise and vision of different sectorial agents. Main results: The FMG consist in quantitative silvicultural models that include typical silvicultural variables, technical descriptions of treatments and codes of good practice. Guidelines now cover almost all forest types in Catalonia (spanning up to 90% of the Catalan forest area). Different silvicultural models have been developed for pure and mixed stands, different site quality classes (2–3 classes per species), and even- and multi-aged stands. Research highlights: FMG: i) orient the management of private and public forests, (ii) provide a technical scaffold for efficient allocation/investment of public subsidies in forest management, and (iii) bridge forest planning instruments at regional (strategic-tactical) and stand (operational) level.

  16. Good for the group? Explaining apparent group-level selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallegange, I.M.; Egas, M.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that group selection can explain adaptive trait evolution is still controversial. Recent empirical work proposes evidence for group-level adaptation in a social spider, but the findings can also be explained from an individual-level perspective. The challenge remains to identify situations

  17. Silvicultural management and the manipulation of rare alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Donald H. DeHayes; Samuel E. Nijensohn

    2004-01-01

    Because rare alleles provide a means for adaptation to environmental change they are often considered important to long-term forest health. Through the selective removal of trees (and genes), silvicultural management may alter the genetic structure of forests, with rare alleles perhaps being uniquely vulnerable to manipulation due to their low frequencies or...

  18. A financial evaluation of two contrasting silvicultural systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation area in north-east Uruguay was 108 000 ha in 2008. Recent industrial capacity developments have resulted in major structural changes. Silvicultural system selection depends on site productivity, costs, timber prices and public policies. This study aimed to assess economic ...

  19. The effect of silvicultural management on regeneration, growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the objective of determining the effects of silvicultural management on regeneration and growth of mismanaged Arundinaria alpina stands, an experiment was conducted in the Choke Mountain, northwest Ethiopia. Eight soil and plant management techniques that comprise soil loosening, selective thinning and removal ...

  20. Proceedings of the 12th biennial southern silvicultural research conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristina F. Connor; [Editor

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-two papers and thirty-six poster summaries address a range of issues affecting southern forests. Papers are grouped in 15 sessions that include wildlife ecology; fire ecology; natural pine management; forest health; growth and yield; upland hardwoods - natural regeneration; hardwood intermediate treatments; longleaf pine; pine plantation silviculture; site...

  1. Applied group theory selected readings in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cracknell, Arthur P

    1968-01-01

    Selected Readings in Physics: Applied Group Theory provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of applied group theory. This book discusses the properties of symmetry of a system in quantum mechanics.Organized into two parts encompassing nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the problem of elastic vibrations of a symmetric structure. This text then examines the numbers, degeneracies, and symmetries of the normal modes of vibration. Other chapters consider the conditions under which a polyatomic molecule can have a stable equilibrium configuration when its electronic

  2. Simulating Silvicultural Treatments Using FIA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Woodall; Carl E. Fiedler

    2005-01-01

    Potential uses of the Forest Inventory and Analysis Database (FIADB) extend far beyond descriptions and summaries of current forest resources. Silvicultural treatments, although typically conducted at the stand level, may be simulated using the FIADB for predicting future forest conditions and resources at broader scales. In this study, silvicultural prescription...

  3. 32 CFR 1624.3 - Age selection groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Age selection groups. 1624.3 Section 1624.3....3 Age selection groups. Age selection groups are established as follows: (a) The age 20 selection group for each calendar year consists of registrants who have attained or will attain the age of 20 in...

  4. The sound bases of systemic silviculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nocentini S

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Following recent critiques on systemic silviculture, the author examines the principles, scientific consequences and practical implications of this theory. Systemic silviculture is based on the assumption that the forest is a complex biological system. This means abandoning the reductive, mechanistic and deterministic paradigm that has characterized forest science until the last century. If the forest is a complex biological system then its properties cannot be reduced to those of its components. According to this assumption, the author analyzes the concepts of forest structure, predictability and unpredictability of forest ecosystem processes, intrinsic value and rights of the forest. Systemic silviculture is characterized by an adaptive approach which has the flexibility and the capacity to respond to environmental retroactions which are fundamental for the governance of complex and adaptive systems. The author concludes that the bases of systemic silviculture are unassailable and surely much sounder than those of “naturalistic” silviculture, or at least of that type of silviculture which, trying to define “natural structural models” for forest ecosystems, is still anchored to the old, classic, paradigm of natural resource management and conservation.

  5. GUIDANCE ON SELECTING AGE GROUPS FOR ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guidance document provides a set of early-lifestage age groups for Environmental Protection Agency scientists to consider when assessing children’s exposure to environmental contaminants and the resultant potential dose. These recommended age groups are based on current understanding of differences in behavior and physiology which may impact exposures in children. A consistent set of early-life age groups, supported by an underlying scientific rationale, is expected to improve Agency exposure and risk assessments for children by increasing the consistency and comparability of risk assessments across the Agency; by improving accuracy and transparency in assessments for those cases where current practice might too broadly combine behaviorally and physiologically disparate age groups; and by fostering a consistent approach to future exposure surveys and monitoring efforts to generate improved exposure factors for children. see description

  6. Getting to the future through silviculture - Workshop proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis Murphy

    1992-01-01

    Includes 19 papers documenting presentations at the 1991 Forest Service National Silviculture Workshop. Discussions focus on the role of silviculture in New Perspectives (ecosystem management), new approaches to the practice of silviculture, and examples of successful integration of practices into multi resource management.

  7. Communicating the story of silviculture on the Allegheny National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lois M. DeMarco; Susan L. Stout

    1997-01-01

    To communicate the story of silviculture on the Allegheny National Forest, we need to distinguish silviculture-the art and science of manipulating forest vegetation to achieve management objectives-from forest management. During the field trip for the National Silviculture Workshop we visited five sites that demonstrate how inventory and monitoring, resource management...

  8. Silvicultural treatments enhance growth rates of future crop trees in a tropical dry forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villegas, Z.; Peña-Claros, M.; Mostacedo, B.; Alarcón, A.; Licona, J.C.; Leaño, C.; Pariona, W.; Choque, U.

    2009-01-01

    Silvicultural treatments are often needed in selectively logged tropical forest to enhance the growth rates of many commercial tree species and, consequently, for recovering a larger proportion of the initial volume harvested over the next cutting cycle. The available data in the literature suggest,

  9. The management system of silvicultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone F

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of public and private interests on forest ecosystems makes the silvicultural interventions the most thorny moment of their management. In this paper the author analyzes the characteristics of forest firms and logging companies usually involved in forest management. The relations between their legitimate interests, expectations and strategies, the ways by which forest firm may entrust the execution of the silvicultural intervention, etc. are aspects strongly connected with the public interests, which is protected by forestry institutions. Silvicultural system of management interventions is the context where public interests are coordinated with the private interests. The output are qualitative and quantitative standards for the use of forest resources. Moving on from this preliminary to the executive phase, the case study has highlighted the crucial role played by foresters, who have to guarantee the coexistence of public and private interests on forests.

  10. Group selection as behavioral adaptation to systematic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruixun; Brennan, Thomas J; Lo, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Despite many compelling applications in economics, sociobiology, and evolutionary psychology, group selection is still one of the most hotly contested ideas in evolutionary biology. Here we propose a simple evolutionary model of behavior and show that what appears to be group selection may, in fact, simply be the consequence of natural selection occurring in stochastic environments with reproductive risks that are correlated across individuals. Those individuals with highly correlated risks will appear to form "groups", even if their actions are, in fact, totally autonomous, mindless, and, prior to selection, uniformly randomly distributed in the population. This framework implies that a separate theory of group selection is not strictly necessary to explain observed phenomena such as altruism and cooperation. At the same time, it shows that the notion of group selection does captures a unique aspect of evolution-selection with correlated reproductive risk-that may be sufficiently widespread to warrant a separate term for the phenomenon.

  11. Effects of Timber Harvests and Silvicultural Edges on Terrestrial Salamanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Jami E.; Williams, Rod N.

    2014-01-01

    Balancing timber production and conservation in forest management requires an understanding of how timber harvests affect wildlife species. Terrestrial salamanders are useful indicators of mature forest ecosystem health due to their importance to ecosystem processes and sensitivity to environmental change. However, the effects of timber harvests on salamanders, though often researched, are still not well understood. To further this understanding, we used artificial cover objects to monitor the relative abundance of terrestrial salamanders for two seasons (fall and spring) pre-harvest and five seasons post-harvest in six forest management treatments, and for three seasons post-harvest across the edge gradients of six recent clearcuts. In total, we recorded 19,048 encounters representing nine species of salamanders. We observed declines in mean encounters of eastern red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) and northern slimy salamanders (P. glutinosus) from pre- to post-harvest in group selection cuts and in clearcuts. However, we found no evidence of salamander declines at shelterwoods and forested sites adjacent to harvests. Edge effects induced by recent clearcuts influenced salamanders for approximately 20 m into the forest, but edge influence varied by slope orientation. Temperature, soil moisture, and canopy cover were all correlated with salamander counts. Our results suggest silvicultural techniques that remove the forest canopy negatively affect salamander relative abundance on the local scale during the years immediately following harvest, and that the depth of edge influence of clearcuts on terrestrial salamanders is relatively shallow (harvests (<4 ha) and techniques that leave the forest canopy intact may be compatible with maintaining terrestrial salamander populations across a forested landscape. Our results demonstrate the importance of examining species-specific responses and monitoring salamanders across multiple seasons and years. Long

  12. Multispectral iris recognition based on group selection and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Foysal; Roy, Kaushik

    2017-05-01

    A commercially available iris recognition system uses only a narrow band of the near infrared spectrum (700-900 nm) while iris images captured in the wide range of 405 nm to 1550 nm offer potential benefits to enhance recognition performance of an iris biometric system. The novelty of this research is that a group selection algorithm based on coalition game theory is explored to select the best patch subsets. In this algorithm, patches are divided into several groups based on their maximum contribution in different groups. Shapley values are used to evaluate the contribution of patches in different groups. Results show that this group selection based iris recognition

  13. Efficient silvicultural practices for eastern hardwood management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary W. Miller; John E. Baumgras

    1994-01-01

    Eastern hardwood forests are now managed to meet a wide range of objectives, resulting in the need for silvicultural alternatives that provide timber, wildlife, aesthetics, recreation, and other benefits. However, forest management practices must continue to be efficient in terms of profiting from current harvests, protecting the environment, and sustaining production...

  14. Modelling Facilitates Silvicultural Decision-Making for Improving the Mitigating Effect of Beech (Fagus Sylvatica L. Dominated Alpine Forest against Rockfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Kajdiž

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In southeast Europe, silvicultural measures for improving forest protective effects against rockfall are often based on unsystematic observation and experience. We compared formalised expert assessment of forest protective effects and silvicultural decision-making with an approach supported by modelling (Rockyfor3D, Rockfor.NET, shadow angle method. The case study was conducted in Fagus sylvatica dominated Alpine forests above the regional road leading to the Ljubelj pass, in Slovenia. We analysed rock sources, silent witnesses, forest structure and regeneration. Expert assessment indicated acceptable protection effects of the forest and their decline in the future. Modelling revealed several road sections endangered by rockfalls. It also indicated subtle differences between silvicultural alternatives: current forest, current forest with cable crane lines, selection forest and non-forested slope. This outcome may be due to short transition zones, small rock sizes, low rock source heights and low resolution of the digital elevation model. Modelling requires more initial input than formalised expert assessment but gives spatially explicit results that enable comparison of silvicultural alternatives, coordination of silviculture and forest operations, and delineation of protection forests. Modelling also supported prioritising of silvicultural measures, where the necessity of silvicultural measures increases with increasing rockfall susceptibility and decreasing long-term stability of stands.

  15. Effects of clear-cutting and alternative silvicultural systems on wildlife in Ontario`s boreal mixedwoods. NODA/NFP technical report No. TR-19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedeles, C.H.; Van Damme, L.

    1995-12-31

    Reviews the potential impacts of alternative silvicultural systems in Ontario boreal mixedwood forests on individual species and groups of wildlife. Begins with an overview of the ecology of boreal mixedwoods and a discussion of some of the concepts relevant to the later sections of the report, such as biodiversity. Alternative silvicultural systems are then reviewed, including modified clear-cut systems and the shelterwood system. The next four chapters cover habitat affiliations and the stand-level and large-scale effects of those silvicultural systems on the following categories of wildlife: Birds, small mammals such as rabbits and squirrels, ungulates (moose, caribou), and furbearers with small, intermediate, and large home ranges.

  16. Selecting groups of covariates in the elastic net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    This paper introduces a novel method to select groups of variables in sparse regression and classication settings. The groups are formed based on the correlations between covariates and ensure that for example spatial or spectral relations are preserved without explicitly coding for these....... The preservation of relations gives increased interpretability. The method is based on the elastic net and adaptively selects highly correlated groups of variables and does therefore not waste time in grouping irrelevant variables for the problem at hand. The method is illustrated on a simulated data set...... and on regression of moisture content in multispectral images of sand. In both cases, the predictions were better or similar to existing regression and classication algorithms and the interpretation was enhanced using the grouping method. On top of that, the grouping method more consistently selects the important...

  17. Bayesian Group Bridge for Bi-level Variable Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Himel; Yi, Nengjun

    2017-06-01

    A Bayesian bi-level variable selection method (BAGB: Bayesian Analysis of Group Bridge) is developed for regularized regression and classification. This new development is motivated by grouped data, where generic variables can be divided into multiple groups, with variables in the same group being mechanistically related or statistically correlated. As an alternative to frequentist group variable selection methods, BAGB incorporates structural information among predictors through a group-wise shrinkage prior. Posterior computation proceeds via an efficient MCMC algorithm. In addition to the usual ease-of-interpretation of hierarchical linear models, the Bayesian formulation produces valid standard errors, a feature that is notably absent in the frequentist framework. Empirical evidence of the attractiveness of the method is illustrated by extensive Monte Carlo simulations and real data analysis. Finally, several extensions of this new approach are presented, providing a unified framework for bi-level variable selection in general models with flexible penalties.

  18. Summary of the 2009 National Silviculture Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin

    2010-01-01

    The theme of the 2009 National Silviculture Workshop held in Boise Idaho in June 2009 was, “Integrated management of carbon sequestration and biomass utilization opportunities in a changing climate.” The session had a series of outstanding presentations and field tours focused on the theme of the meeting nationally, and with specific reference to the forests of the...

  19. Applicant Personality and Procedural Justice Perceptions of Group Selection Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Hege H; Sandal, Gro M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how job applicants' personalities influence perceptions of the structural and social procedural justice of group selection interviews (i.e., a group of several applicants being evaluated simultaneously). We especially addressed trait interactions between neuroticism and extraversion (the affective plane) and extraversion and agreeableness (the interpersonal plane). Data on personality (pre-interview) and justice perceptions (post-interview) were collected in a field study among job applicants ( N  = 97) attending group selection interviews for positions as teachers in a Norwegian high school. Interaction effects in hierarchical regression analyses showed that perceptions of social and structural justice increased with levels of extraversion among high scorers on neuroticism. Among emotionally stable applicants, however, being introverted or extraverted did not matter to justice perceptions. Extraversion did not impact on the perception of social justice for applicants low in agreeableness. Agreeable applicants, however, experienced the group interview as more socially fair when they were also extraverted. The impact of applicant personality on justice perceptions may be underestimated if traits interactions are not considered. Procedural fairness ratings for the group selection interview were high, contrary to the negative reactions predicted by other researchers. There was no indication that applicants with desirable traits (i.e., traits predictive of job performance) reacted negatively to this selection tool. Despite the widespread use of interviews in selection, previous studies of applicant personality and fairness reactions have not included interviews. The study demonstrates the importance of previously ignored trait interactions in understanding applicant reactions.

  20. Group therapy for selective mutism - a parents' and children's treatment group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Louise; Mc Nicholas, Fiona; Barry, Edwina; Begley, Maire; Ahern, Sinead

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of group therapy for children with selective mutism and their parents. Five children (mean age 6.1 years) with a diagnosis of selective mutism were administered group therapy over an 8-week period. Parents simultaneously attended a second group, aimed at providing education and advice on managing selective mutism in everyday situations, and in the school environment. At post-treatment, all children increased their level of confident speaking in school, clinic and community settings. Parents indicated a reduction in their own anxiety levels, from pre- to post-treatment on self-rating scales. Findings support the feasibility and effectiveness of group therapy for children with selective mutism and their parents.

  1. Use of expert systems for integrated silvicultural planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1997-01-01

    The use of silvicultural treatments in hardwood stands presents opportunities for increasing the growth and yield of quality sawtimber and enhancing the suitability of the site for use by numerous species of wildlife. Planners, loggers, and managers must consider multiple aspects of the ecosystem when making silvicultural decisions. In this paper we demonstrate an...

  2. Silvicultural guide for northern hardwoods in the northeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    William B. Leak; Mariko Yamasaki; Robbo. Holleran

    2014-01-01

    This revision of the 1987 silvicultural guide includes updated and expanded silvicultural information on northern hardwoods as well as additional information on wildlife habitat and the management of mixed-wood and northern hardwood-oak stands. The prescription methodology is simpler and more field-oriented. This guide also includes an appendix of familiar tables and...

  3. A transportation-scheduling system for managing silvicultural projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge F. Valenzuela; H. Hakan Balci; Timothy McDonald

    2005-01-01

    A silvicultural project encompasses tasks such as sitelevel planning, regeneration, harvestin, and stand-tending treatments. an essential problem in managing silvicultural projects is to efficiently schedule the operations while considering project task due dates and costs of moving scarce resources to specific job locations. Transportation costs represent a...

  4. Reference Stands for Silvicultural Research: A Maine Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura S. Kenefic; Alan S. White; Andrew R. Cutko; Shawn Fraver

    2005-01-01

    Silvicultural experiments should have untreated stand replicates in which development can be tracked over time. Unfortunately, field studies are seldom ideal. This article is one of six in this issue addressing experimental controls. Our focus is the Penobscot Experimental Forest (PEF) in Maine, where a 55-year-old experiment in northern conifer silviculture has an...

  5. Economics of hardwood silviculture using skyline and conventional logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Baumgras; Gary W. Miller; Chris B. LeDoux

    1995-01-01

    Managing Appalachian hardwood forests to satisfy the growing and diverse demands on this resource will require alternatives to traditional silvicultural methods and harvesting systems. Determining the relative economic efficiency of these alternative methods and systems with respect to harvest cash flows is essential. The effects of silvicultural methods and roundwood...

  6. Shifting conceptions of complexity in forest management and silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert T. Fahey; Brandon C. Alveshere; Julia I. Burton; Anthony W. D' Amato; Yvette L. Dickinson; William S. Keeton; Christel C. Kern; Andrew J. Larson; Brian J. Palik; Klaus J. Puettmann; Michael R. Saunders; Christopher R. Webster; Jeff W. Atkins; Christopher M. Gough; Brady S. Hardiman

    2018-01-01

    In the past several decades, a trend in forestry and silviculture has been toward promoting complexity in forest ecosystems, but how complexity is conceived and described has shifted over time as new ideas and terminology have been introduced. Historically, ecologically-focused silviculture has focused largely on manipulation of structural complexity, but often with...

  7. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working document I. The Florida Eucalyptus energy farm: silvicultural methods and considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    The silvicultural matrix within which the nation's first large scale wood energy plantation will develop is described in detail. The relevant literature reviewed is identified and distilled. The plantation history, site preparation, planting, species selection, maintenance and management, harvesting, and the Eucalyptus biomass production estimates are presented.

  8. Understory Vegetation 3 Years after Implementing Uneven-Aged Silviculture in a Shortleaf Pine-Oak Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Shelton; Paul A. Murphy

    1997-01-01

    The effects of retaining overstory hardwoods on understory vegetation were determined after implementing uneven-aged silviculture usingsingle-tree selection in a shortleaf pine-oak stand (Pinus echinata Mill. and Quercus spp.) in the Ouachita Mountains. Treatments were the following hardwood basal areas (square feet per acre) and...

  9. Kin groups and trait groups: population structure and epidemic disease selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, A G

    1984-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation based on the population structure of a small-scale human population, the Semai Senoi of Malaysia, has been developed to study the combined effects of group, kin, and individual selection. The population structure resembles D.S. Wilson's structured deme model in that local breeding populations (Semai settlements) are subdivided into trait groups (hamlets) that may be kin-structured and are not themselves demes. Additionally, settlement breeding populations are connected by two-dimensional stepping-stone migration approaching 30% per generation. Group and kin-structured group selection occur among hamlets the survivors of which then disperse to breed within the settlement population. Genetic drift is modeled by the process of hamlet formation; individual selection as a deterministic process, and stepping-stone migration as either random or kin-structured migrant groups. The mechanism for group selection is epidemics of infectious disease that can wipe out small hamlets particularly if most adults become sick and social life collapses. Genetic resistance to a disease is an individual attribute; however, hamlet groups with several resistant adults are less likely to disintegrate and experience high social mortality. A specific human gene, hemoglobin E, which confers resistance to malaria, is studied as an example of the process. The results of the simulations show that high genetic variance among hamlet groups may be generated by moderate degrees of kin-structuring. This strong microdifferentiation provides the potential for group selection. The effect of group selection in this case is rapid increase in gene frequencies among the total set of populations. In fact, group selection in concert with individual selection produced a faster rate of gene frequency increase among a set of 25 populations than the rate within a single unstructured population subject to deterministic individual selection. Such rapid evolution with plausible rates of

  10. Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: Silvicultural Examination, Prescription, and Related Activities; Missoula, Montana; September 26-28, 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman E. Gould; Don Potter; Ray Johnston; Jim Loton; Donald Pierce; Ronald C. Hamilton; George E. Gruell; Victor DeKalb; Dav Wright; Bill Beaufait; Dan Schroeder; Bob Blomquist; John C. Tappeiner; Carl Puuri; Dav Terry; R. E. Stewart; Walter H. Knapp

    1978-01-01

    The 1978 Silviculture Workshop was held in Missoula, Montana, September 26-28, 1978. The objective of the meeting was to discuss Silvicultural prescriptions, standards of certification for silviculturists, certification of planting and thinning projects, and other related items of interest. These proceedings includes the presentations that were available for...

  11. Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: Silviculture for All Resources; Sacramento, CA; May 11-14, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Malespin Woolever; Mike Smith; Elizabeth McGraw; Mike Lanasa; Arthur C. Zack; Chris Reichert; Robert MacWhorter; Michael R. Lennartz; Richard A. Lancia; Marc G. Rounsaville; James R. Sedell; Fred H. Everest; David R. Gibbons; Stephen R. Shifley; Melinda Moeur; David A. Marquis; Richard O. Fitzgerald; Nelson Loftus; Thomas C. Turpin; William R. Terrill; Glenn L. Crouch; Wayne D. Shepperd; Edith W. Petrick; John J. Petrick; Roger W. Dennington; Allan W. Ashton; Hubertus J. Mittmann; Gary Thompson; Ken Sonksen; David A. Stark; Michael A. Ware; Allan J. West; Patrick D. Jackson; Richard L. Bassett; Jimmie D. Chew; William B. White; Bruce W. Morse; Mike Znerold; Russell T. Graham; Peyton W. Owston; Richard G. Miller; John R. Nesbitt; Gaston Porterie; Ernest Del Rio

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 National Silviculture Workshop was held in Sacramento, California, and the Eldorado National Forest. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss, review, and share information and experiences regarding how silviculture can serve as the tool to help accomplish the objectives of many resources.

  12. Classification and Target Group Selection Based Upon Frequent Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); R. Potharst (Rob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this technical report , two new algorithms based upon frequent patterns are proposed. One algorithm is a classification method. The other one is an algorithm for target group selection. In both algorithms, first of all, the collection of frequent patterns in the training set is

  13. Linguistic Extension for Group Multicriteria Project Manager Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Dodangeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Qualified human resource selection is one of the organizational key success factors. Since choosing the best candidate to fill the defined vacancy in a company is a complex task, intelligence analytical methods would be required to deal with this important issue. Regarding the vagueness and uncertainty of human resource selection process, it requires the linguistic extension of multicriteria decision making (MCDM models for robust recruitment. This research is aimed to develop a fuzzy MCDM model for linguistic reasoning under new fuzzy group decision making. The new linguistic reasoning for group decision making is able to aggregate subjective evaluation of the decision makers and hence create an opportunity to perform more robust human resource selection procedures. A numerical example demonstrates possibilities for the improvement of human resource management and any other business decision areas through applying the proposed model.

  14. Novel web service selection model based on discrete group search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jie; Shao, Zhiqing; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Haiteng

    2014-01-01

    In our earlier work, we present a novel formal method for the semiautomatic verification of specifications and for describing web service composition components by using abstract concepts. After verification, the instantiations of components were selected to satisfy the complex service performance constraints. However, selecting an optimal instantiation, which comprises different candidate services for each generic service, from a large number of instantiations is difficult. Therefore, we present a new evolutionary approach on the basis of the discrete group search service (D-GSS) model. With regard to obtaining the optimal multiconstraint instantiation of the complex component, the D-GSS model has competitive performance compared with other service selection models in terms of accuracy, efficiency, and ability to solve high-dimensional service composition component problems. We propose the cost function and the discrete group search optimizer (D-GSO) algorithm and study the convergence of the D-GSS model through verification and test cases.

  15. Group Cooperation without Group Selection: Modest Punishment Can Recruit Much Cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max M Krasnow

    Full Text Available Humans everywhere cooperate in groups to achieve benefits not attainable by individuals. Individual effort is often not automatically tied to a proportionate share of group benefits. This decoupling allows for free-riding, a strategy that (absent countermeasures outcompetes cooperation. Empirically and formally, punishment potentially solves the evolutionary puzzle of group cooperation. Nevertheless, standard analyses appear to show that punishment alone is insufficient, because second-order free riders (those who cooperate but do not punish can be shown to outcompete punishers. Consequently, many have concluded that other processes, such as cultural or genetic group selection, are required. Here, we present a series of agent-based simulations that show that group cooperation sustained by punishment easily evolves by individual selection when you introduce into standard models more biologically plausible assumptions about the social ecology and psychology of ancestral humans. We relax three unrealistic assumptions of past models. First, past models assume all punishers must punish every act of free riding in their group. We instead allow punishment to be probabilistic, meaning punishers can evolve to only punish some free riders some of the time. This drastically lowers the cost of punishment as group size increases. Second, most models unrealistically do not allow punishment to recruit labor; punishment merely reduces the punished agent's fitness. We instead realistically allow punished free riders to cooperate in the future to avoid punishment. Third, past models usually restrict agents to interact in a single group their entire lives. We instead introduce realistic social ecologies in which agents participate in multiple, partially overlapping groups. Because of this, punitive tendencies are more expressed and therefore more exposed to natural selection. These three moves toward greater model realism reveal that punishment and cooperation

  16. Group Cooperation without Group Selection: Modest Punishment Can Recruit Much Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Max M; Delton, Andrew W; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2015-01-01

    Humans everywhere cooperate in groups to achieve benefits not attainable by individuals. Individual effort is often not automatically tied to a proportionate share of group benefits. This decoupling allows for free-riding, a strategy that (absent countermeasures) outcompetes cooperation. Empirically and formally, punishment potentially solves the evolutionary puzzle of group cooperation. Nevertheless, standard analyses appear to show that punishment alone is insufficient, because second-order free riders (those who cooperate but do not punish) can be shown to outcompete punishers. Consequently, many have concluded that other processes, such as cultural or genetic group selection, are required. Here, we present a series of agent-based simulations that show that group cooperation sustained by punishment easily evolves by individual selection when you introduce into standard models more biologically plausible assumptions about the social ecology and psychology of ancestral humans. We relax three unrealistic assumptions of past models. First, past models assume all punishers must punish every act of free riding in their group. We instead allow punishment to be probabilistic, meaning punishers can evolve to only punish some free riders some of the time. This drastically lowers the cost of punishment as group size increases. Second, most models unrealistically do not allow punishment to recruit labor; punishment merely reduces the punished agent's fitness. We instead realistically allow punished free riders to cooperate in the future to avoid punishment. Third, past models usually restrict agents to interact in a single group their entire lives. We instead introduce realistic social ecologies in which agents participate in multiple, partially overlapping groups. Because of this, punitive tendencies are more expressed and therefore more exposed to natural selection. These three moves toward greater model realism reveal that punishment and cooperation easily evolve by

  17. Cultural group selection follows Darwin's classic syllogism for the operation of selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richerson, Peter; Baldini, Ryan; Bell, Adrian V; Demps, Kathryn; Frost, Karl; Hillis, Vicken; Mathew, Sarah; Newton, Emily K; Naar, Nicole; Newson, Lesley; Ross, Cody; Smaldino, Paul E; Waring, Timothy M; Zefferman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of our target article was to sketch the empirical case for the importance of selection at the level of groups on cultural variation. Such variation is massive in humans, but modest or absent in other species. Group selection processes acting on this variation is a framework for developing explanations of the unusual level of cooperation between non-relatives found in our species. Our case for cultural group selection (CGS) followed Darwin's classic syllogism regarding natural selection: If variation exists at the level of groups, if this variation is heritable, and if it plays a role in the success or failure of competing groups, then selection will operate at the level of groups. We outlined the relevant domains where such evidence can be sought and characterized the main conclusions of work in those domains. Most commentators agree that CGS plays some role in human evolution, although some were considerably more skeptical. Some contributed additional empirical cases. Some raised issues of the scope of CGS explanations versus competing ones.

  18. Silviculture and forest protection: results and prospects from third Italian National Congress of Silviculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the topics discussed during the session “Silviculture, Forest Protection” of the Third Italian National Congress of Silviculture. The health of Italian forests is often depending on irrational forest exploitation schemes and is threatened by the arrival of invasive species, the strengthening of native pests and diseases, and the increase of stress related to changing environment (both climate and pollution. The climate change is considered as a major complication in forest protection, as it is related to increasing outbreaks both directly and indirectly, through changes in tree physiology. Drawbacks are observed on biodiversity, forest growth and productivity, and protective function of forests. Ecosystems with high biodiversity may show a high degree of resilience to the changes. It is important to address these issues in the framework of the systemic silviculture approach to the management of Italian forests. Important requisites are availability of trained staff, funding for research and monitoring projects, access to the most uptodated scientific knowledge and methodologies. An integration of different types of available expertise (entomologists, plant pathologists, pollution scientists is also envisaged.

  19. Internal radioactive contamination in selected groups of CRNL employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.W.S.

    1975-10-01

    This report details the development and execution of a 30 month program designed to characterize the magnitude and distribution of internal radioactive contaminaton amongst selected groups of employees at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, using a shadow shield whole-body counter. The results show that the levels of contamination in these employees are very low, and no contaminant was present in amounts exceeding 10% of the maximum permissible body burden, with the exception of a medically administered radionuclide (selenium-75). Details of the time course of some of the body burdens are also furnished. (author)

  20. Management of Assortment Inventory Groups in Selected Foundry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymszal J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As experience shows the practical, reliable assessment and optimisation of total costs of logistical processes implemented in supply chains of foundry plants is a quite complex and complicated process, because it requires to enclose all, without exception, performed actions, including them in various reference cross-sections, systematic activities and finally transforming them in a totally homogenous collection. Only solid analysis and assessment of assortment management in logistical supply systems in foundry plants of particular assortment groups allows to lower the supply costs significantly. In the article the analysis and assessment of the newest implemented optimising algorithms are presented in the process stock management of selected material groups used in a production process of a chosen foundry plant. A practical solution to solve a problem of rotary stock cost minimisation is given as well as of costs while creating a stock with the usage of economical volume and value of order.

  1. Opportunity for natural selection among some selected population groups of Northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Farida Ahmed; Mithun, Sikdar

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selection potential based on differential fertility and mortality has been computed for seven population groups inhabiting different geographical locations of Northeast India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Crow’s as well as Johnston and Kensinger’s index have been used for the present purpose. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Irrespective of the methodology, the total index of selection was found to be highest among the Deoris followed by the Kaibartas. The lowest selection index was found among the Oraon population. If the relative contribution of fertility and mortality components to the total index is considered to be multiplicative, it is observed that in all these communities the fertility component exceeds that of mortality component, which may indicate initiation of demographic transitional phase in the selected populations with the betterment of healthcare and socioeconomic condition within the last few decades. PMID:21031053

  2. Opportunity for natural selection among some selected population groups of Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Farida Ahmed; Mithun, Sikdar

    2010-05-01

    Selection potential based on differential fertility and mortality has been computed for seven population groups inhabiting different geographical locations of Northeast India. Crow's as well as Johnston and Kensinger's index have been used for the present purpose. Irrespective of the methodology, the total index of selection was found to be highest among the Deoris followed by the Kaibartas. The lowest selection index was found among the Oraon population. If the relative contribution of fertility and mortality components to the total index is considered to be multiplicative, it is observed that in all these communities the fertility component exceeds that of mortality component, which may indicate initiation of demographic transitional phase in the selected populations with the betterment of healthcare and socioeconomic condition within the last few decades.

  3. Wild chimpanzees show group differences in selection of agricultural crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Matthew R; Hockings, Kimberley J

    2014-08-05

    The ability of wild animals to respond flexibly to anthropogenic environmental changes, including agriculture, is critical to survival in human-impacted habitats. Understanding use of human foods by wildlife can shed light on the acquisition of novel feeding habits and how animals respond to human-driven land-use changes. Little attention has focused on within-species variation in use of human foods or its causes. We examined crop-feeding in two groups of wild chimpanzees - a specialist frugivore - with differing histories of exposure to agriculture. Both groups exploited a variety of crops, with more accessible crops consumed most frequently. However, crop selection by chimpanzees with long-term exposure to agriculture was more omnivorous (i.e., less fruit-biased) compared to those with more recent exposure, which ignored most non-fruit crops. Our results suggest chimpanzees show increased foraging adaptations to cultivated landscapes over time; however, local feeding traditions may also contribute to group differences in crop-feeding in this species. Understanding the dynamic responses of wildlife to agriculture can help predict current and future adaptability of species to fast-changing anthropogenic landscapes.

  4. Job Satisfaction of a selected group of hospital dietitians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie E. Van Heernden

    1976-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on the job satisfaction of a selected group of hospital dietitians is reported in an attempt to explain the interrelationship of various aspects contributing to such satisfaction. General job satisfaction, satisfaction with specific aspects of the job and personality profiles of a newly developed Job Factor scale. The study is a further contribution to the understanding of job satisfaction of professional women in a specific work environment - in this case professional dietitians in hospitals. Opsomming Die werkstevredenheid van hospitaaldieetkundiges word ondersoek na aanleiding van die interverwantskap van verskillende aspekte wat tot 'n beter verklaring daarvan kan lei. Die algemene werkstevredenheid, werkstevredenheid met spesifieke aspekte van die werk en persoonlikheidstrekke van dieetkundiges word met bestaande skale en ‘n ontwikkelde meetmiddel ondersoek. Die studie is 'n bydrae tot die verdere verklaring en moontlike bevraagtekening van die werkstevredenheid van professionele vroue in 'n bepaalde werksomgewing - in hierdie geval professionele dieetkundiges in hospitale.

  5. Multicriteria decision group model for the selection of suppliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Hazin Alencar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have been studying group decision making over the years, which indicates how relevant it is. This paper presents a multicriteria group decision model based on ELECTRE IV and VIP Analysis methods, to those cases where there is great divergence among the decision makers. This model includes two stages. In the first, the ELECTRE IV method is applied and a collective criteria ranking is obtained. In the second, using criteria ranking, VIP Analysis is applied and the alternatives are selected. To illustrate the model, a numerical application in the context of the selection of suppliers in project management is used. The suppliers that form part of the project team have a crucial role in project management. They are involved in a network of connected activities that can jeopardize the success of the project, if they are not undertaken in an appropriate way. The question tackled is how to select service suppliers for a project on behalf of an enterprise that assists the multiple objectives of the decision-makers.Vários autores têm estudado decisão em grupo nos últimos anos, o que indica a relevância do assunto. Esse artigo apresenta um modelo multicritério de decisão em grupo baseado nos métodos ELECTRE IV e VIP Analysis, adequado aos casos em que se tem uma grande divergência entre os decisores. Esse modelo é composto por dois estágios. No primeiro, o método ELECTRE IV é aplicado e uma ordenação dos critérios é obtida. No próximo estágio, com a ordenação dos critérios, o método VIP Analysis é aplicado e as alternativas são selecionadas. Para ilustrar o modelo, uma aplicação numérica no contexto da seleção de fornecedores em projetos é realizada. Os fornecedores que fazem parte da equipe do projeto têm um papel fundamental no gerenciamento de projetos. Eles estão envolvidos em uma rede de atividades conectadas que, caso não sejam executadas de forma apropriada, podem colocar em risco o sucesso do

  6. EPA Selects Lawrence, Mass. Group for Brownfields Job Training Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today, EPA announced that the Merrimack Valley Workforce Investment Board, of Lawrence, Mass., was one of 14 organizations nationwide selected to receive funding to operate environmental job training programs for local unemployed residents.

  7. OPPS Provider Summary for 30 Selected APC Groups - CY2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A provider level summary of Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) average estimated submitted charges and average Medicare Payments for 30 selected Ambulatory...

  8. Innovative silvicultural treatments to enhance soil biodiversity in artificial black pine stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocali, Stefano; De Meo, Isabella; Bianchetto, Elisa; Landi, Silvia; Salerni, Elena; Mori, Paolo; Bruschini, Silvia; Montini, Piergiuseppe; Samaden, Stefano; Cantiani, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The decay of forest cover and soil erosion is a consequence of continual intensive forest exploitation, such as grazing and wildfires over the centuries. From the end of the eighteenth century up to the mid-1900s, black pine plantations were established throughout the Apennines' range in Italy, to improve forest soil quality. The main aim of this reafforestation was to re-establish the pine as a first cover, pioneer species. This was a preparatory step to the reintroduction of broadleaf trees, such as oaks and beech trees, and thus the reestablishment of mixed forest. A series of thinning activities were planned by foresters when these plantations were designed. Many stands, however, remain unthinned, which over time, has weakened the trees in the plantations. Alternative forms of regeneration have been and are being tested to improve the natural and artificial establishment of indigenous species. Thinning, however, remains the most common and one of the most successful regeneration methods used in pine forests. The project's main objective is to demonstrate the potential of an innovative silvicultural treatment to enhance the level of biodiversity in the soil of black pine stands. In particular, the project aims to evaluate the effects of selective thinning on soil biodiversity on young black pine stands. These effects will be compared to traditional thinning methods (selecting trees from below leaving well-spaced, highest-quality trees) and to areas of forest where silvicultural treatments (e.g. weeding, cleaning, liberation cutting) are not carried out.

  9. Qualitative and Quantitative Characteristics of Selected Bacterial Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Dorota; Gałęcka, Mirosława; Cichy, Wojciech; Szachta, Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was evaluation of qualitative and quantitative changes in bacterial ecosystem in 109 children with inflammatory bowel diseases. Stools obtained from patients were analysed for selected bacteria and concentration of faecal inflammatory markers (calprotectin, lactoferrin, M2-PK). The number of selected microorganisms depends on the level of clinical activity of disease and is correlated with faecal concentration of inflammatory markers. Differences in microflora disturbance, observed in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, may suggest different causes of development of both pathologies.

  10. Resistance and resilience: A conceptual framework for silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. DeRose; James N. Long

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, forest management goals include building or maintaining resistance and/or resilience to disturbances in the face of climate change. Although a multitude of descriptive definitions for resistance and resilience exist, to evaluate whether specific management activities (silviculture) are effective, prescriptive characterizations are necessary. We introduce...

  11. Effect of Silviculture on the Yield and Quality of Veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie H. Groom; Ray Newbold; Jim Guldin

    2002-01-01

    The structural and aesthetic value of wood is typically sacrificed in an attempt to meet demand. This paper addresses the financial and quality aspects of silvicultural choices as it relates to wood veneers. Five trees each were harvested from an uneven-aged stand and from the following even- aged stands: intensive plantation, conventional plantation, and natural...

  12. Combining Silviculture and Landscape Architecture to Enhance the Roadside View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. McDonald; R. Burton Litton Jr.

    1998-01-01

    On a high-quality site in the mixed conifer forest of northern California, understory and overstory vegetation along a 3-mile paved county road were manipulated to enhance the view for the traveler. Traditional silvicultural cutting methods and landscape architectural techniques were blended to give contrast and variability to the vegetation along both sides of the...

  13. Plantation Forestry in Sub Saharan Africa: Silvicultural, Ecological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the potentials of meeting the wood demand and achieving SFM in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) through the establishment of forest plantations. The paper reviews forest plantation ownership and distribution patterns in SSA and the factors –silvicultural, ecological, and economic that affect supply and ...

  14. Silvicultural approaches to animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh C. Black

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the potential of Silvicultural approaches for managing animal damage in forests at two levels: management of free-to-grow stands and sitespecific practices that foster prompt and successful regeneration. Introductory chapters provide a historical perspective of animal damage management in the Pacific Northwest, describe the elements of an integrated...

  15. A nice textbook of silviculture published in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercurio R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive textbook of regional and functional silviculture, recently published in Spain by R. Serrada, G. Montero and J. A. Reque (eds., is presented here as a very useful reference text for all the people who is interested in the management of Mediterranean forests.

  16. Past, present, and future role of silviculture in forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell T. Graham; Theresa Benavidez Jain

    2004-01-01

    In general, silviculture can be defined as the art and science of controlling the establishment, growth, competition, health, and quality of forests and woodlands to meet the diverse needs and values of landowners and society on a sustainable basis (Helms 1998). This definition or variations of it have existed since the late 1800s. Gifford (1902), an Assistant...

  17. Evolution of silvicultural thinning: from rejection to transcendence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris Zeide

    2006-01-01

    Our views on a main tool of forestry, silvicultural thinning, have changed greatly since the beginning of forestry over 200 years ago. At first, thinning was rejected as something unnatural and destructive. It was believed that the densest stands were the most productive and any thinning only detracted from maximum growth produced by nature. This philosophy was still...

  18. Silviculture: what is it like, and where have we journeyed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph D. Nyland

    1997-01-01

    The philosophy of ecosystem management calls for a new way of doing business. It represents an evolution of thinking and acting that began during the era of dominant use, and continued through the time of multiple use. As such, ecosystem management represents a maturing of thought about silviculture and other aspects of natural resources management and use. It stresses...

  19. Perceived Visual Deterioration among a Selected Group of Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the perceived visual deterioration and the determinants among selected dental surgeons in Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey of Resident doctors attending the Revision course of Faculty of Dental Surgery of the National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, ...

  20. Maximizing Consensus in Portfolio Selection in Multicriteria Group Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michael, Emmerich T. M.; Deutz, A.H.; Li, L.; Asep, Maulana A.; Yevseyeva, I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a scenario of decision making where a moderator selects a (sub)set (aka portfolio) of decision alternatives from a larger set. The larger the number of decision makers who agree on a solution in the portfolio the more successful the moderator is. We assume that decision makers

  1. Selected papers on harmonic analysis, groups, and invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Nomizu, Katsumi

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains papers that originally appeared in Japanese in the journal Sūgaku. Ordinarily the papers would appear in the AMS translation of that journal, but to expedite publication the Society has chosen to publish them as a volume of selected papers. The papers range over a variety of topics, including representation theory, differential geometry, invariant theory, and complex analysis.

  2. A simple model of group selection that cannot be analyzed with inclusive fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, M.; Luo, S.; Simon, B.

    2014-01-01

    A widespread claim in evolutionary theory is that every group selection model can be recast in terms of inclusive fitness. Although there are interesting classes of group selection models for which this is possible, we show that it is not true in general. With a simple set of group selection models,

  3. Personnel selection using group fuzzy AHP and SAW methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Afshari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Personnel evaluation and selection is a very important activity for the enterprises. Different job needs different ability and the requirement of criteria which can measure ability is different. It needs a suitable and flexible method to evaluate the performance of each candidate according to different requirements of different jobs in relation to each criterion. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP is one of Multi Criteria decision making methods derived from paired comparisons. Simple Additive Weighting (SAW is most frequently used multi attribute decision technique. The method is based on the weighted average. It successfully models the ambiguity and imprecision associated with the pair wise comparison process and reduces the personal biasness. This study tries to analyze the Analytic Hierarchy Process in order to make the recruitment process more reasonable, based on the fuzzy multiple criteria decision making model to achieve the goal of personnel selection. Finally, an example is implemented to demonstrate the practicability of the proposed method.

  4. Group selection, kin selection, altruism and cooperation: when inclusive fitness is right and when it can be wrong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Group selection theory has a history of controversy. After a period of being in disrepute, models of group selection have regained some ground, but not without a renewed debate over their importance as a theoretical tool. In this paper I offer a simple framework for models of the evolution of

  5. Investigation on soil organic component and its relationships with silvicultural regime in beechwoods (Trento, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cason D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the last 50 years, areas where beech coppices remain unmanaged are increasing in Italy. In more recent years some of these coppices underwent conversion to high-forest. Little information exists on the consequences of this management choice for ecosystem properties, such as soil organic matter and soil humic substances. This study consists in a quantitative and qualitative characterization of soil organic matter as a function of different management and pedoclimatic conditions in beech coppices in Trentino, Northern Italy. The study was conducted in four beech coppices, two calcicolous mesic typical beech forests and two calcicolous xeric beech forests. For each forest type we selected one unmanaged coppice (over the last 40 years and one coppice stand converted to high forest by releasing a limited number of standards. The qualitative features of humic substances were examined through gel-filtration and Diffuse Reflectance Infra Red Spectroscopy. Results show that the two types of forest respond in a different way to the conversion treatment. In mesic beech forest, humification parameters appear to slow down after silvicultural treatment; in xeric beech forest, a stronger polycondensation of humic compounds was observed after the silvicultural treatment.

  6. Overlapping Group Logistic Regression with Applications to Genetic Pathway Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yaohui; Breheny, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Discovering important genes that account for the phenotype of interest has long been a challenge in genome-wide expression analysis. Analyses such as gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) that incorporate pathway information have become widespread in hypothesis testing, but pathway-based approaches have been largely absent from regression methods due to the challenges of dealing with overlapping pathways and the resulting lack of available software. The R package grpreg is widely used to fit group lasso and other group-penalized regression models; in this study, we develop an extension, grpregOverlap, to allow for overlapping group structure using a latent variable approach. We compare this approach to the ordinary lasso and to GSEA using both simulated and real data. We find that incorporation of prior pathway information can substantially improve the accuracy of gene expression classifiers, and we shed light on several ways in which hypothesis-testing approaches such as GSEA differ from regression approaches with respect to the analysis of pathway data.

  7. Daily dietary selenium intake of selected Brazilian population groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maihara, V.A.; Favaro, D.I.T.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A.; Gonzaga, I.B.; Silva, V.L.; Cozzolino, S.M.F.

    2004-01-01

    Due to its essential characteristics, the daily dietary selenium intake of individuals should be monitored accurately. Daily selenium intake of different Brazilian population groups based on duplicate portion diet analysis was evaluated and compared with the new estimated average requirement values (EAR), to assess if selenium deficiency or excess could be observed in these groups. Selenium content was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The average daily dietary selenium intake found was 26.3 (±8.3) μg/day for children from the city of Sao Paulo, 37.4 (±16.0) μg/day for children from Belem, 107 (±107) μg/day for children from Macapa, 28.4 (±7.5) μg/day for institutionalized elderly, 32 (±6) μg/day for non-institutionalized elderly and 37 (±17) μg/day for university students from Sao Paulo. Most daily dietary selenium intake range observed were below the EAR values. The values obtained for children groups from Belem and Macapa cities, whose intake levels were much higher than the recommendation, were an exception. (author)

  8. Nesting success of birds in different silvicultural treatments in southeastern U.S. Pine Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D.R.; Martin, T.E.; Melchiors, M.A.; Thill, R.E.; Wigley, T.B.

    2001-01-01

    We examined nesting success and levels of nest predation and cowbird parasitism among five different silvicultural treatments: regenerating (3-6 years old), mid-rotation (12-15 years old), and thinned (17-23 years old) pine plantations, single-tree selection, and late-rotation pine-hardwood stands in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas from 1993 to 1995. We monitored 1674 nests. Differences in daily mortality and daily predation rate among two or more treatments were found for 4 and 3 of 12 species, respectively. These differences were lost following Bonferroni adjustments, but thinned stands had higher levels of predation than single-tree selection stands when predation levels were averaged across species. Daily predation rates were positively correlated with the relative abundance of birds, suggesting that nest predators respond to prey availability (i.e., nests) in a density-dependent manner. The relative abundance of cowbirds differed among treatments, with the highest densities in regenerating, thinned, and single-tree selection stands. Field Sparrows (Spizella pusilla) and Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens) experienced higher levels of parasitism in thinned than regenerating plantations, whereas White-eyed Vireos (Vireo griseus) experienced higher parasitism in regenerating plantations than in mid-rotation or thinned plantations. Several shrub-nesting and 1 ground-nesting species had lower nesting success in thinned and regenerating plantations than has been reported in previously published studies. Thus, some seral stages of even-aged management may provide low-quality nesting habitat for several early-successional bird species. In contrast, many species nesting in mid-rotation and single-tree selection stands had nesting success similar to or greater than that found in previous studies, suggesting that some silvicultural treatments, when embedded in a largely forested landscape, may provide suitable habitat for forest land birds without affecting their

  9. Exclusion as a Criterion for Selecting Socially Vulnerable Population Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anatol’evna Shabunova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article considers theoretical aspects of a scientific research “The Mechanisms for Overcoming Mental Barriers of Inclusion of Socially Vulnerable Categories of the Population for the Purpose of Intensifying Modernization in the Regional Community” (RSF grant No. 16-18-00078. The authors analyze the essence of the category of “socially vulnerable groups” from the legal, economic and sociological perspectives. The paper shows that the economic approach that uses the criterion “the level of income and accumulated assets” when defining vulnerable population groups prevails in public administration practice. The legal field of the category based on the economic approach is defined by the concept of “the poor and socially unprotected categories of citizens”. With the help of the analysis of theoretical and methodological aspects of this issue, the authors show that these criteria are a necessary but not sufficient condition for classifying the population as being socially vulnerable. Foreign literature associates the phenomenon of vulnerability with the concept of risks, with the possibility of households responding to them and with the likelihood of losing the well-being (poverty theory; research areas related to the means of subsistence, etc.. The asset-based approaches relate vulnerability to the poverty that arises due to lack of access to tangible and intangible assets. Sociological theories presented by the concept of social exclusion pay much attention to the breakdown of social ties as a source of vulnerability. The essence of social exclusion consists in the inability of people to participate in important aspects of social life (in politics, labor markets, education and healthcare, cultural life, etc. though they have all the rights to do so. The difference between the concepts of exclusion and poverty is manifested in the displacement of emphasis from income inequality to limited access to rights. Social exclusion is

  10. Comparing single-tree selection, group selection, and clearcutting for regenerating oaks and pines in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy G. Jensen; John M. Kabrick

    2008-01-01

    In the Missouri Ozarks, there is considerable concern about the effectiveness of the uneven-aged methods of single-tree selection and group selection for oak (Quercus L.) and shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) regeneration. We compared the changes in reproduction density of oaks and pine following harvesting by single-tree...

  11. Geographical information systems (GIS), a great tool for urban silviculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaya Burbano, Leodan Andres; Sanchez Zapata, Robinson de Jesus; Morales Soto, Leon; Botero Fernandez, Veronica

    2006-01-01

    As a pilot phase, to acquire experience, define methodologies and determine the advantages of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for applying to urban silviculture and inventory, diagnosis, management plan and economic appraisal were made for the urban forest in the Magnolia neighborhood of the Envigado municipality, department of Antioquia, Colombia. for the management and analysis of the data collected in field, a database was designed using the software microsoft Access. The species inventoried were mapped digitally and the conditions there were analyzed using some tools and extensions of technological architecture ArcGIS 8.3 such as: characteristics, silviculture practices required, and environmental conflicts. It was determined that the GIS analysis of the urban forest conducted for a specific neighborhood can be a tool that permits environmental authorities and interested researchers to have agile and easy access to the information stored in it; it permits programming of required silviculture activities; it also permits having a general vision of the urban forest according to the infrastructure of the neighborhood, complemented by photographs of the area for improved illustration; it permits the inclusion or elimination of information in a rapid and simple manner, thus facilitating decision making with relation to management of the urban woodland and for comparison with other similar studies

  12. Multilevel selection with kin and non-kin groups, experimental results with Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, William M; Bijma, P; Schinckel, A

    2013-06-01

    An experiment was conducted comparing multilevel selection in Japanese quail for 43 days weight and survival with birds housed in either kin (K) or random (R) groups. Multilevel selection significantly reduced mortality (6.6% K vs. 8.5% R) and increased weight (1.30 g/MG K vs. 0.13 g/MG R) resulting in response an order of magnitude greater with Kin than Random. Thus, multilevel selection was effective in reducing detrimental social interactions, which contributed to improved weight gain. The observed rates of response did not differ significantly from expected, demonstrating that current theory is adequate to explain multilevel selection response. Based on estimated genetic parameters, group selection would always be superior to any other combination of multilevel selection. Further, near optimal results could be attained using multilevel selection if 20% of the weight was on the group component regardless of group composition. Thus, in nature the conditions for multilevel selection to be effective in bringing about social change maybe common. In terms of a sustainability of breeding programs, multilevel selection is easy to implement and is expected to give near optimal responses with reduced rates of inbreeding as compared to group selection, the only requirement is that animals be housed in kin groups. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning... obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits. ...

  14. An expert system for estimating production rates and costs for hardwood group-selection harvests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux; B. Gopalakrishnan; R. S. Pabba

    2003-01-01

    As forest managers shift their focus from stands to entire ecosystems alternative harvesting methods such as group selection are being used increasingly. Results of several field time and motion studies and simulation runs were incorporated into an expert system for estimating production rates and costs associated with harvests of group-selection units of various size...

  15. The Current Evidence for Hayek’s Cultural Group Selection Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Lowell Stone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article I summarize Friedrich Hayek’s cultural group selection theory and describe the evidence gathered by current cultural group selection theorists within the behavioral and social sciences supporting Hayek’s main assertions. I conclude with a few comments on Hayek and libertarianism.

  16. Cultural evolution of cooperation : The interplay between forms of social learning and group selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Lucas; Quiñones, Andres; Weissing, Franz J.

    The role of cultural group selection in the evolution of human cooperation is hotly debated. It has been argued that group selection is more effective in cultural evolution than in genetic evolution, because some forms of cultural transmission (conformism and/or the tendency to follow a leader)

  17. Testing the cultural group selection hypothesis in Northern Ghana and Oaxaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo-Carmona, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    We examine the cultural group selection (CGS) hypothesis in light of our fieldwork in Northern Ghana and Oaxaca, highly multi-ethnic regions. Our evidence fails to corroborate two central predictions of the hypothesis: that the cultural group is the unit of evolution, and that cultural homogenization is to be expected as the outcome of a selective process.

  18. The evolution of competition and policing: opposing selection within and among groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although selection favors exploitative competition within groups, a group of hypercompetitive individuals may be less productive than a cooperative group. When competition is costly for group fitness, among-group selection can favor groups with 'policing' individuals who reduce within-group competition at a cost to their own fitness, or groups of individuals who restrain their competitive intensity ('self policing'. We examine these possibilities in a series of explicit population-genetic models. Results By comparing results from models of half and full sib structured populations, we find that increased relatedness increases the strength of among-group selection against competition genotypes, and increases the strength of among group selection favoring policing genotypes. However, the strength of selection favoring costly policing behavior also increases with increased levels of competition. When levels of competition and policing feedback on one another, groups with lower levels of relatedness can favor higher levels of costly policing. Conclusion The result of the joint selection on policing and competition leads to results different from those based on the evolution of policing alone. Our model makes 'long term' predictions equivalent to those of optimization models, but we also show the existence of protected polymorphisms of police and civilians, as well as competitors and non-competitors.

  19. Uneven-Aged Silviculture for the Loblolly and Shortleaf Pine Forest Cover Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    James B. Baker; Michael D. Cain; James M. Guldin; Paul A. Murphy; Michael G. Shelton

    1996-01-01

    The results of a half-century of experience and research with uneven-aged silviculture within the loblolly-shortleaf pine type of the Southern United States are summarized, and silvicultural guidelines for developing and managing uneven-aged stands are provided in this publication.

  20. The Ecology and Silviculture of Oaks, Second Edition: A new book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul S. Johnson; Stephen R. Shifley; Robert. Rogers

    2011-01-01

    The second edition of The Ecology and Silviculture of Oaks was recently published (Johnson and others 2009). The approach of the book is fundamentally silvicultural, but the content is based on the premise that eff ective and environmentally sound management and protection of oak forests and associated landscapes must be grounded in ecological...

  1. Understory light regimes following silvicultural treatments in central hardwood forests in Kentucky, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. Grayson; David S. Buckley; Jason G. Henning; Callie J. Schweitzer; Kurt W. Gottschalk; David L. Loftis

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation of the light regime is a primary goal of many silvicultural treatments, but the specific light conditions created remain poorly documented for many forest types and geographic locations. To help quantify effects of silvicultural treatments on light conditions, measurements of basal area, canopy cover, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), measured...

  2. Habitat use by bats in two Indiana forests prior to silvicultural treatments for oak regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy J. Sheets; Joseph E. Duchamp; Megan K. Caylor; Laura D' Acunto; John O. Whitaker; Virgil Jr. Brack; Dale W. Sparks

    2013-01-01

    As part of a study examining the effects of silvicultural treatments for oak regeneration on habitat use by bats, we surveyed forest stands prior to the implementation of treatments in two state forests in Indiana. Interior forest sites corresponding to areas designated for silvicultural treatments were surveyed for 2 nights each during the summers of 2007 and 2008....

  3. 40 CFR 49.134 - Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule for forestry and silvicultural... Provisions General Rules for Application to Indian Reservations in Epa Region 10 § 49.134 Rule for forestry... permitting program for forestry and silvicultural burning within the Indian reservation to control emissions...

  4. Ecology and silviculture of the spruce-fir forests of eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinus. Westveld

    1953-01-01

    Using the climax forest as a guide to growing the species best suited to the climate and the site, the author offers a silvicultural system for managing the spruce-fir forests of eastern North America. Based on ecological principles, such silviculture is aimed to bring about forests that are inherently healthy and have a natural resistance to insects and disease.

  5. Silviculture for the 21st century--objective and subjective standards to guide successful practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin; Russell T. Graham

    2007-01-01

    Silviculture is increasingly being applied in ways that go beyond traditional timber management objectives. Across the National Forest System, on other public lands, and increasingly on private lands as well, foresters are working with professional colleagues and landowners to develop innovative silvicultural prescriptions designed to meet diverse resource management...

  6. Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: Hardwood Management; Roanoke, Virginia; June 1-5, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Gillespie; Dan Cramsey; Dick Miller; Dennis Hamel; Carl Puuri; F. Bryan Clark; John Erickson; Nelson Loftus; Lloyd Casey; H. Clay Smith; Bob Marquis; Martin Dale; Charles E. McGee; Robert D. Williams; Gayne G. Erdmann; R. M. Godman; Stephen G. Boyce; Paul A. Schrauder; DonaId E. Beck; David A. Marquis; James L. McConnell; Paul S. Debald; David R. Houston; Walter Knapp; Tom Turpin; Warren Bacon; Arnold Schulz

    1981-01-01

    This year's National Silviculture Workshop was held in Roanoke, Virginia and the Monongahela National Forest. The purpose of the meetings were to discuss current silvicultural issues affecting all Regions and to review in detail the state-of-the-art application of hardwood management in the United States. These proceedings include the presentations of individuals...

  7. Age structure of a southern pine stand following 72 years of uneven-aged silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg

    2012-01-01

    Work on uneven-aged silviculture in southern pine stands on the Crossett Experimental Forest (CEF) began in the 1930s, when a number of 16.2-ha compartments were placed into a series of demonstration projects and studies (Reynolds 1980). Two of these compartments, the Good and Poor Farm Forestry Forties, have been maintained continuously in this silvicultural regime...

  8. Silviculture guide for the mahogany forests of Quintana Roo, Mexico – Criteria and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Negreros-Castillo; L. Cámara-Cabrales; Margaret Devall; M.A. Fajvan; M.A. Mendoza Briseño; C.W. Mize

    2014-01-01

    Silviculture is the art, science and practice of controlling the establishment, composition, health, quality and growth of forests to accomplish a set of management objectives. This publication offers an approach to silviculture of the forests of Quintana Roo in which mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King), the commercially most important tree species in Latin America,...

  9. Silviculture of the mahogany forest of Quintana Roo, Mexico: criteria and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. ​​Negreros-Castillo; L. Camara-Cabrales; MS Devall; Mary Ann Fajvan; M.A. Mendoza Briseno; C.W. Mize; A. Navarro-Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Silviculture is the art, science and practice of controlling the establishment, composition, health, quality and growth of forests to accomplish a set of management objectives. This publication offers an approach to silviculture of the forests of Quintana Roo in which mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King), the commercially most important tree...

  10. Variable-retention harvesting as a silvicultural option for lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher R. Keyes; Thomas E. Perry; Elaine K. Sutherland; David K. Wright; Joel M. Egan

    2014-01-01

    Bark beetle-induced mortality in forested landscapes of structurally uniform, even-aged lodgepole pine stands has inspired a growing interest in the potential of silvicultural treatments to enhance resilience by increasing spatial and vertical complexity. Silvicultural treatments can simulate mixed-severity disturbances that create multiaged lodgepole pine stands,...

  11. The future of silviculture research-thoughts from the Yale forestry forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon T. Friedman; James M. Guldin

    2001-01-01

    The 1999 Yale Forestry Forum, sponsored by Yale University and the USDA Forest Service, brought together a number of experts in an academic setting to discuss the future of silviculture research in the next century. Four participants in the plenary session outlined three areas that will characterize the future of silviculture research-sustainability, flexibility, and...

  12. Social Groups Prioritize Selective Attention to Faces: How Social Identity Shapes Distractor Interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gewnhi Park

    Full Text Available Human faces automatically attract visual attention and this process appears to be guided by social group memberships. In two experiments, we examined how social groups guide selective attention toward in-group and out-group faces. Black and White participants detected a target letter among letter strings superimposed on faces (Experiment 1. White participants were less accurate on trials with racial out-group (Black compared to in-group (White distractor faces. Likewise, Black participants were less accurate on trials with racial out-group (White compared to in-group (Black distractor faces. However, this pattern of out-group bias was only evident under high perceptual load-when the task was visually difficult. To examine the malleability of this pattern of racial bias, a separate sample of participants were assigned to mixed-race minimal groups (Experiment 2. Participants assigned to groups were less accurate on trials with their minimal in-group members compared to minimal out-group distractor faces, regardless of race. Again, this pattern of out-group bias was only evident under high perceptual load. Taken together, these results suggest that social identity guides selective attention toward motivationally relevant social groups-shifting from out-group bias in the domain of race to in-group bias in the domain of minimal groups-when perceptual resources are scarce.

  13. Silviculture and Forestry Exploitation in Mongolia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dediu, Engr

    1960-01-01

    In line with the collaboration between the Rumanian People's Republic and the People's Republic of Mongolia regarding problems of cultivation, exploitation, and industrialization of timber, a group...

  14. Silvicultural systems - uneven-aged management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris R. Wing

    1977-01-01

    Uneven-aged Management, to me, indicates some form of partial cutting, perhaps selective cutting or diameter limit control in the harvesting cut, which, in most cases, removes the larger diameter, more mature trees and leaves a residual stand composed of healthy, fast-growing, well-spaced second growth timber, with a good number of trees in the 6"-12"...

  15. Opportunity for natural selection among five population groups of Manipur, North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, M; Meitei, S Y; Luxmi, Y; Achoubi, N; Meitei, K S; Murry, B; Sachdeva, M P; Saraswathy, K N

    2014-01-01

    Opportunity for natural selection among five population groups of Manipur in comparison with other North East Indian population has been studied. Crow's index as well as Johnston and Kensinger's index for natural selection were calculated based on differential fertility and mortality. The mortality component was found to be lower compared to fertility component in all the populations which may attribute to comparatively improved and easily accessible health care facilities. However, different selection pressures, artificial and natural, seem to be influencing the selection intensity through induced abortion and spontaneous abortion among the two non-tribal migrant groups: Bamon and Muslims, respectively. This study highlights the probable interaction of artificial and natural selection in determining the evolutionary fate of any population group.

  16. Ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selig, W.

    1977-11-08

    The literature on the use of ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis is surveyed in some detail. The survey is complete through Chemical Abstracts, Vol. 83 (1975). 40 figures, 52 tables, 236 references.

  17. Ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, W.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the use of ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis is surveyed in some detail. The survey is complete through Chemical Abstracts, Vol. 83 (1975). 40 figures, 52 tables, 236 references

  18. Effect of Group-Selection Opening Size on Breeding Bird Habitat Use in a Bottomland Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorman, C.E.; D.C. Guynn, Jr.

    2001-12-01

    Research on the effects of creating group-selection openings of various sizes on breeding birds habitat use in a bottomland hardwood forest of the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Creation of 0.5-ha group selection openings in southern bottomland forests should provide breeding habitat for some field-edge species in gaps and habitat for forest-interior species and canopy-dwelling forest-edge species between gaps provided that enough mature forest is made available.

  19. Multilevel selection with kin and non-kin groups, experimental results with japanese quail (coturnix japonica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muir, W.M.; Bijma, P.; schinckel, A.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted comparing multilevel selection in Japanese quail for 43 days weight and survival with birds housed in either kin (K) or random (R) groups. Multilevel selection significantly reduced mortality (6.6% K vs. 8.5% R) and increased weight (1.30 g/MG K vs. 0.13 g/MG R) resulting

  20. Suitable computerized maintenance management system selection using grey group TOPSIS and fuzzy group VIKOR: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Zare

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is developing a method to choose an appropriate Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS using Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MADM for a dairy company. Among different methods, the grey group TOPSIS and fuzzy group VIKOR methods were selected. TOPSIS is a Technique for order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution and VIKOR technique is a method based on compromise programming. The data in this article were gathered using the interviews with the company’s managers and elites in the field of maintenance. Then, out of five types of maintenance software, the best ones were selected using these two techniques and finally the results were compared with each other. In the selection process, 13 sub-criteria were introduced under 5 main criteria. These criteria were selected out of a huge number of criteria using the studies of others and by consulting with the company’s managers and experts. We have tried to make the choices in a way that the majority of aspects could be considered. This paper helps the maintenance managers in decision-making related to choosing the CMMS software in uncertainty environment. Using two different fuzzy and grey approaches and comparing the results can lead to appropriate selection and improve the confidence in decision-making. Maintenance planning issues are among the important issues in industrial production systems. Maintenance systems have basically made remarkable progress in recent years. The increase of companies’ competitive pressure on the one hand and the close relationship between maintenance activities and companies’ core activities, on the other hand, have encouraged companies to use the software in order to manage their maintenance activities.

  1. An integrated approach for determining the size of hardwood group-selection openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1999-01-01

    The use of group-selection methods is becoming more widespread as landowners and forest managers attempt to respond to public pressure to reduce the size of clearcut blocks. Several studies have shown that harvesting timber in smaller groups or clumps increases the cost of operations for both cable and ground-based logging systems. Recent regeneration studies have...

  2. Enhancing chestnut coppices: silvicultural management and socio-economic context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Manetti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available  Castanea sativa is one of the most important species for timber production in Italy but, both management system, ownership type and wood chain structure, aren’t able to  enhance enough the market value of wood assortments. Although the high demand of quality timber, the internal production is heavily  reduced, mainly as far as timber quality is concerned and because of the lack of suitable timber sizes. In this context, experimental trials  have been approached to identify and verify which silvicultural methods are best suited to reach high yields depending to the investments  needed and the local socio-economical condition. Two technical approaches were evaluated: stand silviculture and single-tree oriented silviculture. As for the socio-economical aspects, a few demographic indexes have been examined and the first-phase processing enterprises  acting in the concerned area were analyzed. The goals of this paper are to evaluate the biological response to the applied silviculture, to  analyze the problems arisen and to estimate the applicability of the proposed methods in relation to the different socio-economic contexts. The research has been carried out in Tuscany in two important forest areas - Monte Amiata and Colline Metallifere - in young chestnut  coppices characterized by an homogeneous stand density and a good site index. The two examined districts showed some similarities  but they have mainly highlighted important differences about the social structure and concerns and enterprises characteristics. The area of Monte Amiata is typified by a higher residents density then the Colline Metallifere but only 1/3 of the population is employed in the agro-forest sector. In addition, in the Monte Amiata district most concerns are sized less than 2 hectares and chestnut is the main forest  species. On the contrary, in the Colline Metallifere the agro-forest sector (57% of workers is one of the main sources of income for the  local

  3. The effectiveness of group selection theory on the quality of drug addicted life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sodani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and aim: Increase in addiction in the community and the plight of its people demand for improving the problems of addicts, indicate a need for individuals to interventions and training expertise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of group selection theory on the quality of drug addicted life.  .  Methods: This study is an quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest and follow up with the control group. The study population included: all addicted people who referred to ahvaz addiction treatment center in 2015. 50 addicts were selected by using of  available sampling and randomly divided into  two experimental group (number=25 and control group (number=25. The participants were completed the quality of life inventory in three stages (pre-test, post-test and follow-up after 60 days. The experimental group was received group training of the concepts of selection theory of 10 sessions of 90 minutes per week.Statistical data were analyzed  using of covariance(ANCOVA analysis. Results: Group training theory led to a significant difference among pretest, posttest, and follow-up of quality of addicted people life (p <0.001. In this case, the post-test and follow-up, after controlling of pre-test score, the experimental group compared to the control group higher quality of life was reported. Conclusion: Group training of selected theory about the role of choosing a behavior, five senses  the importance of self control, the role of effective behavior, the way of need fulfilment, responsibility, self worth, Quality world, seven destructive behavior, seven caring behavior, faiure identification and success identification can result in increasing the quality of life for addicted people.

  4. Proceedings. Larch genetics and breeding. Research findings and ecological-silvicultural demands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Owe [ed.

    1995-12-31

    The genus Larix Mill. (larch) represents a great part of the boreal and alpine forests. Larch species are the most common conifers in Siberia and they have an important role in European and North American forest ecosystems and forest economies. The value of these group of species are expected to increase in the future. There are at least three different reasons for that assumption: 1. Larch has highly appreciated technical wood properties., 2. Intensive cutting during the past three centuries has made larch a threatened group of species in some parts of the world., 3. Increasing access to Siberia will make forestry and forest harvest of larch an important part of the forest economy and ecology. In August 1995 a group of forest scientists gathered under the framework of IUFRO working group S2.02-07 in southern Sweden for exchange of experience in the fields of breeding and silviculture of larch. This proceedings was compiled on the basis of the presentations of this working group. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 12 of the 17 papers

  5. Supplier Selection Group Decision Making in Logistics Service Value Cocreation Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intuitionistic fuzzy information aggregation plays an important role in intuitionistic fuzzy set theory and is widely used in group decision making. In this paper, an induced intuitionistic fuzzy Einstein hybrid aggregation operator (I-IFEHA is investigated for supplier selection group decision making in logistics service value cocreation based on fuzzy measures. We first introduce some aggregation operators and Einstein operations on intuitionistic fuzzy sets and develop a new induced intuitionistic fuzzy Einstein hybrid aggregation operator to accommodate the environment in which the given arguments are intuitionistic fuzzy values. Then, we study the supplier selection group decision model in logistics service value cocreation based on intuitionistic fuzzy sets with the I-IFEHA operator. Finally, an example of 3PL supplier selection in logistics service value cocreation environment is given to verify the developed approach and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed approach.

  6. Hybrid Multicriteria Group Decision Making Method for Information System Project Selection Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Information system (IS) project selection is of critical importance to every organization in dynamic competing environment. The aim of this paper is to develop a hybrid multicriteria group decision making approach based on intuitionistic fuzzy theory for IS project selection. The decision makers’ assessment information can be expressed in the form of real numbers, interval-valued numbers, linguistic variables, and intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs). All these evaluation pieces of information...

  7. Application Forms for Forestry and Silvicultural Burning Tribal Permits Under the FARR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application form for forestry and silvicultural burning on the Nez Perce Indian Reservation and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation under EPA's Federal Air Rules for Reservations.

  8. Physiology and silviculture of black walnut for combined timber and nut production

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Van Sambeek; George Rink

    1981-01-01

    Research literature was reviewed for evidence supporting the management of black walnut plantations for combined timber and nut production. The silviculture of the species is discussed in relation to dual cropping. Stimulation and phenology of flowering and fruiting are reviewed.

  9. MULTILEVEL SELECTION WITH KIN AND NON-KIN GROUPS, EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS WITH JAPANESE QUAIL (COTURNIX JAPONICA)

    OpenAIRE

    Muir, William M; Bijma, P; Schinckel, A

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted comparing multilevel selection in Japanese quail for 43 days weight and survival with birds housed in either kin (K) or random (R) groups. Multilevel selection significantly reduced mortality (6.6% K vs. 8.5% R) and increased weight (1.30 g/MG K vs. 0.13 g/MG R) resulting in response an order of magnitude greater with Kin than Random. Thus, multilevel selection was effective in reducing detrimental social interactions, which contributed to improved weight gain. The...

  10. Genetic grouping strategies in selection efficiency of composite beef cattle ( × ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, J; Pertile, S F N; Eler, J P; Ferraz, J B S; Mattos, E C; Figueiredo, L G G; Mourão, G B

    2015-02-01

    The inclusion of genetic groups in sire evaluation has been widely used to represent genetic differences among animals not accounted for by the absence of parentage data. However, the definition of these groups is still arbitrary, and studies assessing the effects of genetic grouping strategies on the selection efficiency are rare. Therefore, the aim in this study was to compare genetic grouping strategies for animals with unknown parentage in prediction of breeding values (EBV). The total of 179,302 records of weaning weight (WW), 29,825 records of scrotal circumference (SC), and 70,302 records of muscling score (MUSC) from Montana Tropical animals, a Brazilian composite beef cattle population, were used. Genetic grouping strategies involving year of birth, sex of the unknown parent, birth farm, breed composition, and their combinations were evaluated. Estimated breeding values were predicted for each approach simulating a loss of genealogy data. Thereafter, these EBV were compared to those obtained in an analysis involving a real relationship matrix to estimate selection efficiency and correlations between EBV and animal rankings. The analysis model included the fixed effects of contemporary groups and class of the dam age at calving, the covariates of additive and nonadditive genetic effects, and age, and the additive genetic effect of animal as random effects. A second model also included the fixed effects of genetic group. The use of genetic groups resulted in means of selection efficiency and correlation of 70.4 to 97.1% and 0.51 to 0.94 for WW, 85.8 to 98.8% and 0.82 to 0.98 for SC, and 85.1 to 98.6% and 0.74 to 0.97 for MUSC, respectively. High selection efficiencies were observed for year of birth and breed composition strategies. The maximum absolute difference in annual genetic gain estimated through the use of complete genealogy and genetic groups were 0.38 kg for WW, 0.02 cm for SC, and 0.01 for MUSC, with lower differences obtained when year of birth

  11. Pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection favor aggressive, young males in polyandrous groups of red junglefowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Grant C; Spurgin, Lewis G; Fairfield, Eleanor A; Richardson, David S; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2017-06-01

    A challenge in evolutionary biology is to understand the operation of sexual selection on males in polyandrous groups, where sexual selection occurs before and after mating. Here, we combine fine-grained behavioral information (>41,000 interactions) with molecular parentage data to study sexual selection in replicated, age-structured groups of polyandrous red junglefowl, Gallus gallus. Male reproductive success was determined by the number of females mated (precopulatory sexual selection) and his paternity share, which was driven by the polyandry of his female partners (postcopulatory sexual selection). Pre- and postcopulatory components of male reproductive success covaried positively; males with high mating success also had high paternity share. Two male phenotypes affected male pre- and postcopulatory performance: average aggressiveness toward rival males and age. Aggressive males mated with more females and more often with individual females, resulting in higher sexual exclusivity. Similarly, younger males mated with more females and more often with individual females, suffering less intense sperm competition than older males. Older males had a lower paternity share even allowing for their limited sexual exclusivity, indicating they may produce less competitive ejaculates. These results show that-in these populations-postcopulatory sexual selection reinforces precopulatory sexual selection, consistently promoting younger and more aggressive males. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Hydrologic response of northern wetlands to silvicultural water management systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trettin, C.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of water management systems are used to ameliorate saturated soil conditions which limit silvicultural operations and site productivity in northern wetlands. The pattern ditch system is an intensive drainage network designed to regulate water table depth in peat soils. The prescription drainage system is a low-intensity drainage system that is used to develop apparent drainage patterns in mineral and histic-mineral soils. These water management systems may either increase or decrease peak flow, base flow, and the duration of peak flow events, depending on drainage system design, climate, season, site characteristics, and land use. The most common hydrologic response to drainage is an increase in peak flow and base flow, and an increase in annual runoff. The effect of wetland drainage on watershed hydrology depends on the proportion of the watershed drained. Drainage may also affect water quality, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition and structure.

  13. The Group Selection Debate and ALife: Weak Altruism, Strong Altruism, and Inclusive Fitness (abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Simon T.; Watson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Models of the evolution of social behaviour are often framed in terms of either multi-level selection or inclusive individual fitness theory. Although both of these descriptions correctly predict changes in gene frequency (where group fitness is defined as the average individual fitness of the group members), it is still a hotly contested issue as to which provides a faithful description of the underlying causal processes at work. Furthermore, the type of model analysis used reflects the phil...

  14. Detection of Alzheimer's disease using group lasso SVM-based region selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuo; Fan, Yong; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; van de Giessen, Martijn

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most frequent forms of dementia and an increasing challenging public health problem. In the last two decades, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential in distinguishing patients with Alzheimer's disease and elderly controls (CN). To obtain AD-specific biomarkers, previous research used either statistical testing to find statistically significant different regions between the two clinical groups, or l1 sparse learning to select isolated features in the image domain. In this paper, we propose a new framework that uses structural MRI to simultaneously distinguish the two clinical groups and find the bio-markers of AD, using a group lasso support vector machine (SVM). The group lasso term (mixed l1- l2 norm) introduces anatomical information from the image domain into the feature domain, such that the resulting set of selected voxels are more meaningful than the l1 sparse SVM. Because of large inter-structure size variation, we introduce a group specific normalization factor to deal with the structure size bias. Experiments have been performed on a well-designed AD vs. CN dataset1 to validate our method. Comparing to the l1 sparse SVM approach, our method achieved better classification performance and a more meaningful biomarker selection. When we vary the training set, the selected regions by our method were more stable than the l1 sparse SVM. Classification experiments showed that our group normalization lead to higher classification accuracy with fewer selected regions than the non-normalized method. Comparing to the state-of-art AD vs. CN classification methods, our approach not only obtains a high accuracy with the same dataset, but more importantly, we simultaneously find the brain anatomies that are closely related to the disease.

  15. Selective sexual harassment: differential treatment of similar groups of women workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A

    2004-02-01

    If male workers categorize different groups of women coworkers and, subsequently, treat them differently, the experiences of women from one of these groups would not be indicative of the experiences of women from another group. When this different treatment involves hostile environment sexual harassment of one group, but not the other, then the law must recognize the possibility of "selective sexual harassment." Without this understanding of the nuances of the workplace dynamics, a court could mistake the women of the unharassed group as representing "reasonable women" and the women of the harassed group as simply oversensitive. This paper draws on empirical data to demonstrate such a situation and advocates for a version of the "reasonable victim" standard to facilitate a closer analysis of hostile environment sexual harassment suits.

  16. The impact of selection bias in randomized multi-arm parallel group clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Uschner

    Full Text Available The impact of selection bias on the results of clinical trials has been analyzed extensively for trials of two treatments, yet its impact in multi-arm trials is still unknown. In this paper, we investigate selection bias in multi-arm trials by its impact on the type I error probability. We propose two models for selection bias, so-called biasing policies, that both extend the classic guessing strategy by Blackwell and Hodges. We derive the distribution of the F-test statistic under the misspecified outcome model and provide a formula for the type I error probability under selection bias. We apply the presented approach to quantify the influence of selection bias in multi-arm trials with increasing number of treatment groups using a permuted block design for different assumptions and different biasing strategies. Our results confirm previous findings that smaller block sizes lead to a higher proportion of sequences with inflated type I error probability. Astonishingly, our results also show that the proportion of sequences with inflated type I error probability remains constant when the number of treatment groups is increased. Realizing that the impact of selection bias cannot be completely eliminated, we propose a bias adjusted statistical model and show that the power of the statistical test is only slightly deflated for larger block sizes.

  17. Simultaneous Channel and Feature Selection of Fused EEG Features Based on Sparse Group Lasso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jia Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction and classification of EEG signals are core parts of brain computer interfaces (BCIs. Due to the high dimension of the EEG feature vector, an effective feature selection algorithm has become an integral part of research studies. In this paper, we present a new method based on a wrapped Sparse Group Lasso for channel and feature selection of fused EEG signals. The high-dimensional fused features are firstly obtained, which include the power spectrum, time-domain statistics, AR model, and the wavelet coefficient features extracted from the preprocessed EEG signals. The wrapped channel and feature selection method is then applied, which uses the logistical regression model with Sparse Group Lasso penalized function. The model is fitted on the training data, and parameter estimation is obtained by modified blockwise coordinate descent and coordinate gradient descent method. The best parameters and feature subset are selected by using a 10-fold cross-validation. Finally, the test data is classified using the trained model. Compared with existing channel and feature selection methods, results show that the proposed method is more suitable, more stable, and faster for high-dimensional feature fusion. It can simultaneously achieve channel and feature selection with a lower error rate. The test accuracy on the data used from international BCI Competition IV reached 84.72%.

  18. Comparative evaluation of 5 different selective media for Group B Streptococcus screening in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubrel, Caroline; Gendron, Nicolas; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Touak, Gérald; Verlaguet, Martine; Poyart, Claire; Réglier-Poupet, Hélène

    2014-12-01

    We compared the performances and the cost-effectiveness of 5 selective media for Group B Streptococcus (GBS) screening in vaginal samples from pregnant women. The usefulness of these media is unquestionable for GBS screening; the choice will depend largely on the laboratory organization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Determinants of Labour Force Participation for Selected Groups With Weak Labour Market Attachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Maire, Daniel; Scheuer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the eects of economic incentives on the labour market participation for selected groups with weak labour market attachment. We argue that the people most likely to be affected by economic incentives are recipients of socialassistance and home-working housewives. Partner...

  20. Hybrid Multicriteria Group Decision Making Method for Information System Project Selection Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information system (IS project selection is of critical importance to every organization in dynamic competing environment. The aim of this paper is to develop a hybrid multicriteria group decision making approach based on intuitionistic fuzzy theory for IS project selection. The decision makers’ assessment information can be expressed in the form of real numbers, interval-valued numbers, linguistic variables, and intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs. All these evaluation pieces of information can be transformed to the form of IFNs. Intuitionistic fuzzy weighted averaging (IFWA operator is utilized to aggregate individual opinions of decision makers into a group opinion. Intuitionistic fuzzy entropy is used to obtain the entropy weights of the criteria. TOPSIS method combined with intuitionistic fuzzy set is proposed to select appropriate IS project in group decision making environment. Finally, a numerical example for information system projects selection is given to illustrate application of hybrid multi-criteria group decision making (MCGDM method based on intuitionistic fuzzy theory and TOPSIS method.

  1. Naturally seeded versus planted ponderosa pine seedlings in group-selection openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. McDonald; Gary Fiddler; Martin Ritchie; Paula Anderson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine whether natural regeneration or planted seedlings should be used in group-selection openings. The answer dependson the survival and growth rate of both types of seedlings, and that could depend on the size of the openings and the effect of trees on their edge. In thisside-by-side study, the natural pine seedlings originated...

  2. Highly selective nitroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of primary alcohol groups in water-soluble glucans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooy, A.E.J. de; Besemer, A.C.; Bekkum, H. van

    1995-01-01

    With catalytic amounts of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and hypochlorite/bromide as the regenerating oxidant in water, primary alcohol groups in glucans and derivatives thereof were rapidly and completely oxidised. For pyranosides, selectivity was higher than 95% and no side products

  3. Differences Among Czech Local Action Groups In Using Selected Principles Of Leader*

    OpenAIRE

    Pechrová M.; Boukalová K.

    2015-01-01

    Local Action Groups (LAGs) are implementing LEADER principles in rural development. The aim of the paper is to create a typology of LAGs in the Czech Republic according to the factors linked to the individual features of LAG and to its organizational background. Four different groups of LAGs emerged: ‘stabilized’, ‘experienced’, ‘absorbing’, and ‘well-informed’. In the second step, it is assessed how particular groups fullfil selected features of the LEADER: knowledge transfer and bottomup ap...

  4. A simple three step method for selective placement of organic groups in mesoporous silica thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, Esteban A. [Gerencia Química, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llave, Ezequiel de la; Williams, Federico J. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física and INQUIMAE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Soler-Illia, Galo J.A.A., E-mail: galo.soler.illia@gmail.com [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física and INQUIMAE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Nanosistemas, Universidad Nacional de General San Martín, 25 de Mayo y Francia (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-01

    Selective functionalization of mesoporous silica thin films was achieved using a three step method. The first step consists in an outer surface functionalization, followed by washing off the structuring agent (second step), leaving the inner surface of the pores free to be functionalized in the third step. This reproducible method permits to anchor a volatile silane group in the outer film surface, and a second type of silane group in the inner surface of the pores. As a concept test we modified the outer surface of a mesoporous silica film with trimethylsilane (–Si–(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) groups and the inner pore surface with propylamino (–Si–(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}–NH{sub 2}) groups. The obtained silica films were characterized by Environmental Ellipsometric Porosimetry (EEP), EDS, XPS, contact angle and electron microscopy. The selectively functionalized silica (SF) shows an amount of surface amino functions 4.3 times lower than the one-step functionalized (OSF) silica samples. The method presented here can be extended to a combination of silane chlorides and alkoxides as functional groups, opening up a new route toward the synthesis of multifunctional mesoporous thin films with precisely localized organic functions. - Highlights: • Selective functionalization of mesoporous silica thin films was achieved using a three step method. • A volatile silane group is anchored by evaporation on the outer film surface. • A second silane is deposited in the inner surface of the pores by post-grafting. • Contact angle, EDS and XPS measurements show different proportions of amino groups on both surfaces. • This method can be extended to a combination of silane chlorides and alkoxides functional groups.

  5. A Selective Group Authentication Scheme for IoT-Based Medical Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, YoHan; Park, YoungHo

    2017-04-01

    The technology of IoT combined with medical systems is expected to support advanced medical services. However, unsolved security problems, such as misuse of medical devices, illegal access to the medical server and so on, make IoT-based medical systems not be applied widely. In addition, users have a high burden of computation to access Things for the explosive growth of IoT devices. Because medical information is critical and important, but users have a restricted computing power, IoT-based medical systems are required to provide secure and efficient authentication for users. In this paper, we propose a selective group authentication scheme using Shamir's threshold technique. The property of selectivity gives the right of choice to users to form a group which consists of things users select and access. And users can get an access authority for those Things at a time. Thus, our scheme provides an efficient user authentication for multiple Things and conditional access authority for safe IoT-based medical information system. To the best of our knowledge, our proposed scheme is the first in which selectivity is combined with group authentication in IoT environments.

  6. Multifunctional natural forest silviculture economics revised: Challenges in meeting landowners’ and society's wants. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Campos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: This paper objective focuses on the contribution of multifunctional natural forest silviculture, incorporating both private and public product managements, to forest and woodland economics. Area of study: Spain and California (USA. Material and methods: This conceptual article has developed a critical revision of the existing literature on the main economic issues for multifunctional natural forest silviculture in the last decades. Main results: Multifunctional natural silviculture has secular roots as a local practice, but as a science of the natural environment applied to the economic management of forest lands it is still in the process of maturation. Timber silviculture remains the central concern of forest economics investment in scientific publications. By contrast, silvicultural modeling of the natural growth of firewood, browse and other non-timber forest products from trees and shrubs receives scant attention in scientific journals. Even rarer are publications on multifunctional natural silviculture for forest and woodland managements, including environmental services geared to people’s active and passive consumption. Under this umbrella, private environmental self-consumption is represented by the amenities enjoyed by private non-industrial landowners. As for environmental public products, the most relevant are carbon, water, mushrooms, recreation, landscape and threatened biodiversity. Research highlights: This paper is a good example for the conceptual research on forestry techniques and economic concepts applied to multifunctional silviculture in Mediterranean areas of Spain and California. The combination of technical knowledge and private and public economic behaviors definitively contributes to the multifunctional management of natural forest systems.

  7. A pragmatic pairwise group-decision method for selection of sites for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutbi, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    A pragmatic pairwise group-decision approach is applied to compare two regions in order to select the more suitable one for construction of nulcear power plants in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The selection methodology is based on pairwise comparison by forced choice. The method facilitates rating of the regions or sites using simple calculations. Two regions, one close to Dhahran on the Arabian Gulf and another close to Jeddah on the Red Sea, are evaluated. No specific site in either region is considered at this stage. The comparison is based on a set of selection criteria which include (i) topography, (ii) geology, (iii) seismology, (iv) meteorology, (v) oceanography, (vi) hydrology and (vii) proximetry to oil and gas fields. The comparison shows that the Jeddah region is more suitable than the Dhahran region. (orig.)

  8. College grade point average as a personnel selection device: ethnic group differences and potential adverse impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, P L; Bobko, P

    2000-06-01

    College grade point average (GPA) is often used in a variety of ways in personnel selection. Unfortunately, there is little empirical research literature in human resource management that informs researchers or practitioners about the magnitude of ethnic group differences and any potential adverse impact implications when using cumulative GPA for selection. Data from a medium-sized university in the Southeast (N = 7,498) indicate that the standardized average Black-White difference for cumulative GPA in the senior year is d = 0.78. The authors also conducted analyses at 3 GPA screens (3.00, 3.25, and 3.50) to demonstrate that employers (or educators) might face adverse impact at all 3 levels if GPA continues to be implemented as part of a selection system. Implications and future research are discussed.

  9. Group Selection and Contribution of Minority Variants during Virus Adaptation Determines Virus Fitness and Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio V Bordería

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how a pathogen colonizes and adapts to a new host environment is a primary aim in studying emerging infectious diseases. Adaptive mutations arise among the thousands of variants generated during RNA virus infection, and identifying these variants will shed light onto how changes in tropism and species jumps can occur. Here, we adapted Coxsackie virus B3 to a highly permissive and less permissive environment. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics, we identified a multi-step adaptive process to adaptation involving residues in the receptor footprints that correlated with receptor availability and with increase in virus fitness in an environment-specific manner. We show that adaptation occurs by selection of a dominant mutation followed by group selection of minority variants that together, confer the fitness increase observed in the population, rather than selection of a single dominant genotype.

  10. Assignation of sweet cherry selections to 3 taste groupings based on perceived sweetness and sourness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Carolyn F; Chauvin, Maite A; Whiting, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Providing consumers with basic taste properties of sweet cherries at point of purchase would allow consumers to make purchase decisions based on fruit's intrinsic sensory attributes. The objective of this study was to develop a model to predict taste-grouping assignation of cherries into the following categories: (1) low sweetness/high sourness, (2) balance between sweetness and sourness, and (3) high sweetness/low sourness. A sensory panel (n = 10) was trained to recognize sweetness and sourness in 5 cultivars of sweet cherries and assign a taste grouping based on the perceived balance of sweetness and sourness. Four of these same cultivars were then evaluated for sweetness and sourness by a consumer panel (n = 117) and instrumentally for titratable acidity (TA) and soluble solids concentration (SSC). Results showed that for 3 of the 4 cherry cultivars, the sweetness/sourness balance of the cherries was not significantly different as evaluated instrumentally or by the trained panel. However, the balance determined by the consumer and the trained panel was different for 3 of the 4 cherry cultivars (P sweetness and sourness, a multinomial logit model was developed to predict the assignation of cherry taste grouping. The likelihood of group assignment depended on both the perceived sweetness and sourness of the cherry, with taste groupings agreed upon for 3 of 5 sweet cherry cultivars. As previous studies have indicated a positive relationship between cherry sweetness and sourness to consumer acceptance, these groupings show promise for assisting consumers in cherry selection at the point of purchase. The prediction models proposed in this study suggest that both sweetness and sourness are important in the cherry characterization and the ratio between the 2 attributes may be appropriate for making taste-grouping assignments. These groupings may then be used to provide additional sensory information to consumers to assist them in cherry selection at the point of

  11. Herbivorous insect response to group selection cutting in a southeastern bottomland hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; John C. Kilgo; Christopher E. Moorman

    2005-01-01

    Malaise and pitfall traps were used to sample herbivorous insects in canopy gaps created by group-selection cutting in a bottomland hardwood forest in South Carolina. The traps were placed at the centers, edges, and in the forest adjacent to gaps of different sizes (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha) and ages (1 and 7 yr old) during four sampling periods in 2001. Overall, the...

  12. An Integrated Approach with Group Decision-Making for Strategy Selection in SWOT Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    İhsan Yüksel

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to improve the analytical dimension of SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis with group decision-making, which underlines the analysis of internal and external environments that in turn, will improve the definition of corporate strategy within the strategic planning process. The main issue of the study was how to select the most appropriate strategy by taking into consideration different effects of each factor of SWOT analysis on strat...

  13. Landscape genomic approach to detect selection signatures in locally adapted Brazilian swine genetic groups

    OpenAIRE

    Cesconeto, Robson Jose; Joost, Stéphane; McManus, Concepta Margaret; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; Cobuci, Jaime Araujo; Braccini, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Samples of 191 animals from 18 different Brazilian locally adapted swine genetic groups were genotyped using Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip in order to identify selection signatures related to the monthly variation of Brazilian environmental variables. Using BayeScan software, 71 SNP markers were identified as FST outliers and 60 genotypes (58 markers) were found by Samβada software in 371 logistic models correlated with 112 environmental variables. Five markers were identified in b...

  14. Model for personnel allocation and selection of off-duty groups in a textile company

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Hugo Harry F. R.; Subramanian, Anand; D’Angelis, Luiz Guilherme Binder; Pires, Carlos Eduardo G. L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the resolution of the personnel assignment problem and the selection of the off-work groups of employees belonging to a certain sector of a major textile industry. This is a problem of great importance for most organizations, since it is fundamental to assign the set of available workers, with distinct levels of skill and qualification, to the best suitable tasks. Hence, a multidimensional assignment model was built, taking into account the operational and fu...

  15. An Improved Test Selection Optimization Model Based on Fault Ambiguity Group Isolation and Chaotic Discrete PSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Lv

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensor data-based test selection optimization is the basis for designing a test work, which ensures that the system is tested under the constraint of the conventional indexes such as fault detection rate (FDR and fault isolation rate (FIR. From the perspective of equipment maintenance support, the ambiguity isolation has a significant effect on the result of test selection. In this paper, an improved test selection optimization model is proposed by considering the ambiguity degree of fault isolation. In the new model, the fault test dependency matrix is adopted to model the correlation between the system fault and the test group. The objective function of the proposed model is minimizing the test cost with the constraint of FDR and FIR. The improved chaotic discrete particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm is adopted to solve the improved test selection optimization model. The new test selection optimization model is more consistent with real complicated engineering systems. The experimental result verifies the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Model Selection and Hypothesis Testing for Large-Scale Network Models with Overlapping Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago P. Peixoto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effort to understand network systems in increasing detail has resulted in a diversity of methods designed to extract their large-scale structure from data. Unfortunately, many of these methods yield diverging descriptions of the same network, making both the comparison and understanding of their results a difficult challenge. A possible solution to this outstanding issue is to shift the focus away from ad hoc methods and move towards more principled approaches based on statistical inference of generative models. As a result, we face instead the more well-defined task of selecting between competing generative processes, which can be done under a unified probabilistic framework. Here, we consider the comparison between a variety of generative models including features such as degree correction, where nodes with arbitrary degrees can belong to the same group, and community overlap, where nodes are allowed to belong to more than one group. Because such model variants possess an increasing number of parameters, they become prone to overfitting. In this work, we present a method of model selection based on the minimum description length criterion and posterior odds ratios that is capable of fully accounting for the increased degrees of freedom of the larger models and selects the best one according to the statistical evidence available in the data. In applying this method to many empirical unweighted networks from different fields, we observe that community overlap is very often not supported by statistical evidence and is selected as a better model only for a minority of them. On the other hand, we find that degree correction tends to be almost universally favored by the available data, implying that intrinsic node proprieties (as opposed to group properties are often an essential ingredient of network formation.

  17. Nonnative invasive plants in the Penobscot Experimental Forest in Maine, USA: influence of site, silviculture, and land use history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth Olson; Laura S. Kenefic; Alison C. Dibble; John C. Brissette

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of nonnative invasive plants on approximately 175 ha comprising a long-term, 60-year-old U.S. Forest Service silvicultural experiment and old-field stands in the Penobscot Experimental Forest (PEF) in central Maine. Stands in the silvicultural experiment were never cleared for agriculture, but have been repeatedly partially cut. Our...

  18. Large-scale, long-term silvicultural experiments in the United States: historical overview and contemporary examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Seymour; J. Guldin; D. Marshall; B. Palik

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a synopsis of large-scale, long-term silviculture experiments in the United States. Large-scale in a silvicultural context means that experimental treatment units encompass entire stands (5 to 30 ha); long-term means that results are intended to be monitored over many cutting cycles or an entire rotation, typically for many decades. Such studies...

  19. The selection and use of control groups in epidemiologic studies of radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.; Friedenreich, C.M.; Howe, P.D.

    1990-09-01

    Current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer are based on epidemiologic studies of humans exposed to high doses of radiation. A critical feature of such studies is the selection of an appropriate control group. This report presents a detailed examination of the principles underlying the selection and use of control groups in such epidemiologic studies. It is concluded that the cohort study is the preferred design, because of the rarity of exposure to high levels of radiation in the general population and because the cohort design is less susceptible to bias. This report also assesses potential bias in current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer due to inappropriate choice and use of control groups. Detailed summaries are presented for those epidemiologic studies on which the BEIR IV risk estimates are based. It is concluded that confounding is by far the major potential concern. Bias is probably negligible in risk estimates for breast cancer. For lung cancer, risk estimates may be underestimated by about 30 percent for males and 10 percent for females due to confounding of smoking and radiation exposure. For leukemia and cancers of the thyroid and bone, the absence of established non-radiation risk factors with a high prevalence in the population under study suggests that there is unlikely to be any substantial confounding radiation risk estimates. Finally, lifetime excess mortality risks have been estimated for several of the cancers of interest following exposure to radiation based on Canadian age-, sex- and cause-specific mortality rates. It is concluded that errors in measurement exposure, uncertainty in extrapolating the results of high dose studies to low doses and low dose rates, and sampling variation in the epidemiologic studies contribute far more to uncertainty in current risk estimates than do any biases in the epidemiologic studies introduced by inappropriate selection and use of control groups. (161 refs., 19 tabs.)

  20. Silvicultural Attempts to Induce Browse Resistance in Conifer Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A. Kimball

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiyear study was conducted to determine if soil amendment combined with topical application of elemental sulfur could be employed to reduce deer browse damage to four conifer species. Fertilizer and sulfur were applied to conifer seedlings at seven sites near Corvallis, OR. Growth and browse damage data were collected for all seedlings over a period of 17 months. Additionally, foliar concentrations of monoterpenes and simple carbohydrates were assessed in western redcedar (Thuja plicata seedlings over a period of three years. Fertilization and sulfur treatments had a moderate impact on growth and no influence on browse damage or the chemical responses. Over the course of the study, browse damage diminished while foliar monoterpene concentrations increased in redcedar. It appears that silvicultural manipulation via sulfur application and/or soil amendment cannot accelerate or alter the ontogenetical changes that may naturally defend seedlings against mammalian herbivores. In a brief trial with captive deer, redcedar browse resistance was influenced by seedling maturation, but not monoterpene content. Other maturation effects may yield significant browse protection to young seedlings.

  1. Selection of decommissioning strategies: Issues and factors. Report by an expert group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    A comprehensive assessment of possible strategies is the key step in a decommissioning process. It should be initiated at an early stage in a facility's lifecycle and include a number of factors. The IAEA has provided extensive guidance on decommissioning strategy selection, but there are a number of cases - particularly in countries with limited resources, but not limited to them - where the selection is forced and constrained by prevailing factors and conditions. In its role of an international expert committee assisting the IAEA, the Technical Group on Decommissioning (TEGDE) debates and draws conclusions on topics omitted from general guidance. TEGDE members met in Vienna in 2003, 2004 and 2005 to develop the basis for this publication. The views expressed here reflect those of TEGDE and not necessarily those of the IAEA

  2. Mini Surgical Simulation, Role Play, and Group and Behavioral Interviews in Resident Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, Dotun; Alexander, Carolyn; Tangchitnob, Edward; Kim, David Seil

    2016-01-01

    Background A robust selection process is critical to residents' “cultural fit” and success in their program. Traditional selection methods have shortcomings. Objective We describe a novel residency interview process for obstetrics-gynecology residents that incorporates behavioral, group, and surgical simulation multiple mini interviews (MMIs). Methods In 2010, the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center obstetrics-gynecology residency program developed surgical simulation, role play, ethics group interview, and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competency-based behavioral interview stations. Results From 2010 to 2012, a total of 199 applicants were interviewed, 62 ranked in the top 20, and 18 matched into the program. The MMI scores for interview stations were used in compiling our rank list and were found to adequately differentiate candidates. The MMI mean scores for role play, ethics interview, surgical simulation, and the behavioral interview for the top 20 ranked candidates were statistically significantly higher than those for other applicants. Standardized tests minimally correlated with various interview modalities. Applicants found the interview process acceptable. Implementing these MMI stations increased the total applicant interview time for the day by 15% (from 5.5 to 6.5 hours) and increased the face-to-face interview time from 2 to 4 hours. Approximately 42 hours of coordinator time was required for the yearly interview cycle. Conclusions A multifaceted interview process utilizing MMI, group interview, and surgical simulation MMI is feasible and acceptable. The approach may decrease subjectivity and reliance on traditional interview methods and facilitate the selection of “compatible” residents into the program. PMID:27413446

  3. Genomic selection accuracies within and between environments and small breeding groups in white spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Jean; Doerksen, Trevor K; MacKay, John; Rainville, André; Bousquet, Jean

    2014-12-02

    Genomic selection (GS) may improve selection response over conventional pedigree-based selection if markers capture more detailed information than pedigrees in recently domesticated tree species and/or make it more cost effective. Genomic prediction accuracies using 1748 trees and 6932 SNPs representative of as many distinct gene loci were determined for growth and wood traits in white spruce, within and between environments and breeding groups (BG), each with an effective size of Ne ≈ 20. Marker subsets were also tested. Model fits and/or cross-validation (CV) prediction accuracies for ridge regression (RR) and the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator models approached those of pedigree-based models. With strong relatedness between CV sets, prediction accuracies for RR within environment and BG were high for wood (r = 0.71-0.79) and moderately high for growth (r = 0.52-0.69) traits, in line with trends in heritabilities. For both classes of traits, these accuracies achieved between 83% and 92% of those obtained with phenotypes and pedigree information. Prediction into untested environments remained moderately high for wood (r ≥ 0.61) but dropped significantly for growth (r ≥ 0.24) traits, emphasizing the need to phenotype in all test environments and model genotype-by-environment interactions for growth traits. Removing relatedness between CV sets sharply decreased prediction accuracies for all traits and subpopulations, falling near zero between BGs with no known shared ancestry. For marker subsets, similar patterns were observed but with lower prediction accuracies. Given the need for high relatedness between CV sets to obtain good prediction accuracies, we recommend to build GS models for prediction within the same breeding population only. Breeding groups could be merged to build genomic prediction models as long as the total effective population size does not exceed 50 individuals in order to obtain high prediction accuracy such as that

  4. A Group Decision Framework with Intuitionistic Preference Relations and Its Application to Low Carbon Supplier Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiayu; Wang, Zhou-Jing

    2016-09-19

    This article develops a group decision framework with intuitionistic preference relations. An approach is first devised to rectify an inconsistent intuitionistic preference relation to derive an additive consistent one. A new aggregation operator, the so-called induced intuitionistic ordered weighted averaging (IIOWA) operator, is proposed to aggregate individual intuitionistic fuzzy judgments. By using the mean absolute deviation between the original and rectified intuitionistic preference relations as an order inducing variable, the rectified consistent intuitionistic preference relations are aggregated into a collective preference relation. This treatment is presumably able to assign different weights to different decision-makers' judgments based on the quality of their inputs (in terms of consistency of their original judgments). A solution procedure is then developed for tackling group decision problems with intuitionistic preference relations. A low carbon supplier selection case study is developed to illustrate how to apply the proposed decision model in practice.

  5. Selecting instruments for assessing psychological wellbeing in Afghan and Kurdish refugee groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman-Hill Cheryl MR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Afghan and Iraqi refugees comprise nearly half of all those currently under United Nations protection. As many of them will eventually be resettled in countries outside the region of origin, their long term health and settlement concerns are of relevance to host societies, and will be a likely focus for future research. Since Australia and New Zealand have both accepted refugees for many years and have dedicated, but different settlement and immigration policies, a study comparing the resettlement of two different refugee groups in these countries was undertaken. The purpose of this article is to describe the instrument selection for this study assessing mental health and psychological well being with Afghan and Kurdish former refugees, in particular to address linguistic considerations and translated instrument availability. A summary of instruments previously used with refugee and migrant groups from the Middle East region is presented to assist other researchers, before describing the three instruments ultimately selected for the quantitative component of our study. Findings The Kessler-10 Psychological Distress Scale (K10, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale (GPSE, and Personal Well-Being Index (PWI all showed good reliability (Cronbach's alphas of 0.86, 0.89 and 0.83 respectively for combined language versions and ease of use even for pre-literate participants, with the sample of 193 refugees, although some concepts in the GPSE proved problematic for a small number of respondents. Farsi was the language of choice for the majority of Afghan participants, while most of the Kurds chose to complete English versions in addition to Farsi. No one used Arabic or Turkish translations. Participants settled less than ten years were more likely to complete questionnaires in Farsi. Descriptive summary statistics are presented for each instrument with results split by gender, refugee group and language version completed. Conclusion

  6. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Leclercq

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model. Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  7. Emotional intelligence vs. health behaviour in selected groups in late adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sygit-Kowalkowska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The study deals with the relationship between the emotional intelligence of people in late adulthood and their health behaviour not described in the earlier literature on this subject. The objective of the research was to study the impact of emotional abilities on positive mental attitude, preventive behaviour, correct dietary habits and pro-health practice in selected older persons. Materials and methods. The inventory of Pro-Health Behaviour (IZZ by Juczyński Z was applied, together with the Polish adaptation of the INTE Questionnaire of Emotional Intelligence by Ciechanowicz A, Jaworowska A and Matczak A. A total of 199 people were examined. Two groups were taken into consideration: residents of care homes (DPS group and attendees of the Third Age University (UTW group. Results. Analyses of results showed statistically significant relationships between the variables: emotional intelligence and the individual categories of pro-health behaviour. This correlation had a positive nature: an increase in the intensity of emotional abilities, including the awareness of such abilities, led to the increase of health-care oriented behaviours. The division into DPS and UTW groups proved to be significant for the relationships between emotional intelligence, a positive mental attitude, and correct dietary habits. Conclusions. The result of the study show that pro-health activities are directly associated with the abilities to understand and to control the emotions of older people. The data obtained confirm the positive relationship between the high level of emotional intelligence and pro-health behaviour.

  8. Prediction of the solubility of selected pharmaceuticals in water and alcohols with a group contribution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelczarska, Aleksandra; Ramjugernath, Deresh; Rarey, Jurgen; Domańska, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The prediction of solubility of pharmaceuticals in water and alcohols was presented. ► Improved group contribution method UNIFAC was proposed for 42 binary mixtures. ► Infinite activity coefficients were used in a model. ► A semi-predictive model with one experimental point was proposed. ► This model qualitatively describes the temperature dependency of Pharms. -- Abstract: An improved group contribution approach using activity coefficients at infinite dilution, which has been proposed by our group, was used for the prediction of the solubility of selected pharmaceuticals in water and alcohols [B. Moller, Activity of complex multifunctional organic compounds in common solvents, PhD Thesis, Chemical Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2009]. The solubility of 16 different pharmaceuticals in water, ethanol and octan-1-ol was predicted over a fairly wide range of temperature with this group contribution model. The predicted values, along with values computed with the Schroeder-van Laar equation, are compared to experimental results published by us previously for 42 binary mixtures. The predicted solubility values were lower than those from the experiments for most of the mixtures. In order to improve the prediction method, a semi-predictive calculation using one experimental solubility value was implemented. This one point prediction has given acceptable results when comparison is made to experimental values

  9. A group-based spatial decision support system for wind farm site selection in Northwest Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorsevski, Pece V.; Cathcart, Steven C.; Mirzaei, Golrokh; Jamali, Mohsin M.; Ye, Xinyue; Gomezdelcampo, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the benefits of applying a spatial decision support system (SDSS) framework for evaluating the suitability for wind farm siting in Northwest Ohio. The multiple criteria evaluation (MCE) prototype system is intended for regional planning but also for promoting group decision making that could involve participants with different interests in the development of decision alternatives. The framework integrates environmental and economic criteria and builds a hierarchy for wind farm siting using weighted linear combination (WLC) techniques and GIS functionality. The SDSS allows the multiple participants to interact and develop an understanding of the spatial data for assigning importance values to each factor. The WLC technique is used to combine the assigned values with map layers, which are standardized using fuzzy set theory, to produce individual suitability maps. The maps created by personal preferences from the participants are aggregated for producing a group solution using the Borda method. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the group solution to examine how small changes in the factor weights affect the calculated suitability scores. The results from the sensitivity analysis are intended to aid understanding of compromised solutions through changes in the input data from the participant's perspective. - Highlights: ► We present a prototype tool that we developed for wind farm site selection. ► Multiple participants rank the factors for promoting group-based decision making. ► The factors are aggregated by WLC technique to generate maps from participants. ► Group-based solution uses Borda method to aggregate the maps from participants. ► Sensitivity analysis is performed on the group solution to examine solution affects

  10. Expert and non-expert groups perception of LILW repository site selection procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Polic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Slovenia is now in the process of the site selection for a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository. Earlier searches for the LILW repository site confronted the Agency for radwaste management (ARAO) with a number of problems, mainly concerning the contacts with the local communities and their willingness to accept the repository. Therefore the Agency started with a new, so-called mixed mode approach to the site selection, where the special role of a mediator is introduced. The mediator represents the link between the investor and the local community, and facilitates the communication and negotiations between both. In this study we try to find out how people perceive the mediating process and conditions under which the LILW repository would be accepted in the local community. Therefore a special survey was conducted. The results showed some of the conditions under which participants would possibly accept the LILW repository. Differences in the perception between non-expert and expert groups were demonstrated and analysed, especially in the assessment of the consequences of LILW repository construction on the environment. Also the socio-psychological influences of the LILW repository were noted and examined. Consequences and recommendations for future work on the site selection procedure were prepared on the basis of the research results.(author)

  11. To Make Good Decision: A Group DSS for Multiple Criteria Alternative Rank and Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decision making is a recursive process and usually involves multiple decision criteria. However, such multiple criteria decision making may have a problem in which partial decision criteria may conflict with each other. An information technology, such as the decision support system (DSS and group DSS (GDSS, emerges to assist decision maker for decision-making process. Both the DSS and GDSS should integrate with a symmetrical approach to assist decision maker to take all decision criteria into consideration simultaneously. This study proposes a GDSS architecture named hybrid decision-making support model (HDMSM and integrated four decision approaches (Delphi, DEMATEL, ANP, and MDS to help decision maker to rank and select appropriate alternatives. The HDMSM consists of five steps, namely, criteria identification, criteria correlation calculation, criteria evaluation, critical criteria selection, and alternative rank and comparison. Finally, to validate the proposed feasibility of the proposed model, this study also conducts a case study to find out the important indexes of corporate social responsibility (CSR from multiple perspectives. As the case study demonstrates the proposed HDMSM enables a group of decision makers to implement the MCDM effectively and help them to analyze the relation and degree of mutual influence among different evaluation factors.

  12. Novel Prognostic Groups in Thymic Epithelial Tumors: Assessment of Risk and Therapeutic Strategy Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelillo, Rolando M.; Trodella, Lucio; Ramella, Sara; Cellini, Numa; Balducci, Mario; Mantini, Giovanna; Cellini, Francesco; Ciresa, Marzia; Fiore, Michele; Evoli, Amelia; Sterzi, Silvia; Russo, Patrizia; Grozio, Alessia; Cesario, Alfredo; Granone, Pierluigi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of multimodality treatment on patients with thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) (i.e., thymomas and thymic squamous cell carcinoma) and to define the prognostic classes according to the Masaoka and World Health Organization histologic classification systems. Methods and Materials: Primary surgery was the mainstay of therapy. Extended thymectomy was performed in all cases. The cases were primarily staged according to the Masaoka system. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given to patients diagnosed with Masaoka Stage II, III, and IVA TET. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered in selected cases. Results: We reviewed the records of 120 patients with TETs, with a mean follow-up of 13.8 years. Of the 120 patients, 98 (81.6%) received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of these 98 patients, Grade 1-2 pulmonary or esophageal toxicity was acute in 12 (12.2%) and late in 8 (8.2%). The median overall survival was 21.6 years. Of the 120 patients, 106 were rediagnosed and reclassified according to the World Health Organization system, and the survival rate was correlated with it. Three different prognostic classes were defined: favorable, Masaoka Stage I and histologic grade A, AB, B1, B2 or Masaoka Stage II and histologic grade A, AB, B1; unfavorable, Stage IV disease or histologic grade C or Stage III and histologic grade B3; intermediate, all other combinations. The 10- and 20-year survival rate was 95% and 81% for the favorable group, 90% and 65% for the intermediate group, and 50% and 0% for the unfavorable group, respectively. Local recurrence, distant recurrence, and tumor-related deaths were also evaluated. Conclusion: The analysis of our experience singled out three novel prognostic classes and the assessment of risk identified treatment selection criteria

  13. An evaluation of selective feeding by three age-groups of the rainbow mussel Villosa iris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, K.; Neves, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    A tri-algal diet was fed to three age-groups of the rainbow mussel Villosa iris: ages 2-3 d, 50-53 d, and 3-6 years. Changes in the relative abundance of each algal species were determined in 5-h feeding trials from feeding chambers and by gut content analyses. All age-groups rejected Scenedesmus quadricauda and preferentially selected Nannochloropsis oculata and Selenastrum capricornutum, principally on the basis of size. Changes in the relative abundance of algae in feeding chambers did not differ significantly among age-groups. Observed differences in the ingested quantities of the similar-sized N. oculata and S. capricornutum were attributed to other particle-related characteristics. Results indicate that the rainbow mussel can be fed similar-sized algae at ali ages in captive propagation facilities. When developing a suitable algal diet for rearing juvenile mussels, one probably need not investigate different species at each stage of development if the algae used are in the 2.8-8.5-??m size range.

  14. Comparison of Agricultural Trade in Selected Groups of Countries – Comparison of Real Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Smutka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The world trade is a dynamically changing in the long term horizon, its total value as well as share in the global economy are continuously growing. Despite the growth in agricultural trade, the gaps among various groups of countries and regions are becoming deeper. More and more countries loose its self-sufficiency or its netto export status and become dependent on imports. On the other hand, there exists another limited group of countries controlling most of the world exports. The aim of the article is to identify differences in changing values of agricultural trade among selected groups of countries. An accent is given primarily on an identification of differences relating to the real value of trading streams. These differences are defined not only in relation to the absolute value, but also to values recalculated per capita, active farmer or agricultural respective arable land. The results indicate extreme differences between developed and developing countries, just in favour of developed countries, which control an important share of the world agricultural trade. There is worth noting that despite the fact that developed countries affect essentially the character of the world agricultural market, there exist huge differences among them. They can be illustrated on the EU-15 and EU-13 countries. The differences relate not only to the value of agricultural trade but they can be observed when analysing the trade dynamics and productivity in relation to the production factors labour and land.

  15. Life expectancy for the University of Utah beagle colony and selection of a control group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, D.R.; Stevens, W.; Bruenger, F.W.; Woodbury, L.; Stover, B.J.; Smith, J.M.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the internal-emitters toxicity program at the University of Utah Radiobiology Laboratory, each experimental group carries its own specific control cohort, which is the same size as most of the individual experimental cohorts. Variations in average lifetime are observed among individual control cohorts. This may be due to external causes, genetic variances such as the occurrence of epileptic syndromes, or changes such as those that result from improved medical core or husbandry. The Stover-Eyring method was used to eliminate from control and experimental cohorts those dogs with specific diseases such as epilepsy - dogs that were at risk for too short a time for a later pathological response to occur. By the use of conventional statistical techniques, it ws shown to be reasonable to pool individual control cohorts into a much larger selected cohort that provided greater precision in the estimate of control survival and thus a more sensitive basis for the estimation of the relative life shortening in the experimental groups. The analysis suggested that control groups could be combined, and a control population of 114 beagles was proposed. Their average lifespan was 4926 +- 849 days, and the time when half the animals had died was 5000 days. 3 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Multi-state systems with selective propagated failures and imperfect individual and group protections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitin, Gregory; Xing Liudong; Ben-Haim, Hanoch; Da, Yuanshun

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an algorithm for evaluating performance distribution of complex series–parallel multi-state systems with propagated failures and imperfect protections. The failure propagation can have a selective effect, which means that the failures originated from different system elements can cause failures of different subsets of elements. Individual elements or some disjoint groups of elements can be protected from propagation of failures originated outside the group. The protections can fail with given probabilities. The suggested algorithm is based on the universal generating function approach and a generalized reliability block diagram method. The performance distribution evaluation procedure is repeated for each combination of propagated failures and protection failures. Both an analytical example and a numerical example are provided to illustrate the suggested algorithm. - Highlights: ► Systems with propagated failures and imperfect protections are considered. ► Failures originated from different elements can affect different subsets of elements. ► Protections of individual elements or groups of elements can fail with given probabilities. ► An algorithm for evaluating multi-state system performance distribution is suggested.

  17. Multifunctional natural forest silviculture economics revised: Challenges in meeting landowners’ and society's wants. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, P.; Caparrós, A.; Cerdá, E.; Diaz-Balteiro, L.; Herruzo, A.C.; Huntsinger, L.; Martín-Barroso, D.; Martínez-Jauregui, M.; Ovando, P.; Oviedo, J.L.; Pasalodos-Tato, M.; Romero, C.; Soliño, M.; Standiford, R.B.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study: This paper objective focuses on the contribution of multifunctional natural forest silviculture, incorporating both private and public product managements, to forest and woodland economics. Area of study: Spain and California (USA). Material and methods: This conceptual article has developed a critical revision of the existing literature on the main economic issues about the multifunctional natural forest silviculture in the last decades. Main results: Multifunctional natural silviculture has secular roots as a local practice, but as a science of the natural environment applied to the economic management of forest lands it is still in the process of maturation. Timber silviculture remains the central concern of forest economics investment in scientific publications. By contrast, silvicultural modeling of the natural growth of firewood, browse and other non-timber forest products of trees and shrubs receives scant attention in scientific journals. Even rarer are publications on multifunctional natural silviculture of forest and woodland managements, including environmental services geared to people’s active and passive consumption. Under this umbrella, private environmental self-consumption is represented by the amenities enjoyed by private non-industrial landowners. As for environmental public products, the most relevant are carbon, water, mushrooms, recreation, landscape and threatened biodiversity. Research highlights: This paper is a good example about the conceptual research on forestry techniques and economic concepts applied to multifunctional silviculture in Mediterranean areas of Spain and California. The combination of technical knowledge and private and public economic behaviors definitively contributes to the multifunctional management of natural forest systems.

  18. Multifunctional natural forest silviculture economics revised: Challenges in meeting landowners’ and society's wants. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, P.; Caparrós, A.; Cerdá, E.; Diaz-Balteiro, L.; Herruzo, A.C.; Huntsinger, L.; Martín-Barroso, D.; Martínez-Jauregui, M.; Ovando, P.; Oviedo, J.L.; Pasalodos-Tato, M.; Romero, C.; Soliño, M.; Standiford, R.B.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of study: This paper objective focuses on the contribution of multifunctional natural forest silviculture, incorporating both private and public product managements, to forest and woodland economics. Area of study: Spain and California (USA). Material and methods: This conceptual article has developed a critical revision of the existing literature on the main economic issues about the multifunctional natural forest silviculture in the last decades. Main results: Multifunctional natural silviculture has secular roots as a local practice, but as a science of the natural environment applied to the economic management of forest lands it is still in the process of maturation. Timber silviculture remains the central concern of forest economics investment in scientific publications. By contrast, silvicultural modeling of the natural growth of firewood, browse and other non-timber forest products of trees and shrubs receives scant attention in scientific journals. Even rarer are publications on multifunctional natural silviculture of forest and woodland managements, including environmental services geared to people’s active and passive consumption. Under this umbrella, private environmental self-consumption is represented by the amenities enjoyed by private non-industrial landowners. As for environmental public products, the most relevant are carbon, water, mushrooms, recreation, landscape and threatened biodiversity. Research highlights: This paper is a good example about the conceptual research on forestry techniques and economic concepts applied to multifunctional silviculture in Mediterranean areas of Spain and California. The combination of technical knowledge and private and public economic behaviors definitively contributes to the multifunctional management of natural forest systems.

  19. The procedure of alternative site selection within the report of the study group on the radioactive waste final repository selection process (AKEnd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nies, A.

    2005-01-01

    The study group on the selection procedures of radioactive waste final repository sites has presented the report in December 2002. The author dicusses the consequences of this report with respect to the site selection focussing on two topics: the serach for the best possible site and the prevention of prejudices

  20. Network-based group variable selection for detecting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuegong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL aims to identify the genetic loci associated with the expression level of genes. Penalized regression with a proper penalty is suitable for the high-dimensional biological data. Its performance should be enhanced when we incorporate biological knowledge of gene expression network and linkage disequilibrium (LD structure between loci in high-noise background. Results We propose a network-based group variable selection (NGVS method for QTL detection. Our method simultaneously maps highly correlated expression traits sharing the same biological function to marker sets formed by LD. By grouping markers, complex joint activity of multiple SNPs can be considered and the dimensionality of eQTL problem is reduced dramatically. In order to demonstrate the power and flexibility of our method, we used it to analyze two simulations and a mouse obesity and diabetes dataset. We considered the gene co-expression network, grouped markers into marker sets and treated the additive and dominant effect of each locus as a group: as a consequence, we were able to replicate results previously obtained on the mouse linkage dataset. Furthermore, we observed several possible sex-dependent loci and interactions of multiple SNPs. Conclusions The proposed NGVS method is appropriate for problems with high-dimensional data and high-noise background. On eQTL problem it outperforms the classical Lasso method, which does not consider biological knowledge. Introduction of proper gene expression and loci correlation information makes detecting causal markers more accurate. With reasonable model settings, NGVS can lead to novel biological findings.

  1. Schwarzian conditions for linear differential operators with selected differential Galois groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Y.; Maillard, J.-M.

    2017-11-01

    We show that non-linear Schwarzian differential equations emerging from covariance symmetry conditions imposed on linear differential operators with hypergeometric function solutions can be generalized to arbitrary order linear differential operators with polynomial coefficients having selected differential Galois groups. For order three and order four linear differential operators we show that this pullback invariance up to conjugation eventually reduces to symmetric powers of an underlying order-two operator. We give, precisely, the conditions to have modular correspondences solutions for such Schwarzian differential equations, which was an open question in a previous paper. We analyze in detail a pullbacked hypergeometric example generalizing modular forms, that ushers a pullback invariance up to operator homomorphisms. We finally consider the more general problem of the equivalence of two different order-four linear differential Calabi-Yau operators up to pullbacks and conjugation, and clarify the cases where they have the same Yukawa couplings.

  2. A novel reduced-complexity group detection structure in MIMO frequency selective fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Qaraqe, Khalid A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper a novel reduced complexity detection method named modified symbol flipping method is introduced and its advantages on reducing the burden of the calculations at the receiver compared to the optimum maximum likelihood detection method on multiple input- multiple output frequency selective fading channels are explained. The initial concept of the symbol flipping method is derived from a preliminary detection scheme named bit flipping which was introduced in [1]. The detection structure employed in this paper is ing, detection, and cancellation. On the detection stage, the proposed method is employed and the results are compared to the group maximum likelihood detection scheme proposed in [2]. Simulation results show that a 6 dB performance gain can be achieved at the expense of a slight increase in complexity in comparison with the conventional symbol flipping scheme. © 2010 Crown.

  3. Dream interpretation, affect, and the theory of neuronal group selection: Freud, Winnicott, Bion, and Modell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Walker

    2006-12-01

    The author uses a dream specimen as interpreted during psychoanalysis to illustrate Modell's hypothesis that Edelman's theory of neuronal group selection (TNGS) may provide a valuable neurobiological model for Freud's dynamic unconscious, imaginative processes in the mind, the retranscription of memory in psychoanalysis, and intersubjective processes in the analytic relationship. He draws parallels between the interpretation of the dream material with keen attention to affect-laden meanings in the evolving analytic relationship in the domain of psychoanalysis and the principles of Edelman's TNGS in the domain of neurobiology. The author notes how this correlation may underscore the importance of dream interpretation in psychoanalysis. He also suggests areas for further investigation in both realms based on study of their interplay.

  4. Mechanisms of Winner-Take-All and Group Selection in Neuronal Spiking Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    A major function of central nervous systems is to discriminate different categories or types of sensory input. Neuronal networks accomplish such tasks by learning different sensory maps at several stages of neural hierarchy, such that different neurons fire selectively to reflect different internal or external patterns and states. The exact mechanisms of such map formation processes in the brain are not completely understood. Here we study the mechanism by which a simple recurrent/reentrant neuronal network accomplish group selection and discrimination to different inputs in order to generate sensory maps. We describe the conditions and mechanism of transition from a rhythmic epileptic state (in which all neurons fire synchronized and indiscriminately to any input) to a winner-take-all state in which only a subset of neurons fire for a specific input. We prove an analytic condition under which a stable bump solution and a winner-take-all state can emerge from the local recurrent excitation-inhibition interactions in a three-layer spiking network with distinct excitatory and inhibitory populations, and demonstrate the importance of surround inhibitory connection topology on the stability of dynamic patterns in spiking neural network.

  5. Application of methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises, considering compatibility factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Kozhanova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: motivation of methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises considering compatibility factor. Material: in the research 40 high qualification sportswomen of 17-23 yrs age with sport experience of 11-16 years participated. With cluster analysis 10 gymnasts with morphological indicators, meeting modern standards of group exercises were selected. Results: we found 5 generalized factors, which characterize structure of selection to teams and determines 72% of dispersion. Influence of kinds and connected with them criteria of compatibility on efficiency of gymnasts’ competition functioning were also determined. The authors substantiated methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises, considering compatibility factor. Conclusions: in selection to calisthenics teams for group exercises it is purposeful to realize complex registration of compatibility kinds, considering gymnasts’ similar features by recommended indicators.

  6. Effect of silvicultural practice and wood type on loblolly pine particleboard and medium density fiberboard properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Elvin T. Choong; Leslie H.. Groom

    1999-01-01

    he objective of this study was to determine the effect of five different silvicultural strategies and wood type on mechanical and physical properties of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) particleboard and fiberboard. The furnish was prepared in an unconventional manner from innerwood and outerwood veneer for each stand. Modulus of rupture (MOR)...

  7. Restoring old-growth southern pine ecosystems: strategic lessons from long-term silvicultural research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg; Michael G. Shelton; James M. Guldin

    2008-01-01

    The successful restoration of old-growth-like loblolly (Pinus taeda) and shortleaf (Pinus echinata) pine-dominated forests requires the integration of ecological information with long-term silvicultural research from places such as the Crossett Experimental Forest (CEF). Conventional management practices such as timber harvesting or competition control have supplied...

  8. Silvicultural methods of Lymantria dispar L. management: effects on Agrilus bilineatus (Weber) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Marie Muzika; Andrew Liebhold; Kurt. Gottschalk

    1997-01-01

    The abundance of twolined chestnut borer, Agrilus bilineatus (Weber), adults were sampled using sticky panels over a 6-year period in a mixed hardwood forest in West Virginia. Sixteen stands (average size 10.5 ha) were used in the study; eight of these were silviculturally thinned in 1989, the remainder were uncut. During 1990 and 1991, populations...

  9. Short-term response of small mammals following oak regeneration silviculture treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Raybuck; Christopher E. Moorman; Christopher S. DePerno; Kevin Gross; Dean M. Simon; Gordon S. Warburton

    2012-01-01

    Upland, mixed-oak forests in the eastern United States have experienced widespread oak regeneration failure, largely due to cessation of anthropogenic disturbance. Silvicultural practices used to promote advance oak regeneration may affect ground-dwelling mammals. From May to August 2008 (pre-treatment), 2010 (first year post-treatment), and 2011 (second year post-...

  10. What does modern technology portend for uneven-aged southern pine silviculture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg; Michael G. Shelton; James M. Guldin; Ernest Lovett

    2004-01-01

    Recent changes in forest technology and market influences may impede the practice of uneven-aged (LEA) silviculture. For example, the use of tree-length systems with mechanized harvesters can unacceptably reduce the density of advanced regeneration, making it difficult to maintain the desired size class distribution. Changes to tree utilization standards, limited...

  11. Silvicultural research and the evolution of forest practices in the Douglas-fir region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert O. Curtis; Dean S. DeBell; Richard E. Miller; Michael Newton; J. Bradley St. Clair; William I. Stein

    2007-01-01

    Silvicultural practices in the Douglas-fir region evolved through a combination of formal research, observation, and practical experience of forest managers and silviculturists, and changing economic and social factors. This process began more than a century ago and still continues. It has had a great influence on the economic well-being of the region and on the...

  12. Suitability of close-to-nature silviculture for adapting temperate European forests to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brang, P.; Spathelf, P.; Larsen, J.B.; Bauhus, J.; Boncina, A.; Mohren, G.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    In many parts of Europe, close-to-nature silviculture (CNS) has been widely advocated as being the best approach for managing forests to cope with future climate change. In this review, we identify and evaluate six principles for enhancing the adaptive capacity of European temperate forests in a

  13. Regeneration of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) using shelterwood systems: Ecophysiology, silviculture and management recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Dey; William C. parker

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing relaible methods for regenerating red oak (Quercus rubra) in Ontario. Traditional silviculture methods have not been successful in maintaining the curent levels of oak growing stock. In this paper, we review the ecology, physiology and reproductive biology of red oak. This discussion stresses the...

  14. The Effects of Silvicultural Treatment on Sirex noctilio Attacks and Tree Health in Northeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Dodds

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The invasive woodwasp Sirex noctilio (Hymenoptera: Siricidae is established in east-central North America. A replicated case study testing the effectiveness of silvicultural treatments for reducing the number of S. noctilio attacked trees in a stand was conducted in New York, USA. Silvicultural treatments reduced S. noctilio attacked trees by approximately 75% over the course of the study. There was no tree growth response to silvicultural treatments in the four years after thinning, but targeted removal of weakened trees removed potential S. noctilio habitat from treated stands. Two spectral vegetation indices were used to determine tree health in each treatment and potentially provide guidance for detection efforts. Silvicultural treatment significantly influenced the Red Edge Inflection Point, a strong indicator of chlorophyll content, and the Moisture Stress Index, a reflectance measurement sensitive to changes in foliar leaf water content, with the greatest differences occurring between control and treated blocks. Vegetation indices showed promise as a tool for aiding in stand prioritization for S. noctilio surveys or management activities.

  15. Challenges facing gap-based silviculture and possible solutions for mesic northern forests in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christel C. Kern; Julia I. Burton; Patricia Raymond; Anthony W. D' Amato; William S. Keeton; Alex Royo; Michael B. Walters; Christopher R. Webster; John L. Willis

    2017-01-01

    Gap-based silvicultural systems were developed under the assumption that richness, and diversity of tree species and other biota positively respond to variation in size of harvest-created canopy gaps. However, varying gap size alone often does not meet diversity objectives and broader goals to address contemporary forest conditions. Recent research highlights the need...

  16. Effects of silviculture on neotropical migratory birds in central and southeastern oak pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James G. Dickson; Frank R. Thompson; Richard N. Conner; Kathleen E. Franzreb

    1993-01-01

    Avian communities that are associated with forest habitat attributes are affected by silvicultural and other stand influences. Some species have specific habitat requirements, whereas others occupy a broad range of vegetative conditions. In general, bird species richness and density are positively related to stand foliage volume and diversity. Bird density and...

  17. Forest fuel treatments in western North America: merging silvicultural and fire management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris C. Johnson; David L. Peterson

    2005-01-01

    For many years silviculture and fire management have mostly been separate forestry disciplines with disparate objectives and activities. However, in order to accomplish complex and multiple management objectives related to forest structure, fuels, and fxe disturbance, these two disciplines must be effectively integrated in science and practice. We have linked...

  18. The role of silvicultural thinning in eastern forests threatened by hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Ann Fajvan

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase hemlock survivability in stands threatened by hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), a new study is developing silvicultural thinning guidelines to reduce stand densities, reallocate resources, and increase hemlock vigor across a range of stand types and structures before HWA invasion. The 7 study areas are all geographically similar in that they regularly...

  19. State survey of silviculture nonpoint source programs: a comparison of the 2000 northeastern and national results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Edwards; Gordon W. Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The National Association of State Foresters conducts surveys of silviculture nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control programs to measure progress and identify needs. The 2000 survey results are summarized here for the nation and for the 20-state northeastern region. Current emphasis of NPS pollution programs is on education, training, and monitoring. Educational...

  20. Harvesting productivity and disturbance estimates of three silvicultural prescriptions in eastern Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason D. Thompson; Bob Rummer; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2009-01-01

    A large scale silvicultural assessment designed to examine the effectiveness of four treatments in reducing the impacts of gypsy moth infestation and oak decline was implemented on the Daniel Boone National Forest in eastern Kentucky. The study was funded through the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003. The goal of the treatments was to improve the health and vigor...

  1. Using silviculture to influence carbon sequestration in southern Appalachian spruce-fir forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick T. Moore; R. Justin DeRose; James N. Long; Helga. van Miegroet

    2012-01-01

    Enhancement of forest growth through silvicultural modification of stand density is one strategy for increasing carbon (C) sequestration. Using the Fire and Fuels Extension of the Forest Vegetation Simulator, the effects of even-aged, uneven-aged and no-action management scenarios on C sequestration in a southern Appalachian red spruce-Fraser fir forest were modeled....

  2. Assessing the children's views on foods and consumption of selected food groups: outcome from focus group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif Ishak, Sharifah Intan Zainun; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Kandiah, Mirnalini

    2013-04-01

    The food choices in childhood have high a probability of being carried through into their adulthood life, which then contributes to the risk of many non-communicable diseases. Therefore, there is a need to gather some information about children's views on foods which may influence their food choices for planning a related dietary intervention or programme. This paper aimed to explore the views of children on foods and the types of foods which are usually consumed by children under four food groups (snacks, fast foods, cereals and cereal products; and milk and dairy products) by using focus group discussions. A total of 33 school children aged 7-9 years old from Selangor and Kuala Lumpur participated in the focus groups. Focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the listed themes. The outcomes show that the children usually consumed snacks such as white bread with spread or as a sandwich, local cakes, fruits such as papaya, mango and watermelon, biscuits or cookies, tea, chocolate drink and instant noodles. Their choices of fast foods included pizza, burgers, French fries and fried chicken. For cereal products, they usually consumed rice, bread and ready-to-eat cereals. Finally, their choices of dairy products included milk, cheese and yogurt. The reasons for the food liking were taste, nutritional value and the characteristics of food. The outcome of this study may provide additional information on the food choices among Malaysian children, especially in urban areas with regard to the food groups which have shown to have a relationship with the risk of childhood obesity.

  3. Landscape genomic approach to detect selection signatures in locally adapted Brazilian swine genetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesconeto, Robson Jose; Joost, Stéphane; McManus, Concepta Margaret; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; Cobuci, Jaime Araujo; Braccini, Jose

    2017-11-01

    Samples of 191 animals from 18 different Brazilian locally adapted swine genetic groups were genotyped using Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip in order to identify selection signatures related to the monthly variation of Brazilian environmental variables. Using BayeScan software, 71 SNP markers were identified as F ST outliers and 60 genotypes (58 markers) were found by Samβada software in 371 logistic models correlated with 112 environmental variables. Five markers were identified in both methods, with a Kappa value of 0.073 (95% CI: 0.011-0.134). The frequency of these markers indicated a clear north-south country division that reflects Brazilian environmental differences in temperature, solar radiation, and precipitation. Global spatial territory correlation for environmental variables corroborates this finding (average Moran's I = 0.89, range from 0.55 to 0.97). The distribution of alleles over the territory was not strongly correlated with the breed/genetic groups. These results are congruent with previous mtDNA studies and should be used to direct germplasm collection for the National gene bank.

  4. Silvicultural alternatives to conventional even-aged forest management - what limits global adoption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus J Puettmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The development of forestry as a scientific and management discipline over the last two centuries has mainly emphasized intensive management operations focused on increased commodity production, mostly wood. This “conventional” forest management approach has typically favored production of even-aged, single-species stands. While alternative management regimes have generally received less attention, this has been changing over the last three decades, especially in countries with developed economies. Reasons for this change include a combination of new information and concerns about the ecological consequences of intensive forestry practices and a willingness on the part of many forest owners and society to embrace a wider set of management objectives. Alternative silvicultural approaches are characterized by a set of fundamental principles, including avoidance of clearcutting, an emphasis on structural diversity and small-scale variability, deployment of mixed species with natural regeneration, and avoidance of intensive site-preparation methods. Methods Our compilation of the authors’ experiences and perspectives from various parts of the world aims to initiate a larger discussion concerning the constraints to and the potential of adopting alternative silvicultural practices. Results The results suggest that a wider adoption of alternative silvicultural practices is currently hindered by a suite of ecological, economic, logistical, informational, cultural, and historical constraints. Individual contexts display their own unique combinations and relative significance of these constraints, and accordingly, targeted efforts, such as regulations and incentives, may help to overcome specific challenges. Conclusions In a broader context, we propose that less emphases on strict applications of principles and on stand structures might provide additional flexibility and facilitate the adoption of alternative silvicultural regimes in a

  5. The Turkey oak high forests in the Molise region (central Italy. Analysis of past silvicultural system and current management choices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cantiani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aim of the work is to provide further knowledge on the silvicultural system applied to Quercus cerris hight forests in the Molise Region (Central Italy. An historical analysis, based on a number of forest management plans applied since 1940 referred to 19 municipalities and on other historical documents, is provided in the paper. Forest management has been traditionally applied in the Molise Region and therefore is at now possible to reconstruct in detail the management of the forests of Molise Region. The historical study has been integrated with the analysis of a chronosequence including four steps of stand development in a Turkey oak stand: the regeneration phase (1-2 yrs - the unthinned young stand (46 yrs - the unthinned adult stand (aged 60 to 100 - the mature stand (126 yrs. Mensurational surveys were carried out at each phase in order to characterize both stand structure and derive information on the silvicultural practices applied in the past, but not documented in the available papers. The stand age was determined by tree coring and count of annual rings. At the beginning of the last century, the silvicultural system to be applied in oak high forests wasn’t strictly defined and a particular kind of selection cutting was carried out. It was named taglio a salto per sezioni i.e. “compartment selection cutting”, partly leading back to a real selection cutting, partly to a shelterwood system. The use of the reported silvicultural system gave rise to irregular forest structures and led to management problems well-described in the management plans at the end of 1940s. Another consequence of the applied practices was the absence or the inadequate natural regeneration establishment. The contemporary unregulated practice of grazing the forest floor contributed to the unsuccessful regeneration and made the situation worse. The presence of an understorey layer made up by sproutings

  6. [Advantage of obsessive-compulsive symptoms from the aspect of individual selection and group selection: an evolutionary psychological approach to obsessive-compulsive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Xénia; Jekkel, Eva; Varga, Anna; Miklósi, Mónika; Forintos, Dóra Perczel

    2008-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are difficult to explain from an evolutionary aspect, since it is hard to reason how a characteristic carrying a reproductive disadvantage survives through natural selection. There are several evolution-based papers concerning obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), which aim at resolving this contradiction. Recent studies provided considerable evidence in support for the evolutionary theories of OCD. Research confirmed an important role for genetic factors in the background of OCD, and neuroanatomic studies supported that neuroanatomical structures playing a role in OCD are those areas which are activated during the processing of danger and threat. From the evolutionary aspect OCD can be explained both from the individual and group selection aspect. According to the theory of individual selection, OCD symptoms are based on such behaviors which are by themselves advantageous serving individual survival and reproduction and therefore carry on through natural selection. According to group selection theory, although OCD is disadvantageous for the individual, it is adaptive for the survival of the group. In our paper we review the individual and group selection theories of OCD, and we also outline the continuity and discontinuity theories which show a significant overlap with the evolutionary theories. We review characteristic age and gender differences related to OCD from this aspect. The evolutionary approach to OCD is important in understanding the background factors, development and symptoms of OCD, which mean new tools in the prevention and treatment of this disorder.

  7. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2010-2015. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census...

  8. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2010-2016. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census...

  9. Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: Density of Stocking Control; Eugene, Oregon; October 13-15, 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack H. Usher; Daniel B. Jones; A. R. Stage; Benjamin A. Roach; Gilbert B. Schubert; Darrell W. Crawford; Gilbert H. Schubert; Walter Fox; Edward A. Smith; Richard E. Lowrey Sofes; Richard F. Watt

    1976-01-01

    The 1976 National Silviculture Workshop was held in Eugene, Oregon, on October 13-15, 1976. The objectives were to discuss second growth management of individual stands, with particular emphasis on the control of stand density.

  10. Using the Leaderless Group Discussion Technique for the Selection of Residence Hall Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Trudy W.; McCormick, Jane E.

    1969-01-01

    Describes successful effort to involve head residents in selection responsibilities. Discusses use of Record of Previous Leadership Experience, behavior ratings adapted from Interview and LGD Rating Scale (T. W. Banta) recommendation from head resident as selection criteria. (CJ)

  11. The analysis of individual Visegrad group members’ agrarian export sensitivity in relation to selected macroeconomic aggregations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Svatoš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the development of agricultural trade of the countries of the Visegrad Group with emphasis on development of the value of agricultural exports of the individual countries. The subject matter of the analysis is the sensitivity of the commodity structure of agricultural exports of individual countries and the identification of aggregations that are the least and the most sensitive to changes to the external and internal economic environment. From the conducted research, agricultural trade in the V4 countries was found to have developed very dynamically from 1993 to 2008, while the commodity structure of exports has constantly narrowed as the degree of specialization of the individual countries has increased (this applies especially to the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary. From the results of analysis of sensitivity to changes of selected variables relating to the development of the value of agricultural exports of the individual V4 countries, it appears that the aggregations that react most sensitively to changes are those that are the subject of re-exports, followed by the aggregations that are characterized by a high degree of added value. In general it can be said that products of agricultural primary production exhibit less sensitivity in comparison with grocery industry products. This is confirmed by the general trend arising from the very nature of consumer behaviour.

  12. Using selective chromogenic plates to optimize isolation of group B Streptococcus in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Mattei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS remains the leading cause of severe bacterial infections (sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia in neonates. We compared the detection of GBS from recto-vaginal swabs on blood agar and two chromogenic media and evaluated their antibiotic susceptibility. A total of 1351 swabs were taken from pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation. Following enrichment in Todd Hewitt broth + nalidixic acid and colistin, the samples were plated on Columbia CNA agar (CNA, chromID Strepto B agar (STRB and Granada Agar (GRAN, respectively. GBS were found in 22.4% of recto-vaginal swabs from pregnant women. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of GBS detection were 88%, 88%, 81% and 96% for CNA, 99%, 97%, 90% and 99% for STRB and 94%, 99%, 98% e 99% for GRAN; Cohen’s k index concordances for CNA, STREB and GRAN were 0.68, 0.92 and 0.96, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, whereas resistances of erythromycin and clindamycin were 40% and 42%, respectively. To conclude, selective broth enrichment combined with chromogenic plates is recommended for GBS screening in pregnant women.

  13. Herbivorous insect response to group selection cutting in a southeastern bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; Christopher E. Moorman.

    2005-04-01

    ABSTRACT Malaise and pitfall traps were used to sample herbivorous insects in canopy gaps created by group-selection cutting in a bottomland hardwood forest in South Carolina. The traps were placed at the centers, edges, and in the forest adjacent to gaps of different sizes (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha) and ages (1 and 7 yr old) during four sampling periods in 2001. Overall, the abundance and species richness of insect herbivores were greater at the centers of young gaps than at the edge of young gaps or in the forest surrounding young gaps. There were no differences in abundance or species richness among old gap locations (i.e., centers, edges, and forest), and we collected significantly more insects in young gaps than old gaps. The insect communities in old gaps were more similar to the forests surrounding them than young gap communities were to their respective forest locations, but the insect communities in the two forests locations (surrounding young and old gaps) had the highest percent similarity of all. Although both abundance and richness increased in the centers of young gaps with increasing gap size, these differences were not significant.Weattribute the increased numbers of herbivorous insects to the greater abundance of herbaceous plants available in young gaps.

  14. Gibbs Free Energy of Formation for Selected Platinum Group Minerals (PGM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiros Olivotos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic data for platinum group (Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pd and Pt minerals are very limited. The present study is focused on the calculation of the Gibbs free energy of formation (ΔfG° for selected PGM occurring in layered intrusions and ophiolite complexes worldwide, applying available experimental data on their constituent elements at their standard state (ΔG = G(species − ΔG(elements, using the computer program HSC Chemistry software 6.0. The evaluation of the accuracy of the calculation method was made by the calculation of (ΔGf of rhodium sulfide phases. The calculated values were found to be ingood agreement with those measured in the binary system (Rh + S as a function of temperature by previous authors (Jacob and Gupta (2014. The calculated Gibbs free energy (ΔfG° followed the order RuS2 < (Ir,OsS2 < (Pt, PdS < (Pd, PtTe2, increasing from compatible to incompatible noble metals and from sulfides to tellurides.

  15. Fuzzy mutual information based grouping and new fitness function for PSO in selection of miRNAs in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Jayanta Kumar; Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2017-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are one of the important regulators of cell division and also responsible for cancer development. Among the discovered miRNAs, not all are important for cancer detection. In this regard a fuzzy mutual information (FMI) based grouping and miRNA selection method (FMIGS) is developed to identify the miRNAs responsible for a particular cancer. First, the miRNAs are ranked and divided into several groups. Then the most important group is selected among the generated groups. Both the steps viz., ranking of miRNAs and selection of the most relevant group of miRNAs, are performed using FMI. Here the number of groups is automatically determined by the grouping method. After the selection process, redundant miRNAs are removed from the selected set of miRNAs as per user's necessity. In a part of the investigation we proposed a FMI based particle swarm optimization (PSO) method for selecting relevant miRNAs, where FMI is used as a fitness function to determine the fitness of the particles. The effectiveness of FMIGS and FMI based PSO is tested on five data sets and their efficiency in selecting relevant miRNAs are demonstrated. The superior performance of FMIGS to some existing methods are established and the biological significance of the selected miRNAs is observed by the findings of the biological investigation and publicly available pathway analysis tools. The source code related to our investigation is available at http://www.jayanta.droppages.com/FMIGS.html. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Silyl-protective groups influencing the reactivity and selectivity in glycosylations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bols, Mikael; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Silyl groups such as TBDPS, TBDMS, TIPS or TMS are well-known and widely used alcohol protective groups in organic chemistry. Cyclic silylene protective groups are also becoming increasingly popular. In carbohydrate chemistry silyl protective groups have frequently been used primarily...... as an orthogonal protective group to the more commonly used acyl and benzyl protective groups. However, silyl protective groups have significantly different electronic and steric requirements than acyl and alkyl protective groups, which particularly becomes important when two or more neighboring alcohols are silyl...

  17. On cooperative and efficient overlay network evolution based on a group selection pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Akihiro; Wang, Yufeng

    2010-04-01

    In overlay networks, the interplay between network structure and dynamics remains largely unexplored. In this paper, we study dynamic coevolution between individual rational strategies (cooperative or defect) and the overlay network structure, that is, the interaction between peer's local rational behaviors and the emergence of the whole network structure. We propose an evolutionary game theory (EGT)-based overlay topology evolution scheme to drive a given overlay into the small-world structure (high global network efficiency and average clustering coefficient). Our contributions are the following threefold: From the viewpoint of peers' local interactions, we explicitly consider the peer's rational behavior and introduce a link-formation game to characterize the social dilemma of forming links in an overlay network. Furthermore, in the evolutionary link-formation phase, we adopt a simple economic process: Each peer keeps one link to a cooperative neighbor in its neighborhood, which can slightly speed up the convergence of cooperation and increase network efficiency; from the viewpoint of the whole network structure, our simulation results show that the EGT-based scheme can drive an arbitrary overlay network into a fully cooperative and efficient small-world structure. Moreover, we compare our scheme with a search-based economic model of network formation and illustrate that our scheme can achieve the experimental and analytical results in the latter model. In addition, we also graphically illustrate the final overlay network structure; finally, based on the group selection model and evolutionary set theory, we theoretically obtain the approximate threshold of cost and draw the conclusion that the small value of the average degree and the large number of the total peers in an overlay network facilitate the evolution of cooperation.

  18. On cooperative and efficient overlay network evolution based on a group selection pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufeng; Nakao, Akihiro

    2010-06-01

    In overlay networks, the interplay between network structure and dynamics remains largely unexplored. In this paper, we study dynamic coevolution between individual rational strategies (cooperative or defect) and the overlay network structure, that is, the interaction between peer's local rational behaviors and the emergence of the whole network structure. We propose an evolutionary game theory (EGT)-based overlay topology evolution scheme to drive a given overlay into the small-world structure (high global network efficiency and average clustering coefficient). Our contributions are the following threefold: From the viewpoint of peers' local interactions, we explicitly consider the peer's rational behavior and introduce a link-formation game to characterize the social dilemma of forming links in an overlay network. Furthermore, in the evolutionary link-formation phase, we adopt a simple economic process: Each peer keeps one link to a cooperative neighbor in its neighborhood, which can slightly speed up the convergence of cooperation and increase network efficiency; from the viewpoint of the whole network structure, our simulation results show that the EGT-based scheme can drive an arbitrary overlay network into a fully cooperative and efficient small-world structure. Moreover, we compare our scheme with a search-based economic model of network formation and illustrate that our scheme can achieve the experimental and analytical results in the latter model. In addition, we also graphically illustrate the final overlay network structure; finally, based on the group selection model and evolutionary set theory, we theoretically obtain the approximate threshold of cost and draw the conclusion that the small value of the average degree and the large number of the total peers in an overlay network facilitate the evolution of cooperation.

  19. Sulawesi Onthophagus: seven new species in select groups (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, J; Huijbregts, J

    2017-03-05

    Eleven species in five small operational groups of the scarab genus Onthophagus Latreille, 1802 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) are treated, all from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi and nearby smaller islands. These groups are defined, and their species are keyed, described, and illustrated, including the following seven new species: Onthophagus bisscrutator (O. scrutator group); O. bongkudai (O. holosericus group); O. sopu (O. manguliensis group); O. hollowayi, O. seseba, and O. annulopunctatus (O. seseba group); and O. begoniophilus (O. deflexicollis group). Lectotypes are designated for Onthophagus scrutator Harold, 1877 and O. holosericus Harold, 1877.

  20. Selective versus non-selective culture medium for group B streptococcus detection in pregnancies complicated by preterm labor or preterm-premature rupture of membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luís Nomura

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify group B streptococcus (GBS colonization rates and compare detection efficiency of selective versus non-selective culture media and anorectal versus vaginal cultures in women with preterm labor and preterm-premature rupture of membranes (PROM. A prospective cohort study of 203 women was performed. Two vaginal and two anorectal samples from each woman were collected using sterile swabs. Two swabs (one anorectal and one vaginal were placed separately in Stuart transport media and cultured in blood-agar plates for 48 hours; the other two swabs were inoculated separately in Todd-Hewitt selective media for 24 hours and then subcultured in blood-agar plates. Final GBS identification was made by the CAMP test. A hundred thrity-two cultures out of 812 were positive. The maternal colonization rate was 27.6%. Colonization rates were 30% for preterm PROM and 25.2% for preterm labor. Todd-Hewitt selective medium detected 87.5% and non-selective medium 60.7% GBS-positive women. Vaginal samples and anorectal samples had the same detection rate of 80.3%. Anorectal selective cultures detected 75% of carriers; 39% of GBS-positive women were detected only in selective medium. A combined vaginal-anorectal selective culture is appropriate for GBS screening in this population, minimizing laboratory costs.

  1. Forest adaptation to global climate change through silvicultural treatments and genetic improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnum, P.

    1991-01-01

    The research being conducted by one forest products company into silviculture and plant genetics as a response to future problems caused by the greenhouse effect is reviewed. The company's research priorities have been adjusted to be technologically prepared for greenhouse-effect warming, including the effects of fire, shorter planting seasons, insect problems, and drought-related mortality. The review focuses on research into improving drought-related mortality by developing drought-resistant trees and then growing such trees by making use of biotechnological techniques such as somatic embryogenesis. In silvicultural research, emphasis is placed on quantifying how thinning can mitigate the effects of drought by stand density control. In genetics and physiology research, the applicability of greenhouse studies of drought resistance to stands of older trees was tested. This research led to an examination of the role of root systems and identification of possible characteristics to screen for in genetic tests. 2 refs

  2. Group IV all-semiconductor spintronics. Materials aspects and optical spin selection rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Narayan

    2012-04-03

    In the scope of the present thesis various aspects for the realization of spintronic applications based on group IV semiconductors are discussed. This work comprises a refined material characterization of the magnetic semiconductor GeMn. We furthermore present efforts to utilize this material as spin injector for a Si-based optical spintronic device. Applying transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, we are able to resolve a vertical anisotropy in the self-assembly, leading to the stacking of well-defined clusters in the growth direction. Three-dimensional atom distribution maps confirm that clusters are built from a nonstoichiometric GeMn alloy and exhibit a high-Mn-concentration core with a decreasing Mn concentration toward a shell. An amorphous nature of the cluster cores as well as the crystallinity of the shells, coherent with the surrounding Ge lattice, are revealed in scanning transmission electron microscopy. We localize a strain field surrounding each GeMn cluster by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The importance of strain to the stacking phenomenon of the clusters becomes clear in studies of Ge/GeMn superlattice structures, where a vertical spatial correlation of clusters over 30 nm-thick Ge spacer layers is observed. We present evidence that electrical transport properties of the p-type GeMn thin films fabricated on high-resistivity Ge substrates are severely influenced by parallel conduction through the substrate. It is shown that substrate conduction persists also for wellconducting degenerate p-type reference thin films, giving rise to an effective two-layer conduction scheme. GeMn thin films fabricated on these substrates exhibit only a negligible magnetoresistance effect. Before integrating GeMn in an optical spintronic device, some key aspects important for an understanding of the optical injection and detection of carrier spins in Si and Si-based heterostructures are clarified in the second part of this thesis. In

  3. Introduction of 5'-terminal functional groups into synthetic oligonucleotides for selective immobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, Rainer; Coull, J.M.; Regnier, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides terminating in a 5'-primary amine group are synthesized using solid-phase supported phosphoramidite chemistry. The 5'-terminal amine group in the deprotected oligomers is further derivatized with either succinic anhydride to give 5'-carboxylic acid or with

  4. Suitability of close-to-nature silviculture for adapting temperate European forests to climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Brang, P.; Spathelf, P.; Larsen, J.B.; Bauhus, J.; Boncina, A.; Chauvin, C.; Drössler, L.; Garcia-Güemes, C.; Heiri, C.; Kerr, G.; Lexer, M.J.; Mason, B.; Mohren, F.; Mühlethaler, U.; Nocentini, S.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In many parts of Europe, close-to-nature silviculture (CNS) has been widely advocated as being the best approach for managing forests to cope with future climate change. In this review, we identify and evaluate six principles for enhancing the adaptive capacity of European temperate forests in a changing climate: (1) increase tree species richness, (2) increase structural diversity, (3) maintain and increase genetic variation within tree species, (4) increase resistanc...

  5. Bifunctional groups grafted polyethersulfone magnetic beads for selective sequestration of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Sumana; Aggarwal, S.K.; Pandey, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    The present study involves synthesis of polyethersulfone (PES) beads grafted with two different monomers viz. 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate phosphoric acid ester (HEMP) and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid (AMPS) by photo-induced free radical polymerization method. The selection of bifunctional polymer was based on our previous studies, which indicated its efficacy for selective preconcentration of Pu from 3-4 mol L -1 HNO 3 . The HEMP-co-AMPS grafted PES beads were used for selective extraction of plutonium from dissolver solution

  6. Pressure to drink but not to smoke: disentangling selection and socialization in adolescent peer networks and peer groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuru, Noona; Burk, William J; Laursen, Brett; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-12-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants identified three school friends and described their alcohol and tobacco use on two occasions one year apart. Actor-based models simultaneously examined changes in peer network ties and changes in individual behaviors for all participants within each school. Multi-level analyses examined changes in individual behaviors for adolescents entering new peer groups and adolescents in stable peer groups, both of which were embedded within the school-based peer networks. Similar results emerged from both analytic methods: Selection and socialization contributed to similarity of alcohol use, but only selection was a factor in tobacco use. Copyright © 2010 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. TREE DIAMETER GROWTH FOLLOWING SILVICULTURAL TREATMENTS IN A SEMI-DECIDUOUS SECONDARY FOREST IN CENTRAL BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Venturoli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Cerrado biome of Brazil, savannas and dry forests are intimately linked and form mosaics. These forests are composed of species of high commercial value, well accepted in the timber market, which causes intensive deforestation on the remaining vegetation. Thus, the management of these forests is an important alternative to reduce deforestation in the remaining vegetation. The objective of this study was to analyze the response of tree species in relation to silvicultural treatments of competition and liana cutting in a semi-deciduous forest in Central Brazil. The results showed that community basal area increased 24% over 4.8 years and the median periodic annual increment in diameter was about 20% higher in plots with silvicultural treatments: 2.9 mm.yr-1 in the control compared to 3.2 mm.yr-1 to 3.6 mm.yr-1 between treatments. This study demonstrated that it is possible to increase the rates of radial growth through silvicultural techniques.

  8. Selective polymerization catalysis: controlling the metal chain end group to prepare block copolyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqing; Romain, Charles; Williams, Charlotte K

    2015-09-30

    Selective catalysis is used to prepare block copolyesters by combining ring-opening polymerization of lactones and ring-opening copolymerization of epoxides/anhydrides. By using a dizinc complex with mixtures of up to three different monomers and controlling the chemistry of the Zn-O(polymer chain) it is possible to select for a particular polymerization route and thereby control the composition of block copolyesters.

  9. ABO blood groups and oral premalignancies: A clinical study in selected Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhateja, S; Arora, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ABO blood group antigens are present on the surface of red blood cells and various epithelial cells. As the majority of human cancers are derived from epithelial cells, changes in blood group antigens constitute an important aspect of human cancers. The aim of the study was to establish clinical usefulness of ABO blood group as a predisposing factor in early diagnosis and management of patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 50 control and 50 oral precancer (25 leukoplakia and 25 Oral Submucous Fibrosis) confirmed by histopathologic examination. All samples were subjected to blood group testing and their prevalence was compared by Z-test using STATA version 8. Results: The "A" blood group was prevalent among the precancerous group. Significant differences on prevalences of blood groups were found (P blood group. Conclusion: Blood group type should be considered along with other risk factors to understand the individual patient's risk and further studies in larger samples with inclusion of Rh factor is needed to elucidate the relationship with ABO blood group types.

  10. Survival benefits select for group living in a social spider despite reproductive costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, T.; Coates, K.S.; Birkhofer, K.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of cooperation requires benefits of group living to exceed costs. Hence, some components of fitness are expected to increase with increasing group size, whereas others may decrease because of competition among group members. The social spiders provide an excellent system to investig......The evolution of cooperation requires benefits of group living to exceed costs. Hence, some components of fitness are expected to increase with increasing group size, whereas others may decrease because of competition among group members. The social spiders provide an excellent system...... in phylogenetically distant families and appears to be accompanied by a transition to a system of continuous intra-colony mating and extreme inbreeding. The benefits of group living in such systems should therefore be substantial. We investigated the effect of group size on fitness components of reproduction...... decreased with increasing group size. Mean individual fitness, estimated as LRS and calculated from five components of reproduction and survival, was maximized for intermediate- to large-sized colonies. Group living in these spiders thus entails a net reproductive cost, presumably because of an increase...

  11. Redshift Survey of Galaxies around a Selected Sample of Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Reinaldo R.; Ribeiro, André L. B.; Capelato, Hugo V.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    We report the results of a spectroscopic survey of faint galaxies in the regions surrounding Hickson compact groups. Our sample is composed of 17 groups within 9000 km s-1. The spectra were taken at the prime focus of the Tololo 4 m telescope, using the ARGUS fiber-fed spectrograph. From these observations, redshifts were determined for the faint galaxies previously identified by de Carvalho, Ribeiro, & Zepf in the surroundings of the groups. Statistical methods were applied to the resultant catalog in order to determine the kinematical structure of each group. This analysis confirms the idea that the Hickson sample of compact groups contains a wide variety of projection and dynamical configurations. Our results demonstrate the necessity of new spectroscopic surveys around compact groups in order to assess their complete velocity distribution.

  12. Optimizing trial design in pharmacogenetics research: comparing a fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection design on sample size requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessen, Ruud; van der Baan, Frederieke; Groenwold, Rolf; Egberts, Antoine; Klungel, Olaf; Grobbee, Diederick; Knol, Mirjam; Roes, Kit

    2013-01-01

    Two-stage clinical trial designs may be efficient in pharmacogenetics research when there is some but inconclusive evidence of effect modification by a genomic marker. Two-stage designs allow to stop early for efficacy or futility and can offer the additional opportunity to enrich the study population to a specific patient subgroup after an interim analysis. This study compared sample size requirements for fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection designs with equal overall power and control of the family-wise type I error rate. The designs were evaluated across scenarios that defined the effect sizes in the marker positive and marker negative subgroups and the prevalence of marker positive patients in the overall study population. Effect sizes were chosen to reflect realistic planning scenarios, where at least some effect is present in the marker negative subgroup. In addition, scenarios were considered in which the assumed 'true' subgroup effects (i.e., the postulated effects) differed from those hypothesized at the planning stage. As expected, both two-stage designs generally required fewer patients than a fixed parallel group design, and the advantage increased as the difference between subgroups increased. The adaptive selection design added little further reduction in sample size, as compared with the group sequential design, when the postulated effect sizes were equal to those hypothesized at the planning stage. However, when the postulated effects deviated strongly in favor of enrichment, the comparative advantage of the adaptive selection design increased, which precisely reflects the adaptive nature of the design. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. A grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of hydrogen technologiess in Life Cycle Sustainability perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzardo, Alessandro; Ren, Jingzheng; Mazzi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of the best renewable energy technology (including hydrogen) using a life cycle sustainability perspective. The traditional grey relational analysis has been modified to better address...... using the proposed methodology, electrolysis of water technology by hydropower has been considered to be the best technology for hydrogen production according to the decision-making group....

  14. Minority Groups in Anglo-America: An Introduction and Bibliography of Selected Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterman, Gordon

    As a result of a resolution of the Association of Christian School Administrators this paper was produced on minorities in the United States and Canada. The groups considered here are not only the racial groups, but the various religious sects in both countries. Major emphasis, in terms of numbers of resources discussed or listed, is on the…

  15. Young Children Enforce Social Norms Selectively Depending on the Violator's Group Affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marco F. H.; Rakoczy, Hannes; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To become cooperative members of their cultural groups, developing children must follow their group's social norms. But young children are not just blind norm followers, they are also active norm enforcers, for example, protesting and correcting when someone plays a conventional game the "wrong" way. In two studies, we asked whether young children…

  16. A Combined group EA-PROMETHEE method for a supplier selection problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Rezaee Kelidbari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the important decisions which impacts all firms’ activities is the supplier selection problem. Since the 1950s, several works have addressed this problem by treating different aspects and instances. In this paper, a combined multiple criteria decision making (MCDM technique (EA-PROMETHEE has been applied to implement a proper decision making. To this aim, after reviewing the theoretical background regarding to supplier selection, the extension analysis (EA is used to determine the importance of criteria and PROMETHEE for appraisal of suppliers based on the criteria. An empirical example illustrated the proposed approach.

  17. Determinants of Individual Academic Achievement - Group Selectivity Effects Have Many Dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwick, Th.

    2013-01-01

    This paper measures determinants of individual academic achievements. In addition to an extensive list of individual characteristics, skills obtained during study and socio-economic background factors, many dimensions of selectivity into academic study subjects are shown to drive individual academic

  18. Determinants of individual academic achievement - Group selectivity effects have many dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwick, Th.

    2013-01-01

    This paper measures determinants of individual academic achievements. In addition to an extensive list of individual characteristics, skills obtained during study and socio-economic background factors, many dimensions of selectivity into academic study subjects are shown to drive individual academic

  19. Role of Gestalt grouping in selective attention: Evidence from the Stroop task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, M.J.M.; Roelofs, A.P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Selective attention has been intensively studied using the Stroop task. Evidence suggests that Stroop interference in a color-naming task arises partly because of visual attention sharing between color and word: Removing the target color after 150 msec reduces interference (Neumann, 1986). Moreover,

  20. Selective auditory grouping by zebra finches: testing the iambic-trochaic law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Michelle; Hubert, Jeroen; Ten Cate, Carel

    2017-07-01

    Humans have a strong tendency to spontaneously group visual or auditory stimuli together in larger patterns. One of these perceptual grouping biases is formulated as the iambic/trochaic law, where humans group successive tones alternating in pitch and intensity as trochees (high-low and loud-soft) and alternating in duration as iambs (short-long). The grouping of alternations in pitch and intensity into trochees is a human universal and is also present in one non-human animal species, rats. The perceptual grouping of sounds alternating in duration seems to be affected by native language in humans and has so far not been found among animals. In the current study, we explore to which extent these perceptual biases are present in a songbird, the zebra finch. Zebra finches were trained to discriminate between short strings of pure tones organized as iambs and as trochees. One group received tones that alternated in pitch, a second group heard tones alternating in duration, and for a third group, tones alternated in intensity. Those zebra finches that showed sustained correct discrimination were next tested with longer, ambiguous strings of alternating sounds. The zebra finches in the pitch condition categorized ambiguous strings of alternating tones as trochees, similar to humans. However, most of the zebra finches in the duration and intensity condition did not learn to discriminate between training stimuli organized as iambs and trochees. This study shows that the perceptual bias to group tones alternating in pitch as trochees is not specific to humans and rats, but may be more widespread among animals.

  1. Magnitude of physiological curvatures of the spine and the incidence of contractures of selected muscle groups in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olszewska Elżbieta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of contractures of selected muscle groups with respect to the magnitude of the physiological curvatures of the spine in young men with above-average levels of physical activity.

  2. Magnitude of physiological curvatures of the spine and the incidence of contractures of selected muscle groups in students

    OpenAIRE

    Olszewska Elżbieta; Tabor Piotr; Czarniecka Renata

    2018-01-01

    Study aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of contractures of selected muscle groups with respect to the magnitude of the physiological curvatures of the spine in young men with above-average levels of physical activity.

  3. Pressure to Drink but Not to Smoke: Disentangling Selection and Socialization in Adolescent Peer Networks and Peer Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuru, Noona; Burk, William J.; Laursen, Brett; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants identified three school friends and described…

  4. Why kin and group selection models may not be enough to explain human other-regarding behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Models of kin or group selection usually feature only one possible fitness transfer. The phenotypes are either to make this transfer or not to make it and for any given fitness transfer, Hamilton's rule predicts which of the two phenotypes will spread. In this article we allow for the possibility

  5. The Effects of Visible Cheese on the Selection and Consumption of Food Groups to Encourage in Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Joseph E.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Smith, Bryan K.; Gibson, Cheryl A.; Mayo, Matt; Lee, Robert; Lynch, Anthony; Sallee, Tara; Cook-Weins, Galen; Washburn, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects of visible cheese on selection and consumption of food groups to encourage (FGTE) in middle school students. Methods: Study 1 was conducted in three middle schools with 145 students (Boys=67, Girls=78, 30% minorities). The regular monthly menus were altered to…

  6. Pressure to drink but not to smoke: Disentangling selection and socialization in adolescent peer networks and peer groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiuru, N.; Burk, W.J.; Laursen, B.; Salmela-Aro, K.; Nurmi, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants

  7. Short communication: Calving site selection of multiparous, group-housed dairy cows is influenced by site of a previous calving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvang, Maria Vilain; Nielsen, B.L.; Herskin, Mette S.

    2017-01-01

    A calving cow and her newborn calf appear to have an attracting effect on periparturient cows, which may potentially influence the functionality of future motivation-based calving pen designs. In this pilot study we examined whether calving site selection of group-housed Holstein dairy cows...

  8. Guidance on Selecting Age Groups for Monitoring and Assessing Childhood Exposures to Environmental Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document recommends a set of age groupings based on current understanding of differences in lifestage behavior and anatomy and physiology that can serve as a starting set for consideration by Agency risk assessors and researchers.

  9. Nitro group substitution effects in selected β- and γ-quinoline derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslankiewicz, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The quinolines nitration reaction have been investigated by means of 1 H NMR. The reaction products have been identified and influence of nitro group localization discussed on the base of chemical shifts and coupling constants observed in NMR spectra

  10. Perceived barriers to smoking cessation in selected vulnerable groups: a systematic review of the qualitative and quantitative literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyman, Laura; Bonevski, Billie; Paul, Christine; Bryant, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify barriers that are common and unique to six selected vulnerable groups: low socioeconomic status; Indigenous; mental illness and substance abuse; homeless; prisoners; and at-risk youth. Design A systematic review was carried out to identify the perceived barriers to smoking cessation within six vulnerable groups. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycInfo were searched using keywords and MeSH terms from each database's inception published prior to March 2014. Study selection Studies that provided either qualitative or quantitative (ie, longitudinal, cross-sectional or cohort surveys) descriptions of self-reported perceived barriers to quitting smoking in one of the six aforementioned vulnerable groups were included. Data extraction Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data. Results 65 eligible papers were identified: 24 with low socioeconomic groups, 16 with Indigenous groups, 18 involving people with a mental illness, 3 with homeless groups, 2 involving prisoners and 1 involving at-risk youth. One study identified was carried out with participants who were homeless and addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs. Barriers common to all vulnerable groups included: smoking for stress management, lack of support from health and other service providers, and the high prevalence and acceptability of smoking in vulnerable communities. Unique barriers were identified for people with a mental illness (eg, maintenance of mental health), Indigenous groups (eg, cultural and historical norms), prisoners (eg, living conditions), people who are homeless (eg, competing priorities) and at-risk youth (eg, high accessibility of tobacco). Conclusions Vulnerable groups experience common barriers to smoking cessation, in addition to barriers that are unique to specific vulnerable groups. Individual-level, community-level and social network-level interventions are priority areas for future smoking cessation interventions within

  11. Selective incivility: immigrant groups experience subtle workplace discrimination at different rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Franciska; Johnston, Claire; Binggeli, Steve; Maggiori, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Immigrants play an increasingly important role in local labor markets. Not only do they grow steadily in number but also in cultural, educational, and skill diversity, underlining the necessity to distinguish between immigrant groups when studying discrimination against immigrants. We examined immigrant employees' subtle discrimination experiences in a representative sample in Switzerland, controlling for dispositional influences. Results showed that mainly members of highly competitive immigrant groups, from immediate neighbor countries, experienced workplace incivility and that these incivility experiences were related to higher likelihoods of perceived discrimination at work. This research confirms recent accounts that successful but disliked groups are particularly likely to experience subtle interpersonal discrimination. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Characterization of Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Lancefield group C) from human and selected animal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnham, M.; Cole, G.; Efstratiou, A.; Tagg, J. R.; Skjold, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    We assembled an international collection of strains from sporadic and epidemic human infection with Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Lancefield group C) for laboratory study. Cultural and physiological characteristics of the isolates were determined, including biotyping with the API 20 STREP test kit and susceptibility testing with penicillin, erythromycin and tetracycline. The strains were examined for bacteriocin production and sensitivity and typed with a specially developed group-C streptococcal bacteriophage system incorporating a panel of 14 phages. Results of these tests gave useful discrimination between many of the strains: differences were shown between each of the major outbreak strains, including those complicated by post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Serious group C streptococcal infection may be caused by S. zooepidemicus and isolates should be identified to species level; the application of a typing scheme such as this may help to distinguish epidemiological patterns of infection. PMID:3556444

  13. Energy efficiency advocacy groups: A study of selected interactive efforts and independent initiatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

    1994-03-01

    Non-utility groups participate in a myriad of activities--initiated by themselves and others--aimed at influencing the policies and actions of utilities and their regulators related to Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) and Demand-Side Management (DSM). Some of these activities are not directed toward a particular regulatory body or utility but are designed to influence public knowledge and acceptance of IRP and DSM. Other activities involve interaction with a particular utility or regulatory body. The traditional forum for this interaction is an adversarial debate (i.e., litigation or regulatory intervention) over the merits of a utility`s plan or proposed action. However, an increasingly common forum is one in which non-utility groups and utilities cooperatively develop plans, policies, and/or programs. Arrangements of this type are referred to in this report as ``interactive efforts``. This report presents the findings derived from ten case studies of energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAG) activities to influence the use of cost-effective DSM and to promote IRP; nine of these ten cases involve some form of interactive effort and all of them also include other EEAG activities. The goal of this research is not to measure the success of individual activities of the various groups, but to glean from a collective examination of their activities an understanding of the efficacy of various types of interactive efforts and other EEAG activities and of the contextual and procedural factors that influence their outcomes.

  14. The Preferences of a Selected Group of Older Readers for Five Biographical Short Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotter, Molly Wilson

    The reading interests of a group of older adults were examined. Subjects were 16 adults between the ages of 50 and 85 who read five stories from "Readers' Digest" short story collections and who responded to a questionnaire about their preferences for the stories, their reading habits and interests, and the appealing elements of the stories. The…

  15. Information about old growth for selected forest type groups in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy E. Tyrrell; Gregory J. Nowacki; David S. Buckley; Elizabeth A. Nauertz; Jeffrey N. Niese; Jeanette L. Rollinger; John C. Zasada; John C. Zasada

    1998-01-01

    Compiles information about old-growth attributes for nine forest type groups that occur in the eastern United States. A range of values for each old-growth attribute for each forest type is summarized regionally from published and unpublished sources.

  16. Disgust sensitivity selectively predicts attitudes toward groups that threaten (or uphold) traditional sexual morality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crawford, J.; Inbar, Y.; Malony, V.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has linked disgust sensitivity to negative attitudes toward gays and lesbians. We extend this existing research by examining the extent to which disgust sensitivity predicts attitudes more generally toward groups that threaten or uphold traditional sexual morality. In a sample of

  17. Criteria for the Selection of Reference Groups in the Statistical Evaluation of Tumor Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubec jr., L.; Topolčan, O.; Pikner, R.; Pecen, Ladislav; Holubec sen., L.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, 1B (2002), s. 531 ISSN 0250-7005. [International Hamburg Symposium on Tumor Markers /11./. 27.01.2002-29.01.2002, Hamburg] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : reference groups * tumor markers Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Selection, Availability, and Opportunity: The Conditional Effect of Poverty on Terrorist Group Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Poverty is often identified as a determinant of terrorist group participation, but existing research reveals mixed support for this relationship. Some studies find that macroeconomic decline is associated with increased production of terrorists, but micro-level research suggests terrorists have above average socioeconomic status and educational…

  19. Lexical Cohesion in Students' Argumentative Essay among a Select Group of Filipino College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, Josephine B.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the lexical devices used by undergraduate students in their argumentative text using Halliday and Hasan (1976) and Halliday's (2004) taxonomy. One hundred forty-eight argumentative essays were analyzed. The essays underwent interrating by three independent raters using a 20-point rubric and were grouped according to rating.…

  20. Linguistic Multi-Attribute Group Decision Making with Risk Preferences and Its Use in Low-Carbon Tourism Destination Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Zhou-Jing

    2017-09-17

    Low-carbon tourism plays an important role in carbon emission reduction and environmental protection. Low-carbon tourism destination selection often involves multiple conflicting and incommensurate attributes or criteria and can be modelled as a multi-attribute decision-making problem. This paper develops a framework to solve multi-attribute group decision-making problems, where attribute evaluation values are provided as linguistic terms and the attribute weight information is incomplete. In order to obtain a group risk preference captured by a linguistic term set with triangular fuzzy semantic information, a nonlinear programming model is established on the basis of individual risk preferences. We first convert individual linguistic-term-based decision matrices to their respective triangular fuzzy decision matrices, which are then aggregated into a group triangular fuzzy decision matrix. Based on this group decision matrix and the incomplete attribute weight information, a linear program is developed to find an optimal attribute weight vector. A detailed procedure is devised for tackling linguistic multi-attribute group decision making problems. A low-carbon tourism destination selection case study is offered to illustrate how to use the developed group decision-making model in practice.

  1. Linguistic Multi-Attribute Group Decision Making with Risk Preferences and Its Use in Low-Carbon Tourism Destination Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Zhou-Jing

    2017-01-01

    Low-carbon tourism plays an important role in carbon emission reduction and environmental protection. Low-carbon tourism destination selection often involves multiple conflicting and incommensurate attributes or criteria and can be modelled as a multi-attribute decision-making problem. This paper develops a framework to solve multi-attribute group decision-making problems, where attribute evaluation values are provided as linguistic terms and the attribute weight information is incomplete. In order to obtain a group risk preference captured by a linguistic term set with triangular fuzzy semantic information, a nonlinear programming model is established on the basis of individual risk preferences. We first convert individual linguistic-term-based decision matrices to their respective triangular fuzzy decision matrices, which are then aggregated into a group triangular fuzzy decision matrix. Based on this group decision matrix and the incomplete attribute weight information, a linear program is developed to find an optimal attribute weight vector. A detailed procedure is devised for tackling linguistic multi-attribute group decision making problems. A low-carbon tourism destination selection case study is offered to illustrate how to use the developed group decision-making model in practice. PMID:28926985

  2. SURVEY OF SELECTED PROCEDURES FOR THE INDIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE GROUP REFRACTIVE INDEX OF AIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Dvořáček

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the research was to evaluate numeric procedures of the indirect determination of the group refractive index of air and to choose the suitable ones for requirements of ordinary and high accuracy distance measurement in geodesy and length metrology. For this purpose, 10 existing computation methods were derived from various authors’ original publications and all were analysed for wide intervals of wavelengths and atmospheric parameters. The determination of the phase and the group refractive indices are essential parts in the evaluation of the first velocity corrections of laser interferometers and electronic distance meters. The validity of modern procedures was tested with respect to updated CIPM-2007 equations of the density of air. The refraction model of Leica AT401 laser tracker was analysed.

  3. Selected source term topics. Report to CSNI by an OECD/NEA Group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    CSNI Report 136 summarizes the results of the work performed by the Group of Experts on the Source Term and Environmental Consequences (PWG4) during the period extending from 1983 and 1986. This report is complementary to Part 1, 'Technical Status of the Source Term' of CSNI Report 135, 'Report to CSNI on Source Term Assessment, Containment atmosphere control systems, and accident consequences'; it considers in detail a number of very specific issues thought to be important in the source term area. It consists of: an executive summary (prepared by the Chairman of the Group), a section on conclusions and recommendations, and five technical chapters (fission product chemistry in the primary circuit of a LWR during severe accidents; resuspension/re-entrainment of aerosols in LWRs following a meltdown accident; iodine chemistry under severe accident conditions; effects of combustion, steam explosions and pressurized melt ejection on fission product behaviour; radionuclide removal by pool scrubbing), a technical annex and two appendices

  4. To Make Good Decision: A Group DSS for Multiple Criteria Alternative Rank and Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen-Shu Wang; Heng-Li Yang; Shiang-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Decision making is a recursive process and usually involves multiple decision criteria. However, such multiple criteria decision making may have a problem in which partial decision criteria may conflict with each other. An information technology, such as the decision support system (DSS) and group DSS (GDSS), emerges to assist decision maker for decision-making process. Both the DSS and GDSS should integrate with a symmetrical approach to assist decision maker to take all decision criteria in...

  5. Dietary study and whole body measurements in selected groups in Norway 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerlie, A.A.; Boee, E.; Selnaes, T.D.

    1994-12-01

    This study is a continuation of a study that started in 1987. The main sources to the radiocesium intake in the different groups are almost the same compared to the previous years. The radiation dose burden to which the Norwegian population is subjected shows great variations and is dependent on the types of foods eaten. The consumption of reindeer meat and freshwater fish is of major importance. 6 refs., 9 figs., 13 tabs

  6. Ingestion of radium 226 and its evaluation in a selected population group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivan, J.; Slovak, M.; Abel, E.; Patzeltova, N.

    1976-01-01

    The activity of 226 Ra was followed in the drinking water of the West Slovakia region and in the all-day food intake. The volume activities of 226 Ra in drinking water were in the range 0 to 63 mBq.l -1 (0.0 to 1.7 pCi.l -1 ) with the mean value 9.3 mBq.l -1 (0.25 pCi.l -1 ). The average activity of 226 Ra in the food, as expressed per person and day, was 47.7 mBq (1.29 pCi). A general intake of 226 Ra by ingestion in the observed group, also calculated per person and day, was 57 mBq (1.54 pCi) on the average. The value found was used for the evaluation of the group exposure of a homogeneous group of boarders of a university canteen. The values obtained indicate an average exposure to 226 Ra. The calculated value of the annual dose equivalent of 226 Ra to the skeleton in adults was 2.48 mrem, with the corresponding dose equivalent being 0.119 rem; these values are small in view of the above mentioned annual 226 Ra intake, but are not negligible with regard to the ICRP recommendations. (author)

  7. The Complete Local Volume Groups Sample - I. Sample selection and X-ray properties of the high-richness subsample

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan; Ponman, Trevor J.; Kolokythas, Konstantinos; Raychaudhury, Somak; Babul, Arif; Vrtilek, Jan M.; David, Laurence P.; Giacintucci, Simona; Gitti, Myriam; Haines, Chris P.

    2017-12-01

    We present the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS), a statistically complete optically selected sample of 53 groups within 80 Mpc. Our goal is to combine X-ray, radio and optical data to investigate the relationship between member galaxies, their active nuclei and the hot intra-group medium (IGM). We describe sample selection, define a 26-group high-richness subsample of groups containing at least four optically bright (log LB ≥ 10.2 LB⊙) galaxies, and report the results of XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of these systems. We find that 14 of the 26 groups are X-ray bright, possessing a group-scale IGM extending at least 65 kpc and with luminosity >1041 erg s-1, while a further three groups host smaller galaxy-scale gas haloes. The X-ray bright groups have masses in the range M500 ≃ 0.5-5 × 1013 M⊙, based on system temperatures of 0.4-1.4 keV, and X-ray luminosities in the range 2-200 × 1041 erg s-1. We find that ∼53-65 per cent of the X-ray bright groups have cool cores, a somewhat lower fraction than found by previous archival surveys. Approximately 30 per cent of the X-ray bright groups show evidence of recent dynamical interactions (mergers or sloshing), and ∼35 per cent of their dominant early-type galaxies host active galactic nuclei with radio jets. We find no groups with unusually high central entropies, as predicted by some simulations, and confirm that CLoGS is in principle capable of detecting such systems. We identify three previously unrecognized groups, and find that they are either faint (LX, R500 < 1042 erg s-1) with no concentrated cool core, or highly disturbed. This leads us to suggest that ∼20 per cent of X-ray bright groups in the local universe may still be unidentified.

  8. Evaluation of the Bacti-Lab streptococci culture systems for selective recovery and identification of group A streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeburg, P W; Buckingham, J M

    1976-04-01

    Twenty-nine lots of Bacti-Lab streptococci culture plates containing nalidixic acid, neomycin, and amphotericin B were inoculated with 25 strains of group A, B, C, F, and G strepotocci, 13 strains of nonstrepotcoccal organisms representative of the throat flora, and 198 fresh clinical thorat specimens to determine the accuracy of the plates in identifying group A streptococci. With the Bacti-Lab test plates 98.87% of the beta-hemolytic streptococcal strains tested produced growth 95.51% yielding more than 50 colonies. Of the nonstreptococcal beta-hemolytic and non-beta-hemolytic organism tested, 79.54% were inhibited by the selective media. When bacitracin disks were used for presumptive identification group A streptococci from clinical thorat specimens, 12.00% false positive and 0.00% false negative results were obtained as measured by the direct flourescent-antibody and Lancefield grouping methods.

  9. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Fung, Thomas C.; Masur, Samuel H.; Kelsen, Judith R.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R.; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A.; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gerard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Laufer, Terri M.; Elson, Charles O.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory CD4+ T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. While selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells, and that MHCII+ ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on human colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells in the intestine, and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD. PMID:25908663

  10. Strategies toward protecting group-free glycosylation through selective activation of the anomeric center

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Downey, Alan Michael; Hocek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, Jun 27 (2017), s. 1239-1279 ISSN 1860-5397 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1501 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : glycosides * glycosylation * oligosaccharides * protecting groups Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2016 http://www.beilstein-journals.org/bjoc/ articles /13/123

  11. Interactions of selected policy-stakeholder groups implementing middle school science standards-based systemic reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydston, Theodore Lewis, III

    1999-12-01

    This research is an interpretive inquiry into the views and interactions of stakeholders in a district office of a large school system responsible for implementing science systemic reform. Three major sources of data were used in this research: surveys, stakeholder interviews, and autobiographical reflection on experiences as part of the reform initiative. This is an emergent research that is evident in the shift in the focus of research questions and their supporting assumptions during the research. The literature review describes standards-based reform, arguments about reform, and the major dimensions of reform research. The results of the survey of stakeholders revealed that the views among the stakeholder groups followed the system hierarchy and could be separated into two large groups; staff responsible for implementing the reform initiative and the other stakeholder groups. Each of these groups was composed of identifiable subgroups. The interviews with stakeholders revealed how their different attitudes, values, and beliefs frame the context of stakeholder interactions. An over reliance on an authoritarian view of decision-making leaves many stakeholders feeling disempowered and critical of others. This atmosphere promotes blaming, which inhibits collegial interaction. Work experiences in the district office revealed how stakeholders' unaddressed assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs promote fragmentation and competition rather than cooperation. Hidden assumptions about management by control and mandate, competition, and teaching and learning appear to restrain the interactions of stakeholders. Support of the National Science Education Standards was identified as a unifying view among the stakeholders, yet the professional development program focused on content and pedagogical knowledge without addressing stakeholder concerns and beliefs about the intended constructivist framework of the program. Stakeholders' attitudes about the issue of equity demonstrated

  12. A COPRAS-F base multi-criteria group decision making approach for site selection of wind farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Chandra Chatterjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today global warming is on the rise and the natural resources are getting consumed at a faster rate. Power consumption has increased many folds to cater the human need. Thus renewable energy resources are the only option available at this juncture. Wind energy is one of the renewable energy. Location selection for wind farm takes an important role on power generation. However, the location selection is a complex multicriteria problem due to the criteria factors which are conflicting in nature as well as uncertain. The process becomes more complex when a group of decision makers are involved in decision making. In the present study, a COPRAS (COmplex PRoportional ASsessment based multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM methodology is done under fuzzy environment with the help of multiple decision makers. More specifically, this study is aimed to focus the applicability of COPRAS-F as a strategic decision making tools to handle the group decision-making problems.

  13. AVALIAÇÃO SILVICULTURAL DE DEZ ESPÉCIES NATIVAS DA MATA ATLÂNTICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Carneiro de Mendonça

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the forecast shortage of the Amazonian forest resources is imminent the need for studies concerning the silvicultural potential of species from other regions like the Atlantic Forest. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the silvicultural characteristics of Astronium concinnum, Cariniana legalis, Goniorrhachis marginata, Kielmeyera albopunctata, Lecythi pisonis, Manilkara bella, Basiloxylon brasiliensis, Spondias venulosa, Vitex sp. and Zeyheria tuberculosa, native Atlantic Forest species occurring in Espírito Santo state. The species were planted in full sun in pure stands, with spacing of 2 x 2 m. The stands had ages between 21 and 25 at the time of final evaluation and were conducted at Vale Nature Reserve, in the municipalities of Sooretama and Linhares, ES state. The variables collected and analyzed annually were: failure of plant, plant health, breaking, forking, stem form, diameter at breast height, total height and volumetric average annual increment. The volume was estimated using models developed for each species. It was verified expressive faults planting only Cariniana legalis, Zeyheria tuberculosa and Goniorrhachis marginata. Only Vitex sp. presented phytosanitary restrictions. Spondias venulosa, Goniorrhachis marginata and Kielmeyera albopunctata stood out with the highest rates of breakage. Goniorrhachis marginata, Manilkara bella and Basiloxylon brasiliensis stood out with the lowest levels of bifurcation. Manilkara bella, Cariniana legalis e Zeyheria tuberculosa stood out as the form of a straight stem form. Spondias venulosa presented an expressive and superior to other species growth. More studies are needed to support the economic reforestation of that species, emphasis on studies of genetic improvement, silvicultural techniques, techniques of sawing and timber technology that points out the skills to use.

  14. Effects of a phosphinothricin based herbicide on selected groups of soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampulha, M E; Ferreira, M A S S; Oliveira, A

    2007-08-01

    The effects of the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium on soil microbial populations and activity were observed in a laboratory microcosms over a 40 day period. Culturable aerobic bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes, the fundamental groups of heterotrophic microorganisms, were studied. Nitrifiers, considered a very sensitive group to these compounds were also evaluated. Since herbicides have been found to inhibit decomposition of cellulose in the soil, the effects of glufosinate on cellulolytic bacteria and fungi were determined. Dehydrogenase activity as a measure of microbial activity was another parameter considered. Both stimulating and inhibitory effects on microbial populations were observed, depending on concentration of the herbicide and the period of incubation. A severe inhibiting effect of glufosinate on dehydrogenase activity was found. We concluded that the widespread use of this herbicide may have possible injurious effects on soil microorganisms and their activities. The toxicity exerted by glufosinate may lead to a shift in microbial community structure tending toward a significant loss in functional diversity. Dehydrogenase activity was shown to be an important indicator of glufosinate side-effects.

  15. Group Decision Making Process for Supplier Selection with TOPSIS Method under Interval-Valued Intuitionistic Fuzzy Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Izadikhah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Supplier selection is a fundamental issue of supply chain area that heavily contributes to the overall supply chain performance, and, also, it is a hard problem since supplier selection is typically a multicriteria group decision problem. In many practical situations, there usually exists incomplete and uncertain, and the decision makers cannot easily express their judgments on the candidates with exact and crisp values. Therefore, in this paper an extended technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS method for group decision making with Atanassov's interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy numbers is proposed to solve the supplier selection problem under incomplete and uncertain information environment. In other researches in this area, the weights of each decision maker and in many of them the weights of criteria are predetermined, but these weights have been calculated in this paper by using the decision matrix of each decision maker. Also, the normalized Hamming distance is proposed to calculate the distance between Atanassov's interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy numbers. Finally, a numerical example for supplier selection is given to clarify the main results developed in this paper.

  16. Synthesis and application of a highly selective copper ions fluorescent probe based on the coumarin group

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangjie; Liu, Xiangli; Xu, Jinhe; Ji, Liguo; Yang, Linlin; Fan, Aiying; Wang, Songjun; Wang, Qingzhi

    2018-02-01

    A highly selective copper ions fluorescent probe based on the coumarin-type Schiff base derivative 1 (probe) was produced by condensation reaction between coumarin carbohydrazide and 1H-indazole-3-carbaldehyde. The UV-vis spectroscopy showed that the maximum absorption peak of compound 1 appeared at 439 nm. In the presence of Cu2 + ions, the maximum peak decreased remarkably compared with other physiological important metal ions and a new absorption peak at 500 nm appeared. The job's plot experiments showed that complexes of 1:2 binding mode were formed in CH3CN:HEPES (3:2, v/v) solution. Compound 1 exhibited a strong blue fluorescence. Upon addition of copper ions, the fluorescence gradually decreased and reached a plateau with the fluorescence quenching rate up to 98.73%. The detection limit for Cu2 + ions was estimated to 0.384 ppm. Fluorescent microscopy experiments demonstrated that probe 1 had potential to be used to investigate biological processes involving Cu2 + ions within living cells.

  17. Analysis and selection of magnitude relations for the Working Group on Utah Earthquake Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duross, Christopher; Olig, Susan; Schwartz, David

    2015-01-01

    Prior to calculating time-independent and -dependent earthquake probabilities for faults in the Wasatch Front region, the Working Group on Utah Earthquake Probabilities (WGUEP) updated a seismic-source model for the region (Wong and others, 2014) and evaluated 19 historical regressions on earthquake magnitude (M). These regressions relate M to fault parameters for historical surface-faulting earthquakes, including linear fault length (e.g., surface-rupture length [SRL] or segment length), average displacement, maximum displacement, rupture area, seismic moment (Mo ), and slip rate. These regressions show that significant epistemic uncertainties complicate the determination of characteristic magnitude for fault sources in the Basin and Range Province (BRP). For example, we found that M estimates (as a function of SRL) span about 0.3–0.4 units (figure 1) owing to differences in the fault parameter used; age, quality, and size of historical earthquake databases; and fault type and region considered.

  18. Selected topics of the 4th International Cooperative Study Group meeting on immune thrombocytopenia revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydegger, Urs E; Risch, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The Intercontinental Cooperative immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) Study Group (ICIS) held its 4th Expert Meeting in September 2012 in Montreux, Switzerland. The program reunited researchers and clinicians from all over the globe and was organized with lectures and seminars for real-time exchange of latest information. Platelets target victims of autoimmune disease on their own, participating under physiological conditions in the immune network; these small cells are more immunologically savvy than previously thought. Currently, researchers focus their attention on regulatory T and regulatory B cells, ie, cells that might have a decisive impact on how ITP spontaneously resolves or evolves into chronic disease. Diagnostic criteria and prognosis are increasingly benefiting from molecular biological tests, and therapy has evolved with the availability of biosimilar agents and recombinant hormones or blockers of their receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transpersonal experiences in childhood: an exploratory empirical study of selected adult groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, H T; Gervais, A; Shearing-Johns, S; Travis, F

    1992-12-01

    A questionnaire was developed to assess adult recall for a range of transpersonal experiences throughout childhood and adolescence (mystical experience, out-of-body experience, lucid dreams, archetypal dreams, ESP), as well as nightmares and night terrors as indicators of more conflicted, negative states. In two exploratory studies this questionnaire was administered to subjects with high estimated levels of early transpersonal experiences and practising meditators, with respective undergraduate controls. A cognitive skills/precocity model of early transpersonal experience was contrasted with a vulnerability of self model by comparisons of these groups on questionnaire categories, imaginative absorption, neuroticism, and visual-spatial skills, with some support found for both models depending on experience type, age of estimated recall, and adult meditative practice.

  20. Heterogeneity and diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in select Saudi Arabian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Malik, S

    2015-07-14

    In order to investigate the diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in the Saudi Arabian population, we assembled the phenotypic data of approximately 66,000 subjects from ten representative Saudi populations: Al-Khobar, Riyadh, Tabuk/Madina Al-Munawaara, Jeddah, Abha, South region, Sakaka, Domah, Al-Qurayat, and Sweer. The frequencies of p[A], q[B], and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus were observed to be 0.1688, 0.1242, and 0.7070, respectively, and the frequency of the D allele at the Rh locus was 0.7138. The heterozygosities at the ABO and Rh loci were 0.4563 and 0.4086, respectively, while the combined heterozygosity was 0.4324. Homogeneity tests revealed the population of Abha to be the most heterogeneous while that of Tabuk/Madina was found to be the least heterogeneous. Homogeneity was higher among the Northern populations while Southern populations demonstrated subdivisions and stratification. Gene diversity analyses yielded a total heterozygosity value of 0.4449. The coefficient of gene differentiation was 0.0090. Nei's genetic distance analyses showed that there was close affinity between the populations of Al-Khobar and Riyadh. The largest differences were observed between the populations of Sakaka and Domah. Furthermore, negative correlations were found between p[A] and r[O] alleles, and between q[B] and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus. Clinal analyses revealed that the r[O] allele showed an increasing trend from North-East to South-West, and conversely the q[B] allele exhibited a decreasing trend at these coordinates. These analyses present interesting aspects of the blood group allele distribution across the geography of Saudi Arabia.

  1. Multi-scale inference of interaction rules in animal groups using Bayesian model selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Mann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inference of interaction rules of animals moving in groups usually relies on an analysis of large scale system behaviour. Models are tuned through repeated simulation until they match the observed behaviour. More recent work has used the fine scale motions of animals to validate and fit the rules of interaction of animals in groups. Here, we use a Bayesian methodology to compare a variety of models to the collective motion of glass prawns (Paratya australiensis. We show that these exhibit a stereotypical 'phase transition', whereby an increase in density leads to the onset of collective motion in one direction. We fit models to this data, which range from: a mean-field model where all prawns interact globally; to a spatial Markovian model where prawns are self-propelled particles influenced only by the current positions and directions of their neighbours; up to non-Markovian models where prawns have 'memory' of previous interactions, integrating their experiences over time when deciding to change behaviour. We show that the mean-field model fits the large scale behaviour of the system, but does not capture fine scale rules of interaction, which are primarily mediated by physical contact. Conversely, the Markovian self-propelled particle model captures the fine scale rules of interaction but fails to reproduce global dynamics. The most sophisticated model, the non-Markovian model, provides a good match to the data at both the fine scale and in terms of reproducing global dynamics. We conclude that prawns' movements are influenced by not just the current direction of nearby conspecifics, but also those encountered in the recent past. Given the simplicity of prawns as a study system our research suggests that self-propelled particle models of collective motion should, if they are to be realistic at multiple biological scales, include memory of previous interactions and other non-Markovian effects.

  2. The effects of a support group on selected psychosocial outcomes of bereaved parents whose child died from cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiney, S P; Ruffin, J; Goon-Johnson, K

    1995-04-01

    Group support for bereaved parents whose child died from cancer has been suggested as a means of helping parents express emotions about their loss and improve their coping. Using a quasi-experimental design, we sought to determine the selected psychosocial effects of participation in a support group for bereaved parents whose child died from cancer. Five bereaved parents completed the Emotions Profile Index, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales, and the Social Adjustment Scale Self-Report before and after the seven group sessions. No statistically significant differences were found. Descriptive data were analyzed from the co-therapists' process log and the participants' evaluation forms. The group process log revealed intense pain and grief over the loss of the child and the parents' conscious struggle to adapt to the present and prepare for the future. The discussions poignantly indicated the great extent to which the child's death had changed their lives. Using the group evaluation form parents reported high satisfaction with the group sessions. Tentative conclusions support the value of such a group in providing a forum for some bereaved parents to ventilate feelings and thoughts and validate the normalcy of their reactions.

  3. Parent-child associations in selected food group and nutrient intakes among overweight and obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Allison W; Mâsse, Louise C; Barr, Susan I; Lovato, Chris Y; Hanning, Rhona M

    2014-10-01

    Few studies have compared parent-child dietary intake among adolescents who are overweight or obese. The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between parent-teen intake of selected dietary components among this sample. Baseline data from 165 parent and adolescent (aged 11 to 16 years) pairs who presented for a lifestyle behavior modification intervention were collected between 2010 and 2012. Parent and adolescent dietary intake (servings of fruits and vegetables [F/V]; grams of sugar; and percent energy from total fat, saturated fat, dessert/treats, sugar-sweetened beverages, and snacks) was assessed using web-based 24-hour dietary recalls. Multivariable linear and negative binomial regression models identified associations between parent and child dietary intake adjusting for relevant covariates. A large proportion of adolescents and parents did not meet dietary recommendations for F/V, total fat, and saturated fat. Parent-adolescent intake of F/V, total fat, saturated fat, sugar, sugar-sweetened beverages, and snacks were positively associated (r=0.19 to 0.37). No relationship was observed for dessert/treats. In multivariate models, significant interaction effects suggest that the parent-child association in diet was weaker for fat intake among parents with higher educational attainment (b=-.31; Psnacking among adolescent boys (b=-.30; Pgood health, and related to obesity, was associated with adolescent intake. Helping parents improve their diet may promote improvements in their adolescent's diet and is a potential target for interventions designed to increase healthy eating among adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nominal group technique to select attributes for discrete choice experiments: an example for drug treatment choice in osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiligsmann M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mickael Hiligsmann,1-3 Caroline van Durme,2 Piet Geusens,2 Benedict GC Dellaert,4 Carmen D Dirksen,3 Trudy van der Weijden,5 Jean-Yves Reginster,6 Annelies Boonen21Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 2Department of Internal Medicine, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 4Department of Business Economics, Erasmus Rotterdam University, The Netherlands, 5Department of General Practice, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 6Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liege, BelgiumBackground: Attribute selection represents an important step in the development of discrete-choice experiments (DCEs, but is often poorly reported. In some situations, the number of attributes identified may exceed what one may find possible to pilot in a DCE. Hence, there is a need to gain insight into methods to select attributes in order to construct the final list of attributes. This study aims to test the feasibility of using the nominal group technique (NGT to select attributes for DCEs.Methods: Patient group discussions (4–8 participants were convened to prioritize a list of 12 potentially important attributes for osteoporosis drug therapy. The NGT consisted of three steps: an individual ranking of the 12 attributes by importance from 1 to 12, a group discussion on each of the attributes, including a group review of the aggregate score of the initial rankings, and a second ranking task of the same attributes.Results: Twenty-six osteoporotic patients participated in five NGT sessions. Most (80% of the patients changed their ranking after the discussion. However, the average initial and final ranking did not differ markedly. In the final ranking, the most important medication attributes were

  5. A Descriptive Analysis of Changes in Selected Drug Groups Available to Primary Care Physicians in Israel From 2000 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni

    Several medical and economic factors affect the process of development and introduction of new drugs and the disappearance of various medical agents from the drug market. There are no data in the existing literature on quantitative and qualitative changes in the drug market. We assessed changes in the drug market in Israel over 14 years, focusing on drug groups that, in our subjective opinion, are mainly used in primary care medicine: pain medications, lipid lowering agents, drugs for diabetes, and antihypertensives. We assessed volume of drugs and changes and trends in terms of therapeutic efficacy and safety in selected drugs in each of the groups over the study time period. We used the Medic Compendium for the analyses. Medic contains a listing of drugs that are approved and available for use in Israel. It is updated every 2 months. In 2000, there were 253 available drugs in the study groups that contained 124 active agents. In contrast, in 2013, there were 278 available drugs that contained 130 active agents. Over the study years, there was an increase in the number of drugs that are effective, "user friendly," and have a high safety profile. Our study provides the first data on quantitative and qualitative changes that have taken place in selected groups of drugs. Although the availability of the drugs in different countries is determined by multiple factors, we assumed that there are other countries with a similar situation in terms of their drug markets.

  6. The effect of income inequality on the health of selected US demographic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClere, F B; Soobader, M J

    2000-12-01

    This study assessed whether documented effects of income inequality on health are consistent across demographic subgroups of the US population. Data from the National Health Interview Survey on White and Black non-Hispanics were used. Logistic regression models were estimated with SUDAAN software. Perceived health was the outcome variable. The results of the multivariate analysis, in which individual family income and county-level poverty rates were included, were not consistent with existing research. In the presence of covariates, the conditional effects of inequality were restricted to Whites aged 18-44 years in the 2 highest income inequality quartiles and middle-aged Whites in counties with the highest level of income inequality. The health of Blacks of all ages, elderly Whites, and middle-aged Whites outside of the areas of highest inequality was unaffected when controls for individual characteristics and county-level poverty were in place. For the United States, the independent and direct contribution of income inequality to the determination of self-perceived health net of individual income and county income levels is restricted to certain demographic groups.

  7. Automatic Feature Selection and Weighting for the Formation of Homogeneous Groups for Regional Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) Curve Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Burn, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme rainfall events can have devastating impacts on society. To quantify the associated risk, the IDF curve has been used to provide the essential rainfall-related information for urban planning. However, the recent changes in the rainfall climatology caused by climate change and urbanization have made the estimates provided by the traditional regional IDF approach increasingly inaccurate. This inaccuracy is mainly caused by two problems: 1) The ineffective choice of similarity indicators for the formation of a homogeneous group at different regions; and 2) An inadequate number of stations in the pooling group that does not adequately reflect the optimal balance between group size and group homogeneity or achieve the lowest uncertainty in the rainfall quantiles estimates. For the first issue, to consider the temporal difference among different meteorological and topographic indicators, a three-layer design is proposed based on three stages in the extreme rainfall formation: cloud formation, rainfall generation and change of rainfall intensity above urban surface. During the process, the impacts from climate change and urbanization are considered through the inclusion of potential relevant features at each layer. Then to consider spatial difference of similarity indicators for the homogeneous group formation at various regions, an automatic feature selection and weighting algorithm, specifically the hybrid searching algorithm of Tabu search, Lagrange Multiplier and Fuzzy C-means Clustering, is used to select the optimal combination of features for the potential optimal homogenous groups formation at a specific region. For the second issue, to compare the uncertainty of rainfall quantile estimates among potential groups, the two sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test-based sample ranking process is used. During the process, linear programming is used to rank these groups based on the confidence intervals of the quantile estimates. The proposed methodology fills the gap

  8. Evaluation of the capacity for direct regeneration of maize inbreds of the Lancaster selection group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Derkach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In connection with the necessity of bringing elite maize inbreds of the Lancaster germplasm group, which have potential for cultivation in Ukraine, into the system of genetic tranformation, the aim of this investigation is to identify the ability of maize inbreds of this group to regenerate by direct organogenesis and to determine the optimal mineral basis for their nutritional environment using segments of the node area of shoots. As explantats we used sterile 4-day old seedlings of 4 maize inbreds of Lancaster germplasm and model inbred Chi31 exotic germplasm. The seedlings were obtained by germination of sterile seeds in Petri dishes between two layers of moist sterile filter paper at a temperature of 27 ºC in dark conditions. A single 1 cmlong segment was cut from each from each seedling, running from 0.5 cmbefore the node to 0.5 cmafter the node. A cut was made in each segment of the node in order to create a wounded surface. Explantats were planted in a nutrient environment with mineral bases of MS or N6, modified by the addition of 10 mg/l silver nitrate, 100 mg/l casein hydrolyzate, 690 mg/l L-proline, 30 g/l sucrose, 1.0 mg/l 2,4-dychlorphenoksiacetic acid and 0,1 mg/l abscisic acid. Cultivation was carried out at 25–27 ºC in the light. Direct hemogenesis in this environment on the 14th day of cultivation in vitro reached 100% for each line. This meant that all researched lines of Lancaster germplasm and the model line showed a high capacity for direct regeneration through direct hemogenesis, which does not depend on the composition of the mineral content of their nutritional environment. Callus formation was observed in all genotypes on the 14th day of cultivation in vitro and the extent of its formation increased during the following month of cultivation. The callus formation was observed only at the site of the wounded surface. The calluses were transparent. Although green areas appeared in these calluses, they were

  9. Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Gordon Holley; Kristina F. Connor; James D. Haywood

    2015-01-01

    A range of issues affecting southern forests are addressed in 108 papers or extended abstracts. Papers are grouped in 13 sections that cover the topics of hardwood regeneration, best management practices for stream crossings, pine regeneration and genetics, fire effects, eco-physiology, forest nutrition, vegetation management, forest threats, biomass, biometrics,...

  10. Proceedings of the eleventh biennial southern silvicultural research conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth W. Outcalt; [Editor

    2002-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-four papers and three poster summaries address a range of issues affecting southern forests. Papers are grouped in 19 sessions that include pine nutrition, nurseries/seed and seedlings, ecophysiology, fire, pine thinning and spacing, wood quality/technology, hardwood thinning and spacing, hardwood nutrition, competition, pine natural regeneration...

  11. A Hybrid Multiple Criteria Group Decision-Making Approach for Green Supplier Selection in the TFT-LCD Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Wei Tsui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The awareness of the need for environmental protection is increasing throughout the world. The focuses of green supplier selection are on considering environmental criteria and strengthening the competitiveness of the entire supply chain. The purpose of this study is to develop a green supplier selection procedure for the thin film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD industry using polarizer suppliers as an example. First, a decision framework for green supplier selection is developed based on literatures and the supplier audit forms provided by an anonymous flat panel display manufacturer in Taiwan. Then, a hybrid multiple criteria group decision-making (MCGDM method is proposed based on analytic hierarchy process (AHP, entropy, elimination and choice expressing the reality III (ELECTRE III, and the linear assignment method to assist the manufacturer in choosing among four polarizer suppliers. The final ranking results for green supplier selection and different opinions from each department are provided. An improvement report is suggested to enhance suppliers’ performance. For the evaluation procedure, most managers emphasize the importance of current capability and the capability of research and development. Furthermore, we found that the subsidiary supplier should improve quality control competence immediately to be considered as the potential candidate of primary supplier.

  12. Forest fire occurrence and silvicultural-economic prerequisites for protection improvement in forest regions of Krasnoyarsk Krai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Furyaev

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The territory of the Krasnoyarsk Krai is substantially diverse in terms of climatic, silvicultural and economic conditions owing to its sufficient spread from the North to the South. These differences were to some extent taken into account when the forest fund of the Krasnoyarsk Krai was divided into seven forest regions: forest tundra of Central Siberia, highland taiga of Central Siberia, plain taiga of West Siberia, Angara region, subtaiga forest steppe of Central Siberia, Altai-Sayanskiy highland, Altai-Sayanskiy highland forest steppe. The regions show different levels of fire occurrence and different fire effects that require different levels of protection from forest fires. Optimization of the protection is based on activities that combine prevention and timely detection of fires depending on development of forest regions and intensity of forest management. The main focus of the paper is on possibility or inadvisability of prescribed fires, fire-use fires (fires that started naturally but were then managed for their beneficial effects and the system of activities increasing fire resistance of the most valuable forests. It is justified that taking into account the effects of forest fires, selective protection of forests is expedient in forest-tundra Middle Siberia and highland taiga of Middle Siberia regions. The whole area of plain taiga of West Siberia region should be subject to protection but with various levels of intensity in different parts of it. The forest fund of Angara, subtaiga forest steppe of Middle Siberia, Altai-Sayanskiy highland, Altai-Sayanskiy highland forest steppe regions should be protected on the whole area. Application of prescribed fires is relevant in the subzone of South taiga, in the forest steppe zone as well as in the submontane and lowland taiga belts. Fire-use fires are admissible on limited areas in the subzones of Middle and North taiga.

  13. Do Common Silvicultural Treatments Affect Wood Density of Mediterranean Montane Pines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moreno-Fernández

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Wood density is one of the most important and well documented wood quality attributes. However, studies focusing on the effects of thinning combined with pruning on wood density in Mediterranean areas are scarce, even though both are recommended practices in forests managed for the production of high-quality timber. We assess the effects of both silvicultural interventions on wood density traits (tree-ring, earlywood, and latewood and on the percentage of latewood, on an annual scale, for the main timber species Pinus sylvestris L. and Pinus nigra Arnold (subsp. nigra and subsp. salzmannii in Mediterranean mountains. To this end, three trials (one species per trial were established in monospecific reforestations in the 1990s. Three silvicultural treatments were applied: thinning, thinning combined with pruning, and a control. At the time of installation, stand ages ranged from 26 to 37 years. Small differences were found among treatments in regard to the wood density attributes, with no significant effects of thinning and pruning on the studied wood traits in either timber species. The two subspecies of P. nigra presented comparatively denser wood than P. sylvestris. Our results suggest that thinning and pruning treatments can be applied without causing unfavourable changes to wood density.

  14. Response of the boreal forest ecosystem to climatic change and its silvicultural implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellomaeki, S.; Haenninen, H.; Karjalainen, T. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Faculty of Forestry] [and others

    1996-12-31

    During the next 100 years, the mean annual temperature is expected to be 1-6 deg C higher than at present. It is also expected to be accompanied by a lengthening of the thermal growing season and increased precipitation. Consequently, climatic change will increase the uncertainty of the management of forest ecosystems in the future. In this context, this research project aimed to outline the ecological and silvicultural implications of climatic change with regard to (1) how the expected climatic change might modify the functioning and structure of the boreal forest ecosystem, and (2) how the silvicultural management of the forest ecosystem should be modified in order to maintain sustainable forest yield under changing climatic conditions. The experimental component of the project concerned first the effect that elevating temperature and elevating concentration of atmospheric carbon have on the ontogenetic development of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L) and on the subsequent increase in frost damage during winter. The second part of the study looked the effect of elevating temperature and elevating concentration of atmospheric carbon on the growth of Scots pine through photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, nutrient supply, and changes in crown structure. This experiment was utilised in several subprojects of the overall project

  15. Forest structure of oak plantations after silvicultural treatment to enhance habitat for wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Phillip, Cherrie-Lee P.; Guilfoyle, Michael P.; Wilson, R. Randy; Schweitzer, Callie Jo; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Oswalt, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    During the past 30 years, thousands of hectares of oak-dominated bottomland hardwood plantations have been planted on agricultural fields in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Many of these plantations now have closed canopies and sparse understories. Silvicultural treatments could create a more heterogeneous forest structure, with canopy gaps and increased understory vegetation for wildlife. Lack of volume sufficient for commercial harvest in hardwood plantations has impeded treatments, but demand for woody biomass for energy production may provide a viable means to introduce disturbance beneficial for wildlife. We assessed forest structure in response to prescribed pre-commercial perturbations in hardwood plantations resulting from silvicultural treatments: 1) row thinning by felling every fourth planted row; 2) multiple patch cuts with canopy gaps of basal area was least in diagonal corridor treatments but had greater variance in patch-cut treatments. All treatments increased canopy openness and the volume of coarse woody debris. Occurrence of birds using early successional habitats was greater on sites treated with patch cuts and diagonal intersections. Canopy openings on row-thinned stands are being filled by lateral crown growth of retained trees whereas patch cut and diagonal intersection gaps appear likely to be filled by regenerating saplings.

  16. POTENTIAL OF MULTI-TEMPORAL UAV-BORNE LIDAR IN ASSESSING EFFECTIVENESS OF SILVICULTURAL TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Vepakomma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Silvicultural treatments are practiced to control resource competition and direct forest stand development to meet management objectives. Effective tracking of thinning and partial cutting treatments help in timely mitigation and ensuring future stand productivity. Based on a study conducted in autumn 2015, our findings in a white pine dominant forest stand in Petawawa (Ontario, Canada showed that almost all individual trees were detectable, structure of individual trees and undergrowth was well pronounced and underlying terrain below dense undisturbed canopy was well captured with UAS based Riegl Vux-1 lidar even at a range of 150 m. Thereafter, the site was re-scanned the following summer with the same system. Besides understanding the difference in distribution patterns due to foliage conditions, co-registering the two datasets, in the current study, we tested the potential of quantifying effectiveness of a partial cutting silvicultural system especially in terms of filling of 3D spaces through vertical or lateral growth and mortality in a very short period of time.

  17. Potential of Multi-Temporal Uav-Borne LIDAR in Assessing Effectiveness of Silvicultural Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vepakomma, U.; Cormier, D.

    2017-08-01

    Silvicultural treatments are practiced to control resource competition and direct forest stand development to meet management objectives. Effective tracking of thinning and partial cutting treatments help in timely mitigation and ensuring future stand productivity. Based on a study conducted in autumn 2015, our findings in a white pine dominant forest stand in Petawawa (Ontario, Canada) showed that almost all individual trees were detectable, structure of individual trees and undergrowth was well pronounced and underlying terrain below dense undisturbed canopy was well captured with UAS based Riegl Vux-1 lidar even at a range of 150 m. Thereafter, the site was re-scanned the following summer with the same system. Besides understanding the difference in distribution patterns due to foliage conditions, co-registering the two datasets, in the current study, we tested the potential of quantifying effectiveness of a partial cutting silvicultural system especially in terms of filling of 3D spaces through vertical or lateral growth and mortality in a very short period of time.

  18. Genetic Manipulation of Lactococcus lactis by Using Targeted Group II Introns: Generation of Stable Insertions without Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Courtney L.; San Filippo, Joseph; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Mills, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Despite their commercial importance, there are relatively few facile methods for genomic manipulation of the lactic acid bacteria. Here, the lactococcal group II intron, Ll.ltrB, was targeted to insert efficiently into genes encoding malate decarboxylase (mleS) and tetracycline resistance (tetM) within the Lactococcus lactis genome. Integrants were readily identified and maintained in the absence of a selectable marker. Since splicing of the Ll.ltrB intron depends on the intron-encoded protein, targeted invasion with an intron lacking the intron open reading frame disrupted TetM and MleS function, and MleS activity could be partially restored by expressing the intron-encoded protein in trans. Restoration of splicing from intron variants lacking the intron-encoded protein illustrates how targeted group II introns could be used for conditional expression of any gene. Furthermore, the modified Ll.ltrB intron was used to separately deliver a phage resistance gene (abiD) and a tetracycline resistance marker (tetM) into mleS, without the need for selection to drive the integration or to maintain the integrant. Our findings demonstrate the utility of targeted group II introns as a potential food-grade mechanism for delivery of industrially important traits into the genomes of lactococci. PMID:12571038

  19. 40 CFR 122.27 - Silvicultural activities (applicable to State NPDES programs, see § 123.25).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silvicultural activities (applicable to State NPDES programs, see § 123.25). 122.27 Section 122.27 Protection of Environment..., prescribed burning, pest and fire control, harvesting operations, surface drainage, or road construction and...

  20. Mid-rotation silviculture timing influences nitrogen mineralization of loblolly pine plantations in the mid-south USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Blazier; D. Andrew Scott; Ryan Coleman

    2015-01-01

    Intensively managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations often develop nutrient deficiencies near mid-rotation. Common silvicultural treatments for improving stand nutrition at this stage include thinning, fertilization, and vegetation control. It is important to better understand the influence of timing fertilization and vegetation control...

  1. Modeling silviculture after natural disturbance to sustain biodiversity in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem : balancing complexity and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian J. Palik; Robert J. Mitchell; J. Kevin Hiers

    2002-01-01

    Modeling silviculture after natural disturbance to maintain biodiversity is a popular concept, yet its application remains elusive. We discuss difficulties inherent to this idea, and suggest approaches to facilitate implementation, using longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) as an example. Natural disturbance regimes are spatially and temporally variable. Variability...

  2. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and..., 2007, a person must apply for and obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and...

  3. Physiological responses of eastern hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis) to biological control and silvicultural release: implications for hemlock restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelcy F. Miniat; David Zeitlow; Steven T. Brantley; Albert (Bud) Mayfield; Rusty Rhea; Robert Jetton; Paul.  Arnold

    2016-01-01

    The rapid loss of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) from riparian zones in the southern Appalachian Mountains due to Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelgis tsugae, HWA) infestation has resulted in changes to watershed structure and function. Several restoration strategies have been proposed, including silvicultural treatments that increase incident light in forest...

  4. Silvicultural decisionmaking in an uncertain climate future: a workshop-based exploration of considerations, strategies, and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria K. Janowiak; Christopher W. Swanston; Linda M. Nagel; Christopher R. Webster; Brian J. Palik; Mark J. Twery; John B. Bradford; Linda R. Parker; Andrea T. Hille; Sheela M. Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Land managers across the country face the immense challenge of developing and applying appropriate management strategies as forests respond to climate change. We hosted a workshop to explore silvicultural strategies for addressing the uncertainties surrounding climate change and forest response in the northeastern and north-central United States. Outcomes of this...

  5. Long-term research on classical silvicultural approaches in the Acadian Forest: Penobscot Experimental Forest Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Brissette; Michael R. Saunders; Laura S. Kenefic; Paul E. Sendak

    2006-01-01

    The most comprehensive study of stand dynamics in the Acadian Forest Region is an experiment by the USDA Forest Service at the Penobscot Experimental Forest (PEF) in Maine. It was established from 1952-1957 to study changes in structure, composition, and productivity from an array of silvicultural treatments. Ingrowth, accretion, and mortality of individual trees (!Y0....

  6. Linking Dichotomous Segregation with Multi-group Segregation: Weighted Segregation Ratios in Selected U. S. Metropolitan Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lingxin; Fong, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The U. S. residential landscape is increasingly multi-racial and multi-ethnic, giving rise to the question of how to compare dichotomous segregation among multiple groups living in the same area. To address the problem in the existing dichotomous approach, which offers no common basis for comparing dichotomous segregation among multiple groups, this paper develops a weighted segregation ratio approach based on Theil's segregation index and its additive decomposability. This approach can be used to bridge information obtained from dichotomous segregation between specific groups (such as black-white and black-Hispanic), and dichotomous segregation between group and non-group (such as white-non-white and black-non-black) in previous studies. We apply both dichotomous and weighted segregation ratio approaches to 1990 and 2000 U. S. census data. Results are interpreted for five selected metropolitan areas as well as for the weighted national average. This new approach yields distinctive findings that portray the complicated process of residential segregation, including the increasing significance of Hispanic segregation and Asian segregation in the decade from 1990 to 2000. PMID:25580036

  7. Design of C18 Organic Phases with Multiple Embedded Polar Groups for Ultraversatile Applications with Ultrahigh Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Abul K; Qiu, Hongdeng; Oishi, Tomohiro; Kuwahara, Yutaka; Takafuji, Makoto; Ihara, Hirotaka

    2015-07-07

    For the first time, we synthesized multiple embedded polar groups (EPGs) containing linear C18 organic phases. The new materials were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT), solid-state (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR, suspended-state (1)H NMR, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). (29)Si CP/MAS NMR was carried out to investigate the degree of cross-linking of the silane and silane functionality of the modified silica. Solid-state (13)C CP/MAS NMR and suspended-state (1)H NMR spectroscopy indicated a higher alkyl chain order for the phase containing four EPGs than for the phase with three EPGs. To correlate the NMR results with temperature-dependent chromatographic studies, standard reference materials (SRM 869b and SRM 1647e), a column selectivity test mixture for liquid chromatography was employed. A single EPG containing the C18 phase was also prepared in a similar manner to be used as a reference column especially for the separation of basic and polar compounds in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), respectively. Detailed chromatographic characterization of the new phases was performed in terms of their surface coverage, hydrophobic selectivity, shape selectivity, hydrogen bonding capacity, and ion-exchange capacity at pH 2.7 and 7.6 for RPLC as well as their hydrophilicity, the selectivity for hydrophilic-hydrophobic substituents, the selectivity for the region and configurational differences in hydrophilic substituents, the evaluation of electrostatic interactions, and the evaluation of the acidic-basic nature for HILIC-mode separation. Furthermore, peak shapes for the basic analytes propranolol and amitriptyline were studied as a function of the number of EPGs on the C18 phases in the RPLC. The chromatographic performance of multiple EPGs containing C18 HILIC phases is illustrated

  8. Effects of LY354740, a selective agonist of Glutamate metabotropic group II receptors, on aggressive behavior in mice

    OpenAIRE

    De Castro, Vanessa; Universidad de Málaga; Martín-López, Mercedes; Universidad de Málaga; Navarro, José Francisco; Universidad de Málaga

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that glutamate metabotropic receptors mGlu1 and mGlu5 are involved in the regulation of aggressive behaviour. This study examines the effect of the administration of LY354740 (4-16 mg/kg i.p.), a selective group II metabotropic receptors agonist (mGlu2/3), using an isolation-induced aggression model. Individually housed mice were exposed to anosmic opponents 30 min after drug administration. Ten min of diadic interactions were staged between a singly housed an...

  9. Hydralysin, a novel animal group-selective paralytic and cytolytic protein from a noncnidocystic origin in hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Fishman, Yelena; Sher, Daniel; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2003-08-05

    In Cnidaria, the production of neurotoxic polypeptides is attributed to the ectodermal stinging cells (cnidocytes), which are discharged for offensive (prey capture) and/or defensive purposes. In this study, a new paralysis-inducing (neurotoxic) protein from the green hydra Chlorohydra viridissima was purified, cloned, and expressed. This paralytic protein is unique in that it (1) is derived from a noncnidocystic origin, (2) reveals a clear animal group-selective toxicity, (3) possesses an uncommon primary structure, remindful of pore-forming toxins, and (4) has a fast cytotoxic effect on insect cells but not on the tested mammalian cells. The possible biological role of such a noncnidocystic toxin is discussed.

  10. Functional groups of macro-benthos of selected sites of upstream of Hron River and Hnilec River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufusova, A.

    2011-01-01

    The author used six functional groups of macro-benthos based on 'species traits', which are indicated with the Greek letters α to ζ. In the work authors applied this method to the macroinvertebrate communities of selected sites of upstream of the Hron River and the Hnilec River. The method appropriately captured increasing gradient of anthropogenic changes in the direction of the river continuum. Although the method was used for Slovak rivers for the first time, it seems to be promising for use in the future. (author)

  11. Medication withdrawal may be an option for a select group of patients in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the clinical and radiological evolution of a stable group of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that had their disease-modifying therapy (DMT withdrawn. Forty patients, which had made continuous use of one immunomodulator and had remained free of disease for at least 5 years, had their DMT withdrawn and were observed from 13 to 86 months. Out of the followed patients, 4 (10% patients presented with new attacks. In addition to these patients, 2 (5% patients had new lesions revealed by magnetic resonance imaging that did not correspond to clinical attacks. Despite these results, the difficult decision to withdraw medication requires careful analysis. Withdrawal, however, should not be viewed as simply the suspension of treatment because these patients should be evaluated periodically, and the immunomodulators should be readily reintroduced if new attacks occur. Nonetheless, medication withdrawal is an option for a select group of patients.

  12. The Available Options for Wavelength Group Selection and Transceiver Design for Next Generation PON Stage 2 (NG-PON2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Shahab Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Xi, Lixia; Chen, Yong Li; Idress, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    The full service access network (FSAN) task group meeting was held in April 2012, where they agreed to adopt time and wavelength division multiplexed passive optical network (TWDM-PON) as a primary solution to NG-PON2. Major requirements includes at least 40 Gbit/s aggregate rate in downstream, 1:64 split ratio, 40 km differential reach, and at least 1 Gb/s access rate per optical network unit (ONU). In this paper, a performance analysis will be carried out for downstream 4-wavelengths group selection from S-band, L-band, and C-band. A comparison for optimal transmitter design is also investigated among probable options of chirp managed laser diode, Lithium Niobate (LiNbo3) Mach Zehnder modulator, besides examining tunable transceivers in contrary to remotely fed colorless ONUs.

  13. Nitrogen dynamics across silvicultural canopy gaps in young forests of western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, A.L.; Perakis, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Silvicultural canopy gaps are emerging as an alternative management tool to accelerate development of complex forest structure in young, even-aged forests of the Pacific Northwest. The effect of gap creation on available nitrogen (N) is of concern to managers because N is often a limiting nutrient in Pacific Northwest forests. We investigated patterns of N availability in the forest floor and upper mineral soil (0-10 cm) across 6-8-year-old silvicultural canopy gaps in three 50-70-year-old Douglas-fir forests spanning a wide range of soil N capital in the Coast Range and Cascade Mountains of western Oregon. We used extractable ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) pools, net N mineralization and nitrification rates, and NH4+ and NO3- ion exchange resin (IER) concentrations to quantify N availability along north-south transects run through the centers of 0.4 and 0.1 ha gaps. In addition, we measured several factors known to influence N availability, including litterfall, moisture, temperature, and decomposition rates. In general, gap-forest differences in N availability were more pronounced in the mineral soil than in the forest floor. Mineral soil extractable NH4+ and NO3- pools, net N mineralization and nitrification rates, and NH4+ and NO3- IER concentrations were all significantly elevated in gaps relative to adjacent forest, and in several cases exhibited significantly greater spatial variability in gaps than forest. Nitrogen availability along the edges of gaps more often resembled levels in the adjacent forest than in gap centers. For the majority of response variables, there were no significant differences between northern and southern transect positions, nor between 0.4 and 0.1 ha gaps. Forest floor and mineral soil gravimetric percent moisture and temperature showed few differences along transects, while litterfall carbon (C) inputs and litterfall C:N ratios in gaps were significantly lower than in the adjacent forest. Reciprocal transfer incubations of

  14. Habitual eating of breakfast, consumption frequency of selected food and overweight prevalence in adolescents from various age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüenstel, Justyna Weronika; Kowalkowska, Joanna; Wądołowska, Lidia; Słowińska, Małgorzata Anna; Niedźwiedzka, Ewa; Kurp, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    To assess the influence of eating breakfast on the consumption of selected food and overweight prevalence among adolescents from different age groups. The study group consisted of students aged 13-18.9 (n=1700). Their height and weight measurements were used to calculate their body mass index and interpreted according to international standards for adolescents. Food consumption was assessed via the frequency method and involved the consumption of breakfast, dietary "bre and sweetened beverages. We used Block's validated questionnaire to assess the intake of dietary "bre and its sources. Analysis of the results was carried out in three age groups: 13-14.9, 15-16.9 and 17-18.9 years old. We used one-factor logistic regression adjusted by gender. The percentage of adolescents with a regular habit of eating breakfast dropped by 5.7 percentage points when compared to adolescents aged 13-14.9 and 17-18.9 (from 54.2% to 48.5%), which was a phenomenon accompanied by an increase in the percentage of adolescents who ate breakfast irregularly or hardly ever (by 3.7 and 1.9 percentage points, respectively). Eating breakfast infrequently was related to a more frequent consumption of sweetened beverages (the odds ratio: from 2.32 to 2.67 depending on the age group) and a higher prevalence of a "bre-poor diet (from 1.49 to 2.23). Among adolescents aged 13-14.9 who hardly ever ate breakfast, the chance of being overweight increased by 83% in comparison to adolescents with regular habits of eating breakfast. The frequency of eating breakfast decreased with the adolescents' age, especially among girls. Eating breakfast infrequently was associated with unhealthy nutrition, typical examples of which are lower intake of dietary "bre and more frequent consumption of sweetened beverages, and in the youngest group of adolescents caused a higher prevalence of overweight.

  15. Silvicultural and classificatory analysis of forests of Dnipropetrovsk region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sytnik

    2013-11-01

    ,189.8 ha. The other hard-leaved types of tree are species of Quercus L. – 20,288.2 ha, Robinia L. – 17,639.9 ha, Fraxinus L. – 3,200.1 ha, Acer L. – 864.2 ha, Ulmus L. – 860.3 ha and Gleditsia L. – 172.9 ha. Soft-leaved species in the forests of Dnipropetrovsk region are represented by the following genera Betula, Populus, Alnus, Tilia, Salix. The predominant among the identified age groups of Dnipropetrovsk region are the middle-aged and mature stands which occupy 40.2% (26,392.5 ha and 39.7% (26,076.1 ha of the forest area respectively. The age structure of forests in Dnipropetrovsk region is very irregular, which indicates a great potential for further increase in the volume of reafforestation. It is established that the largest area of the forest stands of environmental, scientific, historical and cultural significance is occupied by middle-aged (3,568.4 ha and over mature (2,782.0 ha stands with a total stock of 657.7 and 517.4 m3 per ha respectively. Stands of young-growth occupy the smallest area – 706.7 ha. Similarly in stands of recreational and health forests the largest area is occupied by middle-aged stands – 13,368.1 ha with a total stock of 2,550.8 m3 per ha. Middle aged trees occupy the largest area of protective forests – 9,456.0 ha (38.4%, of which the stands’ stock is 1,782.0 m3 per ha.

  16. Selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination and antibiotic resistance in patients in intensive-care units: an open-label, clustered group-randomised, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, A.M. de; Kluytmans, J.A.; Blok, H.E.; Mascini, E.M.; Benus, R.F.; Bernards, A.T.; Kuijper, E.J.; Leverstein-van Hall, M.A.; Jansz, A.R.; Jongh, B.M. de; Asselt, G.J. van; Frenay, I.H.; Thijsen, S.F.; Conijn, S.N.; Kaan, J.A.; Arends, J.P.; Sturm, P.D.J.; Bootsma, M.C.; Bonten, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, we assessed selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) on survival and prevention of bacteraemia in patients in intensive-care units. In this analysis, we aimed to assess effectiveness of these interventions for

  17. Selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination and antibiotic resistance in patients in intensive-care units : an open-label, clustered group-randomised, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smet, Anne Marie G. A.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Blok, Hetty E. M.; Mascini, Ellen M.; Benus, Robin F. J.; Bernards, Alexandra T.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Leverstein-van Hall, Maurine A.; Jansz, Arjan R.; de Jongh, Bartelt M.; van Asselt, Gerard J.; Frenay, Ine H. M. E.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; Conijn, Simon N. M.; Kaan, Jan A.; Arends, Jan P.; Sturm, Patrick D. J.; Bootsma, Martin C. J.; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    Background Previously, we assessed selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) on survival and prevention of bacteraemia in patients in intensive-care units. In this analysis, we aimed to assess effectiveness of these interventions for prevention

  18. Residual tree damage during selection cuts using two skidding systems in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Ficklin; John P. Dwyer; Bruce E. Cutter; Tom Draper

    1997-01-01

    Today, there is an interest in using alternative silvicultural systems like selection and two-aged management, because the public finds these systems more acceptable than clearcutting. However, repeated entries into forest stands to remove timber increase the risk of residual stand damage. Harvest techniques are desirable that (1) reduce the risk of stand damage and (2...

  19. Comparison of the neurobiological effects of attribution retraining group therapy with those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of attribution retraining group therapy (ARGT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Subjects were sequentially recruited and randomized into two groups, one receiving ARGT (n = 63 and the other SSRIs (n = 66 for 8 weeks. Fifty-four ARGT outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 16 and 55 SSRI outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 17 completed the study. All subjects were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. The 10-item Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was employed only for OCD subjects. Plasma levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were also measured at baseline and 8 weeks after completion of treatment. Symptom scores were significantly reduced (P < 0.001 in both the ARGT and SSRI groups at the end of treatment. However, MDD, GAD and OCD patients in the ARGT group had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentrations compared to baseline (P < 0.05, whereas MDD and OCD patients receiving SSRIs showed significantly increased plasma levels of serotonin (P < 0.05. These findings suggest that ARGT may modulate plasma cortisol levels and affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as opposed to SSRIs, which may up-regulate plasma serotonin levels via a different pathway to produce an overall improvement in the clinical condition of the patients.

  20. Selection of critical group in relation to the release of radionuclides from nuclear spent fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmomo, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In respect of internal radiation due to the coastal release of radionuclides, survey on marine food consumption is most useful for the selection of critical group. Species of marine organisms they usually eat is fully over 100 in the coastal area of Ibaraki prefecture where the fuel reprocessing plant is located. Though it gives only a spot datum, one day's consumption survey a season is of convenience to obtain cooperation from housewives and is of use to pick up critical organisms and those who eat much of them. However, long-term survey is required to estimate ordinary intake of the critical foods or those who are supposed critical people. One day's consumption survey makes it easy to perform the subsequent long-term one

  1. Personal exposure to benzene of selected population groups and impact of commuting modes in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Liem, Ngo Quang; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh

    2013-04-01

    Personal exposure to benzene of selected population groups, and impacts of traffic on commuters in Ho Chi Minh City were investigated. The study was carried out in June, July and November 2010. The preliminary data showed that on average, personal exposure to benzene for non-occupational people in Ho Chi Minh is ~18 μg/m(3) and most of the exposure is due to commuting. Benzene exposure during travelling by bus, taxi and motorcycle is, respectively, 22-30, 22-39 and 185-240 μg/m(3). Motorcycle-taxi drivers, petrol filling employees and street vendors suffer high daily exposures at 116, 52, 32 μg/m(3), respectively. Further measurements are needed for a better risk assessment and finding effective measures to reduce exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure-based approach to the identification of a novel group of selective glucosamine analogue inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi glucokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Edward L; Deinema, Mason S; Kearns, Sean P; Frey, Tyler A; Tanghe, Scott; Perry, Kay; Roy, Timothy A; Gracz, Hanna S; Rodriguez, Ana; D'Antonio, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Glucokinase and hexokinase from pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi are potential drug targets for antiparasitic chemotherapy of Chagas' disease. These glucose kinases phosphorylate d-glucose with co-substrate ATP and yield glucose 6-phosphate and are involved in essential metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. An inhibitor class was conceived that is selective for T. cruzi glucokinase (TcGlcK) using structure-based drug design involving glucosamine having a linker from the C2 amino that terminates with a hydrophobic group either being phenyl, p-hydroxyphenyl, or dioxobenzo[b]thiophenyl groups. The synthesis and characterization for two of the four compounds are presented while the other two compounds were commercially available. Four high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of TcGlcK inhibitor complexes are reported along with enzyme inhibition constants (Ki) for TcGlcK and Homo sapiens hexokinase IV (HsHxKIV). These glucosamine analogue inhibitors include three strongly selective TcGlcK inhibitors and a fourth inhibitor, benzoyl glucosamine (BENZ-GlcN), which is a similar variant exhibiting a shorter linker. Carboxybenzyl glucosamine (CBZ-GlcN) was found to be the strongest glucokinase inhibitor known to date, having a Ki of 0.71±0.05μM. Also reported are two biologically active inhibitors against in vitro T. cruzi culture that were BENZ-GlcN and CBZ-GlcN, with intracellular amastigote growth inhibition IC50 values of 16.08±0.16μM and 48.73±0.69μM, respectively. These compounds revealed little to no toxicity against mammalian NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and provide a key starting point for further drug development with this class of compound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Using Silviculture to Influence Carbon Sequestration in Southern Appalachian Spruce-Fir Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. Moore

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of forest growth through silvicultural modification of stand density is one strategy for increasing carbon (C sequestration. Using the Fire and Fuels Extension of the Forest Vegetation Simulator, the effects of even-aged, uneven-aged and no-action management scenarios on C sequestration in a southern Appalachian red spruce-Fraser fir forest were modeled. We explicitly considered C stored in standing forest stocks and the fate of forest products derived from harvesting. Over a 100-year simulation period the even-aged scenario (250 Mg C ha1 outperformed the no-action scenario (241 Mg C ha1 in total carbon (TC sequestered. The uneven-aged scenario approached 220 Mg C ha1, but did not outperform the no-action scenario within the simulation period. While the average annual change in C (AAC of the no-action scenario approached zero, or carbon neutral, during the simulation, both the even-aged and uneven-aged scenarios surpassed the no-action by year 30 and maintained positive AAC throughout the 100-year simulation. This study demonstrates that silvicultural treatment of forest stands can increase potential C storage, but that careful consideration of: (1 accounting method (i.e., TC versus AAC; (2 fate of harvested products and; (3 length of the planning horizon (e.g., 100 years will strongly influence the evaluation of C sequestration.

  4. Silviculture and biology of short-rotation woody crops in temperate regions: Then and now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickmann, Donald I. [Department of Forestry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1222 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Although its roots are in antiquity, the current concept of short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) for fiber and energy evolved scientifically from pioneering tree breeding work begun in the early 20th century. A natural outgrowth of this work was the culture of fast-growing trees on rotations of 1-15 years. Close-spaced tree culture received further impetus with the introduction of the 'silage sycamore' concept in the southeastern US in the mid-1960s and the OPEC oil embargo in 1973, leading to statistically designed trials at numerous locations in North America, Europe, and Scandinavia. Early silvicultural research focused on spacing and species trials, propagation methods, site preparation, weed management, nutrition, growth, and yield. Because these trials were based on small plots, and the importance of pest depredations or site variation were not fully recognized, early biomass yield predictions tended to be overly optimistic. Soon physiologists and ecologists began to unravel the biological characteristics of SRWC plantations and their responses to environment. Knowledge of the influence and diversity of pests-insects, diseases, and animals-provided a necessary reality check. Many hardwood tree species and a few conifers have been evaluated over the years for SRWC in temperate regions of the world. Clones of Populus and Salix, however, became the dominant plantation material because of their inherently rapid growth and ease of propagation by hardwood cuttings. Among conifers, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) also shows promise. Because genetic variation is readily exploitable in the dominant SRWC taxa, strongly focused breeding programs began to provide highly productive genotypes and seed sources in the last decades of the 20th century. A new plateau, with significant practical potential, was reached in the late 20th century when biotechnological methods were applied to tree taxa. Recently, the DNA in the Populus genome was sequenced. Thus, the few current

  5. Silviculture of eucaliptus plantations in the Paraiba do Sul basin, Brazil, and its potential implication on the basin ecohydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriello, Felix; Andres Rodriguez, Daniel; Marques Neves, Otto; Vicens, Raul

    2014-05-01

    Silviculture of eucaliptus plantations is an important driver of the Mata Atlântica biome conversion into another land use in the Paraíba do Sul basin, in the southeastern of Brazil. This region is located in one of the most developed areas in Brazil, between Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, the most important cities in Brazil, linked by Presidente Dutra highway. Between both cities there are another cities that produce a variety of goods - from meat to planes, cars and mobile phones. This area is, at the same time, one the most important hot spot for the Mata Atlântica biome. Here we have a large Mata Atlântica fragment protected by law and others fragments being conversed to pasture, agriculture, silviculture and urban areas. Paraiba do Sul river drains the region and runs into Rio de Janeiro State. The basin is highly anthropized, with multiple approaches of its waters resources. Its waters also serve Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area. Because land use and land cover changes impact the water yield in a basin, the study of its dynamic its of great importance for water resources management. We study the land use and land cover change in the region between 1986 and 2010, focusing in the development of silviculture of eucaliptus plantations. We used the HAND (Height Above Nearest Drainage) approach that uses the height above the nearest water body, acquired from SRTM Data and transformed into a Terrain Numeric Mode, to classify the landscape into three different ecohydrological environments: floodplain, mountain top and hillslope. This classes were intersected with 1986 and 2010 land use and cover change classification obtained from Landsat imagery. Results show that silviculture has increased in the region from 1986 to 2010. In both years, silviculture areas are mainly located at the hillslope (47%), while floodplain and mountain top share 28 % and 23 % respectively. Available census data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, IBGE, for 1995 and

  6. Non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes: Controlling Chirality Selectivity via Alkyl Groups of Conjugated Co-Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight, Braden; Gifford, Brendan; Kilina, Svetlana

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play an important role in nanotechnology, including electronics, chemical sensors, and solar cells. Their electronic and optical properties depend on the size and geometry (chirality) of the nanotube. However, one main concern regarding nanotube application in optoelectronic devices is the difficulty of separating them based upon chirality after synthesis, as all known synthesis methods produce more than one chirality simultaneously. To get around this, one method is the functionalization of the CNTs via non-covalent bonding of co-polymers by wrapping them around the tube. We use force field simulations to explore the effects of various structural manipulations to the co-polymer 9,9-dialkylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl bipyridine (PFO-BPY) to find the preferential mechanisms of selective interactions between the PFO-BPY and CNTs of various chiralities. In particular, we focus on the effect of the branching in alkyl side-groups of PFO-BPY on their binding to the CNT surface. We have observed correlations between the side-group structures and their wrapping morphology on the CNT-Polymer interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that the branching in the position closest to the conjugated backboned results in the strongest interaction with all CNT. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (CHE 1413614) and the Center for Computationally-Assisted Science and Technology at NDSU.

  7. Prevalence of hepatitis A antibodies in a normal population and some selected groups of patients in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebke, J C; Degré, M; Ritland, S; Enger, S C

    1982-02-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis A virus antibodies was tested by radioimmunoassay in Norway in healthy blood donors, in patients without clinical signs of liver diseases and in two selected groups of patients. The presence of hepatitis A antibodies was highly age-dependent in 625 normal persons. A major reduction occurred from 50 per cent or more in those born before 1938 to 10 per cent or less among those born after 1943. The decline of hepatitis A antibody prevalence was correlated to the history of infectious hepatitis epidemics in the entire country during World War II. The prevalence was not different from controls in a group of patients with various liver disorders. Hepatitis A antibodies were more prevalent in males than in females in blood donors, patients with chronic liver disorders and their controls. Hepatitis A antibodies were frequently present in prison inmates; their presence was associated with the presence of antibodies against hepatitis B virus and with anamnestic data on drug addiction.

  8. Studies on Lyme disease incidence rates in selected groups of forestry workers in West Pomerania, 2005–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Stawicki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The data collected by sanitary-epidemiological stations in 2005–2014 were analyzed to determine the incidence rates of borreliosis Lyme disease in the West Pomerania group of workers exposed to tick bites. Material and Methods: It was assumed that an adequate comparison of official epidemiological data with the data concerning the number of exposed people, is an indispensable condition for assessing properly the trend in Lyme disease incidence rates, concerning at the same time a real scale of occupational exposure. The study covered a selected group of forestry workers, i.e., white-collar staff employed in different units of the State Forests National Forest Holding with their seats in West Pomerania. The aim of the research was to process and analyze the data on workers employed in the forest sector and their positions, requested from district sanitary-epidemiological stations. Results: In the years concerned 282 cases of the occupational disease were recorded mainly in the groups of forest rangers, junior foresters and forest service inspectors. The values of the incidence factor exhibit high variability with the major share of cases recorded in the years 2008–2010 that accounted for 61.8% of the total occurrences concerned. The incidence in the years 2008, 2009 and 2010 amounted to 2418, 2828 and 2646 cases per 100 000 employees, respectively. Conclusions: The results show that previously published information about the incidence of Lyme disease in the agriculture, forestry and hunting sector, did not fully illustrate a real scale of occupational risk. Med Pr 2017;68(2:211–220

  9. Selection of a method for scoring radiographs for ankylosing spondylitis clinical trials, by the Assessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis Working Group and OMERACT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Radiographs are important for assessing structural damage in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS); this technology was selected by the international ASsessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) Working Group as an important domain for assessing outcome in clinical trials. The selection of a

  10. New 4-Functionalized Glutamate Analogues Are Selective Agonists at Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 2 or Selective Agonists at Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Group III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huynh, Tri H. V.; Erichsen, Mette N.; Tora, Amelie S.

    2016-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (Glu) receptors (mGluRs) play key roles in modulating excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. In all, eight subtypes have been identified and divided into three groups, group I (mGlu1,5), group II (mGlu2,3), and group III (mGlu4,6–8). In this article, we present a L-2...

  11. Comparison of silvicultural and natural disturbance effects on terrestrial salamanders in northern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Hocking; Kimberly J. Babbitt; Mariko. Yamasaki

    2013-01-01

    In forested ecosystems timber harvesting has the potential to emulate natural disturbances, thereby maintaining the natural communities adapted to particular disturbances. We compared the effects of even-aged (clearcut and patch cut) and uneven-aged (group cut, single-tree selection) timber management techniques with natural ice-storm damage and unmanipulated reference...

  12. Prevention of suicide and attempted suicide in Denmark. Epidemiological studies of suicide and intervention studies in selected risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-11-01

    The suicide rates in Denmark have been declining during the last two decades. The decline was relatively larger among women than among men. All age groups experienced a decline except the very young with stable rates and the very old with increasing rates. The Universal, Selective, Indicated (USI) model recommended by Institute of Medicine was used as a framework for the thesis. Universal preventive interventions are directed toward the entire population; selective interventions are directed toward individuals who are at greater risk for suicidal behaviour; and indicated preventions are targeted at individuals who have already begun self-destructive behaviour. At the universal level, a review was carried out to highlight the association between availability of methods for suicide and suicide rate. There were mostly studies of firearms, and the conclusion of the review was that there was clear indication of restricted access to lethal means was associated with decline in suicide with that specific method, and in many cases also with overall suicide mortality. Restricting access is especially important for methods with high case fatality rate. Our own study indicated a beneficial effect on suicide rates of restrictions in access to barbiturates, dextropropoxyphen, domestic gas and car exhaust with high content of carbon monoxide. Although a range of other factors in the society might also be of importance, it was concluded that restrictions in access to dangerous means for suicide were likely to play an important role in reducing suicide rates in Denmark, especially for women. At the selective level, there are several important risk groups such as psychiatric patients, persons with alcohol and drug abuse, persons with newly diagnosed severe physical illness, all who previously attempted suicide, and groups of homeless, institutionalized, prisoners and other socially excluded persons. The thesis focused on homeless persons and psychiatric patients, especially patients

  13. Socio-demographic differentiation of selected risk factors in a group of patients with respiratory system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka B. Bartoszek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor of respiratory system diseases. However, it is worth noticing other crucial factors increasing the risk of such diseases, such as alcohol consumption, obesity, excess fat tissue around the neck and throat, malnutrition, tranquilisers and soporifics, and previous respiratory system diseases. Aim of the research : To analyse the socio-demographic differentiation of selected respiratory system diseases risk factors in a group of pulmonological patients. Material and methods : The research covered 126 pulmonological patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, tuberculosis, or lung cancer. The study employed standardised research tools: the Fagerström test, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, and a self-designed questionnaire. Neck circumference and body weight measurements were performed to calculate body mass index and waist-hip ratio. The significance level was established at p < 0.05. Results : Most patients smoked tobacco in the past or were active smokers. Over 50% reported occasional alcohol drinking and demonstrated malnutrition risk or abdominal obesity. Smoking was more often practised by men, people with lower education, and COPD and tuberculosis patients. Malnutrition risk was associated with tuberculosis and lung cancer. Tobacco consumption as a respiratory system diseases risk factor more often applied to men and people below 50 years of age. The use of soporifics increased with age and concerned lung cancer patients. Previous respiratory system diseases correlated with the respondents’ education. Conclusions : The most frequent respiratory system diseases risk factors are smoking, malnutrition, and abdominal obesity. Respiratory system diseases risk factors are significantly correlated with sex, age, place of residence, and previous respiratory system diseases.

  14. Evaluation and selection of 3PL provider using fuzzy AHP and grey TOPSIS in group decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garside, Annisa Kesy; Saputro, Thomy Eko

    2017-11-01

    Selection of a 3PL provider is a problem of multi criteria decision making, where the decision maker has to select several 3PL provider alternatives based on several evaluation criteria. A decision maker will have difficulty to express judgments in exact numerical values due to the fact that information is often incomplete and the decision environment is uncertain. This paper presents an integrated fuzzy AHP and Grey TOPSIS for the evaluation and selection of 3PL provider method. Fuzzy AHP is used to determine the importance weight of evaluation criteria. For final selection, grey TOPSIS is used to evaluate the alternatives and obtain the overall performance which is measured as closeness coefficient. This method is applied to solve the selection of 3PL provider at PT. X. Five criterias and twelve sub-criterias were determined and then the best alternative among four 3PL providers was selected by proposed method.

  15. FAUNÍSTIC STUDY OF BEETLES (COLEOPTERA IN A SILVICULTURAL-PASTORAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Machado Auad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of beetles (Coleoptera in a silvicultural-pastoral system, estimating constancy, abundance, richness, diversity of families and seasonality, from July 2006 to June 2008. The study was carried out at the Embrapa Dairy Cattle station, in Coronel Pacheco, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The beetles were collected in Malaise traps, every two weeks, and taken to the laboratory for analysis. A total of 26 families, 294 morphospecies and 1,606 specimens were found. The Elateridae, Mordelidae, Chrysomelidae, Coccinellidae and Curculionidae families were the most abundant, rich and diverse. The Scarabaeidae and Scolytidae families were also among the most abundant, and the Cerambycidae family was among the richest, while the Bruchidae and Carabidae families presented high diversity.  The largest number of individuals and morphospecies sampled occurred during the period of rain. November 2007 presented the most (n = 535 specimens captures of any month, followed by October 2006, September 2007, March and April of 2008.

  16. COMPORTAMENTO DA ERVA-MATE (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil. EM CONSÓRCIO SILVICULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odilson dos Santos Oliveira

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi realizado no Campus da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria e teve por objetivo determinar o comportamento da erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil. cultivada em sistemas de consórcio silvicultural. A metodologia adotada constituiu-se da implantação de três tratamentos, cortes aos sistemas de consórcio erva-mate x Pinus sp., erva-mate x bracatinga e erva-mate x capoeira. A análise dos resultados levou às setes conclusões: os melhores resultados de desenvolvimento de erva-mate são obdos nos consórcios com bracatinga e Pinus sp. e, o pior, na capoeira; as vazes extremas dos fatores do meio são amenizadas pelas outras espécies do consórcio; índices elevados de luminosidade não promovem maior produção de matéria seca, nem os índices muito baixos.

  17. Comportamento da erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil. em consórcio silvicultural.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisilvio Pes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 O presente trabalho foi realizado no Campus da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria e teve por objetivo determinar o comportamento da erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil. cultivada em sistema de consórcio silvicultural. A metodologia adotada constituiu-se da implantação de três tratamentos, correspondentes aos sistemas de consórcio erva-mata x Pinus sp., erva-mate x bracatinga e erva-mate x capoeira. A análise dos resultados levou às seguintes conclusões: os melhores resultados de desenvolvimento da erva-mate são obtidos nos consórcios com bracatinga e Pins sp. e, o pior, na caopeira; as variações externas dos fatores do meio são amenizadas pelas outras espécies do consórcio; índices elevados de luminosidade não promovem maior produção de matéria seca, nem os índices muito baixos.

  18. Silvicultural study of Sapindus saponaria L. (Jaboncillo), as foundation for its silvo-industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Buitrago Jose Alejandro; Silva Herrera Luis Jairo

    2008-01-01

    A silvicultural study of Sapindus saponaria L. was carried out including sexual and asexual propagation tests, provenance test, phenological surveillance, and quantification of fruits production. The sexual propagation test was carried out using five source localities, being the best those seeds from Santa Cruz (Bolivia). The asexual propagation test had a negative result because the cuttings did not root, making it necessary to try different methods for asexual reproduction. The seedlings obtained from the sexual propagation test were used to establish a plantation in Otanche (Boyaca) in order to evaluate growth and mortality. After five months, the highest growth was found in those seeds from Santa Cruz (Bolivia). However, this result was not significant from a statistical point of view. The best results regarding mortality came from the seeds from Viota (Cundinamarca), while those from Palmira (Valle) showed the highest levels of mortality. Fruit production was measured and related to the DBH and the canopy wide. Flowering and fruiting periods as well as the harvest season of the fruits in Viota (Cundinamarca) were established. Some methods for fruit harvesting and planting of the species are proposed.

  19. Improvement of selective screening strategy for gestational diabetes through a more accurate definition of high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintaudi, Basilio; Di Vieste, Giacoma; Corrado, Francesco; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Pellegrini, Fabio; Giunta, Loretta; Nicolucci, Antonio; D'Anna, Rosario; Di Benedetto, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the predictive value of risk factors (RFs) for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) established by selective screening (SS) and to identify subgroups of women at a higher risk of developing GDM. A retrospective, single-center study design was employed. Data of 1015 women screened for GDM at 24-28 weeks of gestation and diagnosed according to the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria were evaluated. Information on RFs established by SS was also collected and their association with GDM was determined. To identify distinct and homogeneous subgroups of patients at a higher risk, the RECursive Partitioning and AMalgamation (RECPAM) method was used. Overall, 113 (11.1%) women were diagnosed as having GDM. The application of the SS criteria would result in the execution of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 58.3% of women and 26 (23.0%) cases of GDM would not be detected due to the absence of any RF. The RECPAM analysis identified high-risk subgroups characterized by fasting plasma glucose values >5.1 mmol/l (odds ratio (OR)=26.5; 95% CI 14.3-49.0) and pre-pregnancy BMI (OR=7.0; 95% CI 3.9-12.8 for overweight women). In a final logistic model including RECPAM classes, previous macrosomia (OR=3.6; 95% CI 1.1-11.6), and family history of diabetes (OR=1.8; 95% CI 1.1-2.8), but not maternal age, were also found to be associated with an increased risk of developing GDM. A screening approach based on the RECPAM model would reduce by over 50% (23.0 vs 10.6%) the number of undiagnosed GDM cases when compared with the current SS approach, at the expense of 50 additional OGTTs required. A screening approach based on our RECPAM model results in a significant reduction in the number of undetected GDM cases compared with the current SS procedure.

  20. Randomized Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Women with Fibromyalgia: Group Acupuncture with Traditional Chinese Medicine Diagnosis-Based Point Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mist, Scott D; Jones, Kim Dupree

    2018-02-13

    Group acupuncture is a growing and cost-effective method for delivering acupuncture in the United States and is the practice model in China. However, group acupuncture has not been tested in a research setting. To test the treatment effect of group acupuncture vs group education in persons with fibromyalgia. Random allocation two-group study with repeated measures. Group clinic in an academic health center in Portland, Oregon. Women with confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia (American College of Radiology 1990 criteria) and moderate to severe pain levels. Twenty treatments of a manualized acupuncture treatment based on Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis or group education over 10 weeks (both 900 minutes total). Weekly Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and Global Fatigue Index at baseline, five weeks, and 10 weeks and a four-week follow-up were assessed. Thirty women were recruited, with 78% reporting symptoms for longer than 10 years. The mean attendance was 810 minutes for acupuncture and 861 minutes for education. FIQR total, FIQR pain, and Global Fatigue Index all had clinically and statistically significant improvement in the group receiving acupuncture at end of treatment and four weeks post-treatment but not in participants receiving group education between groups. Compared with education, group acupuncture improved global symptom impact, pain, and fatigue. Furthermore, it was a safe and well-tolerated treatment option, improving a broader proportion of patients than current pharmaceutical options.

  1. A methodology to select a group of species among 131 tropical (colombian) species for bowed timber applications

    OpenAIRE

    Caicedo-Llano,Natalia

    2014-01-01

    We present a methodology of selecting wood species for architectural purposes, especially when a curved shape is required. First, a mechanical criterion is associated with a morphology, more specifically a characteristic value of stress-strain relation is associated with the attitude of wood for bowing. Second, a filtering is done using data of wood in the green state and in the dry state, and then the wood selection is refined by using relevant criteria related to environment and economic co...

  2. Characterization of composition traits related to organoleptic and functional quality for the differentiation, selection and enhancement of local varieties of tomato from different cultivar groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figàs, Maria R; Prohens, Jaime; Raigón, María D; Fita, Ana; García-Martínez, María D; Casanova, Cristina; Borràs, Dionís; Plazas, Mariola; Andújar, Isabel; Soler, Salvador

    2015-11-15

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) local varieties are having an increasing demand. We characterized 69 local tomato accessions from eight cultivar groups for proximate composition traits, major sugars, acids and antioxidants. A large diversity was found, with differences among accessions of almost tenfold for lycopene. Significant differences were found among cultivar group means for most traits. The Cherry and Penjar groups generally presented higher dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, taste index, β-carotene, ascorbic acid, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity that the other groups. Wide ranges of variation were found within each cultivar group. Positive correlations were found between proximate traits related to taste and antioxidants. The multivariate principal components analysis confirms the distinct profile of the Cherry and Penjar groups and the large variation within groups. The results will be useful for the differentiation, enhancement and selection of local tomato varieties with improved organoleptic properties and functional quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Positive assortative mating with selection restrictions on group coancestry enhances gain while conserving genetic diversity in long-term forest tree breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosvall, O; Mullin, T J

    2003-08-01

    Selection and mating principles in a closed breeding population (BP) were studied by computer simulation. The BP was advanced, either by random assortment of mates (RAM), or by positive assortative mating (PAM). Selection was done with high precision using clonal testing. Selection considered both genetic gain and gene diversity by "group-merit selection", i.e. selection for breeding value weighted by group coancestry of the selected individuals. A range of weights on group coancestry was applied during selection to vary parent contributions and thereby adjust the balance between gain and diversity. This resulted in a series of scenarios with low to high effective population sizes measured by status effective number. Production populations (PP) were selected only for gain, as a subset of the BP. PAM improved gain in the PP substantially, by increasing the additive variance (i.e. the gain potential) of the BP. This effect was more pronounced under restricted selection when parent contributions to the next generation were more balanced with within-family selection as the extreme, i.e. when a higher status effective number was maintained in the BP. In that case, the additional gain over the BP mean for the clone PP and seed PPs was 32 and 84% higher, respectively, for PAM than for RAM in generation 5. PAM did not reduce gene diversity of the BP but increased inbreeding, and in that way caused a departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The effect of inbreeding was eliminated by recombination during the production of seed orchard progeny. Also, for a given level of inbreeding in the seed orchard progeny or in a mixture of genotypes selected for clonal deployment, gain was higher for PAM than for RAM. After including inbreeding depression in the simulation, inbreeding was counteracted by selection, and the enhancement of PAM on production population gain was slightly reduced. In the presence of inbreeding depression the greatest PP gain was achieved at still higher

  4. RADIO GALAXY FEEDBACK IN X-RAY-SELECTED GROUPS FROM COSMOS: THE EFFECT ON THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giodini, S.; Finoguenov, A.; Boehringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Smolcic, V.; Massey, R.; BIrzan, L.; Zamorani, G.; Oklopcic, A.; Pratt, G. W.; Schinnerer, E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Thompson, D.

    2010-01-01

    We quantify the importance of the mechanical energy released by radio galaxies inside galaxy groups. We use scaling relations to estimate the mechanical energy released by 16 radio-active galactic nuclei located inside X-ray-detected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field. By comparing this energy output to the host groups' gravitational binding energy, we find that radio galaxies produce sufficient energy to unbind a significant fraction of the intragroup medium. This unbinding effect is negligible in massive galaxy clusters with deeper potential wells. Our results correctly reproduce the breaking of self-similarity observed in the scaling relation between entropy and temperature for galaxy groups.

  5. Woodland salamander responses to a shelterwood harvest-prescribed burn silvicultural treatment within Appalachian mixed-oak forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, W. Mark; Mahoney, Kathleen R.; Russell, Kevin R.; Rodrigue, Jane L.; Riddle, Jason D.; Schuler, Thomas M.; Adams, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Forest management practices that mimic natural canopy disturbances, including prescribed fire and timber harvests, may reduce competition and facilitate establishment of favorable vegetative species within various ecosystems. Fire suppression in the central Appalachian region for almost a century has contributed to a transition from oak-dominated to more mesophytic, fire-intolerant forest communities. Prescribed fire coupled with timber removal is currently implemented to aid in oak regeneration and establishment but responses of woodland salamanders to this complex silvicultural system is poorly documented. The purpose of our research was to determine how woodland salamanders respond to shelterwood harvests following successive burns in a central Appalachian mixed-oak forest. Woodland salamanders were surveyed using coverboard arrays in May, July, and August–September 2011 and 2012. Surveys were conducted within fenced shelterwood-burn (prescribed fires, shelterwood harvest, and fencing to prevent white-tailed deer [Odocoileus virginianus] herbivory), shelterwood-burn (prescribed fires and shelterwood harvest), and control plots. Relative abundance was modeled in relation to habitat variables measured within treatments for mountain dusky salamanders (Desmognathus ochrophaeus), slimy salamanders (Plethodon glutinosus), and eastern red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus). Mountain dusky salamander relative abundance was positively associated with canopy cover and there were significantly more individuals within controls than either shelterwood-burn or fenced shelterwood-burn treatments. Conversely, habitat variables associated with slimy salamanders and eastern red-backed salamanders did not differ among treatments. Salamander age-class structure within controls did not differ from shelterwood-burn or fenced shelterwood-burn treatments for any species. Overall, the woodland salamander assemblage remained relatively intact throughout the shelterwoodburn

  6. Hydrological impact of two intensities of timber harvest and associated silviculture in the jarrah forest in south-western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinal, J.; Stoneman, G. L.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryThe hydrological impact of two different intensities of timber harvest and associated silviculture, one standard and the other more intensive, was investigated using a paired-catchment study in jarrah forest in south-western Australia. This study was undertaken during a period when average annual rainfall was below the long-term average and deep groundwater levels were declining. Following treatment, recharge increased and slowed the decline in deep groundwater levels in proportion to the magnitude of the initial reduction in vegetation density. However, neither treatment was sufficiently intense to reverse the continued decline in groundwater levels over the course of the study. Annual stream salinity did not increase in response to either treatment because saline deep groundwater did not rise following the treatments. Annual streamflow did not increase in either catchment for three reasons. Firstly, there was little additional net precipitation to the intermittent shallow perched groundwater system in the streamzone because the area remained untreated. Secondly, there was minimal additional throughflow to the perched groundwater system in the streamzone from upslope areas because the increased net precipitation in hillslope areas following treatment was used in replenishing the progressively increasing soil moisture deficit. Thirdly, because groundwater levels did not rise and hence there was little prospect for an increased discharge of saline groundwater or of an expanded deep groundwater discharge zone. This study has demonstrated that the measures that were implemented to timber harvest and silvicultural methods to reduce the magnitude of the groundwater response and hence the risk of a transient increase in stream salinity are effective. If annual rainfall remains relatively low and deep groundwater levels remain at current levels or decline further, then the risk of an increase in stream salinity from either the standard or the more intensive harvest

  7. The benefits of Outsourcing facility services when selecting right service provider for a hotel:Case Kämp Group Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Paudyal, Manoj; Acharya, Saroj

    2015-01-01

    This research paper examines about the outsourcing of facility services in the Kämp group of hotels. The scope of the study includes Facility Management, outsourcing facilities services, and the selection process of the service providers for a hotel. The research was carried at the hotels of Kämp group Oy in the Metropolitan Area of Helsinki. Facility management includes wide ranges of non-core functions such as Property management, real estates, design and technology. Activities such as secu...

  8. Evaluation of the effect of diet composition and B-group vitamins supplementation on selected calcium metabolism parameters in female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Sadowska

    2011-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to observe the effects of a modified diet, in which whole grains of cereals had been isocalorically substituted with wheat flour (type “500”) and saccharose, and supplementation with B-group vitamins, on selected calcium metabolism parameters in female rats. Material and methods. The experiment was carried out on 36 female rats aged 6 months. Animals were fed two different diets. Groups I and II received clean tap water to dr...

  9. Prevention of suicide and attempted suicide in Denmark. Epidemiological studies of suicide and intervention studies in selected risk groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    of young persons who had severe suicidal thoughts or who had attempted suicide showed that risk of repetition was reduced in the intervention group, and that the intervention group obtained a significantly greater improvement in Beck's Depression Inventory, Hopelessness Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale...

  10. Reagent Control of Geometric Selectivity and Enantiotopic Group Preference in Asymmetric Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Reactions with meso-Dialdehydes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tullis, Joshua S.; Vares, Lauri; Kann, Nina

    1998-01-01

    Results from asymmetric Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reactions between chiral phosphonate reagents 3a-d, which contain (1R,2S,5R)-8-phenylmenthol as a chiral auxiliary, and meso-dialdehydes 6 and 14 are presented. It was found that both the geometric selectivities and the levels of asymmetric induction...... choice of reagent and conditions, either (E)- or (Z)-monoaddition products could be obtained geometrically pure and with good to excellent diastereoselectivities, in synthetically useful yields. Analyses of the absolute configurations of the products showed that the (E)-selective reagents (3a...

  11. What drives the association between weight-conscious peer groups and disordered eating? Disentangling genetic and environmental selection from pure socialization effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Shannon M; Burt, S Alexandra; VanHuysse, Jessica L; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies suggest strong associations between exposure to weight-conscious peer groups and increased levels of disordered eating. This association has been attributed to socialization effects (i.e., membership leads to disordered eating); however, selection effects (i.e., selecting into peer groups based on genetic and/or environmental predispositions toward disordered eating) could contribute to or even account for these associations. The current study was the first to use a co-twin control design to disentangle these types of selection factors from socialization effects. Participants included 610 female twins (ages 8-14) drawn from the Michigan State University Twin Registry. To comprehensively examine a range of eating pathology, several disordered eating attitudes and behaviors (e.g., body dissatisfaction, binge eating) were examined via self-report questionnaires. Questionnaires also were used to assess peer group emphasis on body weight and shape. Replicating previous results, significant individual-level associations were found between membership in weight-conscious peer groups and disordered eating. However, co-twin control analyses indicated that these associations were largely due to genetic and/or shared environmental selection factors rather than pure socialization effects. Importantly, results remained unchanged when controlling for pubertal status, suggesting that effects do not vary across developmental stage. Overall, these findings question whether associations between weight-conscious peer groups and disordered eating are due entirely to socialization processes. Future studies are needed to identify the specific genetic and/or shared environmental factors that may drive selection into weight-conscious peer groups. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Selected Differences in the Life Chances of Black and White in the United States. Research Group One, Report No. 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Howard J.

    Tabular data presented in this report comprise: total and black population of the U.S. for every census period from 1790 to 1970, the 50 cities with the largest black population for 1970, an index of residential segregation for 1960, selected views of age and sex, life and death, the educational profile of white and black in 1970, family income…

  13. From pan-reactive KV7 channel opener to subtype selective opener/inhibitor by addition of a methyl group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Sigrid Marie; Rottländer, Mario; Kehler, Jan

    2014-01-01

    .2-5 opener retigabine indicate that SMB-1 binds within the same pocket as retigabine for both inhibition of KV7.2 and activation of KV7.4. SMB-1 may serve as a valuable tool for KV7 channel research and may be used as a template for further design of better subtype selective KV7 channel modulators...

  14. Silvicultural and phytosanitary researches in thinned chestnut coppices at different elevations in Sila (Calabria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvano Avolio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of mensurational and phytosanitary researches ten years after thinning trials in chestnut coppices (Castanea sativa Miller in Sila, are reported.. Eight experimental areas, four located at an average elevation of 1200 m a.s.l. aged 20 yrs and four located on average at 1050 m a.s.l. aged 13 yrs, were compared. Three sub-plots were installed in each area and mensurational and phytosanitary surveys were carried out in 1997 (before and after thinning trials and ten years later (2007 on 30 stools per sub-plot to assess bio-ecological, structural and compositional status of the standing crops. At each elevation, the experimental protocol included the following theses: thesis T (control: release of the standing crop and removal of dried up stems on the ground, only; thesis A (light thinning: removal of the dominated storey, on average 30% of coppice shoots, poorly shaped, both withered and green; thesis B (moderate thinning: removal from the dominated up to the dominant storey = 43% of the shoots, both dried up and green; thesis C (heavy thinning: removal = 62% of coppice shoots, both withered and green. Results highlighted the significance of thinnings in the cultivation of chestnut coppices. As for silviculture and growth pattern, the surveying ten years later showed the following outcomes: reduction of shoots mortality, according to the thinning intensity from A to C (by comparing the number of dried up coppice shoots surveyed in the control theses; a higher number of coppice shoots in the commercial category “average stems” in the thinned plots; the higher percentage increment in dbh, basal area and volume in the sub-plots undergoing thinning A and C at the elevation of 1050 m and, in general, with thesis C at both elevations; the complete recovery of canopy cover even in the sub-plots heavily thinned. As for the phytosanitary aspects, the research has been oriented on the chestnut blight caused by Cryphonectria parasitica, due to

  15. Selective antagonists at group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis and molecular pharmacology of 4-aryl-3-isoxazolol amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Hasse; Sløk, Frank A; Stensbøl, Tine B

    2002-01-01

    Homologation of (S)-glutamic acid (Glu, 1) and Glu analogues has previously provided ligands with activity at metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The homologue of ibotenic acid (7), 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (HIBO, 8), and the 4-phenyl derivative of 8, compound 9a, are bot...... antagonists at group I mGluRs. Here we report the synthesis and molecular pharmacology of HIBO analogues 9b-h containing different 4-aryl substituents. All of these compounds possess antagonist activity at group I mGluRs but are inactive at group II and III mGluRs....

  16. Rh2(II)-Catalyzed Nitro-group Migration Reactions: Selective Synthesis of 3-Nitroindoles from β-Nitro Styryl Azides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Benjamin J.; Liu, Sheng; Driver, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodium carboxylate complexes (1 mol %) catalyze the migration of electron withdrawing groups to selectively produce 3-substituted indoles from β-substituted styryl azides. The relative order of migratorial aptitude for this transformation is ester ≪ amide < H < sulfonyl < benzoyl ≪ nitro. PMID:21401042

  17. Development and application of a selective pcr-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach to detect a recently cultivated Bacillus group predominant in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzeneva, V.A.; Li, Y.; Felske, A.; Vos, de W.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Vaughan, E.E.; Smidt, H.

    2004-01-01

    The worldwide presence of a hitherto-nondescribed group of predominant soil microorganisms related to Bacillus benzoevorans was analyzed after development of two sets of selective primers targeting 16S rRNA genes in combination with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The high abundance

  18. GIS-based identification of areas with mineral resource potential for six selected deposit groups, Bureau of Land Management Central Yukon Planning Area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James V.; Karl, Susan M.; Labay, Keith A.; Shew, Nora B.; Granitto, Matthew; Hayes, Timothy S.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Todd, Erin; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    This study, covering the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Central Yukon Planning Area (CYPA), Alaska, was prepared to aid BLM mineral resource management planning. Estimated mineral resource potential and certainty are mapped for six selected mineral deposit groups: (1) rare earth element (REE) deposits associated with peralkaline to carbonatitic intrusive igneous rocks, (2) placer and paleoplacer gold, (3) platinum group element (PGE) deposits associated with mafic and ultramafic intrusive igneous rocks, (4) carbonate-hosted copper deposits, (5) sandstone uranium deposits, and (6) tin-tungsten-molybdenum-fluorspar deposits associated with specialized granites. These six deposit groups include most of the strategic and critical elements of greatest interest in current exploration.

  19. Pitting binding against selection--electrophysiological measures of feature-based attention are attenuated by Gestalt object grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Adam C; Fiebelkorn, Ian C; Foxe, John J

    2012-03-01

    Humans have limited cognitive resources to process the nearly limitless information available in the environment. Endogenous, or 'top-down', selective attention to basic visual features such as color or motion is a common strategy for biasing resources in favor of the most relevant information sources in a given context. Opposing this top-down separation of features is a 'bottom-up' tendency to integrate, or bind, the various features that constitute objects. We pitted these two processes against each other in an electrophysiological experiment to test if top-down selective attention can overcome constitutive binding processes. Our results demonstrate that bottom-up binding processes can dominate top-down feature-based attention even when explicitly detrimental to task performance. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Expert agreed standards for the selection and development of cancer support group leaders: an online reactive Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomery, Amanda; Schofield, Penelope; Xhilaga, Miranda; Gough, Karla

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop pragmatic, consensus-based minimum standards for the role of a cancer support group leader. Secondly, to produce a structured interview designed to assess the knowledge, skills and attributes of the individuals who seek to undertake the role. An expert panel of 73 academics, health professionals, cancer agency workers and cancer support group leaders were invited to participate in a reactive online Delphi study involving three online questionnaire rounds. Participants determined and ranked requisite knowledge, skills and attributes (KSA) for cancer support group leaders, differentiated ideal from required KSA to establish minimum standards, and agreed on a method of rating KSA to determine suitability and readiness. Forty-five experts (62%) participated in round 1, 36 (49%) in round 2 and 23 (31%) in round 3. In round 1, experts confirmed 59 KSA identified via a systemic review and identified a further 55 KSA. In round 2, using agreement ≥75%, 52 KSA emerged as minimum standards for support group leaders. In round 3, consensus was reached on almost every aspect of the content and structure of a structured interview. Panel member comments guided refinement of wording, re-ordering of questions and improvement of probing questions. Alongside a novel structured interview, the first consensus-based minimum standards have been developed for cancer support group leaders, incorporating expert consensus and pragmatic considerations. Pilot and field testing will be used to appraise aspects of clinical utility and establish a rational scoring model for the structured interview.

  1. Diffusion approximations for one-locus multi-allele kin selection, mutation and random drift in group-structured populations: a unifying approach to selection models in population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Sabin

    2009-11-01

    Diffusion approximations are ascertained from a two-time-scale argument in the case of a group-structured diploid population with scaled viability parameters depending on the individual genotype and the group type at a single multi-allelic locus under recurrent mutation, and applied to the case of random pairwise interactions within groups. The main step consists in proving global and uniform convergence of the distribution of the group types in an infinite population in the absence of selection and mutation, using a coalescent approach. An inclusive fitness formulation with coefficient of relatedness between a focal individual J affecting the reproductive success of an individual I, defined as the expected fraction of genes in I that are identical by descent to one or more genes in J in a neutral infinite population, given that J is allozygous or autozygous, yields the correct selection drift functions. These are analogous to the selection drift functions obtained with pure viability selection in a population with inbreeding. They give the changes of the allele frequencies in an infinite population without mutation that correspond to the replicator equation with fitness matrix expressed as a linear combination of a symmetric matrix for allozygous individuals and a rank-one matrix for autozygous individuals. In the case of no inbreeding, the mean inclusive fitness is a strict Lyapunov function with respect to this deterministic dynamics. Connections are made between dispersal with exact replacement (proportional dispersal), uniform dispersal, and local extinction and recolonization. The timing of dispersal (before or after selection, before or after mating) is shown to have an effect on group competition and the effective population size.

  2. Socialization and Selection Effects in the Association between Weight Conscious Peer Groups and Thin-Ideal Internalization: A Co-Twin Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, S. Alexandra; O’Connor, Shannon; Thompson, J. Kevin; Klump, Kelly L.

    2016-01-01

    Affiliation with weight conscious peer groups is theorized to increase thin-ideal internalization through socialization processes. However, selection effects could contribute if genetic and/or environmental predispositions lead to affiliation with weight conscious peers. Co-twin control methodology was used to examine socialization and selection effects in 614 female twins (ages 8–15) from the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR). Thin-ideal internalization and peer group characteristics were assessed via self-report questionnaires. Results suggested the presence of both socialization and selection effects. In terms of socialization, twins who reported increased exposure to weight conscious peers relative to their co-twins had elevated thin-ideal internalization scores, regardless of zygosity. However, associations between weight conscious peers and thin-ideal internationalization within twin pairs were attenuated, suggesting that genetic and shared environmental selection effects also contribute. Findings significantly extend previous work by confirming the presence of socialization processes and highlighting selection processes to be examined in future longitudinal research. PMID:26859605

  3. Socialization and selection effects in the association between weight conscious peer groups and thin-ideal internalization: A co-twin control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHuysse, Jessica L; Burt, S Alexandra; O'Connor, Shannon M; Thompson, J Kevin; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-06-01

    Affiliation with weight conscious peer groups is theorized to increase thin-ideal internalization through socialization processes. However, selection effects could contribute if genetic and/or environmental predispositions lead to affiliation with weight conscious peers. Co-twin control methodology was used to examine socialization and selection effects in 614 female twins (ages 8-15) from the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR). Thin-ideal internalization and peer group characteristics were assessed via self-report questionnaires. Results suggested the presence of both socialization and selection effects. In terms of socialization, twins who reported increased exposure to weight conscious peers relative to their co-twins had elevated thin-ideal internalization scores, regardless of zygosity. However, associations between weight conscious peers and thin-ideal internationalization within twin pairs were attenuated, suggesting that genetic and shared environmental selection effects also contribute. Findings significantly extend previous work by confirming the presence of socialization processes and highlighting selection processes to be examined in future longitudinal research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Are post-fire silvicultural treatments a useful tool to fight the climate change threat in terms of plant diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedo de Santiago, Javier; Esteban Lucasr Borja, Manuel; de las Heras, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Adaptative forest management demands a huge scientific knowledge about post-fire vegetation dynamics, taking into account the current context of global change. We hypothesized that management practices should be carry out taking into account the climate change effect, to obtain better results in the biodiversity maintenance across time. All of this with respect to diversity and species composition of the post-fire naturally regenerated Aleppo pine forests understory. The study was carried out in two post-fire naturally regenerated Aleppo pine forests in the Southeastern of the Iberian Peninsula, under contrasting climatic conditions: Yeste (Albacete) shows a dry climate and Calasparra (Murcia) shows a semiarid climate. Thinning as post-fire silvicultural treatment was carried out five years after the wildfire event, in the year 1999. An experiment of artificial drought was designed to evacuate 15% of the natural rainfall in both sites, Yeste and Calasparra, to simulate climate change. Taking into account all the variables (site, silvicultural treatment and artificial drought), alpha diversity indices including species richness, Shannon and Simpson diversity indices, and plant cover, were analyzed as a measure of vegetation abundance. The results showed that plant species were affected by thinning, whereas induced drought affected total cover and species, with lower values at Yeste. Significant site variation was also observed in soil properties, species richness and total plant cover, conversely to the plant species diversity indices. We conclude that the plant community shows different responses to a simulated environment of climate change depending on the experimental site.

  5. What Are Student Loan Borrowers Thinking? Insights from Focus Groups on College Selection and Student Loan Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carrie L.; O'Neill, Barbara; Worthy, Sheri Lokken; Lown, Jean M.; Bowen, Cathy F.

    2016-01-01

    This study used data from online focus groups collected from November 2014 to April 2015 to understand college students' decision-making processes when borrowing money to finance their education. Data were collected using an online course management system. Results suggest that (a) students relied heavily on advice from parents, guidance…

  6. Comparison of Selected Protein Levels in Tumour and Surgical Margin in a Group of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Gołąbek, Karolina; Cuber, Piotr; Krakowczyk, Łukasz; Owczarek, Aleksander Jerzy; Fronczek, Martyna; Choręża, Piotr; Hudziec, Edyta; Ostrowska, Zofia

    2017-08-01

    Oral cavity cancer belongs to head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma group. The purpose of the study was to assess the levels of certain proteins in a tumour and surgical margin in a group of patients with oral cavity cancer. The levels of DAPK1, MGMT, CDH1, SFRP1, SFRP2, RORA, TIMP3, p16, APC and RASSF1 proteins were measured by ELISA in tissue homogenates. The protein levels of DAPK1, MGMT, CDH1, SFRP2 and RASSF1 were significantly higher in tumour tissue than in the margin, contrary to TIMP3 which was lower in the tumour itself. DAPK1 level in the tumour was significantly higher in females than in males, the MGMT and p16 levels were lower in the tumours with lymph node metastasis (N1 + N2) than in N0 samples. The CDH1 expression was higher in a group with smoking habits, whereas TIMP3 was lower in this group. Changes in the levels of proteins in tumour and surgical margin may be either reflective of tumour occurrence and development, or they might be also responsible for the progress and reoccurrence of the disease. Levels of the studied proteins might be good prognostic factors; however, further studies are required.

  7. Ground-layer plant community responses to even-age and uneven-age silvicultural treatments in Wisconsin northern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristel C. Kern; Brian J. Palik; Terry F. Strong

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated ground-layer plant diversity and community composition in northern hardwood forests among uncut controls and stands managed with even-age or uneven-age silvicultural systems. Even-age treatments included diameter-limit cuttings (20-cm diameter at 30-cm stem height) in 1952 and shelterwood removals in 1964. Uneven-age treatments included three intensities...

  8. Integrated management of carbon sequestration and biomass utilization opportunities in a changing climate: Proceedings of the 2009 National Silviculture Workshop; 2009 June 15-18; Boise, ID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain; Russell T. Graham; Jonathan Sandquist

    2010-01-01

    Forests are important for carbon sequestration and how they are manipulated either through natural or human induced disturbances can have an effect on CO2 emissions and carbon sequestration. The 2009 National Silviculture Workshop presented scientific information and management strategies to meet a variety of objectives while simultaneously addressing carbon...

  9. The Impact of Selected Groups of Non-communicable Disease Deaths on Life Expectancy in the Slovak Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavurová, Beáta; Vagašová, Tatiana; Dražilová, Sylvia; Jarčuška, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compute the potential gains in life expectancy (PGLEs) if the five main groups of non-communicable disease deaths were eliminated in the Slovak population during 1996-2014, and to decompose PGLEs by five-year age groups. PGLEs were computed from mortality reports for deaths from ischaemic heart disease (I20-25), cerebrovascular diseases (I60-I69), cancer (C00-C97), diabetes mellitus (E10-E14), and chronic respiratory diseases (J30-J98) using the life table decomposition technique. In 2014, life expectancy at birth was 76.87 years compared to 72.87 in 1996. The highest impact on life expectancy was recorded for ischaemic heart disease and PGLEs have changed from 3.9 years to 4.6 over 1996-2014. However, the trends for other diseases did not fluctuate. The PGLEs of cancer, as the second most influential disease, increased from 3.3 years to 3.6. Conversely, a slight decline was observed in cerebrovascular diseases from 1.13 years to 1.12, and diabetes mellitus from 0.14 years to 0.13. The proportion of diabetes mellitus and chronic respiratory diseases in PGLEs was low, approaching zero. As far as PGLEs among age groups in 2014 are concerened: whereas PGLEs for ischaemic heart disease mortality reduction are very similar among all age groups they are mostly on the decrease from other causes of death. However, PGLEs reached a value of 0.13 years in the 0-54 years age-group for diabetes mellitus; this means that the number of years of life lost are the same for 54 year old people and younger, with the impact of diabetes mellitus declining at age 55 and over. The same scenario is apparent for cerebrovascular diseases. The impact of mortality from other causes of death is decreasing with age. Our findings suggest that optimum benefit would be gained from prevention programs for reduction of ischaemic heart disease mortality in all age groups. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017.

  10. How Select Groups of Preservice Science Teachers with Inquiry Orientations View Teaching and Learning Science through Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Peggy

    Although hailed as a powerful form of instruction, in most teaching and learning contexts, inquiry-based instruction is fraught with ambiguous and conflicting definitions and descriptions. Yet little has been written about the experiences preservice science teacher have regarding their learning to teach science through inquiry. This project sought to understand how select preservice secondary science teachers enrolled in three UTeach programs in Arkansas conceptualize inquiry instruction and how they rationalize its value in a teaching and learning context. The three teacher education programs investigated in this study are adoption sites aligned with the UTeach Program in Austin, TX that distinguishes itself in part by its inquiry emphasis. Using a mixed method investigation design, this study utilized two sources of data to explore the preservice science teachers' thinking. In the first phase, a modified version of the Pedagogy of Science teaching Tests (POSTT) was used to identify select program participants who indicated preferences for inquiry instruction over other instructional strategies. Secondly, the study used an open-ended questionnaire to explore the selected subjects' beliefs and conceptions of teaching and learning science in an inquiry context. The study also focused on identifying particular junctures in the prospective science teachers' education preparation that might impact their understanding about inquiry. Using a constant comparative approach, this study explored 19 preservice science teachers' conceptions about inquiry. The results indicate that across all levels of instruction, the prospective teachers tended to have strong student-centered teaching orientations. Except subjects in for the earliest courses, subjects' definitions and descriptions of inquiry tended toward a few of the science practices. More advanced subjects, however, expressed more in-depth descriptions. Excluding the subjects who have completed the program, multiple

  11. Target-specific NMR detection of protein-ligand interactions with antibody-relayed 15N-group selective STD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Hegedűs, Zsófia; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva; Kövér, Katalin E; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-12-01

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein-ligand interactions is a key element. 1 H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed 15 N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A 15 N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  12. Impact of personality temperaments and characters on academic performance and specialty selection among a group of Egyptian medical graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sheikh, Mona M; Shaker, Nermin M; Hussein, Hanan; Ramy, Hisham A

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between personality temperaments, academic achievement and specialty interest is important because of its implications in career counseling. To assess the effect of personality on academic performance and career selection and to study the impact of some sociodemographic factors on academic achievement and career choice of medical graduates. A total of 436 medical graduates of Ain Shams medical school were approached, out of which 331 participated. They were given a sociodemographic questionnaire, and the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R; 240) for personality construct; they had to answer questions about academic achievement, ranking, scores and choice of medical specialty. Novelty seeking (NS1, NS2 and NS3) and self-transcendence (ST1 and ST2) were correlated with graduation ranking, (r = .2, p = .00; r = .15, p = .009; r = .16, p = .005; r = .12, p = .003; r = .14, p = .02; r = .17, p = .004; r = .13, p = .03, respectively), that is, lower NS and ST had better academic outcome. Only high school score was associated with better achievement (p = .00). In specialty selection, females were significantly overrepresented in pediatrics and clinical pathology, whereas males were significantly predominating surgical specialties except for obstetrics and gynecology (p = .00). Students choosing patient-centered specialties had higher reward dependence (RD), persistence (PS) and cooperativeness (C); those choosing clinical pathology had highest harm avoidance (HA), whereas those choosing radiology had lowest HA and those choosing surgery had significantly higher self-directedness (SD3). Personality impacts academic achievement and specialty choice with other factors as gender and previous scholastic performance. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Kinetic and structural basis for acyl-group selectivity and NAD+-dependence in Sirtuin-catalyzed deacylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Julie N.; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Acylation of lysine is an important protein modification regulating diverse biological processes. It was recently demonstrated that members of the human Sirtuin family are capable of catalyzing long-chain deacylation, in addition to the well-known NAD+-dependent deacetylation activity.1 Here we provide a detailed kinetic and structural analysis that describes the interdependence of NAD+ and acyl-group length for a diverse series of human Sirtuins, SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3 and SIRT6. Steady-state and rapid-quench kinetic analyses indicated that differences in NAD+ saturation and susceptibility to nicotinamide inhibition reflect unique kinetic behavior displayed by each Sirtuin and depend on acyl-substrate chain length. Though the rate of nucleophilic attack of the 2′-hydroxyl on the C1′-O-alkylimidate intermediate varies with acyl substrate chain length, this step remains rate-determining for SIRT2 and SIRT3; however for SIRT6, this step is no longer rate-limiting for long-chain substrates. Co-crystallization of SIRT2 with myristoylated peptide and NAD+ yielded a co-complex structure with reaction product 2′-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose, revealing a latent hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the long chain acyl group, and suggesting a general mechanism for long chain deacylation. Comparing two separately solved co-complex structures containing either a myristoylated peptide or 2′-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose indicate there are conformational changes at the myristoyl-ribose linkage with minimal structural differences in the enzyme active site. During the deacylation reaction, the fatty acyl group is held in a relatively fixed position. We describe a kinetic and structural model to explain how various Sirtuins display unique acyl-substrate preferences and how different reaction kinetics influence NAD+ dependence. The biological implications are discussed. PMID:25897714

  14. Winter blood values of selected parameters in a group of non-hibernating captive brown bears (Ursus arctos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergiel, A; Bednarski, M; Maślak, R; Piasecki, T; Huber, D

    2015-01-01

    Bears undergo some significant changes reflected in blood values during winter season. The most significant are reduced urea and increased creatinine, by some authors considered to be physiological indicators of hibernation. Studied group of six captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) showed decreased activity in winter but were accepting food and walked outdoors. Blood parameters assessed in February 2011 revealed mean values of leucocytes and neutrophils as significantly lower, and creatinine significantly increased compared to captive and free living bears sampled during other seasons when bears are active.

  15. Forest-food nexus: a topical opportunity for human well-being and silviculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piermaria Corona

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As population will reach over 9 billion by 2050, interest in the forest-food nexus is rising. Forests play an important role in food production and nutrition. Forests can provide nutritionally-balanced diets, woodfuel for cooking and a broad set of ecosystem services. A large body of evidence recommends multi-functional and integrated landscape approaches to reimagine forestry and agriculture systems. Here, after a commented discussion of the literature produced in the last decade about the role for forests with respect to the food security global emergency, we summarize the state of the art in Italy as a representative country-case-study. The aim is to increase awareness about the potential of silviculture in Italy for combining ecological resilience with economic resilience, and reducing the pressure over tropical and sub-tropical forests by means of a sustainable intensification of forest management at national level. Although a quantification of the Italian non-wood forest products is difficult, the potential of this sector for the Italian bioeconomy is relatively high. Italy is among the four top European exporters of cork stoppers, is one of the three top countries for chestnut seed processing, and is among the leading exporters of wild mushroom, while it is the only European country among the top five global importers of tannins. In order to develop this sector for the food industry, more research is needed on non-wood forest products, the scale of production, emerging markets, marketing and production innovation. On the other hand, chain-supply fragmentation, landowner inertia, and lack of governance and cooperation may hamper an effective exploitation of non-wood products. A renewed joint impulse for exploitation of wood and non-wood products may come from a sustainable intensification of forest management. The strategies to guarantee an effective supply of non-wood products require appropriate business skills and the presence of a

  16. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saremi, E; Abedi, A; Javadi, A; Khosroshahi, H; Molaei Nezhad, A; Van Loon, J Th; Bamber, J; Hashemi, S A; Nikzat, F

    2017-01-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss. (paper)

  17. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, E.; Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th; Khosroshahi, H.; Abedi, A.; Bamber, J.; Hashemi, S. A.; Nikzat, F.; Molaei Nezhad, A.

    2017-06-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss.

  18. Determining the selectivity of divalent metal cations for the carboxyl group of alginate hydrogel beads during competitive sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Byungryul; Lee, Healim; Lee, Soonjae; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the competitive sorption of divalent metal ions such as Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Pb(2+) on alginate hydrogel beads, batch and column tests were conducted. The concentration of carboxyl group was found to be limited in the preparation of spherical hydrogel beads. From kinetic test results, 80% of sorption was observed within 4h, and equilibrium was attained in 48 h. According to the comparison of the total uptake and release, divalent metal ions were found to stoichiometrically interact with the carboxyl group in the alginate polymer chain. From the Langmuir equation, the maximum capacities of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Ni(2+) were calculated to be 1.1, 0.48, and 0.13 mmol/g, respectively. The separation factor (α) values for αPb/Cu, αPb/Ni, and αCu/Ni were 14.0, 98.9, and 7.1, respectively. The sorption capacity of Pb(2+) was not affected by the solution pH; however, the sorption capacities of Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) decreased with increasing solution pH, caused by competition with hydrogen. According to the result from the fixed column test, Pb(2+) exhibited the highest affinity, followed by Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), which is in exact agreement with those of kinetic and isotherm tests. The sorbent could be regenerated using 4% HCl, and the regenerated sorbent exhibited 90% capacity upto 9 cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Functionalizing porous aromatic frameworks with polar organic groups for high-capacity and selective CO2 separation: a molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babarao, Ravichandar; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2011-04-05

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) were recently synthesized with the highest surface area to date; one such PAF (PAF-1) has diamond-like structure with biphenyl building blocks and exhibits exceptional thermal and hydrothermal stabilities. Herein, we computationally design new PAFs by introducing polar organic groups to the biphenyl unit and then investigate their separating power toward CO(2) by using grand-canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. Among these functional PAFs, we found that tetrahydrofuran-like ether-functionalized PAF-1 shows higher adsorption capacity for CO(2) at 1 bar and 298 K (10 mol per kilogram of adsorbent) and also much higher selectivities for CO(2)/CH(4), CO(2)/N(2), and CO(2)/H(2) mixtures when compared with the amine functionality. The electrostatic interactions are found to play a dominant role in the high CO(2) selectivities of functional PAFs, as switching off atomic charges would decrease the selectivity by an order of magnitude. This work suggests that functionalizing porous frameworks with tetrahydrofuran-like ether groups is a promising way to increase CO(2) adsorption capacity and selectivity, especially at ambient pressures.

  20. Synthesis and pharmacology of 3-isoxazolol amino acids as selective antagonists at group I metabotropic glutamic acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2001-01-01

    GluRs), the few analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [HIBO, (RS)-4] so far known typically interact with iGluRs as well as metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). We here report the synthesis and pharmacology of a series of 4-substituted analogues of HIBO. The hexyl analogue 9 was shown......Using ibotenic acid (2) as a lead, two series of 3-isoxazolol amino acid ligands for (S)-glutamic acid (Glu, 1) receptors have been developed. Whereas analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [AMPA, (RS)-3] interact selectively with ionotropic Glu receptors (i...... to originate in (S)-11 (EC(50) = 395 microM, K(b) = 86 and 90 microM, respectively). Compound 9, administered icv, but not sc, was shown to protect mice against convulsions induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). Compounds 9 and 11 were resolved using chiral HPLC, and the configurational assignments...

  1. Synthesis and pharmacology of 3-isoxazolol amino acids as selective antagonists at group I metabotropic glutamic acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2001-01-01

    Using ibotenic acid (2) as a lead, two series of 3-isoxazolol amino acid ligands for (S)-glutamic acid (Glu, 1) receptors have been developed. Whereas analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [AMPA, (RS)-3] interact selectively with ionotropic Glu receptors (i......GluRs), the few analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [HIBO, (RS)-4] so far known typically interact with iGluRs as well as metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). We here report the synthesis and pharmacology of a series of 4-substituted analogues of HIBO. The hexyl analogue 9 was shown...... to originate in (S)-11 (EC(50) = 395 microM, K(b) = 86 and 90 microM, respectively). Compound 9, administered icv, but not sc, was shown to protect mice against convulsions induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). Compounds 9 and 11 were resolved using chiral HPLC, and the configurational assignments...

  2. Using focus groups to investigate service quality determinants for customer satisfaction in selected university libraries in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaminda Jayasundara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at establishing service quality determinants which may affect customer satisfaction in university libraries in Sri Lanka. Using the literature, 113 service quality determinants were identified. These were then reviewed by eight focus groups in four different universities. Forty of the determinants were perceived to be applicable to their context. The participants also added 14 quality requirements which they thought were not provided for in the list. Finally, the content and face validity of the 54 determinants were evaluated by a panel of experts who ultimately reduced them to 50. This study recommends the use of the identified quality determinants by library administrators and policymakers in the higher education sector in Sri Lanka to gauge the levels of customer satisfaction and assure quality of service.

  3. Explaining the Immigrant Health Advantage: Self-selection and Protection in Health-Related Factors Among Five Major National-Origin Immigrant Groups in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riosmena, Fernando; Kuhn, Randall; Jochem, Warren C.

    2017-01-01

    Despite being newcomers, immigrants often exhibit better health relative to native-born populations in industrialized societies. We extend prior efforts to identify whether self-selection and/or protection explain this advantage. We examine migrant height and smoking levels just prior to immigration to test for self-selection; and we analyze smoking behavior since immigration, controlling for self-selection, to assess protection. We study individuals aged 20–49 from five major national origins: India, China, the Philippines, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic. To assess self-selection, we compare migrants, interviewed in the National Health and Interview Surveys (NHIS), with nonmigrant peers in sending nations, interviewed in the World Health Surveys. To test for protection, we contrast migrants’ changes in smoking since immigration with two counterfactuals: (1) rates that immigrants would have exhibited had they adopted the behavior of U.S.-born non-Hispanic whites in the NHIS (full —assimilation ); and (2) rates that migrants would have had if they had adopted the rates of nonmigrants in sending countries (no-migration scenario). We find statistically significant and substantial self-selection, particularly among men from both higher-skilled (Indians and Filipinos in height, Chinese in smoking) and lower-skilled (Mexican) undocumented pools. We also find significant and substantial protection in smoking among immigrant groups with stronger relative social capital (Mexicans and Dominicans). PMID:28092071

  4. Explaining the Immigrant Health Advantage: Self-selection and Protection in Health-Related Factors Among Five Major National-Origin Immigrant Groups in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riosmena, Fernando; Kuhn, Randall; Jochem, Warren C

    2017-02-01

    Despite being newcomers, immigrants often exhibit better health relative to native-born populations in industrialized societies. We extend prior efforts to identify whether self-selection and/or protection explain this advantage. We examine migrant height and smoking levels just prior to immigration to test for self-selection; and we analyze smoking behavior since immigration, controlling for self-selection, to assess protection. We study individuals aged 20-49 from five major national origins: India, China, the Philippines, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic. To assess self-selection, we compare migrants, interviewed in the National Health and Interview Surveys (NHIS), with nonmigrant peers in sending nations, interviewed in the World Health Surveys. To test for protection, we contrast migrants' changes in smoking since immigration with two counterfactuals: (1) rates that immigrants would have exhibited had they adopted the behavior of U.S.-born non-Hispanic whites in the NHIS (full "assimilation"); and (2) rates that migrants would have had if they had adopted the rates of nonmigrants in sending countries (no-migration scenario). We find statistically significant and substantial self-selection, particularly among men from both higher-skilled (Indians and Filipinos in height, Chinese in smoking) and lower-skilled (Mexican) undocumented pools. We also find significant and substantial protection in smoking among immigrant groups with stronger relative social capital (Mexicans and Dominicans).

  5. From pan-reactive KV7 channel opener to subtype selective opener/inhibitor by addition of a methyl group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Marie Blom

    Full Text Available The voltage-gated potassium channels of the KV7 family (KV7.1-5 play important roles in controlling neuronal excitability and are therefore attractive targets for treatment of CNS disorders linked to hyperexcitability. One of the main challenges in developing KV7 channel active drugs has been to identify compounds capable of discriminating between the neuronally expressed subtypes (KV7.2-5, aiding the identification of the subunit composition of KV7 currents in various tissues, and possessing better therapeutic potential for particular indications. By taking advantage of the structure-activity relationship of acrylamide KV7 channel openers and the effects of these compounds on mutant KV7 channels, we have designed and synthesized a novel KV7 channel modulator with a unique profile. The compound, named SMB-1, is an inhibitor of KV7.2 and an activator of KV7.4. SMB-1 inhibits KV7.2 by reducing the current amplitude and increasing the time constant for the slow component of the activation kinetics. The activation of KV7.4 is seen as an increase in the current amplitude and a slowing of the deactivation kinetics. Experiments studying mutant channels with a compromised binding site for the KV7.2-5 opener retigabine indicate that SMB-1 binds within the same pocket as retigabine for both inhibition of KV7.2 and activation of KV7.4. SMB-1 may serve as a valuable tool for KV7 channel research and may be used as a template for further design of better subtype selective KV7 channel modulators. A compound with this profile could hold novel therapeutic potential such as the treatment of both positive and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia.

  6. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C cells remove pyrimidine dimers selectively from the transcribed strand of active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, J.; van Hoffen, A.; Karcagi, V.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mullenders, L.H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA fragments of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes in primary normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells. Using strand-specific probes, we show that in normal cells, preferential repair of the 5' part of the ADA gene is due to the rapid and efficient repair of the transcribed strand. Within 8 h after irradiation with UV at 10 J m-2, 70% of the pyrimidine dimers in this strand are removed. The nontranscribed strand is repaired at a much slower rate, with 30% dimers removed after 8 h. Repair of the transcribed strand in XP-C cells occurs at a rate indistinguishable from that in normal cells, but the nontranscribed strand is not repaired significantly in these cells. Similar results were obtained for the DHFR gene. In the 3' part of the ADA gene, however, both normal and XP-C cells perform fast and efficient repair of either strand, which is likely to be caused by the presence of transcription units on both strands. The factor defective in XP-C cells is apparently involved in the processing of DNA damage in inactive parts of the genome, including nontranscribed strands of active genes. These findings have important implications for the understanding of the mechanism of UV-induced excision repair and mutagenesis in mammalian cells

  7. Selection of greenery plants' group tolerant to mineralized human wastes for their inclusion into intrasystem mass exchange of BTLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Kalacheva, Galina; Ushakova, Sofya; Trifonov, Sergey V.; Pavlova, Anastasiya

    2016-07-01

    A possible way solving the inclusion problem of the human liquid wastes containing sodium chloride into intrasystem mass exchange of bio-technical life support system (BTLSS) is selection of such species of greenery plants that can utilize sodium chloride, be edible for a human and have rather a high productivity. Our previous works showed that salt-accumulating halophyte Salicornia europaea L. was a promising candidate for sodium chloride inclusion into BTLSS mass exchange. However, with the aim of creation of more various human diet possibilities a set of greenery plants cultivated by the water culture method was estimated. Based on preliminary experiments the plants Brassica juncea L., Nasturtium officinale R. Br., Lepidium sativum angustifolia L. and Salicornia europaea L. were chosen as the investigation objects. The nutrient solution for greenery plant's cultivation was obtained after harvesting the wheat plants grown on the solution with mineralized human wastes' addition. The results of the first stage of the investigations carried out showed that plants of Brassica juncea and Lepidium sativum angustifolia are unpromising for their inclusion into BTLSS because of a set of physiological characteristics. On the next stage of investigations, an experimental model of closed ecosystem was created. For that purpose the plants of Salicornia europaea and Nasturtium officinale were introduced in the phototroph unit structure. It was determined that there was deficiency of main macronutrients for Salicornia europaea and Nasturtium officinale including sodium for Salicornia europaea. The deficiency had an effect on plants productivity and on carry-over of sodium from solution by Salicornia europaea. Thus in the future experiment it is necessary to carry out desalinization of solution by Salicornia europaea plants. Nasturtium officinale, that is rich in essential fatty acids and contributes into variety of human vegetable diet is planned to be cultivated by the

  8. Ability of Group IVB metallocene polyethers containing dienestrol to arrest the growth of selected cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Monomeric Group IVB (Ti, Zr and Hf) metallocenes represent a new class of antitumor compounds. There is literature on the general biological activities of some organotin compounds. Unfortunately, there is little information with respect to the molecular level activity of these organotin compounds. We recently started focusing on the anti-cancer activity of organotin polymers that we had made for other purposes and as part of our platinum anti-cancer effort. Methods For this study, we synthesized a new series of metallocene-containing compounds coupling the metallocene unit with dienestrol, a synthetic, nonsteroidal estrogen. This is part of our effort to couple known moieties that offer antitumor activity with biologically active units hoping to increase the biological activity of the combination. The materials were confirmed to be polymeric using light scattering photometry and the structural repeat unit was verified employing matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy results. Results The polymers demonstrated the ability to suppress the growth of a series of tumor cell lines originating from breast, colon, prostrate, and lung cancers at concentrations generally lower than those required for inhibition of cell growth by the commonly used antitumor drug cisplatin. Conclusion These drugs show great promise in vitro against a number of cancer cell lines and due to their polymeric nature will most likely be less toxic than currently used metal-containing drugs such as cisplatin. These drugs also offer several addition positive aspects. First, the reactants are commercially available so that additional synthetic steps are not needed. Second, synthesis of the polymer is rapid, occurring within about 15 seconds. Third, the interfacial synthetic system is already industrially employed in the synthesis of aromatic nylons and polycarbonates. Thus, the ability to synthesize large amounts of the drugs is straight

  9. Ability of Group IVB metallocene polyethers containing dienestrol to arrest the growth of selected cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashida Yuki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monomeric Group IVB (Ti, Zr and Hf metallocenes represent a new class of antitumor compounds. There is literature on the general biological activities of some organotin compounds. Unfortunately, there is little information with respect to the molecular level activity of these organotin compounds. We recently started focusing on the anti-cancer activity of organotin polymers that we had made for other purposes and as part of our platinum anti-cancer effort. Methods For this study, we synthesized a new series of metallocene-containing compounds coupling the metallocene unit with dienestrol, a synthetic, nonsteroidal estrogen. This is part of our effort to couple known moieties that offer antitumor activity with biologically active units hoping to increase the biological activity of the combination. The materials were confirmed to be polymeric using light scattering photometry and the structural repeat unit was verified employing matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy results. Results The polymers demonstrated the ability to suppress the growth of a series of tumor cell lines originating from breast, colon, prostrate, and lung cancers at concentrations generally lower than those required for inhibition of cell growth by the commonly used antitumor drug cisplatin. Conclusion These drugs show great promise in vitro against a number of cancer cell lines and due to their polymeric nature will most likely be less toxic than currently used metal-containing drugs such as cisplatin. These drugs also offer several addition positive aspects. First, the reactants are commercially available so that additional synthetic steps are not needed. Second, synthesis of the polymer is rapid, occurring within about 15 seconds. Third, the interfacial synthetic system is already industrially employed in the synthesis of aromatic nylons and polycarbonates. Thus, the ability to synthesize large amounts of

  10. Ability of Group IVB metallocene polyethers containing dienestrol to arrest the growth of selected cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roner, Michael R; Carraher, Charles E Jr; Shahi, Kimberly; Ashida, Yuki; Barot, Girish

    2009-01-01

    Monomeric Group IVB (Ti, Zr and Hf) metallocenes represent a new class of antitumor compounds. There is literature on the general biological activities of some organotin compounds. Unfortunately, there is little information with respect to the molecular level activity of these organotin compounds. We recently started focusing on the anti-cancer activity of organotin polymers that we had made for other purposes and as part of our platinum anti-cancer effort. For this study, we synthesized a new series of metallocene-containing compounds coupling the metallocene unit with dienestrol, a synthetic, nonsteroidal estrogen. This is part of our effort to couple known moieties that offer antitumor activity with biologically active units hoping to increase the biological activity of the combination. The materials were confirmed to be polymeric using light scattering photometry and the structural repeat unit was verified employing matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy results. The polymers demonstrated the ability to suppress the growth of a series of tumor cell lines originating from breast, colon, prostrate, and lung cancers at concentrations generally lower than those required for inhibition of cell growth by the commonly used antitumor drug cisplatin. These drugs show great promise in vitro against a number of cancer cell lines and due to their polymeric nature will most likely be less toxic than currently used metal-containing drugs such as cisplatin. These drugs also offer several addition positive aspects. First, the reactants are commercially available so that additional synthetic steps are not needed. Second, synthesis of the polymer is rapid, occurring within about 15 seconds. Third, the interfacial synthetic system is already industrially employed in the synthesis of aromatic nylons and polycarbonates. Thus, the ability to synthesize large amounts of the drugs is straight forward

  11. Evaluation of the effect of diet composition and B-group vitamins supplementation on selected calcium metabolism parameters in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to observe the effects of a modified diet, in which whole grains of cereals had been isocalorically substituted with wheat flour (type "500") and saccharose, and supplementation with B-group vitamins, on selected calcium metabolism parameters in female rats. The experiment was carried out on 36 female rats aged 6 months. Animals were fed two different diets. Groups I and II received clean tap water to drink, while group III had water solution of group-B vitamins. An analysis of the outcomes of the diet modifications allowed concluding that the females fed on the modified feed, either supplemented or non-supplemented, excreted more calcium with urine and exhibited its lower concentrations in blood plasma, as compared with the females fed on the standard feed. No significant differences, however, were observed in plasma ionized calcium concentrations in the studied animals, which implies that the regulation mechanism of its bio-active form concentrations is preserved. It has been found that the applied supplementation of the modified diet promoted bone calcium release inducing plasma alkaline phosphatase activity in this group of animals. Supplementation was also accompanied by a shift in calcium distribution manifested by its increased concentrations in erythrocytes. Change in diet composition and supplementation were found to significantly affect calcium metabolism of the rats examined. Observed intracellular calcium accumulation may have been an underlying cause of an increased adipose tissue accumulation in B-group vitamin supplemented animals, which had been observed in previous studies.

  12. Knowledge and Attitude of Married Women in the Reproductive Age Group Regarding Emergency Contraception in Selected Rural Areas of Udupi District

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    Preethi Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted pregnancy is still a major problem in the modern world despite the widely available contraception services. This study was conducted to determine the knowledge and attitude of married women in the reproductive age group regarding emergency contraception in selected rural areas of Udupi district, India. Material and Methods: The study group comprised of 350 married women in the reproductive age group residing in rural areas of Udupi district, India. A structured questionnaire and an attitude scale were used to assess the knowledge and the attitude. Results: Majority, 69.1% of the married women belonged to Hindu religion, 46.9% had an educational qualification of 10th standard and below. About 13.1% of the married women had undergone abortion. Nearly 96.9% of the married women had heard about emergency contraceptives and only 2% of the married women had used emergency contraceptive pills. About 63.7% out of 339 married women had got information about emergency contraceptive pills from health personnel and about 77.7% from television. Majority 84% had poor knowledge on emergency contraception. About 99.7% had favourable attitude on the use of emergency contraceptives. There was a significant association between knowledge scores and selected variable like education, knowledge and the attitude scores had a correlation. Conclusion: The study identifies the knowledge and attitude of the rural married women regarding emergency contraception, hence to help them to plan future pregnancies and prevent any unwanted or unintended pregnancies.

  13. Using an Integrated Group Decision Method Based on SVM, TFN-RS-AHP, and TOPSIS-CD for Cloud Service Supplier Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-hui Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the cloud service supplier selection problem under the background of cloud computing emergence, an integrated group decision method is proposed. The cloud service supplier selection index framework is built from two perspectives of technology and technology management. Support vector machine- (SVM- based classification model is applied for the preliminary screening to reduce the number of candidate suppliers. A triangular fuzzy number-rough sets-analytic hierarchy process (TFN-RS-AHP method is designed to calculate supplier’s index value by expert’s wisdom and experience. The index weight is determined by criteria importance through intercriteria correlation (CRITIC. The suppliers are evaluated by the improved TOPSIS replacing Euclidean distance with connection distance (TOPSIS-CD. An electric power enterprise’s case is given to illustrate the correctness and feasibility of the proposed method.

  14. AN ASSESSMENT OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING EFFECTIVENESS IN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY TEACHING – A CASE STUDY OF SELECTED STUDENT GROUPS AT STRATHMORE UNIVERSITY IN KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Kibuye Wadawi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative Learning has been defined as a relationship in a group of students that requires positive interdependence, individual accountability, interpersonal skills, face-to-face promotive interaction, and processing. Several techniques have been used to implement to advance learning amongst groups of tourism and hospitality students. While a number of methods have delivered favourable results in students’ motivation and learning, some have been used with counterproductive results. The purpose of this study therefore was to carry out a practical assessment of a specified cooperative learning technique using selected student groups within the School of Tourism and Hospitality in Strathmore University, Kenya. In this study, identified learning groups were given fundamental rules on how to use the chosen technique and thereafter asked to apply the technique in a specified learning session. Students were then asked to complete a simple questionnaire to make judgement on the learning effectiveness of the technique and their attitude to it regarding group dynamics. This study established that there are aspects typical of cooperative learning that should be encouraged and specific aspects that should be discouraged. The research identified major factors that should be considered to enhance cooperative learning in tourism and hospitality education in Africa

  15. Cost analysis for the prevention of variceal rebleeding: a comparison between transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy in a selected group of Italian cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddi, P; Merli, M; Lionetti, R; De Santis, A; Valeriano, V; Masini, A; Rossi, P; Salvatori, F; Salerno, F; de Franchis, R; Capocaccia, L; Riggio, O

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the cumulative cost of the first 18-month period in a selected group of Italian cirrhotic patients treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) versus endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) to prevent variceal rebleeding. Thirty-eight patients enrolled in a controlled trial were considered (18 TIPS and 20 sclerotherapy). The number of days spent in the hospital for the initial treatment and during the follow-up period were defined as the costs of hospitalization. ES sessions, TIPS procedures, angioplasty or addition of a second stent to maintain the shunt patency, were defined as the costs of therapeutic procedures. The two groups were comparable for age, sex, and Child-Pugh score. During the observation period 4 patients died in the TIPS group, and 2 died and 1 was transplanted in the sclerotherapy group. The rebleeding rate was significantly higher in the sclerotherapy group. Despite this, the number of days spent in the hospital was similar in the two groups. This was because of a higher number of hospital admissions for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy and shunt insufficiency in the TIPS group. The therapeutic procedures were more expensive for TIPS. Consequently, the cumulative cost was higher for patients treated with TIPS than for those treated with sclerotherapy. The extra cost was because of the initial higher cost of the procedure and the difference was still maintained at the end of the 18-month follow-up. When the cumulative costs were expressed per month free of rebleeding, the disadvantage of TIPS disappeared. In conclusion, a program of prevention of variceal rebleeding with TIPS, despite the longer interval free of rebleeding, is not a cost-saving strategy in comparison with sclerotherapy.

  16. Regeneración de un bosque mixto de Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae después de una corta selectiva Regeneration of a Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae mixed forest after selective cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEJANDRO DEZZOTTI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available El estudio de la ecología de la regeneración natural del bosque constituye una parte esencial de la silvicultura. El cerro Tren Tren (40°12' S, 71°26' O, 1.367 m, Reserva Mapuche Curruhuinca, Argentina está ocupado por un bosque cerrado compuesto por Nothofagus dombeyi, N. nervosa y N. obliqua. En 1994 se estimó la densidad de renovales (diámetro en la base del tallo Understanding forest regeneration is essential to develop sound, ecologically-based silvicultural practices. Mount Tren Tren (40°12' S, 71°26' W, 1,367 m, Reservation Mapuche Curruhuinca, Argentina is occupied by a closed stand of Nothofagus dombeyi, N. obliqua, and N. nervosa. In 1994, tree regeneration (root collar diameter < 10 cm was estimated to be 90 ind ha-1. After that, a group selection silvicultural system was implemented and the resulting 10 artificial gaps of between 1,587 and 4,322 m² were enclosed to prevent grazing by domestic livestock. Size and age structure of regeneration were analysed based on systematic and random samplings. All tree species became established simultaneously within the artificial gaps. However, the less light demanding N. nervosa exhibited a mean age slightly larger given its differential persistence as "advanced regeneration" previous to cutting treatment. Tree regeneration was estimated in 97,006 ind ha-1 (68 % of N. dombeyi, 20 % of N. obliqua, and 12 % of N. nervosa. Regeneration abundance and composition were unrelated to shape and size of regeneration gaps, nor to abundance of adult trees within the stand and along the gap boundaries. A significant positive effect of the enclosure on plant was observed. The 86 % of juvenile Nothofagus were present when understory height and cover were low to intermediate. The management plan is considered adequate if the abundance of regeneration is compared before and after its implementation, and encourages the use and conservation of this forest type under the current silvicultural system

  17. Admission-Group Salary Differentials in the United States: The Significance of Labor Market Institutional Selection of High-Skilled Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lingxin

    In 1990 a temporary-to-permanent pathway was established for highly skilled workers admitted to the United States under nonimmigrant programs. The paper argues that this policy shift has allowed employers to play a crucial role in the immigration of highly skilled workers, thereby creating labor-market institutional selection that gives a salary advantage to highly skilled temporary-admitted workers retained in the United States. Through analyses of the salary differentials among admission-category groups, the paper finds that the salary advantage is based on recruitment from Western countries, adjustment from temporary to permanent status after a second employer screening, working in the information technology sector and the private sector, holding a supervisory position, or having a skill-matched job, all of which are consequences of institutional selection rather than individual self-selection. Our results also reveal a difference between those admitted from abroad and those recruited from graduating foreign students in USA higher educational institutions, which suggests a distinction between overseas hiring and domestic hiring. Policy implications for the United States and other receiving countries are discussed.

  18. Blooming of the Novel in the Bloomsbury Group: An Investigation to the Impact of the Members of Bloomsbury Group on the Composition of the Selected Works of Virginia Woolf and E.M. Forster

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    SeyedehZahra Nozen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available “For masterpieces are not single and solitary births; they are the outcome of many years of thinking in common, of thinking by the body of the people, so that the experience of the mass is behind the single voice…”. Woolf’s belief has been put to the test in the Bloomsbury Group and this paper intends to investigate the validity of her claim through a critical analysis of the selected works of its novelist members. In a central part of London during the first half of the twentieth century a group of intellectual and literary writers, artists, critics and an economist came together which later on was labeled as Bloomsbury group. The group’s members had an influential role in blooming novel in a different form of expression and profoundly affect its literary figures, Virginia Woolf and E.M. Forster, in the composition of their fictions The Waves, A Room of One’s Own, To the Lighthouse and Forster’s A Room with a view and Howards End. The formation of Bloomsbury circle acted as a bridge from the Victorian bigotries and narrow-mindedness to the unbounded era of modernism as they searched for universal peace, individual liberalism and human accomplishments due to ideal social norms. They freely exchanged their views on variety of subjects without any limitation. The reasons behind their popularity compared to several contemporary groups were their innumerable works, the clarification of their lives through their diaries, biographies and autobiographies and their diverse kinds of activities such as criticism, painting, politics and literary writings. They were adherents of truth, goodness, enjoyment of beautiful object, intrinsic values, aesthetics, friendship and personal relationship. Intellectual intimacy and cooperation can be considered as the main attribute of its members as they collaborate with each other and employ the fundamental tenets of the group within their works. The modern style of its artists as post

  19. Platinum-group elements fractionation by selective complexing, the Os, Ir, Ru, Rh-arsenide-sulfide systems above 1020 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Hassan M.; Bragagni, Alessandro

    2017-11-01

    The platinum-group element (PGE) contents in magmatic ores and rocks are normally in the low μg/g (even in the ng/g) level, yet they form discrete platinum-group mineral (PGM) phases. IPGE (Os, Ir, Ru) + Rh form alloys, sulfides, and sulfarsenides while Pt and Pd form arsenides, tellurides, bismuthoids and antimonides. We experimentally investigate the behavior of Os, Ru, Ir and Rh in As-bearing sulfide system between 1300 and 1020 °C and show that the prominent mineralogical difference between IPGE (+Rh) and Pt and Pd reflects different chemical preference in the sulfide melt. At temperatures above 1200 °C, Os shows a tendency to form alloys. Ruthenium forms a sulfide (laurite RuS2) while Ir and Rh form sulfarsenides (irarsite IrAsS and hollingworthite RhAsS, respectively). The chemical preference of PGE is selective: IPGE + Rh form metal-metal, metal-S and metal-AsS complexes while Pt and Pd form semimetal complexes. Selective complexing followed by mechanical separation of IPGE (and Rh)-ligand from Pt- and Pd-ligand associations lead to PGE fractionation.

  20. [Evaluation of self-esteem in males with erectile dysfunction treated with viagra. Analysis of a Spanish patients group selected from a multicenter, international study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M; Moncada, I; Rodríguez-Vela, L; Gutiérrez, P R; Chaves, J

    2010-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) leads to psychological disturbances, especially anxiety and loss of self-esteem. We try to understand the emotional changes, based on self-esteem and relationships in a group of Spanish men with ED after sildenafil treatment, with the use of the the SEAR questionnaire (Self-Esteem And Relationship). The patients recruited in Spain, where selected from an international, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, sildenafil study designed to assess self-esteem and relationships in men with ED. We compared the changes in the different domains of the SEAR questionnaire (Self-steem, sexual activity, self-confidence and general relationships) that was administered before and after treatment; the different domains of the IIEF was evaluated as well. We also calculated the correlation between changes in self-esteem domain of the SEAR questionnaire. The statistical study was based on an analysis of covariance of change in scores and a correlation analysis. The Spanish group of researchers included 119 patients. The erectile function domain score showed significantly greater improvement for the group of sildenafil. The difference in change in total mean score of the SEAR after treatment was 16.9 (95% CI 8.9, 24.8) for sildenafil over placebo (p=0.0001), with a significantly higher score improvement in all the domains of the SEAR for Sildenafil. There was a significant correlation between the changes in the domain of self-esteem of the SEAR and the IIEF erectile function domain for both treatment groups. Emotional improvement was confirmed in patients treated with sildenafil based on improved self-esteem, self-confidence and relationships. Changes in the IIEF erectile function domain correlate with the SEAR self-esteem domain.

  1. POTENCY OF RAMIN (Gonystylus bancanus Kurtz. AND OTHER COMMERCIAL SPECIES IN PEAT SWAMP FOREST MANAGED WITH TPTI SILVICULTURAL SYSTEM IN BAGAN, RIAU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendromono Hendromono

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Ramin  (Gonystylus bancanus Kurtz.  is one  of  the  tree  species in  peat-swamp  forest  that  is endangered due to excessive exploitation. The objective of this research was to assess the potency of rarnin and other commercial tree species in primary and logged over peat-swamp forests at Bagan, Riau. The tree stands were inventoried in primary forest of the 2004 and 2006 Annual Work Plan (RKTs and in  the  1997  and  2001  RKTs  managed  with  Indonesian  Selective Cutting  and  Planting  (TPTI silvicultural system.  The  result  showed  that  rarnin in  Bagan peat-swamp  forest  was not  evenly distributed. The total number of ramin  in tree stage in primary forests was fewer than that in  logged over forests.  The total number of ramin species at tree stage in primary forest was between 4.5  and 5 trees ha·' with the important value index (IVI of 10.3  to 12.0%,  whereas the one at logged over forest were between 2.5 and 15  trees ha·' with theM    indices of 7.9 to 20.4%.  Commercial species of swamp meranti (Shorea uliginosaand S. teysmaniana and balam/ suntai or (Palaqqiumspp. were dominant at tree stage both in the primary and the logged over forests. Enrichment in logged over forests is not needed since the total number of seedlings and saplings  is enough. The total number of potential core trees in logged over forests was enough for the next cutting cycle. The effort that must be done in logged over forests is to protect them from illegal logging.

  2. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of hybrid bioisoster derivatives of N-acylhydrazone and furoxan groups with potential and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarico Serafim, Ricardo Augusto; Gonçalves, José Eduardo; de Souza, Felipe Pereira; de Melo Loureiro, Ana Paula; Storpirtis, Silvia; Krogh, Renata; Andricopulo, Adriano Defini; Dias, Luiz Carlos; Ferreira, Elizabeth Igne

    2014-07-23

    Hybrid bioisoster derivatives from N-acylhydrazones and furoxan groups were designed with the objective of obtaining at least a dual mechanism of action: cruzain inhibition and nitric oxide (NO) releasing activity. Fifteen designed compounds were synthesized varying the substitution in N-acylhydrazone and in furoxan group as well. They had its anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity in amastigotes forms, NO releasing potential and inhibitory cruzain activity evaluated. The two most active compounds (6, 14) both in the parasite amastigotes and in the enzyme contain the nitro group in para position of the aromatic ring. The permeability screening in Caco-2 cell and cytotoxicity assay in human cells were performed for those most active compounds and both showed to be less cytotoxic than the reference drug, benznidazole. Compound 6 was the most promising, since besides activity it showed good permeability and selectivity index, higher than the reference drug. Thereby the compound 6 was considered as a possible candidate for additional studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective Debridement With Labral Preservation Using Narrow Indications in the Hip: Minimum 5-Year Outcomes With a Matched-Pair Labral Repair Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Austin W; Yuen, Leslie C; Ortiz-Declet, Victor; Litrenta, Jody; Maldonado, David R; Domb, Benjamin G

    2018-02-01

    Arthroscopic labral debridement in the hip can be an effective treatment for labral tears but has demonstrated inferior outcomes compared with labral repair. Thus, the role for labral debridement has become unclear. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the outcomes of a selective debridement with labral preservation (SDLP) group with a minimum 5-year follow-up. It was hypothesized that, with narrow indications, SDLP would produce statistically improved patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores, comparable with those of a matched-pair labral repair control group. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were collected on all patients undergoing primary hip arthroscopic surgery between February 2008 and September 2011. Exclusion criteria were acetabular or femoral head Outerbridge grade 4 chondral damage, preoperative Tnnis grade ≥2, workers' compensation claims, previous hip conditions, severe dysplasia (lateral center-edge angle <18°), or previous ipsilateral hip surgery. Patients who underwent arthroscopic labral debridement and had preoperative and minimum 5-year PRO scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), and Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS) as well as the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, were included. In a nested matched-pair comparison, the SDLP group was matched 1:1 to an arthroscopic labral repair control group based on age ±5 years, body mass index ±5 kg/m 2 , sex, and Seldes tear type. One hundred twenty-five hips were eligible for inclusion, of which 101 (80.8%) hips had a minimum 5-year follow-up. All PRO scores were significantly improved ( P < .001) at latest follow-up (mHHS, 63.4 to 82.4; NAHS, 57.4 to 83.6; HOS-SSS, 44.2 to 74.5). The mean VAS score decreased from 5.8 to 2.3 ( P < .001). The mean patient satisfaction score was 8.1. Four (4.0%) patients underwent second-look arthroscopic surgery (mean, 18.5 months), and 14 (13.9%) patients converted to total hip

  4. GIS-based identification of areas that have resource potential for critical minerals in six selected groups of deposit types in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Susan M.; Jones, James V.; Hayes, Timothy S.

    2016-11-16

    Alaska has considerable potential for undiscovered mineral resources. This report evaluates potential for undiscovered critical minerals in Alaska. Critical minerals are those for which the United States imports more than half of its total supply and which are largely derived from nations that cannot be considered reliable trading partners. In this report, estimated resource potential and certainty for the state of Alaska are analyzed and mapped for the following six selected mineral deposit groups that may contain one or more critical minerals: (1) rare earth elements-thorium-yttrium-niobium(-uranium-zirconium) [REE-Th-Y-Nb(-U-Zr)] deposits associated with peralkaline to carbonatitic igneous intrusive rocks; (2) placer and paleoplacer gold (Au) deposits that in some places might also produce platinum group elements (PGE), chromium (Cr), tin (Sn), tungsten (W), silver (Ag), or titanium (Ti); (3) platinum group elements(-cobalt-chromium-nickel-titanium-vanadium) [PGE(-Co-Cr-Ni-Ti-V)] deposits associated with mafic to ultramafic intrusive rocks; (4) carbonate-hosted copper(-cobalt-silver-germanium-gallium) [Cu(-Co-Ag-Ge-Ga)] deposits; (5) sandstone-hosted uranium(-vanadium-copper) [U(-V-Cu)] deposits; and (6) tin-tungsten-molybdenum(-tantalum-indium-fluorspar) [Sn-W-Mo(-Ta-In-fluorspar)] deposits associated with specialized granites.This study used a data-driven, geographic information system (GIS)-implemented method to identify areas that have mineral resource potential in Alaska. This method systematically and simultaneously analyzes geoscience data from multiple geospatially referenced datasets and uses individual subwatersheds (12-digit hydrologic units) as the spatial unit of classification. The final map output uses a red, yellow, green, and gray color scheme to portray estimated relative potential (High, Medium, Low, Unknown) for each of the six groups of mineral deposit types, and it indicates the relative certainty (High, Medium, Low) of that estimate for

  5. COMPARISON OF DAILY MILK YIELD AND ITS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION BETWEEN COWS FROM SELECTED GENETIC GROUPS OF BETA-LACTOGLOBULIN AND KAPPACASEIN GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata SITKOWSKA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to analyse the influence of selected genetic groups on the daily milk yield and its chemical composition in black and white Holstein-Friesian cows. The genotyping of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genes was conducted by means of the PCR-RFLP technique. The collected numeric data were analysed statistically with the covariance analysis. The joint effects of beta-lactoglobulin and kappa-casein genotypes were estimated. The greatest amount of milk was obtained from the genotype combination AAAB, whereas the milk of the genotype combination AABB was characterized with the greatest fat content. The smallest number of samples was collected from cows with genes that are preferred in terms of technological processing, combination BBBB. During test milking, the BBBB genotype combination was characterised by high milk yield and protein content, but also the highest content of somatic cells in milk samples under analysis.

  6. (15)N and (13)C group-selective techniques extend the scope of STD NMR detection of weak host-guest interactions and ligand screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kövér, Katalin E; Wéber, Edit; Martinek, Tamás A; Monostori, Eva; Batta, Gyula

    2010-10-18

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) is a valuable tool for studying the binding of small molecules to large biomolecules and for obtaining detailed information on the binding epitopes. Here, we demonstrate that the proposed (15)N/(13)C variants of group-selective, "GS-STD" experiments provide a powerful approach to mapping the binding epitope of a ligand even in the absence of efficient spin diffusion within the target protein. Therefore, these experimental variants broaden the scope of STD studies to smaller and/or more-dynamic targets. The STD spectra obtained in four different experimental setups (selective (1)H STD, (15)N GS-STD, (13)C(Ar) and (13)C(aliphatic) GS-STD approaches) revealed that the signal-intensity pattern of the difference spectra is affected by both the type and the spatial distribution of the excited "transmitter" atoms, as well as by the efficiency of the spin-diffusion-mediated magnetization transfer. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated on a system by using the lectin, galectin-1 and its carbohydrate ligand, lactose.

  7. Silviculture conditions and wood properties of Samanea saman and Enterolobium cyclocarpum in 19-year-old mixed plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Obando

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The objective of this work is to examine wood properties of a mixed plantation of Samanea saman and Enterolobium cyclocarpum, combined with native species of Costa Rica.Area of study: Mixed plantation in dry tropical zone of Costa Rica.Material and Methods: It was measured by total diameter, heartwood, bark thickness, several physical wood properties (green density, specific gravity, volumetric, tangential and radial shrinkage and moisture content and wood color.Main results: The largest of this diameter are reached when S. saman is planted with E. cyclocarpum, E. cyclocarpum and Swietenia macrophylla and Simarouba glauca. Meanwhile the largest total diameter and heartwood in E. cyclocarpum was found when this species is planted with Dalbergia retusa. Heartwood percentage, bark percentage, and some physical properties are not affected when S. saman or E. cyclocarpum are planted with other species. However, parameters of wood color were affected mixture plantation of S. saman or E. cyclocarpum with other species. The lowest difference between wood from mixed plantations and wood from trees growing in native forests is produced when S. saman is mixed with E. cyclocarpum, but this last species is mixed with Hymenaea courbaril and produced wood with the lowest difference in wood color compared to trees growing in the natural forest.Research highlights: S. saman and E. cyclocarpum tress planted in a mixed plantation produce variation in breast diameter, physical properties, heartwood percentage and wood color.Keywords: silvicultural condition; wood properties; tropical species; plantation species.

  8. Determination of L-AP4-bound human mGlu8 receptor amino terminal domain structure and the molecular basis for L-AP4’s group III mGlu receptor functional potency and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schkeryantz, Jeffery M.; Chen, Qi; Ho, Joseph D.; Atwell, Shane; Zhang, Aiping; Vargas, Michelle C.; Wang, Jing; Monn, James A.; Hao, Junliang (Lilly)

    2018-02-01

    Here, L-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) is a known potent and selective agonist for the Group III mGlu receptors. However, it does not show any selectivity among the individual group III mGlu subtypes. In order to understand the molecular basis for this group selectivity, we solved the first human mGlu8 amino terminal domain (ATD) crystal structures in complex with L-glu and L-AP4. In comparison with other published L-glu-bound mGlu ATD structures, we have observed L-glu binds in a significantly different manner in mGlu1. Furthermore, these new structures provided evidence that both the electronic and steric nature of the distal phosphate of L-AP4 contribute to its exquisite Group III functional agonist potency and selectivity.

  9. Assessment of nutritional status of selected group of children living in urban and rural areas in Upper Silesia, in the intervening five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witanowska, Jolanta; Obuchowicz, Anna; Warmuz-Wancisiewicz, Aneta; Szczurek, Urszula

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to assess changes in nutritional status of a selected group of children from urban and rural environment in Upper Silesia in the intervening 5 years. The study was conducted twice - in 2003 and during the school year 2008/2009, and involved children from the town of Bytom and from the village Boronów. To assess the nutritional status, the following measurements were used - weight, height and thickness of subcutaneous fold. Body Mass Index (BMI) was also calculated. The results obtained were referred to the appropriate percentile charts. Measurement values, which were located below the 10th percentile or above the 90th percentile were treated as incorrect. Statistical analysis included only those children who participated in the I and II survey. The frequency of the anthropometric measurements and BMI exceeding the accepted limits of norms in both studied environments and between them, 5 years after the previous evaluation, were compared. In both environments, the number of pupils whose body mass exceeded the value of the 90th percentile increased. The number of pupils whose body mass was lower than the 10th percentile also increased in the city, but decreased in the country. Considering BMI, the percentage of children located above the norm increased as well in comparison to the first study. In addition, it was also found that the thickness of subcutaneous skin-fold difference between the studied communities was significant in both the first (p = 0.020) and the second survey (p = 0.015), as well as in each environment, after 5 years since the previous evaluation (Bytom: p = 0.001; Boronów: p = 0.32). In 5 years (2003-2008), the incidence of overweight of pupils increased in both groups. The percentage of pupils who weighed less than 10th percentile increased to a greater extent in urban environment than in rural areas.

  10. Efficacy and tolerability of tropisetron in primary fibromyalgia--a highly selective and competitive 5-HT3 receptor antagonist. German Fibromyalgia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, L; Stratz, T; Brückle, W; Späth, M; Pongratz, D; Lautenschläger, J; Kötter, I; Zöller, B; Peter, H H; Neeck, G; Alten, R; Müller, W

    2000-01-01

    Based on a potential role for serotonin receptors in fibromyalgia, we investigated the efficacy and tolerability of treatment with tropisetron, a highly selective, competitive inhibitor of the 5-HT3 receptor. In this prospective, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, dose-finding study, 418 patients suffering from primary fibromyalgia (ACR criteria) were randomly assigned to receive either placebo, 5 mg, 10 mg or 15 mg tropisetron once daily, respectively. The duration of treatment was 10 days. The clinical response was measured by changes in pain-score, visual analog scale (VAS), and the number of painful tender-points. Treatment with 5 mg tropisetron resulted in a significantly higher response rate (39.2%) when compared with placebo (26.2%) (p=0.033). The absolute reduction in pain-score was -13.5% for 5 mg tropisetron, -13.0% for 10 mg tropisetron, and -6.3% for placebo (pVAS, while a clear trend in terms of clinical benefit was seen with 10 mg tropisetron. The number of painful tender-points was also reduced significantly (p=0.002) in the 5 mg tropisetron group. Of interest, during the 12-month follow-up period, pain intensity of responders on 5 mg and 10 mg tropisetron was still markedly below baseline. The treatment was well tolerated, with gastro-intestinal complaints being the most frequently reported side effects, in keeping with the known safety profile for 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. This study demonstrates the efficacy of short-term treatment with 5 mg tropisetron once daily in primary fibromyalgia. Treatment was well tolerated and prolonged clinical benefits were seen.

  11. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement experiments show that the monoclonal antibody strep 9 selects a local minimum conformation of a Streptococcus group A trisaccharide-hapten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, T; Harris, S L; Pitner, J B; Bock, K; Pinto, B M

    1995-10-17

    Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement (TRNOE) experiments have been performed to investigate the bound conformation of the trisaccharide repeating unit of the Streptococcus Group A cell-wall polysaccharide. Thus, the conformations of propyl 3-O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyran osyl)- alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside [C(A')B] (1) as a free ligand and when complexed to the monoclonal antibody Strep 9 were examined. Improved insights about the conformational preferences of the glycosidic linkages of the trisaccharide ligand showed that the free ligand populates various conformations in aqueous solution, thus displaying relatively flexible behavior. The NOE HNAc-H2A', which was not detected in previous work, accounts for a conformation at the beta-(1-->3) linkage with a phi angle of approximately 180 degrees. Observed TRNOEs for the complex are weak, and their analysis was further complicated by spin diffusion. With the use of transferred rotating-frame Overhauser enhancement (TRROE) experiments, the amount of spin diffusion was assessed experimentally, proving that all of the observed long-range TRNOEs arose through spin diffusion. Four interglycosidic distances, derived from the remaining TRNOEs and TRROEs, together with repulsive constraints, derived from the absence of TRROE effects, were used as input parameters in simulated annealing and molecular mechanics calculations to determine the bound conformation of the trisaccharide. Complexation by the antibody results in the selection of one defined conformation of the carbohydrate hapten. This bound conformation, which is a local energy minimum on the energy maps calculated for the trisaccharide ligand, shows only a change from a +gauche to a -gauche orientation at the psi angle of the alpha-(1-->2) linkage when compared to the global minimum conformation. The results infer that the bound conformation of the Streptococcus Group A cell-wall polysaccharide is different from its

  12. Levels of Platinum Group Metals in Selected Species (Sarotherodon melanotheron, Chonophorus lateristriga, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii and Crassostrea tulipa in Some Estuaries and Lagoons Along the Coast of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Essumang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of some biota as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution has been demonstrated as particularly adequate due to their capacity of bioconcentration. This study evaluated the levels of platinum group metals (PGMs in some selected species along the coastal belt of Ghana, using the neutron activation analysis (NAA method. The result was processed to evaluate pollution indices in order to map the distribution of the metals in those species in the lagoons and estuaries along the costal belt of Ghana. The analysis showed significant levels of all PGMs in blackchin tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron Cichlidae, brown goby (Chonophorus lateristriga Gobiidae, shrimp (Macrobrachium vollenhovenii Palaemonidae, and mangrove oysters (Crassostrea tulipa Ostreidae in the lagoons and river Pra estuary. However, the oysters showed an elevated mean concentration of 0.13 μ/g (dry weight Pd. From the pollution indices, most of the sampling sites registered mean contamination factor (CF values between 1.20 and 3.00 for Pt, Pd, and Rh. The pollution load index (PLI conducted also gave an average pollution index between 0.79 and 2.37, indicating progressive contamination levels. The results revealed that anthropogenic sources, industrial and hospital effluent, etc., together with vehicular emissions, could be the contributing factors to the deposition of PGMs along the Ghanaian coast.

  13. Hypervariability generated by natural selection in an extracellular complement-inhibiting protein of serotype M1 strains of group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbauer, K E; Grigsby, D; Pan, X; Fu, Y X; Mejia, L M; Cravioto, A; Musser, J M

    1998-03-17

    In many countries, M1 strains of the human pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus are the most common serotype recovered from patients with invasive disease episodes. Strains of this serotype express an extracellular protein that inhibits complement [streptococcal inhibitor of complement (Sic)] and is therefore believed to be a virulence factor. Comparative sequence analysis of the 915-bp sic gene in 165 M1 organisms recovered from diverse localities and infection types identified 62 alleles. Inasmuch as multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis previously showed that most M1 organisms represent a distinct streptococcal clone, the extent of sic gene polymorphism was unexpected. The level of polymorphism greatly exceeds that recorded for all other genes examined in serotype M1 strains. All insertions and deletions are in frame, and virtually all nucleotide substitutions alter the amino acid sequence of the Sic protein. These molecular features indicate that structural change in Sic is mediated by natural selection. Study of 70 strains recovered from two temporally distinct epidemics of streptococcal infections in the former East Germany found little sharing of Sic variants among strains recovered in the different time periods. Taken together, the data indicate that sic is a uniquely variable gene and provide insight into a potential molecular mechanism contributing to fluctuations in streptococcal disease frequency and severity.

  14. Heavier drinking American college students may self-select into study abroad programs: An examination of sex and ethnic differences within a high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R; LaBrie, Joseph W; Hummer, Justin F; Larimer, Mary E; Lee, Christine M

    2010-09-01

    As with other heavier drinking groups, heavier drinking American college students may self-select into study abroad programs with specific intentions to use alcohol in the foreign environment. This cross-sectional study used a sample of 2144 students (mean age=20.00, SD=1.47) to explore differences in alcohol use and related negative consequences among (1) students intending to study abroad while in college, (2) students not intending to study abroad, and (3) students reporting prior study abroad participation. Results revealed that participants with no intention to study abroad drank less and experienced fewer alcohol-related consequences than participants intending to study abroad. In addition, students reporting prior completion of study abroad programs drank more and reported more hazardous alcohol use than those not intending to study abroad. Ethnic and sex differences existed; with White students, males, and females intending to study abroad and non-White students who previously completed study abroad programs demonstrating the most risk. These findings provide empirical support that study abroad students may be a heavier drinking subgroup necessitating intervention prior to beginning programs abroad. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Water infiltration and hydraulic conductivity in a natural Mediterranean oak forest: impacts of hydrology-oriented silviculture on soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Bautista, Inmaculada; Cerdà, Artemi; Cullotta, Sebastiano; del Campo, Antonio; González-Sanchis, María; Iovino, Massimo; Maetzke, Federico

    2016-04-01

    microcontroller platform, Arduino. The very limited cost of the system could represent a step towards a cheaper and more widespread application of accurate and automated infiltration rate measurement. However, automatic data collection increases measurement speed, permits measurement at short time intervals, improves measurement precision, allows for more efficient data handling and analysis, and reduces the amount of effort involved and the potential for errors that may occur when manual procedures are applied (Di Prima et al., 2016). The main objective of this study was to determine soil hydraulic properties by using the combination of the automated infiltrometer and the BEST algorithm in a natural Mediterranean oak forest. The forest is located in a typical Mediterranean area, within the public forest La Hunde, Valencia (NE Spain). Two contiguous plots established in previous studies conducted by González-Sanchis et al. (2015) were selected, one of them was thinned reducing the forest density from 861 to 414 tree per ha. Control plot was not thinned. These authors studied the water cycle during the period 2012-2013. In particular, they characterized and compared the plots in term of throughfall, stemflow, soil moisture and transpiration, concluding that the AFM results in an increasing water availability, and at the same time in a substantial maintenance of overland and surface flow, precluding therefore enhancement of erosion rate. In this paper, the focus was put on the impacts of thinning on soil hydraulic properties, such as infiltration capacity, hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention, determined by simplified and low-cost methods in connection with a hydrology-oriented silviculture. Acknowledgements This study is a part of research projects: "Indagini sperimentali per la simulazione dei processi di formazione del deflusso superficiale nei suoli boscati, Progetto FIRB 2012 - MIMOSE", and "CGL2011-28776-C02-02, HYDROSIL" References Alagna, V., Bagarello, V., Di

  16. Use of Jackknifing to Evaluate Effects of Anchor Item Selection on Equating with the Nonequivalent Groups with Anchor Test (NEAT) Design. Research Report. ETS RR-15-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ru; Haberman, Shelby; Guo, Hongwen; Liu, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we apply jackknifing to anchor items to evaluate the impact of anchor selection on equating stability. In an ideal world, the choice of anchor items should have little impact on equating results. When this ideal does not correspond to reality, selection of anchor items can strongly influence equating results. This influence does not…

  17. The Nordic Maintenance Care Program – An interview study on the use of maintenance care in a selected group of Danish chiropractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although maintenance care appears to be relatively commonly used among chiropractors, the indications for its use are incompletely understood. A questionnaire survey was recently carried out among Swedish chiropractors in order to identify their choice of various management strategies, including maintenance care. That study revealed a common pattern of choice of strategies. However, it would be necessary to verify these findings in another study population and to obtain some additional information best collected through an interview. Objectives The main aim of the present study was to attempt to reproduce the findings in the Swedish study and to obtain more information on the use of maintenance care. Method A group of 11 chiropractors were selected because they used maintenance care. They were interviewed using the questionnaire from the previous Swedish survey. The questionnaire consisted of a simple description of a hypothetical patient with low back pain and nine possible ways in which the case could develop ("scenarios". They could choose between six different management strategies for each scenario. In addition, the chiropractors were encouraged to provide their own definition of maintenance care in an open-ended question. Interviews were taped, transcribed and analyzed. For the open-ended question, statements were identified relating to six pre hoc defined topics on the inclusion criteria/rationale for maintenance care, the frequency of treatments, and the duration of the maintenance care program. Results The open-ended question revealed that in patients with low back pain, maintenance care appears to be offered to prevent new events. The rationale was to obtain optimal spinal function. There appears to be no common convention on the frequency of treatments and duration of the treatment program was not mentioned by any of the interviewees. Conclusion The results from the questionnaire in the Danish survey showed that

  18. Selected data for wells and test holes used in structure-contour maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected data on wells and test holes that were used in the construction of structure-contour maps of selected formations that contain major aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. Altitudes of the top of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation are presented for the wells and test holes presented in this report.

  19. Influence of warmth and competence on the promotion of safe in-group selection: Stereotype content model and social categorization of faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsi, G; Panasiti, M S; Scandola, M; Aglioti, S M

    2016-01-01

    Categorizing an individual as a friend or foe plays a pivotal role in navigating the social world. According to the stereotype content model (SCM), social perception relies on two fundamental dimensions, warmth and competence, which allow us to process the intentions of others and their ability to enact those intentions, respectively. Social cognition research indicates that, in categorization tasks, people tend to classify other individuals as more likely to belong to the out-group than the in-group (in-group overexclusion effect, IOE) when lacking diagnostic information, probably with the aim of protecting in-group integrity. Here, we explored the role of warmth and competence in group-membership decisions by testing 62 participants in a social-categorization task consisting of 150 neutral faces. We assessed whether (a) warmth and competence ratings could predict the in-group/out-group categorization, and (b) the reliance on these two dimensions differed in low-IOE versus high-IOE participants. Data showed that high ratings of warmth and competence were necessary to categorize a face as in-group. Moreover, while low-IOE participants relied on warmth, high-IOE participants relied on competence. This finding suggests that the proneness to include/exclude unknown identities in/from one's own in-group is related to individual differences in the reliance on SCM social dimensions. Furthermore, the primacy of the warmth effect seems not to represent a universal phenomenon adopted in the context of social evaluation.

  20. Silvicultural and agronomic practices for improving Tuber magnatum habitat in natural woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagliaferro F

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2003 IPLA is taking part, in the project “Innovative interventions for the natural habitat protection and connection in order to create an ecological network” promoted by GAL Alta Langa. The final aim of the project, that has finished at the end of 2006, is to realize an ecological network where the elements are also truffi�res in which management practices are carried out in order to improve the Tuber magnatum Pico habitat. Using two SIR (Site of regional interest, located in Langa, as core areas three truffi�res have been selected; since spring 2004, the experimental activities have been carried out. The first truffi�res (Barbaresco, CN is located in a mixed white poplar wood with black locust. The first practices were the trees and shrubs thinning in order to increase the light and water availability and improve the organic matter cycle. The second one (Monchiero-CN is an oak (Quercus robur and black poplar wood of limited extension (less than 1000 square meters. Here the first practices were the shrubs thinning and the digging of narrow channels in contour in order to make easier the soil wetting. The last truffi�res (Murazzano-CN is a young black poplar wood grown after the cutting of some big trees; here at first Rubus sp., that covers a great part of the undergrowth, has been cut. This first management practices gave good results and the experimental activities will be carried on.

  1. Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio T C C Rachid

    Full Text Available Fungi are ubiquitous and important contributors to soil nutrient cycling, playing a vital role in C, N and P turnover, with many fungi having direct beneficial relationships with plants. However, the factors that modulate the soil fungal community are poorly understood. We studied the degree to which the composition of tree species affected the soil fungal community structure and diversity by pyrosequencing the 28S rRNA gene in soil DNA. We were also interested in whether intercropping (mixed plantation of two plant species could be used to select fungal species. More than 50,000 high quality sequences were analyzed from three treatments: monoculture of Eucalyptus; monoculture of Acacia mangium; and a mixed plantation with both species sampled 2 and 3 years after planting. We found that the plant type had a major effect on the soil fungal community structure, with 75% of the sequences from the Eucalyptus soil belonging to Basidiomycota and 19% to Ascomycota, and the Acacia soil having a sequence distribution of 28% and 62%, respectively. The intercropping of Acacia mangium in a Eucalyptus plantation significantly increased the number of fungal genera and the diversity indices and introduced or increased the frequency of several genera that were not found in the monoculture cultivation samples. Our results suggest that management of soil fungi is possible by manipulating the composition of the plant community, and intercropped systems can be a means to achieve that.

  2. Selective Fatalism.

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass R

    1998-01-01

    Human beings are selectively fatalistic. Some risks appear as "background noise," whereas other, quantitatively identical risks cause enormous concern. This essay explores the reasons for selective fatalism and possible legal responses. Sometimes selective fatalism is a product of distributional issues, as people focus especially on risks that face particular groups; sometimes people adapt their preferences and beliefs so as to reduce concern with risks that they perceive themselves unable to...

  3. Emotional bookkeeping and high partner selectivity are necessary for the emergence of partner-specific reciprocal affiliation in an agent-based model of primate groups.

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    Ellen Evers

    Full Text Available Primate affiliative relationships are differentiated, individual-specific and often reciprocal. However, the required cognitive abilities are still under debate. Recently, we introduced the EMO-model, in which two emotional dimensions regulate social behaviour: anxiety-FEAR and satisfaction-LIKE. Emotional bookkeeping is modelled by providing each individual with partner-specific LIKE attitudes in which the emotional experiences of earlier affiliations with others are accumulated. Individuals also possess fixed partner-specific FEAR attitudes, reflecting the stable dominance hierarchy. In this paper, we focus on one key parameter of the model, namely the degree of partner selectivity, i.e. the extent to which individuals rely on their LIKE attitudes when choosing affiliation partners. Studying the effect of partner selectivity on the emergent affiliative relationships, we found that at high selectivity, individuals restricted their affiliative behaviours more to similar-ranking individuals and that reciprocity of affiliation was enhanced. We compared the emotional bookkeeping model with a control model, in which individuals had fixed LIKE attitudes simply based on the (fixed rank-distance, instead of dynamic LIKE attitudes based on earlier events. Results from the control model were very similar to the emotional bookkeeping model: high selectivity resulted in preference of similar-ranking partners and enhanced reciprocity. However, only in the emotional bookkeeping model did high selectivity result in the emergence of reciprocal affiliative relationships that were highly partner-specific. Moreover, in the emotional bookkeeping model, LIKE attitude predicted affiliative behaviour better than rank-distance, especially at high selectivity. Our model suggests that emotional bookkeeping is a likely candidate mechanism to underlie partner-specific reciprocal affiliation.

  4. Dynamical Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, Josef

    The well known symmetry (invariance, degeneracy) dynamical groups or algebras of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians provide quantum numbers (conservation laws, integrals of motion) for state labeling and the associated selection rules. In addition, it is often advantageous to employ much larger groups, referred to as the dynamical groups (noninvariance groups, dynamical algebras, spectrum generating algebras), which may or may not be the invariance groups of the studied system [4.1,2,3,4,5,6,7]. In all known cases, they are Lie groups (LGs), or rather corresponding Lie algebras (LAs), and one usually requires that all states of interest of a system be contained in a single irreducible representation (irrep). Likewise, one may require that the Hamiltonian be expressible in terms of the Casimir operators of the corresponding universal enveloping algebra [4.8,9]. In a weaker sense, one regards any group (or corresponding algebra) as a dynamical group if the Hamiltonian can be expressed in terms of its generators [4.10,11,12]. In nuclear physics, one sometimes distinguishes exact (baryon number preserving), almost exact (e.g., total isospin), approximate (e.g., SU(3) of the "eightfold way") and model (e.g., nuclear shell model) dynamical symmetries [4.13]. The dynamical groups of interest in atomic and molecular physics can be conveniently classified by their topological characteristic of compactness. Noncompact LGs (LAs) generally arise in simple problems involving an infinite number of bound states, while those involving a finite number of bound states (e.g., molecular vibrations or ab initio models of electronic structure) exploit compact LG's.

  5. Saliva composition in three selected groups with normal stimulated salivary flow rates, but yet major differences in caries experience and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardow, Allan; Lykkeaa, Joan; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim; Twetman, Svante; Fiehn, Niels-Erik

    2014-08-01

    It was hypothesized that, by comparing matched subjects with major differences in these dental diseases, but yet normal saliva flow rates, it would be possible to obtain data on the effect of saliva composition on dental disease isolated from the effect of the flow rate. Thus, the aim of the study was to compare the major physicochemical characteristics of stimulated whole saliva in three groups of 85 subjects, each with normal saliva flow rates and at least 24 remaining teeth. A group with very little dental disease (healthy), a group with dental erosion (erosion) and a group with very high caries experience (caries) were chosen. Furthermore, the aim was to determine whether differences among groups could also be found on an individual level. Although it was not possible to retrieve three groups whose members were completely identical, the present study points in the direction that, on a group level, subjects with very little dental disease seemed to have a more favorable physicochemical saliva composition with respect to higher calcium, phosphate, bicarbonate, pH, degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite and a lower critical pH (p erosion (p erosion in single individuals.

  6. Comparing yield and relative costs of WHO TB screening algorithms in selected risk groups among people aged 65 years and over in China, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canyou Zhang

    Full Text Available To calculate the yield and cost per diagnosed tuberculosis (TB case for three World Health Organization screening algorithms and one using the Chinese National TB program (NTP TB suspect definitions, using data from a TB prevalence survey of people aged 65 years and over in China, 2013.This was an analytic study using data from the above survey. Risk groups were defined and the prevalence of new TB cases in each group calculated. Costs of each screening component were used to give indicative costs per case detected. Yield, number needed to screen (NNS and cost per case were used to assess the algorithms.The prevalence survey identified 172 new TB cases in 34,250 participants. Prevalence varied greatly in different groups, from 131/100,000 to 4651/ 100,000. Two groups were chosen to compare the algorithms. The medium-risk group (living in a rural area: men, or previous TB case, or close contact or a BMI <18.5, or tobacco user had appreciably higher cost per case (USD 221, 298 and 963 in the three algorithms than the high-risk group (all previous TB cases, all close contacts. (USD 72, 108 and 309 but detected two to four times more TB cases in the population. Using a Chest x-ray as the initial screening tool in the medium risk group cost the most (USD 963, and detected 67% of all the new cases. Using the NTP definition of TB suspects made little difference.To "End TB", many more TB cases have to be identified. Screening only the highest risk groups identified under 14% of the undetected cases,. To "End TB", medium risk groups will need to be screened. Using a CXR for initial screening results in a much higher yield, at what should be an acceptable cost.

  7. Nearby Young Stars Selected by Proper Motion. I. Four New Members of the β Pictoris Moving Group From The Tycho-2 Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépine, Sébastien; Simon, Michal

    2009-03-01

    We describe a procedure to identify stars from nearby moving groups and associations out of catalogs of stars with large proper motions. We show that from the mean motion vector of a known or suspected moving group, one can identify additional members of the group based on proper motion data and photometry in the optical and infrared, with minimal contamination from background field stars. We demonstrate this technique by conducting a search for low-mass members of the β Pictoris moving group in the Tycho-2 catalog. All known members of the moving group are easily recovered, and a list of 51 possible candidates is generated. Moving group membership is evaluated for 33 candidates based on X-ray flux from ROSAT, Hα line emission, and radial velocity measurement from high-resolution infrared spectra obtained at Infrared Telescope Facility. We confirm three of the candidates to be new members of the group: TYC 1186-706-1, TYC 7443-1102-1, and TYC 2211-1309-1 which are late-K and early-M dwarfs 45-60 pc from the Sun. We also identify a common proper motion companion to the known β Pictoris Moving Group member TYC 7443-1102-1, at a 26farcs3 separation; the new companion is associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J195602.8 - 320720. We argue that the present technique could be applied to other large proper motion catalogs to identify most of the elusive, low-mass members of known nearby moving groups and associations. Based on data obtained in part with the 2.4 m Hiltner telescope of the MDM observatory. Based on data obtained in part with the CTIO 1.5 m telescope, operated by SMARTS, the Small and Medium Aperture Telescope System consortium, under contract with the Associated Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).

  8. Selective agonists at group II metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis, stereochemistry, and molecular pharmacology of (S)- and (R)-2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2002-01-01

    Homologation of analogues of the central excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (Glu), in which the distal carboxy group has been bioisosterically replaced by acidic heterocyclic units, has previously provided subtype selective ligands for metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The (S)-form of t...

  9. Working group results on the division by four of the greenhouse gases emissions in France, at 2050, called factor four

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This working group aims to evaluate and propose different ways to divide by four the greenhouse gases emissions at 2050 in France. This objective was decided by the Government and fixed in the Climate Plan and in the Program law of 13 July 2005. In this framework, this meeting presents studies of the working group, concerning the following topics: buildings and greenhouse gases, a scenario for the UE25 realized by Greenpeace, the agriculture and the forests facing the climate, the biomass the nature the agriculture and the silviculture facing the climate. (A.L.B.)

  10. Selective Reductive Removal of Ester and Amide Groups from Arenes and Heteroarenes through Nickel-Catalyzed C−O and C−N Bond Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Huifeng

    2017-03-21

    An inexpensive nickel(II) catalyst and a hydrosilane were used for the efficient reductive defunctionalization of aryl and heteroaryl esters through a decarbonylative pathway. This versatile method could be used for the removal of ester and amide functional groups from various organic molecules. Moreover, a scale-up experiment and a synthetic application based on the use of a removable carboxylic acid directing group highlight the usefulness of this reaction.

  11. Anion-selective materials with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane functional groups for advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnát, J.; Plevová, M.; Žitka, Jan; Paidar, M.; Bouzek, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 248, 10 September (2017), s. 547-555 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20728S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : water electrolysis * alkaline environment * anion-selective membrane Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cell s, batteries, fuel cell s, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  12. Preliminary selection for potential probiotic Bifidobacterium isolated from subjects of different Chinese ethnic groups and evaluation of their fermentation and storage characteristics in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W J; Chen, Y F; Kwok, L Y; Li, M H; Sun, T; Sun, C L; Wang, X N; Dan, T; Menghebilige; Zhang, H P; Sun, T S

    2013-01-01

    A total of 29 strains of Bifidobacterium were isolated from 18 samples of human feces in different ethnic minority regions of China. All isolates were identified as Bifidobacterium longum (9 strains) and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum (20 strains) based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. These strains were preliminarily tested for their suitability to become probiotics by assessing their ability to survive adequately at low pH conditions and their tolerance of different concentrations of bile salts and simulated gastrointestinal juices. In vitro tests were sequentially used to predict the survival of these strains in the simulated conditions in the human gastrointestinal tract. These strains were first exposed to pH 2.5 for 3h, and 7 out of the 29 strains were discriminated from the others by their high survival rates. Out of these 7 strains, 4 were found to grow and survive well at an even lower pH of 2.0 and in high bile salt concentration. Apart from the gastrointestinal survival capacity, both fermentation efficiency and storage characteristics are important criteria for selecting for suitable potential probiotic strains. Therefore, the fermentation efficiency in bovine milk and the bacterial viability during the storage in the resultant fermented milk were also evaluated for these 4 selected strains. In this study, we isolated and identified 29 novel Bifidobacterium strains. Based on our initial evaluation, at least 4 of them may serve as valuable resources for further dairy probiotic strain selection. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender Rationales in Selecting a Major in Information Technology at the Undergraduate Level of a University Program: A Focus Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sushma; Draus, Peter; Caputo, Donald; Leone, Gregory; Kohun, Frederick; Repack, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Previous research studies of women applying to, enrolling and completing computing degrees at the undergraduate collegiate level suggest a significant underrepresentation of females in the Information Technology domain in the past decade. This study employs a focus group approach to the gender gap that encompasses forays into the qualitative…

  14. Nitro group substitution effects in selected {beta}- and {gamma}-quinoline derivatives; Efekty podstawnikowe grupy nitrowej w wybranych pochodnych {beta}- i {gamma}-chinolinylowych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslankiewicz, M.J. [Inst. Chemii, Uniwersytet Slaski, Katowice (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The quinolines nitration reaction have been investigated by means of {sup 1}H NMR. The reaction products have been identified and influence of nitro group localization discussed on the base of chemical shifts and coupling constants observed in NMR spectra. 5 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII): Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII) and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII) is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative) selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII. Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00) programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00). Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3). A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (π) with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative) selection, geographical clustering of haplotypes

  16. Large allele frequency differences between human continental groups are more likely to have occurred by drift during range expansions than by selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, T; Ray, N; Wegmann, D; Excoffier, L

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found strikingly different allele frequencies between continents. This has been mainly interpreted as being due to local adaptation. However, demographic factors can generate similar patterns. Namely, allelic surfing during a population range expansion may increase the frequency of alleles in newly colonised areas. In this study, we examined 772 STRs, 210 diallelic indels, and 2834 SNPs typed in 53 human populations worldwide under the HGDP-CEPH Diversity Panel to determine to which extent allele frequency differs among four regions (Africa, Eurasia, East Asia, and America). We find that large allele frequency differences between continents are surprisingly common, and that Africa and America show the largest number of loci with extreme frequency differences. Moreover, more STR alleles have increased rather than decreased in frequency outside Africa, as expected under allelic surfing. Finally, there is no relationship between the extent of allele frequency differences and proximity to genes, as would be expected under selection. We therefore conclude that most of the observed large allele frequency differences between continents result from demography rather than from positive selection.

  17. Learning how to use a tool: Mutually exclusive tool-function mappings are selectively acquired from linguistic in-group models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pető, Réka; Elekes, Fruzsina; Oláh, Katalin; Király, Ildikó

    2018-07-01

    The current study investigated whether 4-year-olds used language as a cue to social group membership to infer whether the tool-use behavior of a model needed to be encoded as indicative of the tool's function. We built on children's tendency to treat functions as mutually exclusive, that is, their propensity to refrain from using the same tool for more than one function. We hypothesized that children would form mutually exclusive tool-function mappings only if the source of the function information was a linguistic in-group person (native) as opposed to an out-group (foreign) person. In Experiment 1, participants (N = 39) were presented with four tool-function pairs by a model who had previously spoken either in their native language or in a foreign language. During the test phase, children encountered new purposes for which they could either use the demonstrated tools' color variant or use another equally suitable, as yet unseen, alternative tool. In line with our predictions, children preferred to use the alternative tool for the new function only in the native language condition (native: 63.3%; foreign: 42.7%). Experiment 2 replicated the initial finding using another foreign language and demonstrated that the lack of mutually exclusive tool choice in the foreign condition did not originate from children's failure to encode the demonstration. These findings suggest that children restrict learning artifact functions from linguistic in-group models. The mutual exclusivity principle in the domain of function learning is used more flexibly than previously proposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of potential prognostic value of Bmi-1 gene product and selected markers of proliferation (Ki-67 and apoptosis (p53 in the neuroblastoma group of tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Taran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cancer in children is a very important issue in pediatrics. The least satisfactory treatment outcome occurs among patients with clinically advanced neuroblastomas. Despite much research, the biology of this tumor still remains unclear, and new prognostic factors are sought. The Bmi-1 gene product is a currently highly investigated protein which belongs to the Polycomb group (PcG and has been identified as a regulator of primary neural crest cells. It is believed that Bmi‑1 and N-myc act together and are both involved in the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma. The aim of the study was to assess the potential prognostic value of Bmi-1 protein and its relations with mechanisms of proliferation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma group of tumors.Material/Methods: 29 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded neuroblastoma tissue sections were examined using mouse monoclonal antibodies anti-Bmi-1, anti-p53 and anti-Ki-67 according to the manufacturer’s instructions.Results: There were found statistically significant correlations between Bmi-1 expression and tumor histology and age of patients.Conclusions: Bmi-1 seems to be a promising marker in the neuroblastoma group of tumors whose expression correlates with widely accepted prognostic parameters. The pattern of BMI-1 expression may indicate that the examined protein is also involved in maturation processes in tumor tissue.

  19. Target-specific NMR detection of protein–ligand interactions with antibody-relayed {sup 15}N-group selective STD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetényi, Anasztázia [University of Szeged, Department of Medical Chemistry (Hungary); Hegedűs, Zsófia [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary); Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva [Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Lymphocyte Signal Transduction Laboratory, Institute of Genetics (Hungary); Kövér, Katalin E. [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Martinek, Tamás A., E-mail: martinek@pharm.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein–ligand interactions is a key element. {sup 1}H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed {sup 15}N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A {sup 15}N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  20. Storage of radioactive wastes in geological formations. Technical criteria for site selection. Report by the work-group chaired by Professor Goguel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goguel, Jean; Candes, Pierre; Izabel, Cecile; Autran, Albert; Barthoux, Alain; Baudin, Guy; Devillers, Christian; Habib, Pierre; Lafuma, Jacques; Lefevre, Jean; Peaudecerf, Pierre; Pradel, Jacques; Salle, Claude; Treuil, Michel; Lebrun, Patrick; Tissier, Marie-Solange

    1985-06-01

    This document is the result of a prospective mission on the long term storage of radioactive wastes containing long-period emitters (wastes of B and C categories), and notably on a definitive storage in deep continental geological formations. After a presentation of hypotheses (brief description of the storage concept, main safety principles, objectives in terms of radiological safety, safety options, time-related considerations), the authors addressed the following issues: safety before closing during the exploitation period, and safety after closure (after backfilling and sealing of all underground cavities). For the first issue, they discuss the impacts of works on safety and thermal effects during exploitation. For the second issue, they discuss the site natural hydro-geological context, the disturbances brought by the storage (access of water to the storage, and return of water into the biosphere), and the influence of external factors (geological phenomena, human intrusion). Then, the authors make recommendations regarding reconnaissance programs and studies for the selection and qualification of a site. They finally propose technical criteria and main recommendations for site selection. Appendices propose a list of hearings, a presentation of the storage concept, a report on the impact of works, a report on the presence of mineralisation in granite massifs, reports on radiological consequences of intrusions in salt formations and in granite massif containing storage of radioactive wastes or vitrified wastes, a report on the characterization of unsteady parts of the French continental construction, a presentation of the evolution of climate and icings, and a study of seismic movements in the case of deep storages

  1. Silvicultural aspects intermediate cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Carvell

    1971-01-01

    Correct timing of the first thinning in mixed oak stands depends largely on the composition and condition of the stands and on available markets for small wood products. Delaying first thinnings in high-quality seedling-origin stands until a long, straight, clear bole has developed is of primary importance in assuring high quality of the final crop trees. However, many...

  2. Historical silvicultural treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. E. Gruell; W. C. Schmidt; S. F. Arno; W. J. Reich; James Menakis

    1999-01-01

    The Lick Creek timber sale of 1906 attracted much attention because it was the first large National Forest timber sale (2,135 acres) in the ponderosa pine cover type in the USDA Forest Service Northern Region. A total of 37,600,000 board feet (bd ft) was cut (White 1924).

  3. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    A limited intralysosomal proteolytic degradation is probably a key event in the accessory cell processing of large protein antigens before their presentation to T cells. With the aid of highly specific inhibitors of proteinases, we have examined the role of proteolysis in the presentation...... of antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. The proteinase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanylalanine-diazomethyl-ketone, which selectively inhibits cysteine proteinases, was used to block this set of enzymes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that the selective inhibition of the cysteine proteinases...... inhibitor. Another inhibitor, pepstatin A, which selectively blocks aspartic proteinases, did not block the presentation of dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine. The results identify cysteine proteinases, probably lysosomal, as one of the groups of enzymes involved in antigen processing....

  4. Descriptive report on pattern of variation in cancer cases within selected ethnic groups in Kamrup Urban District of Assam, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Kalita, Manoj; Barbhuiya, Jamil Ahmed; Lahon, Ranjan; Sharma, Arpita; Barman, Debanjana; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Roy, Barsha Deka

    2014-01-01

    The global burden of cancer is continuously increasing. According to recent report of the National Cancer Registry Programme (NCRP) on time trends it is estimated that future burden of cancer cases for India in 2020 will be 1,320,928. It is well known that knowledge of the incidence of cancer is a fundamental requirement of rational planning and monitoring of cancer control programs. It would help health planners to formulate public health policy if relevant ethnic groups were considered. North East-India alone contains over 160 Scheduled Tribes and 400 other sub-tribal communities and groups, whose cancer incidence rates are high compared to mainland India. As since no previous study was done focusing on ethnicity, the present investigation was performed. In this paper PBCR-Guwahati data on all cancer registrations from January 2009 to December 2011 for residents of the Kamrup Urban District, comprising an area of 261.8 sq. km with a total population of 900,518, including individual records with information on sex, age, ethnicity and cancer site are provided. Descriptive statistics including age adjusted rates (AARs) were taken as provided by NCRP. For comparison of proportional incidence ratios (PIR) the Student's t test was used, with ppolicy makers to formulate different strategies to control the level of burden as well as for treatment planning. This study also suggests that age is an important factor of cancer among different ethnic populations as well as for overall population of Kamrup District of Assam.

  5. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-05-27

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins.

  6. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins. PMID:26013289

  7. Nutritional Status among the Children of Age Group 5-14 Years in Selected Arsenic Exposed and Non-Exposed Areas of Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaul Karim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess and compare the nutritional status of children aged 5-14 years in arsenic exposed and non- exposed areas.It was a cross sectional study conducted on 600 children of age 5-14 years from arsenic exposed and non-exposed areas in Bangladesh. Designed questionnaire and check list were used for collection of data. To estimate BMI necessary anthropometric measurements of the studied children were done. Dietary intakes of the study children were assessed using 24-hours recall method.The difference of socio-economic conditions between the children of exposed area and non-exposed area was not significant. On an average the body mass index was found to be significantly (p < 0.01 lower among the children of arsenic exposed area (49% in comparison to that of children in non-exposed area (38%. Stunting (p < 0.01, wasting (p < 0.05 and underweight (p < 0.05 were significantly higher in exposed group in comparison to non-exposed group. No significant difference of nutrition intake was found between exposed and non-exposed children as well as thin and normal children.In this study children exposed to arsenic contaminated water were found to be suffered from lower nutritional status.

  8. Estimation of dietary supplements intake in a selected group of women over 50 and the risk assessment of interactions between the ingredients of dietary supplements and drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Joanna; Bruszkowska, Magda

    Concurrent use of dietary supplements and drugs may result in complications of pharmacotherapy due to possible interactions between their ingredients. The aim of the survey was to estimate the intake of dietary supplements in a group of women over 50 and to analyse the risk of interactions between the ingredients of dietary supplements and drugs taken by the women. The study was carried out among 146 women over 50 years of age. Questionnaire included detailed questions on the type of prescription drugs, OTC (over-the-counter) drugs, and dietary supplements taken. The risk of interactions was determined on the basis of chemical composition of the drugs and supplements specified by the manufacturer, by comparing the obtained data with literature reports on known interactions. The analysis has shown that 88.4% of respondents constantly took prescription drugs, 44.5% of them took OTC drugs, and 66.4% of respondents took dietary supplements throughout the survey period. It has been found that 71.3% of surveyed women taking prescription drugs, took dietary supplements as well. Among women taking supplements and drugs, 36.9% of respondents were taking them concurrently, 60.9% kept such an interval, but only 21.8% of them waited for at least two hours. It has been found that the drug-supplement interactions might occur in 35.8% women under the survey. The analysis of the obtained results has revealed that taking dietary supplements by the group under survey was frequent, and the risk of interactions between dietary supplements and drugs was significant. It is recommended that doctors ask their patients about taken supplements during regular check-ups, and inform them about possible interactions between dietary supplements and drugs. Moreover, appropriate would be to change the labelling of dietary supplements, so that the packaging provides information on possible interactions between their ingredients and drugs.

  9. Impact of the corrin framework of vitamin B12on the electrochemical carbon-skeleton rearrangement in comparison to an imine/oxime planar ligand; tuning selectivity in 1,2-migration of a functional group by controlling electrolysis potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Keishiro; Pan, Ling; Yamaguchi, Ryoko; Shimakoshi, Hisashi; Abe, Masaaki; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2017-10-01

    Among the coenzyme B 12 -dependent enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MMCM) catalyzes the carbon-skeleton rearrangement reaction between R-methylmalonyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. Diethyl 2-bromomethyl-2-phenylmalonate, an alkyl bromide substrate having two different migrating groups (phenyl and carboxylic ester groups) on the β-carbon, was applied to the electrolysis mediated by a hydrophobic vitamin B 12 model complex, heptamethyl cobyrinate perchlorate in this study. The electrolysis of the substrate at -1.0V vs. Ag-AgCl by light irradiation afforded the simple reduced product (diethyl 2-methyl-2-phenylmalonate) and the phenyl migrated product (diethyl 2-benzyl-2-phenylmalonate), as well as the electrolysis of the substrate at -1.5V vs. Ag-AgCl in the dark. The electrolysis of the substrate at -2.0V vs. Ag-AgCl afforded the carboxylic ester migrated product (diethyl phenylsuccinate) as the major product. The selectivity for the migrating group was successfully tuned by controlling the electrolysis potential. We clarified that the cathodic chemistry of the Co(III) alkylated heptamethyl cobyrinate is critical for the selectivity of the migrating group through mechanistic investigations and comparisons to the simple vitamin B 12 model complex, an imine/oxime-type cobalt complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. impact of life style on body Weight in adolescents on the basis of questionnaire findings in selected group of youth from rural and urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ścibor

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Overweight and primary obesity in children and adolescents is a crucial problem in public health. Obese children and adolescents are especially susceptible to obesity in adulthood and consequently exposed to many obesity related diseases. Objective: Evaluation of overweight and primary obesity in urban and rural youth populations and comparison of life style concerning: physical activity, sedentary behaviors, dietary habits among overweight and obese adolescents and their peers with proper Body Mass Index value. Materials and methods: The study was performed in the group of 136 students from junior high school. The students with BMI value over 85th percentile of sex-specific growth charts were classified as overweight. Research tool was a questionnaire. Results: 15,9% of adolescents were overweight, out of which 4,5% were obese. There was not a significant relation between Body Mass Index and the place of residence. Overweight and obese adolescents revealed lower physical activity and tendency to spend much more time playing computer games. Adolescents with overweight or obesity did not regularly have breakfast at weekends, more often had sweets and sweet drinks and also high energy and very salty snacks instead. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity is a serious problem among students from junior high school population which calls for taking immediate preventive measures to promote healthy lifestyle among children and adolescents.

  11. Role of the Methoxy Groups in Cryptophanes for Complexation of Xenon: Conformational Selection Evidence from129Xe-1H NMR SPINOE Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthault, Patrick; Boutin, Céline; Léonce, Estelle; Jeanneau, Erwann; Brotin, Thierry

    2017-06-20

    We report the laser-polarized 129 Xe and 1 H NMR spectra of a series of cryptophane derivatives that differ only by the number of methoxy groups attached on their benzene rings and the syn or anti arrangement of the linkers (compounds 6 a-s, 9 a-s, 12 a-s). All these compounds bind xenon even though the characteristic signal of the gas encapsulated in the cavity of the cage-molecule cannot always be detected. Interestingly, the exchange dynamics of xenon strongly depends on the degree of substitution and is different from that of the cryptophane derivatives studied previously. In solution, the 1 H NMR spectra of these derivatives show the presence of different conformations in a slow exchange regime that can be explained by a decrease of the flexibility of their skeleton. Thanks to 129 Xe- 1 H dipolar cross-relaxation (SPINOE) spectra, we demonstrate that a single conformation present in solution can bind xenon. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Risk of infection and adverse outcomes among pregnant working women in selected occupational groups: A study in the Danish National Birth Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llopis-González Agustín

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to infectious pathogens is a frequent occupational hazard for women who work with patients, children, animals or animal products. The purpose of the present study is to investigate if women working in occupations where exposure to infections agents is common have a high risk of infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods We used data from the Danish National Birth Cohort, a population-based cohort study and studied the risk of Infection and adverse outcomes in pregnant women working with patients, with children, with food products or with animals. The regression analysis were adjusted for the following covariates: maternal age, parity, history of miscarriage, socio-occupational status, pre-pregnancy body mass index, smoking habit, alcohol consumption. Results Pregnant women who worked with patients or children or food products had an excess risk of sick leave during pregnancy for more than three days. Most of negative reproductive outcomes were not increased in these occupations but the prevalence of congenital anomalies (CAs was slightly higher in children of women who worked with patients. The prevalence of small for gestational age infants was higher among women who worked with food products. There was no association between occupation infections during pregnancy and the risk of reproductive failures in the exposed groups. However, the prevalence of CAs was slightly higher among children of women who suffered some infection during pregnancy but the numbers were small. Conclusion Despite preventive strategies, working in specific jobs during pregnancy may impose a higher risk of infections, and working in some of these occupations may impose a slightly higher risk of CAs in their offspring. Most other reproductive failures were not increased in these occupations.

  13. Cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO groups as selective extraction agents for lanthanide and actinide cations from highly acidic nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, B.; Plesek, J.; Baca, J.; Cisarova, I.; Dozol, J.F.; Rouquette, H.; Vinas, C.; Selucky, P.; Rais, J.

    2002-01-01

    A new series of boron substituted cobalt bis(dicarbollide)(1-) ion (1) derivatives of the general formula [(8-CMPO-(CH 2 -CH 2 O) 2 -1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )-3,3'-Co] - (CMPO = Ph 2 P(O)-CH 2 C(O)NR, R = C 4 H 9 (3b), -C 12 H 25 (4b), -CH 2 -C 6 H 5 (5b)) was prepared by ring cleavage of the 8-dioxane-cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (2) bi-polar compound by the respective primary amines and by subsequent reaction of the resulting amino derivatives (3a-5a) with the nitrophenyl ester of diphenyl-phosphoryl-acetic acid. The compounds were synthesized with the aim to develop a new class of more efficient extraction agents for liquid/liquid extraction of polyvalent cations, i.e. lanthanides and actinides, from high-level activity nuclear waste. All compounds were characterized by a combination of 11 B NMR, 1 H high field NMR, Mass Spectrometry with Electro-spray and MALDI TOF ionisation, HPLC and other techniques. The molecular structure of the supramolecular Ln 3+ complex of the anion 5b was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystallographic results proved that the Ln(m) atom is bonded to three functionalized cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anions in a charge compensated complex. The cation is tightly coordinated by six oxygen atoms of the CMPO terminal groups (two of each ligand) and by three water molecules completing the metal coordination number to 9. Atoms occupying the primary coordination sphere form a tri-capped trigonal prismatic arrangement. Very high liquid-liquid extraction efficiency of all anionic species was observed. Moreover, less polar toluene can be applied as an auxiliary solvent replacing the less environmentally friendly nitro- and chlorinated solvents used in the current dicarbollide liquid-liquid extraction process. The extraction coefficients are sufficiently high for possible technological applications. (authors)

  14. Evaluating Nicotine Levels Selection and Patterns of Electronic Cigarette use in a Group of “Vapers” Who Had Achieved Complete Substitution of Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2013-01-01

    capacity and improved olfactory and gustatory senses. Perceived EC dependenct was significantly lower compared to smoking. Conclusions Nicotine levels appear to play an important role in achieving and maintaining smoking cessation in the group of motivated subjects studied. High nicotine-containing liquids were used while few mild and temporary side effects were reported. Proposals about regulation should consider the pragmatic use patterns of ECs, especially in consumers who have completely substituted smoking.

  15. Selective agonists at group II metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis, stereochemistry, and molecular pharmacology of (S)- and (R)-2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2002-01-01

    )-form of the 1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-ol Glu analogue, 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)propionic acid (TDPA, 6), is an 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist, which in addition stereospecifically activates group I mGluRs. We have now synthesized the (S)- and (R......Homologation of analogues of the central excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (Glu), in which the distal carboxy group has been bioisosterically replaced by acidic heterocyclic units, has previously provided subtype selective ligands for metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The (S......)-forms of 2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid (homo-TDPA, 7) and shown that whereas neither enantiomer interacts with AMPA receptors, (S)- and (R)-7 appear to be selective and equipotent agonists at group II mGluRs as represented by the mGluR2 subtype. The activities of (S)- and (R)-7...

  16. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  17. Key Ingredients-Target Groups, Methods and Messages, and Evaluation-of Local-Level, Public Interventions to Counter Stigma and Discrimination: A Lived Experience Informed Selective Narrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Laura J; Gordon, Sarah E; Reeves, Racheal A

    2018-04-01

    A proliferation of recent literature provides substantial direction as to the key ingredients-target groups, messages and methods, and evaluation-of local-level, public interventions to counter stigma and discrimination. This paper provides a selective narrative review of that literature from the perspective or standpoint of anti-stigma experts with lived experience of mental distress, the key findings of which have been synthesised and presented in diagrammatic overviews (infographics). These are intended to guide providers in planning, delivering and evaluating lived experience-directed local-level, public interventions to counter stigma and discrimination in accord with current best practice.

  18. Selection, specification, design and use of various nuclear power plant training simulators. Report prepared within the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Several IAEA publications consider the role of training and particularly the role of simulator training to enhance the safety of NPP operations. Initially, the focus was on full scope simulators for the training of main control room operators. Experience shows that other types of simulator are also effective tools that allow simulator training for a broader range of target groups and training objectives. This report provides guidance to training centers and suppliers on the proper selection, specification, design and use of various forms of simulators. In addition, it provides examples of their use in several Member States. This report is the result of a series of advisory and consultants meetings held in the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI) in 1995-1996

  19. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Chary, K.V.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-03-15

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH{sub 3}) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally {sup 13}C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally {sup 13}C-labeling the rest. A 2D [{sup 13}C-{sup 1}H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH{sub 3} groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  20. Working group results on the division by four of the greenhouse gases emissions in France, at 2050, called factor four; Les travaux du groupe de travail sur la division par quatre des emissions de gaz a effet de serre de la France, a l'horizon 2050, dit facteur 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This working group aims to evaluate and propose different ways to divide by four the greenhouse gases emissions at 2050 in France. This objective was decided by the Government and fixed in the Climate Plan and in the Program law of 13 July 2005. In this framework, this meeting presents studies of the working group, concerning the following topics: buildings and greenhouse gases, a scenario for the UE25 realized by Greenpeace, the agriculture and the forests facing the climate, the biomass the nature the agriculture and the silviculture facing the climate. (A.L.B.)

  1. Effects of silvicultural techniques on the diversity of microorganisms in forest soil and their possible participation in biological control of Armillaria and Heterobasidion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaśna Hanna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of different pre-planting soil preparations and post-harvest wood debris applications in a clear-cut Scots pine plantation, on the abundance, diversity, and activity of culturable microorganisms were investigated. The investigation was done 9 years after the re-plantings had been done. This formed part of an investigation of silvicultural practices for conservation and the biological control of Armillaria and Heterobasidion in northern temperate forests (Poland. The treatments being compared, were expected to have altered the soil’s physical and chemical properties, and consequently, its biological properties. Only soft-rot microfungi from the Ascomycota and Zygomycota were detected in the soil. Fungi, including those antagonistic to Armillaria and Heterobasidion, were more abundant after shallow ploughing than after deep ploughing or ridging, and where chipped rather than coarse wood debris was left on the soil surface or incorporated. Scots pine trees had the most biomass and the least mortality after ridging and leaving coarse wood debris on the surface (associated with only a relatively moderate abundance of fungi.

  2. A Review of the Characteristics of Small-Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata Mill. and Their Implications for Silviculture in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy De Jaegere

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tilia cordata Mill. is a minor European broadleaved species with a wide but scattered distribution. Given its scarcity and low value in the wood market, it has received little attention from researchers and forest managers. This review summarizes the main aspects of T. cordata ecology and growth. Its main limiting factor is its need for warm summer temperatures to ensure successful seed production. It has a height growth pattern relatively similar to that of Acer pseudoplatanus L., with a slight delay in the early stages. Yield tables report great productivity, especially in eastern Europe. T. cordata used to be a major species in Europe, in contrast to its present distribution, but it is very likely to receive renewed interest in the future. Indeed, with the potential change of competition between species in some regions and the need for important diversification in others, T. cordata may play an important role in forest adaptation to climate change, especially owing to its wide ecological tolerance and its numerous ecosystem services. It is necessary to increase our knowledge about its regeneration and its responses to environmental and silvicultural factors, to establish clear management recommendations.

  3. General role of the amino and methylsulfamoyl groups in selective cyclooxygenase(COX)-1 inhibition by 1,4-diaryl-1,2,3-triazoles and validation of a predictive pharmacometric PLS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Maria Grazia; Vitale, Paola; Panella, Andrea; Fortuna, Cosimo G; Scilimati, Antonio

    2015-04-13

    A novel set of 1,4-diaryl-1,2,3-triazoles were projected as a tool to study the effect of both the heteroaromatic triazole as a core ring and a variety of chemical groups with different electronic features, size and shape on the catalytic activity of the two COX isoenzymes. The new triazoles were synthesized in fair to good yields and then evaluated for their inhibitory activity towards COXs arachidonic acid conversion catalysis. Their COXs selectivity was also measured. A predictive pharmacometric Volsurf plus model, experimentally confirmed by the percentage (%) of COXs inhibition at the concentration of 50 μM and IC50 values of the tested compounds, was built by using a number of isoxazoles of known COXs inhibitory activity as a training set. It was found that two compounds {4-(5-methyl-4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)benzenamine (18) and 4-[1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-yl]benzenamine (19)} bearing an amino group (NH2) are potent and selective COX-1 inhibitors (IC50 = 15 and 3 μM, respectively) and that the presence of a methylsulfamoyl group (SO2CH3) is not a rule to have a Coxib. In fact, 4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazole (23) has COX-1 IC50 = 23 μM and was found inactive towards COX-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Complemented with Selected 16S rRNA and gyrB Genes Sequencing to Practically Identify Clinical Important Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Menglan; Yang, Qiwen; Kudinha, Timothy; Zhang, Li; Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yupei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    There are challenges in viridans group streptococci (VGS) identification especially for the mitis group. Few studies have investigated the performance of MALDI-TOF MS system in VGS identification. Using 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene sequencing as a gold standard, the performance of two MALDI-TOF MS instruments in the identification of 181 VGS clinical isolates was studied. The Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS IVD systems correctly identified 88.4% and 98.9% of the 181 isolates, respectively. The Vitek MS RUO system was the least reliable, only correctly identifying 38.7% of the isolates to species level with several misidentifications and invalid results. The Bruker Biotyper system was very unreliable in the identification of species within the mitis group. Among 22 non-pneumococci isolates (S. mitis/S. oralis/S. pseudopneumoniae), Biotyper misidentified 21 of them as S. pneumoniae leading to a low sensitivity and low positive predictive value in these species. In contrast, the Vitek MS IVD demonstrated a better resolution for pneumococci and non-pneumococci despite the inability to distinguish between S. mitis/S. oralis. For more accurate species-level identification, further improvements in the VGS spectra databases are needed. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis and selected 16S rRNA gene plus gyrB genes sequencing, we designed a practical VGS identification algorithm.

  5. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF complemented with selected 16S rRNA and gyrB genes sequencing to practically identify clinical important viridans group streptococci (VGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglan Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are challenges in viridans group streptococci (VGS identification especially for the mitis group. Few studies have investigated the performance of MALDI-TOF MS system in VGS identification. Using 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene sequencing as a gold standard, the performance of two MALDI-TOF MS instruments in the identification of 181 VGS clinical isolates was studied. The Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS IVD systems correctly identified 88.4% and 98.9% of the 181 isolates, respectively. The Vitek MS RUO system was the least reliable, only correctly identifying 38.7% of the isolates to species level with several misidentifications and invalid results. The Bruker Biotyper system was very unreliable in the identification of species within the mitis group. Among 22 non-pneumococci isolates (S. mitis/S. oralis/S. pseudopneumoniae, Biotyper misidentified 21 of them as S. pneumoniae leading to a low sensitivity and low positive predictive value in these species. In contrast, the Vitek MS IVD demonstrated a better resolution for pneumococci and non-pneumococci despite the inability to distinguish between S. mitis/S. oralis. For more accurate species-level identification, further improvements in the VGS spectra databases are needed. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis and selected 16S rRNA gene plus gyrB genes sequencing, we designed a practical VGS identification algorithm.

  6. An ecologically based approach to oak silviculture: a synthesis of 50 years of oak ecosystem research in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Dey; Alejandro A. Royo; Patrick H. Brose; Todd F. Hutchinson; Martin A. Spetich; Scott H. Stoleson

    2010-01-01

    Oak (Quercus L.) is an abundant and widely distributed genus in eastern North America. A history of periodic fire, grazing, canopy disturbance and timber harvesting has favored oak's dominance. But, changes in this regime toward much less fire or complete fire suppression, and selective cutting are causing the successional replacement of oak....

  7. The influence of silvicultural practices on genetic improvement: height growth and weevil resistance in eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Thomas Ledig; D.M. Smith

    1981-01-01

    When grown in a common environment, the progeny of white pine (Pinus strobus L.) from weeviled stands improved by selection thinning outperformed the progeny of wolfy dominants from untreated stands in both height and weevil resistance. Within families, weevils tended to attack the tallest trees. Among families the relationship was not as strong and...

  8. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  9. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  10. Linkage of human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein gO variant groups identified from worldwide clinical isolates with gN genotypes, implications for disease associations and evidence for N-terminal sites of positive selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, C.; Dewin, D.; Polley, S.; Sevilla-Reyes, E.; Pignatelli, S.; Rawlinson, W.; Wilkinson, G.; Dal Monte, P.; Gompels, U.A.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we identified the glycoprotein gO gene, UL74, as a hypervariable locus in the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome [Virology 293 (2002) 281]. Here, we analyze gO from 50 isolates from congenitally infected newborns, transplant recipients, and HIV/AIDS patients from Italy, Australia, and UK. These are compared to four gO groups described from USA transplantation patients [J. Virol. 76 (2002) 10841]. Phylogenetic analyses identified seven genotypes. Divergence between genotypes was up to 55% and within 3%. Discrete linkage was shown between seven hypervariable gO and gN genotypes, but not with gB. This suggests interactions, while gN and gO are known to form complexes with distinct conserved glycoproteins gM, gH/gL, respectively, both are involved in fusogenic entry and exit. Codon-based maximum likelihood models showed evidence for sites of positive selection. Further analyses of disease relationships should take into account these newly defined gO/gN groups

  11. Isopermutation group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muktibodh, A. S. [Department of Mathematics, Mohota College of Science, NAGPUR-440009 India E-mail: amukti2000@yahoo.com (India)

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  12. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  13. Silvicultural operation on the forest ecosystems: Methodology for forest hydrological monitoring; Effetti del taglio sugli ecosistemi forestali in ambiente montamo: Proposte metologiche per il monitoraggio dell`idrologia forestale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreotti, A.; Collina, M.; Serra, F.; Naviglio, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Brasimone, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Bonora, P. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `E. Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Gregori, E.; Napoli, R. [Istituto Sperimentale per lo Studio e la Difesa del Suolo, Firenze (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    During 1994, Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, with the contribution of the Ministry of Agricultural, Alimentary and Forest Resources, started a research program to assess the effects of the silvicultural operations on the forest ecosystems, investigating particularly the hydrological aspects, the erosion and the nutrient cycle. The research must monitor two forest plots coinciding with two secondary watersheds in the Torto stream valley (Northern Italy - high Bolognan Appennines) during about ten years. One plot will be let naturally evolve, while the other one, after a period of 3-5 years, must be subject to a cut; the comparison between the two plots will allow us to evaluate the nature and the size of the changes induced in the ecosystem by man through the silvicultural operations. Because of the complexity of the environmental parameters the authors want to study, initially it was necessary to determine methodology and instruments required for attaining the set goals. In this technical report are shown the results the authors obtained at the end of this first testing and setting up period, and therefore it assumes the form of a methodological protocol for carrying out the research itself.

  14. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.;  uhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-02-25

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg2 of the XMM–Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y_500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17 ± 9)per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter

  15. Hydrologic response to and recovery from differing silvicultural systems in a deciduous forest landscape with seasonal snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttle, J. M.; Beall, F. D.; Webster, K. L.; Hazlett, P. W.; Creed, I. F.; Semkin, R. G.; Jeffries, D. S.

    2018-02-01

    Hydrological consequences of alternative harvesting strategies in deciduous forest landscapes with seasonal snow cover have received relatively little attention. Most forest harvesting experiments in landscapes with seasonal snow cover have focused on clearcutting in coniferous forests. Few have examined alternative strategies such as selection or shelterwood cutting in deciduous stands whose hydrologic responses to harvesting may differ from those of conifers. This study presents results from a 31-year examination of hydrological response to and recovery from alternative harvesting strategies in a deciduous forest landscape with seasonal snow cover in central Ontario, Canada. A quantitative means of assessing hydrologic recovery to harvesting is also developed. Clearcutting resulted in increased water year (WY) runoff. This was accompanied by increased runoff in all seasons, with greatest relative increases in Summer. Direct runoff and baseflow from treatment catchments generally increased following harvesting, although annual peak streamflow did not. Largest increases in WY runoff and seasonal runoff as well as direct runoff and baseflow generally occurred in the selection harvest catchment, likely as a result of interception of hillslope runoff by a forest access road and redirection to the stream channel. Hydrologic recovery appeared to begin towards the end of the experimental period for several streamflow metrics but was incomplete for all harvesting strategies 15 years after harvesting. Geochemical tracing indicated that harvesting enhanced the relative importance of surface and near-surface water pathways on catchment slopes for all treatments, with the clearcut catchment showing the most pronounced and prolonged response. Such insights into water partitioning between flow pathways may assist assessments of the ecological and biogeochemical consequences of forest disturbance.

  16. Selected Data for Wells and Test Holes Used in Structure-Contour Maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills Area, South Dakota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carter, Janet M

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected data on wells and test holes that were used in the construction of structure-contour maps of selected formations that contain major aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota...

  17. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  18. Group Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  19. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey Data I: Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since Z similar to 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J; Desai, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Vikram, V.

    2016-01-10

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z similar to 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, m(*) proportional to (M-200/1.5 x 10(14)M(circle dot))(0.24 +/- 0.08)(1+z)(-0.19 +/- 0.34), and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M-200,M-z = 10(13.8)M(circle dot); at z = 1.0: m(*, BCG) appears to have grown by 0.13 +/- 0.11 dex, in tension at the similar to 2.5 sigma significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  20. Concentrations of Platinum Group Elements (Pt, Pd, Rh in Airborne Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Collected at Selected Canadian Urban Sites: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celo V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing environmental concentrations of platinum group elements (PGEs, in particular platinum (Pt, palladium (Pd and rhodium (Rh, from catalytic converters has been reported worldwide. Initially it was believed that the emitted PGEs remain in the roadside environment, but recent studies have shown that fine PGE-containing particles can be transported and distributed at regional and long-range levels. Therefore, the monitoring of PGEs in airborne particulate matter (PM is important for the estimation of potential risks to human health and to the ecosystem. The aim of this study is to present the first results from an analysis on the concentration and distribution of Pt, Pd and Rh in PM collected on Teflon filters at two selected urban sites (Toronto, Ontario; Edmonton, Alberta collected within the Canadian National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS network. In this work, a quadruple inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, combined with microwave assisted acid digestion using aqua regia was used. A cation exchange separation was used to alleviate the matrix-induced spectral and nonspectral interferences prior to ICP-MS analysis. To obtain sufficient material needed for PGEs analysis, fine PM (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 mm; PM2.5 and coarse PM (with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 mm; PM10-2.5 samples were combined into composite samples on a seasonal basis. The obtained results will be discussed and compared with literature data.

  1. Selection and grouping of indicators of water quality using Multivariate StatisticsSeleção e agrupamento de indicadores da qualidade de águas utilizando Estatística Multivariada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Almeida Bertossi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate statistics techniques (Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis were employed to select the most important parameters that explain water quality variability at a rural watershed in the state of Espírito Santo (Brazil. In addition to group the waters studied for the similarity of features selected to verify the effect of type of soil cover (agriculture, livestock, forest and urban, water resource (surface and underground and sampling period (rainy and dry seasons. Nineteen physico-chemical parameters of water quality were analyzed: pH, electrical conductivity, total solids, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, turbidity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, total phosphorous, Ca, Mg, Fe, Na, K, Zn, Cu and total coliform. Application of Principal Component Analysis reduced the 19 parameters to three components that explained 87.53% of the total variance of data set. Water quality parameters that best explained variability of data were: electrical conductivity, total solids, total dissolved solids, turbidity, BOD, nitrate, Ca, Mg, and Na. Application of Cluster Analysis showed four different groups of water quality that differed in concentration of physicochemical characteristics and the type of water resource study, since the collection periods and the type of soil cover did not influence the segregation of groups formed. No presente trabalho empregaram-se técnicas de Estatística Multivariada (Análise de Componentes Principais e Análise de Agrupamento Hierárquico com o objetivo de selecionar as características físico-químicas mais importantes para explicar a variabilidade da qualidade das águas de uma sub-bacia hidrográfica rural no Sul do Estado do Espírito Santo, além de agrupar as águas estudadas quanto à similaridade das características selecionadas para verificar o efeito do tipo de cobertura do solo (agrícola, pecuário, florestal e urbano, de recurso h

  2. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  3. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  4. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  5. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . These fields are interrelated and each of these fields contributes to the other. 2. Examples and classification. We first give some examples of Lie groups. The most frequently occurring ones are the linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), ...

  6. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S RAGHUNATHAN and T N VENKATARAMANA. ∗. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental ... linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), SOn(R),. SOn(C), Spn(R) and Spn(C). Let us call a con- nected Lie ..... split groups due respectively to C C Moore and. V Deodhar. B Sury solved the congruence subgroup ...

  7. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  8. Prevalence of R5 strains in multi-treated HIV subjects and impact of new regimens including maraviroc in a selected group of patients with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Isabella; Clò, Alberto; Borderi, Marco; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Calza, Leonardo; Morini, Silvia; Miserocchi, Anna; Cricca, Monica; Gibellini, Davide; Re, Maria Carla

    2013-10-01

    Maraviroc currently represents an important antiretroviral drug for multi-experienced and viremic HIV patients. This study focused on two main points: (1) determining the prevalence of R5 and X4 HIV strains in antiretroviral-experienced patients using two main tests currently in use to determine viral tropism, and (2) the follow-up to 3 years of a limited number of patients who started a new antiretroviral protocol including maraviroc. A group of 56 HIV patients, previously multi-treated, were first analyzed by genotyping assay and Trofile™ to establish their eligibility for maraviroc treatment. In addition, 25 subjects selected to follow a new therapeutic protocol including a CCR5 antagonist were monitored by HIV RNA viral load and CD4+ cell count. The determination of viral tropism showed a large percentage of patients with an R5 profile (72% by genotyping assay and 74% by Trofile). The follow-up of most (21 out 25) patients who started the new antiretroviral protocol showed an undetectable viral load throughout the observation period, accompanied by a major improvement in CD4 cell count (cells/mm(3)) (baseline: median CD4 cell count 365, interquartile range (IQR) 204-511; 12 months: median value 501, IQR 349-677, p=0.042; 24 months: median value 503, IQR 386-678, p=0.026; 36 months: median value 601, IQR 517-717, p=0.001). Among the four non-responder subjects, two showed a lack of drug compliance and two switched from R5 to X4. Although our patient cohort was small, the results showed a high prevalence of R5 viral strains in multi-experienced patients. As well as showing the advantages of genotyping, which can be performed in plasma samples with low viral load replication, the follow-up of HIV patients selected for an alternative drug protocol, including a CCR5 antagonist, showed a persistent undetectable viral replication and a good recovery of CD4 cell count in most treated HIV patients. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases

  9. Ungulate browsing causes species loss in deciduous forests independent of community dynamics and silvicultural management in Central and Southeastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Schulze

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Grid-based inventories of 1,924 deciduous forests plots in Germany and 4,775 in Romania were used to investigate tree species composition as affected by browsing and grazing under different forest management (rotation forestry, selectively cut forest, protected forest. At regional scale, the loss of tree species in the dominant layer was between 52 to 67% in Germany and of 10 to 30% in Romania, with largest effects in protected nature reserves in Germany. At plot level, only 50% (Germany to 54% (Romania of canopy species were found in the regeneration layer with a height of 1.5 m. Browsing was influenced by the proportion of Fagus in the regenerating trees in Germany, and by stand density, basal area, and management in both regions. Structural equation modeling explained 11 to 26% of the variance in species loss based on the fresh loss of the terminal bud in the winter prior to the inventory work (one season browsing. Browsing (and grazing in Romania is shown to be a significant cause of species loss across both countries and all management types. Potential cascading effects on other organisms of deciduous forest ecosystems are discussed. We conclude that the present hunting practices that support overabundant ungulate populations constitute a major threat to the biodiversity of deciduous forests in Germany and Romania and to other places with similar ungulate management, and that changes my only be possible by modernizing the legal framework of hunting.

  10. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... with which they coexist. To achieve this, the research adopted phenomenology as a method and ethnography as strategy, using participant observation, in-depth interviews, and interviews-to-the-double. The results show that the collective management practice is a crossroad of other practices......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  11. The effect of plantation silviculture on soil organic matter and particle-size fractions in Amazonia O efeito de manejo silvicultural de eucalipto sobre matéria orgânica e frações de solo na Amazônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Patrick Beldini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus grandis and other clonal plantations cover about 3.5 million ha in Brazil. The impacts of intensively-managed short-rotation forestry on soil aggregate structure and Carbon (C dynamics are largely undocumented in tropical ecosystems. Long-term sustainability of these systems is probably in part linked to maintenance of soil organic matter and good soil structure and aggregation, especially in areas with low-fertility soils. This study investigated soil aggregate dynamics on a clay soil and a sandy soil, each with a Eucalyptus plantation and an adjacent primary forest. Silvicultural management did not reduce total C stocks, and did not change soil bulk density. Aggregates of the managed soils did not decrease in mass as hypothesized, which indicates that soil cultivation in 6 year cycles did not cause large decreases in soil aggregation in either soil texture. Silt, clay, and C of the sandy plantation soil shifted to greater aggregate protection, which may represent a decrease in C availability. The organic matter in the clay plantation soil increased in the fractions considered less protected while this shift from C to structural forms considered more protected was not observed.Este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a dinâmica dos agregados do solo e das suas frações derivadas dos mesmos em duas texturas de solo, cada uma com uma plantação de Eucalipto e uma floresta primaria imediatamente adjacente. Eucalyptus grandis e outros clones cultivados em plantações cobrem aproximadamente 3,5 milhões de hectares no Brasil. Os impactos de manejo intensivo de plantações de rotação curta sobre a estrutura de solo e a dinâmica de carbono (C são em grande parte desconhecidos em ecossistemas tropicais. No longo prazo, a sustentabilidade desses sistemas é provavelmente ligada à manutenção da matéria orgânica e à estrutura de agregação do solo, principalmente em áreas de solos de baixa fertilidade. Manejo silvicultural n

  12. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  13. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  15. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the v......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer...

  16. Multiaged silviculture of ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin L. O' Hara

    2005-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson) is highly suitable for management using multiaged systems. This suitability is primarily the result of a frequent, low severity disturbance regime, but also because it naturally occurs at low densities and has a long history of management to promote multiple age classes. Several different stocking...

  17. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  18. System analysis task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    At this meeting, the main tasks of the study group were to discuss their task report with other task groups and to formulate the five-year research program, including next year's plans. A summary of the discussion with other task groups is presented. The general objective of the five-year program is to gather all elements necessary for a decision on the technical feasibility of the subseabed option. In addition, site selection criteria consistent with both radiological assessment and engineering capability will be produced. The task group report discussed radiological assessments, normal or base-case assessments, operational failures, low-probability postdisposal events, engineering studies, radiological criteria, legal aspects, social aspects, institutional aspects, generic comparison with other disposal options, and research priorities. The text of the report is presented along with supporting documents

  19. Landscape management and domestication of Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae) in the Tehuacán Valley: human guided selection and gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Fabiola; Blancas, José Juan; Casas, Alejandro

    2012-08-14

    Use of plant resources and ecosystems practiced by indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica commonly involves domestication of plant populations and landscapes. Our study analyzed interactions of coexisting wild and managed populations of the pitaya Stenocereus pruinosus, a columnar cactus used for its edible fruit occurring in natural forests, silviculturally managed in milpa agroforestry systems, and agriculturally managed in homegardens of the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico. We aimed at analyzing criteria of artificial selection and their consequences on phenotypic diversity and differentiation, as well as documenting management of propagules at landscape level and their possible contribution to gene flow among populations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to 83 households of the region to document perception of variation, criteria of artificial selection, and patterns of moving propagules among wild and managed populations. Morphological variation of trees from nine wild, silviculturally and agriculturally managed populations was analyzed for 37 characters through univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In addition, indexes of morphological diversity (MD) per population and phenotypic differentiation (PD) among populations were calculated using character states and frequencies. People recognized 15 pitaya varieties based on their pulp color, fruit size, form, flavor, and thorniness. On average, in wild populations we recorded one variety per population, in silviculturally managed populations 1.58 ± 0.77 varieties per parcel, and in agriculturally managed populations 2.19 ± 1.12 varieties per homegarden. Farmers select in favor of sweet flavor (71% of households interviewed) and pulp color (46%) mainly red, orange and yellow. Artificial selection is practiced in homegardens and 65% of people interviewed also do it in agroforestry systems. People obtain fruit and branches from different population types and move propagules from one another. Multivariate

  20. Landscape management and domestication of Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae in the Tehuacán Valley: human guided selection and gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Fabiola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of plant resources and ecosystems practiced by indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica commonly involves domestication of plant populations and landscapes. Our study analyzed interactions of coexisting wild and managed populations of the pitaya Stenocereus pruinosus, a columnar cactus used for its edible fruit occurring in natural forests, silviculturally managed in milpa agroforestry systems, and agriculturally managed in homegardens of the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico. We aimed at analyzing criteria of artificial selection and their consequences on phenotypic diversity and differentiation, as well as documenting management of propagules at landscape level and their possible contribution to gene flow among populations. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted to 83 households of the region to document perception of variation, criteria of artificial selection, and patterns of moving propagules among wild and managed populations. Morphological variation of trees from nine wild, silviculturally and agriculturally managed populations was analyzed for 37 characters through univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In addition, indexes of morphological diversity (MD per population and phenotypic differentiation (PD among populations were calculated using character states and frequencies. Results People recognized 15 pitaya varieties based on their pulp color, fruit size, form, flavor, and thorniness. On average, in wild populations we recorded one variety per population, in silviculturally managed populations 1.58 ± 0.77 varieties per parcel, and in agriculturally managed populations 2.19 ± 1.12 varieties per homegarden. Farmers select in favor of sweet flavor (71% of households interviewed and pulp color (46% mainly red, orange and yellow. Artificial selection is practiced in homegardens and 65% of people interviewed also do it in agroforestry systems. People obtain fruit and branches from different population