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Sample records for group key management

  1. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  2. Scalable Multi-group Key Management for Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Benmalek , Mourad; Challal , Yacine; Bouabdallah , Abdelmadjid

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) is composed of systems and networks to incorporate changes for modernizing the electricity grid, reduce peak loads, and meet energy efficiency targets. AMI is a privileged target for security attacks with potentially great damage against infrastructures and privacy. For this reason, Key Management has been identified as one of the most challenging topics in AMI development. In this paper, we propose a new Scalable multi-group key ...

  3. Effects of a group-based reproductive management extension programme on key management outcomes affecting reproductive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlie, Tom S; Morton, John M; Heuer, Cord; McDougall, Scott

    2015-02-01

    A group-based reproductive management extension programme has been designed to help managers of dairy herds improve herd reproductive performance. The aims of this study were, firstly, to assess effects of participation by key decision makers (KDMs) in a farmer action group programme in 2009 and 2010 on six key management outcomes (KMOs) that affect reproductive performance over 2 years (2009-2010 and 2010-2011), and secondly, to describe KDM intentions to change management behaviour(s) affecting each management outcome after participation in the programme. Seasonal calving dairy herds from four regions of New Zealand were enrolled in the study. Intentions to modify management behaviour were recorded using the formal written action plans developed during the extension programme. KMOs assessed were calving pattern of the herd, pre-calving heifer liveweight, pre-calving and premating body condition score (BCS), oestrus detection, anoestrus cow management and bull management. Participation was associated with improvements in heifer liveweight, more heifers calving in the first 6 weeks of the seasonal calving period, premating BCS and oestrus detection. No significant effects were observed on anoestrus cow management or bull management. KDMs with greater numbers of proposed actions had lower 6 week in-calf rates in the second study year than KDMs who proposed fewer actions. A more effective strategy to ensure more appropriate objectives is proposed. Strategies to help KDMs to implement proposed actions more successfully should be investigated to improve the programme further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Group assessment of key indicators of sustainable waste management in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tot, Bojana; Vujić, Goran; Srđević, Zorica; Ubavin, Dejan; Russo, Mário Augusto Tavares

    2017-09-01

    Decision makers in developing countries are struggling to solve the present problems of solid waste management. Prioritisation and ranking of the most important indicators that influence the waste management system is very useful for any decision maker for the future planning and implementation of a sustainable waste management system. The aim of this study is to evaluate key indicators and their related sub-indicators in a group decision-making environment. In order to gain insight into the subject it was necessary to obtain the qualified opinions of decision makers from different countries who understand the situation in the sector of waste management in developing countries. An assessment is performed by 43 decision makers from both developed and developing countries, and the applied methodology is based on a combined use of the analytic hierarchy process, from the multi-criteria decision-making set of tools, and the preferential voting method known as Borda Count, which belongs to social choice theory. Pairwise comparison of indicators is performed with the analytic hierarchy process, and the ranking of indicators once obtained is assessed with Borda Count. Detailed analysis of the final results showed that the Institutional-Administrative indicator was the most important one, with the maximum weight as derived by both groups of decision makers. The results also showed that the combined use of the analytic hierarchy process and Borda Count contributes to the credibility and objectivity of the decision-making process, allowing its use in more complex waste management group decision-making problems to be recommended.

  5. Performance Analysis of Hierarchical Group Key Management Integrated with Adaptive Intrusion Detection in Mobile ad hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    applications in wireless networks such as military battlefields, emergency response, mobile commerce , online gaming, and collaborative work are based on the...www.elsevier.com/locate/peva Performance analysis of hierarchical group key management integrated with adaptive intrusion detection in mobile ad hoc...Accepted 19 September 2010 Available online 26 September 2010 Keywords: Mobile ad hoc networks Intrusion detection Group communication systems Group

  6. Quantum key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  7. Key Management Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a secure environment to research and develop advanced electronic key management and networked key distribution technologies for the Navy and DoD....

  8. A Group Based Key Sharing and Management Algorithm for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Shafi Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs are one special type of ad hoc networks that involves vehicles on roads. Typically like ad hoc networks, broadcast approach is used for data dissemination. Blind broadcast to each and every node results in exchange of useless and irrelevant messages and hence creates an overhead. Unicasting is not preferred in ad-hoc networks due to the dynamic topology and the resource requirements as compared to broadcasting. Simple broadcasting techniques create several problems on privacy, disturbance, and resource utilization. In this paper, we propose media mixing algorithm to decide what information should be provided to each user and how to provide such information. Results obtained through simulation show that fewer number of keys are needed to share compared to simple broadcasting. Privacy is also enhanced through this approach.

  9. Cryptographic Key Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  10. Creativity Management Key Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Fuchs Ángeles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Organizations are constantly looking towards innovation. In order to reach it they must foment creativity. This paper analyzes a series of elements considered in the organizational creativity management and proposes a model with the indispensable factors that organizations should consider to reach it. These elements are: culture and organizational environment, strategy, structure, communication, relation with customers, human resources (recruiting, training, job design, compensation, promotion, and performance evaluation, long term orientation and the organizational life cycle. Having the analysis of those elements as a basis, the indispensable pillars on management creativity are identified. The proposed model is based on 5 pillars: the alignment between strategic, culture and organizational structure, called by the authors 'Holy Trinity'; intern publicity; customer’s voice; recognition and a look towards future. Finally, the case of an innovative Peruvian enterprise is presented from the model’s perspective and the study conclusions.

  11. Manet key management via Mobile Ficlke Key protocol (MFK ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manet key management via Mobile Ficlke Key protocol (MFK) ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL ... No Abstract. Keywords: MANET; key management scheme; simulation environment ...

  12. Security for Key Management Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer , Steve; Steel , Graham; Warinschi , Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We propose a much-needed formal definition of security for cryptographic key management APIs. The advantages of our definition are that it is general, intuitive, and applicable to security proofs in both symbolic and computational models of cryptography. Our definition relies on an idealized API which allows only the most essential functions for generating, exporting and importing keys, and takes into account dynamic corruption of keys. Based on this we can define the ...

  13. Setting objectives for managing Key deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Duane R.; Wagner, Tyler; Stauffer, Glenn E.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is responsible for the protection and management of Key deer (Odocoileus virginianus clavium) because the species is listed as Endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The purpose of the ESA is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. There are a host of actions that could possibly be undertaken to recover the Key deer population, but without a clearly defined problem and stated objectives it can be difficult to compare and evaluate alternative actions. In addition, management goals and the acceptability of alternative management actions are inherently linked to stakeholders, who should be engaged throughout the process of developing a decision framework. The purpose of this project was to engage a representative group of stakeholders to develop a problem statement that captured the management problem the FWS must address with Key deer and identify objectives that, if met, would help solve the problem. In addition, the objectives were organized in a hierarchical manner (i.e., an objectives network) to show how they are linked, and measurable attributes were identified for each objective. We organized a group of people who represented stakeholders interested in and potentially affected by the management of Key deer. These stakeholders included individuals who represented local, state, and federal governments, non-governmental organizations, the general public, and local businesses. This stakeholder group met five full days over the course of an eight-week period to identify objectives that would address the following problem:“As recovery and removal from the Endangered Species list is the purpose of the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service needs a management approach that will ensure a sustainable, viable, and healthy Key deer population. Urbanization has affected the behavior and population dynamics of the Key deer and the amount and characteristics

  14. Two-Dimensional Key Table-Based Group Key Distribution in Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong Go

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A smart grid provides two-way communication by using the information and communication technology. In order to establish two-way communication, the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI is used in the smart grid as the core infrastructure. This infrastructure consists of smart meters, data collection units, maintenance data management systems, and so on. However, potential security problems of the AMI increase owing to the application of the public network. This is because the transmitted information is electricity consumption data for charging. Thus, in order to establish a secure connection to transmit electricity consumption data, encryption is necessary, for which key distribution is required. Further, a group key is more efficient than a pairwise key in the hierarchical structure of the AMI. Therefore, we propose a group key distribution scheme using a two-dimensional key table through the analysis result of the sensor network group key distribution scheme. The proposed scheme has three phases: group key predistribution, selection of group key generation element, and generation of group key.

  15. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENTKEY FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena Daniela DINU

    2014-01-01

    This paper exposes Supply Chain Management by its key factors. Briefly, where the Supply Chain Management is treated as strategic part of a company then maintaining both control and influence throughout the entire supply chain are key factors and critical to success. On the other hand, finding the right partner to manage the non-strategic Supply Chains would be another key factor too. To define the most important key factors within Supply Chain Management means a deeply understanding of bot...

  16. Ancestors protocol for scalable key management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Gollmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Group key management is an important functional building block for secure multicast architecture. Thereby, it has been extensively studied in the literature. The main proposed protocol is Adaptive Clustering for Scalable Group Key Management (ASGK. According to ASGK protocol, the multicast group is divided into clusters, where each cluster consists of areas of members. Each cluster uses its own Traffic Encryption Key (TEK. These clusters are updated periodically depending on the dynamism of the members during the secure session. The modified protocol has been proposed based on ASGK with some modifications to balance the number of affected members and the encryption/decryption overhead with any number of the areas when a member joins or leaves the group. This modified protocol is called Ancestors protocol. According to Ancestors protocol, every area receives the dynamism of the members from its parents. The main objective of the modified protocol is to reduce the number of affected members during the leaving and joining members, then 1 affects n overhead would be reduced. A comparative study has been done between ASGK protocol and the modified protocol. According to the comparative results, it found that the modified protocol is always outperforming the ASGK protocol.

  17. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENTKEY FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Daniela DINU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper exposes Supply Chain Management by its key factors. Briefly, where the Supply Chain Management is treated as strategic part of a company then maintaining both control and influence throughout the entire supply chain are key factors and critical to success. On the other hand, finding the right partner to manage the non-strategic Supply Chains would be another key factor too. To define the most important key factors within Supply Chain Management means a deeply understanding of both Supply Chain’ s components, procedures, workflow, processes and the importance of Supply Chain Management into maximizing company's value. SCORE model able to provide solid information about measuring performance and identifying priorities within Supply Chain Management will help us to understand the key factors by analyzing its elements: Plan, Source, Make, Deliver,Return, Enable. These elements covers all the challenging areas from first to third tier of Supply Chain Management.

  18. 6 Keys to Identity Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, Idan

    2011-01-01

    An Identity and Access Management (IAM) project on campus can feel like a Sisyphean task: Just when access rights have finally been sorted out, the semester ends--and users change roles, leave campus, or require new processes. IT departments face a constantly changing technical landscape: (1) integrating new applications and retiring old ones; (2)…

  19. Key characteristics of different management styles

    OpenAIRE

    AGADZHANYAN A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The article reveals main management styles practiсed by managers all over the world. The author considers key characteristics of management styles, conditions of their using. The paper analyzes cultural differences in management styles in the West and in the East.

  20. The Liabilities Management Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Liabilities Management Group (LMG) was initiated by DTI. It is a cooperative forum which was set up in 1995. The current participants are DTI, UKAEA, NLM (for BNFL), MOD and Magnox Electric. The LMG was initiated to produce closer cooperation between public sector liability management organizations, achieve more cost-effective management of UK nuclear liabilities and enhance development of the UK nuclear decommissioning and waste management strategy. The objectives are to compare practices between liabilities management organizations discuss the scope for collaboration identify priority areas for possible collaboration agree action plans for exploring and undertaking such collaboration.Four task forces have been formed to look at specific areas (R and D, safety, contracts, and project management) and each reports separately to the LMG. The LMG has achieved its original aim of bringing together those with public sector liability management responsibilities. All participants feel that the LMG has been useful and that it should continue. Looking to the future, there is a continuing need for the LMG to facilitate removal of barriers to the achievement of best value for money. The LMG might also consider addressing the 'business process' elements that a liability management organization must be good at in order to define best practice in these. (author)

  1. Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing CyberSecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system

  2. The Key to Risk Management: Management

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian E. Tschoegl

    2000-01-01

    The Barings, Daiwa Bank and Sumitomo Corp. financial debacles in the mid-1990s suggest that management failures rather than misfortune, errors, or complexity are a major source of the risk of financial debacles. These errors are systematic and are a concommittant of the structure of trading and of human nature. Risk management systems must take these facts into account.

  3. Eight Key Facets of Small Business Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James Calvert

    1980-01-01

    Identifies eight key facets of small business management and suggests activities that may be used to assist in their development. The key facets are (1) product or service, (2) competition, (3) marketing strategies, (4) personnel needs, (5) equipment and facility needs, (6) finances, (7) planning, and (8) entrepreneurship. (JOW)

  4. Optimal grazing management strategies: evaluating key concepts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finally, overstocking will override key management initiatives, such as effective recovery periods, leading to rangeland degradation. Thus, in variable climates, stocking rate should be set conservatively to allow easier adaptation of animal numbers to rainfall variability from year to year. We suggest several key concepts that ...

  5. An SSH key management system: easing the pain of managing key/user/account associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipkin, D.; Betts, W.; Lauret, J.; Shiryaev, A.

    2008-07-01

    Cyber security requirements for secure access to computing facilities often call for access controls via gatekeepers and the use of two-factor authentication. Using SSH keys to satisfy the two factor authentication requirement has introduced a potentially challenging task of managing the keys and their associations with individual users and user accounts. Approaches for a facility with the simple model of one remote user corresponding to one local user would not work at facilities that require a many-to-many mapping between users and accounts on multiple systems. We will present an SSH key management system we developed, tested and deployed to address the many-to-many dilemma in the environment of the STAR experiment. We will explain its use in an online computing context and explain how it makes possible the management and tracing of group account access spread over many sub-system components (data acquisition, slow controls, trigger, detector instrumentation, etc.) without the use of shared passwords for remote logins.

  6. An SSH key management system: easing the pain of managing key/user/account associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipkin, D; Shiryaev, A; Betts, W; Lauret, J

    2008-01-01

    Cyber security requirements for secure access to computing facilities often call for access controls via gatekeepers and the use of two-factor authentication. Using SSH keys to satisfy the two factor authentication requirement has introduced a potentially challenging task of managing the keys and their associations with individual users and user accounts. Approaches for a facility with the simple model of one remote user corresponding to one local user would not work at facilities that require a many-to-many mapping between users and accounts on multiple systems. We will present an SSH key management system we developed, tested and deployed to address the many-to-many dilemma in the environment of the STAR experiment. We will explain its use in an online computing context and explain how it makes possible the management and tracing of group account access spread over many sub-system components (data acquisition, slow controls, trigger, detector instrumentation, etc.) without the use of shared passwords for remote logins

  7. Partial Key Grouping: Load-Balanced Partitioning of Distributed Streams

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, Muhammad Anis Uddin; Morales, Gianmarco De Francisci; Garcia-Soriano, David; Kourtellis, Nicolas; Serafini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of load balancing in distributed stream processing engines, which is exacerbated in the presence of skew. We introduce PARTIAL KEY GROUPING (PKG), a new stream partitioning scheme that adapts the classical “power of two choices” to a distributed streaming setting by leveraging two novel techniques: key splitting and local load estimation. In so doing, it achieves better load balancing than key grouping while being more scalable than shuffle grouping. We test PKG on severa...

  8. Talent Management: Working lines and key processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Alonso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Talent management represents today a challenge for companies, since the contribution of value comes increasingly from the area of intangible capital. The current paradigm of expanding technology and competitive dynamics, makes talent management that companies realize a critical success factor in today's markets. However, there is no generally accepted theoretical framework and empirical studies sufficient to demonstrate the role of talent management in creating competitive advantage. Therefore, the first objective of this paper is to analyze the evolution of talent management, to understand more deeply their fundamental dimensions: people and key positions in the organization. From these dimensions, as a second objective of the research is proposed to classify and characterize the literature about four alternative ways of study, according to the treatment they receive such dimensions and thus improve understanding of the role of talent management in business strategyDesign/methodology: To develop this paper we have selected the major contributions to the field of talent management, with particular emphasis on certain meta-analysis very quoted by the scientific community (Lewis and Heckman, 2006; Mellahi and Collings, 2009; Tarique and Schuler, 2010. In addition we have select additional papers published in high impact journals seen in ABI/Inform, Science Direct, SCOPUS, and EBSCO (Business Source Complete, through the keywords "Gestion del talento", "Plan de Gestion del Talento" and "Modelo de Gestion de Talento" and its English equivalent "Talent Management ", "Talent Management Plans/Systems" and "Talent Management Framework/Model ".Findings: From this review, we extracted the existence of different ways of understanding and talent management apply in organizations and even different understandings of what is talent itself. For this, we describe the basic dimensions of talent management (people and key positions and four alternative

  9. Cryptographic Key Management in Delay Tolerant Networks: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Anna Menesidou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their appearance at the dawn of the second millennium, Delay or Disruption Tolerant Networks (DTNs have gradually evolved, spurring the development of a variety of methods and protocols for making them more secure and resilient. In this context, perhaps, the most challenging problem to deal with is that of cryptographic key management. To the best of our knowledge, the work at hand is the first to survey the relevant literature and classify the various so far proposed key management approaches in such a restricted and harsh environment. Towards this goal, we have grouped the surveyed key management methods into three major categories depending on whether the particular method copes with (a security initialization, (b key establishment, and (c key revocation. We have attempted to provide a concise but fairly complete evaluation of the proposed up-to-date methods in a generalized way with the aim of offering a central reference point for future research.

  10. Key personality traits of sales managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounsbury, John W; Foster, Nancy A; Levy, Jacob J; Gibson, Lucy W

    2014-01-01

    Sales managers are crucial for producing positive sales outcomes for companies. However, there has been a relative dearth of scholarly investigations into the personal attributes of sales managers. Such information could prove important in the recruitment, selection, training needs identification, career planning, counseling, and development of sales managers. Drawing on Holland's vocational theory, we sought to identify key personality traits that distinguish sales managers from other occupations and are related to their career satisfaction. The main sample was comprised of a total of 978 sales managers employed in a large number of companies across the United States (along with a comparison sample drawn from 79,512 individuals from other professional occupations). Participants completed an online version of Resource Associates' Personal Style Inventory as well a measure of career satisfaction. Our sample of 978 sales managers had higher levels of Assertiveness, Customer Service Orientation, Extraversion, Image Management, Optimism, and Visionary Style; and lower levels of Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, Intrinsic Motivation, Openness, and Tough-Mindedness than a sample of 79,512 individuals in a variety of other occupations. Nine of these traits were significantly correlated with sales managers' career satisfaction. Based on the results, a psychological profile of sales managers was presented as were implications for their recruitment, selection, training, development, and mentoring.

  11. Optimisation of key performance measures in air cargo demand management

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander May; Adrian Anslow; Udechukwu Ojiako; Yue Wu; Alasdair Marshall; Maxwell Chipulu

    2014-01-01

    This article sought to facilitate the optimisation of key performance measures utilised for demand management in air cargo operations. The focus was on the Revenue Management team at Virgin Atlantic Cargo and a fuzzy group decision-making method was used. Utilising intelligent fuzzy multi-criteria methods, the authors generated a ranking order of ten key outcome-based performance indicators for Virgin Atlantic air cargo Revenue Management. The result of this industry-driven study showed that ...

  12. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  13. Key policy choices in groundwater quality management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batie, S.S.; Diebel, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental policy choice of who has the right to do what to whom is a pivotal issue of governance. Over the last few decades, the answer to that question has become more restrictive to those who own and use natural resources as inputs into production processes. Increasingly, the beneficiaries of new policy initiatives are those who desire higher protection of groundwater quality. With respect to groundwater management, policy design increasingly reflects such diverse interests as agriculturists, industrialists, homeowners, local government officials and state officials. Policy design is becoming complex, in part because of this diversity and in part because scientific uncertainty hampers informed policy design. No umbrella federal legislation exists for managing groundwater resources. EPA's role has been mainly an advisory one on groundwater issues. The difficulties and responsibilities of protecting groundwater thus remain with the states. For the near future, it is the states that will address key policy choices with respect to groundwater quality management issues

  14. Key Management in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mansour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are a challenging field of research when it comes to security issues. Using low cost sensor nodes with limited resources makes it difficult for cryptographic algorithms to function without impacting energy consumption and latency. In this paper, we focus on key management issues in multi-hop wireless sensor networks. These networks are easy to attack due to the open nature of the wireless medium. Intruders could try to penetrate the network, capture nodes or take control over particular nodes. In this context, it is important to revoke and renew keys that might be learned by malicious nodes. We propose several secure protocols for key revocation and key renewal based on symmetric encryption and elliptic curve cryptography. All protocols are secure, but have different security levels. Each proposed protocol is formally proven and analyzed using Scyther, an automatic verification tool for cryptographic protocols. For efficiency comparison sake, we implemented all protocols on real testbeds using TelosB motes and discussed their performances.

  15. Authenticated group Diffie-Hellman key exchange: theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevassut, Olivier [Catholic Univ. of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2002-10-01

    Authenticated two-party Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals A and B, communicating over a public network, and each holding a pair of matching public/private keys to agree on a session key. Protocols designed to deal with this problem ensure A (B resp.)that no other principals aside from B (A resp.) can learn any information about this value. These protocols additionally often ensure A and B that their respective partner has actually computed the shared secret value. A natural extension to the above cryptographic protocol problem is to consider a pool of principals agreeing on a session key. Over the years several papers have extended the two-party Diffie-Hellman key exchange to the multi-party setting but no formal treatments were carried out till recently. In light of recent developments in the formalization of the authenticated two-party Diffie-Hellman key exchange we have in this thesis laid out the authenticated group Diffie-Hellman key exchange on firmer foundations.

  16. Constant round group key agreement protocols: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makri, E.; Konstantinou, Elisavet

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to review and evaluate all constant round Group Key Agreement (GKA) protocols proposed so far in the literature. We have gathered all GKA protocols that require 1,2,3,4 and 5 rounds and examined their efficiency. In particular, we calculated each protocol’s computation and

  17. Optimisation of key performance measures in air cargo demand management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander May

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article sought to facilitate the optimisation of key performance measures utilised for demand management in air cargo operations. The focus was on the Revenue Management team at Virgin Atlantic Cargo and a fuzzy group decision-making method was used. Utilising intelligent fuzzy multi-criteria methods, the authors generated a ranking order of ten key outcome-based performance indicators for Virgin Atlantic air cargo Revenue Management. The result of this industry-driven study showed that for Air Cargo Revenue Management, ‘Network Optimisation’ represents a critical outcome-based performance indicator. This collaborative study contributes to existing logistics management literature, especially in the area of Revenue Management, and it seeks to enhance Revenue Management practice. It also provides a platform for Air Cargo operators seeking to improve reliability values for their key performance indicators as a means of enhancing operational monitoring power.

  18. Uniformity: The key to better inventory management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boshears, G.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show how uniformity in describing parts and materials can be the key ingredient to more effective inventory management. Although most nuclear utilities have some type of computer system for maintenance management as well as materials tracking, few have a system to provide the various users with complete information about parts and material in stock. One of the industry's most perplexing problems is How do you know, and find, the item you need to repair a particular piece of equipment or component? In many instances it is easier to order a new one from the manufacturer rather than try to find it on-site, which can result in inaccurate usage records, over-stocking, frustration, and strain on cash flow. What is needed is a higher degree of uniformity within a station, and a utility, of catalog descriptions for parts and material that will satisfy all users-planners, craftsmen, warehouse personnel, and buyers. The results of attaining this uniformity are improved performance through searchability, duplicate stock avoidance, interchangeability, substitutability, and more accurate bills of material; economic benefits will also be noted

  19. Dynamic Group Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange under standard assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2002-01-01

    Authenticated Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals communicating over a public network, and each holding public-private keys, to agree on a shared secret value. In this paper we study the natural extension of this cryptographic problem to a group of principals. We begin from existing formal security models and refine them to incorporate major missing details (e.g., strong-corruption and concurrent sessions). Within this model we define the execution of a protocol for authenticated dynamic group Diffie-Hellman and show that it is provably secure under the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption. Our security result holds in the standard model and thus provides better security guarantees than previously published results in the random oracle model

  20. Outreach: Key to Sustainable Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: With the numerous nuclear power plants being built globally and the prospects for many more, the challenge of the timely availability of a well-prepared, qualified, knowledgeable workforce is a key element in the “critical path” to commissioning these plants. All of these individuals will need quality education and training that is rooted in safety and established in experience. In addition, because many of these new plants are typically being built in developing countries, education, training, recruiting and retaining operations staff can be a significant challenge. Attracting sources of qualified employees for these nuclear power plants in local communities is paramount which implies a strong focus on the science and math education outreach programmes at all levels. This paper will highlight the Nuclear Power Institute’s integration of human resource development outreach strategies, education and training systems, and international cooperation to demonstrate how working in particular with the education sector can not only create interest in future careers in nuclear technology and capture valuable knowledge, but can also build community based support for nuclear power programmes with an emphasis of developing competent workers through education and training, mentoring and apprenticeships. Outreach has also become an important element of all nuclear knowledge management endeavours. (author

  1. Future of energy managers groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henshaw, T.

    1979-07-01

    The objectives of the Energy Managers Groups, formed to provide a regular opportunity for industry and commerce to exchange views and experiences on energy conservation matters are discussed. Group procedure, liaison and cooperation, government support, and options for the future are discussed. (MCW)

  2. Key Management for Secure Multicast over IPv6 Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqi Mohammad Umar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicasting is an efficient method for transmission and routing of packets to multiple destinations using fewer network resources. Along with widespread deployment of wireless networks, secure multicast over wireless networks is an important and challenging goal. In this paper, we extend the scope of a recent new key distribution scheme to a security framework that offers a novel solution for secure multicast over IPv6 wireless networks. Our key management framework includes two scenarios for securely distributing the group key and rekey messages for joining and leaving a mobile host in secure multicast group. In addition, we perform the security analysis and provide performance comparisons between our approach and two recently published scenarios. The benefits of our proposed techniques are that they minimize the number of transmissions required to rekey the multicast group and impose minimal storage requirements on the multicast group. In addition, our proposed schemes are also very desirable from the viewpoint of transmission bandwidth savings since an efficient rekeying mechanism is provided for membership changes and they significantly reduce the required bandwidth due to key updating in mobile networks. Moreover, they achieve the security and scalability requirements in wireless networks.

  3. Perceptions of food risk management among key stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kleef, Ellen; Frewer, Lynn J.; Chryssochoidis, George M.

    2006-01-01

    In designing and implementing appropriate food risk management strategies, it is important to examine how key stakeholders perceive both the practice and effectiveness of food risk management.......In designing and implementing appropriate food risk management strategies, it is important to examine how key stakeholders perceive both the practice and effectiveness of food risk management....

  4. Water management as a key component of integrated weed management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Berti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Water management within the cropping system is a key factor for an integrated weed management. Soil moisture affects seed persistence and seed dormancy, thus influencing their germination, the establishment of seedlings as well as the competition at adult stage and the number, vitality and dormancy of the new seeds produced by the weeds. The interactions among water availability and competition are very complex and still not fully understood. A research effort in this sector should the be very relevant for the development of new approaches of weed management, such as “Ecological weed management”, aiming to reduce weed density and competitiveness and, in the medium term, to prevent undesired modifications of the weed flora.

  5. Research of user key management mechanisms in the cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Іван Федорович Аулов

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of comparison and recommendations on the use of existing user key management mechanisms in the cloud environment are given. New generation and installing mechanism of a private key pair between the N-means of key management in the cloud by using a modified Diffie-Hellman protocol is proposed

  6. A Key Management Method for Cryptographically Enforced Access Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zych, Anna; Petkovic, Milan; Jonker, Willem; Fernández-Medina, Eduardo; Yagüe, Mariemma I.

    Cryptographic enforcement of access control mechanisms relies on encrypting protected data with the keys stored by authorized users. This approach poses the problem of the distribution of secret keys. In this paper, a key management scheme is presented where each user stores a single key and is

  7. Efficient key management for cryptographically enforced access control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zych, Anna; Petkovic, Milan; Jonker, Willem

    Cryptographic enforcement of access control mechanisms relies on encrypting protected data with the keys stored by authorized users. This approach poses the problem of the distribution of secret keys. In this paper, a key management scheme is presented where each user stores a single key and is

  8. Determinants of Key Account Management Effectiveness: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dires Abebe Fenta

    maintaining enhanced relationships with strategic business customers named as. 'key accounts'. ... Key account management is one mechanism of treating strategic ..... Considering this report, correlation statistics was undergone to check the.

  9. Nonverbal Cues: The Key to Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Garth; Lindauer, Patricia; Bennett, Brenda; Gibson, Sherri

    1998-01-01

    Principals should familiarize teachers with the benefits of nonverbal procedures for classroom management and discipline enforcement. A behavior-management checklist of nonverbal techniques (eye contact, touching, smiling, and frowning) can be used in a series of short visits. At least 75% of control techniques should be nonverbal. Relying on…

  10. Key Intersections between HRD and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Toby M.

    2011-01-01

    This article is in part inspired by an HRD director's insight that his HRD staff should view themselves as HRD Family Doctors, suggesting that a doctor-patient relationship was similar in many respects to the HRD-manager consulting relationship. Although that is possible in some organizations, the author's interviews with corporate managers and…

  11. Socialization as key process in knowledge management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José GARCÍA-PEÑALVO

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The editorial of this second issue of volume 17,corresponding to 2016, is devoted to socialization process in the knowledge management in order to complement the special section about Social Networks and Education.

  12. Environmental conflicts: Key issues and management implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental crises and problems throughout the world are widespread and increasing rapidly. In relation to these concerns, the article discusses the following aspects: people and the environment, environmental conflicts, climate change and environmental conflicts, and management implications. The section on people ...

  13. Key Management Strategies for Safeguards Authentication and Encryption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coram, M.; Hymel, R.; McDaniel, M.; Brotz, J.

    2015-01-01

    Management of cryptographic keys for the authentication and encryption of safeguards data can be the critical weak link in the practical implementation of information security. Within the safeguards community, there is the need to validate that data has not been modified at any point since generation and that it was generated by the monitoring node and not an imposter. In addition, there is the need for that data to be transmitted securely between the monitoring node and the monitoring party such that it cannot be intercepted and read while in transit. Encryption and digital signatures support the required confidentiality and authenticity but challenges exist in managing the cryptographic keys they require. Technologies developed at Sandia National Laboratories have evolved in their use of an associated key management strategy. The first generation system utilized a shared secret key for digital signatures. While fast and efficient, it required that a list of keys be maintained and protected. If control of the key was lost, fraudulent data could be made to look authentic. The second generation changed to support public key / private key cryptography. The key pair is generated by the system, the public key shared, and the private key held internally. This approach eliminated the need to maintain the list of keys. It also allows the public key to be provided to anyone needing to authenticate the data without allowing them to spoof data. A third generation system, currently under development, improves upon the public key / private key approach to address a potential man-in-the-middle attack related to the sharing of the public key. In a planned fourth generation system, secure key exchange protocols will distribute session keys for encryption, eliminating another fixed set of keys utilized by the technology and allowing for periodic renegotiation of keys for enhanced security. (author)

  14. Careful assessment key in managing prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujadhur, Rahul; Aning, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Prostatitis is a common condition estimated to affect up to 30% of men in their lifetime, it is most prevalent in men aged between 35 and 50. Prostatitis is subclassified into: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic pelvic pain and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. Acute bacterial prostatitis presents with acute onset pelvic pain which may or may not be related to voiding, lower urinary tract symptoms, sometimes haematuria or haematospermia and systemic symptoms such as fever and rigors. A documented history of recurrent urinary tract infections is the key feature of chronic bacterial prostatitis. Duration of symptoms > 3 months defines chronicity. The key symptom of chronic pelvic pain syndrome is pain. Patients may describe pain during or after ejaculation as their predominant symptom. Clinical assessment includes a thorough history and examination. A digital rectal examination should be performed after a midstream urine (MSU) sample has been collected for urine dipstick, microscopy and culture. The prostate should be checked for nodules. In acute bacterial prostatitis the MSU is the only laboratory investigation required. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome may be multifactorial and part of a more generalised pain disorder. Pelvic floor muscle abnormalities, altered neuroendocrine pathways, chemically induced inflammation, bacterial infection, autoimmune processes, dysfunctional voiding as well intraprostatic ductal reflux mechanisms have all been identified in men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

  15. Secure Key Management in the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Jakobsen, Thomas Pelle; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2013-01-01

    information such as cryptographic keys. Applications like this include many cases where secure multiparty computation is outsourced to the cloud, and in particular a number of online auctions and benchmark computations with confidential inputs. We consider fully autonomous servers that switch between online......We consider applications involving a number of servers in the cloud that go through a sequence of online periods where the servers communicate, separated by offline periods where the servers are idle. During the offline periods, we assume that the servers need to securely store sensitive...... and offline periods without communicating with anyone from outside the cloud, and semi-autonomous servers that need a limited kind of assistance from outside the cloud when doing the transition. We study the levels of security one can – and cannot – obtain in this model, propose light-weight protocols...

  16. Risk management of key issues of FPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Sun, Hai

    2012-12-01

    Risk analysis of key systems have become a growing topic late of because of the development of offshore structures. Equipment failures of offloading system and fire accidents were analyzed based on the floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) features. Fault tree analysis (FTA), and failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) methods were examined based on information already researched on modules of relex reliability studio (RRS). Equipment failures were also analyzed qualitatively by establishing a fault tree and Boolean structure function based on the shortage of failure cases, statistical data, and risk control measures examined. Failure modes of fire accident were classified according to the different areas of fire occurrences during the FMEA process, using risk priority number (RPN) methods to evaluate their severity rank. The qualitative analysis of FTA gave the basic insight of forming the failure modes of FPSO offloading, and the fire FMEA gave the priorities and suggested processes. The research has practical importance for the security analysis problems of FPSO.

  17. Managing clinical education through understanding key principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joanne; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, a practicum facilitated the integration of on-campus learning and practical workplace training. Over the past 3 decades, an educative practicum has evolved that promotes clinical reasoning, including analytical and evaluative abilities, through reflective practice. Anecdotal evidence indicates that the delivery of clinical education within medical radiation science entry-level programs continues to vacillate between traditional practicums and the new reflective practicums. To review the literature about clinical education within the medical radiation sciences and identify key principles for practitioners seeking to reflect upon and improve their approach to teaching and supporting students in the clinical environment. A search of 3 major journal databases, Internet searches, and hand searches of reference lists were conducted to identify literature about clinical education in the medical radiation sciences from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2012. Twenty-two studies were included in this review. The 5 key elements associated with clinical education include the clinical support model and quality, overcoming the theory-practice gap, learning outcomes and reliable and valid assessment, preparing and supporting students, and accommodating differing teaching and learning needs. Many factors influence the quality of clinical education, including the culture of the clinical environment and clinical leadership roles. Several approaches can help students bridge the theory-practice gap, including simulators, role-playing activities, and reflective journals. In addition, clinical educators should use assessment strategies that objectively measure student progress, and they should be positive role models for their students. The successful clinical education of students in the medical radiation sciences depends upon the systems, structures, and people in the clinical environment. Clinical education is accomplished through the collaborative efforts of the

  18. Managing cumulative impacts: A key to sustainability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1994-12-31

    This paper addresses how science can be more effectively used in creating policy to manage cumulative effects on ecosystems. The paper focuses on the scientific techniques that we have to identify and to assess cumulative impacts on ecosystems. The term ``sustainable development`` was brought into common use by the World Commission on Environment and Development (The Brundtland Commission) in 1987. The Brundtland Commission report highlighted the need to simultaneously address developmental and environmental imperatives simultaneously by calling for development that ``meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the needs of future generations.`` We cannot claim to be working toward sustainable development until we can quantitatively assess cumulative impacts on the environment: The two concepts are inextricibally linked in that the elusiveness of cumulative effects likely has the greatest potential of keeping us from achieving sustainability. In this paper, assessment and management frameworks relevant to cumulative impacts are discussed along with recent literature on how to improve such assessments. When possible, examples are given for marine ecosystems.

  19. Key factors of efficient organization management

    OpenAIRE

    Firsankov, I. E.; Фирсанков, И. Е.

    2014-01-01

    Issues of efficiency of organization management are examined in the article. Aggressive competition between companies; what’s the difference between manager and leader; who is a leader; personal qualities of strong charismatic leaders etc. Particular attention is paid to the question of possibility to become a leader or to be born a leader. В статье рассмотрены основные черты настоящего лидера, затронута тема различия между лидером и менеджером, а также освещён вопрос о том, можно ли стать...

  20. A Study on the Key Management Strategy for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon KO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many users who are in a cyber-space usually want to join the social group to have or to share their information. Now, there are two ways to join the group, the group manager invites them, and the users who want to join ask the owner. These days the group polices usually follow this way. But, it can be faced a security problem when the manager send group messages in near future because they don’t have any securities. Therefore, the security modules to join groups will be needed when they join the group or when they read the group messages. To set the security, we have to think how to keep the key such as a generation /an update/an arrangement, because all users need the key to join the groups or to read the group messages by decrypting. The key are going to be used to joining the group when it dynamically changes such as frequent group joining and leaving. If it applies or uses the existing methods in the smart cities which consider the users who will move globally, it could easily assume that the overhead/the cost of CPU will be increased and it follows capacity down because of lots of the key updates. So, to let them down, we suggest three key strategies, a group key, a subgroup key and a session key in this paper.

  1. VerSAMI: Versatile and Scalable key management for Smart Grid AMI systems

    OpenAIRE

    Benmalek , Mourad; Challal , Yacine; Derhab , Abdelouahid; Bouabdallah , Abdelmadjid

    2018-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we propose four new key management schemes for Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) to secure data communications in the Smart Grid (SG). The schemes are based on individual and batch rekeying operations using a novel multi-group key graph structure, are also versatile in the sense that they can support broadcast, unicast, as well as multicast communications. Security analysis shows that our schemes satisfy key management security properties. Furthermo...

  2. Group Decisions in Value Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiono Utomo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with a technique to expedite group decision making during the selection of technical solutions for value management process. Selection of a solution from a set of alternatives is facilitated by evaluating using multicriteria decision making techniques. During the process, every possible solution is rated on criteria of function and cost. Function deals more with quality than with quantity, and cost can be calculated based on the theoretical time value of money. Decision-making techniques based on satisfying games are applied to determine the relative function and cost of solutions and hence their relative value. The functions were determined by function analysis system technique. Analytical hierarchy process was applied to decision making and life-cycle cost analysis were used to calculate cost. Cooperative decision making was shown to consist of identifying agreement options, analyzing, and forming coalitions. The objective was attained using the satisfying game model as a basis for two main preferences. The model will improve the value of decision regarding design. It further emphasizes the importance of performance evaluation in the design process and value analysis. The result of the implementation, when applied to the selection of a building wall system, demonstrates a process of selecting the most valuable technical solution as the best-fit option for all decision makers. This work is relevant to group decision making and negotiation, as it aims to provide a framework to support negotiation in design activity.

  3. Key Issues in the Application of Knowledge Management in Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendoza, George A

    2005-01-01

    .... This shift in paradigms has made knowledge the key resource as organizations shift their focus from natural resources to intellectual assets, heralding the use of a concept called Knowledge Management (KM...

  4. A new two-round dynamic authenticated contributory group key ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Computer Science, S V K P and Dr K S R Arts and Science College, ... curve key of a given length provides the same level of security as a 1,024-bit ...... Kwon T, Cheon J H, Kim Y and Lee J 2006 Privacy protection in PKIs: A ...

  5. Farmer groups key to boosting technology adoption in Kenya | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... ... and semi-arid areas and contribute to more sustainable water and soil management. ... postharvest technologies, socioeconomics, and market analysis ... New animal vaccines could keep more African farmers in business.

  6. A Forward Authentication Key Management Scheme for Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jen-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Key encryption technology is a basic technique for protecting the secrecy of transmitted data among sensor nodes in wireless sensor networks. However, sensor nodes are inherently limited by insufficient hardware resources such as memory capacity and battery lifetime. As a result, few current key management schemes are appropriate for wireless sensor networks. This paper proposes a new key management method that uses dynamic key management schemes for heterogeneous sensor networks. The proposed scheme loads a hash function into the base station, cluster heads, and sensor nodes. The cluster heads and sensor nodes then generate their own keychains to provide forward authentication in case of key changes, security breaches, key changes due to security breaches. The cluster heads and sensor nodes establish pairwise keys to ensure transmission secrecy. The proposed scheme decreases the number of keys required for sensor nodes and cluster heads and is robust to the following attacks: guessing attacks, replay attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, node capture attacks, and denial-of-service attacks.

  7. Information Systems Management: an Australian view of the key issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Pervan

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies investigating the key issues in IS management serve to better understand the concerns of IS managers and help to guide IS researchers in choosing IS management problems worthy of investigation. This paper presents results from a study of the key issues facing the IS managers of Australia's largest 300 organisations which is part of a three-yearly longitudinal study. In order to gain consensus on the relative importance of the key issues, a three-round Delphi method was applied. The results reveal that IS strategic planning continues to be the paramount issue in our industry, as are many issues associated with IS strategic planning, including responsiveness of the IT infrastructure, effective use of the data resource, IS for competitive advantage, and a comprehensive information architecture. A greater emphasis on quality is also revealed in highly rated issues such as effective use of the data resource, data integrity and quality assurance, and the quality of software development

  8. Key aspects to perform a project on energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachini, R.

    1993-01-01

    A general overview on elements and organisms playing a key role to launch a new industrial project is given, taking as base case an energy management project. Likewise the problematic of training personnel involved in the project is analyzed. Energy management becomes crucial in industries where energy costs represent a big portion of the whole production cost. Main aspects to be analyzed are: - Adequate production procedures to be competitive - Environment protection regarding waste management - Maximization of safety at production installations. (Author)

  9. Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DunnGalvin, A.; Chan, C. -H.; Crevel, R.

    2015-01-01

    to summarize the perspectives of all the key stakeholders (including clinicians, patients, food industry and regulators), with the aim of defining common health protection and risk minimization goals. The lack of agreed reference doses has resulted in inconsistent application of PAL by the food industry...... and in levels of contamination that prompt withdrawal action by enforcement officers. So there is a poor relationship between the presence or absence of PAL and actual reaction risk. This has led to a loss of trust in PAL, reducing the ability of consumers with food allergies to make informed choices....... The result has been reduced avoidance, reduced quality of life and increased risk-taking by consumers who often ignore PAL. All contributing stakeholders agree that PAL must reflect actual risk. PAL should be transparent and consistent with rules underpinning decision-making process being communicated...

  10. Two-Dimensional Key Table-Based Group Key Distribution in Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Woong Go; Jin Kawk

    2014-01-01

    A smart grid provides two-way communication by using the information and communication technology. In order to establish two-way communication, the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) is used in the smart grid as the core infrastructure. This infrastructure consists of smart meters, data collection units, maintenance data management systems, and so on. However, potential security problems of the AMI increase owing to the application of the public network. This is because the transmitted in...

  11. Key management issue in SCADA networks: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalhossein Rezai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA networks have a vital role in Critical Infrastructures (CIs such as public transports, power generation systems, gas, water and oil industries, so that there are concerns on security issues in these networks. The utilized Remote Terminal Units (RTUs and Intelligence Electronic Devices (IEDs in these networks have resource limitations, which make security applications a challenging issue. Efficient key management schemes are required besides lightweight ciphers for securing the SCADA communications. Many key management schemes have been developed to address the tradeoff between SCADA constrain and security, but which scheme is the most effective is still debatable. This paper presents a review of the existing key management schemes in SCADA networks, which provides directions for further researches in this field.

  12. Key determinants of managing the marketing asset of global companies

    OpenAIRE

    Tatyana Tsygankova; Roman Ponomarenko

    2016-01-01

    As a result of organization and summarization of key concepts of evolution of the marketing tools of global companies, the authors determined the role of the marketing assets in the system of modern marketing management (as a dialectically higher stage of development of the analyzed tools, which will allow overcoming the antagonistic contradiction of “P- and C-vectors” of their development). The article identified the optimal set of key elements of the system of marketing assets, which are th...

  13. DNA based random key generation and management for OTP encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Manhui

    2017-09-01

    One-time pad (OTP) is a principle of key generation applied to the stream ciphering method which offers total privacy. The OTP encryption scheme has proved to be unbreakable in theory, but difficult to realize in practical applications. Because OTP encryption specially requires the absolute randomness of the key, its development has suffered from dense constraints. DNA cryptography is a new and promising technology in the field of information security. DNA chromosomes storing capabilities can be used as one-time pad structures with pseudo-random number generation and indexing in order to encrypt the plaintext messages. In this paper, we present a feasible solution to the OTP symmetric key generation and transmission problem with DNA at the molecular level. Through recombinant DNA technology, by using only sender-receiver known restriction enzymes to combine the secure key represented by DNA sequence and the T vector, we generate the DNA bio-hiding secure key and then place the recombinant plasmid in implanted bacteria for secure key transmission. The designed bio experiments and simulation results show that the security of the transmission of the key is further improved and the environmental requirements of key transmission are reduced. Analysis has demonstrated that the proposed DNA-based random key generation and management solutions are marked by high security and usability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Enhanced Key Management Protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojiang Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development and extensive use of wireless sensor networks (WSNs, it is urgent to enhance the security for WSNs, in which key management is an effective way to protect WSNs from various attacks. However, different types of messages exchanged in WSNs typically have different security requirements which cannot be satisfied by a single keying mechanism. In this study, a basic key management protocol is described for WSNs based on four kinds of keys, which can be derived from an initial master key, and an enhanced protocol is proposed based on Diffie-Hellman algorithm. The proposed scheme restricts the adverse security impact of a captured node to the rest of WSNs and meets the requirement of energy efficiency by supporting in-network processing. The master key protection, key revocation mechanism, and the authentication mechanism based on one-way hash function are, respectively, discussed. Finally, the performance of the proposed scheme is analyzed from the aspects of computational efficiency, storage requirement and communication cost, and its antiattack capability in protecting WSNs is discussed under various attack models. In this paper, promising research directions are also discussed.

  15. Knowledge Management – the Key Resource in the Knowledge Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo NEVADO PEÑA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of global information and communication technology changes and globalization have transformed our society by favoring the economy and innovation as key driver of global competition. Creation and exploitation of knowledge has become key resource in the new economy. All advanced economies are technologically knowledgebased economy. Many of today's managers and their employees, still guided by the definition given by Francis Bacon (1597 “Knowledge is power” instead of “sharing and managing knowledge is power”. Knowing taken alone may not bring value if not shared before and then managed in an efficient manner. This article seeks to demonstrate what knowledge, what the knowledge management is and what are its main implications in the new economy, a knowledge-based economy.

  16. Constructive Management of Conflict in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rex C.; Mitchell, Rie R.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a concise overview of important conflict management concepts and strategies for those working in group settings. Presents a brief conceptual basis for understanding conflict and group memebers' behavior when in conflict, followed by specific recommendations for managing and making use of conflict in groups. (JAC)

  17. Network Information Management: The Key To Providing High WAN Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysdal, Craig

    1996-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with increasing corporate network complexity as a result of the proliferation of client/server applications at remote locations, and suggests the key to providing high WAN (wide area network) availability is relational databases used in an integrated management approach. (LRW)

  18. Institutional Data Management in Higher Education. ECAR Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosky, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the key findings from the 2009 ECAR (EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) study of institutional data management, which examines the policies and practices by which higher education institutions effectively collect, protect, and use digital information assets to meet academic and business needs. Importantly, it also…

  19. SHAMROCK: A Synthesizable High Assurance Cryptography and Key Management Coprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    cryptographic functions such as Advanced Encryption Standard ( AES ) [5] to produce keywraps to orchestrate key exchanges between groups of devices. These...Storage (MPMS). This is done for two reasons: first, the mission package is encrypted using AES keywrap mode with the CEK [7], which is a special version...Zone 1) denoting ephemeral secrets such as dynamic keys. AES encryption is employed as a one-way function leading from the ephemeral Zone 1 to the

  20. Key determinants of managing the marketing asset of global companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Tsygankova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of organization and summarization of key concepts of evolution of the marketing tools of global companies, the authors determined the role of the marketing assets in the system of modern marketing management (as a dialectically higher stage of development of the analyzed tools, which will allow overcoming the antagonistic contradiction of “P- and C-vectors” of their development. The article identified the optimal set of key elements of the system of marketing assets, which are the brand, customer loyalty, reputation, network cooperation, marketing strategy, internal marketing, marketing information system and marketing innovation. Due to correlation and regression analysis of the impact of each system elements on performance of global companies, the model of the "marketing asset octagon" was built as an integrative management tool. Also, as a result of construction of the said model, the authors identified the most profitable marketing assets, return on investment and development of competencies in the field of efficient management will bring the highest profit to the company. On the basis of summarizing the regional and branch features of managing the disparate elements of the marketing assets of global companies, the key regional and sectoral priorities of formation, development and improvement of existing concepts of the international marketing management were identified, particularly in terms of building an author’s integrative octagon model.

  1. Zidan Management Group, Inc. Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan Management Group, Inc. (the Company) is located in Indianapolis, Indiana. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

  2. Analysing PKCS#11 Key Management APIs with Unbounded Fresh Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröschle, Sibylle; Steel, Graham

    We extend Delaune, Kremer and Steel’s framework for analysis of PKCS#11-based APIs from bounded to unbounded fresh data. We achieve this by: formally defining the notion of an attribute policy; showing that a well-designed API should have a certain class of policy we call complete; showing that APIs with complete policies may be safely abstracted to APIs where the attributes are fixed; and proving that these static APIs can be analysed in a small bounded model such that security properties will hold for the unbounded case. We automate analysis in our framework using the SAT-based security protocol model checker SATMC. We show that a symmetric key management subset of the Eracom PKCS#11 API, used in their ProtectServer product, preserves the secrecy of sensitive keys for unbounded numbers of fresh keys and handles, i.e. pointers to keys. We also show that this API is not robust: if an encryption key is lost to the intruder, SATMC finds an attack whereby all the keys may be compromised.

  3. Report of the ERIC Management Review Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Launor F.; And Others

    The mission of the ERIC Management Review Group was to examine the practices and procedures used by Central ERIC Management in their guidance and management of the 19 ERIC clearinghouses. The major topics covered in this report are: recommendations; the role of the clearinghouses; the bibliographic and documentation function; the interpretation…

  4. The Assistant Manager - a Key Factor of the Managerial Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecturer Ph. D. Niculina Vargolici

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The new economic context, marked by the crisis and by radical transformations of the labor market, generates the need for more and more sophisticated skills for the assistant manager. That is because the efficiency of the secretarial activity implies both strategic skills and complex abilities, starting from knowledge about the specific activity of the company/institution where the person works as assistant manager, to connected areas such as: management, marketing, human resources, brand communication, company’s culture etc. Whether the manager changes his job together with the “boss”, or the boss is changed and he is bond to adapt to new conditions, a strong team spirit between the manager and his assistant is one of the most important elements that contribute to the productivity and efficiency of the both. The loyalty to the boss and to the company where he works, his adaptation capacity, his competence and his professionalism make the today’s assistant manager a key factor of the managerial team. The essence of the assistant manager job consists in making more efficient the managerial activities, namely, to make it respond to the expectations expressed or not of the manager, or even to anticipate them.

  5. Knowledge management - A key issue for EnBW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The motivation for knowledge management can be summarised with the words of EnBW CEO Prof. Claassen, 2002 'knowledge manager of the year' in Germany: 'Against the backdrop of the ever-increasing complexity of strategic planning and activities on the operational front, knowledge management is a key factor in the long-term success of our business.' Professional knowledge management motivates and supports employees, helping to create networks in which they can lay the foundations for the future success of the company. It must be emphasised that knowledge management is the responsibility of management, and EnBW has established a suitable framework consisting of different action levels and goals: 1) Normative level (corporate culture): creating a knowledge-aware and knowledge-friendly corporate culture 2) Strategic level (human resources): systematic gearing of internal intangible potentials towards future requirements. 3) Operational level (information/communication): making the required knowledge available in the necessary scope and quality, in the right place and at the right time. If knowledge management can generally be seen as basic requirement for successful companies, then it is even more important for nuclear operators. Today, nuclear energy is an important generating technology in Europe, for Germany and for EnBW with major future potential, but a technology that must be employed with great caution and attaching top priority to safe operation. For nuclear operators, the rule is always 'safety first'. But knowledge management implemented and used in the right way can also enhance both safety and competitive operation of the plants at the same time. In this connection, successful knowledge management plays a key role due to the complex interplay of many different disciplines within a demanding legal and regulatory framework, the paramount importance of collective past experience and the high demands on the expertise of the employees operating nuclear

  6. Key Management Infrastructure Increment 2 (KMI Inc 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Infrastructure (KMI) is a unified, scalable, interoperable, and trusted infrastructure that provides net-centric key management services to systems that rely ...products to human users and devices (hereinafter referred to as "supported" or "security-enabled") to enable secure communications. The objectives for...Threshold met during Spiral 1 IOT &E and FOT&E. Connected Networks: Network Identification KMI products and services shall be provided to KMI clients via

  7. Design of IP Camera Access Control Protocol by Utilizing Hierarchical Group Key

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Unlike CCTV, security video surveillance devices, which we have generally known about, IP cameras which are connected to a network either with or without wire, provide monitoring services through a built-in web-server. Due to the fact that IP cameras can use a network such as the Internet, multiple IP cameras can be installed at a long distance and each IP camera can utilize the function of a web server individually. Even though IP cameras have this kind of advantage, it has difficulties in access control management and weakness in user certification, too. Particularly, because the market of IP cameras did not begin to be realized a long while ago, systems which are systematized from the perspective of security have not been built up yet. Additionally, it contains severe weaknesses in terms of access authority to the IP camera web server, certification of users, and certification of IP cameras which are newly installed within a network, etc. This research grouped IP cameras hierarchically to manage them systematically, and provided access control and data confidentiality between groups by utilizing group keys. In addition, IP cameras and users are certified by using PKI-based certification, and weak points of security such as confidentiality and integrity, etc., are improved by encrypting passwords. Thus, this research presents specific protocols of the entire process and proved through experiments that this method can be actually applied.

  8. Heisenberg Groups as Platform for the AAG key-exchange protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Kahrobaei, Delaram; Lam, Ha T.

    2014-01-01

    Garber, Kahrobaei, and Lam studied polycyclic groups generated by number field as platform for the AAG key-exchange protocol. In this paper, we discuss the use of a different kind of polycyclic groups, Heisenberg groups, as a platform group for AAG by submitting Heisenberg groups to one of AAG's major attacks, the length-based attack.

  9. Managing key capabilities: A challenge for nuclear plant building companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascal Corbel

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear plant building industry faces a paradoxical situation. The use of nuclear reactors to produce energy for civil purposes is both a promising technology, with potentially huge outlets, and a technology facing declining demand. One of the key problems is then: how to maintain the capabilities necessary to benefit from the potential recovery? The resource-based view of strategic management has shown the importance of different types of resources and capabilities in gaining a sustainable competitive advantage. Successful incumbents in the market of nuclear station building have built those kinds of distinctive capabilities that give them a competitive advantage over potential new entrants. But we show that, without a permanent activity in plant building, preserving those capabilities necessitates specific strategic action. We firstly develop the argument that the nuclear plant building industry is in a paradoxical situation in terms of demand and technical performance trends. Secondly, we try to identify the key capabilities of the incumbents. We show that companies in that field use mainly three types of distinctive capabilities: pure technical and scientific knowledge in direct relation to the use of nuclear as an energy generator, competences in risk management and competences in large project management, including financing. Thirdly, we show that although some of those capabilities are used through other nuclear-related activities such as plant maintenance or fuel supply, some of them necessitate taking strategic actions in order to be preserved. We argue that this should be a priority of nuclear equipment company managers in the next few years. (author)

  10. Managing Key Risks in Post-Merger IS Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alaranta, Mar; Mathiassen, L

    2014-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) require organizations to blend together different information system (IS) configurations. Unfortunately, less than 50 percent of M&A's achieve their goals, with IS integration being a major problem. Here, the authors offer a framework to help managers prepare for......, analyze, and mitigate risks during post-merger IS integration. They identify key risks relating to IS integration content, process, and context, and present five strategies for mitigating those risks. Their framework aims to help managers proactively reduce the impact of adverse events. Adopting...... the framework supported by their templates is straightforward and the time and resources required are minimal. When properly executed, adoption increases the likelihood of successful merger outcomes; the framework is thus a valuable addition to the management tool box and can be applied in collaboration...

  11. Active listening: The key of successful communication in hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Vahid Kohpeima; Tabatabaee, Seyed Saeed; Abdar, Zahra Esmaeili; Rajabi, Mahboobeh

    2016-03-01

    One of the important causes of medical errors and unintentional harm to patients is ineffective communication. The important part of this skill, in case it has been forgotten, is listening. The objective of this study was to determine whether managers in hospitals listen actively. This study was conducted between May and June 2014 among three levels of managers at teaching hospitals in Kerman, Iran. Active Listening skill among hospital managers was measured by self-made Active Listening Skill Scale (ALSS), which consists of the key elements of active listening and has five subscales, i.e., Avoiding Interruption, Maintaining Interest, Postponing Evaluation, Organizing Information, and Showing Interest. The data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS software, version 20, and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, the chi-squared test, and multiple linear regressions. The mean score of active listening in hospital managers was 2.32 out of 3.The highest score (2.27) was obtained by the first-level managers, and the top managers got the lowest score (2.16). Hospital mangers were best in showing interest and worst in avoiding interruptions. The area of employment was a significant predictor of avoiding interruption and the managers' gender was a strong predictor of skill in maintaining interest (p < 0.05). The type of management and education can predict postponing evaluation, and the length of employment can predict showing interest (p < 0.05). There is a necessity for the development of strategies to create more awareness among the hospital managers concerning their active listening skills.

  12. Information Systems Management: an Australasian view of key issues - 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Pervan

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of a longitudinal study of key information systems management issues, a survey of Australasia's largest 500 organisations was conducted to identify which issues were perceived by the IS executives as being important, problematic and critical over the next three to five years. The most critical issues were revealed to be a mix of technology management issues (IT infrastructure, communications, disaster recovery, strategic management issues (competitive advantage, IS planning, aligning the IS organisation, people management issues (organisational learning, educating senior management in IT, systems development and data management issues (effective use of the data resource, and end-user computing. This reflects the need for a balance of business, technical, and people skills in an IS executive. Non-critical issues were mostly related to systems development and the individual technologies which must be integrated and managed to ensure a responsive IT infrastructure. The study also reveals that some issues are much more important than problematic (disaster recovery, competitive advantage, information architecture, and IS alignment while others are much more problematic than important (end-user computing, IS role and contribution, and BPR. The former reflects a growing level of knowledge in handling these issues, while the latter reflects a continuing problem with them. The differences between this study and similar studies conducted in 1988 and 1992 show that there is a growing confidence in the IS executive's ability to manage the strategic issues, a continuing concern about providing a responsive IT infrastructure (especially communications, and a continuing concern with educating all 'customers' in the organisation in the effective use of IT, including senior management.

  13. Can Management Potential Be Revealed in Groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, P. J.; Jackson, D.

    1971-01-01

    Videotaping small group problem solving sessions and applying Bales Social Interaction scale can give valuable insight into areas where people (particularly managers) can profitably spend time developing themselves. (Author/EB)

  14. Safe management of nuclear energy. A key towards sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreimanis, Andrejs

    2011-01-01

    Management of nuclear risks - crucial factor for acceptance of novel nuclear projects. We propose an interdisciplinary approach to societal optimization of nuclear energy management. As the keystones we choose: self-organization concept, 2) the principle of the requisite variety. A primary source of growth of internal variety - information and knowledge. Comprehensive knowledge management and informational support firstly is needed in: Technical issues: a) nuclear energy indicators of safety and reliability, b) extensive research and development of advanced technologies, c) multilateral cooperation in common projects; Societal issues: a) general nuclear awareness, b) risk management, engagement in decision-making, personnel education and training, staff renascence, c) public education, stakeholder involvement. There is shown: public education and social learning - efficient self-organization mechanisms, thereby forming a learning and knowledge-creating community. Such an acquired and created knowledge could facilitate solution of key socio-technical issues of nuclear safety as a) public acceptance, in particular, of siting of novel nuclear power plant and radioactive waste disposal objects, b) promotion of adequate perception of risk, equity and trust factors, and c) elevation of safety level of nuclear facilities and adequate management of nuclear risks. The importance of multi-level confidence building at global, regional and national levels is emphasized. (author)

  15. Simple group password-based authenticated key agreements for the integrated EPR information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tian-Fu; Chang, I-Pin; Wang, Ching-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    The security and privacy are important issues for electronic patient records (EPRs). The goal of EPRs is sharing the patients' medical histories such as the diagnosis records, reports and diagnosis image files among hospitals by the Internet. So the security issue for the integrated EPR information system is essential. That is, to ensure the information during transmission through by the Internet is secure and private. The group password-based authenticated key agreement (GPAKE) allows a group of users like doctors, nurses and patients to establish a common session key by using password authentication. Then the group of users can securely communicate by using this session key. Many approaches about GAPKE employ the public key infrastructure (PKI) in order to have higher security. However, it not only increases users' overheads and requires keeping an extra equipment for storing long-term secret keys, but also requires maintaining the public key system. This investigation presents a simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE) protocol for the integrated EPR information system. The proposed SGPAKE protocol does not require using the server or users' public keys. Each user only remembers his weak password shared with a trusted server, and then can obtain a common session key. Then all users can securely communicate by using this session key. The proposed SGPAKE protocol not only provides users with convince, but also has higher security.

  16. Proses Knowledge Management di Semen Indonesia Group

    OpenAIRE

    Putri, Natalia Yan

    2017-01-01

    Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui prosesknowledge management yang ada di Perusahaan Semen IndonesiaGroup, yakni PT Semen Gresik, PT Semen Padang, PT SemenTonasa. Proses knowledge management dapat dilakukan denganpenciptaan pengetahuan, berbagi pengetahuan dan penggunaankembali pengetahuan. Penelitian ini menggunakan metodekualitatif dengan wawancara. Validasi data menggunakan codingdan uji triangulasi sumber data dan teori.

  17. Critical success factors for managing purchasing groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, Fredo; Telgen, Jan; de Boer, L.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we identify critical success factors for managing small and intensive purchasing groups by comparing successful and unsuccessful purchasing groups in a large-scale survey. The analysis of our data set suggests the following success factors: no enforced participation, sufficient

  18. Key management of the double random-phase-encoding method using public-key encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2010-03-01

    Public-key encryption has been used to encode the key of the encryption process. In the proposed technique, an input image has been encrypted by using the double random-phase-encoding method using extended fractional Fourier transform. The key of the encryption process have been encoded by using the Rivest-Shamir-Adelman (RSA) public-key encryption algorithm. The encoded key has then been transmitted to the receiver side along with the encrypted image. In the decryption process, first the encoded key has been decrypted using the secret key and then the encrypted image has been decrypted by using the retrieved key parameters. The proposed technique has advantage over double random-phase-encoding method because the problem associated with the transmission of the key has been eliminated by using public-key encryption. Computer simulation has been carried out to validate the proposed technique.

  19. Optimising waste management performance - The key to successful decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keep, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: On the 1. of April 2005 the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority became responsible for the enormous task of decommissioning the UK's civilian nuclear liabilities. The success of the NDA in delivering its key objectives of safer, cheaper and faster decommissioning depends on a wide range factors. It is self-evident, however, that the development of robust waste management practices by those charged with decommissioning liability will be at the heart of the NDA's business. In addition, the implementation of rigorous waste minimisation techniques throughout decommissioning will deliver tangible environmental benefits as well as better value for money and release funds to accelerate the decommissioning program. There are mixed views as to whether waste minimisation can be achieved during decommissioning. There are those that argue that the radioactive inventory already exists, that the amount of radioactivity cannot be minimised and that the focus of activities should be focused on waste management rather than waste minimisation. Others argue that the management and decommissioning of the UK's civilian nuclear liability will generate significant volumes of additional radioactive waste and it is in this area where the opportunities for waste minimisation can be realised. (author)

  20. Total Quality Management (TQM): Group Dynamics Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-15

    take for these changes to penetrate most OSD agencies. - The unique organizational culture, structure, and functioning of OSD (i.e., a gigantic size...Performing (group problem solving; Performing diagnosing and solving quality problems and sele2cting and implementing solutions). Total Quality Management...Stage, the quality improvement group diagnoses the quality problem/opportunity, gathers the right kind of quantitative data, and formulates, selects, and

  1. Concurrently Deniable Group Key Agreement and Its Application to Privacy-Preserving VANETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengke Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available VANETs need secure communication. Authentication in VANETs resists the attack on the receipt of false information. Authenticated group key agreement (GKA is used to establish a confidential and authenticated communication channel for the multiple vehicles. However, authentication incurs privacy leakage, that is, by using digital signature. Therefore, the deniability is deserved for GKA (which is termed as DGKA due to the privacy protection. In the DGKA protocol, each participant interacts with intended partners to establish a common group session key. After this agreement session, each participant can not only be regarded as the intended sender but also deny that it has ever participated in this session. Therefore, under this established key, vehicles send confidential messages with authentication property and the deniability protects the vehicles privacy. We present a novel transformation from an unauthenticated group key agreement to a deniable (authenticated group key agreement without increasing communication round. Our full deniability is achieved even in the concurrent setting which suits the Internet environment. In addition, we design an authenticated and privacy-preserving communication protocol for VANETs by using the proposed deniable group key agreement.

  2. Gaussian elimination in split unitary groups with an application to public-key cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Mahalanobis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gaussian elimination is used in special linear groups to solve the word problem. In this paper, we extend Gaussian elimination to split unitary groups. These algorithms have an application in building a public-key cryptosystem, we demonstrate that.

  3. A Study on Group Key Agreement in Sensor Network Environments Using Two-Dimensional Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung-Jae; Lee, Young-Gu; Lee, Kwang-Hyung; Kim, Tai-Hoon; Jun, Moon-Seog

    2011-01-01

    These days, with the emergence of the concept of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks that collect, analyze and process all the information through the sensors have become of huge interest. However, sensor network technology fundamentally has wireless communication infrastructure as its foundation and thus has security weakness and limitations such as low computing capacity, power supply limitations and price. In this paper, and considering the characteristics of the sensor network environment, we propose a group key agreement method using a keyset pre-distribution of two-dimension arrays that should minimize the exposure of key and personal information. The key collision problems are resolved by utilizing a polygonal shape’s center of gravity. The method shows that calculating a polygonal shape’s center of gravity only requires a very small amount of calculations from the users. The simple calculation not only increases the group key generation efficiency, but also enhances the sense of security by protecting information between nodes. PMID:22164072

  4. Key management schemes using routing information frames in secure wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaev, V. A.; Finogeev, A. G.; Finogeev, A. A.; Parygin, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    The article considers the problems and objectives of key management for data encryption in wireless sensor networks (WSN) of SCADA systems. The structure of the key information in the ZigBee network and methods of keys obtaining are discussed. The use of a hybrid key management schemes is most suitable for WSN. The session symmetric key is used to encrypt the sensor data, asymmetric keys are used to encrypt the session key transmitted from the routing information. Three algorithms of hybrid key management using routing information frames determined by routing methods and the WSN topology are presented.

  5. Medical group management: a marketing orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, K D; Allcorn, S

    1986-09-01

    This article considers the pragmatic aspects of conducting a situation/marketing audit for group medical practices. This audit is a key component in the formulation of a competitive strategy and the development of a marketing program. Given are a series of questions that may be used by medical groups to guide assessment of the opportunities and threats present in the environment as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the organization in meeting the environmental challenges. Furthermore, the article provides a framework for thinking about strategy and the variables that should be considered and aligned to achieve effective implementation of strategy. Finally, the parameters are outlined for deciding on a marketing program: the mix of marketing tools (service design, distribution channels, pricing and promotion) that should be employed to offensively and/or defensively position the medical group in the competitive marketplace.

  6. Policy legitimacy - The key to long term Management of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, E.; Dalton, J.; Wild, D.

    2003-01-01

    Experience in the UK has shown that the central theme of delivering a solution is contingent on building a broad base of support for the long term management project. This is multi-layered, both in terms of local, regional and national political actors, but also across societal groups. Legitimacy is the key to success and needs to be understood in three main domains - equity, competence and economics. Finding the appropriate balance is essential for progress in the long term. (authors)

  7. Blockchain-Based Dynamic Key Management for Heterogeneous Intelligent Transportation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Ao; Cruickshank, Haitham; Cao, Y; Asuquo, Philip; Anyigor Ogah, Chibueze Pascal; Sun, Zhili

    2017-01-01

    As modern vehicle and communication technologies advanced apace, people begin to believe that Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) would be achievable in one decade.\\ud ITS introduces information technology to the transportation infrastructures and aims to improve road safety and traffic efficiency. However, security is still a main concern in Vehicular Communication Systems (VCS). This can be addressed through secured group broadcast. Therefore, secure key management schemes are considere...

  8. CHALLANGES OF MANAGING WORKFORCE : Posti Group Oyj

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaunya , Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis project was to analyze the challenges of managing workforce and its minimizing techniques according to current changing trends in delivery department of Posti Group Oyj. The project was taken forward in co-ordination with supervisors where the qualitative method of research “Interview” was used to analyze the outcomes of questionnaire. The interview was conducted with three different supervisors. Communication and cultural challenge were mostly focused by them. Only rel...

  9. Knowledge communication: a key to successful crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Härenstam, Malin

    2013-09-01

    A winning concept of crisis management can be summarized in 2 words: knowledge communication. If decision makers, communicators, experts, and the public understand what the crisis is about and share their knowledge, the process of handling it will be optimized. Effective crisis communication implies the necessity of an unhindered but purposeful exchange of information within and between authorities, organizations, media, involved individuals, and groups before, during, and after a crisis. This article focuses on the importance of the before, or prevention, part of a crisis since it holds a rich possibility to enhance the chances for successful crisis management of a bioterrorism incident. An extended perspective on crisis communication efficiently links to a more thorough understanding of risk perception with various stakeholders and the public, which also will be helpful for situational awareness. Furthermore, the grounded baseline for the dialogue type of crisis communication suitable in modern society and to modern social media is achieved by linking to those risk communication efforts that are made. The link between risk and crisis should be afforded more attention since, especially in biosecurity, there would be no crisis without risk negligence and poor or malfunctioning preventive efforts.

  10. Designing and implementing a key account management strategy

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Sisti

    2011-01-01

    Sales Management offers a global perspective on the opportunities and issues facing today's sales managers. Current textbooks have failed to move beyond the US context; Sales Management provides unique access to European and international experts, with globally relevant case studies.

  11. Asynchronous Group Key Distribution on top of the CC2420 Security Mechanisms for Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg

    2009-01-01

    scheme with no time synchronization requirements. The scheme decreases the number of key updates by providing them on an as needed basis according to the amount of network traffic. We evaluate the CC2420 radio security mechanism and show how to use it as a basis to implement secure group communication......A sensor network is a network consisting of small, inexpensive, low-powered sensor nodes that communicate to complete a common task. Sensor nodes are characterized by having limited communication and computation capabilities, energy, and storage. They often are deployed in hostile environments...... creating a demand for encryption and authentication of the messages sent between them. Due to severe resource constraints on the sensor nodes, efficient key distribution schemes and secure communication protocols with low overhead are desired. In this paper we present an asynchronous group key distribution...

  12. Mobility Based Key Management Technique for Multicast Security in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Madhusudhanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In MANET multicasting, forward and backward secrecy result in increased packet drop rate owing to mobility. Frequent rekeying causes large message overhead which increases energy consumption and end-to-end delay. Particularly, the prevailing group key management techniques cause frequent mobility and disconnections. So there is a need to design a multicast key management technique to overcome these problems. In this paper, we propose the mobility based key management technique for multicast security in MANET. Initially, the nodes are categorized according to their stability index which is estimated based on the link availability and mobility. A multicast tree is constructed such that for every weak node, there is a strong parent node. A session key-based encryption technique is utilized to transmit a multicast data. The rekeying process is performed periodically by the initiator node. The rekeying interval is fixed depending on the node category so that this technique greatly minimizes the rekeying overhead. By simulation results, we show that our proposed approach reduces the packet drop rate and improves the data confidentiality.

  13. Facebook Groups for the Management of Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Stephanie R; Gallagher, Patrick; Freeman, Becky; Gallagher, Robyn

    2018-01-17

    The use of Facebook groups by health care researchers and professionals for chronic disease management, namely type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease, is in its early stages and challenges are emerging. While Facebook groups offer great potential to deliver health support, research of Facebook groups for chronic disease management remains in its infancy, with robust evidence not yet available. Designing Facebook groups that are acceptable to users, health care researchers as well as health care professionals is a challenge, and there is a poor fit with traditional research and evaluation methods. Key recommendations for future research of Facebook groups for chronic disease management include: (1) iterative content development with input from the target patient population; (2) further understanding of the potential role of group "champions"; (3) ensuring the social media policies of health care institutions allow for real time online communication; and (4) utilizing comprehensive evaluation strategies, including the use of process evaluations. ©Stephanie R Partridge, Patrick Gallagher, Becky Freeman, Robyn Gallagher. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 17.01.2018.

  14. A Polynomial Subset-Based Efficient Multi-Party Key Management System for Lightweight Device Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Ning, Huansheng; Ghafoor, AtaUllah

    2017-03-24

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) consist of lightweight devices to measure sensitive data that are highly vulnerable to security attacks due to their constrained resources. In a similar manner, the internet-based lightweight devices used in the Internet of Things (IoT) are facing severe security and privacy issues because of the direct accessibility of devices due to their connection to the internet. Complex and resource-intensive security schemes are infeasible and reduce the network lifetime. In this regard, we have explored the polynomial distribution-based key establishment schemes and identified an issue that the resultant polynomial value is either storage intensive or infeasible when large values are multiplied. It becomes more costly when these polynomials are regenerated dynamically after each node join or leave operation and whenever key is refreshed. To reduce the computation, we have proposed an Efficient Key Management (EKM) scheme for multiparty communication-based scenarios. The proposed session key management protocol is established by applying a symmetric polynomial for group members, and the group head acts as a responsible node. The polynomial generation method uses security credentials and secure hash function. Symmetric cryptographic parameters are efficient in computation, communication, and the storage required. The security justification of the proposed scheme has been completed by using Rubin logic, which guarantees that the protocol attains mutual validation and session key agreement property strongly among the participating entities. Simulation scenarios are performed using NS 2.35 to validate the results for storage, communication, latency, energy, and polynomial calculation costs during authentication, session key generation, node migration, secure joining, and leaving phases. EKM is efficient regarding storage, computation, and communication overhead and can protect WSN-based IoT infrastructure.

  15. National disease management plans for key chronic non-communicable diseases in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C C

    2002-07-01

    In Singapore, chronic, non-communicable diseases, namely coronary heart disease, stroke and cancer, account for more than 60% of all deaths and a high burden of disability and healthcare expenditure. The burden of these diseases is likely to rise with our rapidly ageing population and changing lifestyles, and will present profound challenges to our healthcare delivery and financing systems over the next 20 to 30 years. The containment and optimal management of these conditions require a strong emphasis on patient education and the development of integrated models of healthcare delivery in place of the present uncoordinated, compartmentalised way of delivering healthcare. To meet these challenges, the Ministry of Health's major thrusts are disease control measures which focus mainly on primary prevention; and disease management, which coordinates the national effort to reduce the incidence of these key diseases and their predisposing factors and to ameliorate their long-term impact by optimising control to reduce mortality, morbidity and complications, and improving functional status through rehabilitation. The key initiatives include restructuring of the public sector healthcare institutions into two clusters, each comprising a network of primary health care polyclinics, regional hospitals and tertiary institutions. The functional integration of these healthcare elements within each cluster under a common senior administrative and professional management, and the development of common clinical IT systems will greatly facilitate the implementation of disease management programmes. Secondly, the Ministry is establishing National Disease Registries in coronary heart disease, cancer, stroke, myopia and kidney failure, which will be valuable sources of clinical and outcomes data. Thirdly, in partnership with expert groups, national committees and professional agencies, the Ministry will produce clinical practice guidelines which will assist doctors and healthcare

  16. Organizational agility key factors for dynamic business process management

    OpenAIRE

    Triaa , Wafa; Gzara , Lilia; Verjus , Hervé

    2016-01-01

    International audience; For several years, Business Process Management (BPM) is recognized as a holistic management approach that promotes business effectiveness and efficiency. Increasingly, corporates find themselves, operating in business environments filled with unpredictable, complex and continuous change. Driven by these dynamic competitive conditions, they look for a dynamic management of their business processes to maintain their processes performance. To be competitive, companies hav...

  17. 75 FR 34476 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group is to advise and to provide... of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group is in the public interest in connection with...

  18. A Study on Group Key Agreement in Sensor Network Environments Using Two-Dimensional Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Seog Jun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available These days, with the emergence of the concept of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks that collect, analyze and process all the information through the sensors have become of huge interest. However, sensor network technology fundamentally has wireless communication infrastructure as its foundation and thus has security weakness and limitations such as low computing capacity, power supply limitations and price. In this paper, and considering the characteristics of the sensor network environment, we propose a group key agreement method using a keyset pre-distribution of two-dimension arrays that should minimize the exposure of key and personal information. The key collision problems are resolved by utilizing a polygonal shape’s center of gravity. The method shows that calculating a polygonal shape’s center of gravity only requires a very small amount of calculations from the users. The simple calculation not only increases the group key generation efficiency, but also enhances the sense of security by protecting information between nodes.

  19. A Formally Verified Decentralized Key Management Architecture for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Y.W.; Corin, R.J.; Etalle, Sandro; Hartel, Pieter H.

    We present a decentralized key management architecture for wireless sensor networks, covering the aspects of key deployment, key refreshment and key establishment. Our architecture is based on a clear set of assumptions and guidelines. Balance between security and energy consumption is achieved by

  20. Efficient User Authentication and Key Management for Peer-to-Peer Live Streaming Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xuening; YIN Hao; LIN Chuang; DU Changlai

    2009-01-01

    Recent development of the peer-to-peer (P2P) live streaming technique has brought unprece-dented new momentum to the Internet with the characters of effective, scalable, and low cost. However, be-fore these applications can be successfully deployed as commercial applications, efficient access control mechanisms are needed. This work based on earlier research of the secure streaming architecture in Trust-Stream, analyzes how to ensure that only authorized users can access the original media in the P2P live streaming system by adopting a user authentication and key management scheme. The major features of this system include (1) the management server issues each authorized user a unique public key certificate,(2) the one-way hash chain extends the certificate's lifetime, (3) the original media is encrypted by the ses-sion key and delivered to the communication group, and (4) the session key is periodically updated and dis-tributed with the media. Finally, analyses and test results show that scheme provides a secure, scalable, re-liable, and efficient access control solution for P2P live streaming systems.

  1. Leadership – The Key Element in Improving Quality Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Paulová

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution is processed partial results of the survey application of leadership as one of the fundamental principles of quality management in organizations in the Slovak Republic. This survey was conducted in the research project VEGA No. 1/0229/08 Perspectives of quality management development in coherence with requirements of Slovak republic market. Results from the survey were the basis for proposals to improve the quality management in Slovak industrial organizations

  2. Financial Management: Opportunities to Improve Experience and Training of Key Navy Comptrollers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Furthermore, accurate financial data are needed for measuring performance under GPRA. One key factor in agencies being able to achieve these objectives will be having trained and experienced financial management staff in key positions...

  3. Successful customer value management : Key lessons and emerging trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, P.C.; Lemon, Katherine

    In the past decade, firms have paid increasing attention to customer value management (CVM). Through customer-centric management systems, firms aim to maximize customer value. In this article, we put forth six important lessons that firms can employ for successful CVM, integrating available research

  4. Quality Management and Key Performance Indicators in Oncologic Esophageal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockel, Ines; Ahlbrand, Constantin Johannes; Arras, Michael; Schreiber, Elke Maria; Lang, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    Ranking systems and comparisons of quality and performance indicators will be of increasing relevance for complex "high-risk" procedures such as esophageal cancer surgery. The identification of evidence-based standards relevant for key performance indicators in esophageal surgery is essential for establishing monitoring systems and furthermore a requirement to enhance treatment quality. In the course of this review, we analyze the key performance indicators case volume, radicality of resection, and postoperative morbidity and mortality, leading to continuous quality improvement. Ranking systems established on this basis will gain increased relevance in highly complex procedures within the national and international comparison and furthermore improve the treatment of patients with esophageal carcinoma.

  5. The role of primary care in adult weight management: qualitative interviews with key stakeholders in weight management services

    OpenAIRE

    Blane, David N.; Macdonald, Sara; Morrison, David; O’Donnell, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary care has a key role to play in the prevention and management of obesity, but there remain barriers to engagement in weight management by primary care practitioners. The aim of this study was to explore the views of key stakeholders in adult weight management services on the role of primary care in adult weight management. Methods Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with nine senior dietitians involved in NHS weight management from seven Scottish health bo...

  6. Identifying Key Stakeholder Groups for Implementing a Place Branding Policy in Saint Petersburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulibanova V. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Regional brands have become a valuable intangible asset and a crucial competitive resource for forging partnerships. An effective place branding policy is impossible without a precise understanding of the interests of stakeholder groups. It is essential to realize that each region is unique in its own way. Territories differ in the structure of stakeholders, their influence on regional development, and the range of leverages over regional decision-makers. This study aims to give a more precise definition of key groups of stakeholders in Saint Petersburg place branding, and to identify them. The authors employ the method of theoretical and empirical typology of a territory’s stakeholders within a theoretical framework proposed by E. Freeman, P. Kotler, S. Zenker, and E. Brown. The article defines the concept of key regional stakeholders and identifies them. The proposed target audience (stakeholder group model for a place branding policy is tested on the case of Saint Petersburg. The authors show that each target audience of place marketing requires an individual policy. This is explained by the fact that each group enjoys its unique features that should be taken into account when creating and transmitting messages.

  7. Determinants of Key Account Management Effectiveness: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Business and Economics (The) ... the postulated seven determinants of KAM effectiveness (strategy, solution, people, management, ... The findings provide the empirical application of the KAM model theorized by Zupancic ...

  8. Key challenges facing water resource management in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ashton, P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Resource Managers The Dichotomy of Water Source of destruction, dispute and poverty • Drought and desertification • Flooding and erosion • Salinization • Malnutrition and starvation • Contamination • Epidemics and diseases • Dispute...

  9. Key Practice for Green Building Management In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Aghili Nasim; Bin Mohammed Abdul Hakim; Sheau-Ting Low

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies the management practices for green building management in Malaysia. A set of practices was ascertained from the reviewed of various established Green Building Standard in the world. Green building practices are significant role in attaining sustainability particularly in the construction industry. Green building is constructed for minimizing impacts to environment as well as decreasing building effects on occupants. To achieve the goals of green buildings, set of managem...

  10. Nurses' Educational Needs Assessment for Financial Management Education Using the Nominal Group Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Wonjung Noh, PhD, RN; Ji Young Lim, PhD, RN, MBA

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the financial management educational needs of nurses in order to development an educational program to strengthen their financial management competencies. Methods: Data were collected from two focus groups using the nominal group technique. The study consisted of three steps: a literature review, focus group discussion using the nominal group technique, and data synthesis. Results: After analyzing the results, nine key components were s...

  11. Managing the pursuit of health and wealth: the key challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, David P; Drager, Nick; Lee, Kelley

    2009-01-24

    This article forms part of a six-part Series on trade and health, and sets the stage for this Series by analysing key aspects of the relationship between trade and health. The Series takes stock of this relation and provides timely analysis of the key challenges facing efforts to achieve an appropriate balance between trade and health across a diverse range of issues. This introductory article reviews how trade and health have risen and expanded on global policy agendas in the past decade in unprecedented ways, describes how trade and health issues are respectively governed in international relations, examines the ongoing search for policy coherence between the two policy spheres, and highlights the topics of the remaining articles in the Series.

  12. Managing Water in the Rural-Urban Interface : the Key to Climate ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Managing Water in the Rural-Urban Interface : the Key to Climate Change Resilient Cities ... cities - one in East and the other in West Africa - through better management ... Sustaining water use : stakeholders' strategies under different climate ...

  13. MASY: Management of secret keys in federated wireless sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Maerien, Jef; Michiels, Sam; Huygens, Christophe; Joosen, Wouter

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks are becoming federated and mobile environments. These new capabilities pose a lot of new possibilities and challenges. One of these challenges is to create a secure environment to allow multiple trusted companies to share and merge their sensor network infrastructure. The most basic need for a secure environment is the deployment of key material. However, most current day research assumes pre-shared secrets between the sensor nodes of most, if not all, companies in a ...

  14. Customer service: the key to remaining competitive in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J E

    2000-01-01

    The health care industry is undergoing a rapid transformation to meet the ever-increasing needs and demands of its patient population. Employers and managed care organizations are demanding better service and higher quality care, while providers are trying to tackle reimbursement cutbacks, streamlining of services, and serving a diverse population. Providers have begun to realize that to overcome these obstacles and meet the needs of their health plans and consumers, they must focus on the demands of their customers. Health care organizations have found they can meet the demands of both the consumer and the managed care industry through initiating and maintaining a customer service program. This essay explains the importance of customer service and its link to success in the managed care environment.

  15. Program management: The keys to a successful ERWM contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenyk, R.G.; Cusack, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Program management for a large Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) task order contract is both a skill and an art. Unlike project management, program management deals with global and political issues, with both client and home organizations, as well as with day-to-day operations. Program management requires up-front planning and nurturing, for no contract matures successfully by itself. This paper identifies the many opportunities presented in the planning and initial implementation of the contract. Potential traps are identified so that they can be recognized and avoided or mitigated. Teaming and subcontracting are also addressed. The authors rely on years of program management experience to explore such questions as the following: Can you have an integrated team? What needs to be done before you sign Your contract? Do you know who your client(s) is(are)? Have you incorporated the relevant, especially any new, procurement strategies? The US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) ERWM Remedial Design Contract with Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation is used as a model for exploring these topics. This ERWM Program-which focuses on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Weapons Plant, and the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Portsmouth, Ohio-is in its fifth year with over 225 task orders. The program has been highly successful and has obtained from DOE outstanding marks for achieving quality, responsiveness, timeliness, and subcontracting goals

  16. Functional group diversity is key to Southern Ocean benthic carbon pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K A Barnes

    Full Text Available High latitude benthos are globally important in terms of accumulation and storage of ocean carbon, and the feedback this is likely to have on regional warming. Understanding this ecosystem service is important but difficult because of complex taxonomic diversity, history and geography of benthic biomass. Using South Georgia as a model location (where the history and geography of benthic biology is relatively well studied we investigated whether the composition of functional groups were critical to benthic accumulation, immobilization and burial pathway to sequestration-and also aid their study through simplification of identification. We reclassified [1], [2] morphotype and carbon mass data to 13 functional groups, for each sample of 32 sites around the South Georgia continental shelf. We investigated the influence on carbon accumulation, immobilization and sequestration estimate by multiple factors including the compositions of functional groups. Functional groups showed high diversity within and between sites, and within and between habitat types. Carbon storage was not linked to a functional group in particular but accumulation and immobilization increased with the number of functional groups present and the presence of hard substrata. Functional groups were also important to carbon burial rate, which increased with the presence of mixed (hard and soft substrata. Functional groups showed high surrogacy for taxonomic composition and were useful for examining contrasting habitat categorization. Functional groups not only aid marine carbon storage investigation by reducing time and the need for team size and speciality, but also important to benthic carbon pathways per se. There is a distinct geography to seabed carbon storage; seabed boulder-fields are hotspots of carbon accumulation and immobilization, whilst the interface between such boulder-fields and sediments are key places for burial and sequestration.

  17. Networking: A Key to Career Communication and Management Consulting Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Now that job security with one organization is a relic of the past and companies are outsourcing training and other "nonessential" functions, the author suggests in his career communication classes that students develop the same inventive strategies to plan their employment futures that management consultants use to market themselves in the 21st…

  18. Key characteristics relevant for selecting knowledge management software tools

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smuts, H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The shift to knowledge as the primary source of value results in the new economy being led by those who manage knowledge effectively. Today’s organisations are creating and leveraging knowledge, data and information at an unprecedented pace – a...

  19. Key Institutions in Business and Management Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciari, Charles J.; Arbaugh, J. B.; Asarta, Carlos J.; Bento, Regina F.; Hwang, Alvin; Lund Dean, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigate institutional productivity in business and management education (BME) research based on the analysis of 4,464 articles published by 7,210 authors across 17 BME journals over a 10-year period, involving approximately 1,900 schools worldwide. Departing from traditional disciplinary silos, they examine the BME research field…

  20. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Paul H.; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas

  1. Cultural Intelligence as a Key Construct for Global Talent Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bücker, J.J.L.E.; Al Ariss, A.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the competencies needed to undertake global talent management (GTM), according to the concept of cultural intelligence (CQ) and its four main dimensions. Using real-world examples and excerpts from interviews with relevant actors in this field, this chapter outlines the CQ

  2. Key Elements of the Tutorial Support Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Grace; Paasuke, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In response to an exponential growth in enrolments the "Tutorial Support Management" (TSM) model has been adopted by Open Universities Australia (OUA) after a two-year project on the provision of online tutor support in first year, online undergraduate units. The essential focus of the TSM model was the development of a systemic approach…

  3. Resource management as a key factor for sustainable urban planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agudelo Vera, C.M.; Mels, A.R.; Keesman, K.J.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Due to fast urbanization and increasing living standards, the environmental sustainability of our global society becomes more and more questionable. In this historical review we investigate the role of resources management (RM) and urban planning (UP) and propose ways for integration in sustainable

  4. Media Management Education: Key Themes, Pedagogies, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Kati; Rohn, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The media sphere has changed significantly as a result of globalization, technology, and new habits of media use. Scholars in journalism and mass communication thus call on a transformation and reinvention of higher education in the field. The purpose of this article is to investigate how media management is taught across different institutions,…

  5. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Paul H., E-mail: paul.h.brunner@tuwien.ac.at; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  6. Key Determinants of Human Resource Management in Hospitals: Stakeholder Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchelt Beata Irma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, theoretical and empirical research on the various aspects of human resources (HR within the healthcare (HC sector has grown extensively due to its′ strategic importance in the sector. There is a visible tendency among researchers to pursue an effective human resource management (HRM strategies, methods, and tools. Countries implement policies which should increase the amount and competences of employees within healthcare. Providers of HC services (i.e. hospitals tend to enforce modern HRM solutions adapted from business organisations to attract, retain and develop HR. However, these seem not be as effective as they could (Hyde et al., 2013. Because of this, authors approached a researched reality from the point of view of a contextual paradigm, assuming that HRM solutions to be effective should match the reality of HC providers (Pocztowski, 2008. The aim of the research was to detect determinants which might influence the management of medical personnel in hospitals and identify the possible strength of these determinants so a more adjusted organisational and human resource management strategy could be elaborated. The list of possible determinants of hospital operations as the result of meta-analysis was elaborated. The list created the basis for interviews conducted among stakeholders and experts. Respondents were asked to appraise the factors with the usage of numerical scale considering their influence on medical personnel management in hospitals (physicians, nurses and others. In total, there were 28 interviews completed. The general conclusion which can be drawn from the analysis of these data is that hospitals should reorient their HRM practices in such the way that not only the quantitative but also the qualitative aspect of performance would be properly handled. This paper draws from HRM theory (contextual approach, stakeholder theory, and healthcare management theory, adding new insight to each in the context of

  7. Optimal energy management of urban rail systems: Key performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Gil, A.; Palacin, R.; Batty, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An overall picture of urban rail energy use is provided. • Performance indicators are developed for urban rail system energy optimisation. • A multi-level methodology for assessing energy efficiency measures is presented. - Abstract: Urban rail systems are facing increasing pressure to minimise their energy consumption and thusly reduce their operational costs and environmental impact. However, given the complexity of such systems, this can only be effectively achieved through a holistic approach which considers the numerous interdependences between subsystems (i.e. vehicles, operations and infrastructure). Such an approach requires a comprehensive set of energy consumption-related Key Performance Indicators (KEPIs) that enable: a multilevel analysis of the actual energy performance of the system; an assessment of potential energy saving strategies; and the monitoring of the results of implemented measures. This paper proposes an original, complete list of KEPIs developed through a scientific approach validated by different stakeholders. It consists of a hierarchical list of 22 indicators divided into two levels: 10 key performance indicators, to ascertain the performance of the whole system and complete subsystems; and 12 performance indicators, to evaluate the performance of single units within subsystems, for example, a single rail vehicle or station. Additionally, the paper gives a brief insight into urban rail energy usage by providing an adequate context in which to understand the proposed KEPIs, together with a methodology describing their application when optimising the energy consumption of urban rail systems

  8. Six key elements' analysis of FAC effective management in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhaojiang; Chen Hanming

    2010-01-01

    Corporate Commitment, Analysis, Operating Experience, Inspection, Training and Engineering Judgment, Long-Term Strategy are the six key elements of FAC effective management in nuclear power plant. Corporate commitment is the economy base of FAC management and ensure of management system, Analysis is the method of FAC's optimization and consummation, Operating experience is the reference and complementarity of FAC, Inspection is the base of accumulating FAC data, Training and engineering judgment is the technical complementarity and deepening, Long-term strategy is successful key of FAC management. Six key elements supplement each other, and make up of a full system of FAC effective management. For present FAC management in our national nuclear power plant, six key elements are the core and bring out the best in each other to found the FAC effective management system and prevent great FAC occurrence. (authors)

  9. Audit as Key Element of System Management Improvement in Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wojtynek

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents what is an audit for a company, tries to regularize the quality audits, presents main differences between separate types of audits and between audit and control. There are also some exemplary types of nonconformance in a company. Each system has a risk of deficiencies. They can result from material defects or human imperfection. A good quality system should allow the company to detect them in an organized and systematical manner. It guarantees that the irregularities will be removed before they cause a defective production. Quality management consists of planning the quality via quality plans, control and research plans, and supervision and verification by audits and controls. The objective of this paper is to present a special message of audit for organizations which is the improvement of management system in company. Quality audit is used with reference to quality system and its elements, to process, products and services. It compares the real values with expected ones with reference to the activities connected with quality and their results, and planned data. Thanks to quality audits, it is possible to state if the quality management instruments achieve the desired effect. Quality audit can be conducted for the internal and external purposes. One of the quality audit purposes is to estimate if the improvement is necessary or to take corrective actions. The universality of audit, which is completed by periodic system review preformed by head management, allows the use of its application effects both on the strategic and operational effects. Audit is often misled with quality monitoring or control, i.e. activities which aim to control the process or accept the product. Therefore this paper shows the differences between the notions. The information used to conduct an audit is only based on facts (evidence objective, which really exist, independent on emotions or prejudice. They can be documented, declared, based on observed

  10. BARI+: A Biometric Based Distributed Key Management Approach for Wireless Body Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Muhammad Khaliq-ur-Rahman Raazi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless body area networks (WBAN consist of resource constrained sensing devices just like other wireless sensor networks (WSN. However, they differ from WSN in topology, scale and security requirements. Due to these differences, key management schemes designed for WSN are inefficient and unnecessarily complex when applied to WBAN. Considering the key management issue, WBAN are also different from WPAN because WBAN can use random biometric measurements as keys. We highlight the differences between WSN and WBAN and propose an efficient key management scheme, which makes use of biometrics and is specifically designed for WBAN domain.

  11. BARI+: a biometric based distributed key management approach for wireless body area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Khaliq-ur-Rahman Raazi Syed; Lee, Heejo; Lee, Sungyoung; Lee, Young-Koo

    2010-01-01

    Wireless body area networks (WBAN) consist of resource constrained sensing devices just like other wireless sensor networks (WSN). However, they differ from WSN in topology, scale and security requirements. Due to these differences, key management schemes designed for WSN are inefficient and unnecessarily complex when applied to WBAN. Considering the key management issue, WBAN are also different from WPAN because WBAN can use random biometric measurements as keys. We highlight the differences between WSN and WBAN and propose an efficient key management scheme, which makes use of biometrics and is specifically designed for WBAN domain.

  12. A Retention Assessment Process: Utilizing Total Quality Management Principles and Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codjoe, Henry M.; Helms, Marilyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Retaining students is a critical topic in higher education. Methodologies abound to gather attrition data as well as key variables important to retention. Using the theories of total quality management and focus groups, this case study gathers and reports data from current college students. Key results, suggestions for replication, and areas for…

  13. A CEO View of Key Issues in Australian Information Systems Management - 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Pervan

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of a research programme on key information systems management issues, a survey of Australasia's largest 500 organisations was conducted to identify which issues were perceived by their chief executive officers (CEOs as being important, problematic and critical over the next three to five years. The results reported are based on a relatively low response rate (though perhaps reasonable for the target group so should be regarded as only exploratory. The most critical issues were revealed to be a mix of technology management issues (IT infrastructure, disaster recovery, strategic management issues (BPR, competitive advantage, information architecture, people management issues (organisational learning, systems development and data management issues (effective use of the data resource, effectiveness/productivity of IS, effectiveness of software development, and their own support systems (EIS/DSS. This reflects their interest in a wide range of issues, but all with an organisation-wide focus. Non-critical issues were mostly related to the individual technologies and the place and role of IS in the organisation. While the CEOs showed some agreement with their chief information officers (CIOs on issues such as the IT infrastructure, competitive advantage, and organisational learning some distinct differences exist, particularly in relation to the quality and effectiveness of systems and processes and also how CEOs and CIOs perceive each other.

  14. Management of key pension plan risks from the user aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakonjac-Antić Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pension system is an important form of protection of individuals, i.e. of their ensuring for a period of living after retirement, when they are no longer able for working engagement. On the other hand, as a form of long-term insurance, this system presents a strong investment incentive for each economy. Pension plans are an important element of the pension system. There are defined benefit plans, defined contribution plans and hybrid plans, which represent a combination of the two previously mentioned plans. The aim of the work is to define the key risks for each of these types of pension plans in order to determine their advantages and disadvantages, from the aspect of their potential users, on the basis of their comparative analysis.

  15. Diagnosis and Management of High Risk Group for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval. PMID:25547086

  16. Geriatric hip fracture management: keys to providing a successful program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, N; Natour, M; Mounasamy, V; Kates, S L

    2016-10-01

    Hip fractures are a common event in older adults and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality and costs. This review examines the necessary elements required to implement a successful geriatric fracture program and identifies some of the barriers faced when implementing a successful program. The Geriatric Fracture Center (GFC) is a treatment model that standardizes the approach to the geriatric fracture patient. It is based on five principles: surgical fracture management; early operative intervention; medical co-management with geriatricians; patient-centered, standard order sets to employ best practices; and early discharge planning with a focus on early functional rehabilitation. Implementing a geriatric fracture program begins with an assessment of the hospital's data on hip fractures and standard care metrics such as length of stay, complications, time to surgery, readmission rates and costs. Business planning is essential along with the medical planning process. To successfully develop and implement such a program, strong physician leadership is necessary to articulate both a short- and long-term plan for implementation. Good communication is essential-those organizing a geriatric fracture program must be able to implement standardized plans of care working with all members of the healthcare team and must also be able to foster relationships both within the hospital and with other institutions in the community. Finally, a program of continual quality improvement must be undertaken to ensure that performance outcomes are improving patient care.

  17. Key Management Scheme Based on Route Planning of Mobile Sink in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many wireless sensor network application scenarios the key management scheme with a Mobile Sink (MS should be fully investigated. This paper proposes a key management scheme based on dynamic clustering and optimal-routing choice of MS. The concept of Traveling Salesman Problem with Neighbor areas (TSPN in dynamic clustering for data exchange is proposed, and the selection probability is used in MS route planning. The proposed scheme extends static key management to dynamic key management by considering the dynamic clustering and mobility of MSs, which can effectively balance the total energy consumption during the activities. Considering the different resources available to the member nodes and sink node, the session key between cluster head and MS is established by modified an ECC encryption with Diffie-Hellman key exchange (ECDH algorithm and the session key between member node and cluster head is built with a binary symmetric polynomial. By analyzing the security of data storage, data transfer and the mechanism of dynamic key management, the proposed scheme has more advantages to help improve the resilience of the key management system of the network on the premise of satisfying higher connectivity and storage efficiency.

  18. Key Management Scheme Based on Route Planning of Mobile Sink in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Liang, Jixing; Zheng, Bingxin; Jiang, Shengming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-29

    In many wireless sensor network application scenarios the key management scheme with a Mobile Sink (MS) should be fully investigated. This paper proposes a key management scheme based on dynamic clustering and optimal-routing choice of MS. The concept of Traveling Salesman Problem with Neighbor areas (TSPN) in dynamic clustering for data exchange is proposed, and the selection probability is used in MS route planning. The proposed scheme extends static key management to dynamic key management by considering the dynamic clustering and mobility of MSs, which can effectively balance the total energy consumption during the activities. Considering the different resources available to the member nodes and sink node, the session key between cluster head and MS is established by modified an ECC encryption with Diffie-Hellman key exchange (ECDH) algorithm and the session key between member node and cluster head is built with a binary symmetric polynomial. By analyzing the security of data storage, data transfer and the mechanism of dynamic key management, the proposed scheme has more advantages to help improve the resilience of the key management system of the network on the premise of satisfying higher connectivity and storage efficiency.

  19. Design of material management system of mining group based on Hadoop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhiyuan; Tan, Zhuoying; Qi, Kuan; Li, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Under the background of persistent slowdown in mining market at present, improving the management level in mining group has become the key link to improve the economic benefit of the mine. According to the practical material management in mining group, three core components of Hadoop are applied: distributed file system HDFS, distributed computing framework Map/Reduce and distributed database HBase. Material management system of mining group based on Hadoop is constructed with the three core components of Hadoop and SSH framework technology. This system was found to strengthen collaboration between mining group and affiliated companies, and then the problems such as inefficient management, server pressure, hardware equipment performance deficiencies that exist in traditional mining material-management system are solved, and then mining group materials management is optimized, the cost of mining management is saved, the enterprise profit is increased.

  20. Adaptability and flexibility : keys towards successful SCAT data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarche, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) is the standard method used in North America to document oiling conditions in the aftermath of an oil spill. The data generated by SCAT can support all aspects of shoreline spill response, including treatment strategies, selecting treatment methods, providing detailed instructions to response personnel and evaluating the response effort. However, some adaptations were needed, such as adding shoreline types specific to the impacted area, accommodating multiple teams surveying the same shoreline segment, and adding descriptors to characterize unique practical aspects of oil conditions. This paper presented a review, description and examples of the various adaptations that were needed to provide SCAT data management support during a number of spill response incidents. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs

  1. Resource management as a key factor for sustainable urban planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Vera, Claudia M; Mels, Adriaan R; Keesman, Karel J; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2011-10-01

    Due to fast urbanization and increasing living standards, the environmental sustainability of our global society becomes more and more questionable. In this historical review we investigate the role of resources management (RM) and urban planning (UP) and propose ways for integration in sustainable development (SD). RM follows the principle of circular causation, and we reflect on to what extent RM has been an element for urban planning. Since the existence of the first settlements, a close relationship between RM, urbanization and technological development has been present. RM followed the demand for urban resources like water, energy, and food. In history, RM has been fostered by innovation and technology developments and has driven population growth and urbanization. Recent massive resource demand, especially in relation to energy and material flows, has altered natural ecosystems and has resulted in environmental degradation. UP has developed separately in response to different questions. UP followed the demand for improved living conditions, often associated to safety, good manufacturing and trading conditions and appropriate sanitation and waste management. In history UP has been a developing research area, especially since the industrial era and the related strong urbanization at the end of the 18th century. UP responded to new emerging problems in urban areas and became increasingly complex. Nowadays, UP has to address many objectives that are often conflicting, including, the urban sustainability. Our current urban un-sustainability is rooted in massive resource consumption and waste production beyond natural limits, and the absence of flows from waste to resources. Therefore, sustainable urban development requires integration of RM into UP. We propose new ways to this integration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Symmetric Link Key Management for Secure Neighbor Discovery in a Decentralized Wireless Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    KEY MANAGEMENT FOR SECURE NEIGHBOR DISCOVERY IN A DECENTRALIZED WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK by Kelvin T. Chew September 2017 Thesis Advisor...and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT...DATE September 2017 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SYMMETRIC LINK KEY MANAGEMENT FOR SECURE NEIGHBOR

  3. Key Account Management and Quality in Business-to-Business Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Ojasalo, Jukka

    2000-01-01

    What are the main elements of successful Key Account Management (KAM)? What is the nature of quality for the company and for the individual in business-to-business relationships? What kind of managerial practices are required at the company and individual level in Key Account Management? This paper focuses on these central aspects of KAM. It describes the main elements of KAM, which is a systematic marketing management approach in the business-to-business context with the objective to build p...

  4. Pain management in pediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Namrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of pain in palliative care of children is somewhat different from that in adults.The use of opioids in pediatric palliative care presents some unique challenges. Confident and rational use of opioids, illustrated by WHO Guidelines is essential for adequate management of pain in children with life limiting conditions.

  5. Stakeholder Confidence and Radioactive Waste management - An annotated glossary of key terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martell, Meritxell; Pescatore, Claudio; Mays, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) Annotated Glossary is a review of concepts central to societal decision making about radioactive waste management. It records the evolution in understanding that has taken place in the group as the FSC has worked with these concepts over time. This should be a useful resource not only for new FSC participants but also for others: this annotated glossary forms a good reference handbook for future texts regarding societal aspects of radioactive waste management and its governance. Each glossary entry is structured, to the extent possible, as follows: - The term and its variants, if any, in FSC literature are identified. - The common FSC understanding of the concept and any guidance are captured, based upon a review of all FSC documents to date. - Any evolution of the concept observed over the decade of FSC work is analysed. - The FSC interpretation of the symbolic dimension is explored. - The current status of outlook in the FSC, and intended activities according to the current Programme of Work (2010 and beyond) are assessed. Overall, although different persons and groups may assign different meanings to words, and although terminology will continue to evolve, this glossary is the FSC's 'state-of-the-art' guide to key terms in use. As such, it should prove to be a handy reference for all those interested in the governance of radioactive waste management

  6. Muscular dystrophies: key elements for everyday diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Palladino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that share similar clinical features and dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy, associated with progressive weakness. Weakness may be noted at birth or develop in late adult life. In recent years, cardiac involvement has been observed in a growing number of genetic muscle diseases, and considerable progress has been made in understanding the relationships between disease skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle disease. This review will focus on the skeletal muscle diseases most commonly associated with cardiac complications that can be diagnosed by echocardiography, such as dystrophinopathies including Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathy of DMD/BMD carriers and X-L dilated cardiomyopathy.

  7. Integrated sign management system : ADOT maintenance group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    The Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) maintains and manages an inventory of roadway signs. Before the implementation of this project, sign technicians maintained inventory records on individual laptops to track their daily sign maintenance ...

  8. Polio Endgame: Lessons Learned From the Immunization Systems Management Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, Simona; Vandelaer, Jos; Brooks, Alan; Dietz, Vance; Kachra, Tasleem; Farrell, Margaret; Ottosen, Ann; Sever, John L; Zaffran, Michel J

    2017-07-01

    The Immunization Systems Management Group (IMG) was established to coordinate and oversee objective 2 of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018, namely, (1) introduction of ≥1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in all 126 countries using oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) only as of 2012, (2) full withdrawal of OPV, starting with the withdrawal of its type 2 component, and (3) using polio assets to strengthen immunization systems in 10 priority countries. The IMG's inclusive, transparent, and partnership-focused approach proved an effective means of leveraging the comparative and complementary strengths of each IMG member agency. This article outlines 10 key factors behind the IMG's success, providing a potential set of guiding principles for the establishment and implementation of other interagency collaborations and initiatives beyond the polio sphere. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  9. Short Essay on Managing Multicultural Students Groups within Diversity Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Ploae

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present essay focuses on summarizing the key elements that should be considered wheneducators are in a position to manage and interact with a group of students from different culturesor social environments. In this respect, we consider that the challenge educators’ face inconnecting with students of diverse backgrounds is to develop a critical consciousness of the waysin which these larger discourses operate in their classrooms and to care enough to question them,to challenge them and to advocate for their students. To care for students who come fromhistorically marginalized populations educators need to remember that schooling can serve eithera liberating or marginalizing function. They can empower students to identify structures in societythat have contributed to marginalizing their perspective and seek to maintain inequitable structuresin society or even narrow communities.

  10. Key Account Management - nøglen til vækst?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skogberg, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen tager afsæt i en beskrivelse af begrebet Key Account Management samt den udvikling begrebet har gennemgået de senere år. Artiklen diskuterer problemstillingen om hvorvidt virksomheder skal implementere Key Account Management som et styringsredskab, men sætter samtidig spørgsmålstegn ved om...... Key Account Management nu også er den frelser som faglitteraturen ofte betegner det som. Artiklen inddrager eksempler fra en nordjysk energivirksomhed, hvis aktuelle situation illustrerer de udfordringer mange virksomheder i praksis står overfor....

  11. Nurses' Educational Needs Assessment for Financial Management Education Using the Nominal Group Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Wonjung; Lim, Ji Young

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the financial management educational needs of nurses in order to development an educational program to strengthen their financial management competencies. Data were collected from two focus groups using the nominal group technique. The study consisted of three steps: a literature review, focus group discussion using the nominal group technique, and data synthesis. After analyzing the results, nine key components were selected: corporate management and accounting, introduction to financial management in hospitals, basic structure of accounting, basics of hospital accounting, basics of financial statements, understanding the accounts of financial statements, advanced analysis of financial statements, application of financial management, and capital financing of hospitals. The present findings can be used to develop a financial management education program to strengthen the financial management competencies of nurses. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. 77 FR 9265 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning.... L. 102-575) of 1992. The AMP includes a Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group...

  13. 78 FR 7810 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning..., the AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, and independent...

  14. 78 FR 21415 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning... Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group, a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research...

  15. 77 FR 22801 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group...). SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary..., the AMWG, a technical work group, a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, and independent...

  16. 77 FR 45370 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ...-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders... take place at the North Fork Grange Hall, Dutch Creek Road, Junction City, CA 96048. The group will...

  17. 76 FR 24516 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning..., the AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, and independent...

  18. Key Element Performance In Occupational Safety And Health Management System In Organization (A Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Salim Nuzaihan Aras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting an effective safety and health management system is crucial in order to reduce problem relating to accident and ill in management organizational. It is involve with multiple level of management and stakeholders who empower the organization to the management in handling the safety and health cases and issues in organizational. It is necessary to prepare a well knowledge about safety and health management systems and preparing the framework for setting a certain scale in measuring its performance in this area. The successful or failure of management does showing the capability of the organization in delivering the responsible to management levels [1]. The problem in safe work issues and practices cause by the management commitment and involvement that create improper safety program and procedures, and this crisis keep continuing till present [2]. This paper describes about key element of safety and health management system and measuring the performance in order to get an effective management system in organization that describes the process in achieving effectiveness in management. The literature review will be conducted through the data collection from research findings and defined the strong character of key element in which focusing on measuring performance. A guide on key element performance in occupational safety and health management system is specifically drawn to prepare for a future research.

  19. Trust Threshold Based Public Key Management in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-05

    detection 49 [6,7] , authentication, access control, key management, iso- 50 lating misbehaving nodes for effective routing [6,8,9] , and 51 many other...83 84 85 aims to achieve: (a) resiliency against misbehaving nodes 86 in the network to maintain minimum security vulnerabil- 87 ity; (b...neighbor will decreas the misbehaving node’s direct competence trust. Fur thermore, this neighbor when acting as a recommended public key management in

  20. Managing and developing key supplier relationships : An introduction to the special issue, discussion and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivens, B.; van de Vijver, M.A.R.; Vos, G.C.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to this special issue on managing and developing key supplier relationships. Key suppliers are increasingly seen as strategic assets of buying companies which need careful nurturing to fully utilize their potential for value creation. The six articles of this

  1. ERP as an organization innovation : Key users and cross-boundary knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.-B.; van Fenema, P.C.; Soeters, J.M.M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide more insight in the ways key users act as knowledge managers and boundary spanners during the enterprise resource planning (ERP) system usage phase. Despite the recognized importance of key users during the implementation phase of an ERP system, little

  2. Evaluating HIV prevention strategies for populations in key affected groups: The example of Cabo Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, João Filipe G.; Galea, Sandro; Flanigan, Timothy; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Friedman, Samuel R.; Marshall, Brandon DL

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We used an individual-based model to evaluate the effects of hypothetical prevention interventions on HIV incidence trajectories in a concentrated, mixed epidemic setting from 2011 to 2021, and using Cabo Verde as an example. Methods Simulations were conducted to evaluate the extent to which early HIV treatment and optimization of care, HIV testing, condom distribution, and substance abuse treatment could eliminate new infections (i.e., reduce incidence to less than 10 cases per 10,000 person-years) among non-drug users, female sex workers (FSW), and people who use drugs (PWUD). Results Scaling up all four interventions resulted in the largest decreases in HIV, with estimates ranging from 1.4 (95%CI:1.36–1.44) per 10,000 person-years among non-drug users to 8.2 (95%CI:7.8–8.6) per 10,000 person-years among PWUD in 2021. Intervention scenarios targeting FWS and PWUD also resulted in HIV incidence estimates at or below 10 per 10,000 person-years by 2021 for all population sub-groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that scaling up multiple interventions among entire population is necessary to achieve elimination. However, prioritizing key populations with this combination prevention strategy may also result in a substantial decrease in total incidence. PMID:25838121

  3. Evaluating HIV prevention strategies for populations in key affected groups: the example of Cabo Verde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, João Filipe G; Galea, Sandro; Flanigan, Timothy; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Friedman, Samuel R; Marshall, Brandon D L

    2015-05-01

    We used an individual-based model to evaluate the effects of hypothetical prevention interventions on HIV incidence trajectories in a concentrated, mixed epidemic setting from 2011 to 2021, and using Cabo Verde as an example. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the extent to which early HIV treatment and optimization of care, HIV testing, condom distribution, and substance abuse treatment could eliminate new infections (i.e., reduce incidence to less than 10 cases per 10,000 person-years) among non-drug users, female sex workers (FSW), and people who use drugs (PWUD). Scaling up all four interventions resulted in the largest decreases in HIV, with estimates ranging from 1.4 (95 % CI 1.36-1.44) per 10,000 person-years among non-drug users to 8.2 (95 % CI 7.8-8.6) per 10,000 person-years among PWUD in 2021. Intervention scenarios prioritizing FWS and PWUD also resulted in HIV incidence estimates at or below 10 per 10,000 person-years by 2021 for all population sub-groups. Our results suggest that scaling up multiple interventions among entire population is necessary to achieve elimination. However, prioritizing key populations with this combination prevention strategy may also result in a substantial decrease in total incidence.

  4. Key Informant Models for Measuring Group-Level Variables in Small Groups: Application to Plural Subject Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algesheimer, René; Bagozzi, Richard P.; Dholakia, Utpal M.

    2018-01-01

    We offer a new conceptualization and measurement models for constructs at the group-level of analysis in small group research. The conceptualization starts with classical notions of group behavior proposed by Tönnies, Simmel, and Weber and then draws upon plural subject theory by philosophers Gilbert and Tuomela to frame a new perspective…

  5. Anxiety management groups in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Clarke, A; Whitfield, W; Cadbury, S; Sandu, S

    Anxiety symptoms are commonly reported both in patients and in the general population. There is also increasing concern being expressed over the widespread use of prescribed anxiolytics. This has encouraged the development of psychological interventions for both specific and generalised anxiety. In this paper, 29 patients, most of whom suffered from generalised or free-floating anxiety, were treated in small groups as part of a staff training programme. Their treatment was standardised, and consisted of progressive muscular relaxation, cognitive therapy and an educational input as to the nature of anxiety. Two measures, the Spielberger Trait Scale and an individualised problem rating scale were completed before and after the group and at three months follow-up. All but one of the results was statistically significant. The implications of these results are discussed.

  6. Agri-Environmental Resource Management by Large-Scale Collective Action: Determining KEY Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large-scale collective action is necessary when managing agricultural natural resources such as biodiversity and water quality. This paper determines the key factors to the success of such action. Design/Methodology/Approach: This paper analyses four large-scale collective actions used to manage agri-environmental resources in Canada and…

  7. Perceptions of food risk management among key stakeholders: Results from a cross-European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Frewer, L.J.; Chryssochoidis, G.M.; Houghton, J.R.; Korzen-Bohr, S.; Krystallis, T.; Lassen, J.; Pfenning, U.; Rowe, G.

    2006-01-01

    In designing and implementing appropriate food risk management strategies, it is important to examine how key stakeholders perceive both the practice and effectiveness of food risk management. The objective of this study is to identify similarities and differences in perceptions of, and attitudes

  8. The most important key-performance indicators at BC Timişoara management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia GRĂDINARU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the management of objectives at BC Timisoara, motivation and performance analysis. The aim of this paper is to analyze the most important key factors involved in a basketball team performance. The basketball team analyzed is BC Timisoara, a well established club in this city of Western Romania. The article combines information gathered from BC Timisoara’s manager and management theories relevant to the topic. Goal setting is affected by financial and human resource factors as well control and regulation functions. Finally motivation plays a key role in players performance.

  9. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Hughes, Richard John; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2013-07-09

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

  10. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard John; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2017-06-14

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

  11. Responses of Aquatic Bacteria to Terrestrial Runoff: Effects on Community Structure and Key Taxonomic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huong T.; Ho, Cuong T.; Trinh, Quan H.; Trinh, Duc A.; Luu, Minh T. N.; Tran, Hai S.; Orange, Didier; Janeau, Jean L.; Merroune, Asmaa; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Organic fertilizer application is often touted as an economical and effective method to increase soil fertility. However, this amendment may increase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff into downstream aquatic ecosystems and may consequently alter aquatic microbial community. We focused on understanding the effects of DOC runoff from soils amended with compost, vermicompost, or biochar on the aquatic microbial community of a tropical reservoir. Runoff collected from a series of rainfall simulations on soils amended with different organic fertilizers was incubated for 16 days in a series of 200 L mesocosms filled with water from a downstream reservoir. We applied 454 high throughput pyrosequencing for bacterial 16S rRNA genes to analyze microbial communities. After 16 days of incubation, the richness and evenness of the microbial communities present decreased in the mesocosms amended with any organic fertilizers, except for the evenness in the mesocosms amended with compost runoff. In contrast, they increased in the reservoir water control and soil-only amended mesocosms. Community structure was mainly affected by pH and DOC concentration. Compared to the autochthonous organic carbon produced during primary production, the addition of allochthonous DOC from these organic amendments seemed to exert a stronger effect on the communities over the period of incubation. While the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria classes were positively associated with higher DOC concentration, the number of sequences representing key bacterial groups differed between mesocosms particularly between the biochar runoff addition and the compost or vermi-compost runoff additions. The genera of Propionibacterium spp. and Methylobacterium spp. were highly abundant in the compost runoff additions suggesting that they may represent sentinel species of complex organic carbon inputs. Overall, this work further underlines the importance of studying the off-site impacts of organic fertilizers as

  12. Managing malocclusion in the mixed dentition: six keys to success. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Johal, Ama; DiBiase, Andrew T

    2008-11-01

    Indications of developing malocclusion are often present in the mixed dentition.With judicious supervision and timely intervention their effects can be minimized. The general dental practitioner is ideally placed to recognize, manage and correct many such incipient problems. This first of two papers considers three keys to success involving, normal dental development, deviations from normal eruption patterns, crossbite correction and habit cessation. The appropriate management of developing malocclusion may simplify later orthodontic management or indeed make such intervention unnecessary.

  13. 75 FR 17158 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2010-N065; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  14. 75 FR 51284 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2010-N168; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  15. 77 FR 10766 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2012-N039; FXFR1334088TWG0W4-123-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders...

  16. 75 FR 70947 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2010-N253; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  17. 76 FR 52345 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2011-N168; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  18. 76 FR 70751 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2011-N237; FXFR1334088TWG0W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  19. 75 FR 27814 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2010-N101; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  20. 76 FR 14044 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2011-N044; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  1. 77 FR 74203 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2012-N266; FXFR1334088TWG0W4-123-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders...

  2. 76 FR 34248 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2011-N116; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  3. 76 FR 23621 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2011-N083; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  4. 77 FR 30314 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2012-N124: FXFR1334088TWG0W4-123-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders...

  5. 77 FR 50155 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2012-N201;FXFR1334088TWG0W4-123-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders...

  6. 75 FR 10501 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-FHC-2010-N041; 81331-1334-8TWG-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the...

  7. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  8. Key Design Considerations When Calculating Cost Savings for Population Health Management Programs in an Observational Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shannon M E; Hough, Douglas E; Sylvia, Martha L; Dunbar, Linda J; Frick, Kevin D

    2018-02-08

    To illustrate the impact of key quasi-experimental design elements on cost savings measurement for population health management (PHM) programs. Population health management program records and Medicaid claims and enrollment data from December 2011 through March 2016. The study uses a difference-in-difference design to compare changes in cost and utilization outcomes between program participants and propensity score-matched nonparticipants. Comparisons of measured savings are made based on (1) stable versus dynamic population enrollment and (2) all eligible versus enrolled-only participant definitions. Options for the operationalization of time are also discussed. Individual-level Medicaid administrative and claims data and PHM program records are used to match study groups on baseline risk factors and assess changes in costs and utilization. Savings estimates are statistically similar but smaller in magnitude when eliminating variability based on duration of population enrollment and when evaluating program impact on the entire target population. Measurement in calendar time, when possible, simplifies interpretability. Program evaluation design elements, including population stability and participant definitions, can influence the estimated magnitude of program savings for the payer and should be considered carefully. Time specifications can also affect interpretability and usefulness. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  9. Introduction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Henry

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we presented the planned direction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group. This group consists of concerned system developers and users who have organized to synthesize recommendations for standard UNIX performance management subsystem interfaces and architectures. The purpose of these recommendations is to provide a core set of performance management functions and these functions can be used to build tools by hardware system developers, vertical application software developers, and performance application software developers.

  10. Management systems, control and motivation methods used at enterprises groups

    OpenAIRE

    Leugaudaitė, Dalia

    2017-01-01

    MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS, CONTROL AND MOTIVATION METHODS USED AT ENTERPRISES GROUPS 69 pages, 3 tables, 25 pictures, 39 literature references. The aim of the Master's paper is to determine the implementation impact of the motivation and controlling methods to achieve efficiency in management systems. As a result of the scientific literature analysis, the advantages and disadvantages of the management systems were selected. These statements were used for the primary survey of the initial group of co...

  11. Key Supplier Relationship Management: The Case of Croatian Medium-Sized and Large Manufacturing Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Miočević

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The key supplier relationship management represents a vital organizational process. Companies should pay attention not only to managing customer relationships but also to managing relationships with suppliers in order to perform well. They should identify the extent to which a certain supplier adds value through the procurement process. In this line of reasoning, both theory and practice make a distinction between strategic (key and non-strategic (transactional suppliers. By employing the segmentation of the supply market, companies balance their supplier portfolio and are capable of identifying the key suppliers. They can also develop specific programs and initiatives that are aimed at preserving these relationships. In the empirical part of the paper, a survey was conducted on a sample of 123 medium-sized and large Croatian manufacturing companies. The structural model involving the relationship between the key supplier relationship management and value-oriented purchasing was tested. The results indicate that there is a statistically direct, positive and significant relationship between these two constructs. Likewise, the results stress that a theoretical conceptualization and operationalization of the key supplier relationship management construct is both valid and justified. Finally, the theoretical and practical implications and limitations of this study are offered.

  12. Key elements on implementing an occupational health and safety management system using ISO 45001 standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darabont Doru Costin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health and safety (OHS management system is one of the main elements of the company’s general management system. During last decade, Romanian companies gained a valuable experience on implementing this type of management systems, using OHSAS 18001 referential and standard. However, the projected release of the ISO 45001 represents a new approach which requires the companies to take in consideration new key elements for a successful implementation of the OHS management system. The aim of the paper is to identify and analyse these key elements, by integration of the following issues: standard requirements, Romanian OHS legislation and good practice examples, including the general control measures for new and emerging risks such as psycho-social risks, workforce ageing and new technologies. The study results represent an important work instrument for each company interested to implement or upgrade its OHS management system using ISO 45001 standard and could be used regardless the company size or activity domain.

  13. A Round-Efficient Authenticated Key Agreement Scheme Based on Extended Chaotic Maps for Group Cloud Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Hung; Tsung, Chen-Kun; Lee, Tian-Fu; Wang, Zeng-Bo

    2017-12-03

    The security is a critical issue for business purposes. For example, the cloud meeting must consider strong security to maintain the communication privacy. Considering the scenario with cloud meeting, we apply extended chaotic map to present passwordless group authentication key agreement, termed as Passwordless Group Authentication Key Agreement (PL-GAKA). PL-GAKA improves the computation efficiency for the simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE) proposed by Lee et al. in terms of computing the session key. Since the extended chaotic map has equivalent security level to the Diffie-Hellman key exchange scheme applied by SGPAKE, the security of PL-GAKA is not sacrificed when improving the computation efficiency. Moreover, PL-GAKA is a passwordless scheme, so the password maintenance is not necessary. Short-term authentication is considered, hence the communication security is stronger than other protocols by dynamically generating session key in each cloud meeting. In our analysis, we first prove that each meeting member can get the correct information during the meeting. We analyze common security issues for the proposed PL-GAKA in terms of session key security, mutual authentication, perfect forward security, and data integrity. Moreover, we also demonstrate that communicating in PL-GAKA is secure when suffering replay attacks, impersonation attacks, privileged insider attacks, and stolen-verifier attacks. Eventually, an overall comparison is given to show the performance between PL-GAKA, SGPAKE and related solutions.

  14. A Round-Efficient Authenticated Key Agreement Scheme Based on Extended Chaotic Maps for Group Cloud Meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hung Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The security is a critical issue for business purposes. For example, the cloud meeting must consider strong security to maintain the communication privacy. Considering the scenario with cloud meeting, we apply extended chaotic map to present passwordless group authentication key agreement, termed as Passwordless Group Authentication Key Agreement (PL-GAKA. PL-GAKA improves the computation efficiency for the simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE proposed by Lee et al. in terms of computing the session key. Since the extended chaotic map has equivalent security level to the Diffie–Hellman key exchange scheme applied by SGPAKE, the security of PL-GAKA is not sacrificed when improving the computation efficiency. Moreover, PL-GAKA is a passwordless scheme, so the password maintenance is not necessary. Short-term authentication is considered, hence the communication security is stronger than other protocols by dynamically generating session key in each cloud meeting. In our analysis, we first prove that each meeting member can get the correct information during the meeting. We analyze common security issues for the proposed PL-GAKA in terms of session key security, mutual authentication, perfect forward security, and data integrity. Moreover, we also demonstrate that communicating in PL-GAKA is secure when suffering replay attacks, impersonation attacks, privileged insider attacks, and stolen-verifier attacks. Eventually, an overall comparison is given to show the performance between PL-GAKA, SGPAKE and related solutions.

  15. Capacity building in water demand management as a key component for attaining millennium development goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Forster, Laura; Arntzen, Jaap

    Successful water demand management (WDM) implementation as a component of integrated water resource management (IWRM) can play a significant role in the alleviation of poverty through more efficient use of available water resources. The urban population in Southern African cities is characterised by so-called ‘water poor’ communities who typically expend a high percentage of their household income on poor quality water. Usually they have no access to an affordable alternative source. Although WDM as a component of IWRM is not a panacea for poverty, it can help alleviate poverty by facilitating water services management by municipal water supply agencies (MWSAs) in the region. WDM is a key strategy for achieving the millennium development goals (MDGs) and, as such, should be given due attention in the preparation of national IWRM and water efficiency plans. Various studies in the Southern African region have indicated that capacity building is necessary for nations to develop IWRM and water-use efficiency plans to meet the targets set out in the MDGs. WDM education and training of water professionals and end-users is particularly important in developing countries, which are resource and information-access poor. In response to these findings, The World Conservation Union (IUCN) and its consulting partners, the Training and Instructional Design Academy of South Africa (TIDASA), and Centre for Applied Research (CAR) designed, developed and presented a pilot WDM Guideline Training Module for MWSAs as part of Phase II of IUCN’s Southern Africa regional WDM project. Pilot training was conducted in July 2004 in Lusaka, Zambia for a group of 36 participants involved in municipal water supply from nine Southern African countries. This paper looks at the links between building the capacity of professionals, operational staff and other role-players in the municipal water supply chain to implement WDM as part of broader IWRM strategies, and the subsequent potential for

  16. Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefevre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.BACKGROUND: During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership.DESIGN: The stu...

  17. Provably-Secure Authenticated Group Diffie-Hellman KeyExchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2007-01-01

    Authenticated key exchange protocols allow two participantsA and B, communicating over a public network and each holding anauthentication means, to exchange a shared secret value. Methods designedto deal with this cryptographic problem ensure A (resp. B) that no otherparticipants aside from B (resp. A) can learn any information about theagreed value, and often also ensure A and B that their respective partnerhas actually computed this value. A natural extension to thiscryptographic method is to consider a pool of participants exchanging ashared secret value and to provide a formal treatment for it. Startingfrom the famous 2-party Diffie-Hellman (DH) key exchange protocol, andfrom its authenticated variants, security experts have extended it to themulti-party setting for over a decade and completed a formal analysis inthe framework of modern cryptography in the past few years. The presentpaper synthesizes this body of work on the provably-secure authenticatedgroup DH key exchange.

  18. Knowledge Management in the Neutronics Group of CAREM Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, L.; Lopasso, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: An analysis of the Neutronics Group of CAREM25 project was performed in order to plan for the gradual implementation of knowledge management. The group structure, performed tasks and the way these tasks are linked together were studied. Staff functions within the group, profiles of each position and the training and education of human resources were also analyzed. (author

  19. Signcryption-Based Key Management for MANETs Applications in Mobile Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jingfeng; ZHU Yuefei; ZHANG Yajuan; PAN Heng

    2006-01-01

    Mobile commerce uses wireless device and wireless link to result in the transfer of values in exchange of information, services or goods. Wireless mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) will bring a revolution to the business model of mobile commerce if such networks are used as the underlying network technology for mobile commerce. Mobile commerce will remain in a niche market until the security issue is properly addressed. Hence, security is also very important for MANET applications in mobile commerce. Robust key management is one of the most crucial technologies for security of MANETs. In this paper, a new solution for key management is proposed using identity-based (ID-based) signcryption and threshold secret sharing. It enables flexible and efficient key management while respecting the constraints of MANETs. In our solution, each mobile host uses its globally unique identity as its public key. It greatly decreases the computation and storage costs of mobile hosts, as well as communication cost for system key management.

  20. Applicability of DUKPT Key Management Scheme to Cloud Wallet and other Mobile Payments

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Amal; Sanyal, Sugata

    2014-01-01

    After discussing the concept of DUKPT based symmetric encryption key management (e.g., for 3DES) and definition of cloud or remote wallet, the paper analyses applicability of DUKPT to different use cases like mobile banking, NFC payment using EMV contactless card and mobile based EMV card emulation, web browser based transaction and cloud or remote wallet. Cloud wallet is an emerging payment method and is gaining momentum very fast. Anticipating that the wallet product managers and security s...

  1. Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses. During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership. The study was designed as a controlled study with a pretest/post-test design where the participants form their own control group. A group leadership course was given to 56 child healthcare nurses and evaluated in a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, a course evaluation and an interview with the course leaders. The child healthcare nurses felt their group leadership skills were strengthened and the majority (96%) felt that the course had changed their way of leading parental groups. They felt that the group leader role had been clarified and that they had obtained several new tools to use in their groups. Clarifying the role of group leader and adding knowledge about group leadership and dynamics seems to have increased the self-confidence for child healthcare nurses in group leadership. Improved confidence in group management might motivate the child healthcare nurses to further develop parental groups to attract the parents who currently choose not to participate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Group Policy Fundamentals, Security, and the Managed Desktop

    CERN Document Server

    Moskowitz, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The ultimate Group Policy guide-now updated for Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2!. IT and network administrators can streamline their Windows Server management tasks by using Group Policy tools to automate or implement rules, processes, or new security across the enterprise. In this comprehensive guide, Microsoft Group Policy MVP Jeremy Moskowitz thoroughly explores Group Policy across all Windows platforms, including the latest on Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2. If you're a Windows network administrator managing scores of users and computers, you need this essential reference on your desk.: Covers

  3. Patients’ Data Management System Protected by Identity-Based Authentication and Key Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Rivero-García

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A secure and distributed framework for the management of patients’ information in emergency and hospitalization services is proposed here in order to seek improvements in efficiency and security in this important area. In particular, confidentiality protection, mutual authentication, and automatic identification of patients are provided. The proposed system is based on two types of devices: Near Field Communication (NFC wristbands assigned to patients, and mobile devices assigned to medical staff. Two other main elements of the system are an intermediate server to manage the involved data, and a second server with a private key generator to define the information required to protect communications. An identity-based authentication and key exchange scheme is essential to provide confidential communication and mutual authentication between the medical staff and the private key generator through an intermediate server. The identification of patients is carried out through a keyed-hash message authentication code. Thanks to the combination of the aforementioned tools, a secure alternative mobile health (mHealth scheme for managing patients’ data is defined for emergency and hospitalization services. Different parts of the proposed system have been implemented, including mobile application, intermediate server, private key generator and communication channels. Apart from that, several simulations have been performed, and, compared with the current system, significant improvements in efficiency have been observed.

  4. Patients' Data Management System Protected by Identity-Based Authentication and Key Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-García, Alexandra; Santos-González, Iván; Hernández-Goya, Candelaria; Caballero-Gil, Pino; Yung, Moti

    2017-03-31

    A secure and distributed framework for the management of patients' information in emergency and hospitalization services is proposed here in order to seek improvements in efficiency and security in this important area. In particular, confidentiality protection, mutual authentication, and automatic identification of patients are provided. The proposed system is based on two types of devices: Near Field Communication (NFC) wristbands assigned to patients, and mobile devices assigned to medical staff. Two other main elements of the system are an intermediate server to manage the involved data, and a second server with a private key generator to define the information required to protect communications. An identity-based authentication and key exchange scheme is essential to provide confidential communication and mutual authentication between the medical staff and the private key generator through an intermediate server. The identification of patients is carried out through a keyed-hash message authentication code. Thanks to the combination of the aforementioned tools, a secure alternative mobile health (mHealth) scheme for managing patients' data is defined for emergency and hospitalization services. Different parts of the proposed system have been implemented, including mobile application, intermediate server, private key generator and communication channels. Apart from that, several simulations have been performed, and, compared with the current system, significant improvements in efficiency have been observed.

  5. Patients’ Data Management System Protected by Identity-Based Authentication and Key Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-García, Alexandra; Santos-González, Iván; Hernández-Goya, Candelaria; Caballero-Gil, Pino; Yung, Moti

    2017-01-01

    A secure and distributed framework for the management of patients’ information in emergency and hospitalization services is proposed here in order to seek improvements in efficiency and security in this important area. In particular, confidentiality protection, mutual authentication, and automatic identification of patients are provided. The proposed system is based on two types of devices: Near Field Communication (NFC) wristbands assigned to patients, and mobile devices assigned to medical staff. Two other main elements of the system are an intermediate server to manage the involved data, and a second server with a private key generator to define the information required to protect communications. An identity-based authentication and key exchange scheme is essential to provide confidential communication and mutual authentication between the medical staff and the private key generator through an intermediate server. The identification of patients is carried out through a keyed-hash message authentication code. Thanks to the combination of the aforementioned tools, a secure alternative mobile health (mHealth) scheme for managing patients’ data is defined for emergency and hospitalization services. Different parts of the proposed system have been implemented, including mobile application, intermediate server, private key generator and communication channels. Apart from that, several simulations have been performed, and, compared with the current system, significant improvements in efficiency have been observed. PMID:28362328

  6. From Loose Groups to Effective Teams: The Nine Key Factors of the Team Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, A. G.; Kakabadse, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    A loose group of individuals working on a task differs from an effective team on nine factors: clearly defined goals, priorities, roles and responsibilities, self-awareness, leadership, group dynamics, communications, content, and infrastructure. Ways to eliminate barriers and speed formation of effective teams could be based on those factors.…

  7. The Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group collecting outcomes mentoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The is a newsletter article for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group (WM DPG). The article presents the ‘Collecting Outcomes Mentoring Program’ for 2017 that is managed by the Research Section of the WM DPG. Dietitians in the WM DGP are provided wi...

  8. Factors facilitating dementia case management : Results of online focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. J. de Lange; E. Deusing; I.F.M. van Asch; J. Peeters; M. Zwaanswijk; A.M. Pot; A.L. Francke

    2016-01-01

    To obtain insight into facilitating factors for case management in dementia care, we conducted a qualitative study with 13 online focus groups (OFGs). Participants were professionals involved in dementia case management (N = 99). We used mind-maps and the method of constant comparison for analysis.

  9. KALwEN+: Practical Key Management Schemes for Gossip-Based Wireless Medical Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, Qiang; Law, Y.W.; Chen, Hongyang; Lai, X.; Yung, M.

    2010-01-01

    The constrained resources of sensors restrict the design of a key management scheme for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). In this work, we first formalize the security model of ALwEN, which is a gossip-based wireless medical sensor network (WMSN) for ambient assisted living. Our security model

  10. Securing Metering Infrastructure of Smart Grid: A Machine Learning and Localization Based Key Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Parvez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In smart cities, advanced metering infrastructure (AMI of the smart grid facilitates automated metering, control and monitoring of power distribution by employing a wireless network. Due to this wireless nature of communication, there exist potential threats to the data privacy in AMI. Decoding the energy consumption reading, injecting false data/command signals and jamming the networks are some hazardous measures against this technology. Since a smart meter possesses limited memory and computational capability, AMI demands a light, but robust security scheme. In this paper, we propose a localization-based key management system for meter data encryption. Data are encrypted by the key associated with the coordinate of the meter and a random key index. The encryption keys are managed and distributed by a trusted third party (TTP. Localization of the meter is proposed by a method based on received signal strength (RSS using the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE. The received packets are decrypted at the control center with the key mapped with the key index and the meter’s coordinates. Additionally, we propose the k-nearest neighbors (kNN algorithm for node/meter authentication, capitalizing further on data transmission security. Finally, we evaluate the security strength of a data packet numerically for our method.

  11. EMSODEV and EPOS-IP: key findings for effective management of EU research infrastructure projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, Paola; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Beranzoli, Laura; Cocco, Massimo; Favali, Paolo; Freda, Carmela; Sangianantoni, Agata

    2017-04-01

    -2019) is a project of 47 partners, 6 associate partners and several international organizations for a total of 25 countries involved. EPOS IP is a key step in EPOS' mission of a pan-European Earth science integrated platform. It will deliver not only a suite of domain-specific and multidisciplinary data and services in one platform, but also the legal, governance and financial frameworks to ensure the infrastructure future operation and sustainability (EPOS ERIC). INGV experience over the years indicates that effective management of EU RIs projects should contain 5 basic elements: 1.Defined life cycle and milestones: Map of phases, deliverables, key milestones and sufficiency criteria for each group involved in the project using project management tools and software. 2.Shared organization, systems, roles: Defined roles for team members and responsibilities for functional managers are crucial. Similarly, a system of communication and team involvement is essential to success. Leadership and interpersonal/organizational skills are also important. 3.Quality assurance: Quality dimension should be aligned to the project objectives and specific criteria should be identified for each phase of the project. 4.Tracking and variance analysis: Regular reports and periodic meetings of the teams are crucial to identify when things are off target. Schedule slips, cost overruns, open issues, new risks and problems must be dealt with as early as possible. 5.Impact assessment by monitoring the achievement of results and socio-economic impact.

  12. Key Performance Indicators for Maintenance Management Effectiveness of Public Hospital Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Omar Mardhiah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of management in maintenance aspect holds the key element in influencing the performance of overall maintenance management. Similarly, public hospital building needs an effective maintenance management as this type of building in nature is one of the most complex issues in the field of maintenance. Improper building maintenance management adopted by the organization significantly will interrupt the overall operation of the building. Therefore, this paper is aim to identifying the key performance indicator (KPI of effectiveness of maintenance management for the public hospital building. A total of 32 set of questionnaires were distributed to the maintenance manager for each hospital in the northern region of peninsular Malaysia by using self-administration strategy. The survey answer was analyzed by performing descriptive analysis in SPSS. Overall, the result of descriptive analysis shows that all the ten factors of effectiveness of maintenance management are accepted as KPI since the mean value is at least 3.93 which classified as important and significant. The most significant factor of effectiveness of maintenance management is task planning and scheduling with the mean score of 4.35. While less significant factor is identify as maintenance approach with the value of mean score is 3.93. The both results indicates that the management need to have well-structured planning for the maintenance works and also need to embrace the exact strategy of maintenance approach in order to achieved better overall performance of maintenance management. This study may draw a standard practice for the government in assessing the performance of public facilities in terms of maintenance management.

  13. Luminescence Dating Work From The Heidelberg Group: A Key Technology In Geoarchaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G. A.; Kadereit, A.

    Geoarchaeology is a growing discipline in archaeological science. It aims at the natural environment as context of past human societies and at the interaction between both, the environment and man as part of a joint ecosystem. This topic is also of considerable concern of present societies. Like other historic sciences, geoarchaeology requires accurate chronologies. Since one deals in geoarchaeology predominantly with sediments and rocks, luminescence methods play a key role. This is demonstrated in two case studies from Phlious in southern Greece and Nasca in southern Peru. The results show clearly climatically triggered social developments and feedbacks to the environment.

  14. A Lightweight Authentication and Key Management Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyang Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Security problem is one of the most popular research fields in wireless sensor networks for both the application requirement and the resource-constrained essence. An effective and lightweight Authentication and Key Management Scheme (AKMS is proposed in this paper to solve the problem of malicious nodes occurring in the process of networking and to offer a high level of security with low cost. For the condition that the mobile sensor nodes need to be authenticated, the keys in AKMS will be dynamically generated and adopted for security protection. Even when the keys are being compromised or captured, the attackers can neither use the previous keys nor misuse the authenticated nodes to cheat. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme provides more efficient security with less energy consumption for wireless sensor networks especially with mobile sensors.

  15. KEY ASPECTS OF MANAGING AN INNOVATION PROJECT IN THE EU FRAMEWORK PROGRAMME HORIZON 2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša M. Arsić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The program EU Horizon 2020 (ec.europa.eu is the largest source of resources for all legal entities from Europe, with the budget of 80 billion €. It is possible to use donations from the EU for various proposals and themes, from the 91 calls for projects, with subjects differing from sustainable transport to the innovation support of the SME sector. A group of Serbian authors decided to enter into somewhat of an ambitious endeavour (authors had individual experience on projects, they decided to send a project proposal in the framework of the „SME Instrument“ call, which is directed to inovation support project in the SME sector. The projects that are proposed for the financing by the EU Horizon 2020 program, are in the group of complex and very specific projects, so the authors presented the review of key aspects of projects that are engaged in realization of the inovation process that starts with a certain idea on paper, and ends with a verified product which is placed on the competitive EU market. The special chapter of this paper deals with the sinergy of the inovation project explorers, which must answer to the multidisciplinarity of research problems. The possibilities are examined in the research of the technical-technological sciences, by using organizational-informatic tools, developed for the needs of managing projects. The main use of this work for readers are illuminating of numerous unknown technical details regarding the proposal itself, and the process of connecting with the project partners, because the large number of proposals quits off right at the beginning. Then contribution is reflected in the fact that the paper signifies a sort of basis for a knowledge base, which can be served to higher education institutions and economy to focus a part of their intentions on lifting their own capacity for the struggle with the massive competition of EU that is expected in years and decades to come.

  16. The Platform Architecture and Key Technology of Cloud Service that Support Wisdom City Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xiao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the new requirement of constructing “resource sharing and service on demand” wisdom city system, this paper put forward the platform architecture of cloud service for wisdom city management which support IaaS, PaaS and SaaS three types of service model on the basis of researching the operation mode of the wisdom city which under cloud computing environment and through the research of mass storing technology of cloud data, building technology of cloud resource pool, scheduling management methods and monitoring technology of cloud resource, security management and control technology of cloud platform and other key technologies. The platform supports wisdom city system to achieve business or resource scheduling management optimization and the unified and efficient management of large-scale hardware and software, which has the characteristics of cross-domain resource scheduling, cross-domain data sharing, cross-domain facilities integration and cross-domain service integration.

  17. Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Rae

    2011-01-01

    In organizational behavior and management survey courses, students are likely to maximize certain career-appropriate knowledge when their classroom groups are leadered rather than leaderless. Using leadered groups facilitates the learning of the professional and managerial skills associated with formal leadership while reducing some problematic…

  18. Key environmental challenges for food groups and regions representing the variation within the EU, Ch.3 Salmon Aquaculture Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G., Ólafsdóttir; Andrade, Grace Patricia Viera; Nielsen, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    The report is aimed to give a thorough review of different environmental impacts that the food and drink sector are producing along the whole chain, from fork to farm and to assess which of them are the key environmental challenges for Europe. A representative range of product groups have been ch...... chosen: • Orange juice • Beef and dairy • Aquaculture (salmon)...

  19. Virtual communities, research groups and projects on IMS Learning Design. State of the art, key factors and forthcoming challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Burgos, D., Koper, R. (2005) Virtual communities, research groups and projects on IMS Learning Design. State of the art, key factors and forthcoming challenges. In E-Journal of Educational Research, Assessment and Evaluation, vol. 11, issue 2 [www.uv.es/RELIEVE]. Available at

  20. Group decision-making techniques for natural resource management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Beth A.K.; Armour, Carl L.

    1992-01-01

    This report is an introduction to decision analysis and problem-solving techniques for professionals in natural resource management. Although these managers are often called upon to make complex decisions, their training in the natural sciences seldom provides exposure to the decision-making tools developed in management science. Our purpose is to being to fill this gap. We present a general analysis of the pitfalls of group problem solving, and suggestions for improved interactions followed by the specific techniques. Selected techniques are illustrated. The material is easy to understand and apply without previous training or excessive study and is applicable to natural resource management issues.

  1. Self-esteem and anxiety: key issues in an abused women's support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpey, M L

    1989-01-01

    A support group was organized for women who sought help to cope with physical and emotional abuse from their male partners. Women who have lived through the cycle of violence may experience a stress response that includes fear, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. High anxiety can interfere with problem solving and with developing new coping patterns. Low self-esteem can accompany depression and intensify the sense of helplessness and powerlessness abused women feel. A descriptive study was conducted to determine to what extent women in the group experienced high anxiety and low self-esteem. Results indicated that high levels of anxiety and low self-esteem were present in the group. Anxiety reduction strategies and techniques to enhance self-esteem were developed.

  2. The role of enterprise asset management system in the PVO group`s business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervinen, J. [RAMSE Consulting Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation describes the role of the Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) and Enterprise Document Management (EDM) in the PVO Group`s business. The use of the functionality of the EAM (Immpower) and EDM (Documentum) is not limited only to the plant maintenance. All power plants and some other business functions and units will use the system in the future for financial management, activity based costing, purchasing, of materials, office supplies and fuel, invoice matching, project budgeting and costing, real estate management etc. The technical service concept of IT solution is also described in this presentation. The Information Management Strategy development as background to the project is also outlined together with the company information. The benefits of the common EAM system and related business process needs are also described. (orig.)

  3. The role of enterprise asset management system in the PVO group`s business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervinen, J [RAMSE Consulting Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-12-31

    This presentation describes the role of the Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) and Enterprise Document Management (EDM) in the PVO Group`s business. The use of the functionality of the EAM (Immpower) and EDM (Documentum) is not limited only to the plant maintenance. All power plants and some other business functions and units will use the system in the future for financial management, activity based costing, purchasing, of materials, office supplies and fuel, invoice matching, project budgeting and costing, real estate management etc. The technical service concept of IT solution is also described in this presentation. The Information Management Strategy development as background to the project is also outlined together with the company information. The benefits of the common EAM system and related business process needs are also described. (orig.)

  4. Consolidation of medical groups into physician practice management organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J C

    1998-01-14

    Medical groups are growing and merging to improve efficiency and bargaining leverage in the competitive managed care environment. An increasing number are affiliating with physician practice management (PPM) firms that offer capital financing, expertise in utilization management, and global capitation contracts with health insurance entities. These physician organizations provide an alternative to affiliation with a hospital system and to individual physician contracting with health plans. To describe the growth, structure, and strategy of PPM organizations that coordinate medical groups in multiple markets and contract with health maintenance organizations (HMOs). Case studies, including interviews with administrative and clinical leaders, review of company documents, and analysis of documents from investment bankers, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and industry observers. Medical groups and independent practice associations (IPAs) in California and New Jersey affiliated with MedPartners, FPA Medical Management, and UniMed. Growth in number of primary care and specialty care physicians employed by and contracting with affiliated medical groups; growth in patient enrollment from commercial, Medicare, and Medicaid HMOs; growth in capitation and noncapitation revenues; structure and governance of affiliated management service organizations and professional corporations; and contracting strategies with HMOs. Between 1994 and 1996, medical groups and IPAs affiliated with 3 PPMs grew from 3787 to 25763 physicians; 65% of employed physicians provide primary care, while the majority of contracting physicians provide specialty care. Patient enrollment in HMOs grew from 285503 to 3028881. Annual capitation revenues grew from $190 million to $2.1 billion. Medical groups affiliated with PPMs are capitated for most professional, hospital, and ancillary clinical services and are increasingly delegated responsibility by HMOs for utilization management and quality

  5. THE MANAGEMENT SUBSIDIARIES: CORPORATE GOVERNANCE MECHANISMS IN GROUP OF COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Tatulyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many holdings in the process of converting its organizational structure to face several new problems, which reduce the overall efficiency of the management of its group of companies. Most often these problems are related to the control activities of subsidiaries. Due to the large number of organizations in the group of companies the Supervisory Board has no possibility to monitor all the activities of its sub-sidiaries, as a result of which most of these "daughters" more freedom and opportunity to conduct their activities without agreeing it with top management. Group of companies or integrated structures imply a close interaction between companies and coordination of their activities in the moment and end-to-end operational control. The main study is how the parent organization may be based on legitimate mechanisms to manage the activities of the subsidiary. The article is devoted to the interaction between subsidiaries and the parent organization in the group companies. It also discusses a variety of mecha-nisms through which the parent organization may influence the decisions made by subsidiaries. There is a very actual problem of management and control over the activities of subsidiaries and affiliates group companies that have a well developed organizational structure, a large number of subsidiaries and lead-ing the activities of several types. These mechanisms have already proven international practice and are promising in terms of adaptation to the management structure of the Russian groups of companies that will allow you to create the best conditions for conducting control activities of subsidiaries. The article describes some of the most common tools for the management of subsidiaries, for example is the direct involvement of senior management or even the owners of parent organization in the work of the Board of Directors of the subsidiary. The article discusses the contradictions that arise in the organization of the procedure of

  6. Optimization of Key Parameters of Energy Management Strategy for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Using DIRECT Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Hao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rule-based logic threshold control strategy has been frequently used in energy management strategies for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs owing to its convenience in adjusting parameters, real-time performance, stability, and robustness. However, the logic threshold control parameters cannot usually ensure the best vehicle performance at different driving cycles and conditions. For this reason, the optimization of key parameters is important to improve the fuel economy, dynamic performance, and drivability. In principle, this is a multiparameter nonlinear optimization problem. The logic threshold energy management strategy for an all-wheel-drive HEV is comprehensively analyzed and developed in this study. Seven key parameters to be optimized are extracted. The optimization model of key parameters is proposed from the perspective of fuel economy. The global optimization method, DIRECT algorithm, which has good real-time performance, low computational burden, rapid convergence, is selected to optimize the extracted key parameters globally. The results show that with the optimized parameters, the engine operates more at the high efficiency range resulting into a fuel savings of 7% compared with non-optimized parameters. The proposed method can provide guidance for calibrating the parameters of the vehicle energy management strategy from the perspective of fuel economy.

  7. Efficient Key Management System for Large-scale Smart RFID Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fal Sadikin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to low-cost and its practical solution, the integration of RFID tag to the sensor node called smart RFID has become prominent solution in various fields including industrial applications. Nevertheless, the constrained nature of smart RFID system introduces tremendous security and privacy problem. One of them is the problem in key management system. Indeed, it is not feasible to recall all RFID tags in order to update their security properties (e.g. update their private keys. On the other hand, using common key management solution like standard TLS/SSL is too heavy-weight that can drain and overload the limited resources. Furthermore, most of existing solutions are highly susceptible to various threats reaching from privacy threats, physical attacks to various technics of Man-in-the-Middle attacks. This paper introduces novel key management system, tailored to the limited resources of smart RFID system. It proposes light-weight mutual authentication and identity protection to mitigate the existing threats.

  8. Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) - Materials and Waste Management in the United States Key Facts and Figures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Each year EPA produces a report called Advancing Sustainable Materials Management: Facts and Figures. It includes information on municipal solid waste (MSW)...

  9. A quick needs assessment of key stakeholder groups on the role of family medicine in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sanders

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Zambia is a nation of nine million people, and has too few physicians to meet the country’s health needs. Following the strategy of other sub-Saharan countries, Zambia has developed a training programme in family medicine to help improve the medical competencies of its physician workforce. A needs assessment was undertaken to better understand the landscape into which Zambian family medicine is being placed. Methods. In 2014, a nine-question survey in Likert-scale format was developed, validated, and then delivered to four stakeholder groups: (i practicing clinical physicians, (ii the general public, (iii the University of Zambia’s School of Medicine’s academic faculty and (iv medical students. The needs assessment was delivered through several different mechanisms: via web-based service, to respondents’ email addresses; in paper form, to population samples of convenience; and verbally, through face-to-face encounters. Results. The number of stakeholders from each group who responded to the needs assessment were: clinical physicians, 27; general public, 15; academic faculty, 14; and medical students, 31. Five of the nine survey statements achieved super-majority consensus, with >66% of stakeholders in each group agreeing. Two additional statements achieved a simple-majority consensus with >50% agreement within each stakeholder group. Conclusion. This survey suggests that there is a broad-based a priori understanding of family medicine in Zambia, and general agreement that its presence would be valuable to Zambia’s healthcare system.

  10. KEY ISSUES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: BREAKOUT GROUP REPORTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractOn the final afternoon of the Workshop, Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of 1) Use of Human Clinical Data; 2) Animal Models to Assess Food ...

  11. Modelling the exposure of wildlife to radiation: key findings and activities of IAEA working groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, Nicholas A. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Center, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, Jordi; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LM2E, Cadarache (France); Johansen, Mathew P. [ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Menai, NSW (Australia); Goulet, Richard [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Environmental Risk Assessment Division, 280 Slater, Ottawa, K1A0H3 (Canada); Wood, Michael D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (United States); Stark, Karolina; Bradshaw, Clare [Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Andersson, Pal [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16, Stockholm (Sweden); Copplestone, David [Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom); Yankovich, Tamara L.; Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, 1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    In total, participants from 14 countries, representing 19 organisations, actively participated in the model application/inter-comparison activities of the IAEA's EMRAS II programme Biota Modelling Group. A range of models/approaches were used by participants (e.g. the ERICA Tool, RESRAD-BIOTA, the ICRP Framework). The agreed objectives of the group were: 'To improve Member State's capabilities for protection of the environment by comparing and validating models being used, or developed, for biota dose assessment (that may be used) as part of the regulatory process of licensing and compliance monitoring of authorised releases of radionuclides.' The activities of the group, the findings of which will be described, included: - An assessment of the predicted unweighted absorbed dose rates for 74 radionuclides estimated by 10 approaches for five of the ICRPs Reference Animal and Plant geometries assuming 1 Bq per unit organism or media. - Modelling the effect of heterogeneous distributions of radionuclides in sediment profiles on the estimated exposure of organisms. - Model prediction - field data comparisons for freshwater ecosystems in a uranium mining area and a number of wetland environments. - An evaluation of the application of available models to a scenario considering radioactive waste buried in shallow trenches. - Estimating the contribution of {sup 235}U to dose rates in freshwater environments. - Evaluation of the factors contributing to variation in modelling results. The work of the group continues within the framework of the IAEA's MODARIA programme, which was initiated in 2012. The work plan of the MODARIA working group has largely been defined by the findings of the previous EMRAS programme. On-going activities of the working group, which will be described, include the development of a database of dynamic parameters for wildlife dose assessment and exercises involving modelling the exposure of organisms in the marine coastal

  12. RE: Forests and forest management plays a key role in mitigating climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Niclas Scott; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Larsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    as also reported by Naudts et al. By ignoring the link between forestry and fossil carbon pools and not considering development in the absence of forest management, there is no accounting for the effect on GHG emissions, and no basis for estimating the contribution of forest management to cl......The report by Naudts et al. concludes that forest management in Europe during the last 260 years has failed to result in net CO2 removal from the atmosphere. The authors have reached this conclusion through their failure to consider a key factor in their otherwise comprehensive analysis....... The authors present an analysis of net carbon emissions from forest, but omit substitution effects related to the link between forest management and the fossil carbon pool. The link between fossil and terrestrial carbon pools is however critical for modelling climate impacts. To conclude as they do...

  13. The challenge of employing and managing new graduate midwives in midwifery group practices in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Allison M; Denney-Wilson, E; Homer, C S E

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the views of midwifery managers and key stakeholders, regarding the facilitators and barriers to employing new graduate midwives in midwifery continuity of care models. Maternity services in Australia are shifting towards midwifery continuity of care models, where midwives work in small group practices, requiring a change to the management of staff. Public policy in Australia supports maternity services to be reconfigured in this way. Historically, experienced midwives work in these models, as demand grows; new graduates are employed to staff the models. A qualitative descriptive approach exploring the manager's experience of employing new graduate's in the models. Managers, clinical educators and hospital midwifery consultants (n = 15) were recruited by purposeful sampling. Drivers, enablers, facilitators and barriers to employing new graduates in the models were identified. Visionary leadership enabled the managers to employ new graduates in the models through initial and ongoing support. Managing the myths stemming from fear of employing new graduates to work in midwifery continuity of care models was challenging. Managers and other key stakeholders provide initial and ongoing support through orientation and providing a reduced workload. Visionary leadership can be seen as critical to supporting new graduates into midwifery continuity of care models. The challenges for management to overcome include managing the myths stemming from fear of employing new graduates to work in a flexible way around the needs of the women within an organisation culture. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Complex of Key Instruments of Management of Operation Activity of a Small Business Trade Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdyuk Vira M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article offers a complex of key instruments of management of operation activity of a small business trade enterprise, including: 1 budgeting of operation activity; 2 its accounting by norms and deviations from them; 3 monitoring of operational activity of an enterprise, which envisages analysis of revealed deviations. The article shows the most efficient way of realisation and practical use of the presented concept – application of the “standard-cost” scheme within the framework of which the following tasks are solved: 1 budgeting of income from operational activity; 2 establishment of standards of costs; 3 accumulation of data on factual income and expenditures; 4 analysis of deviations and reporting; and 5 introduction of necessary amendments. The article also offers an imitation model of analysis of dynamics of trade processes, which allows detection of key spheres of management of operation activity of a small trade enterprise and principles of carrying out an efficient and well thought over financial policy.

  15. A brief review on key technologies in the battery management system of electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kailong; Li, Kang; Peng, Qiao; Zhang, Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Batteries have been widely applied in many high-power applications, such as electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles, where a suitable battery management system (BMS) is vital in ensuring safe and reliable operation of batteries. This paper aims to give a brief review on several key technologies of BMS, including battery modelling, state estimation and battery charging. First, popular battery types used in EVs are surveyed, followed by the introduction of key technologies used in BMS. Various battery models, including the electric model, thermal model and coupled electro-thermal model are reviewed. Then, battery state estimations for the state of charge, state of health and internal temperature are comprehensively surveyed. Finally, several key and traditional battery charging approaches with associated optimization methods are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of risk management and financial performance of BMW Group

    OpenAIRE

    Mysina, Amira

    2017-01-01

    Effective risk and financial management possess a great challenge for the multinational companies operating globally. Despite the increasing development of diverse hedging strategies against foreign exchange risk, global firms cannot fully foresee and measure the degree of the impact of foreign currency fluctuations. This paper aims to evaluate the exchange risk management and financial performance of the BMW Group from the year 2005 to 2016. Moreover, this paper is devoted to provide explana...

  17. Omega West Reactor program management and communication key to successful Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mee, Stephen F.; Rendell, Keith R.; Peifer, Martin J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gallegos, John A. [National Nuclear Security Administration, P.O. Box 5400, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Straehr, James P.; Stringer, Joe B. [Framatome ANP, Tour AREVA, 92084 - Paris la Defense (France)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes what differentiates the Omega West Reactor (OWR) Decommissioning and Decontamination (D and D) Project from other projects with similar scope and how the project was successfully completed ahead of schedule. With less than 26 months to scope, schedule, advertise, select a contractor and complete the actual D and D, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) needed a new approach to form the foundation for the project's success and ensure that the project was completed on time and within the original contract value. This paper describes the three key elements of this new approach - including team building, strong project management and technical innovation. LANL and WD3, a joint venture between Framatome ANP, Inc. and Washington Group Inc., teamed through a fixed price best value contract to perform the D and D of the OWR. The project was initiated in an effort to reduce the risk to LANL facilities identified in the aftermath of the Cerro Grande fires. Between May 4 and June 10, 2000, a devastating wildfire swept across the Bandelier National Monument in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico and onto the Department of Energy's (DOE's) LANL. The Cerro Grande fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,500 acres of LANL property. Large areas of vegetation in the Jemez Mountains surrounding LANL were destroyed. The DOE, LANL, other federal agencies, and the State of New Mexico initiated prompt actions to identify and mitigate the risks from the fire aftermath. Assessments conducted after the fire determined that serious environmental and safety problems associated with flash floods, erosion, and contaminant run-off would persist at LANL for a number of years. Since the OWR was located in a potential flash flood area it was decided to accelerate the D and D of the facility. (authors)

  18. Omega West Reactor program management and communication key to successful Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, Stephen F.; Rendell, Keith R.; Peifer, Martin J.; Gallegos, John A.; Straehr, James P.; Stringer, Joe B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes what differentiates the Omega West Reactor (OWR) Decommissioning and Decontamination (D and D) Project from other projects with similar scope and how the project was successfully completed ahead of schedule. With less than 26 months to scope, schedule, advertise, select a contractor and complete the actual D and D, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) needed a new approach to form the foundation for the project's success and ensure that the project was completed on time and within the original contract value. This paper describes the three key elements of this new approach - including team building, strong project management and technical innovation. LANL and WD3, a joint venture between Framatome ANP, Inc. and Washington Group Inc., teamed through a fixed price best value contract to perform the D and D of the OWR. The project was initiated in an effort to reduce the risk to LANL facilities identified in the aftermath of the Cerro Grande fires. Between May 4 and June 10, 2000, a devastating wildfire swept across the Bandelier National Monument in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico and onto the Department of Energy's (DOE's) LANL. The Cerro Grande fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,500 acres of LANL property. Large areas of vegetation in the Jemez Mountains surrounding LANL were destroyed. The DOE, LANL, other federal agencies, and the State of New Mexico initiated prompt actions to identify and mitigate the risks from the fire aftermath. Assessments conducted after the fire determined that serious environmental and safety problems associated with flash floods, erosion, and contaminant run-off would persist at LANL for a number of years. Since the OWR was located in a potential flash flood area it was decided to accelerate the D and D of the facility. (authors)

  19. An oral epidemiological comparison of Chinese and New Zealand adults in 2 key age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Songlin; Thomson, William Murray

    2018-04-01

    To use recent national survey data to compare dentition status and oral diseases in China and New Zealand (NZ), with a particular focus on differences by sex and education level. We undertook secondary analysis of representative data from oral health surveys conducted in 2009 in Sichuan (China) and NZ. Both surveys had an oral examination component and collected detailed demographic data. Socioeconomic position in this analysis was represented by the highest level of education completed. Participants were allocated to 1 of 3 comparable ordinal categories of years of education (primary, middle or tertiary). Analyses used survey weights. The proportion of Chinese who had been educated to only primary level was 3 times higher than that among their NZ counterparts, and the proportion with a tertiary education was correspondingly lower. In the 35-44 age group, the dentate proportions were similar, although the mean number of teeth was higher in China than in NZ. There were substantial differences in dental caries experience, with the mean DMFT in NZ being almost 3 times that observed in China. New Zealanders had more filled teeth, but the prevalence of 1+ missing teeth was lower. Periodontitis was more common in the NZ sample than in the Chinese one, although the extent of bleeding on probing was almost 3 times higher among the latter. For the 65-74 age group, there were significant differences in dentition status, with greater tooth retention among Chinese people. There were also significant differences in dental caries experience, with Chinese 65- to 74-year-olds having more decayed teeth but fewer filled or missing teeth, and lower DMFT scores, on average. Periodontal health was better among the New Zealanders. There were notable differences by sex and education level. The differences observed in this study provide strong support for using broader sociocultural models of oral health. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Sources Management Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J. L.; Polansky, G. F.; Parks, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Sources Management Group (NISSMG) is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management and managed by Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL) to serve as a complex-wide resource for the management of DOE-owned Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Source (NISS) materials. NISS materials are defined as including: any isotope in sealed sources or standards; and isotopes, regardless of form, with atomic number less than 90. The NISSMG assists DOE sites with the storage, reuse, disposition, transportation, and processing of these materials. The NISSMG has focused its efforts to date at DOE closure sites due to the immediacy of their problems. Recently, these efforts were broadened to include closure facilities at non-closure sites. Eventually, the NISSMG plans to make its resources available to all DOE sites. This paper documents the lessons learned in managing NISS materials at DOE sites to date

  1. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique.

  2. Impact of a community-based diabetes self-management program on key metabolic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Characterize the impact of a pharmacist-led diabetes self-management program on three key metabolic parameters: glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP among employee health program participants. Methods: A self-insured company in the Kansas City metropolitan area began offering a pharmacist-led diabetes self-management program to eligible company employees and their dependents in 2008. A retrospective pre-post analysis was conducted to determine if the program affected key metabolic parameters in participants by determining mean change after one year of participation. Results: Among 183 program participants, 65 participants met inclusion criteria. All three key metabolic parameters were significantly reduced from baseline to one year of program participation: HbA1c decreased from 8.1% to 7.3% (p=0.007; LDL-C decreased from 108.3 mg/dL to 96.4 mg/dL (p=0.009; and MAP decreased from 96.1 to 92.3 mm Hg (p=0.005. Conclusions: The pharmacist-led diabetes self-management program demonstrated significant reductions in HbA1c, LDL-C, and MAP from baseline to one year of program participation. Improvements were statistically significant and clinically relevant for each parameter. Previous studies indicate these reductions may cause reduced overall healthcare costs.

  3. Renormalization group invariance and optimal QCD renormalization scale-setting: a key issues review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Ma, Yang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Fu, Hai-Bing; Ma, Hong-Hao; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mojaza, Matin

    2015-12-01

    A valid prediction for a physical observable from quantum field theory should be independent of the choice of renormalization scheme—this is the primary requirement of renormalization group invariance (RGI). Satisfying scheme invariance is a challenging problem for perturbative QCD (pQCD), since a truncated perturbation series does not automatically satisfy the requirements of the renormalization group. In a previous review, we provided a general introduction to the various scale setting approaches suggested in the literature. As a step forward, in the present review, we present a discussion in depth of two well-established scale-setting methods based on RGI. One is the ‘principle of maximum conformality’ (PMC) in which the terms associated with the β-function are absorbed into the scale of the running coupling at each perturbative order; its predictions are scheme and scale independent at every finite order. The other approach is the ‘principle of minimum sensitivity’ (PMS), which is based on local RGI; the PMS approach determines the optimal renormalization scale by requiring the slope of the approximant of an observable to vanish. In this paper, we present a detailed comparison of the PMC and PMS procedures by analyzing two physical observables R e+e- and Γ(H\\to b\\bar{b}) up to four-loop order in pQCD. At the four-loop level, the PMC and PMS predictions for both observables agree within small errors with those of conventional scale setting assuming a physically-motivated scale, and each prediction shows small scale dependences. However, the convergence of the pQCD series at high orders, behaves quite differently: the PMC displays the best pQCD convergence since it eliminates divergent renormalon terms; in contrast, the convergence of the PMS prediction is questionable, often even worse than the conventional prediction based on an arbitrary guess for the renormalization scale. PMC predictions also have the property that any residual dependence on

  4. Hamming's "open doors" and group creativity as keys to scientific excellence: the example of Cambridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, Thomas C

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Charlton used diverse approaches to identify research institutions which provided home to outstanding scientists and work. One intriguing example of long-lasting scientific excellence is Cambridge with 19 Nobel laureates who worked at the University or at the MRC Molecular Biology Unit when they received the prize between 1947 and 2006. With specific reference to Cambridge, I would like to complement the primarily quantitative assessment and offer considerations as to why and how research achievements may have clustered in space and time. Indeed, observations voiced by the mathematician Richard Hamming as to how great research can be pursued offer explanations for the series of great science in the UK. In my view, the most important determinant of the clustering may be illustrated by Hamming's fitting picture of "open doors": working in environments with the doors open allows constant interactions with peers with various disciplinary backgrounds, and thus fast avoidance of detours or dead ends in science and, ultimately, a focus on and the solution of problems of paramount, rather than of tangential, importance. Narrative insights into a strong argumentative tradition at Cambridge provided by Drs. Watson and Magueijo between 1968 and 2003 are in line with Hamming's suggestion and the value of group creativity. In the internet age with abundant interactions beyond home institutions we should not be surprised if clusters of great science were no longer confined to the usual suspect institutions which were awarded disproportionally with Nobel prizes in the past.

  5. What are the key food groups to target for preventing obesity and improving nutrition in schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A C; Swinburn, B A

    2004-02-01

    To determine differences in the contribution of foods and beverages to energy consumed in and out of school, and to compare consumption patterns between school canteen users and noncanteen users. Cross-sectional National Nutrition Survey, 1995. Australia. SUBJECTS ON SCHOOL DAYS: A total of 1656 children aged 5-15 y who had weekday 24-h dietary recall data. An average of 37% of total energy intake was consumed at school. Energy-dense foods and beverages such as fat spreads, packaged snacks, biscuits and fruit/cordial drinks made a greater contribution to energy intake at school compared to out of school (Pfoods and soft drinks contributed 11 and 3% of total energy intake; however, these food groups were mostly consumed out of school. Fruit intake was low and consumption was greater in school. In all, 14% of children purchased food from the canteen and they obtained more energy from fast food, packaged snacks, desserts, milk and confectionary (Pfoods and beverages are over-represented in the Australian school environment. To help prevent obesity and improve nutrition in schools, biscuits, snack bars and fruit/cordial drinks brought from home and fast food, packaged snacks, and confectionary sold at canteens should be replaced with fruit and water.

  6. Location-Aware Dynamic Session-Key Management for Grid-Based Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsien Lin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Security is a critical issue for sensor networks used in hostile environments. When wireless sensor nodes in a wireless sensor network are distributed in an insecure hostile environment, the sensor nodes must be protected: a secret key must be used to protect the nodes transmitting messages. If the nodes are not protected and become compromised, many types of attacks against the network may result. Such is the case with existing schemes, which are vulnerable to attacks because they mostly provide a hop-by-hop paradigm, which is insufficient to defend against known attacks. We propose a location-aware dynamic session-key management protocol for grid-based wireless sensor networks. The proposed protocol improves the security of a secret key. The proposed scheme also includes a key that is dynamically updated. This dynamic update can lower the probability of the key being guessed correctly. Thus currently known attacks can be defended. By utilizing the local information, the proposed scheme can also limit the flooding region in order to reduce the energy that is consumed in discovering routing paths.

  7. Clinical risk management in hospitals: strategy, central coordination and dialogue as key enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, Matthias; Manser, Tanja; Kessler, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    The study aims to identify key enablers fostering clinical risk management (CRM) in hospitals to guide health care in this vital area of patient safety. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the national level in 324 Swiss hospitals in 2007-2008 to assess the relationship between key elements and systematic CRM. Therefore, a comprehensive monitoring instrument for CRM was used for the first time. Organizational factors (e.g. strategy, coordination, resources) and structural conditions (e.g. hospital size) were tested as key elements. CRM was assessed by evaluating its maturity (i.e. the level of CRM development) by 12 theoretically derived indices joining together essential aspects of CRM at the hospital level and the service level. Chi-square measures were used to analyse the relationships between organizational factors or structural conditions and maturity of CRM. Participation in this voluntary survey was good, with CRM experts of 138 out of 324 hospitals responding (response rate 43%). Three key enablers for CRM were identified: implementing a function for central CRM coordination, assuring dialogue with and between the different hospital services, and developing strategic CRM objectives. This study offers, for the first time, an assessment of the maturity of hospitals' CRM and identifies key enablers related to CRM. This is a feasible first step in guiding hospitals to shape their CRM and presents a basis for future studies, for example, linking CRM to outcome data. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. A new species of Chilicola from Bahia, Brazil (Hymenoptera, Colletidae, with a key to the species of the megalostigma group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favizia Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The bee genus Chilicola Spinola (Xeromelissinae is recorded from the State of Bahia, Brazil for the first time, based on a new species of the megalostigma group of the subgenus Hylaeosoma Ashmead. Chilicola (Hylaeosoma kevani sp. n. is described and figured from males collected in Wesceslau Guimarães, Bahia. The species can be distinguished on the basis of coloration, size, integumental sculpturing, and structure of the hidden metasomal sterna and genitalia. A revised key to the species of the megalostigma group is provided.

  9. The Proposal of Key Performance Indicators in Facility Management and Determination the Weights of Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbalová, Jarmila; Vilčeková, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    The practice of facilities management is rapidly evolving with the increasing interest in the discourse of sustainable development. The industry and its market are forecasted to develop to include non-core functions, activities traditionally not associated with this profession, but which are increasingly being addressed by facilities managers. The scale of growth in the built environment and the consequential growth of the facility management sector is anticipated to be enormous. Key Performance Indicators (KPI) are measure that provides essential information about performance of facility services delivery. In selecting KPI, it is critical to limit them to those factors that are essential to the organization reaching its goals. It is also important to keep the number of KPI small just to keep everyone's attention focused on achieving the same KPIs. This paper deals with the determination of weights of KPI of FM in terms of the design and use of sustainable buildings.

  10. Conditioning Factors for Group Management in Blended Learning Scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Sanagustín, Mar; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Blat, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Pérez-Sanagustín, M., Hernández-Leo D., & Blat, J. (accepted). Conditioning Factors for Group Management in Blended Learning Scenarios. The 9th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies. July, 14-18, 2009, Riga, Latvia.

  11. Class Management and Homogeneous Grouping in Kindergarten Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guanglei; Pelletier, Janette; Hong, Yihua; Corter, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold. Firstly the authors examine, given the amount of time allocated to literacy instruction, whether homogeneous grouping helps improve class manageability over the kindergarten year and whether individual students' externalizing problem behaviors will decrease in tandem. Secondly, they investigate whether the…

  12. Strategic Approach to Group Anger Management with Incarcerated Murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Susan; Brown, Lillian G.

    1991-01-01

    Incarcerated male murderers manifested consistent changes in attitudes toward treatment efficacy and their culpability as function of participating in 12-week anger management groups. Four qualitatively different stages were evident during treatment as prisoners' resistive responses were actively encouraged: initial apathy, emerging interest in…

  13. Key factors of case management interventions for frequent users of healthcare services: a thematic analysis review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Lambert, Mireille; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Bouliane, Danielle; Beaudin, Jérémie

    2017-10-22

    The aim of this paper was to identify the key factors of case management (CM) interventions among frequent users of healthcare services found in empirical studies of effectiveness. Thematic analysis review of CM studies. We built on a previously published review that aimed to report the effectiveness of CM interventions for frequent users of healthcare services, using the Medline, Scopus and CINAHL databases covering the January 2004-December 2015 period, then updated to July 2017, with the keywords 'CM' and 'frequent use'. We extracted factors of successful (n=7) and unsuccessful (n=6) CM interventions and conducted a mixed thematic analysis to synthesise findings. Chaudoir's implementation of health innovations framework was used to organise results into four broad levels of factors: (1) ,environmental/organisational level, (2) practitioner level, (3) patient level and (4) programme level. Access to, and close partnerships with, healthcare providers and community services resources were key factors of successful CM interventions that should target patients with the greatest needs and promote frequent contacts with the healthcare team. The selection and training of the case manager was also an important factor to foster patient engagement in CM. Coordination of care, self-management support and assistance with care navigation were key CM activities. The main issues reported by unsuccessful CM interventions were problems with case finding or lack of care integration. CM interventions for frequent users of healthcare services should ensure adequate case finding processes, rigorous selection and training of the case manager, sufficient intensity of the intervention, as well as good care integration among all partners. Other studies could further evaluate the influence of contextual factors on intervention impacts. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted

  14. Sealed Radioactive Sources. Information, Resources, and Advice for Key Groups about Preventing the Loss of Control over Sealed Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    Among its many activities to improve the safety and security of sealed sources, the IAEA has been investigating the root causes of major accidents and incidents since the 1980's and publishes findings so that others can learn from them. There are growing concerns today about the possibility that an improperly stored source could be stolen and used for malicious purposes. To improve both safety and security, information needs to be in the hands of those whose actions and decisions can prevent a source from being lost or stolen in the first place. The IAEA developed this booklet to help improve communication with key groups about hazards that may result from the loss of control over sealed radioactive sources and measures that should be implemented to prevent such loss of control. Many people may benefit from the information contained in this booklet, particularly those working with sources and those likely to be involved if control over a source is lost; especially: officials in government agencies, first responders, medical users, industrial users and the metal recycling industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety. This booklet is comprised of several stand-alone chapters intended to communicate with these key groups. Various accidents that are described and information that is provided are relevant to more than one key group and therefore, some information is repeated throughout the booklet. This booklet seeks to raise awareness of the importance of the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. However, it is not intended to be a comprehensive 'how to' guide for implementing safety and security measures for sealed radioactive sources. For more information on these measures, readers are encouraged to consult the key IAEA safety and security-related publications identified in this booklet

  15. A secure effective dynamic group password-based authenticated key agreement scheme for the integrated EPR information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanga Odelu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of the Internet, a lot of electronic patient records (EPRs have been developed for e-medicine systems. The security and privacy issues of EPRs are important for the patients in order to understand how the hospitals control the use of their personal information, such as name, address, e-mail, medical records, etc. of a particular patient. Recently, Lee et al. proposed a simple group password-based authenticated key agreement protocol for the integrated EPR information system (SGPAKE. However, in this paper, we show that Lee et al.’s protocol is vulnerable to the off-line weak password guessing attack and as a result, their scheme does not provide users’ privacy. To withstand this security weakness found in Lee et al.’s scheme, we aim to propose an effective dynamic group password-based authenticated key exchange scheme for the integrated EPR information system, which retains the original merits of Lee et al.’s scheme. Through the informal and formal security analysis, we show that our scheme provides users’ privacy, perfect forward security and known-key security, and also protects online and offline password guessing attacks. Furthermore, our scheme efficiently supports the dynamic group password-based authenticated key agreement for the integrated EPR information system. In addition, we simulate our scheme for the formal security verification using the widely-accepted AVISPA (Automated Validation of Internet Security Protocols and Applications tool and show that our scheme is secure against passive and active attacks.

  16. Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG and Hospital Business Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szynkiewicz Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present the possibility of using Diagnosis- Related Groups (DRG in the hospital management process and to analyse the need for business performance management on the part of hospital management staff. The following research methods were used: literature analysis, case studies, and poll analysis. It is not possible to increase the effectiveness of operation of healthcare entities without increasing the importance of IT systems and using DRG more effectively in the management process. Training users in IT and the use of DRGs is important to achieving hospital effectiveness. The increased importance of analyses and planning in a hospital should be reflected in the organisational structure of service providers. Hospital controllers should have a similar role to those present in most companies in other industries.

  17. Group handoff management in low power microcell-femtocell network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis De

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical model of group based hand-off management based on bird flocking behavior. In the proposed scheme, a number of mobile devices form a group if these devices move together for a long time duration. Although call delivery or call generation are performed individually, hand-off is performed in a group. Dynamic group formation, group division and group merging methods are proposed in this paper. From the simulation results it is demonstrated that approximately 75%, 65% and 90% reduction in power, cost and latency consumption can be obtained respectively using group hand-off management. Thus the proposed scheme is referred as green, economic and fast hand-off strategy. In this paper instead of a macrocell network, a microcell-femtocell network is considered as the transmission power of a microcell or a femtocell base station is much less than a macrocell base station. Simulation results present that the microcell-femtocell network achieves approximately 25–55% and 35–55% reduction in power transmission, and 50–65% and 15–45% reduction in path loss than only a macrocell network and macrocell-femtocell network respectively. Thus microcell-femtocell network is a power-efficient network.

  18. The management of social problems talk in a support group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Gomes Peretti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the health-disease process from a multifactorial perspective has allowed important transformations in the healthcare practices. In this article, we discuss the use of the support group as a resource for mental health care, analyzing how conversations about social issues are managed in this context. Based on contributions from the social constructionist movement, we analyzed the transcripts of the conversations developed in meetings of a support group offered to patients of a mental health outpatient clinic. The analysis of the process of meaning making indicates that the discourse of the social influence on mental health is not legitimized, due to a predominant individualistic discourse, which psychologizes care and is centered on the emotional analysis of the problems of the quotidian. We argue that this mode of management brings limits to the construction of the group as a device for promoting autonomy and encouraging the social transformation processes.

  19. The integrated supplier: key to cost management and multi-franchise capitation contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuweiler, R C

    1996-05-01

    Capitation...most healthcare providers do not work under it, comprehend it, or even want it, yet supply capitation contracting seminars are popping up everywhere creating the feeling that the bandwagon is leaving, and it might be time to get on board. Not true. Supply capitation is not for all organizations. Capitation contracting is not easy and there are not many successful models to help the uninitiated. If a panacea is sought for reducing supply costs, capitation is only one component of a systematic strategy to reduce materiel costs. This article suggests a direction using the Group Health Materiel Management (Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, WA) experience as a point of reference. It advocates a systematic approach that focuses on expense reduction in: cost of goods, holding cost of inventory, labor cost associated with all materiel processes, distribution cost (transportation and par stock pick, pack, and replenishment), product utilization, variation in product standards, and waste stream byproducts. At Group Health (GH) these issues are primarily addressed through the use of: information systems, supplier certification/selection processes, group purchasing compliance, supply channel management, supply capitation contracting programs, standardization, and utilization management. Because of managed care organizational structure, Group Health Cooperative supply capitation contracting, as performed at GH, is discussed not as a quick fix solution but in the spirit of sharing our experience with others who may be considering it as a cost savings tactic in the context of a broad-based materiel management strategy. This article highlights the experiences of GH beginning with materiel management's business process assumptions toward multiple-franchise supply capitation.

  20. Conceptual framework for holistic dialysis management based on key performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hu-Chen; Itoh, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    This paper develops a theoretical framework of holistic hospital management based on performance indicators that can be applied to dialysis hospitals, clinics or departments in Japan. Selection of a key indicator set and its validity tests were performed primarily by a questionnaire survey to dialysis experts as well as their statements obtained through interviews. The expert questionnaire asked respondents to rate the degree of "usefulness" for each of 66 indicators on a three-point scale (19 responses collected). Applying the theoretical framework, we selected a minimum set of key performance indicators for dialysis management that can be used in the Japanese context. The indicator set comprised 27 indicators and items that will be collected through three surveys: patient satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and safety culture. The indicators were confirmed by expert judgment from viewpoints of face, content and construct validity as well as their usefulness. This paper established a theoretical framework of performance measurement for holistic dialysis management from primary healthcare stakeholders' perspectives. In this framework, performance indicators were largely divided into healthcare outcomes and performance shaping factors. Indicators of the former type may be applied for the detection of operational problems or weaknesses in a dialysis hospital, clinic or department, while latent causes of each problem can be more effectively addressed by the latter type of indicators in terms of process, structure and culture/climate within the organization. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  1. Mobile Device Based Dynamic Key Management Protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Ling Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, wireless sensor network (WSN applications have tended to transmit data hop by hop, from sensor nodes through cluster nodes to the base station. As a result, users must collect data from the base station. This study considers two different applications: hop by hop transmission of data from cluster nodes to the base station and the direct access to cluster nodes data by mobile users via mobile devices. Due to the hardware limitations of WSNs, some low-cost operations such as symmetric cryptographic algorithms and hash functions are used to implement a dynamic key management. The session key can be updated to prevent threats of attack from each communication. With these methods, the data gathered in wireless sensor networks can be more securely communicated. Moreover, the proposed scheme is analyzed and compared with related schemes. In addition, an NS2 simulation is developed in which the experimental results show that the designed communication protocol is workable.

  2. COST ACCOUNTING AS THE KEY INFORMATION CORE OF THE COMPANY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Jablan STEFANOVIĆ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The management is expected to lead the company towards the achievement of set objectives which, in the contemporary settings of marked external and internal complexity, inevitably requires sophisticated expert knowledge and skills, as well as quality information support. Cost accounting generates cost and performance information with the goal of qualitatively meeting information needs of, above all, internal users. It represents the essential part of the company’s accounting information system as a whole and it is often stressed as the key information core and a reliable information support for the company’s management in performing their managerial activities. The contemporary business environment inevitably requires the restructuring of cost accounting and new approaches to costing and cost management, in the attempt to improve the quality of cost information that has always been the object of particular interest. Moreover, only a flexibly designed cost accounting information system can qualitatively respond to the increasingly numerous and various information requirements. In this paper we discuss the role cost accounting has in offering adequate information support to managers at all managerial levels. We emphasize some of the new tools, techniques, concepts and approaches to costing and cost management

  3. A multicenter prospective cohort study on camera navigation training for key user groups in minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafland, Maurits; Bok, Kiki; Schreuder, Henk W R; Schijven, Marlies P

    2014-06-01

    Untrained laparoscopic camera assistants in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) may cause suboptimal view of the operating field, thereby increasing risk for errors. Camera navigation is often performed by the least experienced member of the operating team, such as inexperienced surgical residents, operating room nurses, and medical students. The operating room nurses and medical students are currently not included as key user groups in structured laparoscopic training programs. A new virtual reality laparoscopic camera navigation (LCN) module was specifically developed for these key user groups. This multicenter prospective cohort study assesses face validity and construct validity of the LCN module on the Simendo virtual reality simulator. Face validity was assessed through a questionnaire on resemblance to reality and perceived usability of the instrument among experts and trainees. Construct validity was assessed by comparing scores of groups with different levels of experience on outcome parameters of speed and movement proficiency. The results obtained show uniform and positive evaluation of the LCN module among expert users and trainees, signifying face validity. Experts and intermediate experience groups performed significantly better in task time and camera stability during three repetitions, compared to the less experienced user groups (P < .007). Comparison of learning curves showed significant improvement of proficiency in time and camera stability for all groups during three repetitions (P < .007). The results of this study show face validity and construct validity of the LCN module. The module is suitable for use in training curricula for operating room nurses and novice surgical trainees, aimed at improving team performance in minimally invasive surgery. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. THE FORMATION OF CONSCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT GROUPS IN ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neisa Maria, Martins da Cunha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents theoretical proposals, as the Theory of Human Relations, especially the Theory of Group Dynamics and the Conscience Formation, which promote understanding and support for the conduct of the leaders in team management, aiming at a route suitable for questions, reflections, enabling new perceptions of self-consciousness, as Hegel says. It is worth highlighting that through these considerations, it becomes possible to conduct more realistic impacts triggered in the organizational culture, as from a better management of interpersonal relationships within teams, these teams have a training goal or not.

  5. The clinical role of lecturers in nursing in Ireland: perceptions from key stakeholder groups in nurse education on the role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskell, Pauline; Murphy, Kathleen; Shaw, David

    2009-10-01

    The clinical role of lecturers in nursing has been a focus of debate since the integration of nurse education into higher education institutions. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from the preliminary phase of a study, undertaken to investigate the perceptions of key stakeholder groups in nurse education, regarding the current clinical role of nurse lecturers in Ireland. A descriptive exploratory design was used involving focus group and individual interviews, soliciting views of purposefully selected educationalists, clinicians, policy formulators and students. The issue was examined from a policy perspective, aiming to collectively represent views of all participant groups. This approach facilitated a more complete picture of perceptions of the role to emerge, to better inform future decision making. Twenty two focus group interviews and twenty one individual interviews were conducted. Content analysis was used to identify themes. All groups were in agreement that role definition was urgently required to dispel ambiguities surrounding what the clinical role should involve. Conflicting views were evident among groups regarding lecturers' clinical credibility, visibility and teaching effectiveness. Findings highlight the essential nature of nurse lecturers engaging with clinical areas to maintain their skills, demonstrate a value for the practice component of the role and provide a link between education and practice.

  6. Research on and design of key circuits in RFID tag chip for container management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the design of semi-passive RFID tag chip capable of monitoring container safety. A system framework complying with requirements by ISO/IEC 18000-6C is firstly presented, and then differences from the key units of common passive chip, such as switch-state monitoring circuit, power management unit and anti-shake design in baseband processor, are elaborated. The main function of such a chip is to record the container opening frequency during transportation. Finally, the realizations of each unit’s function are simulated.

  7. Lifetime assessment and lifetime management for key components of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Yikang; Sun Hanhong; Qu Jiadi

    2000-01-01

    On the bases of investigation on recent development of plant lifetime management in the world, the author gives some points of view on how to establish plant lifetime assessment (PLA) and management (PLM) systems for Chinese nuclear power plants. The main points lie in: 1) safety regulatory organizations, utilities and R and D institutes work cooperatively for PLA and PLM; 2) PLA and PLM make a interdependent cycle, which means that a good PLM system ensures authentic input for PLA, while veritable PLA provides valuable feedback for PLM improvement; 3) PLA and PLM should be initiated for some key components. The author also analyzes some important problems to be tackled in PLA and PLM from the view angle of a R and D institute

  8. Management of Assortment Inventory Groups in Selected Foundry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymszal J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As experience shows the practical, reliable assessment and optimisation of total costs of logistical processes implemented in supply chains of foundry plants is a quite complex and complicated process, because it requires to enclose all, without exception, performed actions, including them in various reference cross-sections, systematic activities and finally transforming them in a totally homogenous collection. Only solid analysis and assessment of assortment management in logistical supply systems in foundry plants of particular assortment groups allows to lower the supply costs significantly. In the article the analysis and assessment of the newest implemented optimising algorithms are presented in the process stock management of selected material groups used in a production process of a chosen foundry plant. A practical solution to solve a problem of rotary stock cost minimisation is given as well as of costs while creating a stock with the usage of economical volume and value of order.

  9. Emergency management in health: key issues and challenges in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew C K; Phillips, Wendy; Challen, Kirsty; Goodacre, Steve

    2012-10-19

    Emergency planning in the UK has grown considerably in recent years, galvanised by the threat of terrorism. However, deficiencies in NHS emergency planning were identified and the evidence-base that underpins it is questionable. Inconsistencies in terminologies and concepts also exist. Different models of emergency management exist internationally but the optimal system is unknown. This study examines the evidence-base and evidence requirements for emergency planning in the UK health context. The study involved semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and opinion leaders. Purposive sampling was used to obtain a breadth of views from various agencies involved in emergency planning and response. Interviews were then analysed using a grounded approach using standard framework analysis techniques. We conducted 17 key informant interviews. Interviewees identified greater gaps in operational than technical aspects of emergency planning. Social and behavioural knowledge gaps were highlighted with regards to how individuals and organisations deal with risk and behave in emergencies. Evidence-based approaches to public engagement and for developing community resilience to disasters are lacking. Other gaps included how knowledge was developed and used. Conflicting views with regards to the optimal configuration and operation of the emergency management system were voiced. Four thematic categories for future research emerged:(i) Knowledge-base for emergency management: Further exploration is needed of how knowledge is acquired, valued, disseminated, adopted and retained.(ii) Social and behavioural issues: Greater understanding of how individuals approach risk and behave in emergencies is required.(iii) Organisational issues in emergencies: Several conflicting organisational issues were identified; value of planning versus plans, flexible versus standardized procedures, top-down versus bottom-up engagement, generic versus specific planning, and reactive versus

  10. Managing Uncertainties Associated With Radioactive Waste Disposal: Task Group 4 Of The IAEA PRISM Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, R.

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the results of safety assessment calculations provide an important contribution to the safety arguments for a disposal facility, but cannot in themselves adequately demonstrate the safety of the disposal system. The safety assessment and a broader range of arguments and activities need to be considered holistically to justify radioactive waste disposal at any particular site. Many programs are therefore moving towards the production of what has become known as a Safety Case, which includes all of the different activities that are conducted to demonstrate the safety of a disposal concept. Recognizing the growing interest in the concept of a Safety Case, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is undertaking an intercomparison and harmonization project called PRISM (Practical Illustration and use of the Safety Case Concept in the Management of Near-surface Disposal). The PRISM project is organized into four Task Groups that address key aspects of the Safety Case concept: Task Group 1 - Understanding the Safety Case; Task Group 2 - Disposal facility design; Task Group 3 - Managing waste acceptance; and Task Group 4 - Managing uncertainty. This paper addresses the work of Task Group 4, which is investigating approaches for managing the uncertainties associated with near-surface disposal of radioactive waste and their consideration in the context of the Safety Case. Emphasis is placed on identifying a wide variety of approaches that can and have been used to manage different types of uncertainties, especially non-quantitative approaches that have not received as much attention in previous IAEA projects. This paper includes discussions of the current results of work on the task on managing uncertainty, including: the different circumstances being considered, the sources/types of uncertainties being addressed and some initial proposals for approaches that can be used to manage different types of uncertainties.

  11. Key Technologies in the Context of Future Networks: Operational and Management Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Isabel Barona López

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Future Networks is based on the premise that current infrastructures require enhanced control, service customization, self-organization and self-management capabilities to meet the new needs in a connected society, especially of mobile users. In order to provide a high-performance mobile system, three main fields must be improved: radio, network, and operation and management. In particular, operation and management capabilities are intended to enable business agility and operational sustainability, where the addition of new services does not imply an excessive increase in capital or operational expenditures. In this context, a set of key-enabled technologies have emerged in order to aid in this field. Concepts such as Software Defined Network (SDN, Network Function Virtualization (NFV and Self-Organized Networks (SON are pushing traditional systems towards the next 5G network generation.This paper presents an overview of the current status of these promising technologies and ongoing works to fulfill the operational and management requirements of mobile infrastructures. This work also details the use cases and the challenges, taking into account not only SDN, NFV, cloud computing and SON but also other paradigms.

  12. Modelling management process of key drivers for economic sustainability in the modern conditions of economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishchulina E.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The text is about issues concerning the management of driver for manufacturing enterprise economic sustainability and manufacturing enterprise sustainability assessment as the key aspect of the management of enterprise economic sustainability. The given issues become topical as new requirements for the methods of manufacturing enterprise management in the modern conditions of market economy occur. An economic sustainability model that is considered in the article is an integration of enterprise economic growth, economic balance of external and internal environment and economic sustainability. The method of assessment of economic sustainability of a manufacturing enterprise proposed in the study allows to reveal some weaknesses in the enterprise performance, and untapped reserves, which can be further used to improve the economic sustainability and efficiency of the enterprise. The management of manufacturing enterprise economic sustainability is one of the most important factors of business functioning and development in modern market economy. The relevance of this trend is increasing in accordance with the objective requirements of the growing volumes of production and sale, the increasing complexity of economic relations, changing external environment of an enterprise.

  13. Toward a national policy for managing low-level radioactive waste: key issues and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, C.J.; Mantell, M.; Thompson, G.P.

    1981-06-01

    The Conservation Foundation, a not-for-profit research and public education organization, asked individuals with diverse backgrounds and viewpoints to come together under Foundation leadership as a Dialogue Group on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management. The group, including persons who represent waste generators, concerned citizens, state regulators, and environmentalists, met over an 18-month period to discuss issues crucial to the development of a national policy on low-level wastes. The Dialogue Group agreed that three principles, if accepted broadly, would form the basis of a sound national policy for managing low-level radioactive wastes: with proper implementation, technology exists to manage low-level waste safely; generators and their customers should pay disposal costs; and greater public involvement at all stages can improve the disposal system. These principles acted as polestars for the group as it worked toward a series of policy recommendations in four main areas: (1) cleaning up closed commercial sites; (2) remodeling a system for defining and classifying low-level radioactive waste; (3) siting new low-level waste disposal facilities; and (4) decommissioning, long-term care, and liability. This report presents an extensive discussion of these recommendations covering qualifications, limitations, and alternatives

  14. AIS as key component in modern vessel traffic management and information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamers, W. [DaimlerChrysler Aerospace AG (DASA), Ulm (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide information in respect to universal shipborne identification system (UAIS) as main sensor in various vessel traffic applications. The presented paper will give general information concerning AIS functionality and the standardisation process. Based on experience from recent projects and various IALA working group activities, a typical future VTMIS architectures is also presented being based on AIS as key sensor. The required key performance of AIS associated with the HW components will be described. The results from European technology study Indris are presented and discussed. Finally, a summary and conclusion from the presented material will complete the technical paper. The elaboration of this presentation has been carried out as a joint task between Mr. Andre van Berg, MDS Suedafrika und Mr. Walter Lamers, DASA Ulm. (orig.)

  15. Enhancing LoRaWAN Security through a Lightweight and Authenticated Key Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Iborra, Ramon; Sánchez-Gómez, Jesús; Pérez, Salvador; Fernández, Pedro J; Santa, José; Hernández-Ramos, José L; Skarmeta, Antonio F

    2018-06-05

    Luckily, new communication technologies and protocols are nowadays designed considering security issues. A clear example of this can be found in the Internet of Things (IoT) field, a quite recent area where communication technologies such as ZigBee or IPv6 over Low power Wireless Personal Area Networks (6LoWPAN) already include security features to guarantee authentication, confidentiality and integrity. More recent technologies are Low-Power Wide-Area Networks (LP-WAN), which also consider security, but present initial approaches that can be further improved. An example of this can be found in Long Range (LoRa) and its layer-two supporter LoRa Wide Area Network (LoRaWAN), which include a security scheme based on pre-shared cryptographic material lacking flexibility when a key update is necessary. Because of this, in this work, we evaluate the security vulnerabilities of LoRaWAN in the area of key management and propose different alternative schemes. Concretely, the application of an approach based on the recently specified Ephemeral Diffie⁻Hellman Over COSE (EDHOC) is found as a convenient solution, given its flexibility in the update of session keys, its low computational cost and the limited message exchanges needed. A comparative conceptual analysis considering the overhead of different security schemes for LoRaWAN is carried out in order to evaluate their benefits in the challenging area of LP-WAN.

  16. Enhancing LoRaWAN Security through a Lightweight and Authenticated Key Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Sanchez-Iborra

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Luckily, new communication technologies and protocols are nowadays designed considering security issues. A clear example of this can be found in the Internet of Things (IoT field, a quite recent area where communication technologies such as ZigBee or IPv6 over Low power Wireless Personal Area Networks (6LoWPAN already include security features to guarantee authentication, confidentiality and integrity. More recent technologies are Low-Power Wide-Area Networks (LP-WAN, which also consider security, but present initial approaches that can be further improved. An example of this can be found in Long Range (LoRa and its layer-two supporter LoRa Wide Area Network (LoRaWAN, which include a security scheme based on pre-shared cryptographic material lacking flexibility when a key update is necessary. Because of this, in this work, we evaluate the security vulnerabilities of LoRaWAN in the area of key management and propose different alternative schemes. Concretely, the application of an approach based on the recently specified Ephemeral Diffie–Hellman Over COSE (EDHOC is found as a convenient solution, given its flexibility in the update of session keys, its low computational cost and the limited message exchanges needed. A comparative conceptual analysis considering the overhead of different security schemes for LoRaWAN is carried out in order to evaluate their benefits in the challenging area of LP-WAN.

  17. Managing Climate Risk. Integrating Adaptation into World Bank Group Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aalst, M.

    2006-08-01

    Climate change is already taking place, and further changes are inevitable. Developing countries, and particularly the poorest people in these countries, are most at risk. The impacts result not only from gradual changes in temperature and sea level but also, in particular, from increased climate variability and extremes, including more intense floods, droughts, and storms. These changes are already having major impacts on the economic performance of developing countries and on the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world. Climate change thus directly affects the World Bank Group's mission of eradicating poverty. It also puts at risk many projects in a wide range of sectors, including infrastructure, agriculture, human health, water resources, and environment. The risks include physical threats to the investments, potential underperformance, and the possibility that projects will indirectly contribute to rising vulnerability by, for example, triggering investment and settlement in high-risk areas. The way to address these concerns is not to separate climate change adaptation from other priorities but to integrate comprehensive climate risk management into development planning, programs, and projects. While there is a great need to heighten awareness of climate risk in Bank work, a large body of experience on climate risk management is already available, in analytical work, in country dialogues, and in a growing number of investment projects. This operational experience highlights the general ingredients for successful integration of climate risk management into the mainstream development agenda: getting the right sectoral departments and senior policy makers involved; incorporating risk management into economic planning; engaging a wide range of nongovernmental actors (businesses, nongovernmental organizations, communities, and so on); giving attention to regulatory issues; and choosing strategies that will pay off immediately under current

  18. Centralized Cryptographic Key Management and Critical Risk Assessment - CRADA Final Report For CRADA Number NFE-11-03562

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, R. K. [ORNL; Peters, Scott [Sypris Electronics, LLC

    2014-05-28

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modified and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system

  19. Air Force Supply Management Analysis of Activity Groups Financial Reports, Prices, and Cash Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force supply management activity group provides about two million types of inventory items, including weapon system spare parts, fuels, and medical-dental supplies, to customers which consist...

  20. Deviation Management: Key Management Subsystem Driver of Knowledge-Based Continuous Improvement in the Henry Ford Production System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Richard J; Copeland, Jacqueline R; Varney, Ruan C

    2017-10-01

    To develop a business subsystem fulfilling International Organization for Standardization 15189 nonconformance management regulatory standard, facilitating employee engagement in problem identification and resolution to effect quality improvement and risk mitigation. From 2012 to 2016, the integrated laboratories of the Henry Ford Health System used a quality technical team to develop and improve a management subsystem designed to identify, track, trend, and summarize nonconformances based on frequency, risk, and root cause for elimination at the level of the work. Programmatic improvements and training resulted in markedly increased documentation culminating in 71,641 deviations in 2016 classified by a taxonomy of 281 defect types into preanalytic (74.8%), analytic (23.6%), and postanalytic (1.6%) testing phases. The top 10 deviations accounted for 55,843 (78%) of the total. Deviation management is a key subsystem of managers' standard work whereby knowledge of nonconformities assists in directing corrective actions and continuous improvements that promote consistent execution and higher levels of performance. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Same but different? Measurement invariance of the PIAAC motivation-to-learn scale across key socio-demographic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gorges

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC revealed that countries systematically differ in their respondents’ literacy, numeracy, and problem solving in technology-rich environments skills; skill levels also vary by gender, age, level of education or migration background. Similarly, systematic differences have been documented with respect to adults’ participation in education, which can be considered as a means to develop and maintain skills. From a psychological perspective, motivation to learn is considered a key factor associated with both skill development and participation in (further education. In order to account for motivation when analyzing PIAAC data, four items from the PIAAC background questionnaire were recently compiled into a motivation-to-learn scale. This scale has been found to be invariant (i.e., showing full weak and partial strong measurement invariance across 21 countries. Methods This paper presents further analyses using multiple-group graded response models to scrutinize the validity of the motivation-to-learn scale for group comparisons. Results Results indicate at least partial strong measurement invariance across gender, age groups, level of education, and migration background in most countries under study (all CFI > .95, all RMSEA < .08. Thus, the scale is suitable for comparing both means and associations across these groups. Conclusions Results are discussed in light of country characteristics, challenges of measurement invariance testing, and potential future research using PIAAC data.

  2. Key performance indicators in plant asset management: hype, burden or real help?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, A. (Steinbeis Advanced Risk Technologies, Stuttgart (Germany)); Bareiss, J.M. (EnBW, Stuttgart (Germany))

    2010-05-15

    The paper tackles the increasing role and use of indicators (e.g. the key performance indicators, KPIs) in asset management in power and process plants, in particular for risk and safety management (safety performance indicators, SPIs), inspection, maintenance, emerging risks analysis and aging management. The two main aspects of the use of indicators are monitoring of performance (e.g. of a single unit) and benchmarking (e.g. among different units). The basis for the considerations presented in the paper are several international projects in the field, showing that the main issue in the field is not and cannot be just the introduction of new indicators as such. They deal with the principles of establishing indicators, establishing generally accepted indicators (goal 'globally accepted' indicators), creating of 'repositories' of indicators in industry and respective tools. The repository/tool developed in the EU project iNTeg-Risk is presented in more detail. The main proposed criteria for successful introduction are the acceptance, transparency and clear added value, e.g. when the indicators help in finding solutions for the issues where the conventional analysis, e.g. the one based on engineering models and analysis is too expensive, complex or simply unavailable. Three practical cases are briefly shown in the paper: one for the improved asset management in a refinery, one for the identification of indicators helping to deal with emerging risks (how to identify them and how to assess risks of a new technology) and one for the implementation of a complex aging management program for industrial plants. (orig.)

  3. Key performance indicators in plant asset management: hype, burden or real help?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.; Bareiss, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper tackles the increasing role and use of indicators (e.g. the key performance indicators, KPIs) in asset management in power and process plants, in particular for risk and safety management (safety performance indicators, SPIs), inspection, maintenance, emerging risks analysis and aging management. The two main aspects of the use of indicators are monitoring of performance (e.g. of a single unit) and benchmarking (e.g. among different units). The basis for the considerations presented in the paper are several international projects in the field, showing that the main issue in the field is not and cannot be just the introduction of new indicators as such. They deal with the principles of establishing indicators, establishing generally accepted indicators (goal 'globally accepted' indicators), creating of 'repositories' of indicators in industry and respective tools. The repository/tool developed in the EU project iNTeg-Risk is presented in more detail. The main proposed criteria for successful introduction are the acceptance, transparency and clear added value, e.g. when the indicators help in finding solutions for the issues where the conventional analysis, e.g. the one based on engineering models and analysis is too expensive, complex or simply unavailable. Three practical cases are briefly shown in the paper: one for the improved asset management in a refinery, one for the identification of indicators helping to deal with emerging risks (how to identify them and how to assess risks of a new technology) and one for the implementation of a complex aging management program for industrial plants. (orig.)

  4. "From resistance to challenge": child health service nurses experiences of how a course in group leadership affected their management of parental groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-01-01

    All parents in Sweden are invited to child health service (CHS) parental groups, however only 49% of the families participate. The way the parental groups are managed has been shown to be of importance for how parents experience the support and CHS nurses describe feeling insecure when running the groups. Lack of facilitation, structure and leadership might jeopardise the potential benefit of such support groups. This study describes CHS nurses' experiences of how a course in group leadership affected the way they ran their parental groups. A course in group leadership given to 56 CHS nurses was evaluated in focus group interviews 5-8 months after the course. The nurses felt strengthened in their group leader role and changed their leadership methods. The management of parental groups was after the course perceived as an important work task and the nurses included time for planning, preparation and evaluation, which they felt improved their parental groups. Parental participation in the activities in the group had become a key issue and they used their new exercises and tools to increase this. They expressed feeling more confident and relaxed in their role as group leaders and felt that they could adapt their leadership to the needs of the parents. Specific training might strengthen the CHS nurses in their group leader role and give them new motivation to fulfil their work with parental groups.  Clinical Trials.gov ID: NCT02494128.

  5. Asthma referrals: a key component of asthma management that needs to be addressed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available David Price,1,2 Leif Bjermer,3 David A Bergin,4 Rafael Martinez5 1Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; 2Observational and Pragmatic Research Institute, Singapore; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 4Novartis Ireland Limited, Dublin, Ireland; 5Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Heterogeneity of asthma and difficulty in achieving optimal control are the major challenges in the management of asthma. To help attain the best possible clinical outcomes in patients with asthma, several guidelines provide recommendations for patients who will require a referral to a specialist. Such referrals can help in clearing the uncertainty from the initial diagnosis, provide tailored treatment options to patients with persistent symptoms and offer the patients access to health care providers with expertise in the management of the asthma; thus, specialist referrals have a substantial impact on disease prognosis and the patient’s health status. Hurdles in implementing these recommendations include lack of their dissemination among health care providers and nonadherence to these guidelines; these hurdles considerably limit the implementation of specialist referrals, eventually affecting the rate of referrals. In this review, recommendations for specialist referrals from several key international and national asthma guidelines and other relevant published literature are evaluated. Furthermore, we highlight why referrals are not happening, how this can be improved, and ultimately, what should be done in the specialist setting, based on existing evidence in published literature. Keywords: asthma, disease management, specialization, primary care physicians, referral

  6. Managing the market. Focusing on a select group of customers can keep an organization competitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacStravic, R S

    1989-05-01

    The real challenge in healthcare marketing today is managing markets, focusing on selected groups of customers rather than on the organization or its services. Market management includes three distinct but related levels: Strategic market management assesses current and potential markets and chooses those the organization can serve best; segment management focuses on the needs and wants of subsets of chosen customers; and customer management reinforces long-term commitments to the organization. The patient care experience can be broken down into specific contacts with each staff member. The key to managing the experience is to identify and achieve standards of performance for each contact by examining what each event means to the patients and how patients judge each staff member, as well as the overall care experience. Regular feedback helps. An unavoidable risk in market management is that a given segment may decline in size, in need for services, or in cohesiveness as a segment. Yet those organizations which can identify the right segments and "manage" them effectively will have an advantage in a competitive market.

  7. Group dynamics for the acquisition of competences in Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguas, E. V.; Aguilar, M. C.; Castillo, C.; Polo, M. J.; Pérez, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Bologna Process promotes European citizens' employability from teaching fields in the University which implies the design of activities addressed to the development of skills for the labor market and engagement of employers. This work has been conceived for improving the formation of Engineering Project Management through group dynamics focused on: 1) the use of the creativity for solving problems; 2) promoting leadership capacities and social skills in multidisciplinary/multicultural work groups; 3) the ethical, social and environmental compromise; 4) the continuous learning. Different types of activities were designed: short activities of 15-30 minutes where fragments of books or songs are presented and discussed and long activities (2 h) where groups of students take different roles for solving common problems and situations within the Engineering Projects context. An electronic book with the content of the dynamics and the material for the students has been carried out. A sample of 20 students of Electronic Engineering degree which had participated at least in two dynamics, evaluated the utility for improving their formation in Engineering Project Management with a mark of 8.2 (scale 0-10, standard deviation equal to 0.9). On the other hand, the teachers observed how this type of work, promotes the interdisciplinary training and the acquisition of social skills, usually not-included in the objectives of the subjects.

  8. Consumption of key food groups during the postpartum period in low-income, non-Hispanic black mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Melissa C; Wasser, Heather; Adair, Linda S; Thompson, Amanda L; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Suchindran, Chirayath M; Bentley, Margaret E

    2017-10-01

    The postpartum period can impact diet quality and subsequently place women at greater risk for overweight or obesity. This study examined consumption of key food groups during the first 2 years postpartum among low income, non-Hispanic black, first-time mothers. Data were from the Infant Care, Feeding and Risk of Obesity Study, a cohort of 217 mother-infant dyads, followed from 3 to 18 months postpartum, collected from 2003 to 2007. At each study visit (3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months) 24-h dietary recalls were collected. Consumption levels were compared to those recommended from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) for each of the following food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, whole grains, protein foods and dairy, as well as an estimated upper limit for sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption. At each time point, mothers met recommended intake levels for grains and protein foods only. In random-intercept logistic regression models, no demographic or household characteristics were associated with a likelihood of consuming recommended levels for any of the food groups according to the DGAs. Given the low intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein foods and high intake of SSBs and refined grains, interventions targeting women's diet during the postpartum period are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Research on key technology of prognostic and health management for autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are non-cable and autonomous motional underwater robotics. With a wide range of activities, it can reach thousands of kilometers. Because it has the advantages of wide range, good maneuverability, safety and intellectualization, it becomes an important tool for various underwater tasks. How to improve diagnosis accuracy of the AUVs electrical system faults, and how to repair AUVs by the information are the focus of navy in the world. In turn, ensuring safe and reliable operation of the system has very important significance to improve AUVs sailing performance. To solve these problems, in the paper the prognostic and health management(PHM) technology is researched and used to AUV, and the overall framework and key technology are proposed, such as data acquisition, feature extraction, fault diagnosis, failure prediction and so on.

  10. Ecological thresholds: The key to successful enviromental management or an important concept with no practical application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groffman, P.M.; Baron, Jill S.; Blett, T.; Gold, A.J.; Goodman, I.; Gunderson, L.H.; Levinson, B.M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Paerl, H.W.; Peterson, G.D.; Poff, N.L.; Rejeski, D.W.; Reynolds, J.F.; Turner, M.G.; Weathers, K.C.; Wiens, J.

    2006-01-01

    An ecological threshold is the point at which there is an abrupt change in an ecosystem quality, property or phenomenon, or where small changes in an environmental driver produce large responses in the ecosystem. Analysis of thresholds is complicated by nonlinear dynamics and by multiple factor controls that operate at diverse spatial and temporal scales. These complexities have challenged the use and utility of threshold concepts in environmental management despite great concern about preventing dramatic state changes in valued ecosystems, the need for determining critical pollutant loads and the ubiquity of other threshold-based environmental problems. In this paper we define the scope of the thresholds concept in ecological science and discuss methods for identifying and investigating thresholds using a variety of examples from terrestrial and aquatic environments, at ecosystem, landscape and regional scales. We end with a discussion of key research needs in this area.

  11. Identifying and weighting of key performance indicators of knowledge management2.0 in organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Khalilazar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Main purpose of this research is identifying and weighting of key performance indicators of knowledge management2.0 in organizations. According to widespread permeation of technology, especially social media in different organizational dimensions and functional view to this phenomenon in knowledge management, performance measurement of this kind of media in order to meet organizational goals seems necessary. KM2.0 key performance indicators in this article has been identified and weighted through Delphi methodology, via questionnaire in three rounds. KM2.0 KPIs which are identified and weighted in this article are applicable in organizations that are eager to implement KM2.0 initiative and they can measure the performance of KM2.0 activities therefore this research is applicable in goal oriented approach. According to the results, KM2.0 participation process consists of 3 stages and 8 steps as mentioned below: First stage which is presence, consists of 3 steps which are registration, visit and download. Second stage which is feedback consists of 3 steps which are conversation, applause and amplification. Finally, third stage which is creation consists of 2 steps which are codification and personalization. Ultimate contribution of this research is identifying and weighting KPIs of KM2.0 in conceptual framework of KM2.0. Based on developing a conceptual framework and participation process in KM2.0 and listing related KPIs as an applicable solution in order to measure and improve the performance of organizational social media, this research has unique innovation among related and other articles.

  12. Risk based knowledge assessments: towards a toolbox for managing key knowledge assets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, Clive

    2008-01-01

    Full text: It is now well acknowledged that considerable Knowledge Management (KM) issues are faced by national and international nuclear communities. Much of these problems relate to issues of an ageing workforce and the significantly reduced influx of new generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. The management discipline of KM contains a broad spectrum of methods and techniques. However, the effective implementation of a KM strategy requires the selection and deployment of appropriate and targeted approaches that are pertinent to the particular issues of the technical or business area within an organisation. A clear strategy is contingent upon an assessment of what are the knowledge areas and what are the key (knowledge) risk areas. In particular the following issues have to be addressed: 'what knowledge exists?', 'what is the nature and format of that knowledge?' and 'what knowledge is key to our continued, safe, and effective operation?'. Answers to such questions will enable an organisation to prioritise KM effort and employ subsequent KM approaches that are appropriate. Subsequent approaches ranging from the utilisation of information technologies, such as databases; knowledge retention methods; and the setting up of Community of Practices to share knowledge and experience. This paper considers a risk assessment based approach to KM. In so doing the paper extends work previously reported on an approach to conducting knowledge audits by considering the integration of that approach with approaches to (knowledge) risk assessment. The paper also provides a brief review of the various KM approaches that can act to reduce the level of risk faced by an organisation. The paper concludes by reflecting upon the role, value of deploying such a risk based approach. (author)

  13. The key incident monitoring and management system - history and role in quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrick, Tony; Gay, Stephanie; Mackay, Mark; Sikaris, Ken

    2018-01-26

    The determination of reliable, practical Quality Indicators (QIs) from presentation of the patient with a pathology request form through to the clinician receiving the report (the Total Testing Process or TTP) is a key step in identifying areas where improvement is necessary in laboratories. The Australasian QIs programme Key Incident Monitoring and Management System (KIMMS) began in 2008. It records incidents (process defects) and episodes (occasions at which incidents may occur) to calculate incident rates. KIMMS also uses the Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) to assign quantified risk to each incident type. The system defines risk as incident frequency multiplied by both a harm rating (on a 1-10 scale) and detection difficulty score (also a 1-10 scale). Between 2008 and 2016, laboratories participating rose from 22 to 69. Episodes rose from 13.2 to 43.4 million; incidents rose from 114,082 to 756,432. We attribute the rise in incident rate from 0.86% to 1.75% to increased monitoring. Haemolysis shows the highest incidence (22.6% of total incidents) and the highest risk (26.68% of total risk). "Sample is suspected to be from the wrong patient" has the second lowest frequency, but receives the highest harm rating (10/10) and detection difficulty score (10/10), so it is calculated to be the 8th highest risk (2.92%). Similarly, retracted (incorrect) reports QI has the 10th highest frequency (3.9%) but the harm/difficulty calculation confers the second highest risk (11.17%). TTP incident rates are generally low (less than 2% of observed episodes), however, incident risks, their frequencies multiplied by both ratings of harm and discovery difficulty scores, concentrate improvement attention and resources on the monitored incident types most important to manage.

  14. Prioritizing key resilience indicators to support coral reef management in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Tim R; Donner, Simon D; Maynard, Jeffrey A; MacNeil, M Aaron; Graham, Nicholas A J; Maina, Joseph; Baker, Andrew C; Alemu I, Jahson B; Beger, Maria; Campbell, Stuart J; Darling, Emily S; Eakin, C Mark; Heron, Scott F; Jupiter, Stacy D; Lundquist, Carolyn J; McLeod, Elizabeth; Mumby, Peter J; Paddack, Michelle J; Selig, Elizabeth R; van Woesik, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Managing coral reefs for resilience to climate change is a popular concept but has been difficult to implement because the empirical scientific evidence has either not been evaluated or is sometimes unsupportive of theory, which leads to uncertainty when considering methods and identifying priority reefs. We asked experts and reviewed the scientific literature for guidance on the multiple physical and biological factors that affect the ability of coral reefs to resist and recover from climate disturbance. Eleven key factors to inform decisions based on scaling scientific evidence and the achievability of quantifying the factors were identified. Factors important to resistance and recovery, which are important components of resilience, were not strongly related, and should be assessed independently. The abundance of resistant (heat-tolerant) coral species and past temperature variability were perceived to provide the greatest resistance to climate change, while coral recruitment rates, and macroalgae abundance were most influential in the recovery process. Based on the 11 key factors, we tested an evidence-based framework for climate change resilience in an Indonesian marine protected area. The results suggest our evidence-weighted framework improved upon existing un-weighted methods in terms of characterizing resilience and distinguishing priority sites. The evaluation supports the concept that, despite high ecological complexity, relatively few strong variables can be important in influencing ecosystem dynamics. This is the first rigorous assessment of factors promoting coral reef resilience based on their perceived importance, empirical evidence, and feasibility of measurement. There were few differences between scientists' perceptions of factor importance and the scientific evidence found in journal publications but more before and after impact studies will be required to fully test the validity of all the factors. The methods here will increase the feasibility

  15. Prioritizing key resilience indicators to support coral reef management in a changing climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim R McClanahan

    Full Text Available Managing coral reefs for resilience to climate change is a popular concept but has been difficult to implement because the empirical scientific evidence has either not been evaluated or is sometimes unsupportive of theory, which leads to uncertainty when considering methods and identifying priority reefs. We asked experts and reviewed the scientific literature for guidance on the multiple physical and biological factors that affect the ability of coral reefs to resist and recover from climate disturbance. Eleven key factors to inform decisions based on scaling scientific evidence and the achievability of quantifying the factors were identified. Factors important to resistance and recovery, which are important components of resilience, were not strongly related, and should be assessed independently. The abundance of resistant (heat-tolerant coral species and past temperature variability were perceived to provide the greatest resistance to climate change, while coral recruitment rates, and macroalgae abundance were most influential in the recovery process. Based on the 11 key factors, we tested an evidence-based framework for climate change resilience in an Indonesian marine protected area. The results suggest our evidence-weighted framework improved upon existing un-weighted methods in terms of characterizing resilience and distinguishing priority sites. The evaluation supports the concept that, despite high ecological complexity, relatively few strong variables can be important in influencing ecosystem dynamics. This is the first rigorous assessment of factors promoting coral reef resilience based on their perceived importance, empirical evidence, and feasibility of measurement. There were few differences between scientists' perceptions of factor importance and the scientific evidence found in journal publications but more before and after impact studies will be required to fully test the validity of all the factors. The methods here will

  16. Secure Trust Based Key Management Routing Framework for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jugminder Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Security is always a major concern in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Several trust based routing protocols are designed that play an important role in enhancing the performance of a wireless network. However they still have some disadvantages like limited energy resources, susceptibility to physical capture, and little protection against various attacks due to insecure wireless communication channels. This paper presents a secure trust based key management (STKF routing framework that establishes a secure trustworthy route depending upon the present and past node to node interactions. This route is then updated by isolating the malicious or compromised nodes from the route, if any, and a dedicated link is created between every pair of nodes in the selected route with the help of “q” composite random key predistribution scheme (RKPS to ensure data delivery from source to destination. The performance of trust aware secure routing framework (TSRF is compared with the proposed routing scheme. The results indicate that STKF provides an effective mechanism for finding out a secure route with better trustworthiness than TSRF which avoids the data dropping, thereby increasing the data delivery ratio. Also the distance required to reach the destination in the proposed protocol is less hence effectively utilizing the resources.

  17. Management of investment-construction projects basing on the matrix of key events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozenko Andrey Aleksandrovich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the current problematic issues in the management of investment-construction projects, examines the questions of efficiency increase of construction operations on the basis of the formation of a reflex-adaptive organizational structure. The authors analyzed the necessity of forming a matrix of key events in the investment-construction project (ICP, which will create the optimal structure of the project, basing on the work program for its implementation. For convenience of representing programs of the project implementation in time the authors make recommendations to consolidate the works into separate, economically independent functional blocks. It is proposed to use an algorithm of forming the matrix of an investment-construction project, considering the economic independence of the functional blocks and stages of the ICP implementation. The use of extended network model is justified, which is supplemented by organizational and structural constraints at different stages of the project, highlighting key events fundamentally influencing the further course of the ICP implementation.

  18. Managing the nation's high-level radioactive waste: key issues and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    To date, no unified national plan has been adopted to develop and implement a comprehensive system of management and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the United States. Growing public concern about this problem has resulted in a number of recent efforts to develop a national high-level waste management policy. The 96th Congress strove to resolve the central issues, but ultimately failed to pass legislation, partly because of disagreements about the appropriate role of states in the siting of repositories for military waste. Outside government, a number of organizations convened representatives of diverse groups concerned with national high-level radioactive waste management to seek agreement on the major elements of national policy. One such organization was RESOLVE, Center for Environmental Conflict Resolution, which in May 1981 was merged into The Conservation Foundation. RESOLVE convened Forum II, a series of discussions among representatives of environmental, industrial, governmental, and citizen interest groups, in 1981 specifically to address the issues blocking Congressional agreement on high-level waste policy. This report contains the recommendations which resulted from these deliberations. Reprocessing, interim storage, respository development, and licensing requirements are addressed. Federal, state, and public participation in decision making are also discussed

  19. The American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) Working Group: 15 years of collaborative focal species research and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Theodore R.

    2017-01-01

    The American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) Working Group formed spontaneously in 2001 as coastal waterbird biologists recognized the potential for American Oystercatchers to serve as focal species for collaborative research and management. Accomplishments over the past 15 years include the establishment of rangewide surveys, color-banding protocols, mark-resight studies, a revision of the Birds of North America species account, and new mechanisms for sharing ideas and data. Collaborations among State, Federal, and private sector scientists, natural resource managers, and dedicated volunteers have provided insights into the biology and conservation of American Oystercatchers in the United States and abroad that would not have been possible without the relationships formed through the Working Group. These accomplishments illustrate how broad collaborative approaches and the engagement of the public are key elements of effective shorebird conservation programs.

  20. Social management of laboratory rhesus macaques housed in large groups using a network approach: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Brenda; Beisner, Brianne; Hannibal, Darcy

    2017-12-07

    Biomedical facilities across the nation and worldwide aim to develop cost-effective methods for the reproductive management of macaque breeding groups, typically by housing macaques in large, multi-male multi-female social groups that provide monkey subjects for research as well as appropriate socialization for their psychological well-being. One of the most difficult problems in managing socially housed macaques is their propensity for deleterious aggression. From a management perspective, deleterious aggression (as opposed to less intense aggression that serves to regulate social relationships) is undoubtedly the most problematic behavior observed in group-housed macaques, which can readily escalate to the degree that it causes social instability, increases serious physical trauma leading to group dissolution, and reduces psychological well-being. Thus for both welfare and other management reasons, aggression among rhesus macaques at primate centers and facilities needs to be addressed with a more proactive approach.Management strategies need to be instituted that maximize social housing while also reducing problematic social aggression due to instability using efficacious methods for detection and prevention in the most cost effective manner. Herein we review a new proactive approach using social network analysis to assess and predict deleterious aggression in macaque groups. We discovered three major pathways leading to instability, such as unusually high rates and severity of trauma and social relocations.These pathways are linked either directly or indirectly to network structure in rhesus macaque societies. We define these pathways according to the key intrinsic and extrinsic variables (e.g., demographic, genetic or social factors) that influence network and behavioral measures of stability (see Fig. 1). They are: (1) presence of natal males, (2) matrilineal genetic fragmentation, and (3) the power structure and conflict policing behavior supported by this

  1. Aenictus hoelldobleri sp. n., a new species of the Aenictus ceylonicus group (Hymenoptera, Formicidae from China, with a key to the Chinese members of the group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Staab

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aenictus is the most species-rich genus of army ants in the subfamily Dorylinae and one of the most species rich ant genera in China and the world. In this paper, a new species of the Aenictus ceylonicus group, Aenictus hoelldobleri sp. n., is described and illustrated based on the worker caste. The new species occurs in the subtropical forests of south-east China and is morphologically most similar to A. henanensis Li & Wang, 2005 and A. wudangshanensis Wang, 2006. Aenictus hoelldobleri sp. n. can be distinguished from both species by the shape of the subpetiolar process. The new species also resembles Aenictus lifuiae Terayama 1984 and A. thailandianus Terayama & Kubota, 1993 but clearly differs in various features of the cuticular sculpture. A key to the Chinese species of the A. ceylonicus group based on the worker caste is provided, which may help to reassess and clarify the taxonomic status of the abundant Chinese records of the true A. ceylonicus (Mayr, 1866, a species which almost certainly does not occur in China. Several new locality records are given, among them the first record of A. watanasiti Jaitrong & Yamane, 2013 from China.

  2. Description of 23 new species of the Exocelina ekari-group from New Guinea, with a key to all representatives of the species group (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Shaverdo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty three new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from New Guinea are described herein: E. bewaniensis sp. n., E. bismarckensis sp. n., E. craterensis sp. n., E. gorokaensis sp. n., E. herowana sp. n., E. jimiensis sp. n., E. kisli sp. n., E. ksionseki sp. n., E. lembena sp. n., E. mantembu sp. n., E. michaelensis sp. n., E. pinocchio sp. n., E. pseudoastrophallus sp. n., E. pseudobifida sp. n., E. pseudoedeltraudae sp. n., E. pseudoeme sp. n., E. sandaunensis sp. n., E. simbaiarea sp. n., E. skalei sp. n., E. tabubilensis sp. n., E. tariensis sp. n., E. vovai sp. n., and E. wannangensis sp. n. All of them have been found to belong to the E. ekari-group. An identification key to all known species of the group is provided, and important diagnostic characters (habitus, color, male antennae, protarsomeres 4–5, median lobes, and parameres are illustrated. Data on the distribution of the new species and some already described species are given.

  3. Monomorium dryhimi sp. n., a new ant species (Hymenoptera, Formicidae of the M. monomorium group from Saudi Arabia, with a key to the Arabian Monomorium monomorium-group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Aldawood

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new ant species, Monomorium dryhimi, is described based on workers from a single colony collected in Al Bahah, Asir Province, Saudi Arabia. This is the fourth species of the Monomorium monomorium-group collected from Arabian Peninsula, and appears to be closely related to Monomorium holothir Bolton, 1987, from Kenya. It can be distinguished by the following characters: head in profile with a weakly convex dorsal surface and a clearly convex ventral surface; eyes of moderate size with maximum diameter EL 0.19–0.25 × HW and with 6 ommatidia in the longest row; body colour yellow to light brownish yellow. In some individuals, head and gaster slightly but conspicuously darker than rest of body. Second halves of first and second gastral tergites with two characteristic brownish transverse bands. An identification key to the workers of the Arabian species of the Monomorium monomorium-group is presented. Scanning electron micrographs are given to illustrate the new species.

  4. Management of group B streptococcal bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Victoria M; Yudin, Mark H

    2012-05-01

    To provide information regarding the management of group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteriuria to midwives, nurses, and physicians who are providing obstetrical care. The outcomes considered were neonatal GBS disease, preterm birth, pyelonephritis, chorioamnionitis, and recurrence of GBS colonization. Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane database were searched for articles published in English to December 2010 on the topic of GBS bacteriuria in pregnancy. Bacteriuria is defined in this clinical practice guideline as the presence of bacteria in urine, regardless of the number of colony-forming units per mL (CFU/mL). Low colony counts refer to pregnancies in which it is appropriate to treat GBS bacteriuria to optimize maternal and perinatal outcomes, to reduce the occurrences of antibiotic anaphylaxis, and to prevent increases in antibiotic resistance to GBS and non-GBS pathogens. No cost-benefit analysis is provided. 1. Treatment of any bacteriuria with colony counts ≥ 100 000 CFU/mL in pregnancy is an accepted and recommended strategy and includes treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (II-2A) 2. Women with documented group B streptococcal bacteriuria (regardless of level of colony-forming units per mL) in the current pregnancy should be treated at the time of labour or rupture of membranes with appropriate intravenous antibiotics for the prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease. (II-2A) 3. Asymptomatic women with urinary group B streptococcal colony counts pregnancy should not be treated with antibiotics for the prevention of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes such as pyelonephritis, chorioamnionitis, or preterm birth. (II-2E) 4. Women with documented group B streptococcal bacteriuria should not be re-screened by genital tract culture or urinary culture in the third trimester, as they are presumed to be group B streptococcal colonized. (II-2D).

  5. Group participants' experiences of a patient-directed group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers-Jewell, Kate; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Thomas, Rae; Reidlinger, Dianne P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals who participated in a group-based education program, including their motivators in relation to their diabetes management, and the perceived impact of group interactions on participants' experiences and motivation for self-management. Understanding individuals diagnosed with diabetes experiences of group-based education for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus may guide the development and facilitation of these programs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all individuals who participated in the intervention. Using thematic analysis underpinned by self-determination theory, we developed themes that explored participants' motivators in relation to diabetes management and the impact of group interactions on their experiences and motivation. The key themes included knowledge, experience, group interactions and motivation. Participants perceived that the group interactions facilitated further learning and increased motivation, achieved through normalization, peer identification or by talking with, and learning from the experience of others. The results support the use of patient-centred programs that prioritize group interactions over the didactic presentation of content, which may address relevant psychological needs of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and improve their motivation and health behaviours. Future group-based education programs may benefit from the use of self-determination theory as a framework for intervention design to enhance participant motivation.

  6. Some key principles in implementing knowledge management: the views of employees in a small software company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clair Wagner

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available As the Knowledge Era replaces the Information Age the challenge is to transform information into knowledge and use this knowledge to create and sustain the competitive advantage of organisations. In this article four key principles for implementing knowledge management are discussed. These principles were derived from a survey and discussions with employees at a small software company. The four principles are: the need for a common definition of and vision for knowledge management, the interdependence between the human and technology track, the way employees punctuate ‘knowing’ and the structure of a reward system for sharing knowledge. Opsomming Organisasies word gekonfronteer met unieke uitdagings soos wat die Kennisera die Inligtingsera vervang. Een van die grootste uitdagings is om inligting te verander na betekenisvolle kennis en om die kennis te gebruik om ‘n kompeterende voorsprong te skep en te bou. In hierdie artikel word vier kern beginsels vir die implementering van kennisbestuur bespreek. Die beginsels is geskoei op ‘n opname van en onderhoude met werknemers in ‘n klein sagteware besigheid. Die vier beginsels is: die behoefte aan ‘n definisie en visie van kennisbestuur, die interafhanklikheid tussen mense en tegnologie, die wyse waarop werknemers kennis punktueer en die skep van ‘n beloningstruktuur vir die deel van kennis.

  7. Mechanisms of chronic pain - key considerations for appropriate physical therapy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Carol A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Bond, Samantha

    2017-07-01

    In last decades, knowledge of nociceptive pain mechanisms has expanded rapidly. The use of quantitative sensory testing has provided evidence that peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms play a relevant role in localized and widespread chronic pain syndromes. In fact, almost any patient suffering with a chronic pain condition will demonstrate impairments in the central nervous system. In addition, it is accepted that pain is associated with different types of trigger factors including social, physiological, and psychological. This rational has provoked a change in the understanding of potential mechanisms of manual therapies, changing from a biomechanical/medical viewpoint, to a neurophysiological/nociceptive viewpoint. Therefore, interventions for patients with chronic pain should be applied based on current knowledge of nociceptive mechanisms since determining potential drivers of the sensitization process is critical for effective management. The current paper reviews mechanisms of chronic pain from a clinical and neurophysiological point of view and summarizes key messages for clinicians for proper management of individuals with chronic pain.

  8. A Hierarchical structure of key performance indicators for operation management and continuous improvement in production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ningxuan; Zhao, Cong; Li, Jingshan; Horst, John A

    2016-01-01

    Key performance indicators (KPIs) are critical for manufacturing operation management and continuous improvement (CI). In modern manufacturing systems, KPIs are defined as a set of metrics to reflect operation performance, such as efficiency, throughput, availability, from productivity, quality and maintenance perspectives. Through continuous monitoring and measurement of KPIs, meaningful quantification and identification of different aspects of operation activities can be obtained, which enable and direct CI efforts. A set of 34 KPIs has been introduced in ISO 22400. However, the KPIs in a manufacturing system are not independent, and they may have intrinsic mutual relationships. The goal of this paper is to introduce a multi-level structure for identification and analysis of KPIs and their intrinsic relationships in production systems. Specifically, through such a hierarchical structure, we define and layer KPIs into levels of basic KPIs, comprehensive KPIs and their supporting metrics, and use it to investigate the relationships and dependencies between KPIs. Such a study can provide a useful tool for manufacturing engineers and managers to measure and utilize KPIs for CI.

  9. Identifying Key Performance Indicators for Holistic Hospital Management with a Modified DEMATEL Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Sheng-Li; You, Xiao-Yue; Liu, Hu-Chen; Huang, Jia

    2017-08-19

    Performance analysis is an important way for hospitals to achieve higher efficiency and effectiveness in providing services to their customers. The performance of the healthcare system can be measured by many indicators, but it is difficult to improve them simultaneously due to the limited resources. A feasible way is to identify the central and influential indicators to improve healthcare performance in a stepwise manner. In this paper, we propose a hybrid multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) approach to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) for holistic hospital management. First, through integrating evidential reasoning approach and interval 2-tuple linguistic variables, various assessments of performance indicators provided by healthcare experts are modeled. Then, the decision making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) technique is adopted to build an interactive network and visualize the causal relationships between the performance indicators. Finally, an empirical case study is provided to demonstrate the proposed approach for improving the efficiency of healthcare management. The results show that "accidents/adverse events", "nosocomial infection", ''incidents/errors", "number of operations/procedures" are significant influential indicators. Also, the indicators of "length of stay", "bed occupancy" and "financial measures" play important roles in performance evaluation of the healthcare organization. The proposed decision making approach could be considered as a reference for healthcare administrators to enhance the performance of their healthcare institutions.

  10. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Sara; Rowe, Heather; Kirkman, Maggie; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; Bayly, Christine; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane

    2016-02-15

    As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health.

  11. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. Objective To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. Methods To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. Results There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Conclusions Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health. PMID:26878865

  12. The C8 side chain is one of the key functional group of Garcinol for its anti-cancer effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin-Ying; Cao, Jing; Han, Chao-Ming; Li, Shu-Wen; Zhang, Chen; Du, Yin-Duan; Zhou, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Xin-Yan; Chen, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Garcinol from the fruit rind of Garcinia indica shows anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties, but its mechanism and key functional groups were still need to be identified. Our previous computer modeling suggested that the C8 side chain of Garcinol is so large that it may influence the bioactivity of the compound. 8-Me Garcinol, a derivative of Garcinol in which the bulky side chain at the C8 position of Garcinol is replaced with a much smaller methyl group, was synthesized through a 12-step procedure starting from 1,3-cyclohexanedione. The antitumor activity of Garcinol and 8-Me Garcinol was evaluated in vitro by MTT, cell cycle and cell apoptosis assays. The results showed that 8-Me Garcinol had weaker inhibitory activity on cells proliferation, and little effects on cell cycle and apoptosis in oral cancer cell line SCC15 cells when compared with Garcinol. All of the results indicated 8-Me Garcinol exerts weaker antitumor activity than Garcinol, and the C8 side chain might be an important active site in Garcinol. Changing the C8 side chain will affect the inhibitory effect of Garcinol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Policies for managing urban growth and landscape change: a key to conservation in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N., tech. ed. Bengston

    2005-01-01

    Protecting natural areas in the face of urbanization is one of the most important challenges for conservation in the 21st century. The papers in this collection examine key issues related to growth management and selected approaches to managing urban growth and minimizing its social and environmental costs. They were presented at the 2004 annual meeting of the Society...

  14. A Cross-Layer Key Management Scheme for MIPv6 Fast Handover over IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Seop Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new key management and security scheme is proposed to integrate Layer Two (L2 and Layer Three (L3 keys for secure and fast Mobile IPv6 handover over IEEE 802.11 Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN. Unlike the original IEEE 802.11-based Mobile IPv6 Fast Handover (FMIPv6 that requires time-consuming IEEE 802.1x-based Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP authentication on each L3 handover, the newly proposed key management and security scheme requires only one 802.1x-EAP regardless of how many L3 handovers occur. Therefore, the proposed scheme reduces the handover latency that results from a lengthy 802.1x-based EAP. The proposed key management and security scheme is extensively analyzed in terms of security and performance, and the proposed security scheme is shown to be more secure than those that were previously proposed.

  15. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTIVE GROWTH GROUPS (SPGG: INNOVATION ON PAPAYA MITE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marycruz Abato-Zárate

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Grower’s previous experience and their ability to communicate technical information to other growers, allows greater adoption of technologies. Thus, appropriation of technologies of mite management and sampling was evaluated, based on the “Simultaneous Productive Growth Groups (SPGG” technology transfer model. A preliminary diagnosis was made, evaluating the technology transfer achieved by six leading growers showing up continuously to seven meetings carried out from March to July 2010, and also by 19 growers showing up on a more irregular basis. All growers were from the municipality of Cotaxtla and belonged to the Papaya-Product-System of Veracruz, Mexico. Participation, attitude and efficacy of training were evaluated with a survey. Forty-two percent of growers considered the papaya ring spot virus as the main problem and 48 % revealed spider mites as the second one; 96 % used pesticides on spider mites. Participation of the SPGG basic group was 71 %, who agreed on sampling, recording data in sampling forms and using selective acaricides. Seventy percent were able to recognize spider mites from predatory mites and 83 % recognized selective acaricides. Growers considered that sampling can help reduce control costs. The SPGG model allowed building collective knowledge and better decision making by the working group.

  16. Using key performance indicators as knowledge-management tools at a regional health-care authority level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berler, Alexander; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2005-06-01

    The advantages of the introduction of information and communication technologies in the complex health-care sector are already well-known and well-stated in the past. It is, nevertheless, paradoxical that although the medical community has embraced with satisfaction most of the technological discoveries allowing the improvement in patient care, this has not happened when talking about health-care informatics. Taking the above issue of concern, our work proposes an information model for knowledge management (KM) based upon the use of key performance indicators (KPIs) in health-care systems. Based upon the use of the balanced scorecard (BSC) framework (Kaplan/Norton) and quality assurance techniques in health care (Donabedian), this paper is proposing a patient journey centered approach that drives information flow at all levels of the day-to-day process of delivering effective and managed care, toward information assessment and knowledge discovery. In order to persuade health-care decision-makers to assess the added value of KM tools, those should be used to propose new performance measurement and performance management techniques at all levels of a health-care system. The proposed KPIs are forming a complete set of metrics that enable the performance management of a regional health-care system. In addition, the performance framework established is technically applied by the use of state-of-the-art KM tools such as data warehouses and business intelligence information systems. In that sense, the proposed infrastructure is, technologically speaking, an important KM tool that enables knowledge sharing amongst various health-care stakeholders and between different health-care groups. The use of BSC is an enabling framework toward a KM strategy in health care.

  17. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  18. [Application of laboratory information system in the management of the key indicators of quality inspection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ye; Chen, Qian; Wu, Wei; Cui, Wei

    2015-03-31

    To establish a system of monitoring the key indicator of quality for inspection (KIQI) on a laboratory information system (LIS), and to have a better management of KIQI. Clinical sample made in PUMCH were collected during the whole of 2014. Next, interactive input program were designed to accomplish data collecting of the disqualification rate of samples, the mistake rate of samples and the occasions of losing samples, etc. Then, a series moment of sample collection, laboratory sample arrived, sample test, sample check, response to critical value, namely, trajectory information left on LIS were recorded and the qualification rate of TAT, the notification rate of endangering result were calculated. Finally, the information about quality control were collected to build an internal quality control database and the KIQI, such as the out-of-control rate of quality control and the total error of test items were monitored. The inspection of the sample management shows the disqualification rates in 2014 were all below the target, but the rates in January and February were a little high and the rates of four wards were above 2%. The mistake rates of samples was 0.47 cases/10 000 cases, attaining the target (laboratory reports shows the qualification rates of TAT was within the acceptable range (> 95%), however the rates of blood routine in November (94.75%) was out of range. We have solved the problem by optimizing the processes. The notification rate of endangering result attained the target (≥ 98%), while the rate of timely notification is needed to improve. Quality inspection shows the CV of APTT in August (5.02%) was rising significantly, beyond the accepted CV (5.0%). We have solved the problem by changing the reagent. The CV of TT in 2014 were all below the allowable CV, thus the allowable CV of the next year lower to 10%. It is an objective and effective method to manage KIQI with the powerful management mode of database and information process capability on LIS.

  19. Permanent right-to-left shunt is the key factor in managing patent foramen ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Dell'Avvocata, Fabio; Cardaioli, Paolo; Giordan, Massimo; Braggion, Gabriele; Aggio, Silvio; Chinaglia, Mauro; Mandapaka, Sangeeta; Kuruvilla, John; Chen, Jack P; Nanjundappa, Aravinda

    2011-11-15

    We sought to prospectively evaluate risk of stroke and impact of transcatheter patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure in patients with permanent right-to left shunt compared with those with Valsalva maneuver-induced right-to-left shunt. Pathophysiology and properly management of PFO still remain far from being fully clarified: in particular, the contribution of permanent right-to-left shunt remains unknown. Between March 2006 and October 2010, we enrolled 180 (mean age 44 ± 10.9 years, 98 women) of 320 consecutive patients referred to our center for transcatheter PFO closure, who had spontaneous permanent right-to-left shunt on transcranial Doppler and transthoracic/transesophageal echocardiography. All patients fulfilled the standard current indications for transcatheter closure and underwent preoperative transesophageal echocardiography and brain magnetic resonance imaging, with subsequent intracardiac echocardiographic-guided transcatheter PFO closure. We compared the clinical echocardiographic characteristics of these patients (Permanent Group) with the rest of 140 patients with right-to-left shunt only during Valsalva maneuver (Valsalva Group). Compared with the Valsalva Group patients, patients of the Permanent Group had increased frequency of multiple ischemic brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging, previous recurrent stroke, previous peripheral arteries embolism, migraine with aura, and-more frequently-atrial septal aneurysm and prominent Eustachian valve. The presence of permanent shunt confers the highest risk of recurrent stroke (odds ratio: 5.9, 95% confidence interval: 2.0 to 12, p < 0.001). No differences were recorded between the 2 groups with regard to recurrence of ischemic events after the closure procedure. Despite its small-sample nature, our study suggests that patients with permanent right-to-left shunt have potentially a higher risk of paradoxical embolism compared with those without. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology

  20. Closing the water cycle - the key role of water and wastewater management in a circular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Connor, Rick; Koncagul, Engin; Ortigara, Angela

    2017-04-01

    Planetary water boundaries are exceeded locally and regionally as water demand and use are escalating and per capita water availability is decreasing. However, wastewater represents an alternative yet reliable source containing for instance, nutrients (for use as fertilizer) and metals that can be extracted, and can be a source of energy. These characteristics mean that water and wastewater are set to play a key role in the circular economy. Furthermore, wastewater use can generate business opportunities and enhance water, food and energy security, therefore helping to alleviate poverty. However, to increase the collection, treatment and use of wastewater, investments in infrastructure and appropriate (low cost) technologies are needed. Ensuring the development of human and institutional capacity is also essential for proper wastewater management. The UN World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP) produces together with several UN-Water Members and Partners the annual World Water Development Report (WWDR). Its 2017 edition "Wastewater: The Untapped Resource" focuses on the critical role of wastewater management for vibrant economies, resilient societies and the maintenance of a healthy environment. Wastewater issues play also a central role in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, most notably through Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 6.3 that aims to improve water quality by reducing the proportion of untreated wastewater released to the environment and increasing its recycling and safe reuse globally. This target is interlinked with several other targets of SDG 6 ('the water goal') as well as to several other SDGs that relate to, poverty reduction, health, energy and food security, among others. The main policy-relevant messages of the WWDR 2017 will be introduced and linked to socio-hydrological approaches. These messages are an important input to the implementation of the water research agenda of the Panta Rhei initiative of IAHS.

  1. Energy management in production: A novel method to develop key performance indicators for improving energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Gökan; Barletta, Ilaria; Stahl, Bojan; Taisch, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a 7-step methodology to develop firm-tailored energy-related KPIs (e-KPIs). • We provide a practical guide for companies to identify their most important e-KPIs. • e-KPIs support identification of energy efficiency improvement areas in production. • The method employs an action plan for achieving energy saving targets. • The paper strengthens theoretical base for energy-based decision making in manufacturing. - Abstract: Measuring energy efficiency performance of equipments, processes and factories is the first step to effective energy management in production. Thus, enabled energy-related information allows the assessment of the progress of manufacturing companies toward their energy efficiency goals. In that respect, the study addresses this challenge where current industrial approaches lack the means and appropriate performance indicators to compare energy-use profiles of machines and processes, and for the comparison of their energy efficiency performance to that of competitors’. Focusing on this challenge, the main objective of the paper is to present a method which supports manufacturing companies in the development of energy-based performance indicators. For this purpose, we provide a 7-step method to develop production-tailored and energy-related key performance indicators (e-KPIs). These indicators allow the interpretation of cause-effect relationships and therefore support companies in their operative decision-making process. Consequently, the proposed method supports the identification of weaknesses and areas for energy efficiency improvements related to the management of production and operations. The study therefore aims to strengthen the theoretical base necessary to support energy-based decision making in manufacturing industries

  2. Barriers to Eating Traditional Foods Vary by Age Group in Ecuador With Biodiversity Loss as a Key Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penafiel, Daniela; Termote, Celine; Lachat, Carl; Espinel, Ramon; Kolsteren, Patrick; Van Damme, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    To document the perceptions of indigenous peoples for the sustainable management of natural resources against malnutrition. Initially 4 and then 12 interviews were conducted with 4 different age groups. Eight rural villages in Guasaganda, central Ecuador, were studied in 2011-2012. A total of 75 people (22 children, 18 adolescents, 20 adults, and 15 elders). Benefits, severity, susceptibility, barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy of eating traditional foods. Qualitative content analysis was completed using NVivo software. Initial analysis was inductive, followed by a content analysis directed by the Health Belief Model. Coding was completed independently by 2 researchers and kappa statistics (κ ≥ 0.65) were used to evaluate agreement. Healthy perceptions toward traditional foods existed and differed by age. Local young people ate traditional foods for their health benefits and good taste; adults cultivated traditional foods that had an economic benefit. Traditional knowledge used for consumption and cultivation of traditional foods was present but needs to be disseminated. Nutrition education in schools is needed that supports traditional knowledge in younger groups and prevents dietary changes toward unhealthy eating. Increased production of traditional food is needed to address current economic realities. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human and organisational factors as key levers of performance in D and D project management - 59323

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, Thierry; Willmann, Bertrand; Laval, Gregoire de; Lemarch, Jean-Louis; Cordoba, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In a number pf D and D projects, the type of installations to be dismantled and the variety of their equipments (glove-boxes, tanks..) and the products present on site (plutonium, uranium) in the form of powder are making many operations manual ones. Key phases in HR and organisation management: - The first D and D experience, the learning curve ramp-up - To begin any project, you usually try to benefit from benchmark of similar projects to be able to build up the first scenario, by using the best practices. The first experimental team consisted of operators who already had experienced dismantling at least once in the course of their career. This first dismantling operation is preferably to be conducted on an installation relatively poorly contaminated. This was to implement the correct techniques thus reducing the consequences of a possible unforeseen event. The capitalisation on the return on experience The success of this first dismantling site operation allowed us to implement a process of experience feedback to build the scenarios and the operating procedures of the following sites. In particular, targeted safety-security stop points are positioned for validation on the operations by people responsible for safety and security

  4. Key Performance Indicators in Radiology: You Can't Manage What You Can't Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Aran, Shima; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Thrall, James H; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is a fundamental component of every successful radiology operation. A radiology QA program must be able to efficiently and effectively monitor and respond to quality problems. However, as radiology QA has expanded into the depths of radiology operations, the task of defining and measuring quality has become more difficult. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are highly valuable data points and measurement tools that can be used to monitor and evaluate the quality of services provided by a radiology operation. As such, KPIs empower a radiology QA program to bridge normative understandings of health care quality with on-the-ground quality management. This review introduces the importance of KPIs in health care QA, a framework for structuring KPIs, a method to identify and tailor KPIs, and strategies to analyze and communicate KPI data that would drive process improvement. Adopting a KPI-driven QA program is both good for patient care and allows a radiology operation to demonstrate measurable value to other health care stakeholders. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An empirical investigation on the effects of electronic banking on key customer relationship management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Chavoshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been good progress on information and communication technology influencing businesses with a new emerging concept called customer relationship management (CRM and it has made significant changes in electronic banking. The primary objective of this paper is to survey electronic banking effects on key CRM components in one of Iranian banks in city of Tehran, Iran. The survey designs a questionnaire and distributes it among some experts in one of selected regions and the results are verified based on t-student and Freedman tests. Results show that all electronic banking services influence on CRM. In addition, that there are no significant differences among effects of electronic services on CRM but each CRM component has different effects on electronic services. In fact, according to freedman test, improving customer relationship process is the most important factor followed by providing appropriate service for each customer, providing appropriate service on appropriate time for each customer and providing appropriate service by appropriate channel for each customer.

  6. The management committee for post-accidental management - CODIRPA. Synthesis and report by each work group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This huge document contains several parts and reports. The first part contains a report addressing zoning (proposition for the definition of zones just after the emergency phase). The other parts contain stage reports, seminar synthesis, presentations, and final reports made by the different work groups. The topics of these work groups are: Lifting emergency actions of protection of population and reducing the contact between the body and a radioactive source in built environment; Life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water; Assessment of radiological and dosimetric consequences; Health monitoring of populations; Compensation; Management of contaminated soils, products and wastes; Organization of public authorities and commitment of stakeholders; Communication; Hypotheses (choice of hypotheses for the assessment of radiological and dosimetric consequences); Interveners; Water (management of water resources); Regulation; Culture; Centre for population reception and information. A last report has been published by a commission on guidelines for preparation to the long-term management of contaminated territories after a nuclear accident

  7. The social educator as manager of self- managed communities towards a didactics of group work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G. Juliao Vargas

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to reflect upon the function of social educators as promoters of self-managing communities as well as to outline the didactic contribution which group work techniques provide for this task. Therefore, the competencies that a social educator should have been addressed from a trace concept of “community” and its relationship whit social education as a non formal process; principally insisting on its role as “leader” of the self-management community processes: how far Leadership should go and where it should stop. It can be concluded that the social educator is required to work among groups of human beings with the main purpose of arousing the collective processes of teaching and learning of knowledge, attitudes and strategies. These strategies lead communities to manage the environment in which they live in an autonomous way so that decent living conditions are guaranteed for everyone. 

  8. 76 FR 4365 - Renewal of the Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Management Working Group AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Secretary of... Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group (Working Group) for 2 years. The Working Group provides... stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity River...

  9. 78 FR 5830 - Renewal of the Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Management Working Group AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Secretary of... Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group (Working Group) for 2 years. The Working Group provides... stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity River...

  10. Health and productivity management: establishing key performance measures, benchmarks, and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, R Z; Guindon, A M; Turshen, I J; Ozminkowski, R J

    2001-01-01

    Major areas considered under the rubric of health and productivity management (HPM) in American business include absenteeism, employee turnover, and the use of medical, disability, and workers' compensation programs. Until recently, few normative data existed for most HPM areas. To meet the need for normative information in HPM, a series of Consortium Benchmarking Studies were conducted. In the most recent application of the study, 1998 HPM costs, incidence, duration, and other program data were collected from 43 employers on almost one million workers. The median HPM costs for these organizations were $9992 per employee, which were distributed among group health (47%), turnover (37%), unscheduled absence (8%), nonoccupational disability (5%), and workers' compensation programs (3%). Achieving "best-practice" levels of performance (operationally defined as the 25th percentile for program expenditures in each HPM area) would realize savings of $2562 per employee (a 26% reduction). The results indicate substantial opportunities for improvement through effective coordination and management of HPM programs. Examples of best-practice activities collated from on-site visits to "benchmark" organizations are also reviewed.

  11. Key practical issues in strengthening safety culture. INSAG-15. A report by the International Safety Advisory Group [Russian Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the essential practical issues to be considered by organizations aiming to strengthen safety culture. It is intended for senior executives, managers and first line supervisors in operating organizations. Although safety culture cannot be directly regulated, it is important that members of regulatory bodies understand how their actions affect the development of attempts to strengthen safety culture and are sympathetic to the need to improve the less formal human related aspects of safety. The report is therefore of relevance to regulators, although not intended primarily for them. The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) introduced the concept of safety culture in its INSAG-4 report in 1991. Since then, many papers have been written on safety culture, as it relates to organizations and individuals, its improvement and its underpinning prerequisites. Variations in national cultures mean that what constitutes a good approach to enhancing safety culture in one country may not be the best approach in another. However, INSAG seeks to provide pragmatic and practical advice of wide applicability in the principles and issues presented in this report. Nuclear and radiological safety are the prime concerns of this report, but the topics discussed are so general that successful application of the principles should lead to improvements in other important areas, such as industrial safety, environmental performance and, in some respects, wider business performance. This is because many of the attitudes and practices necessary to achieve good performance in nuclear safety, including visible commitment by management, openness, care and thoroughness in completing tasks, good communication and clarity in recognizing major issues and dealing with them as a priority, have wide applicability

  12. Key practical issues in strengthening safety culture. INSAG-15. A report by the International Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the essential practical issues to be considered by organizations aiming to strengthen safety culture. It is intended for senior executives, managers and first line supervisors in operating organizations. Although safety culture cannot be directly regulated, it is important that members of regulatory bodies understand how their actions affect the development of attempts to strengthen safety culture and are sympathetic to the need to improve the less formal human related aspects of safety. The report is therefore of relevance to regulators, although not intended primarily for them. The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) introduced the concept of safety culture in its INSAG-4 report in 1991. Since then, many papers have been written on safety culture, as it relates to organizations and individuals, its improvement and its underpinning prerequisites. Variations in national cultures mean that what constitutes a good approach to enhancing safety culture in one country may not be the best approach in another. However, INSAG seeks to provide pragmatic and practical advice of wide applicability in the principles and issues presented in this report. Nuclear and radiological safety are the prime concerns of this report, but the topics discussed are so general that successful application of the principles should lead to improvements in other important areas, such as industrial safety, environmental performance and, in some respects, wider business performance. This is because many of the attitudes and practices necessary to achieve good performance in nuclear safety, including visible commitment by management, openness, care and thoroughness in completing tasks, good communication and clarity in recognizing major issues and dealing with them as a priority, have wide applicability

  13. Ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitalised patients: a consensus from the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society of Chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hara, G. Levy; Kanj, S.S.; Pagani, L.; Abbo, L.; Endimiani, A.; Wertheim, H.F.L.; Amabile-Cuevas, C.; Tattevin, P.; Mehtar, S.; Cardoso, F.; Unal, S.; Gould, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Antibiotic Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society for Chemotherapy propose ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospital settings. (i) Get appropriate microbiological samples before antibiotic administration and carefully interpret the results:

  14. Update on Activities of CEOS Disaster Management Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Disaster Management Support Group (DMSG) has supported natural and technological disaster management on a worldwide basis by fostering improved utilization of existing and planned Earth Observation (EO) satellite data. The DMSG has focused on developing and refining recommendations for the application of satellite data to selected hazard areas--drought, earthquake, fire, flood, ice, landslide, oil spill, and volcanic hazards. Particular emphasis was placed on working closely with space agencies, international and regional organizations, and commercial organizations on the implementation of these recommendations. The DMSG is in its last year with its primary focus on documenting its work and migrating on going activities to other fora. With over 300 participants from more than 140 organizations, the DMSG has found strong support among CEOS space agencies and the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS), as well as an enthusiastic reception from numerous international, regional, and national emergency managers, and distinct interest from the commercial sector. In addition, the group has worked to give full support to the work of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) in pursuit of decisions taken at UNISPACE III and the United Nations International Strategy on Disaster Reduction (ISDR). In conjunction with the IGOS, several of the DMSG hazards teams (earthquake, landslide, and solid Earth dimensions of volcanoes) are joining in the effort to develop an IGOS Geohazards theme team. Cooperation efforts with organizations such as IGOS, COPUOS, and ISDR will hopefully lead to the pick up of much of the on going DMSG activities. Since the inception of this ad hoc working group and its predecessor project, the DMSG has developed and refined recommendations for the application of satellite data by bringing together experts from eight hazard areas to identify user needs, as well as

  15. Where is the competitive advantage going?: a management model that incorporates people as a key element of the business strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio García Vega

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Competitive advantage is a concept that has evolved in an accelerated way during the last few years. Some scholars and executives claim that people are a fundamental element of its construction. In this line, business management has shown an inclination towards the human resources management – also called “talents” – as the key element of its organizational success. In this journey, the ideas, paradigms and conceptions have been modified in an interesting way. This paper tries to propose these new conceptions facing the organization management challenge, and proposes a management model based on the importance of the people in the competitive advantage administration.

  16. Biometrics based key management of double random phase encoding scheme using error control codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an optical security system has been proposed in which key of the double random phase encoding technique is linked to the biometrics of the user to make it user specific. The error in recognition due to the biometric variation is corrected by encoding the key using the BCH code. A user specific shuffling key is used to increase the separation between genuine and impostor Hamming distance distribution. This shuffling key is then further secured using the RSA public key encryption to enhance the security of the system. XOR operation is performed between the encoded key and the feature vector obtained from the biometrics. The RSA encoded shuffling key and the data obtained from the XOR operation are stored into a token. The main advantage of the present technique is that the key retrieval is possible only in the simultaneous presence of the token and the biometrics of the user which not only authenticates the presence of the original input but also secures the key of the system. Computational experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed technique for key retrieval in the decryption process by using the live biometrics of the user.

  17. Key role of lipid management in nitrogen and aroma metabolism in an evolved wine yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollero, Stéphanie; Mouret, Jean-Roch; Sanchez, Isabelle; Camarasa, Carole; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-02-09

    Fermentative aromas play a key role in the organoleptic profile of young wines. Their production depends both on yeast strain and fermentation conditions. A present-day trend in the wine industry consists in developing new strains with aromatic properties using adaptive evolution approaches. An evolved strain, Affinity™ ECA5, overproducing esters, was recently obtained. In this study, dynamics of nitrogen consumption and of the fermentative aroma synthesis of the evolved and its ancestral strains were compared and coupled with a transcriptomic analysis approach to better understand the metabolic reshaping of Affinity™ ECA5. Nitrogen assimilation was different between the two strains, particularly amino acids transported by carriers regulated by nitrogen catabolite repression. We also observed differences in the kinetics of fermentative aroma production, especially in the bioconversion of higher alcohols into acetate esters. Finally, transcriptomic data showed that the enhanced bioconversion into acetate esters by the evolved strain was associated with the repression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis rather than an enhanced expression of ATF1 and ATF2 (genes coding for the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of acetate esters from higher alcohols). An integrated approach to yeast metabolism-combining transcriptomic analyses and online monitoring data-showed differences between the two strains at different levels. Differences in nitrogen source consumption were observed suggesting modifications of NCR in the evolved strain. Moreover, the evolved strain showed a different way of managing the lipid source, which notably affected the production of acetate esters, likely because of a greater availability of acetyl-CoA for the evolved strain.

  18. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  19. A Public-key based Information Management Model for Mobile Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Diego; Sobrado, Igor

    2000-01-01

    Mobile code based computing requires development of protection schemes that allow digital signature and encryption of data collected by the agents in untrusted hosts. These algorithms could not rely on carrying encryption keys if these keys could be stolen or used to counterfeit data by hostile hosts and agents. As a consequence, both information and keys must be protected in a way that only authorized hosts, that is the host that provides information and the server that has sent the mobile a...

  20. 76 FR 13666 - Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ...., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Guidant... workers and former workers of Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management Division, Engineering... reviewed the certification to clarify the subject worker group's identity. Additional information revealed...

  1. CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc (CHG) Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NELSON, R.L.

    2000-05-08

    The CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., Information Resource Management Strategic Plan is the top-level planning document for applying information and information resource management to achieve the CHG mission for the management of the River Protection Project

  2. CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc (CHG) Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSON, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    The CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., Information Resource Management Strategic Plan is the top-level planning document for applying information and information resource management to achieve the CHG mission for the management of the River Protection Project

  3. Waking the health plan giant: Group Health Cooperative stops counting sheep and starts counting key tobacco indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, T

    1998-01-01

    Implementing a comprehensive approach to decreasing tobacco use in a large health plan requires hard work and commitment on the part of many individuals. We found that major organisational change can be accomplished and sustained. Keys to our success included our decision to remove access barriers to our cessation programmes (including cost); obtaining top leadership buy-in; identifying accountable individuals who owned responsibility for change; measuring key processes and outcomes; and finally keeping at it tenaciously through multiple cycles of improvement.

  4. Permanent education and co-management: experience of a health managing group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Faria Corrêa da Costa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experience lived by a group of workers of the Regional Center for Action on Health of the 4th. Regional Health State Department of Health of Rio Grande do Sul in Santa Maria. The paper presents an experience of reorganization of the work process in order to tackle the historical fragmentation of activities in the field of health management, and trigger a learning process for institutional support to carry thirty-two municipalities in the area of administrative scope of this coordinating body . To do so, it relies upon the co-management strategies and continuing health education as tools to trigger processes of change and inventing other ways of designing and conducting health work. With this experience, we can dislodge established places, inventing new forms of teamwork and interdisciplinary manner in order to strengthen this group of workers and their practices.

  5. 76 FR 46854 - Hewlett Packard Company, Imaging and Printing Group, World Wide Product Data Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., Imaging and Printing Group, World Wide Product Data Management Operations, Including On-Site Leased... Company, Imaging and Printing Group, World Wide Products Data Management Operations, Boise, Idaho and Fort... of Hewlett Packard Company, Imaging and Printing Group, World Wide Product Data Management Operations...

  6. 76 FR 66327 - Iron Mountain Information Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT) Division, Including On-Site Leased... Information Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT) Division, including on-site... location of Iron Mountain Information Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT...

  7. Key Management Schemes for Peer-to-Peer Multimedia Streaming Overlay Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, J. A. M.; López-Ramos, J. A.; Casado, L. G.

    Key distribution for multimedia live streaming peer-to-peer overlay networks is a field still in its childhood stage. A scheme designed for networks of this kind must seek security and efficiency while keeping in mind the following restrictions: limited bandwidth, continuous playing, great audience size and clients churn. This paper introduces two novel schemes that allow a trade-off between security and efficiency by allowing to dynamically vary the number of levels used in the key hierarchy. These changes are motivated by great variations in audience size, and initiated by decision of the Key Server. Additionally, a comparative study of both is presented, focusing on security and audience size. Results show that larger key hierarchies can supply bigger audiences, but offer less security against statistical attacks. The opposite happens for shorter key hierarchies.

  8. Management competences become key factor for success. Competition market energy; Managementkompetenzen werden Schluesselfaktor fuer Erfolg. Wettbewerbsmarkt Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bausch, A. [Allgemeine Betriebswirtschaftlehre/Internationales Management, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany); Strategisches Management und Controlling, Jacobs Univ. Bremen (Germany); Fritz, T. [Jacobs University Bremen (Germany); Werthschulte, S.; Schumacher, T.; Holst, A.; Schiegg, T. [Accenture GmbH (Germany)

    2007-07-09

    In view of deregulation, enhanced competition and a multitude of options for action, clear strategic positioning and a strong operative management have become key factors of success. The authors of the study 'Value Creator III' investigated the approaches that made current industrial leaders successful and the challenges to be met in the future. (orig.)

  9. A survey of selected key areas of management of South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Previous surveys of neurosurgical patient management, including a South African (SA) survey conducted in 2001, confirmed the existence of significant dissimilarities in management on national and international levels. This survey aimed to determine current SA neurosurgical patient management and to ...

  10. A new species of Scheloribates (Acari, Oribatida, Scheloribatidae) from Vietnam, with key to the striolatus-group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ermilov, S.G.; Starý, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, January (2017), s. 14-21 ISSN 2337-0173 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : morphology * new species * Scheloribatidae * systematics * Vietnam * key Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology

  11. Productivity--a key to managing cost-per-case. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orefice, J J; Jennings, M C

    1983-08-01

    Productivity and productivity management are critical to effective case-mix management. Case-mix management expands on traditional productivity management to include the relationship between such intermediate products as patient days, tests and meals, and the ultimate end product, the case. As hospitals search to increase the profitability of specific case types, they must focus on two critical productivity control points. First, they must examine length of stay and ancillary utilization as one level of productivity. Then they must turn to more traditional analyses and review departmental productivity in the production of the intermediate products. No case-mix management system is complete unless it focuses on both of these critical relationships. Part two of this article will explore performance reporting and its role in managing both productivity and case mix.

  12. THE KEY ACTIVITIES OF GREEN LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT IN THE THAI AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Thanyaphat Muangpan; Mana Chaowarat; Jutaporn Neamvonk

    2016-01-01

    Thai automotive industry needs to be developed for understanding activities management on inbound logistics that is an essential element of business operations for a manufacturing firm. The purpose of research is to study the main activities of green logistics management (inbound logistics) in the Thai automotive industry. Survey research was used in this study to collect data by sampling from the people in the field of logistics and environmental management of Thai automotive industry to exa...

  13. The manager's role in marketing. The Health Care Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    With the impending reductions in physician reimbursements, the key to a practice's ongoing vitality will be its ability to increase volume and gain greater market share. Traditionally, most doctors have relied on word-of-mouth referrals from current patients and physicians to bring in new patients. In today's health care environment, however, this approach to practice building is not enough to assure growth.

  14. Construction of Student Groups Using Belbin: Supporting Group Work in Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark; Polglase, Giles; Parry, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Belbin team role self and observer perceptions were applied to a large cohort (145) of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences undergraduates in a module assessed through two separate group projects. Students self-selected groups for the first project; for the second, groups were more "balanced." Results show slight improvement in…

  15. Understanding the cultures of fishing communities: a key to fisheries management and food security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGoodwin, James R

    2001-01-01

    .... The paper suggests methods that might help fisheries managers to obtain reliable information about fishing cultures in an ethical manner, including the rapid acquisition of important information...

  16. Nursing leadership in a chronic pain management group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysvik, Elin; Furnes, Bodil

    2012-03-01

    To explore and debate nursing leadership and challenges on organizational and group levels when conducting rehabilitation groups for people suffering from chronic pain. Group approaches based on cognitive behavioural therapy are generally described as effective. Leadership in group approaches offered to people suffering from chronic pain is a great challenge for nurses on an organizational as well as a group level. One overall leader and nine group leaders conducting 13 groups constituted the sample. Qualitative content analysis was used by identifying categories, subthemes and themes. The results from the content analysis revealed one main theme ('Complexity in nursing leadership') and three subthemes ('Challenges in leadership on organizational level', 'Challenges in leadership on teamwork level' and 'Challenges in leadership on group level'. The results show how important it is to have firm overall leadership and trained group leaders with a common purpose, interdependent roles and complementary skills, who are thus well prepared to prevent or deal with challenging group processes. The leaders of both levels, which are highly interrelated, should have a current theoretical understanding of pain theory, group leadership skills and a cognitive behavioural approach. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Personnel Identity Management and the Expeditionary Strike Group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neises, Glen E

    2007-01-01

    .... Chapter I defines IM and explains why IM is important for the Department of Defense (DoD). Chapter II provides an overview of DoD human resource management and Defense Manpower Data Center information systems...

  18. [Discussion on developing a data management plan and its key factors in clinical study based on electronic data capture system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-na; Huang, Xiu-ling; Gao, Rui; Lu, Fang

    2012-08-01

    Data management has significant impact on the quality control of clinical studies. Every clinical study should have a data management plan to provide overall work instructions and ensure that all of these tasks are completed according to the Good Clinical Data Management Practice (GCDMP). Meanwhile, the data management plan (DMP) is an auditable document requested by regulatory inspectors and must be written in a manner that is realistic and of high quality. The significance of DMP, the minimum standards and the best practices provided by GCDMP, the main contents of DMP based on electronic data capture (EDC) and some key factors of DMP influencing the quality of clinical study were elaborated in this paper. Specifically, DMP generally consists of 15 parts, namely, the approval page, the protocol summary, role and training, timelines, database design, creation, maintenance and security, data entry, data validation, quality control and quality assurance, the management of external data, serious adverse event data reconciliation, coding, database lock, data management reports, the communication plan and the abbreviated terms. Among them, the following three parts are regarded as the key factors: designing a standardized database of the clinical study, entering data in time and cleansing data efficiently. In the last part of this article, the authors also analyzed the problems in clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine using the EDC system and put forward some suggestions for improvement.

  19. How coaching can play a key role in the development of nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Liz

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore empirically the role that coaching plays in the development of nurse managers in order to inform further research and policy makers about the potential utility and value of this means of development. There is evidence of the importance of the role of nurse managers who are first line managers of a team of nurses within any health sector. However, there appears to be little understanding of the United Kingdom wide scope of nurse manager development across the United Kingdom and the means to increase its effectiveness. At the same time, it appears that some nurse managers receive coaching to help in their development. This is a mixed methods study, using a pragmatist paradigm. Data was gathered from a quantitative survey and qualitative interviews. This paper is reporting the results of the qualitative interviews only. Twenty-one qualitative interviews were undertaken with nurse managers, coaches and directors of nursing to draw out their own experiences of coaching for nurse managers. Thematic analysis framework was used for data interrogation, identifying new patterns and emerging themes. Themes that emerged from interviews include how nurse managers were introduced to coaching, how they balanced transitions, the role of reflection, the value of relationships and overlaps between clinical supervision, mentoring and coaching. Findings show that following coaching, nurse managers gained increased resilience, confidence and better coping mechanisms. This resulted in perceived improved team management and cohesion and appeared to lead to better quality of care for patients. This study suggests the importance of nurse managers accessing coaching, to enable transformational leadership of their teams of nurses. It suggests also the importance of organisations supporting a coaching culture, to ensure staff satisfaction, motivation and improved quality of patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [From quality management to dynamic management through quality: Deployment within a radiotherapy group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrier, B; Halm, É; Craman, M; Dujols, J-P; Norkowski, J-L; Meynard, K

    2017-10-01

    In 2015, the quality group of the radiotherapy clinic Groupement de Radiothérapie et d'Oncologie des Pyrénées (GROP, Pau, France) decided to review the deployment of its quality approach in order to optimize it continuously. For this, two improvements were proposed: an involvement of process drivers and a material and financial investment in document management software. The implementation of these organizational and managerial provisions enabled us to better cover the requirements of the ISO 9001 standard, the international reference in quality management. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploration of Route to Establish the Office Administrative Management Matching the Key Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis on the main problems in office administrative work in the modern higher vocational colleges, I put forward some suggestions on improving the office management by changing administrative management idea, strengthening the service consciousness and professional skills, perfecting the rules and regulations, enhancing staff training and so on.

  2. Key convention on safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste to enter into force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At a ceremony at IAEA Headquarters today, Ireland deposited its instrument of ratification to an important convention on the safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste, thereby ensuring its entry into force. The Convention will be the first international instrument to address the safety of management and storage of radioactive wastes and spent fuels in countries with and without nuclear programmes

  3. Key Authors in Business and Management Education Research: Productivity, Topics, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaugh, J. B.; Asarta, Carlos J.; Hwang, Alvin; Fornaciari, Charles J.; Bento, Regina F.; Dean, Kathy Lund

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of author productivity in business and management education (BME) research have focused on single disciplinary areas, and even single journals. This study is the first to examine the productivity of BME scholars across multiple disciplinary areas (i.e., accounting, economics, finance, information systems, management, marketing,…

  4. Leadership and Quality Management: An Analysis of Three Key Features of the Greek Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiti, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate whether educational leadership in Greece implements the values of total quality management and contributes to the improvement of the educational process, and to offer proposals for a framework of total quality management that would contribute to an improvement in the overall quality of the education process.…

  5. Biodiversity in the city: key challenges for urban green space management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myla F.J. Aronson; Christopher A. Lepczyk; Karl L. Evans; Mark A. Goddard; Susannah B. Lerman; J. Scott MacIvor; Charles H. Nilon; Timothy. Vargo

    2017-01-01

    Cities play important roles in the conservation of global biodiversity, particularly through the planning and management of urban green spaces (UGS). However, UGS management is subject to a complex assortment of interacting social, cultural, and economic factors, including governance, economics, social networks, multiple stakeholders, individual preferences, and social...

  6. Interviewing Key Informants: Strategic Planning for a Global Public Health Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Karen E.; Kassim, Anisa; Howze, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Goldie

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Sustainable Management Development Program (SMDP) partners with low- and middle-resource countries to develop management capacity so that effective global public health programs can be implemented and better health outcomes can be achieved. The program's impact however, was variable. Hence, there…

  7. Lean Information Management: Criteria For Selecting Key Performance Indicators At Shop Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuga, Maria Virginia; Kifor, Claudiu Vasile; Rosca, Liviu-Ion

    2015-07-01

    Most successful organizations worldwide use key performance indicators as an important part of their corporate strategy in order to forecast, measure and plan their businesses. Performance metrics vary in their purpose, definition and content. Therefore, the way organizations select what they think are the optimal indicators for their businesses varies from company to company, sometimes even from department to department. This study aims to answer the question of what is the most suitable way to define and select key performance indicators. More than that, it identifies the right criteria to select key performance indicators at shop floor level. This paper contributes to prior research by analysing and comparing previously researched selection criteria and proposes an original six-criteria-model, which caters towards choosing the most adequate KPIs. Furthermore, the authors take the research a step further by further steps to closed research gaps within this field of study.

  8. ANALYSIS OF THE KEY ACTIVITIES OF THE LIFE CYCLE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONCEPTUAL ARCHITECTURE OF THE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene N. Tcheremsina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an analysis of the key activities of the life cycle of knowledge management in terms of the features of knowledge management in higher education. Based on the analysis we propose the model of the conceptual architecture of virtual knowledge-space of a university. The proposed model is the basis for the development of kernel intercollegiate virtual knowledge-space, based on cloud technology. 

  9. Classroom management of situated group learning: A research study of two teaching strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeh, Kathy; Fawns, Rod

    2000-06-01

    Although peer-based work is encouraged by theories in developmental psychology and although classroom interventions suggest it is effective, there are grounds for recognising that young pupils find collaborative learning hard to sustain. Discontinuities in collaborative skill during development have been suggested as one interpretation. Theory and research have neglected situational continuities that the teacher may provide in management of formal and informal collaborations. This experimental study, with the collaboration of the science faculty in one urban secondary college, investigated the effect of two role attribution strategies on communication in peer groups of different gender composition in three parallel Year 8 science classes. The group were set a problem that required them to design an experiment to compare the thermal insulating properties of two different materials. This presents the data collected and key findings, and reviews the findings from previous parallel studies that have employed the same research design in different school settings. The results confirm the effectiveness of social role attribution strategies in teacher management of communication in peer-based work.

  10. INVAP and its project management capabilities: a key to company success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore, Marcelo; Delgado, Ricardo; Niklison, Carlos; Ordonez, Juan Pablo; Gerbino, Juan Jose Gil

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 26 years, several factors have contributed to INVAP's projection into domestic and overseas operations. Of these, the most recognized is of course the technological capabilities INVAP keeps developing to satisfy our customer's requirements. In a second thought, the other factor is the strategic objective of providing specific purpose customer oriented solutions. The less obvious third important factor in this trilogy is the successful application of Project Management techniques and methods. INVAP's vision on Project Management encompasses well known concepts as: Integrated Management, Proactive solutions, Cost Control and Reporting, Quality Assurance, Target Schedules, Performance Requirements, Risk Management, Configuration Management and Integrated Logistic Support. After 2 years of execution of the Replacement Research Reactor Project for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, our Project Management methodology have allowed us to timely meet all project milestones, complete basic and detail engineering, timely deliver the preliminary safety reports, manufacture and test technological concepts in specifically built mock ups and overcome risky situations -like the economical panorama in Argentina- without jeopardizing our Contractual commitments. Present paper depicts the practical approach INVAP has for Project Management -particularly within the Nuclear Division-, and a description of the tools to such aim developed. (author)

  11. 78 FR 61387 - Supermedia LLC, Publishing Operations Divison, Account Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... LLC, Publishing Operations Divison, Account Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex Media Inc..., Publishing Operations Divison, Listing Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex Media Inc., Including On-Site... to workers and former workers of SuperMedia LLC, Publishing Operation Division, Account Management...

  12. Effective knowledge management as basis for holistic knowledge engineering – Knowledge as the key asset of an organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lazović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In knowledge management , human resources are in the foreground and their value is constantly rising. In the eyes of modern managers knowledge is the key asset of an organization. Effective management and management of knowledge processes are central preoccupations of modern managers and, at the same time, the most prominent feature of a knowledge-based organization. Like innovation and creativity, knowledge needs to be encouraged and treated with due care. Commitment to acquisition of new knowledge depends on how the interpersonal relationships are managed in an organization, therefore, those responsible for knowledge processes, the so-called modern knowledge managers, will develop partnership relation- ships with all members of their organization. In the core of such partnerships lie competences of individual employees and their creative application of knowledge. By encouraging learning, discussions and opinion exchange as well as personal and professional growth of their employees, management in knowledge-based organizations is improving the quality of work, and consequently, generation of new knowledge and their organization’s competitive advantage.

  13. [Job performance in work organizations: the effects of management by group goals and job interdependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Hisataka

    2015-04-01

    cThis study examined the interactive effect of management by group goals and job interdependence on employee's activities in terms of task and contextual performance. A survey was conducted among 140 Japanese employees. Results indicated that management by group goals was related only to contextual performance. Job interdependence, however, had a direct effect on both task and contextual performance. Moreover, moderated regression analyses revealed that for work groups requiring higher interdependence among employees, management by group goals had a positive relation to contextual performance but not to task performance. When interdependence was not necessarily required, however, management by group goals had no relation to contextual performance and even negatively impacted task performance, respectively. These results show that management by group goals affects task and contextual performance, and that this effect is moderated by job interdependence. This provides a theoretical extension as well as a practical application to the setting and management of group goals.

  14. Two books on dementia care: Risk Assessment and management for living well with dementia, and Key issues in evolving dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Manthorpe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk Assessment and Management for Living Well with Dementia. Charlotte L. Clarke, Heather Wilkinson, John Keady and Catherine E. Gibb. Foreword by Murna Downs. Part of the Bradford Dementia Group Good Practice Guides series. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2011, pp. 128, ISBN: 978-1-84905-005-0Key Issues in Evolving Dementia Care. International Theory-based Policy and Practice. Edited by Anthea Innes, Fiona Kelly and Louise McCabe. Foreword by Professor June Andrews. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2012, pp. 264, ISBN: 978-1-84905-242-9

  15. Key Management Theories ... and What They Have to Say with Regards to Contemporary Headquarters Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Multinational and multibusiness headquarters increasingly structure their headquarters in novel ways. They use several locations spread around the world, differentiate different types of headquarters activities in a very fine-grained way, they temporarily relocate top management teams, or relocate...

  16. The keys to CERN conference rooms - Managing local collaboration facilities in large organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Baron, T; Duran, G; Correia Fernandes, J; Ferreira, P; Gonzalez Lopez, J B; Jouberjean, F; Lavrut, L; Tarocco, N

    2013-01-01

    For a long time HEP has been ahead of the curve in its usage of remote collaboration tools, like videoconference and webcast, while the local CERN collaboration facilities were somewhat behind the expected quality standards for various reasons. This time is now over with the creation by the CERN IT department in 2012 of an integrated conference room service which provides guidance and installation services for new rooms (either equipped for video-conference or not), as well as maintenance and local support. Managing now nearly half of the 250 meeting rooms available on the CERN sites, this service has been built to cope with the management of all CERN rooms with limited human resources. This has been made possible by the intensive use of professional software to manage and monitor all the room equipment, maintenance and activity. This paper will focus on presenting these packages, either off-the-shelf commercial products (asset and maintenance management tool, remote audiovisual equipment monitoring systems, ...

  17. Five Key Changes for the Management of UK Defence - An Agenda for Research?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatham, Peter; Taylor, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    .... Given the paucity of academic research into the general area of defence management, it is suggested that there is considerable potential for focused application of ideas and concepts from a broad...

  18. Conference communication. Managing change in tourism destinations: Key issues and current trends.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, M.M.; Buhalis, Dimitrios; Longhi, C.; Vitouladiti, O.

    2013-01-01

    This conference communication illustrates the major outcomes emerging from the EIASM Conference on Tourism Management and Tourism Related Issues held in Nice (France), September 20-21, 2012. While a number of managerial issues pertaining to the tourism field were dealt with, this communication covers three specific areas of interest for destination management and marketing: (1) the increasing competition among tourism destinations and the rise and consolidation of BRIC countries as outbound t...

  19. Managers’ Support – A Key Driver behind Enterprise Risk Management Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprčić Danijela Miloš

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe consequences of the global fi nancial crisis resulted in re-thinking the risk management processes and approaches, highlighting the need for a comprehensive risk management framework. Consequently, more and more companies are moving away from the Traditional “silo-based” Risk Management (TRM to a more holistic approach known as Enterprise Risk Management (ERM. This paper presents results of both exploratory and empirical research. First, we develop ERM Index that measures maturity of ERM process within the company. Then, we present empirical results on the level of maturity and determinants of risk management system development in listed Croatian companies. Research indicates low levels of ERM development: even 38 per cent of analysed companies have no elements of ERM system, from which 22 per cent do not manage corporate risks at all. Except the company’s size supported by the economies of scale argument, managers’ support is the most important determinant of ERM system maturity in Croatian companies.

  20. An integrative framework for managing project issues across stakeholder groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Offenbeek, Marjolein A.G.; Vos, Janita F.J.

    2016-01-01

    The stakeholders and the issues associated with a project are different concepts but closely interconnected. Despite this, the project stakeholder management literature falls short in analyzing the linkages between the stakeholders and the issues they bring. This paper develops a multilayered

  1. National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, S.

    1995-12-01

    To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) outlines the key activities that the NLLWMP will accomplish in the following fiscal year. Additional activities are added during the fiscal year as necessary to accomplish programmatic goals. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during fiscal year 1995

  2. National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) outlines the key activities tat the NLLWMP will accomplish in the following fiscal year. Additional activities are added during the fiscal year as necessary to accomplish programmatic goals. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during Fiscal Year 1996

  3. The Effects of Quality Management Practices on Key Results: questionnaires sample for the industry of tourist accommodation in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Álvarez García

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, we examine the direct and indirect effects of quality management practices on key results and we identify the relationship between quality practices. To achieve the proposed objective, a structural model was used, taking into account the previous review of the literature, in order to identify the quality practices and causal relationships with the key results. The theoretical model and hypotheses are tested using data collected from a sample of 186 tourist accommodation companies certified with the “Q for Tourist Quality” standard in Spain, from a questionnaire based on quality practices identified in the literature and on the EFQM Model, taking some of the most relevant scales as a reference. The methodology used consists of the application of an Exploratory and Confirmatory Factorial Analysis to validate the scales (reliability, one-dimensionality and validity and define the number of items of each of the measuring instruments of the constructs proposed, to then estimate the causal model proposed, proceeding to test the hypotheses formulated by using the Structural Equation Model (SEM technique. The results achieved support the relationship between quality practices and the direct and positive impact of two of the practices, processes management and quality policy/planning, on the key results. It was also observed that the quality practices that most influence key results are quality policy/planning along with leadership, when considering the total effects (direct and indirect.

  4. Implications of Boy Scout group use of public lands for natural resource managers: a regional comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail A. Vander Stoep

    1992-01-01

    Resource managers can apply group-specific rather than generic communications and management strategies to different public land user groups. This study compares use patterns of one user group, Boy Scout troops, from two regions of the United States. It identifies their public land use patterns, activities, needs, and motivations. Results can be used by resource...

  5. Key articles and guidelines in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension: 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel G; Kayser, Steven R; Attridge, Rebecca L; Duvall, Laura; Kiser, Tyree H; Moote, Rebecca; Reed, Brent N; Rodgers, Jo E; Erstad, Brian

    2012-06-01

    Pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have expanded greatly in the last 10 years. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a relatively rare disease and is associated with myriad disease processes. The older term for PAH, primary PAH, has been changed to represent these differences and to distinguish it from postcapillary PAH associated with left-sided heart failure. Limitations in evaluating treatment approaches for PAH include its rarity, the small number of patients included in clinical trials, and issues regarding the use of placebo-controlled trials in a disease with such a high mortality rate if left untreated. Management options include the use of prostacyclin and prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors, as well as traditional background therapy with diuretics, digoxin, calcium channel blockers, and warfarin. Numerous drugs are under investigation to evaluate their possible roles in management. Combination therapy is increasingly becoming a standard approach to therapy, with mounting literature to document effectiveness. Current or emerging roles for the pharmacist in the management of PAH largely involves ensuring access to drug therapy, facilitating specialty pharmacy dispensing, and providing patient counseling. Newer roles may include future drug development, optimized use of investigational drugs, and specialized disease management programs. This compilation includes a series of articles identifying important literature in cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. This bibliography focuses on pharmacotherapeutic management of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Most of the cited works present the results of significant human clinical studies that have shaped the management of patients with PAH. Limited primary literature is available for some topics, so in addition, consensus documents prepared by expert panels are reviewed. This compilation may serve as a

  6. Small Group Discussion as a Key Component in Online Assessment Training for Enhanced Student Learning in Web-Based Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiongyi; Li, Lan; Zhang, Zhihong

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of online assessment training, with synchronous group discussion as a key component, on subsequent web-based peer assessment results. Participants included 81 college students, mostly women, taking a business writing class. After initial submission of a draft counter-offer letter, they completed…

  7. [Key points for the management of dermatitis in Latin America. The SLAAI Consensus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jorge; Páez, Bruno; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; De Falco, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of atopic dermatitis in Latin America, as in other regions, has been increasing in recent years. The SLAAI consensus is based on a systematic search for articles related to dermatitis, with focus in the pathophysiology and treatment and its impact on Latin America, and reviewed using the Delphi methodology (Revista Alergia Mexico 2014;61:178-211). In this article we highlight the key points of consensus and particular considerations in Latin America.

  8. Managing more than the mean: Using quantile regression to identify factors related to large elk groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Angela K.; Cross, Paul C.; Creely, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animal group size distributions are often right-skewed, whereby most groups are small, but most individuals occur in larger groups that may also disproportionately affect ecology and policy. In this case, examining covariates associated with upper quantiles of the group size distribution could facilitate better understanding and management of large animal groups.

  9. The Key Principles of Process Manager Motivation in Production and Administration Processes in an Industrial Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chromjakova Felicita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic premise of sustainable development is that companies should completely re-evaluate their enterprise work logic and process organization. Most of the necessary changes concern employee stimulation and motivation. If we are truly interested in improving business results and the effectiveness of business processes – there would be no progress otherwise – we have to strive to break down the barriers between company management (leadership and employees in order to establish effective relationships between firms and customers. This paper presents research results of process manager activities in modern industrial enterprises, connected with a methodology proposal for the systematically-oriented process manager motivation of employees in accordance with the increased competitiveness of production and administration processes. It also presents an effective methodology of how to increase the positive effects of welldefined employee motivations from the process manager´s perspective. The core benefit of this methodology lies in the design of a systematic approach to the motivation process from the process manager side, allowing for radical performance improvement via production and administrative processes and the increased competitiveness of enterprise processes.

  10. The Difficulty in Following Project Schedule as a Key Project Management Challenge: Family Firm Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna SADKOWSKA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of how to manage projects successfully has been gaining growing interest for the last decades. The aforementioned is mainly caused by the fact that project management offers a wide range of methods and tools which, when properly used, can stimulate long-term growth of businesses. As a consequence it offers a particular development opportunity for family enterprises which, due to their specificity, have to overcome many difficulties. The primary objective of this paper is to examine whether family enterprises perceive, and to what extent, the factor of following project schedule as a difficulty in the area of project management. 154 Polish family firms representing different sectors were surveyed. The results of regression analysis show that family firms with global range of business activities, on the contrary to those with local or regional ones, do not find the factor of following project schedule as a difficulty. This results manly from the tools employed and the maturity level they have reached in project management. The findings support the current discussion on the specificity and uniqueness of family businesses in relationship to the knowledge area of project management. It also contributes to filling the gap on understanding the functioning of family firms in the emerging economies of Eastern Europe.

  11. The key to successful management of STS operations: An integrated production planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. A.; Thomasen, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Space Transportation System operations managers are being confronted with a unique set of challenges as a result of increasing flight rates, the demand for flight manifest/production schedule flexibility and an emphasis on continued cost reduction. These challenges have created the need for an integrated production planning system that provides managers with the capability to plan, schedule, status and account for an orderly flow of products and services across a large, multi-discipline organization. With increased visibility into the end-to-end production flow for individual and parallel missions in process, managers can assess the integrated impact of changes, identify and measure the interrelationships of resource, schedule, and technical performance requirements and prioritize productivity enhancements.

  12. The Influence of Group Training in the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program on Preschool Teachers' Classroom Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John S.; Tiret, Holly B.; Bender, Stacy L.; Benson, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined changes in preschool teachers' perceptions of classroom management strategies following group training in the recently revised Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program (C. Webster-Stratton, 2006). The authors used a pre/post follow-up design across 2 groups that each met for 8 sessions over an 8-10-week period for…

  13. Clusters Regarding Key Factors Affecting Changes in Accounting, Finance, Administration and Management Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Gabriela Blidisel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, important changes have occurred in public governance, which has evolved in this time from hierarchical bureaucracy to participatory governance, where the role of citizens in public decision-making process is more direct. There were performed reforms in finance, management administration and finances of public sector. Starting from the factors that influenced during the history the accounting, finances, administration and management control, we want to test the factors that affect the changes of these elements in Romanian environment.

  14. Strategic Planning, Key Tool for Brand Management in the New Advertising Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Mayorga-Escalada

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New market conditions combined with continuous technological development in Communication, push brands to take decisions in order to ensure viability. This adaptation process makes corporations to rethink new methods of Advertising Communication. Consumers have also changed, they are well informed and discerning buyers, a fact that forces brands to build relevant relationships with their audiences letting brands to develop powerful positioning connections and create added value. These new conditions lead brands to professionalize their management practices, developing comprehensive strategic planning process to manage their brand image building through the marketing mix also called branding.

  15. EDF - Annual results 2015. Consolidated financial statements at 31 December 2015. 2015 Management report - Group results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Jean-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2015 annual results, management report and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2015, as well as the 2015 activity report: Group results: Key figures; economic environment; significant events of 2015; subsequent events; analysis of the business and the consolidated income statements for 2014 and 2015; net indebtedness, cash flows and investments; management and control of market risks; transactions with related parties; scope of consolidation; principal risks and uncertainties; financial outlook. consolidated financial statements: group accounting standards; comparability; significant events and transactions; regulatory events in France; changes in the scope of consolidation; segment reporting; sales; fuel and energy purchases; other external expenses; personnel expenses; taxes other than income taxes; other operating income and expenses; impairment/reversals; other income and expenses; financial result; income taxes; basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share; operating assets and liabilities, equity; goodwill; other intangible assets; property, plant and equipment operated under French public electricity distribution concessions; property, plant and equipment operated under concessions for other activities; property, plant and equipment used in generation and other tangible assets owned by the group; investments in associates and joint ventures; inventories; trade receivables; other receivables; equity; provisions; provisions related to nuclear generation - back-end of the nuclear cycle

  16. General practitioners' perspectives on management of early-stage chronic kidney disease: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dipten, Carola; van Berkel, Saskia; de Grauw, Wim J C; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke D; Brongers, Bouke; van Spaendonck, Karel; Wetzels, Jack F M; Assendelft, Willem J J; Dees, Marianne K

    2018-06-06

    Guideline adherence in chronic kidney disease management is low, despite guideline implementation initiatives. Knowing general practitioners' (GPs') perspectives of management of early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the applicability of the national interdisciplinary guideline could support strategies to improve quality of care. Qualitative focus group study with 27 GPs in the Netherlands. Three analysts open-coded and comparatively analysed the data. Mind-mapping sessions were performed after data-saturation. Five themes emerged: defining CKD, knowledge and awareness, patient-physician interaction, organisation of CKD care and value of the guideline. A key finding was the abstractness of the CKD concept. The GPs expressed various perspectives about defining CKD and interpreting estimated glomerular filtration rates. Views about clinical relevance influenced the decision-making, although factual knowledge seems lacking. Striving to inform well enough without creating anxiety and to explain suitably for the intellectual ability of the patient caused tension in the patient-physician interaction. Integration with cardiovascular disease-management programmes was mentioned as a way of implementing CKD care in the future. The guideline was perceived as a rough guide rather than a leading document. CKD is perceived as an abstract rather than a clinical concept. Abstractness plays a role in all formulated themes. Management of CKD patients in primary care is complex and is influenced by physician-bound considerations related to individual knowledge and perception of the importance of CKD. Strategies are needed to improve GPs' understanding of the concept of CKD by education, a holistic approach to guidelines, and integration of CKD care into cardiovascular programmes. Not applicable.

  17. The emergent demand chain management: key features and illustration from the beef business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canever, M.D.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Beers, G.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Purpose - The paper seeks to delineate the emergence of demand chain management (DCM) from a theoretical perspective and to illustrate its occurrence in practice. Design/methodology/approach ¿ The DCM concept is examined empirically through a case study with retailers involved in the beef

  18. Change Management and the SENCo Role: Developing Key Performance Indicators of Inclusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Elizabeth; Murphy, Mike; Bedford, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This article highlights the changing role of special educational needs co-ordinators (SENCos) in England. SENCos are now required to manage change strategically and deliver inclusive school cultures. A school-based evaluative study undertaken by a teacher who is studying for the postgraduate National Award for SEN Co-ordination (NASENCO) for…

  19. Enhancing chronic disease management: a review of key issues and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, Kevin D; Williams, Paul; Andrews, Gavin J

    2007-11-01

    This paper highlights three selected issues and potential strategies towards meeting chronic disease management needs. First, the orientation of the biomedical science model often gives insufficient attention to chronic health care needs. A second issue is that the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may offer for some an opportunity to enhance their chronic disease management efforts. A third issue is that our understanding of this potential is limited, as many who use CAM do not disclose such use. With reference to proposed solutions/strategies, first, an improved focus to respect patient/client values and goals may encourage people to disclose their use of CAM. Second, a community-based participatory approach shows promise in enhancing communication plus helps integrate CAM within new models of chronic disease management. Lastly, those in public health could help facilitate such an approach plus be a monitor of CAM practices. Overall, this review provides a springboard for further research and practice in CAM and the management of chronic diseases.

  20. Change Management and the SENCo Role: Developing Key Performance Indicators in the Strategic Development of Inclusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Liz; Murphy, Mike; Watt, Mia

    2016-01-01

    This article follows an earlier publication highlighting the changing role of special educational needs co-ordinators (SENCos) in England. SENCos are now required to manage change strategically and deliver inclusive school cultures. School-based action research undertaken by a teacher studying for the postgraduate National Award for SEN…

  1. The keys to CERN conference rooms - Managing local collaboration facilities in large organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, T; Domaracky, M; Duran, G; Fernandes, J; Ferreira, P; Lopez, J B Gonzalez; Jouberjean, F; Lavrut, L; Tarocco, N

    2014-01-01

    For a long time HEP has been ahead of the curve in its usage of remote collaboration tools, like videoconference and webcast, while the local CERN collaboration facilities were somewhat behind the expected quality standards for various reasons. This time is now over with the creation by the CERN IT department in 2012 of an integrated conference room service which provides guidance and installation services for new rooms (either equipped for videoconference or not), as well as maintenance and local support. Managing now nearly half of the 246 meeting rooms available on the CERN sites, this service has been built to cope with the management of all CERN rooms with limited human resources. This has been made possible by the intensive use of professional software to manage and monitor all the room equipment, maintenance and activity. This paper focuses on presenting these packages, either off-the-shelf commercial products (asset and maintenance management tool, remote audio-visual equipment monitoring systems, local automation devices, new generation touch screen interfaces for interacting with the room) when available or locally developed integration and operational layers (generic audio-visual control and monitoring framework) and how they help overcoming the challenges presented by such a service. The aim is to minimise local human interventions while preserving the highest service quality and placing the end user back in the centre of this collaboration platform.

  2. Right-of-way management: A key to controlling the spread of cogograss (Imperata cylindrica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.H. Faircloth; M.G. Patterson; James H. Miller; D.H. Teem

    2004-01-01

    Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica(L.) Beauv.] is an undesired species on highway rights-of-way (ROWS) due to its displacenent of native and/or more manageable grasses, unsightly growth characteristic, and propensity for fire. Fire not only poses a danger to motorists but could cause property loss to adjoining landowners. Most importantly, ROWS provide...

  3. Key-socio economic factors influencing sustainable land management investments in the West Usambara Highlands, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, A.W.; Kessler, C.A.; Tenge, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Low investments in sustainable land management (SLM) limit agricultural production in the East African Highlands, leading to increased soil erosion, low productivity of land and food insecurity. Recent studies in the region show that different socio-economic factors influence SLM investments by

  4. Positioning the Learning Asset Portfolio as a Key Component in an Organization's Enterprise Risk Management Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a process for valuing a portfolio of learning assets used by line executives across industries to value traditional business assets. Embedded within the context of enterprise risk management, this strategic asset allocation process is presented step by step, providing readers the operational considerations to implement this…

  5. Recommendations to establish a waste management group for emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de; Silva, Eliane Magalhaes Pereira da; Prado, Maria Augusta Silva do

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of a radiation waste group to work in the emergency situations is proposed, as well as the guidelines for its formation. The purpose is to avoid or minimise possible wastes arising from accidents/incidents, and therefore minimise the environmental, economical and social impacts originated from these situations to the present and future generations

  6. A Model for Behavioral Management and Relationship Training for Parents in Groups,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavior, Human relations, *Training, *Families(Human), Symposia, Models, Children, Psychotherapy, Problem solving, Management, Control, Learning, Skills, Decision making , Group dynamics, Military psychology, Military medicine

  7. Long-Term Soil Experiments: A Key to Managing Earth's Rapidly Changing Critical Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    In a few decades, managers of Earth's Critical Zones (biota, humans, land, and water) will be challenged to double food and fiber production and diminish adverse effects of management on the wider environment. To meet these challenges, an array of scientific approaches is being used to increase understanding of Critical Zone functioning and evolution, and one amongst these approaches needs to be long-term soil field studies to move us beyond black boxing the belowground Critical Zone, i.e., to further understanding of processes driving changes in the soil environment. Long-term soil experiments (LTSEs) provide direct observations of soil change and functioning across time scales of decades, data critical for biological, biogeochemical, and environmental assessments of sustainability; for predictions of soil fertility, productivity, and soil-environment interactions; and for developing models at a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Unfortunately, LTSEs globally are not in a good state, and they take years to mature, are vulnerable to loss, and even today remain to be fully inventoried. Of the 250 LTSEs in a web-based network, results demonstrate that soils and belowground Critical Zones are highly dynamic and responsive to human management. The objective of this study is to review the contemporary state of LTSEs and consider how they contribute to three open questions: (1) can soils sustain a doubling of food production in the coming decades without further impinging on the wider environment, (2) how do soils interact with the global C cycle, and (3) how can soil management establish greater control over nutrient cycling. While LTSEs produce significant data and perspectives for all three questions, there is on-going need and opportunity for reviews of the long-term soil-research base, for establishment of an efficiently run network of LTSEs aimed at sustainability and improving management control over C and nutrient cycling, and for research teams that

  8. An Effective Key Management Approach to Differential Access Control in Dynamic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Yogesh Karandikar; Xukai Zou; Yuanshun Dai

    2006-01-01

    Applications like e-newspaper or interactive online gaming have more than one resource and a large number of users. There is a many-to-many relationship between users and resources; each user can access multiple resources and multiple users can access each resource. The resources are independent and each resource needs to be encrypted by a different Resource Encryption Key (REK). Each REK needs to be distributed to all subscribers of the resource and each subscriber must get all the REKs he/s...

  9. Disinvestment policy and the public funding of assisted reproductive technologies: outcomes of deliberative engagements with three key stakeholder groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, Katherine; Hiller, Janet E; Street, Jackie M; Carter, Drew; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Watt, Amber M; Moss, John R; Elshaug, Adam G

    2014-05-05

    Measures to improve the quality and sustainability of healthcare practice and provision have become a policy concern. In addition, the involvement of stakeholders in health policy decision-making has been advocated, as complex questions arise around the structure of funding arrangements in a context of limited resources. Using a case study of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), deliberative engagements with a range of stakeholder groups were held on the topic of how best to structure the distribution of Australian public funding in this domain. Deliberative engagements were carried out with groups of ART consumers, clinicians and community members. The forums were informed by a systematic review of ART treatment safety and effectiveness (focusing, in particular, on maternal age and number of treatment cycles), as well as by international policy comparisons, and ethical and cost analyses. Forum discussions were transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Each forum demonstrated stakeholders' capacity to understand concepts of choice under resource scarcity and disinvestment, and to countenance options for ART funding not always aligned with their interests. Deliberations in each engagement identified concerns around 'equity' and 'patient responsibility', culminating in a broad preference for (potential) ART subsidy restrictions to be based upon individual factors rather than maternal age or number of treatment cycles. Community participants were open to restrictions based upon measures of body mass index (BMI) and smoking status, while consumers and clinicians saw support to improve these factors as part of an ART treatment program, as distinct from a funding criterion. All groups advocated continued patient co-payments, with measures in place to provide treatment access to those unable to pay (namely, equity of access). Deliberations yielded qualitative, socially-negotiated evidence required to inform ethical, accountable policy decisions in the specific

  10. Footwear Supply Network Management for Specific Target Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Franchini, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    This research is a part of CoReNet (Customer-ORiented and Eco-friendly NETworks for healthy fashionable goods), an European 7th Framework Program project, whose objective is to implement innovative methods and tools to fulfil needs and expectations of specific target groups – elderly, obese, disabled and diabetic people – by improving the supply network structure of the European Textile, Clothing and Footwear Industry (TCFI) to produce small series of functional and fashionable clothes and fo...

  11. THE JAPANESE MANAGEMENT, A KEY ELEMENT OF TOYOTA’S SUCCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Sorin-George

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available After its defeat in the World War II, Japan was a country in ruin. The Japanese economy faced huge problems as unemployment and hyperinflation increased. The vast majority of its industry was destroyed and new industrial facilities had to be re-constructed from the ashes. In the 1970s Japan achieved a giant economic stature, evolving into the second largest economy of the world. There are many ways of analyzing the Japanese economic miracle, but in the final, management has to being considered as one of its most important factors. The aims of our paper are to emphasize some of the main features of the Japanese management in the globalization era, and to present the case of Toyota Motor Company. The research type is a literature review combined with a case study.

  12. Emotionally intelligent leadership as a key determinant of strategic and effective management of human capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Viskupičová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to outline the strategic importance of Emotional Intelligence (EI in contemporary approaches to management of Human resources (HR. The aim of this study is to provide a conceptual theoretical insight of the relationship between EI and leadership. The paper also reflects the conditions within the present business environment in Slovakia with the emphasis on leadership in the context of EI (based on the research conducted in this field, while answering the following question: To what extent do Slovak organizations incorporate EI measures into the hiring process for managerial positions? The answer to this question would consequently disclose whether organizations in Slovakia consider Emotional Intelligence as a factor determining effective performance of managers – leaders.

  13. Management of waste from french nuclear fuel cycle: what are the key issues?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londres, V.; Do Quang, R.; Fournier, P.

    2000-01-01

    Like any other industry, the nuclear industry generates waste. This waste arises in the different successive stages of the fuel cycle, including nuclear power plants, and its physical and chemical properties vary greatly. What is special about it is the radioactivity it contains. Management of waste generated by spent fuel conditioning in nuclear reprocessing facilities, and which cannot be stored in surface repositories, according to current French regulations (ILW and HLW), is specifically discussed in this paper. (authors)

  14. The key role of shared participation in changing occupational self-efficacy through stress management courses

    OpenAIRE

    Füllemann, Désirée; Jenny, Gregor J; Brauchli, Rebecca; Bauer, Georg F

    2015-01-01

    This study is the first that longitudinally examined change in occupational self-efficacy (OSE) through individual and shared participation in occupational stress management courses (SMC). Applying the framework of social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall), we assumed that participation in SMC facilitates OSE perceptions. We further assumed that the psychosocial environment promotes change ...

  15. Five Key Changes for the Management of UK Defence - An Agenda for Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-23

    in which the high-level commander’s Strategic Intent is clearly spelled out. Subordinates are then encouraged and empowered to implement this...provision of so-called “C” vehicles7 announced in June 2005, and the Future Strategic Tanker Aircraft (FSTA) which requires industry to raise some £3...management. For example, writers in this field such as Hamel & Prahalad (1994) and Johnson, Scholes and Whittington (2005) recommend that companies should

  16. Motivation and job satisfaction as a key element of successful business management.

    OpenAIRE

    Kazachok, Alina

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is motivation and job satisfaction of employees. The theoretical part deals with basic terms in the field of motivation and job satisfaction, motivation principles, factors that influence motivation and job satisfaction. Also the theoretical part gives consideration to the methods of measuring job satisfaction, manager's role in the sphere of motivation and job satisfaction. The part contains the description of the major motivational theories. The second part is dev...

  17. Key accountization at Bosch Automotive Aftermarket (BAA) Italy: managing and implementing a strategic change

    OpenAIRE

    P.Guenzi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to describe how a multinational company adopted a KAM program in a local branch, using the lenses of a well-established framework. Starting from a change in Strategy, the company had to modify its Shared values (culture), leadership Style, organization Structure, support Systems, Skills and Staff characteristics. To do this, we first review the sparse literature on KAM and change management, and summarize it. Next, we introduce the background information abo...

  18. Learning Lessons from TMI to Fukushima and Other Industrial Accidents: Keys for Assessing Safety Management Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechy, N.; Rousseau, J.-M.; Dien, Y.; Montmayeul, R.; Llory, M.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the paper is to discuss and to argue about transfer, from an industrial sector to another industrial sector, of lessons learnt from accidents. It will be achieved through the discussion of some theoretical foundations and through the illustration of examples of application cases in assessment of safety management practices in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The nuclear energy production industry has faced three big ones in 30 years (TMI, Chernobyl, Fukushima) involving three different reactor technologies operated in three quite different cultural, organizational and regulatory contexts. Each of those accident has been the origin of questions, but also generator of lessons, some changing the worldview (see Wilpert and Fahlbruch, 1998) of what does cause an accident in addition to the engineering view about the importance of technical failures (human error, safety culture, sociotechnical interactions). Some of their main lessons were implemented such as improvements of human-machine interfaces ergonomics, recast of some emergency operating procedures, severe accident mitigation strategies and crisis management. Some lessons did not really provide deep changes. It is the case for organizational lessons such as, organizational complexity, management of production pressures, regulatory capture, and failure to learn, etc.

  19. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2013-07-09

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones (13)C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the (13)C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-25°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes.

  20. Differential effects of professional leaders on health care teams in chronic disease management groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Douglas R; Disch, Joanne; White, Katie M; Powell, Adam; Rector, Thomas S; Sahay, Anju; Heidenreich, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Leadership by health care professionals is likely to vary because of differences in the social contexts within which they are situated, socialization processes and societal expectations, education and training, and the way their professions define and operationalize key concepts such as teamwork, collaboration, and partnership. This research examines the effect of the nurse and physician leaders on interdependence and encounter preparedness in chronic disease management practice groups. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of complementary leadership by nurses and physicians involved in jointly producing a health care service on care team functioning. The design is a retrospective observational study based on survey data. The unit of analysis is heart failure care groups in U.S. Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Survey and administrative data were collected in 2009 from 68 Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Key variables include nurse and physician leadership, interdependence, psychological safety, coordination, and encounter preparedness. Reliability and validity of survey measures were assessed with exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach alphas. Multivariate analyses tested hypotheses. Professional leadership by nurses and physicians is related to encounter preparedness by different paths. Nurse leadership is associated with greater team interdependence, and interdependence is positively associated with respect. Physician leadership is positively associated with greater psychological safety, respect, and shared goals but is not associated with interdependence. Respect is associated with involvement in learning activities, and shared goals are associated with coordination. Coordination and involvement in learning activities are positively associated with encounter preparedness. By focusing on increasing interdependence and a constructive climate, nurse and physician leaders have the opportunity to increase care coordination

  1. Managing Water in the Rural-Urban Interface : the Key to Climate ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The research team will draw up simple hydrological scenarios of city water supply and wastewater production. They will analyze the implications of these scenarios with interactive platforms of municipal authorities, affected persons and vulnerable groups (including women). And, for each city they will devise a strategic plan ...

  2. POSITIONING KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AS KEY SUCCESS FACTOR IN THE GROWTH OF COOPERATIVES IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeop Hussin Bidin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic and business challenges in the new millennium have shaped the manner cooperative movement in Malaysia charts its future outlook. After almost 82 years, a national policy was launched by the Government on January 2004 to assist in the comprehensive development of the cooperative movement. The National CooperativePolicy (NCP will ensure that the huge resources of the cooperatives can be harnessed to generate and contribute to the economic growth of the country. However, in the light of many issues such as weak structure and the absence of good corporate governance in some cooperatives, the present Cooperative Act 1993 is being reviewed and several new provisions would be added to increase supervision, monitoring and enforcement against existing cooperatives in alaysia. It is quite imperative that by regulating the operation of cooperatives will require also the managing of intellectual and human capital assets that exist in the movement. Through establishing a framework and terms of reference such that fundamental elements of knowledge management can be instilled areprerequisites to developing innovativeness in this growing economic sector. The sharing of knowledge among the cooperatives will eventually produce better and more educated human resources that are able to experience greater control over the works and the administration of their quality working life. Structural analysis of the cooperative movement indicates the significant influence of knowledge management in sustaining its future growth given the timely introduction of the NCP. Thus, measures taken to underline this influence will also be addressed to represent the cooperative movement's readiness to face economic and business challenges in Malaysia.

  3. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  4. A structured elicitation method to identify key direct risk factors for the management of natural resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Smith

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The high level of uncertainty inherent in natural resource management requires planners to apply comprehensive risk analyses, often in situations where there are few resources. In this paper, we demonstrate a broadly applicable, novel and structured elicitation approach to identify important direct risk factors. This new approach combines expert calibration and fuzzy based mathematics to capture and aggregate subjective expert estimates of the likelihood that a set of direct risk factors will cause management failure. A specific case study is used to demonstrate the approach; however, the described methods are widely applicable in risk analysis. For the case study, the management target was to retain all species that characterise a set of natural biological elements. The analysis was bounded by the spatial distribution of the biological elements under consideration and a 20-year time frame. Fourteen biological elements were expected to be at risk. Eleven important direct risk factors were identified that related to surrounding land use practices, climate change, problem species (e.g., feral predators, fire and hydrological change. In terms of their overall influence, the two most important risk factors were salinisation and a lack of water which together pose a considerable threat to the survival of nine biological elements. The described approach successfully overcame two concerns arising from previous risk analysis work: (1 the lack of an intuitive, yet comprehensive scoring method enabling the detection and clarification of expert agreement and associated levels of uncertainty; and (2 the ease with which results can be interpreted and communicated while preserving a rich level of detail essential for informed decision making.

  5. Key differences and similarities in ways of managing and supporting radical pharmaceutical front end innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2015-01-01

    of the Danish and US based pharmaceutical company, H. Lundbeck A/S, and a comparative study including five European and American pharmaceutical companies. The findings from the study reveal a number of similarities and differences in innovation management and FEI support of radical projects and among...... pharmaceutical companies, which represent a growing market. The value added and the contribution of this paper to the existing FEI literature is therefore in the specificity of the empirical setting in which the issue is investigated. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S1363919615500115...

  6. Governance and New Technologies: Key Reflections of Informatization on Administrative Management of Judiciary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Correia Da Silva Gomes Caldas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the consequences of new technologies in the administrativeorganization of the Judiciary and has good management practices that combine economic and social outcomes allies sustainability. The objective is to analyze how new technologies help in the governance of the Judiciary, especially regarding the transposition of the traditional support process paper to electronic court case. We opted for the bibliographical and documentary research using the deductive method. Justified the search because of democracy and globalization connect judicial governance computerization where it seeks to reconcile an administration results with sustainable practices.

  7. Success under duress: policies and practices managers view as keys to profitability in five California hospitals with challenging payer mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundall, Thomas; Oberlin, Shelley; Thygesen, Brian; Janus, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals with a challenging payer mix (CPM)-high proportions of uninsured and Medicaid patients and a low proportion of commercially insured patients-are an important source of care for low-income, uninsured people. Achieving profitability is difficult for CPM hospitals. From 2005 through 2008, only one-third of 67 CPM hospitals in California reported positive total margins. In-depth group interviews were completed with the management leadership teams of a diverse group of five profitable CPM hospitals to identify the management strategies and practices that the hospitals' leadership teams credited for their financial success. Twelve management policy and practice topics were identified. Four of the policies and practices that managers identified involve organizational actions to increase hospital revenue or operational efficiency. These factors are consistent with those identified in previous research. However, managers also identified eight factors not previously revealed in research on hospital profitability, including management policies and practices that establish the organizational culture, workforce, relationships, monitoring systems, and governance necessary to ensure that hospital employees and affiliated physicians support and successfully implement organizational actions necessary to achieve profitability.

  8. Understanding Lolium rigidum Seeds: The Key to Managing a Problem Weed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J. Steadman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The 40 million hectare southern Australian winter cropping region suffers from widespread infestation by Lolium rigidum (commonly known as annual or rigid ryegrass, a Mediterranean species initially introduced as a pasture plant. Along with its high competitiveness within crops, rapid adaptability and widespread resistance to herbicides, the dormancy of its seeds means that L. rigidum is the primary weed in southern Australian agriculture. With the individuals within a L. rigidum population exhibiting varying levels of seed dormancy, germination can be staggered across the crop-growing season, making complete weed removal virtually impossible, and ensuring that the weed seed bank is constantly replenished. By understanding the processes involved in induction and release of dormancy in L. rigidum seeds, it may be possible to develop strategies to more effectively manage this pest without further stretching herbicide resources. This review examines L. rigidum seed dormancy and germination from a weed-management perspective and explains how the seed bank can be depleted by control strategies encompassing all stages in the lifecycle of a seed, from development to germination.

  9. IT service management - key to the quality of IT service delivering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recky, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective of the contribution is to introduce IT service management (ITSM) as an approach to services quality improvement provided by IT departments of enterprises. As a result of massive application of information technologies in the past, the enterprises have become increasingly dependent on processes within IT of which many are critical for the business operations. Therefore it appears to be inevitable for IT organizations to become customer-oriented. ITSM's objective is to implement standardized and measurable IT services in every enterprise, to enable accurate service cost allocation and increase accuracy of planning of IT budget and investments. This method is based on processes definition, necessary technologies implementation and restructuralisation of human resources in IT organisations. It requires a change of attitude towards IT users who become IT department customers as well as cost-balanced utilization of in-sourcing and out-sourcing etc. Hewlett-Packard is a global leader offering its consulting and integration services in the area of IT service management together with an extensive portfolio of related technologies based on HP OpenView software platform. (author)

  10. Reputation management on facebook: awareness is key to protecting yourself, your practice, and the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Cynthia A; Coe, Jason B; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2014-01-01

    From the Social media use by health professionals occurs in a digital environment where etiquette has yet to be solidly defined. The objectives of this study were to explore veterinarians' personal use of Facebook, knowledge of privacy settings, and factors related to sharing personal information online. All American Animal Hospital Association member veterinarians with a valid e-mail address (9469) were invited to complete an online survey about Facebook (e.g., time spent on Facebook, awareness of consequences, types of information posted). Questions assessing personality dimensions including trust, popularity, self-esteem and professional identity were included. The response rate was 17% (1594 of 9469); 72% of respondents (1148 of 1594) had a personal Facebook profile. Veterinarians were more likely to share information on Facebook than they would in general. Trust, need for popularity, and more time spent on Facebook predicted more disclosure of personal information on Facebook. Awareness of consequences and increased veterinary experience predicted lesser disclosure. As veterinary practices use Facebook to improve client services, they need also to manage risks associated with online disclosure by staff. Raising awareness of reputation management and consequences of posting certain types of information to Facebook is integral to protecting the individual, the practice, and the veterinary profession.

  11. The key to health services in Turkey: new perspectives on leadership and hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Alper A

    2014-01-01

    Health services are one of the most important criteria for making a country function. Turkey has mobilized all of its resources to provide high-quality, easily accessible and patient-friendly services for its population. To achieve this aim, the Turkish health care system has been undergoing a significant transformation through its Health Transformation Programme begun in 2005. The reforms focus on the introduction of a general health insurance system, changing hospital health services, improvements in hospital management and transformational leadership skills. Firstly, all state-run hospitals in the country were merged under the same umbrella, giving millions of people covered by the national security agency access to all of these hospitals. Secondly, all drugs and medical equipment used by patients were made free of charge. Thanks to these developments, hospitals were modernized, and this modernization process in the health sector is still continuing swiftly. On the other hand, for Turkish hospitals to survive, they need to modernize further and become closer to European models, and produce new leaders with new paradigms. In this new and changing health system, hospital leaders and executive officers should be visionaries and strategists advising when to change direction. Following this doctrine, most Turkish hospitals are now run by two top executives: the hospital manager and the chief executive officer who is in charge of business functions. These executives should clearly be the leaders of high-quality, health care organizations.

  12. Producer responsibility for e-waste management: key issues for consideration - learning from the Swiss experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetriwal, Deepali Sinha; Kraeuchi, Philipp; Widmer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life. This paper briefly introduces the concept of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and its applicability in the area of the end-of-life management of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE). It then examines the decade-long experience of Switzerland in using EPR to manage its e-waste, elaborating on the experience of the Swiss system in overcoming specific issues, and finally wrapping up with a synopsis of the lessons for policy makers. We consider each issue as an enquiry of questions confronting a policy maker and the choices that may present themselves. The five issues discussed are: (i) the challenges in getting an EPR based system started; (ii) securing financing to ensure a self-sustaining and smooth functioning system; (iii) organising a logistics network for the take back and collection of the e-waste; (iv) ensuring compliance of the various actors involved; and finally (v) reducing the threat of monopolistic practices.

  13. Implementing Self-Management within a Group Counseling Context: Effects on Academic Enabling Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briesch DuBois, Jacquelyn M.; Briesch, Amy M.; Hoffman, Jessica A.; Struzziero, Joan; Toback, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Self-management interventions have been adapted to serve as targeted interventions to increase academic enabling behaviors in groups of students. However, a trade-off exists between adapting these interventions to feasibly fit group contexts and maintaining theoretical intervention components. This study examines the use of self-management within…

  14. 75 FR 66125 - Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... pollutants that could affect the health and status of resources in areas managed by the three agencies... Work Group (FLAG) AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of final... Public Comments document. The Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG) was...

  15. 78 FR 46361 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity River...-FF08EACT00] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting... Trinity Management Council (TMC). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and web-based meeting: TAMWG and...

  16. CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc (CHG) Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NELSON, R.L.

    2000-06-06

    The CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), Information Resource Management Strategic Plan is the top-level planning document for applying information and information resource management to achieve the CHG mission for the management of the River Protection Project waste tank farm.

  17. CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc (CHG) Information Resource Management (IRM) Strategic Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSON, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    The CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), Information Resource Management Strategic Plan is the top-level planning document for applying information and information resource management to achieve the CHG mission for the management of the River Protection Project waste tank farm

  18. An Energy-Efficient Secure Routing and Key Management Scheme for Mobile Sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Deployment Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Xuan Hung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For many sensor network applications such as military or homeland security, it is essential for users (sinks to access the sensor network while they are moving. Sink mobility brings new challenges to secure routing in large-scale sensor networks. Previous studies on sink mobility have mainly focused on efficiency and effectiveness of data dissemination without security consideration. Also, studies and experiences have shown that considering security during design time is the best way to provide security for sensor network routing. This paper presents an energy-efficient secure routing and key management for mobile sinks in sensor networks, called SCODEplus. It is a significant extension of our previous study in five aspects: (1 Key management scheme and routing protocol are considered during design time to increase security and efficiency; (2 The network topology is organized in a hexagonal plane which supports more efficiency than previous square-grid topology; (3 The key management scheme can eliminate the impacts of node compromise attacks on links between non-compromised nodes; (4 Sensor node deployment is based on Gaussian distribution which is more realistic than uniform distribution; (5 No GPS or like is required to provide sensor node location information. Our security analysis demonstrates that the proposed scheme can defend against common attacks in sensor networks including node compromise attacks, replay attacks, selective forwarding attacks, sinkhole and wormhole, Sybil attacks, HELLO flood attacks. Both mathematical and simulation-based performance evaluation show that the SCODEplus significantly reduces the communication overhead, energy consumption, packet delivery latency while it always delivers more than 97 percent of packets successfully.

  19. Relation Analysis of Knowledge Management, Research, and Innovation in University Research Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyder Paez-Logreira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a competitive advantage for companies. Knowledge Management helps to keep this competitiveness. Universities face with challenges in research, innovation and international competitiveness. The purpose of this paper includes studying Knowledge Management Models, and Innovation Models apply to Research Groups of Universities, through an analysis of relation in inter-organizational level. Some researchers and leaders of research groups participated in a survey about knowledge management and innovation. Here we show the relationship between knowledge management, innovation and research, including processes and operations performed by universities around these. We organize the results in three dimensions: Knowledge Management perception, the relationship between Knowledge Management and Innovation, and Strategic Knowledge organization. Too, we identify a generality of good practices, challenges, and limitations on Research Groups for Knowledge Management.

  20. Trust Management for Public Key Infrastructures: Implementing the X.509 Trust Broker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Samer Wazan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Public Key Infrastructure (PKI is considered one of the most important techniques used to propagate trust in authentication over the Internet. This technology is based on a trust model defined by the original X.509 (1988 standard and is composed of three entities: the certification authority (CA, the certificate holder (or subject, and the Relying Party (RP. The CA plays the role of a trusted third party between the certificate holder and the RP. In many use cases, this trust model has worked successfully. However, we argue that the application of this model on the Internet implies that web users need to depend on almost anyone in the world in order to use PKI technology. Thus, we believe that the current TLS system is not fit for purpose and must be revisited as a whole. In response, the latest draft edition of X.509 has proposed a new trust model by adding new entity called the Trust Broker (TB. In this paper, we present an implementation approach that a Trust Broker could follow in order to give RPs trust information about a CA by assessing the quality of its issued certificates. This is related to the quality of the CA’s policies and procedures and its commitment to them. Finally, we present our Trust Broker implementation that demonstrates how RPs can make informed decisions about certificate holders in the context of the global web, without requiring large processing resources themselves.

  1. How will ocean acidification affect Baltic sea ecosystems? an assessment of plausible impacts on key functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenhand, Jonathan N

    2012-09-01

    Increasing partial pressure of atmospheric CO₂ is causing ocean pH to fall-a process known as 'ocean acidification'. Scenario modeling suggests that ocean acidification in the Baltic Sea may cause a ≤ 3 times increase in acidity (reduction of 0.2-0.4 pH units) by the year 2100. The responses of most Baltic Sea organisms to ocean acidification are poorly understood. Available data suggest that most species and ecologically important groups in the Baltic Sea food web (phytoplankton, zooplankton, macrozoobenthos, cod and sprat) will be robust to the expected changes in pH. These conclusions come from (mostly) single-species and single-factor studies. Determining the emergent effects of ocean acidification on the ecosystem from such studies is problematic, yet very few studies have used multiple stressors and/or multiple trophic levels. There is an urgent need for more data from Baltic Sea populations, particularly from environmentally diverse regions and from controlled mesocosm experiments. In the absence of such information it is difficult to envision the likely effects of future ocean acidification on Baltic Sea species and ecosystems.

  2. Strategic management and organizational behavior in dental education: reflections on key issues in an environment of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, David G; Durham, Timothy M; Lange, Brian M; Aksu, Mert N

    2009-06-01

    With issues such as shrinking revenue, access to care, faculty workloads, and graying faculty, dental schools are faced with difficult challenges that fall to dental school deans to manage. Do dental school deans have the organizational skill sets and ethical frameworks necessary to address the challenges now facing dental schools? The purpose of this article is to pose questions and suggestions regarding some of the key issues in dental colleges today and to stimulate discussion in the dental community about needed changes in dental education.

  3. Online tutoring procedure for research project supervision: management, organization and key elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antònia Darder Mesquida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Research project tutoring appears as a crucial element for teaching; it is a planned action based on the relationship between a tutor and a student. This paper presents the findings of a design and development research which has as its main aim to create an organization system for the tutoring of online research projects. That system seeks to facilitate the tutoring and supervision task with trainee researchers, providing guidance for its management and instruments for its implementation. The main conclusions arising from this research derive from considering the need to offer a solution to the problem of distance research project supervision and has materialized in organization and sequencing through a model about the variables that influence the research project tutoring problem.

  4. EMPLOYEE ADAPTATION AS KEY ACTIVITY IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT UPON IMPLEMENTING AND MAINTAINING DESIRED ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Stacho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the greatest possible equivalence between human resources in a company and desired organisational culture elements declared by a company, it is necessary to interconnect activities within individual functions of human resource management with desired values, attitudes and work behaviour. Such an interconnection is crucial for a positive response of employees to a suitable organisational culture, its embedding in their behaviour and subsequent sharing and spreading of organisational values. This paper will specifically define individual activities related to the adaptation of employees which need to be carried out in this regard. Based on a research conducted between 2011 and 2013, the paper will also define the present state and level of focus of organisations operating in Slovakia on both organisational culture as a whole and organisational culture in the context of employee adaptation.

  5. Privacy enhancing techniques - the key to secure communication and management of clinical and genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, G J E; Claerhout, B; De Meyer, F

    2003-01-01

    To introduce some of the privacy protection problems related to genomics based medicine and to highlight the relevance of Trusted Third Parties (TTPs) and of Privacy Enhancing Techniques (PETs) in the restricted context of clinical research and statistics. Practical approaches based on two different pseudonymisation models, both for batch and interactive data collection and exchange, are described and analysed. The growing need of managing both clinical and genetic data raises important legal and ethical challenges. Protecting human rights in the realm of privacy, while optimising research potential and other statistical activities is a challenge that can easily be overcome with the assistance of a trust service provider offering advanced privacy enabling/enhancing solutions. As such, the use of pseudonymisation and other innovative Privacy Enhancing Techniques can unlock valuable data sources.

  6. Proceedings of the 7. annual workshop of the CEATI Water Management Group : water management 2006 : collecting and managing hydrologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This workshop by the Water Management Interest Group of CEATI focused on the development and methods and tools needed to optimize hydraulic processes while maintaining safe and environmentally-sound operations. In particular, it addressed issues regarding watershed management and water use planning, meteorological forecasting, operational modeling, data acquisition techniques, and impact assessment. Hydrologic data must be acquired and processed in order to effectively operate water control structures. It was noted that although data requirements may change from basin to basin, depending on seasonal forecasting, quality data is the foundation of all hydrological operational modelling and decision support software packages. As such, better acquisition methods and equipment are needed along with well designed networks and modern control applications. The first session of this workshop dealt with network data collection offered an opportunity to expand network design criteria standards and technologies that can offer support for cost effective maintenance to achieve acceptable levels of reliability and accuracy. The second session on quality control and data validation explored potential solutions for improved methods and techniques in quality control. The third session on data sharing and network coordination examined ways that companies and government agencies manage and share hydrologic data. The workshop featured 22 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  7. National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenberg, R.B.

    1998-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 to assist states and compacts in their siting and licensing efforts for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) is the element of the DOE that performs the key support activities under the Act. The NLLWMP's activities are driven by the needs of the states and compacts as they prepare to manage their low-level waste under the Act. Other work is added during the fiscal year as necessary to accommodate new requests brought on by status changes in states' and compacts' siting and licensing efforts. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during FY 1997

  8. The ultracondenser. A key component for successful power management; Der Ultrakondensator. Eine Schluesselkomponente fuer erfolgreiches Energiemanagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soucaze-Guillous, Benoit; Wieser, Christoph; Auer, Juergen [Maxwell Technologies GmbH, Gilching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Today's power distribution systems are stressed by a variety of consumers in comfort or safety oriented systems. Ongoing electrification still increases the load so that new approaches for future power distribution system concepts and storage technologies will be required. The energy storage in future vehicles has to fulfill certain requirements which can be met with using ultracaps as electrostatic storage: high current capability, low self discharge rate, good performance at low temperatures and high cycle life. Ultracaps demonstrate their strengths where batteries show weaknesses: at low temperatures. Even in the range down to -40 C they work with highest efficiency and highest possible reliability. In order to support the battery for cold start or as back-up for safety critical systems, the energy stored in a cell is not allowed to be lost by self discharge effects. Therefore Maxwell ultracaps are characterized by low self discharge rates. They help creating an efficient power distribution system by providing the still increasing peak power. In contrast to peak power continuous energy demand is covered by the power distribution system with its integrated primary energy source. Automotive manufacturers develop micro hybrid systems including start-stop and recuperation functions in order to meet legal emission limits. Especially in those applications high currents occur as short pulses. For start-stop typically current is at more than 500A. The ultracap is able to handle those high currents even under cycle conditions during whole vehicle life without any negative effects on safety, lifetime or performance. Availability of ultracapacitors will be guaranteed also in future, since the electrode as key component is extracted from an environment-friendly and renewable raw material: coconut shells. (orig.)

  9. Managing medical groups: 21st century challenges and the impact of physician leadership styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William E; Keogh, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Physician group managers and administrators charged with leading medical groups in the 21st century face a set of old and new challenges and opportunities. Leadership is assumed to make the difference between a successful and not-so-successful medical group. Yet, there is little research about how physician manager leadership styles contribute to the success of medical group practices. This article is a study of physician leadership styles using the DiSC, based upon a sample of 232 physician managers. Dominance (D) and conscientiousness (C) were the two dominant styles found in this study. Moreover, the two dominant combination leadership styles fall under the categories of the "creative" and the 'perfectionist." The article formulates practical recommendations for both physician managers and administrators for leading medical groups to respond more effectively to the challenges and opportunities facing medical groups in the 21st century.

  10. Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction - 100-DR-1 Group 2 Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This site-specific waste management instruction (SSWMI) provides guidance for the management of wastes that may be generated during the excavation and remediation of the 100-DR-1 Group 2 sites. The management of waste generated as a result of these activities will be as directed in this SSWMI. This SSWMI will be revised to incorporate guidance for management of wastes encountered that are not addressed in this SSWMI

  11. Analysis on Key Points of Construction and Management of Municipal Landscape Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingxia; Fei, Cheng

    2018-02-01

    At present, China has made great efforts to promote the construction of ecological civilization and promote the development of ecological protection and environmental construction. It has important practical significance to maintain the ecological balance and environmental quality of our country. Especially with the gradual improvement in people’s awareness of environmental protection, so that the green of the city also put forward higher requirements at the same time with the rising of the level of urbanization. In the process of urban landscape construction, the rational planning of urban landscaping involves a lot of subject knowledge. In the green process, we should fully consider the system of urban development and construction in China, based on the design of urban development and long-term planning of the landscaping project. In addition, we must also consider the traditional layout of the city area and the physical and geographical situation and so on, to enhance the objective and scientific nature of urban landscape. Therefore, it is of great practical significance to ensure the quality of landscaping in the effective management of municipal landscape engineering.

  12. Key players and legislative framework relative to radioactive materials and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birraux, C.

    2011-01-01

    While French industry as a whole appears to have bowed slightly under increasing pressure from the competition in an international economic arena that is becoming more and more open and diverse, France's nuclear industry has firmly held onto its position as world leader, secured during the seventies and eighties. This is the result of sustained national investment in research to constantly improve the performance and safety of the solutions deployed; it is also due to the dynamism of the companies involved, which have successfully developed their international base while maintaining a firm national foothold; it is also due to a consistent commitment on the part of the public authorities, which have provided sound guidelines, while placing greater emphasis on transparency and giving structure to crucial dialogue with the public. France is also one of the first countries that has developed a nuclear power programme, to have set up an organisation, a framework and a coherent strategy regarding the management of all its radioactive waste. (author)

  13. Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio T C C Rachid

    Full Text Available Fungi are ubiquitous and important contributors to soil nutrient cycling, playing a vital role in C, N and P turnover, with many fungi having direct beneficial relationships with plants. However, the factors that modulate the soil fungal community are poorly understood. We studied the degree to which the composition of tree species affected the soil fungal community structure and diversity by pyrosequencing the 28S rRNA gene in soil DNA. We were also interested in whether intercropping (mixed plantation of two plant species could be used to select fungal species. More than 50,000 high quality sequences were analyzed from three treatments: monoculture of Eucalyptus; monoculture of Acacia mangium; and a mixed plantation with both species sampled 2 and 3 years after planting. We found that the plant type had a major effect on the soil fungal community structure, with 75% of the sequences from the Eucalyptus soil belonging to Basidiomycota and 19% to Ascomycota, and the Acacia soil having a sequence distribution of 28% and 62%, respectively. The intercropping of Acacia mangium in a Eucalyptus plantation significantly increased the number of fungal genera and the diversity indices and introduced or increased the frequency of several genera that were not found in the monoculture cultivation samples. Our results suggest that management of soil fungi is possible by manipulating the composition of the plant community, and intercropped systems can be a means to achieve that.

  14. APPROACH TO CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT (CRM-THE NEW KEY SALES SUCCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mihai VASILIU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I investigate the new role of marketing specialists as customers supporters by understanding theirreal needs and concerns, ensuring that promises are, effectively and convince, a reality. In the past years there havebeen considerable changes in the arena battle to win customers and is currently recording a reconceptualization of thenotion of selling. In the current business environment, characterized by a competition from increasingly aggressive, thebattle to win customers is powerful every day. Companies that enter a new market to compete weakens the existing andsolid ones thanks to new ways of doing business and design. It will show that implementing a CRM strategy is not aluxury but a necessity in terms of the XXI century economy wich is "Customer Economy", whose rules are: the clienthas the power to decide, the relationship with the customer is its most value of the company, personal experience of theclient in the relationship with the company is decisive for its success, but will emerge and limitations of this approach.It will customize the application of modern competitive strategies focused on customer relationship management (CRMin a banking environment, being only able to provide a lasting competitive advantage in the competition.

  15. Key European guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with phenylketonuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Spronsen, Francjan J; van Wegberg, Annemiek Mj; Ahring, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    was available. From the 70 recommendations formulated, in this Review we describe ten that we deem as having the highest priority. Diet is the cornerstone of treatment, although some patients can benefit from tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Untreated blood phenylalanine concentrations determine management of people...... with PKU. No intervention is required if the blood phenylalanine concentration is less than 360 μmol/L. Treatment is recommended up to the age of 12 years if the phenylalanine blood concentration is between 360 μmol/L and 600 μmol/L, and lifelong treatment is recommended if the concentration is more than...... 600 μmol/L. For women trying to conceive and during pregnancy (maternal PKU), untreated phenylalanine blood concentrations of more than 360 μmol/L need to be reduced. Treatment target concentrations are as follows: 120-360 μmol/L for individuals aged 0-12 years and for maternal PKU, and 120-600 μmol...

  16. Intercropped Silviculture Systems, a Key to Achieving Soil Fungal Community Management in Eucalyptus Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid, Caio T. C. C.; Balieiro, Fabiano C.; Fonseca, Eduardo S.; Peixoto, Raquel Silva; Chaer, Guilherme M.; Tiedje, James M.; Rosado, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous and important contributors to soil nutrient cycling, playing a vital role in C, N and P turnover, with many fungi having direct beneficial relationships with plants. However, the factors that modulate the soil fungal community are poorly understood. We studied the degree to which the composition of tree species affected the soil fungal community structure and diversity by pyrosequencing the 28S rRNA gene in soil DNA. We were also interested in whether intercropping (mixed plantation of two plant species) could be used to select fungal species. More than 50,000 high quality sequences were analyzed from three treatments: monoculture of Eucalyptus; monoculture of Acacia mangium; and a mixed plantation with both species sampled 2 and 3 years after planting. We found that the plant type had a major effect on the soil fungal community structure, with 75% of the sequences from the Eucalyptus soil belonging to Basidiomycota and 19% to Ascomycota, and the Acacia soil having a sequence distribution of 28% and 62%, respectively. The intercropping of Acacia mangium in a Eucalyptus plantation significantly increased the number of fungal genera and the diversity indices and introduced or increased the frequency of several genera that were not found in the monoculture cultivation samples. Our results suggest that management of soil fungi is possible by manipulating the composition of the plant community, and intercropped systems can be a means to achieve that. PMID:25706388

  17. Culture, management and finances as key aspects for healthy workplace initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, Pippa; Pescud, Melanie; Chappell, Stacie; Davies, Christina; Roche, Dee; Shilton, Trevor; Ledger, Melissa; Slevin, Terry; Rosenberg, Michael

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore the barriers and enablers to implementing healthy workplace initiatives in a sample of workplaces based in Perth, Western Australia. In-depth interviews were conducted with representatives from 31 organizations representing small, medium and large businesses in the Perth metropolitan area which reported having healthy workplace initiatives. In total, 43 factors were mentioned as influencing the implementation of healthy workplace initiatives. Factors appearing to exert the most influence on the implementation of health promoting initiatives in this sample were culture; support from managers and staff; collaboration with industry providers; financial resources circumstances and the physical environment. These factors appeared to be mutually reinforcing and interconnected. Findings suggest there may be merit in applying an organizational development lens to the implementation of workplace health promotion initiatives as this could assist in leveraging enablers and minimizing barriers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid, Caio T C C; Balieiro, Fabiano C; Fonseca, Eduardo S; Peixoto, Raquel Silva; Chaer, Guilherme M; Tiedje, James M; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous and important contributors to soil nutrient cycling, playing a vital role in C, N and P turnover, with many fungi having direct beneficial relationships with plants. However, the factors that modulate the soil fungal community are poorly understood. We studied the degree to which the composition of tree species affected the soil fungal community structure and diversity by pyrosequencing the 28S rRNA gene in soil DNA. We were also interested in whether intercropping (mixed plantation of two plant species) could be used to select fungal species. More than 50,000 high quality sequences were analyzed from three treatments: monoculture of Eucalyptus; monoculture of Acacia mangium; and a mixed plantation with both species sampled 2 and 3 years after planting. We found that the plant type had a major effect on the soil fungal community structure, with 75% of the sequences from the Eucalyptus soil belonging to Basidiomycota and 19% to Ascomycota, and the Acacia soil having a sequence distribution of 28% and 62%, respectively. The intercropping of Acacia mangium in a Eucalyptus plantation significantly increased the number of fungal genera and the diversity indices and introduced or increased the frequency of several genera that were not found in the monoculture cultivation samples. Our results suggest that management of soil fungi is possible by manipulating the composition of the plant community, and intercropped systems can be a means to achieve that.

  19. SDAI: a key piece of software to manage the new wideband backend at Robledo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, J. R.; Gutiérrez Bustos, M.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Cernicharo, J.; Sotuela, I.; Pedreira, A.

    2012-09-01

    A joint collaborative project was recently developed to provide the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex with a state-of-the-art wideband backend. This new backend provides from 100MHz to 6 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth, and spectral resolutions from 6 to 200 kHz. The backend includes a new intermediate-frequency processor, as well as a FPGA-based FFT spectrometer, which manage thousands of spectroscopic channels in real time. All these equipment need to be controlled and operated by a common software, which has to synchronize activities among affected devices, and also with the observing program. The final output should be a calibrated spectrum, readable by standard radio astronomical tools for further processing. The developed software at this end is named "Spectroscopic Data Acquisition Interface" (SDAI). SDAI is written in python 2.5, using PyQt4 for the User Interface. By an ethernet socket connection, SDAI receives astronomical information (source, frequencies, Doppler correction, etc.) and the antenna status from the observing program. Then it synchronizes the observations at the required frequency by tuning the synthesizers through their USB ports; finally SDAI controls the FFT spectrometers through UDP commands sent by sockets. Data are transmitted from the FFT spectrometers by TCP sockets, and written as standard FITS files. In this paper we describe the modules built, depict a typical observing session, and show some astronomical results using SDAI.

  20. Conflict Management in Student Groups - a Teacher’s Perspective in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Borg; Joakim Kembro; Jesper Notander; Catarina Petersson; Lars Ohlsson

    2011-01-01

    Students working in groups is a commonly used method of instruction in higher education, popularized by the introduction of problem based learning. As a result, management of small groups of people has become an important skill for teachers. The objective of our study is to investigate why conflicts arise in student groups at the Faculty of Engineering at Lund University and how teachers manage them. We have conducted an exploratory interdepartmental interview study on teachers' views on this...

  1. A Survey of Managers' Access to Key Performance Indicators via HIS: The Case of Iranian Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Khorrami, Farid; Dehnad, Afsaneh; Golchin, Mohammad H; Azad, Mohsen; Rahimi, Shafei

    2018-01-01

    The challenges of using health information systems in developing countries are different from developed countries for various reasons such as infrastructure and data culture of organizations. The aim of this study is to assess managers' access to key performance indicators (KPI) via Hospital Information System (HIS) in teaching hospitals of Iran. All managers (Census method) of the four teaching hospitals affiliated to Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences (HUMS) were included in this study. KPIs which are linked to the strategic objectives of organizations were adopted from the strategic plan of HUMS. The questionnaire used in this study included three categories: Financial, Human Resources and clinical. One-sample t-test was used and the significant difference score was calculated for the acceptable level. We found that HIS cannot facilitate access to KPIs for managers in the main categories, but it was effective in two subcategories of income (p = 0.314) and salary (P = 0.289)). A study of barriers to the use of managers of HIS in hospitals is suggested.

  2. Management of Graves' disease during pregnancy: the key role of fetal thyroid gland monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luton, Dominique; Le Gac, Isabelle; Vuillard, Edith; Castanet, Mireille; Guibourdenche, Jean; Noel, Michèle; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Léger, Juliane; Boissinot, Christine; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Garel, Catherine; Tébeka, Brigitte; Oury, Jean-François; Czernichow, Paul; Polak, Michel

    2005-11-01

    Fetuses from mothers with Graves' disease may experience hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism due to transplacental transfer of antithyroid drugs (ATD) or anti-TSH receptor antibodies, respectively. Little is known about the fetal consequences. Early diagnosis is essential to successful management. We investigated a new approach to the fetal diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and validated the usefulness of fetal thyroid ultrasonograms. Seventy-two mothers with past or present Graves' disease and their fetuses were monitored monthly from 22 wk gestation. Fetal thyroid size and Doppler signals, and fetal bone maturation were determined on ultrasonograms, and thyroid function was evaluated at birth. Thyroid function and ATD dosage were monitored in the mothers. The 31 fetuses whose mothers were anti-TSH receptor antibody negative and took no ATDs during late pregnancy had normal test results. Of the 41 other fetuses, 30 had normal test results at 32 wk, 29 were euthyroid at birth, and one had moderate hypothyroidism on cord blood tests. In the remaining 11 fetuses, goiter was visualized by ultrasonography at 32 wk, and fetal thyroid dysfunction was diagnosed and treated; there was one death, in a late referral, and 10 good outcomes with normal or slightly altered thyroid function at birth. The sensitivity and specificity of fetal thyroid ultrasound at 32 wk for the diagnosis of clinically relevant fetal thyroid dysfunction were 92 and 100%, respectively. In pregnant women with past or current Graves' disease, ultrasonography of the fetal thyroid gland by an experienced ultrasonographer is an excellent diagnostic tool. This tool in conjunction with close teamwork among internists, endocrinologists, obstetricians, echographists, and pediatricians can ensure normal fetal thyroid function.

  3. Biometric Methods for Secure Communications in Body Sensor Networks: Resource-Efficient Key Management and Signal-Level Data Scrambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Francis Minhthang; Hatzinakos, Dimitrios

    2007-12-01

    As electronic communications become more prevalent, mobile and universal, the threats of data compromises also accordingly loom larger. In the context of a body sensor network (BSN), which permits pervasive monitoring of potentially sensitive medical data, security and privacy concerns are particularly important. It is a challenge to implement traditional security infrastructures in these types of lightweight networks since they are by design limited in both computational and communication resources. A key enabling technology for secure communications in BSN's has emerged to be biometrics. In this work, we present two complementary approaches which exploit physiological signals to address security issues: (1) a resource-efficient key management system for generating and distributing cryptographic keys to constituent sensors in a BSN; (2) a novel data scrambling method, based on interpolation and random sampling, that is envisioned as a potential alternative to conventional symmetric encryption algorithms for certain types of data. The former targets the resource constraints in BSN's, while the latter addresses the fuzzy variability of biometric signals, which has largely precluded the direct application of conventional encryption. Using electrocardiogram (ECG) signals as biometrics, the resulting computer simulations demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of these methods for delivering secure communications in BSN's.

  4. Biometric Methods for Secure Communications in Body Sensor Networks: Resource-Efficient Key Management and Signal-Level Data Scrambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Hatzinakos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available As electronic communications become more prevalent, mobile and universal, the threats of data compromises also accordingly loom larger. In the context of a body sensor network (BSN, which permits pervasive monitoring of potentially sensitive medical data, security and privacy concerns are particularly important. It is a challenge to implement traditional security infrastructures in these types of lightweight networks since they are by design limited in both computational and communication resources. A key enabling technology for secure communications in BSN's has emerged to be biometrics. In this work, we present two complementary approaches which exploit physiological signals to address security issues: (1 a resource-efficient key management system for generating and distributing cryptographic keys to constituent sensors in a BSN; (2 a novel data scrambling method, based on interpolation and random sampling, that is envisioned as a potential alternative to conventional symmetric encryption algorithms for certain types of data. The former targets the resource constraints in BSN's, while the latter addresses the fuzzy variability of biometric signals, which has largely precluded the direct application of conventional encryption. Using electrocardiogram (ECG signals as biometrics, the resulting computer simulations demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of these methods for delivering secure communications in BSN's.

  5. Innovative data tools: a suite for managing peer outreach to key affected populations in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Nguyen Thien; Jacka, David; Van Hai, Nguyen; Trinh, Nguyen Kieu; Boisen, Neil; Neukom, Josselyn

    2012-07-01

    The paper tools used to monitor outreach work in all major cities in Viet Nam had substantial writing requirements for each contact with difficulty maintaining confidentiality. This paper describes the development of a Unique Identifier Code (UIC), a field data collection notebook (databook) and a computer data entry system in Viet Nam. The databook can document 40 individual clients and has space for commodity distribution, group contacts and needles/syringe collection for each month. Field implementation trials of the UIC and databook have been undertaken by more than 160 peer outreach workers to document their work with people who inject drugs (PWID) and sex workers (SW). Following an expanded trial in Hai Phong province, there have been requests for national circulation of the databook to be used by peer educators documenting outreach to PWID, SW and men who have sex with men. The standardized UIC and databook, in a variety of locally adapted formats, have now been introduced in more than 40 of the 63 provinces in Viet Nam. This development in Viet Nam is, to our knowledge, the first example of the combination of a confidential UIC and an innovative, simple pocket-sized paper instrument with associated customized data-entry software for documenting outreach.

  6. Environmental Influences on Physical Activity among Rural Adults in Montana, United States: Views from Built Environment Audits, Resident Focus Groups, and Key Informant Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Lo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rural populations in the United States have lower physical activity levels and are at a higher risk of being overweight and suffering from obesity than their urban counterparts. This paper aimed to understand the environmental factors that influence physical activity among rural adults in Montana. Eight built environment audits, 15 resident focus groups, and 24 key informant interviews were conducted between August and December 2014. Themes were triangulated and summarized into five categories of environmental factors: built, social, organizational, policy, and natural environments. Although the existence of active living features was documented by environmental audits, residents and key informants agreed that additional indoor recreation facilities and more well-maintained and conveniently located options were needed. Residents and key informants also agreed on the importance of age-specific, well-promoted, and structured physical activity programs, offered in socially supportive environments, as facilitators to physical activity. Key informants, however, noted that funding constraints and limited political will were barriers to developing these opportunities. Since building new recreational facilities and structures to support active transportation pose resource challenges, especially for rural communities, our results suggest that enhancing existing features, making small improvements, and involving stakeholders in the city planning process would be more fruitful to build momentum towards larger changes.

  7. Environmental Influences on Physical Activity among Rural Adults in Montana, United States: Views from Built Environment Audits, Resident Focus Groups, and Key Informant Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Brian K; Morgan, Emily H; Folta, Sara C; Graham, Meredith L; Paul, Lynn C; Nelson, Miriam E; Jew, Nicolette V; Moffat, Laurel F; Seguin, Rebecca A

    2017-10-04

    Rural populations in the United States have lower physical activity levels and are at a higher risk of being overweight and suffering from obesity than their urban counterparts. This paper aimed to understand the environmental factors that influence physical activity among rural adults in Montana. Eight built environment audits, 15 resident focus groups, and 24 key informant interviews were conducted between August and December 2014. Themes were triangulated and summarized into five categories of environmental factors: built, social, organizational, policy, and natural environments. Although the existence of active living features was documented by environmental audits, residents and key informants agreed that additional indoor recreation facilities and more well-maintained and conveniently located options were needed. Residents and key informants also agreed on the importance of age-specific, well-promoted, and structured physical activity programs, offered in socially supportive environments, as facilitators to physical activity. Key informants, however, noted that funding constraints and limited political will were barriers to developing these opportunities. Since building new recreational facilities and structures to support active transportation pose resource challenges, especially for rural communities, our results suggest that enhancing existing features, making small improvements, and involving stakeholders in the city planning process would be more fruitful to build momentum towards larger changes.

  8. Small, Task-Oriented Groups: Conflict, Conflict Management, Satisfaction, and Decision Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Victor D., Jr.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined relationship among amount of conflict experienced, the style of its management, individual satisfaction, and decision quality of small, task-oriented groups using 129 college student subjects in 24 groups. Data suggest a curvilinear relationship between the number of conflict episodes experienced by group members and the subsequent…

  9. Unified Compact ECC-AES Co-Processor with Group-Key Support for IoT Devices in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Encarnación; López-Ramos, Juan A.; Morales, Diego P.

    2018-01-01

    Security is a critical challenge for the effective expansion of all new emerging applications in the Internet of Things paradigm. Therefore, it is necessary to define and implement different mechanisms for guaranteeing security and privacy of data interchanged within the multiple wireless sensor networks being part of the Internet of Things. However, in this context, low power and low area are required, limiting the resources available for security and thus hindering the implementation of adequate security protocols. Group keys can save resources and communications bandwidth, but should be combined with public key cryptography to be really secure. In this paper, a compact and unified co-processor for enabling Elliptic Curve Cryptography along to Advanced Encryption Standard with low area requirements and Group-Key support is presented. The designed co-processor allows securing wireless sensor networks with independence of the communications protocols used. With an area occupancy of only 2101 LUTs over Spartan 6 devices from Xilinx, it requires 15% less area while achieving near 490% better performance when compared to cryptoprocessors with similar features in the literature. PMID:29337921

  10. Unified Compact ECC-AES Co-Processor with Group-Key Support for IoT Devices in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilla, Luis; Castillo, Encarnación; López-Ramos, Juan A; Álvarez-Bermejo, José A; García, Antonio; Morales, Diego P

    2018-01-16

    Security is a critical challenge for the effective expansion of all new emerging applications in the Internet of Things paradigm. Therefore, it is necessary to define and implement different mechanisms for guaranteeing security and privacy of data interchanged within the multiple wireless sensor networks being part of the Internet of Things. However, in this context, low power and low area are required, limiting the resources available for security and thus hindering the implementation of adequate security protocols. Group keys can save resources and communications bandwidth, but should be combined with public key cryptography to be really secure. In this paper, a compact and unified co-processor for enabling Elliptic Curve Cryptography along to Advanced Encryption Standard with low area requirements and Group-Key support is presented. The designed co-processor allows securing wireless sensor networks with independence of the communications protocols used. With an area occupancy of only 2101 LUTs over Spartan 6 devices from Xilinx, it requires 15% less area while achieving near 490% better performance when compared to cryptoprocessors with similar features in the literature.

  11. Unified Compact ECC-AES Co-Processor with Group-Key Support for IoT Devices in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Parrilla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Security is a critical challenge for the effective expansion of all new emerging applications in the Internet of Things paradigm. Therefore, it is necessary to define and implement different mechanisms for guaranteeing security and privacy of data interchanged within the multiple wireless sensor networks being part of the Internet of Things. However, in this context, low power and low area are required, limiting the resources available for security and thus hindering the implementation of adequate security protocols. Group keys can save resources and communications bandwidth, but should be combined with public key cryptography to be really secure. In this paper, a compact and unified co-processor for enabling Elliptic Curve Cryptography along to Advanced Encryption Standard with low area requirements and Group-Key support is presented. The designed co-processor allows securing wireless sensor networks with independence of the communications protocols used. With an area occupancy of only 2101 LUTs over Spartan 6 devices from Xilinx, it requires 15% less area while achieving near 490% better performance when compared to cryptoprocessors with similar features in the literature.

  12. Making time for learning-oriented leadership in multidisciplinary hospital management groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer E; Gray, Garry C; Kiang, Mathew V

    2015-01-01

    Although the clinical requirements of health care delivery imply the need for interdisciplinary management teams to work together to promote frontline learning, such interdisciplinary, learning-oriented leadership is atypical. We designed this study to identify behaviors enabling groups of diverse managers to perform as learning-oriented leadership teams on behalf of quality and safety. We randomly selected 12 of 24 intact groups of hospital managers from one hospital to participate in a Safety Leadership Team Training program. We collected primary data from March 2008 to February 2010 including pre- and post-staff surveys, multiple interviews, observations, and archival data from management groups. We examined the level and trend in frontline perceptions of managers' learning-oriented leadership following the intervention and ability of management groups to achieve objectives on targeted improvement projects. Among the 12 intervention groups, we identified higher- and lower-performing intervention groups and behaviors that enabled higher performers to work together more successfully. Management groups that achieved more of their performance goals and whose staff perceived more and greater improvement in their learning-oriented leadership after participation in Safety Leadership Team Training invested in structures that created learning capacity and conscientiously practiced prescribed learning-oriented management and problem-solving behaviors. They made the time to do these things because they envisioned the benefits of learning, valued the opportunity to learn, and maintained an environment of mutual respect and psychological safety within their group. Learning in management groups requires vision of what learning can accomplish; will to explore, practice, and build learning capacity; and mutual respect that sustains a learning environment.

  13. 77 FR 63872 - Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc...., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc., Select Staffing, and... follows: ''All workers of Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time...

  14. The management of change in BNFL's UK group with particular reference to the restructuring of the health and safety functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandwood, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    BNFL's UK group business involves reprocessing of uranium metal (Magnox) fuel, storage and dismantling of advanced gas rector (ceramic UO 2 ) fuel, waste treatment and storage, decommissioning and electricity generation. These activities are carried out at three sites in the North West corner of England and Southern Scotland: Sellafield - all activities, Chapelcross -electricity generation, Drigg - waste storage. Achieving fundamental change in a well established nuclear business which is highly regulated is possible and can bring large benefits. The keys to success are leadership and commitment from all senior managers, involvement of all stakeholders and communication. It is essential to involve the regulator as a stakeholder. (author)

  15. Operational Details of the Five Domains Model and Its Key Applications to the Assessment and Management of Animal Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary The Five Domains Model is a focusing device to facilitate systematic, structured, comprehensive and coherent assessment of animal welfare; it is not a definition of animal welfare, nor is it intended to be an accurate representation of body structure and function. The purpose of each of the five domains is to draw attention to areas that are relevant to both animal welfare assessment and management. This paper begins by briefly describing the major features of the Model and the operational interactions between the five domains, and then it details seven interacting applications of the Model. These underlie its utility and increasing application to welfare assessment and management in diverse animal use sectors. Abstract In accord with contemporary animal welfare science understanding, the Five Domains Model has a significant focus on subjective experiences, known as affects, which collectively contribute to an animal’s overall welfare state. Operationally, the focus of the Model is on the presence or absence of various internal physical/functional states and external circumstances that give rise to welfare-relevant negative and/or positive mental experiences, i.e., affects. The internal states and external circumstances of animals are evaluated systematically by referring to each of the first four domains of the Model, designated “Nutrition”, “Environment”, “Health” and “Behaviour”. Then affects, considered carefully and cautiously to be generated by factors in these domains, are accumulated into the fifth domain, designated “Mental State”. The scientific foundations of this operational procedure, published in detail elsewhere, are described briefly here, and then seven key ways the Model may be applied to the assessment and management of animal welfare are considered. These applications have the following beneficial objectives—they (1) specify key general foci for animal welfare management; (2) highlight the foundations of

  16. Patient self-management and pharmacist-led patient self-management in Hong Kong: A focus group study from different healthcare professionals' perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Eliza LY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient self-management is a key approach to manage non-communicable diseases. A pharmacist-led approach in patient self-management means collaborative care between pharmacists and patients. However, the development of both patient self-management and role of pharmacists is limited in Hong Kong. The objectives of this study are to understand the perspectives of physicians, pharmacists, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM practitioners, and dispensers on self-management of patients with chronic conditions, in addition to exploring the possibilities of developing pharmacist-led patient self-management in Hong Kong. Methods Participants were invited through the University as well as professional networks. Fifty-one participants comprised of physicians, pharmacists, TCM practitioners and dispensers participated in homogenous focus group discussions. Perspectives in patient self-management and pharmacist-led patient self-management were discussed. The discussions were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed accordingly. Results The majority of the participants were in support of patients with stable chronic diseases engaging in self-management. Medication compliance, monitoring of disease parameters and complications, lifestyle modification and identifying situations to seek help from health professionals were generally agreed to be covered in patient self-management. All pharmacists believed that they had extended roles in addition to drug management but the other three professionals believed that pharmacists were drug experts only and could only play an assisting role. Physicians, TCM practitioners, and dispensers were concerned that pharmacist-led patient self-management could be hindered, due to unfamiliarity with the pharmacy profession, the perception of insufficient training in disease management, and lack of trust of patients. Conclusions An effective chronic disease management model should involve patients in stable

  17. Common Criteria for Information Technology Security Evaluation: Department of Defense Public Key Infrastructure and Key Management Infrastructure Token Protection Profile (Medium Robustness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-22

    may be derived from detailed inspection of the IC itself or from illicit appropriation of design information. Counterfeit smart cards can be mass...Infrastructure (PKI) as the Internet to securely and privately exchange data and money through the use of a public and a private cryptographic key pair...interference devices (SQDIS), electrical testing, and electron beam testing. • Other attacks, such as UV or X-rays or high temperatures, could cause erasure

  18. Assessing the Health-Care Risk: The Clinical-VaR, a Key Indicator for Sound Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Enrique; Feria-Domínguez, José Manuel; Sebastián-Lacave, Alonso

    2018-03-30

    Clinical risk includes any undesirable situation or operational factor that may have negative consequences for patient safety or capable of causing an adverse event (AE). The AE, intentional or unintentionally, may be related to the human factor, that is, medical errors (MEs). Therefore, the importance of the health-care risk management is a current and relevant issue on the agenda of many public and private institutions. The objective of the management has been evolving from the identification of AE to the assessment of cost-effective and efficient measures that improve the quality control through monitoring. Consequently, the goal of this paper is to propose a Key Risk Indicator (KRI) that enhances the advancement of the health-care management system. Thus, the application of the Value at Risk (VaR) concept in combination to the Loss Distribution Approach (LDA) is proved to be a proactive tool, within the frame of balanced scorecard (BSC), in health organizations. For this purpose, the historical events recorded in the Algo-OpData ® database (Algorithmics Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) have been used. The analysis highlights the importance of risk in the financials outcomes of the sector. The results of paper show the usefulness of the Clinical-VaR to identify and monitor the risk and sustainability of the implemented controls.

  19. Assessing the Health-Care Risk: The Clinical-VaR, a Key Indicator for Sound Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Jiménez-Rodríguez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical risk includes any undesirable situation or operational factor that may have negative consequences for patient safety or capable of causing an adverse event (AE. The AE, intentional or unintentionally, may be related to the human factor, that is, medical errors (MEs. Therefore, the importance of the health-care risk management is a current and relevant issue on the agenda of many public and private institutions. The objective of the management has been evolving from the identification of AE to the assessment of cost-effective and efficient measures that improve the quality control through monitoring. Consequently, the goal of this paper is to propose a Key Risk Indicator (KRI that enhances the advancement of the health-care management system. Thus, the application of the Value at Risk (VaR concept in combination to the Loss Distribution Approach (LDA is proved to be a proactive tool, within the frame of balanced scorecard (BSC, in health organizations. For this purpose, the historical events recorded in the Algo-OpData® database (Algorithmics Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA have been used. The analysis highlights the importance of risk in the financials outcomes of the sector. The results of paper show the usefulness of the Clinical-VaR to identify and monitor the risk and sustainability of the implemented controls.

  20. Assessing the Health-Care Risk: The Clinical-VaR, a Key Indicator for Sound Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Enrique; Sebastián-Lacave, Alonso

    2018-01-01

    Clinical risk includes any undesirable situation or operational factor that may have negative consequences for patient safety or capable of causing an adverse event (AE). The AE, intentional or unintentionally, may be related to the human factor, that is, medical errors (MEs). Therefore, the importance of the health-care risk management is a current and relevant issue on the agenda of many public and private institutions. The objective of the management has been evolving from the identification of AE to the assessment of cost-effective and efficient measures that improve the quality control through monitoring. Consequently, the goal of this paper is to propose a Key Risk Indicator (KRI) that enhances the advancement of the health-care management system. Thus, the application of the Value at Risk (VaR) concept in combination to the Loss Distribution Approach (LDA) is proved to be a proactive tool, within the frame of balanced scorecard (BSC), in health organizations. For this purpose, the historical events recorded in the Algo-OpData® database (Algorithmics Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) have been used. The analysis highlights the importance of risk in the financials outcomes of the sector. The results of paper show the usefulness of the Clinical-VaR to identify and monitor the risk and sustainability of the implemented controls. PMID:29601529