WorldWideScience

Sample records for group ii solid

  1. Space groups for solid state scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Glazer, Michael; Glazer, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    This Second Edition provides solid state scientists, who are not necessarily experts in crystallography, with an understandable and comprehensive guide to the new International Tables for Crystallography. The basic ideas of symmetry, lattices, point groups, and space groups are explained in a clear and detailed manner. Notation is introduced in a step-by-step way so that the reader is supplied with the tools necessary to derive and apply space group information. Of particular interest in this second edition are the discussions of space groups application to such timely topics as high-te

  2. Focus group report - part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The Waste Policy Institute, through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST) conducted a focus group with members of the Hanford Advisory Board (HAB), interviews with tribal government representatives, and a survey of Oak Ridge Local Oversight Committee (LOC) and Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) members. The purpose was to understand what members of the interested and involved public want to know about technology development and ways to get that information to them. These data collection activities were used as a follow-up to two previously held focus groups with the general public near Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Most participants from the first two focus groups said they did not have time and/or were not interested in participating in technology decision-making. They said they would prefer to defer to members of their communities who are interested and want to be involved in technology decision-making

  3. Computing the Symmetry Groups of the Platonic Solids With the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we will determine the symmetry groups of the platonic solids by a combination of some elementary group theory and use of the computer algebra package. Maple. The five platonic solids are the tetrahedron, the cube, the octahedron, the dodecahedron, and the icosa- hedron. By determining a symmetry group, ...

  4. Computing the Symmetry Groups of the Platonic Solids With the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    group theory and use of the computer algebra package. Maple. The five platonic solids are the tetrahedron, the cube, the octahedron, the dodecahedron, and the icosa- hedron. By determining a symmetry group, we lllean not just to determine its elements but to identify it, up to isomorphism, with a well-known group, such as ...

  5. Finite p′-nilpotent groups. II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Srinivasan

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we continue the study of finite p′-nilpotent groups that was started in the first part of this paper. Here we give a complete characterization of all finite groups that are not p′-nilpotent but all of whose proper subgroups are p′-nilpotent.

  6. Lifts of projective congruence groups, II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiming, Ian

    2014-01-01

    We continue and complete our previous paper ``Lifts of projective congruence groups'' concerning the question of whether there exist noncongruence subgroups of  that are projectively equivalent to one of the groups  or . A complete answer to this question is obtained: In case of  such noncongruence...

  7. On derived groups of division rings II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi Hezavehi, M.; Akbari Feyzaabaadi, S.; Mehraabaadi, M.; Hajie Abolhassan, H.

    1995-05-01

    Let D be a division ring with centre F and denote by D' the derived group (commutator subgroup) of D * = D - {0}. It is shown that if each element of D' is algebraic over F, then D is algebraic over F. It is also proved that each finite separable extension of F in D is of the form F(c) for some element c in the derived group D'. Using these results, it is shown that if each element of the derived group D' is of bounded degree over F, then D is finite dimensional over F. (author). 5 refs

  8. The character of free topological groups II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nickolas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A systematic analysis is made of the character of the free and free abelian topological groups on metrizable spaces and compact spaces, and on certain other closely related spaces. In the first case, it is shown that the characters of the free and the free abelian topological groups on X are both equal to the “small cardinal” d if X is compact and metrizable, but also, more generally, if X is a non-discrete k!-space all of whose compact subsets are metrizable, or if X is a non-discrete Polish space. An example is given of a zero-dimensional separable metric space for which both characters are equal to the cardinal of the continuum. In the case of a compact space X, an explicit formula is derived for the character of the free topological group on X involving no cardinal invariant of X other than its weight; in particular the character is fully determined by the weight in the compact case. This paper is a sequel to a paper by the same authors in which the characters of the free groups were analysed under less restrictive topological assumptions.

  9. A fluorescent chemosensor for Zn(II). Exciplex formation in solution and the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencini, Andrea; Berni, Emanuela; Bianchi, Antonio; Fornasari, Patrizia; Giorgi, Claudia; Lima, Joao C; Lodeiro, Carlos; Melo, Maria J; de Melo, J Seixas; Parola, Antonio Jorge; Pina, Fernando; Pina, Joao; Valtancoli, Barbara

    2004-07-21

    The macrocyclic phenanthrolinophane 2,9-[2,5,8-triaza-5-(N-anthracene-9-methylamino)ethyl]-[9]-1,10-phenanthrolinophane (L) bearing a pendant arm containing a coordinating amine and an anthracene group forms stable complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) in solution. Stability constants of these complexes were determined in 0.10 mol dm(-3) NMe(4)Cl H(2)O-MeCN (1:1, v/v) solution at 298.1 +/- 0.1 K by means of potentiometric (pH metric) titration. The fluorescence emission properties of these complexes were studied in this solvent. For the Zn(II) complex, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies were performed in ethanol solution and in the solid state. In solution, intramolecular pi-stacking interaction between phenanthroline and anthracene in the ground state and exciplex emission in the excited state were observed. From the temperature dependence of the photostationary ratio (I(Exc)/I(M)), the activation energy for the exciplex formation (E(a)) and the binding energy of the exciplex (-DeltaH) were determined. The crystal structure of the [ZnLBr](ClO(4)).H(2)O compound was resolved, showing that in the solid state both intra- and inter-molecular pi-stacking interactions are present. Such interactions were also evidenced by UV-vis absorption and emission spectra in the solid state. The absorption spectrum of a thin film of the solid complex is red-shifted compared with the solution spectra, whereas its emission spectrum reveals the unique featureless exciplex band, blue shifted compared with the solution. In conjunction with X-ray data the solid-state data was interpreted as being due to a new exciplex where no pi-stacking (full overlap of the pi-electron cloud of the two chromophores - anthracene and phenanthroline) is observed. L is a fluorescent chemosensor able to signal Zn(II) in presence of Cd(II) and Hg(II), since the last two metal ions do not give rise either to the formation of pi-stacking complexes or to exciplex emission in solution.

  10. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... solution Potassium oleate Potassium salt of polyolefin acid Propyl acetate Propylene carbonate Propylene... lignosulfonate solution Sodium polyacrylate solution 2 Sodium salt of Ferric hydroxyethylethylenediamine... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grouping of Cargoes II Table II to Part 150 Shipping...

  11. Waves in microstructured solids and negative group velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, T.; Kartofelev, D.; Tamm, K.; Engelbrecht, J.

    2013-07-01

    Waves with negative group velocity (NGV) were discovered in optics by Sommerfeld and Brillouin, and experimentally verified in many cases, for example in left-handed media. For waves in solids, such an effect is described mostly in layered media. In this paper, it is demonstrated that in microstructured solids, waves with NGV may also exist leading to backwards pulse propagation. Two physical cases are analysed: a Mindlin-type hierarchical (a scale within a scale) material and a felt-type (made of fibres) material. For both cases, the dispersion analysis of one-dimensional waves shows that there exists certain ranges of physical parameters which lead to NGV. The results can be used in dispersion engineering for designing materials with certain properties.

  12. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  13. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  14. Spring meeting of the DPG Working Group 'Solid state physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The volume contains abstracts of the contributions to the Spring Meeting of the Solid State Physics Section with the topics dielectric solids, thin films, dynamics and statistical physics, semiconductor physics, magnetism, metal physics, surface physics, low temperature physics, vacuum physics and engineering, chemical physics. (MM)

  15. Blood-group-Ii-active gangliosides of human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizi, T.; Childs, R.A.; Hakomori, S.-I.; Powell, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    More than ten new types of gangliosides, in addition to haematoside and sialosylparagloboside, were isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. These were separated by successive chromatographies on DAEA-Sephadex, on porous silica-gel columns and on thin-layer silica gel as acetylated compounds. Highly potent blood-group-Ii and moderate blood-group-H activities were demonstrated in some of the ganglioside fractions. The gangliosides incorporated into chlolesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes stoicheiometrically inhibited binding of anti-(blood-group-I and i) antibodies to a radioiodinated blood-group-Ii-active glycoprotein. The fraction with the highest blood-group-I activity, I(g) fraction, behaved like sialosyl-deca- to dodeca-glycosylceramides on t.l.c. Certain blood-group-I and most of the i-determinants were in partially or completely cryptic form and could be unmasked by sialidase treatment. Thus the I and i antigens, which are known to occur on internal structures of blood-group-ABH-active glycoproteins in secretions, also occur in the interior of the carbohydrate chains of erythrocyte gangliosides. (author)

  16. Chromite and olivine in type II chondrules in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites - Implications for thermal histories and group differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Prinz, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Unequilibrated chromite and olivine margin compositions in type II chondrules are noted to differ systematically among three of the chondrite groups, suggesting that type II liquids differed in composition among the groups. These differences may be interpreted as indicators of different chemical compositions of the precursor solids which underwent melting, or, perhaps, as differences in the extent to which immiscible metal sulfide droplets were lost during chondrule formation. Because zinc is detectable only in type II chromites which have undergone reequilibration, the high zinc contents reported for chondritic chromites in other studies probably reflect redistribution during thermal metamorphism.

  17. Environmental Change in Post-closure Safety Assessment of Solid Radioactive Waste Repositories. Report of Working Group 3 Reference Models for Waste Disposal of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Human Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Reference Models for Waste Disposal Working Group

  18. Solid phase selective separation and preconcentration of Cu(II) by Cu(II)-imprinted polymethacrylic microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakova, Ivanka; Karadjova, Irina; Ivanov, Ivo; Georgieva, Ventsislava; Evtimova, Bisera; Georgiev, George

    2007-02-12

    Ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) particles are prepared by copolymerization of methacrylic acid as monomer, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate as crosslinking agent and 2,2'-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as initiator in the presence of Cu(II), a Cu(II)-4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (Cu(II)-PAR) complex, and PAR only. A batch procedure is used for the determination of the characteristics of the Cu(II) solid phase extraction from the IIP produced. The results obtained show that the Cu(II)-PAR IIP has the greatest adsorption capacity (37.4 micromol g(-1) of dry copolymer) among the IIPs investigated. The optimal pH value for the quantitative preconcentration is 7, and full desorption is achieved by 1 M HNO(3). The selectivity coefficients (S(Cu/Me)) for Me=Ni(II), Co(II) are 45.0 and 38.5, respectively. It is established that Cu(II)-PAR IIPs can be used repeatedly without a considerable adsorption capacity loss. The determination of Cu(II) ions in seawater shows that the interfering matrix does not influence the preconcentration and selectivity values of the Cu(II)-PAR IIPs. The detection and quantification limits are 0.001 micromol L(-1) (3sigma) and 0.003 micromol L(-1) (6sigma), respectively.

  19. Modelling dewatering behaviour through an understanding of solids formation processes. Part II--solids separation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustan, A C; Cohen, B; Petrie, J G

    2005-05-30

    An understanding of the mechanisms which control solids formation can provide information on the characteristics of the solids which are formed. The nature of the solids formed in turn impacts on dewatering behaviour. The 'upstream' solids formation determines a set of suspension characteristics: solids concentration, particle size distribution, solution ionic strength and electrostatic surface potential. These characteristics together define the suspension's rheological properties. However, the complicated interdependence of these has precluded the prediction of suspension rheology from such a fundamental description of suspension characteristics. Recent shear yield stress models, applied in this study to compressive yield, significantly reduce the empiricism required for the description of compressive rheology. Suspension compressibility and permeability uniquely define the dewatering behaviour, described in terms of settling, filtration and mechanical expression. These modes of dewatering may be described in terms of the same fundamental suspension mechanics model. In this way, it is possible to link dynamically the processes of solids formation and dewatering of the resultant suspension. This, ultimately, opens the door to improved operability of these processes. In part I of this paper we introduced an integrated system model for solids formation and dewatering. This model was demonstrated for the upstream processes using experimental data. In this current paper models of colloidal interactions and dewatering are presented and compared to experimental results from batch filtration tests. A novel approach to predicting suspension compressibility and permeability using a single test configuration is presented and tested.

  20. Statistical ensembles and molecular dynamics studies of anisotropic solids. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, J.R.; Rahman, A.

    1985-01-01

    We have recently discussed how the Parrinello--Rahman theory can be brought into accord with the theory of the elastic and thermodynamic behavior of anisotropic media. This involves the isoenthalpic--isotension ensemble of statistical mechanics. Nose has developed a canonical ensemble form of molecular dynamics. We combine Nose's ideas with the Parrinello--Rahman theory to obtain a canonical form of molecular dynamics appropriate to the study of anisotropic media subjected to arbitrary external stress. We employ this isothermal--isotension ensemble in a study of a fcc→ close-packed structural phase transformation in a Lennard-Jones solid subjected to uniaxial compression. Our interpretation of the Nose theory does not involve a scaling of the time variable. This latter fact leads to simplifications when studying the time dependence of quantities

  1. TIBER II/ETR: Nuclear Performance Analysis Group Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    A Nuclear Performance Analysis Group was formed to develop the nuclear technology mission of TIBER-II under the leadership of Argonne National Laboratory reporting to LLNL with major participation by the University of California - Los Angeles (test requirements, R and D needs, water-cooled test modules, neutronic tests). Additional key support was provided by GA Technologies (helium-cooled test modules), Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (material-irradiation tests), Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque (high-heat-flux component tests), and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (safety tests). Support also was provided by Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, and the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. This report discusses these areas and provides a schedule for their completion

  2. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  3. Solid-phase extraction of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, Celal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Gundogdu, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Bulut, Volkan Numan [Department of Chemistry, Giresun Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 28049 Giresun (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)]. E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr; Elci, Latif [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey); Sentuerk, Hasan Basri [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Tuefekci, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2007-07-19

    A new method using a column packed with Amberlite XAD-2010 resin as a solid-phase extractant has been developed for the multi-element preconcentration of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions based on their complex formation with the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (Na-DDTC) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations. Metal complexes sorbed on the resin were eluted by 1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} in acetone. Effects of the analytical conditions over the preconcentration yields of the metal ions, such as pH, quantity of Na-DDTC, eluent type, sample volume and flow rate, foreign ions etc. have been investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) of the analytes were found in the range 0.08-0.26 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials. The method has been applied for the determination of trace elements in some environmental samples.

  4. Casein kinase II is elevated in solid human tumours and rapidly proliferating non-neoplastic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münstermann, U; Fritz, G; Seitz, G

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase CKII (i.e. casein kinase II, CKII, NII) is expressed at a higher level in rapidly proliferating tissues and in solid human tumours (e.g. colorectal carcinomas) when compared to the corresponding non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. This could be shown by (a) Western blotting of cellular...

  5. Solid solutions of platinum(II) and palladium(II) oxalato-complex salt as precursors of nanoalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, A. V.; Asanova, T. I.; Vikulova, E. S.; Filatov, E. Yu.; Plyusnin, P. E.; Baidina, I. A.; Asanov, I. P.; Korenev, S. V.

    2013-03-01

    A solid solution of platinum (II) and palladium (II) oxalato-complex salt, (NH4)2[Pt0.5Pd0.5(C2O4)2]·2H2O, has been synthesized and studied as a precursor for preparing bimetallic PtPd nanoparticles through its thermal decomposition. The smallest homogenous bimetallic PtPd nanoparticles were found to form in hydrogen and helium atmospheres. The annealing temperature and time have low effect on the bimetallic particles size. Comparative analysis of structural and thermal properties of the solid solution and individual Pt, Pd oxalato-complex salts was performed to investigate a mechanism of thermal decomposition of (NH4)2[Pt0.5Pd0.5(C2O4)2]·2H2O. Based on in situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy investigation it was proposed a mechanism of formation of bimetallic PtPd nanoparticles from the solid-solution oxalato-complex salt during thermal decomposition.

  6. Direct determination of bulk etching rate for LR-115-II solid state ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thickness of the removed layer of the LR-115-II solid state nuclear track detector during etching is measured directly with a rather precise instrument. Dependence of bulk etching rate on temperature of the etching solution is investigated. It has been found that the bulk etching rate is 3.2 m/h at 60°C in 2.5 N NaOH of ...

  7. Sulfide precipitation method of separating uranium from Group II and Group III metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium is separated from analytical Group II and Group III metal ions in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is extracted with a non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent containing a reagent which will react with the uranyl ions to form a complex soluble in the solvent. If the liquor is acidic, the solvent is washed with water. Then to the solvent is added an aqueous solution containing about 0.5 to 1.0 mole per liter of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions and sufficient sulfide ions to precipitate the metal ions as sulfides. The solvent and the aqueous solution are separated and the sulfides filtered from the aqueous solution. The ammonium-uranyl-tricarbonate in the aqueous solution can then be precipitated by increasing the concentration of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions to about 1.5 to 2.5 moles per liter. The precipitate is filtered and calcined to obtain U 3 O 8 or UO 2 . 21 claims, 1 figure

  8. II ZWICKY 23 AND FAMILY: A GROUP IN INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Gallagher III, John S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison and 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cigan, Phillip J. [Cardiff University School of Physics and Astronomy Queen’s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, Cf24 3AA (United Kingdom); Rudie, Gwen C., E-mail: elizabeth@thewehners.net, E-mail: jsg@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: CiganP@cardiff.ac.uk, E-mail: gwen@obs.carnegiescience.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science and 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    II Zw 23 (UGC 3179) is a luminous (M{sub B}  ∼ −21) nearby compact narrow emission line starburst galaxy with blue optical colors and strong emission lines. We present a photometric and morphological study of II Zw 23 and its interacting companion, KPG103a, using data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in combination with a WFPC2 image from the Hubble Space Telescope archives. II Zw 23 has a highly disturbed outer structure with long trails of debris that may be contributing material toward the production of tidal dwarfs. Its central regions appear disky, a structure that is consistent with the overall rotation pattern observed in the H α velocity field measured from Densepak observations obtained with WIYN. We find additional evidence for interaction in this system, including the discovery of a new tidal loop extending from an associated dwarf galaxy, which appears to be in the process of disrupting along its orbit. We also present H α equivalent widths and discuss the relative star formation rates across this interacting system.

  9. Definably compact groups definable in real closed fields.II

    OpenAIRE

    Barriga, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    We continue the analysis of definably compact groups definable in a real closed field $\\mathcal{R}$. In [3], we proved that for every definably compact definably connected semialgebraic group $G$ over $\\mathcal{R}$ there are a connected $R$-algebraic group $H$, a definable injective map $\\phi$ from a generic definable neighborhood of the identity of $G$ into the group $H\\left(R\\right)$ of $R$-points of $H$ such that $\\phi$ acts as a group homomorphism inside its domain. The above result and o...

  10. Selective solid-phase extraction of Hg(II) using silica gel surface - imprinting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, H.; Geng, T.; Hu, L.

    2008-01-01

    A new ion-imprinted amino-functionalized silica gel sorbent was synthesized by surface-imprinting technique for preconcentration and separation of Hg(II) prior to its determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Compared to the traditional solid sorbents and non-imprinted polymer particles, the ion-imprinted polymers (IIPs) have higher adsorption capacity and selectivity for Hg(II). The maximum static adsorption capacity of the imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent for Hg(II) was 29.89 mg g -1 and 11.21 mg g -1 , respectively. The highest selectivity coefficient for Hg(II) in the presence of Zn(II) exceeded 230. The detection limit (3σ) of the method was 0.25 μg L -1 . The relative standard deviation of the method was 2.5% for eight replicate determinations of 10 μg of Hg 2+ in 200 mL-in-volume water sample. The procedure was validated by performing the analysis of the certified river sediment sample (GBW 08603, China) using the standard addition method. The developed method was also successfully applied to the determination of trace mercury in Chinese traditional medicine and water samples with satisfactory results. (authors)

  11. Highly selective solid-phase extraction of trace Pd(II) by murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ruijun; He Qun; Hu Zheng; Zhang Shengrui [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Lijun [Faculty of Science and Engineer, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Chang Xijun, E-mail: lirj2010@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-02-03

    Graphical abstract: Murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes have been developed to separate and concentrate trace Pd(II) from aqueous samples. Parameters that affected the sorption and elution efficiency were studied in column mode, and the new adsorbent presented high selectivity and adsorption capacity for the solid phase extraction of trace Pd(II). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as adsorbent has been reported originally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This adsorbent has a unique selectivity for Pd(II) at pH 1.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This adsorbent had high adsorption capacity for Pd(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The precision and accuracy of the method are satisfactory. - Abstract: The originality on the high efficiency of murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as a new adsorbent of solid phase extraction has been reported to preconcentrate and separate Pd(II) in solution samples. The new adsorbent was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms. Effective preconcentration conditions of analyte were examined using column procedures prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The effects of pH, the amount of adsorbent, the sample flow rate and volume, the elution condition and the interfering ions were optimized in detail. Under the optimized conditions, Pd(II) could be retained on the column at pH 1.0 and quantitatively eluted by 2.5 mL of 0.01 mol L{sup -1} HCl-3% thiourea solution at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min{sup -1}. The analysis time was 5 min. An enrichment factor of 120 was accomplished. Common interfering ions did not interfere in both separation and determination. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent at optimum conditions was found to be 42.86 mg g{sup -1} for Pd(II). The detection limit (3{sigma}) of

  12. Highly selective solid-phase extraction of trace Pd(II) by murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruijun; He Qun; Hu Zheng; Zhang Shengrui; Zhang Lijun; Chang Xijun

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes have been developed to separate and concentrate trace Pd(II) from aqueous samples. Parameters that affected the sorption and elution efficiency were studied in column mode, and the new adsorbent presented high selectivity and adsorption capacity for the solid phase extraction of trace Pd(II). Highlights: ► Murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as adsorbent has been reported originally. ► This adsorbent has a unique selectivity for Pd(II) at pH 1.0. ► This adsorbent had high adsorption capacity for Pd(II). ► The precision and accuracy of the method are satisfactory. - Abstract: The originality on the high efficiency of murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as a new adsorbent of solid phase extraction has been reported to preconcentrate and separate Pd(II) in solution samples. The new adsorbent was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and N 2 adsorption–desorption isotherms. Effective preconcentration conditions of analyte were examined using column procedures prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The effects of pH, the amount of adsorbent, the sample flow rate and volume, the elution condition and the interfering ions were optimized in detail. Under the optimized conditions, Pd(II) could be retained on the column at pH 1.0 and quantitatively eluted by 2.5 mL of 0.01 mol L −1 HCl–3% thiourea solution at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min −1 . The analysis time was 5 min. An enrichment factor of 120 was accomplished. Common interfering ions did not interfere in both separation and determination. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent at optimum conditions was found to be 42.86 mg g −1 for Pd(II). The detection limit (3σ) of the method was 0.29 ng mL −1 , and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.1% (n = 11). The method was

  13. EPR of free radicals in solids II trends in methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders; Lund, Anders

    2012-01-01

    EPR of Free Radicals in Solids: Trends in Methods and Applications, 2nd ed. presents a critical two volume review of the methods and applications of EPR (ESR) for the study of free radical processes in solids. Emphasis is on the progress made in the developments in EPR technology, in the application of sophisticated matrix isolation techniques and in the advancement in quantitative EPR that have occurred since the 1st edition was published. Improvements have been made also at theoretical level, with the development of methods based on first principles and their application to the calculation of magnetic properties as well as in spectral simulations. EPR of Free Radicals in Solids II focuses on the trends in applications of experimental and theoretical methods to extract structural and dynamical properties of radicals and spin probes in solid matrices by continuous wave (CW) and pulsed techniques in nine chapters written by experts in the field. It examines the studies involving radiation- and photo-induced in...

  14. Safety test No. S-6, launch pad abort sequential test Phase II: solid propellant fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, E.C.

    1975-08-01

    In preparation for the Lincoln Laboratory's LES 8/9 space mission, a series of tests was performed to evaluate the nuclear safety capability of the Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) to be used to supply power for the satellite. One such safety test is Test No. S-6, Launch Pad Abort Sequential Test. The objective of this test was to subject the RTG and its components to the sequential environments characteristic of a catastrophic launch pad accident to evaluate their capability to contain the 238 PuO 2 fuel. This sequence of environments was to have consisted of the blast overpressure and fragments, followed by the fireball, low velocity impact on the launch pad, and solid propellant fire. The blast overpressure and fragments were subsequently eliminated from this sequence. The procedures and results of Phase II of Test S-6, Solid Propellant Fire are presented. In this phase of the test, a simulant Fuel Sphere Assembly (FSA) and a mockup of a damaged Heat Source Assembly (HSA) were subjected to single proximity solid propellant fires of approximately 10-min duration. Steel was introduced into both tests to simulate the effects of launch pad debris and the solid rocket motor (SRM) casing that might be present in the fire zone. (TFD)

  15. Treatment of plutonium contamined solid wastes by electrogenerated Ag(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulze, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    A process for the treatment of plutonium contaminated solid wastes is designed. Two types of wastes have been studied; incineration ashes (COGEMA UP1) and sludges produced in the cryotreatment facility in Cadarache Center (France). The principle of the process is based on the rapid dissolution of PuO 2 (contained in the wastes) under the action of aggressive Ag(II) species, regenerated electrochemically. In the case of the treatment of incinerator ashes an electrochemical pretreatment is necessary if the chloride ion content of the ashes is high. The feasibility of the decontamination process has been proved for the two types of plutonium contaminated solid wastes at a pilot level; for example 1 Kg of ashes (or 0.75 Kg of sludges) has been treated in one experiment, and 97% (or 95%) of the total plutonium was dissolved at the end of the experiment. Industrial applications of this new process are underway [fr

  16. Finite Groups with Given Quantitative Non-Nilpotent Subgroups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2014-01-01

    As an extension of Shi and Zhang's 2011 article [4], we prove that any finite group having at most 23 non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is solvable except for G ≅ A 5 or SL(2, 5), and any finite group having at most three conjugacy classes of non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is s...

  17. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 1: Title II design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 1 provides a comprehensive narrative description of the proposed facility and systems, the basis for each of the systems design, and the engineering assessments that were performed to support the technical basis of the Title II design. The intent of the system description presented is to provide WHC an understanding of the facilities and equipment provided and the A/E's perspective on how these systems will operate

  18. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of group I and group II metal complexes with Boc-hydroxylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dain, R.P.; Gresham, G.; Groenewold, G.S.; Steill, J.D.; Oomens, J.; van Stipdonk, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Hydroxamates are essential growth factors for some microbes, acting primarily as siderophores that solubilize iron for transport into a cell. Here we determined the intrinsic structure of 1:1 complexes between Boc-protected hydroxylamine and group I ([M(L)](+)) and group II ([M(L-H)](+))

  19. Combinatorial screening of potentiometric Pb(II) sensors from polysulfoaminoanthraquinone solid ionophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Rong; Ding, Yong-Bo; Li, Xin-Gui

    2014-03-10

    A potentiometric Pb(II)-selective sensor was fabricated by a combinatorial screening of electrically conducting polysulfoaminoanthraquinone (PSA) nanoparticles as a solid ionophore, ion exchangers (oleic acid (OA) and NaTPB), plasticizers in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix, membrane thickness, inner filling ion species, and concentration. The membrane sensor with the composition of PSA/PVC/DOP (dioctyl phthalate)/OA (1.0:33:61:5.0) exhibited the best performance, including a slope of 29.3 mV decade(-1) in the concentration range 10(-6.3)-10(-1.6) M, detection limit of 1.6 × 10(-7) M, response time of 16 s, lifetime of five months, and good response reversibility. The proposed sensor has demonstrated good selectivity for Pb(II) over other monovalent, divalent and trivalent interfering ions, and could be used in a pH range of 3.62-5.22. The Pb(II) sensor has been successfully applied for the determination of Pb(II) concentration in real-world samples and also as an indicator electrode for potentiometric titration of lead ions.

  20. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  1. Structural analysis of group II chitinase (ChtII) catalysis completes the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qu, Mingbo; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Qing

    2018-02-23

    Chitin is a linear homopolymer of N -acetyl-β-d-glucosamines and a major structural component of insect cuticles. Chitin hydrolysis involves glycoside hydrolase family 18 (GH18) chitinases. In insects, chitin hydrolysis is essential for periodic shedding of the old cuticle ecdysis and proceeds via a pathway different from that in the well studied bacterial chitinolytic system. Group II chitinase (ChtII) is a widespread chitinolytic enzyme in insects and contains the greatest number of catalytic domains and chitin-binding domains among chitinases. In Lepidopterans, ChtII and two other chitinases, ChtI and Chi-h, are essential for chitin hydrolysis. Although ChtI and Chi-h have been well studied, the role of ChtII remains elusive. Here, we investigated the structure and enzymology of Of ChtII, a ChtII derived from the insect pest Ostrinia furnacalis We present the crystal structures of two catalytically active domains of Of ChtII, Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2, both in unliganded form and complexed with chitooligosaccharide substrates. We found that Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2 both possess long, deep substrate-binding clefts with endochitinase activities. Of ChtII exhibited structural characteristics within the substrate-binding cleft similar to those in Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. However, Of ChtII lacked structural elements favoring substrate binding beyond the active sites, including an extra wall structure present in Of Chi-h. Nevertheless, the numerous domains in Of ChtII may compensate for this difference; a truncation containing one catalytic domain and three chitin-binding modules ( Of ChtII-B4C1) displayed activity toward insoluble polymeric substrates that was higher than those of Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. Our observations provide the last piece of the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Braid group, knot theory and statistical mechanics II

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Chen Ning

    1994-01-01

    The present volume is an updated version of the book edited by C N Yang and M L Ge on the topics of braid groups and knot theory, which are related to statistical mechanics. This book is based on the 1989 volume but has new material included and new contributors.

  3. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of group I and group II metal complexes with Boc-hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Ryan P; Gresham, Gary; Groenewold, Gary S; Steill, Jeffrey D; Oomens, Jos; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2013-08-30

    Hydroxamates are essential growth factors for some microbes, acting primarily as siderophores that solubilize iron for transport into a cell. Here we determined the intrinsic structure of 1:1 complexes between Boc-protected hydroxylamine and group I ([M(L)](+)) and group II ([M(L-H)](+)) cations, where M and L are the cation and ligand, respectively, which are convenient models for the functional unit of hydroxamate siderphores. The relevant complex ions were generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) and isolated and stored in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Infrared spectra of the isolated complexes were collected by monitoring (infrared) photodissociation yield as a function of photon energy. Experimental spectra were then compared to those predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra collected are in good agreement with those predicted to be lowest-energy by DFT. The spectra for the group I complexes contain six resolved absorptions that can be attributed to amide I and II type and hydroxylamine N-OH vibrations. Similar absorptions are observed for the group II cation complexes, with shifts of the amide I and amide II vibrations due to the change in structure with deprotonation of the hydroxylamine group. IRMPD spectroscopy unequivocally shows that the intrinsic binding mode for the group I cations involves the O atoms of the amide carbonyl and hydroxylamine groups of Boc-hydroxylamine. A similar binding mode is preferred for the group II cations, except that in this case the metal ion is coordinated by the O atom of the deprotonated hydroxylamine group. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. On discretization of tori of compact simple Lie groups: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrivnák, Jiří; Motlochová, Lenka; Patera, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    The discrete orthogonality of special function families, called C- and S-functions, which are derived from the characters of compact simple Lie groups, is described in Hrivnák and Patera (2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 385208). Here, the results of Hrivnák and Patera are extended to two additional recently discovered families of special functions, called S s - and S l -functions. The main result is an explicit description of their pairwise discrete orthogonality within each family, when the functions are sampled on finite fragments F s M and F l M of a lattice in any dimension n ⩾ 2 and of any density controlled by M, and of the symmetry of the weight lattice of any compact simple Lie group with two different lengths of roots. (paper)

  5. Crossed products by endomorphisms, vector bundles and group duality, II

    OpenAIRE

    Vasselli, Ezio

    2004-01-01

    We study C*-algebra endomorphims which are special in a weaker sense w.r.t. the notion introduced by Doplicher and Roberts. We assign to such endomorphisms a geometrical invariant, representing a cohomological obstruction for them to be special in the usual sense. Moreover, we construct the crossed product of a C*-algebra by the action of the dual of a (nonabelian, noncompact) group of vector bundle automorphisms. These crossed products supply a class of examples for such generalized special ...

  6. Selective solid-phase extraction of Ni(II) by an ion-imprinted polymer from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraji, Mohammad; Yousefi, Hamideh

    2009-01-01

    A new ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) material was synthesized by copolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine as monomer, ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate as crosslinking agent and 2,2'-azobis-sobutyronitrile as initiator in the presence of Ni-dithizone complex. The IIP was used as sorbent in a solid-phase extraction column. The effects of sampling volume, elution conditions, sample pH and sample flow rate on the extraction of Ni ions form water samples were studied. The maximum adsorption capacity and the relative selectivity coefficients of imprinted polymer for Ni(II)/Co(II), Ni(II)/Cu(II) and Ni(II)/Cd(II) were calculated. Compared with non-imprinted polymer particles, the IIP had higher selectivity for Ni(II). The relative selectivity factor (α r ) values of Ni(II)/Co(II), Ni(II)/Cu(II) and Ni(II)/Cd(II) were 21.6, 54.3, and 22.7, respectively, which are greater than 1. The relative standard deviation of the five replicate determinations of Ni(II) was 3.4%. The detection limit for 150 mL of sample was 1.6 μg L -1 using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace nickel in water samples with satisfactory results.

  7. Lattice thermal transport in group II-alloyed PbTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Hodges, James M.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Chan, Maria K. Y.

    2018-04-01

    PbTe, one of the most promising thermoelectric materials, has recently demonstrated a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of above 2.0 when alloyed with group II elements. The improvements are due mainly to significant reduction of lattice thermal conductivity (κl), which was in turn attributed to nanoparticle precipitates. However, a fundamental understanding of various phonon scattering mechanisms within the bulk alloy is still lacking. In this work, we apply the newly-developed density-functional-theory-based compressive sensing lattice dynamics approach to model lattice heat transport in PbTe, MTe, and Pb0.94M0.06Te (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) and compare our results with experimental measurements, with focus on the strain effect and mass disorder scattering. We find that (1) CaTe, SrTe, and BaTe in the rock-salt structure exhibit much higher κl than PbTe, while MgTe in the same structure shows anomalously low κl; (2) lattice heat transport of PbTe is extremely sensitive to static strain induced by alloying atoms in solid solution form; (3) mass disorder scattering plays a major role in reducing κl for Mg/Ca/Sr-alloyed PbTe through strongly suppressing the lifetimes of intermediate- and high-frequency phonons, while for Ba-alloyed PbTe, precipitated nanoparticles are also important.

  8. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway II: solid phase biogeochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq eSiddique

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Consolidation of clay particles in aqueous tailings suspensions is a major obstacle to effective management of oil sands tailings ponds in northern Alberta, Canada. We have observed that microorganisms indigenous to the tailings ponds accelerate consolidation of mature fine tailings (MFT during active metabolism by using two biogeochemical pathways. In Pathway I, microbes alter porewater chemistry to indirectly increase consolidation of MFT. Here, we describe Pathway II comprising significant, direct and complementary biogeochemical reactions with MFT mineral surfaces. An anaerobic microbial community comprising Bacteria (predominantly Clostridiales, Synergistaceae and Desulfobulbaceae and Archaea (Methanolinea/Methanoregula and Methanosaeta transformed FeIII minerals in MFT to amorphous FeII minerals during methanogenic metabolism of an added organic substrate. Synchrotron analyses suggested that ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3. 9H2O and goethite (α-FeOOH were the dominant FeIII minerals in MFT. The formation of amorphous iron sulfide (FeS and possibly green rust entrapped and masked electronegative clay surfaces in amended MFT. Both Pathways I and II reduced the surface charge potential (repulsive forces of the clay particles in MFT, which aided aggregation of clays and formation of networks of pores, as visualized using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. These reactions facilitated the egress of porewater from MFT and increased consolidation of tailings solids. These results have large-scale implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds, a burgeoning environmental issue for the public and government regulators.

  9. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway II: solid phase biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Li, Carmen; Young, Rozlyn; Arocena, Joselito M; Foght, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Consolidation of clay particles in aqueous tailings suspensions is a major obstacle to effective management of oil sands tailings ponds in northern Alberta, Canada. We have observed that microorganisms indigenous to the tailings ponds accelerate consolidation of mature fine tailings (MFT) during active metabolism by using two biogeochemical pathways. In Pathway I, microbes alter porewater chemistry to indirectly increase consolidation of MFT. Here, we describe Pathway II comprising significant, direct and complementary biogeochemical reactions with MFT mineral surfaces. An anaerobic microbial community comprising Bacteria (predominantly Clostridiales, Synergistaceae, and Desulfobulbaceae) and Archaea (Methanolinea/Methanoregula and Methanosaeta) transformed Fe(III) minerals in MFT to amorphous Fe(II) minerals during methanogenic metabolism of an added organic substrate. Synchrotron analyses suggested that ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3. 9H2O) and goethite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant Fe(III) minerals in MFT. The formation of amorphous iron sulfide (FeS) and possibly green rust entrapped and masked electronegative clay surfaces in amended MFT. Both Pathways I and II reduced the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles in MFT, which aided aggregation of clays and formation of networks of pores, as visualized using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These reactions facilitated the egress of porewater from MFT and increased consolidation of tailings solids. These results have large-scale implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds, a burgeoning environmental issue for the public and government regulators.

  10. Lead(ii) soaps: crystal structures, polymorphism, and solid and liquid mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Casado, F J; Ramos-Riesco, M; Rodríguez-Cheda, J A; Redondo-Yélamos, M I; Garrido, L; Fernández-Martínez, A; García-Barriocanal, J; da Silva, I; Durán-Olivencia, M; Poulain, A

    2017-07-05

    The long-chain members of the lead(ii) alkanoate series or soaps, from octanoate to octadecanoate, have been thoroughly characterized by means of XRD, PDF analysis, DSC, FTIR, ssNMR and other techniques, in all their phases and mesophases. The crystal structures at room temperature of all of the members of the series are now solved, showing the existence of two polymorphic forms in the room temperature crystal phase, different to short and long-chain members. Only nonanoate and decanoate present both forms, and this polymorphism is proven to be monotropic. At higher temperature, these compounds present a solid mesophase, defined as rotator, a liquid crystal phase and a liquid phase, all of which have a similar local arrangement. Since some lead(ii) soaps appear as degradation compounds in oil paintings, the solved crystal structures of lead(ii) soaps can now be used as fingerprints for their detection using X-ray diffraction. Pair distribution function analysis on these compounds is very similar in the same phases and mesophases for the different members, showing the same short range order. This observation suggests that this technique could also be used in the detection of these compounds in disordered phases or in the initial stages of formation in paintings.

  11. The group environment of Seyfert galaxies. II. Spectrophotometry of galaxies in groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, K.J.; Kollatschny, W.

    1989-01-01

    Medium-resolution spectrophotometric data of 104 galaxies have been obtained. These galaxies are members of 22 loose groups of < 1 Mpc size. Thirteen of these groups contain Seyfert galaxies. In this paper we present calibrated emission-line data and absolute optical spectra of the individual galaxies as well as plates of each group

  12. Ni(II) ion-imprinted solid-phase extraction and preconcentration in aqueous solutions by packed-bed columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersoez, Arzu; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2004-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns packed with materials based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were used to develop selective separation and preconcentration for Ni(II) ion from aqueous solutions. SPE is more rapid, simple and economical method than the traditional liquid-liquid extraction. MIPs were used as column sorbent to increase the grade of selectivity in SPE columns. In this study, we have developed a polymer obtained by imprinting with Ni(II) ion as a ion-imprinted SPE sorbent. For this purpose, NI(II)-methacryloylhistidinedihydrate (MAH/Ni(II)) complex monomer was synthesized and polymerized with cross-linking ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate to obtain [poly(EGDMA-MAH/Ni(II))]. Then, Ni(II) ions were removed from the polymer getting Ni(II) ion-imprinted sorbent. The MIP-SPE preconcentration procedure showed a linear calibration curve within concentration range from 0.3 to 25 ng/ml and the detection limit was 0.3 ng/ml (3 s) for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Ni(II) ion-imprinted microbeads can be used several times without considerable loss of adsorption capacity. When the adsorption capacity of nickel imprinted microbeads were compared with non-imprinted microbeads, nickel imprinted microbeads have higher adsorption capacity. The K d (distribution coefficient) values for the Ni(II)-imprinted microbeads show increase in K d for Ni(II) with respect to both K d values of Zn(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions and non-imprinted polymer. During that time K d decreases for Zn(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions and the k' (relative selectivity coefficient) values which are greater than 1 for imprinted microbeads of Ni(II)/Cu(II), Ni(II)/Zn(II) and Ni(II)/Co(II) are 57.3, 53.9, and 17.3, respectively. Determination of Ni(II) ion in sea water showed that the interfering matrix had been almost removed during preconcentration. The column was good enough for Ni determination in matrixes containing similar ionic radii ions such as Cu(II), Zn(II) and Co(II)

  13. Solid phase extraction of copper(II) by fixed bed procedure on cation exchange complexing resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Maria; Sturini, Michela; D'Agostino, Girolamo; Biesuz, Raffaela

    2010-02-19

    The efficiency of the metal ion recovery by solid phase extraction (SPE) in complexing resins columns is predicted by a simple model based on two parameters reflecting the sorption equilibria and kinetics of the metal ion on the considered resin. The parameter related to the adsorption equilibria was evaluated by the Gibbs-Donnan model, and that related to the kinetics by assuming that the ion exchange is the adsorption rate determining step. The predicted parameters make it possible to evaluate the breakthrough volume of the considered metal ion, Cu(II), from different kinds of complexing resins, and at different conditions, such as acidity and ionic composition. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Critical comparison of hydrodynamic models for gas-solid fluidized beds - Part II: freely bubbling gas-solid fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, D.J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Correct prediction of spontaneous bubble formation in freely bubbling gas¿solid fluidized beds using Eulerian models, strongly depends on the description of the internal momentum transfer in the particulate phase. In this part, the comparison of the simple classical model, describing the solid phase

  15. Supported liquid membrane based removal of lead(II) and cadmium(II) from mixed feed: Conversion to solid waste by precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatluri, Kamal Kumar; Manna, Mriganka Sekhar; Ghoshal, Aloke Kumar; Saha, Prabirkumar, E-mail: p.saha@iitg.ac.in

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous removal of two heavy metals lead and cadmium. • Conversion of liquid waste to solid precipitation. • Precipitation facilitates the metals transportation through LM. • Solidification of liquid waste minimizes the final removal of waste. - Abstract: Simultaneous removal of two heavy metals, lead(II) and cadmium(II), from mixed feed using supported liquid membrane (SLM) based technique is investigated in this work. The carrier-solvent combination of “sodium salt of Di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) (4% w/w) in environmentally benign coconut oil” was immobilized into the pores of solid polymeric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) support. Sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) was used as the stripping agent. Carbonate salts of lead(II) and cadmium(II) were formed in the stripping side interface and they were insoluble in water leading to precipitation inside the stripping solution. The transportation of solute is positively affected due to the precipitation. Lead(II) removal was found to be preferential due to its favorable electronic configuration. The conversion of the liquid waste to the solid one was added advantage for the final removal of hazardous heavy metals.

  16. Characterization of IGF-II isoforms in binge eating disorder and its group psychological treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Tasca

    Full Text Available Binge eating disorder (BED affects 3.5% of the population and is characterized by binge eating for at least 2 days a week for 6 months. Treatment options include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and pharmacotherapy which are associated with varied success. Little is known about the biology of BED. Since there is evidence that the insulin like growth factor system is implicated in regulation of body weight, insulin sensitivity and feeding behavior, we speculated it may be involved in BED.A cross-sectional comparison was made between three groups of women: overweight with BED, overweight without BED and normal weight without BED. Women were assigned to Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Blood was collected before therapy, at completion and at 6 months follow up for evaluation of IGF-II using Western blot.97 overweight women with BED contributed to the cross-sectional comparison. The two control groups comprised 53 overweight women without BED, and 50 age matched normal weight women without BED. Obese women had significantly lower Big IGF-II than normal weight women, p = .028; Overweight women with BED had higher Mature IGF-II than normal weight women, p<.05. Big IGF-II showed a significant decreasing slope from pre- to post- to six months post-group psychological treatment, unrelated to changes in BMI (p = .008.Levels of IGF-II isoforms differed significantly between overweight and normal weight women. Overweight women with BED display abnormal levels of circulating IGF-II isoforms. BED is characterized by elevated mature IGF-II, an isoform shown to carry significant bioactivity. This finding is not related to BMI or to changes in body weight. The results also provide preliminary evidence that BIG IGF-II is sensitive to change due to group psychological treatment. We suggest that abnormalities in IGF-II processing may be involved in the neurobiology of BED.

  17. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters

  18. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters.

  19. Combustion of Solids in Microgravity: Results from the BASS-II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkul, Paul V.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Miller, Fletcher; Olson, Sandra L.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; T’ien, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Burning and Suppression of Solids-II (BASS-II) experiment was performed on the International Space Station. Microgravity combustion tests burned thin and thick flat samples, acrylic slabs, spheres, and cylinders. The samples were mounted inside a small wind tunnel which could impose air flow speeds up to 53 cms. The wind tunnel was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox which supplied power, imaging, and a level of containment. The effects of air flow speed, fuel thickness, fuel preheating, and oxygen concentration on flame appearance, growth, spread rate, and extinction were examined in both the opposed and concurrent flow configuration. The flames are quite sensitive to air flow speed in the range 0 to 5 cms. They can be sustained at very low flow speeds of less than 1 cms, when they become dim blue and stable. In this state they are not particularly dangerous from a fire safety perspective, but they can flare up quickly with a sudden increase in air flow speed. Including earlier BASS-I results, well over one hundred tests have been conducted of the various samples in the different geometries, flow speeds, and oxygen concentrations. There are several important implications related to fundamental combustion research as well as spacecraft fire safety. This work was supported by the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division (SLPSRA).

  20. On-line solid phase selective separation and preconcentration of Cd(II) by solid-phase extraction using carbon active modified with methyl thymol blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensafi, Ali A. [College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Ensafi@cc.iut.ac.ir; Ghaderi, Ali R. [College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-09-05

    An on-line flow system was used to develop a selective and efficient on-line sorbent extraction preconcentration system for cadmium. The method is based on adsorption of cadmium ions onto the activated carbon modified with methyl thymol blue. Then the adsorbed ions were washed using 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} and the eluent was used to determine the Cd(II) ions using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained show that the modified activated carbon has the greatest adsorption capacity of 80 {mu}g of Cd(II) per 1.0 g of the solid phase. The optimal pH value for the quantitative preconcentration was 9.0 and full desorption is achieved by using 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} solution. It is established that the solid phase can be used repeatedly without a considerable adsorption capacity loss. The detection limit was less than 1 ng mL{sup -1} Cd(II), with an enrichment factor of 1000. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 1-2000 ng mL{sup -1} Cd(II). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace cadmium (II) in water samples and in the following reference materials: sewage sludge (CRM144R), and sea water (CASS.4) with satisfactory results. The accuracy was assessed through recovery experiments.

  1. On-line solid phase selective separation and preconcentration of Cd(II) by solid-phase extraction using carbon active modified with methyl thymol blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Ghaderi, Ali R.

    2007-01-01

    An on-line flow system was used to develop a selective and efficient on-line sorbent extraction preconcentration system for cadmium. The method is based on adsorption of cadmium ions onto the activated carbon modified with methyl thymol blue. Then the adsorbed ions were washed using 0.5 M HNO 3 and the eluent was used to determine the Cd(II) ions using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained show that the modified activated carbon has the greatest adsorption capacity of 80 μg of Cd(II) per 1.0 g of the solid phase. The optimal pH value for the quantitative preconcentration was 9.0 and full desorption is achieved by using 0.5 M HNO 3 solution. It is established that the solid phase can be used repeatedly without a considerable adsorption capacity loss. The detection limit was less than 1 ng mL -1 Cd(II), with an enrichment factor of 1000. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 1-2000 ng mL -1 Cd(II). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace cadmium (II) in water samples and in the following reference materials: sewage sludge (CRM144R), and sea water (CASS.4) with satisfactory results. The accuracy was assessed through recovery experiments

  2. On-line solid phase selective separation and preconcentration of Cd(II) by solid-phase extraction using carbon active modified with methyl thymol blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A; Ghaderi, Ali R

    2007-09-05

    An on-line flow system was used to develop a selective and efficient on-line sorbent extraction preconcentration system for cadmium. The method is based on adsorption of cadmium ions onto the activated carbon modified with methyl thymol blue. Then the adsorbed ions were washed using 0.5M HNO(3) and the eluent was used to determine the Cd(II) ions using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained show that the modified activated carbon has the greatest adsorption capacity of 80 microg of Cd(II) per 1.0 g of the solid phase. The optimal pH value for the quantitative preconcentration was 9.0 and full desorption is achieved by using 0.5M HNO(3) solution. It is established that the solid phase can be used repeatedly without a considerable adsorption capacity loss. The detection limit was less than 1 ngmL(-1) Cd(II), with an enrichment factor of 1000. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 1-2000 ngmL(-1) Cd(II). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace cadmium (II) in water samples and in the following reference materials: sewage sludge (CRM144R), and sea water (CASS.4) with satisfactory results. The accuracy was assessed through recovery experiments.

  3. Synthesis and application of surface-imprinted activated carbon sorbent for solid-phase extraction and determination of copper (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jingwen; Wang, Yanbin; Wei, Yajun

    2014-01-01

    A new Cu(II)-imprinted amino-functionalized activated carbon sorbent was prepared by a surface imprinting technique for selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of Cu(II) prior to its determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Experimental conditions for effective adsorption of Cu(II) were optimized with respect to different experimental parameters using static and dynamic procedures in detail. Compared with non-imprinted sorbent, the ion-imprinted sorbent had higher selectivity and adsorption capacity for Cu(II). The maximum static adsorption capacity of the ion-imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent for Cu(II) was 26.71 and 6.86 mg g-1, respectively. The relatively selectivity factor values (αr) of Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Ni(II), Cu(II)/Co(II) and Cu(II)/Pb(II) were 166.16, 50.77, 72.26 and 175.77, respectively, which were greater than 1. Complete elution of the adsorbed Cu(II) from Cu(II)-imprinted sorbent was carried out using 2 mL of 0.1 mol L-1 EDTA solution. The relative standard deviation of the method was 2.4% for eleven replicate determinations. The method was validated for the analysis by two certified reference materials (GBW 08301, GBW 08303), the results obtained is in good agreement with standard values. The developed method was also successfully applied to the determination of trace copper in natural water samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Separation of Trace Amount Zn (II Using Additional Carbonyl and Carboxyl Groups Functionalized-Nano Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moghimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of Zn(IIions in water samples has been developed.  The first additional carbonyl and carboxyl functionalized-nano graphene (SPFNano graphene. The presence of additional carbonyl and carboxyl groups located at the edge of the sheets makes GO sheets strongly hydrophilic, allowing them to readily swell and disperse in water. Based on these oxygen functionalities, different model structures of GO were used as absorbent for extraction of Zn (II   ions by solid phase extraction method. The complexes were eluted with HNO3 (2M10% V.V-1 methanol in acetone and determined the analyte by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.  The procedure is based on the selective formation of Zn (II at optimum pH by elution with organic eluents and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The method is based on complex formation on the surface of the ENVI-18 DISKTM disks modified carbonyl and carboxyl functionalized-nano graphene oxide molecules covalently bonded together followed by stripping of the retained species by minimum amounts of appropriate organic solvents. The elution is efficient and quantitative. The effect of potential interfering ions, pH, SPFNano graphene, amount, stripping solvent, and sample flow rate were also investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the break-through volume was found to about 1000mL providing a preconcentration factor of 500. The maximum capacity of the disks was found to be 456± 3 µg for Zn2+.The limit of detection of the proposed method is 5ng per 1000mL.The method was applied to the extraction and recovery of Zn in different water samples.

  5. The group theory of oxidation II: cosets of non-split groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keurentjes, Arjan

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation program given in the first article of this series (see preceding article in this issue) is extended to cover oxidation of 3d sigma model theories on a coset G/H, with G non-compact (but not necessarily split), and H the maximal compact subgroup. We recover the matter content, the equations of motion and Bianchi identities from group lattice and Cartan involution. Satake diagrams provide an elegant tool for the computations, the maximal oxidation dimension, and group disintegration chains can be directly read off. We give a complete list of theories that can be recovered from oxidation of a 3-dimensional coset sigma model on G/H, where G is a simple non-compact group

  6. The generation, validation and testing of a coupled 219-group neutron 36-group gamma ray AMPX-II library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, G.C.; Siciliano, F.; Lioi, A.

    1987-01-01

    The main characteristics of a P 3 coupled 219-group neutron 36-group gamma-ray library in the AMPX-II Master Interface Format obtained processing ENDF/B-IV data by means of various AMPX-II System modules are presented in this note both for the more reprocessing aspects and features of the generated component files-neutrons, photon and secondary gamma-ray production cross sections. As far as the neutron data are concerned there is the avaibility of 186 data sets regarding most significant fission products. Results of the additional validation of the neutron data pertaining to eighteen benchmark experiments are also given. Some calculational tests on both neutron and coupled data emphasize the important role of the secondary gamma-ray data in nuclear criticality safety calculations

  7. Evolution of protoplanetary disks from their taxonomy in scattered light: Group I vs. Group II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garufi, A.; Meeus, G.; Benisty, M.; Quanz, S.P.; Banzatti, A.; Kama, M.; Canovas, H.; Eiroa, C.; Schmid, H.M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; Rigliaco, E.; Ménard, F.; Meyer, M.R.; van Boekel, R.; Dominik, C.

    Context. High-resolution imaging reveals a large morphological variety of protoplanetary disks. To date, no constraints on their global evolution have been found from this census. An evolutionary classification of disks was proposed based on their IR spectral energy distribution, with the Group I

  8. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings...

  9. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.8 Section 76.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1...

  10. Adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on activated carbon by complexation with surface functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella; Alberti, Giancarla; Conti, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on an activated carbon (Filtrasorb 300, Chemviron) was characterized assuming that it takes place by formation of complexes with functional groups, present in the activated carbon. Their concentration and conditional adsorption coefficients were determined for each metal by titration of the carbon in suspension in aqueous phase, at constant acidity, with the metal itself. For each titration point, the concentration of the metal in the solution phase after equilibration was determined, and the data were processed by the Ruzic linearization method, to obtain the concentration of the active sites involved in the sorption, and the conditional constant. The effect of the pH was also examined, in the range 4-6, obtaining that the adsorption increases at increasing pH. The protonation and adsorption constants were determined from the conditional adsorption coefficients obtained at the different acidities. The concentration of the active sites is 0.023 and 0.042 mmol g -1 , and the protonation constants are 1.0x10 6 and 4.6x10 4 M -1 for Pb(II) and Cu(II). The corresponding adsorption constants are respectively 1.4x10 5 and 6.3x10 3 M -1 . All the parameters are affected by a large uncertainty, probably due to the heterogeneity of the active groups in the activated carbon. Even if so, these parameters make it possible a good prediction of the adsorption in a wide range of conditions. Other sorption mechanism can be set up at different conditions, in particular at different pH, as it has been demonstrated in the case of copper(II)

  11. Adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on activated carbon by complexation with surface functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella; Alberti, Giancarla; Conti, Fabio

    2003-03-17

    The adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on an activated carbon (Filtrasorb 300, Chemviron) was characterized assuming that it takes place by formation of complexes with functional groups, present in the activated carbon. Their concentration and conditional adsorption coefficients were determined for each metal by titration of the carbon in suspension in aqueous phase, at constant acidity, with the metal itself. For each titration point, the concentration of the metal in the solution phase after equilibration was determined, and the data were processed by the Ruzic linearization method, to obtain the concentration of the active sites involved in the sorption, and the conditional constant. The effect of the pH was also examined, in the range 4-6, obtaining that the adsorption increases at increasing pH. The protonation and adsorption constants were determined from the conditional adsorption coefficients obtained at the different acidities. The concentration of the active sites is 0.023 and 0.042 mmol g{sup -1}, and the protonation constants are 1.0x10{sup 6} and 4.6x10{sup 4} M{sup -1} for Pb(II) and Cu(II). The corresponding adsorption constants are respectively 1.4x10{sup 5} and 6.3x10{sup 3} M{sup -1}. All the parameters are affected by a large uncertainty, probably due to the heterogeneity of the active groups in the activated carbon. Even if so, these parameters make it possible a good prediction of the adsorption in a wide range of conditions. Other sorption mechanism can be set up at different conditions, in particular at different pH, as it has been demonstrated in the case of copper(II)

  12. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phase transitions in solid Kr-CH4 solutions and rotational excitations in phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagatskii, M.I.; Mashchenko, D.A.; Dudkin, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    The heat capacity C p of solid Kr-n CH 4 solutions with the CH 4 concentrations n=0.82, 0.86, 0.90 as well as solutions with n=0.90, 0.95 doped with 0.002 O 2 impurity has been investigated under equilibrium vapor pressure over the internal 1-24 K. The (T,n)-phase diagram was refined and the region of two-phase states was determined for Kr-n CH 4 solid solutions. The contribution of the rotational subsystem, C r ot, to the heat capacity of the solutions has been separated. Analysis of C r ot(T) at T 1 and E 2 between the tunnel levels of the A-, T- and A-, E--nuclear-spin species of CH 4 molecules in the orientationally ordered subsystem, and to determine the effective energy gaps E 1 between lowest levels of the A- and T- species. The relations τ(n) and E 1 (n) stem from changes of the effective potential field caused as the replacement of CH 4 molecules by Kr atoms at sites of the ordered sublattices. The effective gaps E L between a group of tunnel levels of the ground-state liberation state and the nearest group of excited levels of the liberation state of the ordered CH 4 molecules in the solutions with n=0.90 (E L =52 K) and 0.95 (E L =55 K) has been estimated

  14. Functional requirements for the Tumulus I and II cap Waste Area Grouping 6 Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, L.C.

    1991-06-01

    The tumulus method of solid low-level waste (LLW) disposal began in 1989 with the Tumulus Disposal Demonstration (TDD) project, conducted on Tumulus I. LLW is contained in 4-ft x 4-ft x 6-ft boxes which are placed into precast concrete casks. The annular space around the box is grouted with a cementious grout before the lid is installed. The LLW does not contain RCRA materials or liquids. The casks are then stacked two high on the concrete tumulus pad. Prior to filling Tumulus I to capacity Tumulus II was constructed. Tumulus II will be filled to capacity by the end of 1991 at which time the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF) will have been constructed and will provide approximately six years of LLW disposal capacity. This project will provide interim closure of the Tumulus I and II by designing and constructing a multilayered cap, with monitoring capabilities, which will be consistent in purpose with the requirements of a Record of Decision (ROD) which will result from the Waste Area Group (WAG) 6 closure and remediation effort. Capping Tumulus I and II has been a part of the overall tumulus disposal plan since inception in the Low Level Waste Disposal, Development and Demonstration (LLWDDD) program strategy issued in 1988. This project consists of the design and construction of a low permeability cap over the Tumulus I and II disposal units. The cap shall incorporate a drainage system and be maintainable. The monitoring systems now in place will be modified and be utilized for post-closure monitoring of the pads and groundwater. The capability for performance assessment monitoring will be included in the design

  15. Supported liquid membrane based removal of lead(II) and cadmium(II) from mixed feed: Conversion to solid waste by precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatluri, Kamal Kumar; Manna, Mriganka Sekhar; Ghoshal, Aloke Kumar; Saha, Prabirkumar

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous removal of two heavy metals, lead(II) and cadmium(II), from mixed feed using supported liquid membrane (SLM) based technique is investigated in this work. The carrier-solvent combination of "sodium salt of Di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) (4% w/w) in environmentally benign coconut oil" was immobilized into the pores of solid polymeric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) support. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) was used as the stripping agent. Carbonate salts of lead(II) and cadmium(II) were formed in the stripping side interface and they were insoluble in water leading to precipitation inside the stripping solution. The transportation of solute is positively affected due to the precipitation. Lead(II) removal was found to be preferential due to its favorable electronic configuration. The conversion of the liquid waste to the solid one was added advantage for the final removal of hazardous heavy metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-affine deformation in microstructure selection in solids II: Elastoplastic theory for the dynamics of solid state transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Arya; Bhattacharya, Jayee; Sengupta, Surajit [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Calcutta 700 098 (India); Rao, Madan [Raman Research Institute, C V Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560 080 (India)

    2008-09-10

    We study the nucleation dynamics of a model solid state transformation and the criterion for microstructure selection. Using a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we had shown that the dynamics of the solid is accompanied by the creation of transient non-affine zones (NAZ), which evolve with the rapidly moving transformation front. Guided by our MD results, we formulate a dynamical continuum theory of solid state transformation, which couples the elastic strain to the non-affine deformation. We demonstrate that our elastoplastic description recovers all qualitative features of the MD simulation. We construct a dynamical phase diagram for microstructure selection, including regimes where martensite or ferrite obtains, in addition to making several testable predictions.

  17. The group II intron maturase: a reverse transcriptase and splicing factor go hand in hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2017-12-01

    The splicing of group II introns in vivo requires the assistance of a multifunctional intron encoded protein (IEP, or maturase). Each IEP is also a reverse-transcriptase enzyme that enables group II introns to behave as mobile genetic elements. During splicing or retro-transposition, each group II intron forms a tight, specific complex with its own encoded IEP, resulting in a highly reactive holoenzyme. This review focuses on the structural basis for IEP function, as revealed by recent crystal structures of an IEP reverse transcriptase domain and cryo-EM structures of an IEP-intron complex. These structures explain how the same IEP scaffold is utilized for intron recognition, splicing and reverse transcription, while providing a physical basis for understanding the evolutionary transformation of the IEP into the eukaryotic splicing factor Prp8. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemically modified activated carbon with 1-acylthiosemicarbazide for selective solid-phase extraction and preconcentration of trace Cu(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ru; Hu, Zheng; Chang, Xijun; He, Qun; Zhang, Lijun; Tu, Zhifeng; Shi, Jianping

    2009-12-15

    A new sorbent 1-acylthiosemicarbazide-modified activated carbon (AC-ATSC) was prepared as a solid-phase extractant and applied for removing of trace Cu(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The separation/preconcentration conditions of analytes were investigated, including effects of pH, the shaking time, the sample flow rate and volume, the elution condition and the interfering ions. At pH 3, the maximum static adsorption capacity of Cu(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) onto the AC-ATSC were 78.20, 67.80 and 48.56 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorbed metal ions were quantitatively eluted by 3.0 mL of 2% CS(NH2)2 and 2.0 mol L(-1) HCl solution. Common coexisting ions did not interfere with the separation. According to the definition of IUPAC, the detection limits (3sigma) of this method for Cu(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) were 0.20, 0.12 and 0.45 ng mL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation under optimum conditions is less than 4.0% (n=8). The prepared sorbent was applied for the preconcentration of trace Cu(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) in certified and water samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Nickel Oxide (NiO nanoparticles prepared by solid-state thermal decomposition of Nickel (II schiff base precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Dehno Khalaji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, plate-like NiO nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot solid-state thermal decomposition of nickel (II Schiff base complex as new precursor. First, the nickel (II Schiff base precursor was prepared by solid-state grinding using nickel (II nitrate hexahydrate, Ni(NO32∙6H2O, and the Schiff base ligand N,N′-bis-(salicylidene benzene-1,4-diamine for 30 min without using any solvent, catalyst, template or surfactant. It was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and elemental analysis (CHN. The resultant solid was subsequently annealed in the electrical furnace at 450 °C for 3 h in air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of NiO were produced and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD at 2θ degree 0-140°, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The XRD and FT-IR results showed that the product is pure and has good crystallinity with cubic structure because no characteristic peaks of impurity were observed, while the SEM and TEM results showed that the obtained product is tiny, aggregated with plate-like shape, narrow size distribution with an average size between 10-40 nm. Results show that the solid state thermal decomposition method is simple, environmentally friendly, safe and suitable for preparation of NiO nanoparticles. This method can also be used to synthesize nanoparticles of other metal oxides.

  20. Physicochemical impact studies of gamma rays on "aspirin" analgesics drug and its metal complexes in solid form: Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological assessment of Ca(II), Mg(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) aspirinate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Sharshar, T.; Elsabawy, Khaled M.; Heiba, Zein K.

    2013-09-01

    Metal aspirinate complexes, M2(Asp)4, where M is Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) or Ba(II) are formed by refluxed of aspirin (Asp) with divalent non-transition metal ions of group (II) and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic measurements (infrared, electronic, 1H NMR, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Elemental analysis of the chelates suggests the stoichiometry is 1:2 (metal:ligand). Infrared spectra of the complexes agree with the coordination to the central metal atom through three donation sites of two oxygen atoms of bridge bidentate carboxylate group and oxygen atom of sbnd Cdbnd O of acetyl group. Infrared spectra coupled with the results of elemental analyzes suggested a distorted octahedral structure for the M(II) aspirinate complexes. Gamma irradiation was tested as a method for stabilization of aspirin as well as their complexes. The effect of gamma irradiation, with dose of 80 Gy, on the properties of aspirinate complexes was studied. The aspirinate chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial activity than the free aspirin chelate.

  1. Use of Iron (II Salts and Complexes for the Production of Soil Amendments from Organic Solid Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amerigo Beneduci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to obtain rapidly stabilized composts for crops from solid organic wastes is evaluated. Here we used a laboratory scale reaction chamber where solid waste treatment was performed under strictly controlled temperature and pressure conditions. The row organic waste was mixed with acid solutions containing iron (II ions either in the fully hydrated form or in the form of complexes with the diethylentriaminopentaacetic acid. Data from elemental analysis distribution and GC/MS analysis of the polar and non polar dissolved organic matter, clearly showed that Fe(II ions significantly enhance organic substrate oxidation of the initial solid waste, compared to a material obtained without the addition of the Fe(II ions to the raw organic matrix. These results suggest that Fe(II ions might be involved in a catalytic oxidation pathway that would be activated under the experimental conditions used. The extent of the oxidation process was evaluated by the value of the C/N ratio and, qualitatively, by the molecular composition of the dissolved organic matter. After about 6 hours of incubation, dark-brown and dry organic matrices were obtained with C/N ratio as low as 12 and a high degree of oxidative decomposition into low-molecular-weight compounds at high oxidation state.

  2. Confidence- and security-building in South-East Asia. Working group II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagappa, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion in the Working Group II focused on the following subjects: the establishment of a zone of peace, freedom and neutrality in South-East Asia; the establishment of a nuclear weapon-free zone in South-East Asia; the Cambodian conflict; regional co-operation; military security confidence-building measures

  3. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......, but according to AMH levels, the ovaries remain multifollicular. PERSPECTIVES: A better distinction between hypothalamic amenorrhoea and PCOS could improve treatment strategies for anovulatory infertility....

  5. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Leclercq

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model. Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  6. Physicochemical properties of aluminium alloys with elements of II and III groups of periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshov, B.B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to establish the mechanism and regularities of changes of physicochemical properties of binary and multicomponent aluminium alloys with elements of II and III groups of periodic table as well as optimization and elaboration of new alloys.

  7. Homophilic and Heterophilic Interactions of Type II Cadherins Identify Specificity Groups Underlying Cell-Adhesive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Brasch

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Type II cadherins are cell-cell adhesion proteins critical for tissue patterning and neuronal targeting but whose molecular binding code remains poorly understood. Here, we delineate binding preferences for type II cadherin cell-adhesive regions, revealing extensive heterophilic interactions between specific pairs, in addition to homophilic interactions. Three distinct specificity groups emerge from our analysis with members that share highly similar heterophilic binding patterns and favor binding to one another. Structures of adhesive fragments from each specificity group confirm near-identical dimer topology conserved throughout the family, allowing interface residues whose conservation corresponds to specificity preferences to be identified. We show that targeted mutation of these residues converts binding preferences between specificity groups in biophysical and co-culture assays. Our results provide a detailed understanding of the type II cadherin interaction map and a basis for defining their role in tissue patterning and for the emerging importance of their heterophilic interactions in neural connectivity. : Type II cadherins are a family of vertebrate cell adhesion proteins expressed primarily in the CNS. Brasch et al. measure binding between adhesive fragments, revealing homophilic and extensive selective heterophilic binding with specificities that define groups of similar cadherins. Structures reveal common adhesive dimers, with residues governing cell-adhesive specificity. Keywords: cell adhesion, crystal structure, hemophilic specificity, heterophilic specificity, neural patterning, synaptic targeting, cadherin

  8. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  9. Treatment strategies for women with WHO group II anovulation: systematic review and network meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Rui; Kim, Bobae V.; van Wely, Madelon; Johnson, Neil P.; Costello, Michael F.; Zhang, Hanwang; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu; Legro, Richard S.; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Norman, Robert J.; Mol, Ben Willem J.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of alternative first line treatment options for women with WHO group II anovulation wishing to conceive. Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and Embase, up to 11 April 2016. Randomised controlled trials

  10. Study on the management of radioactive solid wastes for the KRR-I and II dismantling activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. G.; Kim, H. R.; Park, S. K.; Lee, B. J.; Jung, K. H.; Baek, S. T.; Jung, U. S.; Jung, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    KRR-1(TRIGA Mark II) and KRR-2(TRIGA Mark-III) have been operated 33 years and 23 years, respectively, and now are about to be decommissioned as they reach the end of their useful lives. In the decommissioning of the reactors, the treatment of radioactive wastes is practical issues and, therefore, the plan on it has to be essentially established prior to the actual decontamination and decommissioning activities. In the present study, the classification, radiological status, classification criteria and package on the radioactive solid wastes in the TRIGA Mark-II and III are investigated for the investigated for the purpose of the effective management plan of them

  11. Applications of a solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) to the micro-determination of ABO blood group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Fenqiang; Guo Jingyuan

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) method which has been improved. The research included the tests of its methodological parameters, sensitivity, accuracy, and the studies on its applications to the detection of blood group substances in varied forensic biological materials. The coefficient variation of intra-assay was 5.6%, and that of inter-assay was 10.15%. As to its applications to the forensic serology, the ABO blood groups of human bloodstain, hair follicular tissues and salivary stains had been tested and the results were satisfying. Later, 50 unknown type bloodly samples had been blind tested. The judging level used to identify the positive and negative wells was 800 cpm, that meant, if the radioactive count of a well were over 800 cpm, it was determined as a positive well, if that of a well were below 800 cpm, it was negative well. As SPRIA is a method of micro-determination which can micro-test the blood group antigens contained in varied forensic biological materials, it should has a good future of its applications to the forensic medicine fields

  12. Radioimmunoassay of serum group I and group II pepsinogens in normal controls and patients with various disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, M.; Miki, K.; Hayashi, R.; Niwa, H.; Oka, H.; Furihata, C.; Matsushima, T.; Kageyama, T.; Takahashi, K.

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human group I pepsinogens (PgI) in serum was developed, using PgI purified from gastric mucosa. The sensitivity (0.7 μg/l) and reproducibility of the assay were satisfactory for clinical use. In normal controls total serum pepsinogen (T-Pg) level was 58.9 +- 31.7 μg/l (mean +- SD) (PgI, 43.6 +- 25.0 μg/l; PgII, 15.3 +- 11.1 μg/l). Peptic ulcer cases had elevated T-Pg levels (gastric ulcer, gastroduodenal ulcer and duodenal ulcer, in increasing order of magnitude). T-Pg levels were not useful for diagnosis of peptic ulcer because of a large overlap with normal controls. T-Pg levels were low in patients with gastric polyp and in aged subjects. In these groups, the decrease of PgI was more marked than that of PgII. (Auth.)

  13. Radioimmunoassay of serum group I and group II pepsinogens in normal controls and patients with various disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichinose, M.; Miki, K.; Hayashi, R.; Niwa, H.; Oka, H. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Furihata, C.; Matsushima, T. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Medical Science); Kageyama, T.; Takahashi, K. (Kyoto Univ., Inuyama (Japan). Primate Research Inst.)

    1982-12-09

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human group I pepsinogens (PgI) in serum was developed, using PgI purified from gastric mucosa. The sensitivity (0.7 ..mu..g/l) and reproducibility of the assay were satisfactory for clinical use. In normal controls total serum pepsinogen (T-Pg) level was 58.9 +- 31.7 ..mu..g/l (mean +- SD) (PgI, 43.6 +- 25.0 ..mu..g/l; PgII, 15.3 +- 11.1 ..mu..g/l). Peptic ulcer cases had elevated T-Pg levels (gastric ulcer, gastroduodenal ulcer and duodenal ulcer, in increasing order of magnitude). T-Pg levels were not useful for diagnosis of peptic ulcer because of a large overlap with normal controls. T-Pg levels were low in patients with gastric polyp and in aged subjects. In these groups, the decrease of PgI was more marked than that of PgII.

  14. Eriochrome Blue Black modified activated carbon as solid phase extractor for removal of Pb(II ions from water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M. Albishri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a sensitive and simple method for the removal of lead Pb(II, from water samples prior to its determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, was investigated. The method utilized activated carbon (AC physically modified with Eriochrome Blue Black (EBB as a solid-phase extractant. Surface properties of the AC-EBB phase were characterized by FT-IR and SEM. The separation parameters for effective adsorption of lead Pb(II, including effects of pH, initial concentration of Pb(II, coexisting ions and shaking time using batch method were studied. The optimum pH value for the separation of Pb(II on the new sorbent was 7.0, and the maximum static adsorption capacity of Pb(II onto the AC-EBB was 127.896 mg/g at this pH and after 1 h contact time. The Pb(II adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Results demonstrated that the adsorption of Pb(II onto activated carbon followed pseudo second-order kinetic model.

  15. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Brunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favourable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified (encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB and gerC genes (gerX. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC gerX1, ABABCB gerX2 and ACxBBB gerX4, and a single CA-B gerX3 gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptors types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2 and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in DPA release. The cortex lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important.

  16. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 μs temporal resolution and approximately 100 μm spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  17. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2012-05-15

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  18. Solid Phase Extraction of Trace Al(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) Ions in Beverages on Functionalized Polymer Microspheres Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Hale; Alpdogan, Güzin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, poly(glycidyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate-divinylbenzene) was synthesized in the form of microspheres, and then functionalized by 2-aminobenzothiazole ligand. The sorption properties of these functionalized microspheres were investigated for separation, preconcentration and determination of Al(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimum pH values for quantitative sorption were 2 - 4, 5 - 8, 6 - 8, 4 - 6, 2 - 6 and 2 - 3 for Al(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively, and also the highest sorption capacity of the functionalized microspheres was found to be for Cu(II) with the value of 1.87 mmol g -1 . The detection limits (3σ; N = 6) obtained for the studied metals in the optimal conditions were observed in the range of 0.26 - 2.20 μg L -1 . The proposed method was successfully applied to different beverage samples for the determination of Al(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions, with the relative standard deviation of <3.7%.

  19. Contextualizing Earth Science Professional Development Courses for Geoscience Teachers in Boston: Earth Science II (Solid Earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, M. S.; Kamerer, B.; Vugrin, M.; Miller, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earth Science II: The Solid Earth -- Earth History and Planetary Science -- is the second of two Earth Science courses, and one of eleven graduate level science Contextualized Content Courses (CCC), that have been developed by the Boston Science Partnership as part of an NSF-funded Math Science Partnership program. A core goal of these courses is to provide high level science content to middle and high school teachers while modeling good instructional practices directly tied to the Boston Public Schools and Massachusetts science curriculum frameworks. All of these courses emphasize hands-on, lab-based, inquiry-driven, student-centered lessons. The Earth Science II team aimed to strictly adhere to ABC (Activity Before Concept) and 5E/7E models of instruction, and limited lecture or teacher-centered instruction to the later “Explanation” stages of all lessons. We also introduced McNeill and Krajick’s Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) model of scientific explanation for middle school classroom discourse, both as a powerful scaffold leading to higher levels of accountable talk in the classroom, and to model science as a social construct. Daily evaluations, dutifully filled out by the course participants and diligently read by the course instructors, were quite useful in adapting instruction to the needs of the class on a real-time basis. We find the structure of the CCC teaching teams - university-based faculty providing expert content knowledge, K-12-based faculty providing age appropriate pedagogies and specific links to the K-12 curriculum - quite a fruitful, two-way collaboration. From the students’ perspective, one of the most useful takeaways from the university-based faculty was “listening to experts model out loud how they reason,” whereas some of the more practical takeaways (i.e., lesson components directly portable to the classroom?) came from the K-12-based faculty. The main takeaways from the course as a whole were the promise to bring more hands

  20. Reductive dehalogenation by layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides and related iron(II) containing solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao

    In the present PhD project, novel synthesis and modifications of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) were investigated with focus on improved dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride by using modified green rusts and/or altered reaction conditions. The Ph.D. project has comprised: 1...... sulphate green rust formation by aerial oxidation of FeII or co-precipitation by adding Fe(III) salt to Fe(II). In comparison with traditional green rust synthesis, pure GRs were synthesized in minutes. 2. Enhanced dehalogenation of CT by GR in presence of selected amino acids. In presence of glycine......, chloroform (CF) formation is effectively suppressed: less than 10% of CT is transformed to CF, and more than 90% of dehalogenation products are found to be formic acid and carbon monoxide in presence of 60 mM glycine; while a 80% of CF recovery was obtained without amino acids addition. 3. A “switch...

  1. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  2. Characterization and evolutionary implications of the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu in group II phosphopantetheinyl transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Yu-Dong; Liu, Jian-Bo; Ran, Xin-Xin; Guo, Yuan-Yang; Ren, Ni-Ni; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases), which play an essential role in both primary and secondary metabolism, are magnesium binding enzymes. In this study, we characterized the magnesium binding residues of all known group II PPTases by biochemical and evolutionary analysis. Our results suggested that group II PPTases could be classified into two subgroups, two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu and three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Glu-Glu. Mutations of two three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases and one two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTase indicate that the first and the third residues in the triads are essential to activities; the second residues in the triads are non-essential. Although variations of the second residues in the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu exist throughout the whole phylogenetic tree, the second residues are conserved in animals, plants, algae, and most prokaryotes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that: the animal group II PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may derive from horizontal gene transfer from prokaryotes.

  3. Group II intron inhibits conjugative relaxase expression in bacteria by mRNA targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Carol Lyn; Smith, Dorie

    2018-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile ribozymes that are rare in bacterial genomes, often cohabiting with various mobile elements, and seldom interrupting housekeeping genes. What accounts for this distribution has not been well understood. Here, we demonstrate that Ll.LtrB, the group II intron residing in a relaxase gene on a conjugative plasmid from Lactococcus lactis, inhibits its host gene expression and restrains the naturally cohabiting mobile element from conjugative horizontal transfer. We show that reduction in gene expression is mainly at the mRNA level, and results from the interaction between exon-binding sequences (EBSs) in the intron and intron-binding sequences (IBSs) in the mRNA. The spliced intron targets the relaxase mRNA and reopens ligated exons, causing major mRNA loss. Taken together, this study provides an explanation for the distribution and paucity of group II introns in bacteria, and suggests a potential force for those introns to evolve into spliceosomal introns. PMID:29905149

  4. Surgical outcomes in two different age groups with Focal Cortical Dysplasia type II: Any real difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Molina, Jorge Luis; Di Giacomo, Roberta; Mariani, Valeria; Deleo, Francesco; Cardinale, Francesco; Uscátegui-Daccarett, Angélica María; Lorenzana, Pablo; Tassi, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Focal Cortical Dysplasias (FCDs) represent a common architectural cortical disorder underlying drug-resistant focal epilepsy. So far, studies aimed at evaluating whether age at surgery is a factor influencing surgical outcome are lacking, so that data on the comparison between patients harboring Type II FCD operated at younger age and those operated at adult age are still scarce. We compared presurgical clinical features and surgical outcomes of patients with histopathologically diagnosed Type II FCD undergoing surgery at an earlier age with those operated after 20 years of age. We retrospectively analyzed 1660 consecutive patients operated at the "Claudio Munari" Epilepsy Surgery Centre. There were 289 patients (17.4%) with a neuropathological diagnosis of Type II FCD. We included two different groups of patients, the first one including patients operated on at less than 6years, the second sharing the same seizure onset age but with delayed surgery, carried out after the age of 20. Seizure characteristics and, neuropsychological and postoperative seizure outcomes were evaluated by study group. Forty patients underwent surgery before the age of 6 and 66 patients after the age of 20. Surgical outcome was favorable in the whole population (72.6% were classified in Engel's Class Ia+Ic), independently from age at surgery. In the children group, 32 patients were classified in Class I, including 30 (75%) children in classes Ia and Ic. In the adult group, 53 belonged to Class I of whom 47 (71%) were in classes Ia and Ic. The percentage of permanent complications, the surgical outcomes, and AED withdrawal did not significantly differ by study group. Our results indicate that there is no difference between the groups, suggesting that outcome depends mainly on the histological findings and not on timing of surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pd(II)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalizations Directed by Distal Weakly Coordinating Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wan, Li; Zhang, Guofu; Leow, Dasheng; Spangler, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Ortho-C(sp2)–H olefination and acetoxylation of broadly useful synthetic building blocks phenylacetyl Weinreb amides, esters, and ketones are developed without installing an additional directing group. The interplay between the distal weak coordination and the ligand-acceleration is crucial for these reactions to proceed under mild conditions. The tolerance of longer distance between the target C–H bonds and the directing functional groups also allows for the functionalizations of more distal C–H bonds in hydrocinnamoyl ketones, Weinreb amides and biphenyl Weinreb amides. Mechanistically, the coordination of these carbonyl groups and the bisdentate amino acid ligand with Pd(II) centers provides further evidence for our early hypothesis that the carbonyl groups of the potassium carboxylate is responsible for the directed C–H activation of carboxylic acids. PMID:25768039

  6. Solid state lasers II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 24, 25, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dube, G.

    1991-01-01

    Topics presented include an upgrade of the LLNL Nova laser for inertial confinement fusion, the design and energy characteristics of a multisegment glass-disk amplifier, a wavemeter for tuning solid state lasers, and the fabrication of laser materials by laser-heated pedestal growth. Also presented are the suppression of relaxation oscillations in flash-pumped 2-micron lasers, diode pumping of tunable Cr-doped lasers, 2D periodic structures in a solid state laser resonator, and single-frequency solid state lasers and amplifiers

  7. Innovative Solid State Lighting Replacements for Industrial and Test Facility Locations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will develop a solid-state LED replacement lamp for rocket engine test stand lighting and more general hazardous-location lighting. The LED...

  8. The Effect of Group Reminiscence Therapy on Depression in Women With Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of psychological disorders and symptoms. Objectives This research investigated the effect of group reminiscence therapy on depression among women with type II diabetes. Patients and Methods The present study was a clinical trial study. Twenty-four patients referring to the diabetic clinic of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, Iran were selected through simple random sampling and were divided in two groups. Data were collected through a demographic questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. Group reminiscence therapy was held over eight biweekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. Finally, data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Chi-Square tests, using SPSS version 20. Results A significant difference was observed between the two groups after the intervention (P = 0.001. The rating for depression decreased significantly in the experimental group. Before the group reminiscence therapy, the highest rating for depression obtained by the experimental group was “need for consultation” (50%, whereas after the intervention, the highest rating was “no depression” (50%. One month after the intervention, the highest rating obtained for depression was “low” (50%. Conclusions Reminiscence therapy decreased depression among diabetic female patients after the intervention and one month after the intervention. It can be said that, through the reminiscence therapy, patients’ past memories were reviewed and emphasis on the positive aspects thereof in the group setting was followed by an increased sense of self-worth and a decrease in depression.

  9. Coupled Fluid-Solid Interaction Under Shock Wave Loading: Part II - Dynamic Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, David Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Christon, Mark Allen [CTO Offce, Dassault Systµemes SIMULIA, Providence, RI (United States); Ingber, Marc Stuart [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This article is the second of two that consider the treatment of fluid-solid interaction problems where the solid experiences wave loading and large bulk Lagrangian displacements. In part-I, we presented the formulation for the edge-based unstructured-grid Euler solver in the context of a discontinuous- Galerkin framework with the extensions used to treat internal fluid-solid interfaces. A super-sampled L2 projection was used to construct level-set data from the Lagrangian interface, and a narrow-band approach was used to identify and construct appropriate ghost data and boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. A series of benchmark problems were used to verify the treatment of the fluid-solid interface conditions with a static interface position. In this paper, we consider the treatment of dynamic interfaces and the associated large bulk Lagrangian displacements of the solid.We present the coupled dynamic fluid-solid system, and develop an explicit, monolithic treatment of the fully-coupled system. The conditions associated with moving interfaces and their implementation are discussed. A comparison of moving vs. fixed reference frames is used to verify the dynamic interface treatment. Lastly, a series of two and and three-dimensional projectile and shock-body interaction calculations are presented. Ultimately, the use of the Lagrangian interface position and a super-sampled projection for fast level-set construction, the narrow-band extraction of ghost data, and monolithic explicit solution algorithm has proved to be a computationally efficient means for treating shock induced fluid-solid interaction problems.

  10. GENERAL P, TYPE-I S, AND TYPE-II S WAVES IN ANELASTIC SOLIDS; INHOMOGENEOUS WAVE FIELDS IN LOW-LOSS SOLIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Wennerberg, Leif

    1985-01-01

    The physical characteristics for general plane-wave radiation fields in an arbitrary linear viscoelastic solid are derived. Expressions for the characteristics of inhomogeneous wave fields, derived in terms of those for homogeneous fields, are utilized to specify the characteristics and a set of reference curves for general P and S wave fields in arbitrary viscoelastic solids as a function of wave inhomogeneity and intrinsic material absorption. The expressions show that an increase in inhomogeneity of the wave fields cause the velocity to decrease, the fractional-energy loss (Q** minus **1) to increase, the deviation of maximum energy flow with respect to phase propagation to increase, and the elliptical particle motions for P and type-I S waves to approach circularity. Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous type-I S waves is shown to be greater than that for type-II S waves, with the deviation first increasing then decreasing with inhomogeneity. The mean energy densities (kinetic, potential, and total), the mean rate of energy dissipation, the mean energy flux, and Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous waves are shown to be greater than corresponding characteristics for homogeneous waves, with the deviations increasing as the inhomogeneity is increased for waves of fixed maximum displacement amplitude.

  11. Sorption behavior of charged and neutral polar organic compounds on solid phase extraction materials: which functional group governs sorption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bäuerlein, P.S.; Mansell, J.E.; ter Laak, T.L.; de Voogt, P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous polar anthropogenic organic chemicals have been found in the aqueous environment. Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been applied for the isolation of these from aqueous matrices, employing various materials. Nevertheless, little is known about the influence of functional groups on the

  12. Selective enrichment and determination of monoamine neurotransmitters by CU(II) immobilized magnetic solid phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Maofang; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, iminodiacetic acid-Cu(II) functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and used as new adsorbents for magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) of six monoamine neurotransmitters (MNTs) from rabbit plasma. The selective enrichment of MNTs at pH 5.0 was motivated by the specific coordination interaction between amino groups of MNTs and the immobilized Cu(II). The employed weak acidic extraction condition avoided the oxidation of MNTs, and thus facilitated operation and ensured higher recoveries. Under optimal conditions, the recoveries of six MNTs from rabbit plasma were in the range of 83.9-109.4%, with RSD of 2.0-10.0%. When coupled the Cu(II) immobilized MSPE with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection, the method exhibited relatively lower detection limits than the previously reported methods, and the method was successfully used to determine the endogenous MNTs in rabbit plasma. The proposed method has potential application for the determination of MNTs in biological samples. Also, the utilization of coordination interaction to improve the selectivity might open another way to selectively enrich small alkaloids from complex samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  14. Solid State Transmitters for Water Vapor and Ozone DIAL Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of this Select Phase II program is to build and deliver laser components both for airborne water vapor and ozone DIAL systems. Specifically, Fibertek...

  15. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Solid Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    Educational programs in solid waste management offered by 16 schools in 9 states were surveyed. These programs represent a sample, only, of the various programs available nationwide. Enrollment and graduate statistics are presented. Overall, 116 full-time and 124 part-time faculty were involved in the programs surveyed. Curricula and sources of…

  16. Analytical and experimental evaluation of solid waste drum fire performance volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecker, C.F., [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States); Rhodes, B.T.; Beitel, J.J.; Gottuk, D.T.; Beyler, C.L.; Rosenbaum, E.R., [Hughes Associates, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1995-04-28

    Fire hazards associated with drum storage of radioactively contaminated wastes are a major concern in DOE facilities design for long term storage of solid wastes in drums. These facilities include drums stored in pallet arrays and in rack storage systems. This report details testing in this area

  17. Characterization of the molecular basis of group II intron RNA recognition by CRS1-CRM domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ido; Klipcan, Liron; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Kolton, Max; Shaya, Felix; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2008-08-22

    CRM (chloroplast RNA splicing and ribosome maturation) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain of ancient origin that has been retained in eukaryotic genomes only within the plant lineage. Whereas in bacteria CRM domains exist as single domain proteins involved in ribosome maturation, in plants they are found in a family of proteins that contain between one and four repeats. Several members of this family with multiple CRM domains have been shown to be required for the splicing of specific plastidic group II introns. Detailed biochemical analysis of one of these factors in maize, CRS1, demonstrated its high affinity and specific binding to the single group II intron whose splicing it facilitates, the plastid-encoded atpF intron RNA. Through its association with two intronic regions, CRS1 guides the folding of atpF intron RNA into its predicted "catalytically active" form. To understand how multiple CRM domains cooperate to achieve high affinity sequence-specific binding to RNA, we analyzed the RNA binding affinity and specificity associated with each individual CRM domain in CRS1; whereas CRM3 bound tightly to the RNA, CRM1 associated specifically with a unique region found within atpF intron domain I. CRM2, which demonstrated only low binding affinity, also seems to form specific interactions with regions localized to domains I, III, and IV. We further show that CRM domains share structural similarities and RNA binding characteristics with the well known RNA recognition motif domain.

  18. A solid phase extraction procedure for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in food and water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2015-05-01

    A relatively rapid, accurate and precise solid phase extraction method is presented for the determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) in various food and water samples. Quantitation is carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the retention of the trace metal ions on Dowex Marathon C, a strong acid cation exchange resin. Some important parameters affecting the analytical performance of the method such as pH, flow rate and volume of the sample solution; type, concentration, volume, flow rate of the eluent; and matrix effects on the retention of the metal ions were investigated. Common coexisting ions did not interfere on the separation and determination of the analytes. The detection limits (3 σb) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were found as 0.13 and 0.18 μg L(-1), respectively, while the limit of quantification values (10 σb) were computed as 0.43 and 0.60 μg L(-1) for the same sequence of the analytes. The precision (as relative standard deviation was lower than 4% at 5 μg L(-1) Cd(II) and 10 μg L(-1) Pb(II) levels, and the preconcentration factor was found to be 250. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was verified by analysing the certified reference materials, SPS-WW2 Batch 108 wastewater level 2 and INCT-TL-1 tea leaves, with the satisfactory results. In addition, for the accuracy of the method the recovery studies (⩾ 95%) were carried out. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in the various natural waters (lake water, tap water, waste water with boric acid, waste water with H2SO4) and food samples (pomegranate flower, organic pear, radish leaf, lamb meat, etc.), and good results were obtained. While the food samples almost do not contain cadmium, they have included lead at low levels of 0.13-1.12 μg g(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The synthesis and properties of some organometallic compounds containing group IV (Ge, Sn)-group II (Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Des Tombe, F.J.A.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der; Creemers, H.M.J.C.; Carey, N.A.D.; Noltes, J.G.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions of triphenylgermane and triphenyltin hydride with coordinatively saturated organozinc or organocadmium compounds give organometallic complexes containing Group IV (Ge, Sn)-Group II(Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds. The 2,2′-bipyridine complexes show solvent-dependent charge-transfer

  20. 3D Printed Molecules and Extended Solid Models for Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Vaid, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Tangible models help students and researchers visualize chemical structures in three dimensions (3D). 3D printing offers a unique and straightforward approach to fabricate plastic 3D models of molecules and extended solids. In this article, we prepared a series of digital 3D design files of molecular structures that will be useful for teaching…

  1. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcia, Marco; Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts

  2. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  3. Marine Group II Dominates Planktonic Archaea in Water Column of the Northeastern South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haodong Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, nutrients, and salinity are among the important factors constraining the distribution and abundance of microorganisms in the ocean. Marine Group II (MGII belonging to Euryarchaeota commonly dominates the planktonic archaeal community in shallow water and Marine Group I (MGI, now is called Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in global oceans. Results of quantitative PCR (qPCR and 454 sequencing in our study, however, showed the dominance of MGII in planktonic archaea throughout the water column of the northeastern South China Sea (SCS that is characterized by strong water mixing. The abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA representing the main group of Thaumarchaeota in deeper water in the northeastern SCS was significantly lower than in other oceanic regions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the top operational taxonomic units (OTUs of the MGII occurring predominantly below 200 m depth may be unique in the northeastern SCS based on the observation that they are distantly related to known sequences (identity ranging from 90–94%. The abundance of MGII was also significantly correlated with total bacteria in the whole column, which may indicate that MGII and bacteria may have similar physiological or biochemical properties or responses to environmental variation. This study provides valuable information about the dominance of MGII over AOA in both shallow and deep water in the northeastern SCS and highlights the need for comprehensive studies integrating physical, chemical, and microbial oceanography.

  4. Research on combustion instability and application to solid propellant rocket motors. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of analyses of combustion instability in solid-propellant rocket motors, citing appropriate measurements and observations. The work discussed has become increasingly important, both for the interpretation of laboratory data and for predicting the transient behavior of disturbances in full-scale motors. Two central questions are considered - namely, linear stability and nonlinear behavior. Several classes of problems are discussed as special cases of a general approach to the analysis of combustion instability. Application to motors, and particularly the limitations presently understood, are stressed.

  5. HEXAGA-II-120, -60, -30 two-dimensional multi-group neutron diffusion programmes for a uniform triangular mesh with arbitrary group scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicki, Z.

    1979-06-01

    This report presents the AGA two-sweep iterative methods belonging to the family of factorization techniques in their practical application in the HEXAGA-II two-dimensional programme to obtain the numerical solution to the multi-group, time-independent, (real and/or adjoint) neutron diffusion equations for a fine uniform triangular mesh. An arbitrary group scattering model is permitted. The report written for the users provides the description of input and output. The use of HEXAGA-II is illustrated by two sample reactor problems. (orig.) [de

  6. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianlong, E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 4 North Jianshe Rd., 2nd Section, Chengdu 610054 (China); Mallory, Frank B. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Mallory, Clelia W. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A., E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  7. Solubility enhancement of BCS Class II drug by solid phospholipid dispersions: Spray drying versus freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Sophia Yui Kau; Ibisogly, Asiye; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2015-12-30

    The poor aqueous solubility of BCS Class II drugs represents a major challenge for oral dosage form development. Using celecoxib (CXB) as model drug, the current study adopted a novel solid phospholipid nanoparticle (SPLN) approach and compared the effect of two commonly used industrial manufacturing methods, spray- and freeze-drying, on the solubility and dissolution enhancement of CXB. CXB was formulated with Phospholipoid E80 (PL) and trehalose at different CXB:PL:trehalose ratios, of which 1:10:16 was the optimal formulation. Spherical amorphous SPLNs with average diameters <1μm were produced by spray-drying; while amorphous 'matrix'-like structures of solid PL dispersion with larger particle sizes were prepared by freeze-drying. Formulations from both methods significantly enhanced the dissolution rates, apparent solubility, and molecularly dissolved concentration of CXB in phosphate buffer (PBS, pH 6.5) and in biorelevant fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF, pH 6.5) (p<0.05). While similar dissolution rates were found, the spray-dried SPLNs had a larger enhancement in apparent solubility (29- to 132-fold) as well as molecular solubility (18-fold) of CXB at equilibrium (p<0.05). The strong capability of the spray-dried SPLNs to attain 'true' supersaturation state makes them a promising approach for bioavailability enhancement of poorly soluble drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Solid dispersions, part II: new strategies in manufacturing methods for dissolution rate enhancement of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2011-12-01

    The absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs, when presented in the crystalline state to the gastrointestinal tract, is typically dissolution rate-limited, and according to BCS these drugs belong mainly to class II. Both dissolution kinetics and solubility are particle size dependent. Nowadays, various techniques are available to the pharmaceutical industry for dissolution rate enhancement of such drugs. Among such techniques, nanosuspensions and drug formulation in solid dispersions are those with the highest interest. This review discusses strategies undertaken over the last 10 years, which have been applied for the dissolution enhancement of poorly water-soluble drugs; such processes include melt mixing, electrospinning, microwave irradiation and the use of inorganic nanoparticles. Many problems in this field still need to be solved, mainly the use of toxic solvents, and for this reason the use of innovative new procedures and materials will increase over the coming years. Melt mixing remains extremely promising for the preparation of SDs and will probably become the most used method in the future for the preparation of solid drug dispersions.

  9. Postaccident heat removal. II. Heat transfer from an internally heated liquid to a melting solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faw, R.E.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Microwave heating has been used in studies of heat transfer from a horizontal layer of internally heated liquid to a melting solid. Experiments were designed to simulate heat transfer and meltthrough processes of importance in the analysis of postaccident heat removal capabilities of nuclear reactors. Glycerin, heated by 2.45-GHz microwave radiation, was used to simulate molten fuel. Paraffin wax was used to simulate a melting barrier confining the fuel. Experimentally measured heat fluxes and melting rates were consistent with a model based on downward heat transfer by conduction through a stagnant liquid layer and upward heat transfer augmented by natural convection. Melting and displacement of the barrier material occurred by upward-moving droplets randomly distributed across the melting surface. Results indicated that the melting and displacement process had no effect on the heat transfer process

  10. Monitoring of plutonium contaminated solid waste streams. Chapter II: principles and theory of radiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhoff, G.; Bondar, L.; Notea, A.; Segal, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The interpretation of a count rate distribution obtained from radiometric assay of a given waste items population in terms of source strength distribution is discussed. A model for the evaluation of errors, arising from non uniform source density distribution (Pu) within the item volume and heterogeneity of matrix materials, is presented. Points concerning calibration procedures and representativity of reference materials are dealt with. Qualification procedures for possible monitoring systems are outlined on the basis of comparison with reference systems. The latter are composed of reference monitors based on high resolution gamma spectrometry and passive and active neutron techniques. The importance of information upon the elemental composition and density distribution of matrix materials for the interpretation of radiometric assay of solid wastes is stressed

  11. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1994-01-01

    of group II have, during the observation period, become more frequently resistant to penicillin and/or tetracycline. Strains typed at 100 x RTD of subgroup 71+ and the 'rest of group II' are more frequently antibiotic resistant than the rest of the group II strains. Strains of the increasing subgroups...

  12. Boys II Men: A Culturally-Responsive School Counseling Group for Urban High School Boys of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gualdrón, Leyla; Yeh, Christine; Russell, LyRyan

    2016-01-01

    Using a participatory and collaborative approach, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a culturally responsive school counseling group, "Boys II Men," for 11 low-income diverse male students of color at an urban public school. The content of the group focused on five areas: social connections and support, exploring gender roles,…

  13. Hydrogen storage materials with focus on main group I-II elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2005-07-01

    A future hydrogen based society, viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier, is viewed by many as a solution to many of the energy related problems of the world {integral} the ultimate problem being the eventual depletion of fossil fuels. Although, for the hydrogen based society to become realizable, several technical difficulties must be dealt with. Especially, the transport sector relies on a cheap, safe and reliable way of storing hydrogen with high storage capacity, fast kinetics and favourable thermodynamics. No potential hydrogen storage candidate has been found yet, which meets all the criteria just summarized. The hydrogen storage solution showing the greatest potential in fulfilling the hydrogen storage criteria with respect to storage capacity, is solid state storage in light metal hydrides e.g. alkali metals and alkali earth metals. The remaining issues to be dealt with mainly concerns the kinetics of hydrogen uptake/release and the thermal stability of the formed hydride. In this thesis the hydrogen storage properties of some magnesium based hydrides and alkali metal tetrahydridoaluminates, a subclass of the so called complex hydrides, are explored in relation to hydrogen storage. After briefly reviewing the major energy related problems of the world, including some basic concepts of solid state hydrogen storage the dehydrogenation kinetics of various magnesium based hydrides are investigated. By means of time resolved in situ X-ray powder diffraction, quantitative phase analysis is performed for air exposed samples of magnesium, magnesium-copper, and magnesium-aluminum based hydrides. From kinetic analysis of the different samples it is generally found that the dehydrogenation kinetics of magnesium hydride is severely hampered by the presence of oxide impurities whereas alloying with both Cu and Al creates compounds significantly less sensitive towards contamination. This leads to a phenomenological explanation of the large

  14. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Zerbato

    Full Text Available Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  15. Short stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part II. Sensitivity and interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarri, J. I.; Kesler, O.

    In the first part of this two-paper series, we presented a numerical model of the impedance behaviour of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) aimed at simulating the change in the impedance spectrum induced by contact degradation at the interconnect-electrode, and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The purpose of that investigation was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic technique to identify degradation modes in situ. In the present paper, we appraise the predictive capabilities of the proposed method in terms of its robustness to uncertainties in the input parameters, many of which are very difficult to measure independently. We applied this technique to the degradation modes simulated in Part I, in addition to anode sulfur poisoning. Electrode delamination showed the highest robustness to input parameter variations, followed by interconnect oxidation and interconnect detachment. The most sensitive degradation mode was sulfur poisoning, due to strong parameter interactions. In addition, we simulate several simultaneous two-degradation-mode scenarios, assessing the method's capabilities and limitations for the prediction of electrochemical behaviour of SOFC's undergoing multiple simultaneous degradation modes.

  16. Short stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part II. Sensitivity and interaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazzarri, J.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2054-6250 Applied Science Lane, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Kesler, O. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2008-01-21

    In the first part of this two-paper series, we presented a numerical model of the impedance behaviour of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) aimed at simulating the change in the impedance spectrum induced by contact degradation at the interconnect-electrode, and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The purpose of that investigation was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic technique to identify degradation modes in situ. In the present paper, we appraise the predictive capabilities of the proposed method in terms of its robustness to uncertainties in the input parameters, many of which are very difficult to measure independently. We applied this technique to the degradation modes simulated in Part I, in addition to anode sulfur poisoning. Electrode delamination showed the highest robustness to input parameter variations, followed by interconnect oxidation and interconnect detachment. The most sensitive degradation mode was sulfur poisoning, due to strong parameter interactions. In addition, we simulate several simultaneous two-degradation-mode scenarios, assessing the method's capabilities and limitations for the prediction of electrochemical behaviour of SOFC's undergoing multiple simultaneous degradation modes. (author)

  17. Potential of Power Generation from Biogas. Part II: Municipal Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera-Romero Iván

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to estimate the amount of biogas that could be obtained from the anaerobic decomposition of the organic fraction of the municipal solid waste (MSW disposed in a sanitary landfill, by capturing and taking advantage of it to generate electricity which can be consumed by Ciénega Region of Chapala in the state of Michoacán, México. To estimate the biogas captured, the Mexican Model of Biogas version 2.0 was used; capturing MSW for 11 years with a project life of 21 years. For the analysis of power generation an average cost for schedule rate 5-A from the CFE for public service was used. Four possible scenarios were evaluated: optimal, intermediate optimal, intermediate pessimistic and pessimistic; varying characteristics such as adequate handling site, fire presence, coverage, leachate, among others. Each of the scenarios, economically justify the construction of an inter-municipal landfill obtaining substantial long-term economic benefits. (26.5×106 USD, 22.8×106 , 17.9×106 and 11.7×106 respectively, while contributing to climate change mitigation and prevention of diseases.

  18. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. High-throughput sequencing of human plasma RNA by using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Wu, Douglas C.; Nottingham, Ryan M.; Mohr, Sabine; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptome profiling, gene expression analysis, and RNA-based diagnostics. Here, we developed a new RNA-seq method that exploits thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs) and used it to profile human plasma RNAs. TGIRTs have higher thermostability, processivity, and fidelity than conventional reverse transcriptases, plus a novel template-switching activity that can efficiently attach RNA-seq adapters to target RNA sequences without RNA ligation. The new TGIRT-seq method enabled construction of RNA-seq libraries from RNA in RNA in 1-mL plasma samples from a healthy individual revealed RNA fragments mapping to a diverse population of protein-coding gene and long ncRNAs, which are enriched in intron and antisense sequences, as well as nearly all known classes of small ncRNAs, some of which have never before been seen in plasma. Surprisingly, many of the small ncRNA species were present as full-length transcripts, suggesting that they are protected from plasma RNases in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and/or exosomes. This TGIRT-seq method is readily adaptable for profiling of whole-cell, exosomal, and miRNAs, and for related procedures, such as HITS-CLIP and ribosome profiling. PMID:26554030

  20. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2008-04-02

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M{sub 3}P{sub 2} (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be{sub 3}P{sub 2}, Mg{sub 3}P{sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}P{sub 2}, respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail.

  1. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M 3 P 2 (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be 3 P 2 , Mg 3 P 2 and Ca 3 P 2 , respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail

  2. Flagellin Diversity in Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II: a New Strategy for Strain Identification▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Twine, Susan M.; Tam, Kevin J.; Mullen, James A.; Kelly, John F.; Austin, John W.; Logan, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region. PMID:17351097

  3. Flagellin diversity in Clostridium botulinum groups I and II: a new strategy for strain identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J; Twine, Susan M; Tam, Kevin J; Mullen, James A; Kelly, John F; Austin, John W; Logan, Susan M

    2007-05-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region.

  4. Occurrences of flares with type II and IV radio events in interacting sunspot groups in the course of revolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimes, J.; Krivsky, L.

    1984-01-01

    Using data from 11-year solar cycle No. 20, it was found that flares with type II radio bursts are more than twice as frequent and flares with type IV bursts nearly twice as frequent in sunspot groups which developed close to each other or which merged in the course of revolutions than in isolated sunspot groups. With both types the occurrence of these flares is concentrated in the revolution of the so-called sunspot group interaction (their approximation, merging). (author)

  5. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for waste area grouping 7 and solid waste storage area 1, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Ebers, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the drilling and installation of the groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 7 and at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 1, which is a part of WAG 1. Installation of GQM wells was required at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for regulatory compliance. Data obtained from these wells will be used to characterize and assess groundwater quality at the perimeter of each WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells in WAG 7 and SWSA 1 were drilled and developed during the period from June 1989 to March 1990

  6. Report of ICRP Task Group 80: 'radiological protection in geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W

    2012-01-01

    The report of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group 80 entitled 'Radiological protection in geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste' updates and consolidates previous ICRP recommendations related to solid waste disposal (ICRP Publications 46, 77, and 81). The recommendations given in this report apply specifically to geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report explains how the 2007 system of radiological protection, described in ICRP Publication 103, can be applied in the context of the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report is written as a self-standing document. It describes the different stages in the lifetime of a geological disposal facility, and addresses the application of relevant radiological protection principles for each stage depending on the various exposure situations that can be encountered. In particular, the crucial factor that influences application of the protection system over the different phases in the lifetime of a disposal facility is the level of oversight that is present. The level of oversight affects the capability to reduce or avoid exposures. Three main time frames have to be considered for the purpose of radiological protection: time of direct oversight when the disposal facility is being implemented and active oversight is taking place; time of indirect oversight when the disposal facility is sealed and indirect oversight is being exercised to provide additional assurance on behalf of the population; and time of no oversight when oversight is no longer exercised because memory is lost. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Study on the surface hydroxyl group on solid breeding materials by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Taniguchi, Masaki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Hydroxyl groups on the surface of Li{sub 2}O were studied by using a diffuse reflectance method with Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy at high temperature up to 973K under controlled D{sub 2}O or D{sub 2} partial pressure. It was found that hydroxyl groups could exist on Li{sub 2}O surface up to 973K under Ar atmosphere. Under D{sub 2}O containing atmosphere, only the sharp peak at 2520cm{sup -1} was observed at 973K in the O-D stretching vibration region. Below 973K, multiple peaks due to the surface -OD were observed and they showed different behavior with temperature or atmosphere. Multiple peaks mean that surface is not homogeneous for D{sub 2}O adsorption. Assignment of the observed peaks to the surface bonding structure was also discussed. (author)

  8. Proliferation of group II introns in the chloroplast genome of the green alga Oedocladium carolinianum (Chlorophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Simon Brouard

    2016-10-01

    longer and dispersed repeats are more abundant, but a smaller fraction of the Oedocladium genome is occupied by introns. Six additional group II introns are present, five of which lack ORFs and carry highly similar sequences to that of the ORF-less IIA intron shared with Oedogonium. Secondary structure analysis of the group IIA introns disclosed marked differences in the exon-binding sites; however, each intron showed perfect or nearly perfect base pairing interactions with its target site. Discussion Our results suggest that chloroplast genes rearrange more slowly in the Oedogoniales than in the Chaetophorales and raise questions as to what was the nature of the foreign coding sequences in the IR of the common ancestor of the Oedogoniales. They provide the first evidence for intragenomic proliferation of group IIA introns in the Viridiplantae, revealing that intron spread in the Oedocladium lineage likely occurred by retrohoming after sequence divergence of the exon-binding sites.

  9. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289.

  10. Regulation of pathogenicity in hop stunt viroid-related group II citrus viroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reanwarakorn, K; Semancik, J S

    1998-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences were determined for two hop stunt viroid-related Group II citrus viroids characterized as either a cachexia disease non-pathogenic variant (CVd-IIa) or a pathogenic variant (CVd-IIb). Sequence identity between the two variants of 95.6% indicated a conserved genome with the principal region of nucleotide difference clustered in the variable (V) domain. Full-length viroid RT-PCR cDNA products were cloned into plasmid SP72. Viroid cDNA clones as well as derived RNA transcripts were transmissible to citron (Citrus medica L.) and Luffa aegyptiaca Mill. To determine the locus of cachexia pathogenicity as well as symptom expression in Luffa, chimeric viroid cDNA clones were constructed from segments of either the left terminal, pathogenic and conserved (T1-P-C) domains or the conserved, variable and right terminal (C-V-T2) domains of CVd-IIa or CVd-IIb in reciprocal exchanges. Symptoms induced by the various chimeric constructs on the two bioassay hosts reflected the differential response observed with CVd-IIa and -IIb. Constructs with the C-V-T2 domains region from clone-IIa induced severe symptoms on Luffa typical of CVd-IIa, but were non-symptomatic on mandarin as a bioassay host for the cachexia disease. Constructs with the same region (C-V-T2) from the clone-IIb genome induced only mild symptoms on Luffa, but produced a severe reaction on mandarin, as observed for CVd-IIb. Specific site-directed mutations were introduced into the V domain of the CVd-IIa clone to construct viroid cDNA clones with either partial or complete conversions to the CVd-IIb sequence. With the introduction of six site-specific changes into the V domain of the clone-IIa genome, cachexia pathogenicity was acquired as well as a moderation of severe symptoms on Luffa.

  11. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum

  12. Removal of radioactive sodium from experimental breeder reactor-II components and conversion to a disposable solid waste: alcohol recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusl, J.R.; Washburn, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive sodium is removed from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II components by immersing the components in denatured alcohol until the sodium has reacted with the alcohol. The resulting radioactive sodium-alcohol solution must be processed to separate and convert the sodium to a solid waste for disposal. A process was developed and is described that converts radioactive sodium dissolved in alcohol to a dry powdered carbonate waste product and recovers the alcohol for reuse. The sodium-alcohol waste solution, after adjustment for proper sodium and water content, is fed to a wiped-film evaporator operated at 190 0 C and maintained with a CO 2 atmosphere that converts the dissolved sodium to anhydrous Na 2 CO 3 . The end product, about85 to 90 wt% Na 2 CO 3 , is directed into a 208-l (55-gal) drum for disposal. Alcohol distilled during the process is condensed, collected, and dried for immediate reuse. The composition of the alcohol is not altered in the process

  13. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 5: Design validation assessments and lists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. The following Code Evaluation analyzes the applicable sections of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 101, Life Safety Code, 1994 Edition and the 1994 Edition of the Uniform Building Code (UBC) to the W113 Trench Enclosure. A Building Code Analysis generally establishes four primary design criteria: occupancy classification; separation requirements; egress requirements; and construction type. The UBC establishes requirements for all criteria. This analysis is limited to the Trench Enclosure Building. The General Office Building and the Retrieval Staff Change Building is not within the scope of this analysis

  14. Functional role of the cytoplasmic tail domain of the major envelope fusion protein of group II baculoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, G.; Pan, M.; Westenberg, M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    F proteins from baculovirus nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) group II members are the major budded virus (BV) viral envelope fusion proteins. They undergo furin-like proteolysis processing in order to be functional. F proteins from different baculovirus species have a long cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD),

  15. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...

  16. Mobile group II intron based gene targeting in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Paul, Eldho; Gomathi, Sivasamy; Abhishek, Albert; Sasikumar, Sundaresan; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2016-10-01

    The usage of recombinant lactic acid bacteria for delivery of therapeutic proteins to the mucosa has been emerging. In the present study, an attempt was made to engineer a thyA mutant of Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) using lactococcal group II intron Ll.LtrB for the development of biologically contained recombinant L. plantarum for prevention of calcium oxalate stone disease. The 3 kb Ll.LtrB intron donor cassettes from the source vector pACD4C was PCR amplified, ligated into pSIP series of lactobacillus vector pLp_3050sAmyA, yielding a novel vector pLpACD4C (8.6 kb). The quantitative real-time PCR experiment shows 94-fold increased expression of Ll.LtrB intron and 14-fold increased expression of ltrA gene in recombinant L. plantarum containing pLpACD4C. In order to target the thyA gene, the potential intron RNA binding sites in the thyA gene of L. plantarum was predicted with help of computer algorithm. The insertion location 188|189s of thyA gene (lowest E-0.134) was chosen and the wild type intron Ll.LtrB was PCR modified, yielding a retargeted intron of pLpACDthyA. The retargeted intron was expressed by using induction peptide (sppIP), subsequently the integration of intron in thyA gene was identified by PCR screening and finally ThyA - mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) was detected. In vitro growth curve result showed that in the absence of thymidine, colony forming units of mutant ThyA18 was decreased, whereas high thymidine concentration (10 μM) supported the growth of the culture until saturation. In conclusion, ThyA - mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) constructed in this study will be used as a biologically contained recombinant probiotic to deliver oxalate decarboxylase into the lumen for treatment of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate stone deposition. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Reclassification of the Candida haemulonii Complex as Candida haemulonii (C. haemulonii Group I), C. duobushaemulonii sp. nov. (C. haemulonii Group II), and C. haemulonii var. vulnera var. nov.: Three Multiresistant Human Pathogenic Yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cendejas-Bueno, E.; Kolecka, A.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Kostrzewa, M.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Gomez-Lopez, A.; Boekhout, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Candida haemulonii species complex is currently known as C. haemulonii groups I and II. Here we describe C. haemulonii group II as a new species, Candida duobushaemulonii sp. nov., and C. haemulonii var. vulnera as new a variety of C. haemulonii group I using phenotypic and molecular methods.

  18. Insights into functional-group-tolerant polymerization catalysis with phosphine-sulfonamide palladium (II) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Jian, Zhongbao; Falivene, Laura; Wucher, Philipp; Roesle, Philipp; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Gç ttker-Schnetmann, Inigo; Mecking, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Two series of cationic palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NHC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe}2[A]2 (X1+-A: R1=R2=H: H1+-A; R1=R2=CH(CH3)2: DIPP1+-A; R1=H, R2=CF3: CF31+-A; A=BF4 or SbF6) and neutral palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4

  19. Plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry by group I and group II matrix-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Chan, W.-T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of Na, K, Ca and Ba matrices on the plasma excitation conditions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were studied. Normalized relative intensity was used to indicate the extent of the plasma-related matrix effects. The group I matrices have no effects on the plasma excitation conditions. In contrast, the group II matrices depress the normalized relative intensities of some spectral lines. Specifically, the Group II matrices have no effects on the normalized relative intensity of atomic lines of low upper energy level (soft lines), but reduce the normalized relative intensity of some ionic lines and atomic lines of high energy level (hard lines). The Group II matrices seem to shift the Saha balance of the analytes only; no shift in the Boltzmann balance was observed experimentally. Moreover, for some ionic lines with sum of ionization and excitation potentials close to the ionization potential of argon (15.75 eV), the matrix effect is smaller than other ionic lines of the same element. The reduced matrix effects may be attributed qualitatively to charge transfer excitation mechanism of these ionic lines. Charge transfer reaction renders ionic emission lines from the quasi-resonant levels similar in characteristics of atomic lines. The contribution of charge transfer relative to excitation by other non-specific excitation mechanisms (via Saha balance and Boltzmann balance) determines the degree of atomic behavior of a quasi-resonant level. A significant conclusion of this study is that plasma-related matrix effect depends strongly on the excitation mechanism of a spectral line. Since, in general, more than one excitation mechanism may contribute to the overall excitation of an emission line, the observed matrix effects reflect the sum of the effects due to individual excitation mechanisms. Excitation mechanisms, in addition to the often-used total excitation energy, should be considered in matrix effect studies

  20. Drawing plan for solid works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kuk Hwan; Kim, Hyung Seop; Yu, Dae Won

    2004-02-01

    This book deals with beginning solid works 2003, setting system option, setting tool group, setting document and storing part template file. It also introduces works of basic solid works modeling such as making of square, circuit, plate washer, square column, block I, block II, link, cover plate, position block and housing. The last part explains drawing of fix block, stopper plate III, bracket, cover, belt pulley, circle plate, square, block, stopper block, angle block, washer, circle block and link.878

  1. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 2. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with cerium(IV) and ISO 7097-1 uses a titration with potassium dichromate

  2. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 1. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for the determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with potassium dichromate and ISO 7097-2 uses a titration with cerium(IV)

  3. Radioactivity in the pelagic fish. II. Group separation of radioactive elements in fish tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K; Tozawa, H; Amano, K; Takase, A

    1955-01-01

    Analytical group separation was performed with various ashed tissues of some fishes exposed to radioactive ash. The radioactivity was particularly large with elements belonging to the 3rd group, both A and B subgroups. The 2nd group showed considerable activity in pyloric ceca and kidney of Skipjacks. The radioactivity of the 1st and 4th groups was detected in some tissues; the 5th group showed slight activity.

  4. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill.

  5. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill

  6. [Sequence polymorphism of mtDNA HVR Iand HVR II of Oroqen ethnic group in Inner Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chun-Xia; Chen, Feng; Dang, Yong-Hui; Li, Tao; Zheng, Hai-Bo; Chen, Teng; Li, Sheng-Bin

    2008-04-01

    Venous blood samples from 50 unrelated Oroqen individuals living in Inner Mongolia were collected and their mtDNA HVR I and HVR II sequences were detected by using ABI PRISM377 sequencers. The number of polymorphic loci, haplotype, haplotype frequence, average nucleotide variability and other polymorphic parameters were calculated. Based on Oroqen mtDNA sequence data obtained in our experiments and published data, genetic distance between Oroqen ethnic group and other populations were computered by Nei's measure. Phylogenetic tree was constructed by Neighbor Joining method. Comparing with Anderson sequence, 52 polymorphic loci in HVR I and 24 loci in HVR II were found in Oroqen mtDNA sequence, 38 and 27 haplotypes were defined herewith. Haplotype diversity and average nucleotide variability were 0.964+/-0.018 and 7.379 in HVR I, 0.929+/-0.019 and 2.408 in HVR II respectively. Fst and dA genetic distance between 12 populations were calculated based on HVR I sequence, and their relative coefficients were 0.993(P HVR I and HVR II in Oroqen ethnic group has some specificities compared with that of other populations. These data provide a useful tool in forensic identification, population genetic study and other research fields.

  7. Combination of sawdust from teak wood and rice husk activated carbon as adsorbent of Pb(II) ion and its analysis using solid-phase spectrophotometry (sps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputro, S.; Mahardiani, L.; Wulandari, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    This research aimed to know the usage of sawdust of teak wood and rice husk waste as Pb (II) ion adsorbents in simulated liquid waste, the combined optimum mass required adsorbent to adsorb Pb(II) ion, the sensitivity of the solid-phase spectrophotometry (sps) method in determining the decrease of Pb (II) metal ion levels in the μg/L level. This research was conducted by experimental method in laboratory. Adsorbents used in this study were charcoal of sawdust sawdust activated using 15% ZnCl2 solution and activated rice husk using 2 N NaOH solution. The adsorption processes of sawdust and rice husk with Pb(II) solution was done by variation of mass combination with a ratio of 1: 0; 0: 1; 1: 1; 1: 2; and 2: 1. Analysis of Pb(II) ion concentration using SPS and characterization of sawdust and rice husk adsorbent ads using FTIR. The results showed that activated charcoal from sawdust of teak wood and rice husks can be used as Pb (II) metal ion adsorbents with adsorption capacity of 0.86 μg/L, charcoal from sawdust of teak wood and rice husk adsorbent with a combination of optimum mass contact of sawdust and rice husk is 2:1 as much as 3 grams can adsorb 42.80 μg/L. Solid-phase spectophotometry is a sensitive method for analysis of concentration decreasing levels of Pb(II) ion, after it was absorbed by sawdust of teak wood and rice husk with high sensitivity and has the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.06 μg/L.

  8. Solid phase extraction of Cd(II) and Pb(II) using a magnetic metal-organic framework, and their determination by FAAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, Mahmoud Reza; Matbouie, Zahra; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar; Dehghani, Ali

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) for the preconcentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions. The MOF was prepared from the Fe 3 O 4 -pyridine conjugate and the copper(II) complex of trimesic acid. The MOF was characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, SEM and XRD. A Box-Behnken design through response surface methodology and experimental design was used to identify the optimal parameters for preconcentration. Extraction time, amount of magnetic MOF and pH value were found to be critical factors for uptake, while type, volume, concentration of eluent, and elution time are critical in the elution step. The ions were then determined by FAAS. The limits of detection are 0.2 and 1.1 μg L −1 for Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions, respectively, relative standard deviations are −1 of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions), and the enrichment capacity of the MOF is at around 190 mg g −1 for both ions which is higher than the conventional Fe 3 O 4 -pyridine material. The magnetic MOF was successfully applied to the rapid extraction of trace quantities of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in fish, sediment, and water samples. (author)

  9. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Kumar Guha

    Full Text Available In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA small ribosomal subunit (rns gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF encoded within a group I intron (mS1247. This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase. Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2 stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2 to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase.

  10. Facilitation of self-transcendence in a breast cancer support group: II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Doris Dickerson

    2003-01-01

    To pilot a second support group intervention study promoting self-transcendence perspectives and activities and to document changes over time in well-being in support group participants compared with nonparticipants. Quasiexperimental, partial randomization, preference trial design. An urban breast cancer resource center established by survivors. 41 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer were recruited, and 39 completed the study. 22 women participated in three intervention support groups; 17 were in a comparison group. The intervention was an eight-week, closed support group based on self-transcendence theory. Data were collected three times during 14 months. Support group intervention, self-transcendence, and emotional and physical well-being. The intervention group had lower scores than the comparison group on self-transcendence and well-being variables at baseline (time [T] 1). Scores were higher for both groups postintervention (T2), with no differences between groups. One year postintervention (T3), intervention group scores again were lower than comparison group scores. Intervention group T3 scores were unchanged from T2. Most potential participants were unwilling to risk being randomized into a nonpreferred group. Activities based on self-transcendence theory were associated with expanded perspectives and activities and an improved sense of well-being in support group participants at the end of the intervention, but not one year later. Findings from the pilot studies informed a study currently in progress. Nurses should maintain awareness of local resources for support and make that information available to women when they are newly diagnosed with breast cancer, during their treatment, and later.

  11. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  12. Enzyme engineering through evolution: thermostable recombinant group II intron reverse transcriptases provide new tools for RNA research and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen; Nilsen, Timothy W

    2013-08-01

    Current investigation of RNA transcriptomes relies heavily on the use of retroviral reverse transcriptases. It is well known that these enzymes have many limitations because of their intrinsic properties. This commentary highlights the recent biochemical characterization of a new family of reverse transcriptases, those encoded by group II intron retrohoming elements. The novel properties of these enzymes endow them with the potential to revolutionize how we approach RNA analyses.

  13. Solid phase extraction-inductively coupled plasma spectrometry for adsorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) from radioactive wastewaters by natural and modified zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar Malekpour; Mohammad Edrisi; Shamsollah Shirzadi; Saeed Hajialigol

    2011-01-01

    Natural and modified clinoptilolite as low-cost adsorbents have been used for adsorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) from nuclear wastewaters both in batch and continuous experiments. Zeolite X was also synthesized and its ability towards the selected cations was examined. Kinetic and thermodynamic behaviors for the process were investigated and adsorption equilibrium was interpreted in term of Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The effect of various parameters including the initial concentration, temperature, ionic strength and pH of solution were examined to achieve the optimized conditions. The clinoptilolite was shown good sorption potential for Co(II) and Ni(II) ions at pH values 4-6. Based on desorption studies, nearly 74 and 85% of adsorbed Co(II) and Ni(II) were removed from clinoptilolite by HCl. The Na + and NH 4 + forms of clinoptilolite were the best modified forms for the removal of investigated cations. It is concluded that the selectivity of clinoptilolite is higher for Co(II) than Ni(II). The synthesized zeolite showed more ability to remove cobalt and nickel ions from aqueous solution than the natural clinoptilolite. The microwave irradiation was found to be more rapid and effective for ion exchange compared to conventional ion exchange process. (author)

  14. Pd(II)-catalyzed di-o-olefination of carbazoles directed by the protecting N-(2-pyridyl)sulfonyl group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urones, Beatriz; Gómez Arrayás, Ramón; Carretero, Juan Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Despite the significance of carbazole in pharmacy and material science, examples of the direct C-H functionalization of this privileged unit are quite rare. The N-(2-pyridyl)sulfonyl group enables the Pd(II)-catalyzed ortho-olefination of carbazoles and related systems, acting as both a directing and readily removable protecting group. This method features ample structural versatility, affording typically the double ortho-olefination products (at C1 and C8) in satisfactory yields and complete regiocontrol. The application of this procedure to related heterocyclic systems, such as indoline, is also described.

  15. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Ru(II) and Pt(II) Complexes Bearing Carboxyl Groups as Potential Anticancer Targeted Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ma Ángeles; Carranza, M Pilar; Massaguer, Anna; Santos, Lucia; Organero, Juan A; Aliende, Cristina; de Llorens, Rafael; Ng-Choi, Iteng; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta; Rodríguez, Ana M; Manzano, Blanca R; Espino, Gustavo; Jalón, Félix A

    2017-11-20

    The synthesis and characterization of Pt(II) (1 and 2) and Ru(II) arene (3 and 4) or polypyridine (5 and 6) complexes is described. With the aim of having a functional group to form bioconjugates, one uncoordinated carboxyl group has been introduced in all complexes. Some of the complexes were selected for their potential in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The molecular structures of complexes 2 and 5, as well as that of the sodium salt of the 4'-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine ligand (cptpy), were determined by X-ray diffraction. Different techniques were used to evaluate the binding capacity to model DNA molecules, and MTT cytotoxicity assays were performed against four cell lines. Compounds 3, 4, and 5 showed little tendency to bind to DNA and exhibited poor biological activity. Compound 2 behaves as bonded to DNA probably through a covalent interaction, although its cytotoxicity was very low. Compound 1 and possibly 6, both of which contain a cptpy ligand, were able to intercalate with DNA, but toxicity was not observed for 6. However, compound 1 was active in all cell lines tested. Clonogenic assays and apoptosis induction studies were also performed on the PC-3 line for 1. The photodynamic behavior for complexes 1, 5, and 6 indicated that their nuclease activity was enhanced after irradiation at λ = 447 nm. The cell viability was significantly reduced only in the case of 5. The different behavior in the absence or presence of light makes complex 5 a potential prodrug of interest in PDT. Molecular docking studies followed by molecular dynamics simulations for 1 and the counterpart without the carboxyl group confirmed the experimental data that pointed to an intercalation mechanism. The cytotoxicity of 1 and the potential of 5 in PDT make them good candidates for subsequent conjugation, through the carboxyl group, to "selected peptides" which could facilitate the selective vectorization of the complex toward receptors that are overexpressed in

  16. Dispersive solid phase micro-extraction of mercury(II from environmental water and vegetable samples with ionic liquid modified graphene oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollahpour Atefeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new dispersive solid phase micro-extraction (dispersive-SPME method for separation and preconcentration of mercury(II using ionic liquid modified magnetic reduced graphene oxide (IL-MrGO nanoparticles, prior to the measurement by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS has been developed. The IL-MrGO composite was characterized by Brunauer– Emmett–Teller method (BET for adsorption-desorption measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The method is based on the sorption of mercury( II on IL-MrGO nanoparticles due to electrostatic interaction and complex formation of ionic liquid part of IL-MrGO with mercury(II. The effect of experimental parameters for preconcentration of mercury(II, such as solution type, concentration and volume of the eluent, pH, time of the sorption and desorption, amount of the sorbent and coexisting ion concentration have been optimized. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 0.08–10 ng mL-1 with a determination coefficient of 0.9995. The limit of detection (LOD of the method at a signal to noise ratio of 3 was 0.01 ng mL-1. Intra-day and inter-day precisions were obtained equal to 3.4 and 4.5 %, respectively. The dispersive solid phase micro-extraction of mercury(II on IL-MrGO nanoparticles coupled with cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry was successfully used for extraction and determination of mercury(II in water and vegetable samples.

  17. Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron(II after Solid Phase Extraction of Its 2,2′ Bipyridine Complex on Silica Gel-Polyethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Pourreza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new solid phase extraction procedure was developed for preconcentration of iron(II using silica gel-polyethylene glycol (silica-PEG as an adsorbent. The method is based on retention of iron(II as 2,2′ bipyridine complex on silica-PEG. The retained complex is eluted by 1.0 mol L−1 of sulfuric acid-acetone mixture (1:2 and its absorbance is measured at 518 nm, spectrophotometrically. The effects of different parameters such as pH, concentration of the reagent, eluting reagent, sample volume, amount of adsorbent, and interfering ions were investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 1–60 ng mL−1 of iron(II. The limit of detection based on 3Sb was 0.57 ng mL−1 and relative standard deviations (R.S.D for ten replicate measurements of 12 and 42 ng mL−1 of iron(II were 2.4 and 1.7%, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of of iron(II in water, multivitamin tablet, and spinach samples.

  18. Combination of rice husk and coconut shell activated adsorbent to adsorb Pb(II) ionic metal and it’s analysis using solid-phase spectrophotometry (sps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmah, D. N.; Saputro, S.; Masykuri, M.; Mahardiani, L.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to know the effect and determine the mass comparation which most effective combination between rice husk and coconut shell activated adsorbent to adsorb Pb (II) ion using SPS method. This research used experimental method. Technique to collecting this datas of this research is carried out by several stages, which are: (1) carbonization of rice husk and coconut shell adsorbent using muffle furnace at a temperature of 350°C for an hour; (2) activation of the rice husk and coconut shell adsorbent using NaOH 1N and ZnCl2 15% activator; (3) contacting the adsorbent of rice husk and coconut shell activated adsorbent with liquid waste simulation of Pb(II) using variation comparison of rice husk and coconut shell, 1:0; 0:1; 1:1; 2:1; 1:2; (4) analysis of Pb(II) using Solid-Phase Spectrophotometry (SPS); (5) characterization of combination rice husk and coconut shell activated adsorbent using FTIR. The result of this research show that the combined effect of combination rice husk and coconut shell activated adsorbent can increase the ability of the adsorbent to absorb Pb(II) ion then the optimum adsorbent mass ratio required for absorbing 20 mL of Pb(II) ion with a concentration of 49.99 µg/L is a ratio of 2:1 with the absorption level of 97,06%Solid-Phase Spectrophotometry (SPS) is an effective method in the level of µg/L, be marked with the Limit of Detection (LOD) of 0.03 µg/L.

  19. Group Lifting Structures For Multirate Filter Banks, II: Linear Phase Filter Banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brislawn, Christopher M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The theory of group lifting structures is applied to linear phase lifting factorizations for the two nontrivial classes of two-channel linear phase perfect reconstruction filter banks, the whole-and half-sample symmetric classes. Group lifting structures defined for the reversible and irreversible classes of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are shown to satisfy the hypotheses of the uniqueness theorem for group lifting structures. It follows that linear phase lifting factorizations of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are therefore independent of the factorization methods used to compute them. These results cover the specification of user-defined whole-sample symmetric filter banks in Part 2 of the ISO JPEG 2000 standard.

  20. Removal of Pb(II) from wastewater using Al2O3-NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes synthesized from solid waste coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Ji, Jiayou; Wang, Shulin; Xu, Chenxi; Yang, Kun; Xu, Man

    2018-09-01

    Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes were successfully fabricated via hydrothermal synthesis by using industrial solid waste coal fly ash and porous Al 2 O 3 hollow fiber supports. The as-synthesized Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The hollow fiber membranes were used to remove lead ions (Pb(II), 50 mg L -1 ) from synthetic wastewater with a removal efficiency of 99.9% at 0.1 MPa after 12 h of filtration. This study showed that the Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes (the pore size of the membrane was about 0.41 nm in diameter) synthesized from coal fly ash could be efficiently used for treating low concentration Pb(II) wastewater. It recycled solid waste coal fly ash not only to solve its environment problems, but also can produce high-value Al 2 O 3 -NaA zeolite composite hollow fiber membranes for separation application in treating wastewater containing Pb(II). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insights into functional-group-tolerant polymerization catalysis with phosphine-sulfonamide palladium (II) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Jian, Zhongbao

    2014-12-08

    Two series of cationic palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NHC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe}2[A]2 (X1+-A: R1=R2=H: H1+-A; R1=R2=CH(CH3)2: DIPP1+-A; R1=H, R2=CF3: CF31+-A; A=BF4 or SbF6) and neutral palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6H4)2PC6H4SO2NC6H3(2,6-R1,R2)]PdMe(L)} (X1-acetone: L=acetone; X1-dmso: L=dimethyl sulfoxide; X1-pyr: L=pyridine) chelated by a phosphine-sulfonamide were synthesized and fully characterized. Stoichiometric insertion of methyl acrylate (MA) into all complexes revealed that a 2,1 regiochemistry dominates in the first insertion of MA. Subsequently, for the cationic complexes X1+-A, β-H elimination from the 2,1-insertion product X2+-AMA-2,1 is overwhelmingly favored over a second MA insertion to yield two major products X4+-AMA-1,2 and X5+-AMA. By contrast, for the weakly coordinated neutral complexes X1-acetone and X1-dmso, a second MA insertion of the 2,1-insertion product X2MA-2,1 is faster than β-H elimination and gives X3MA as major products. For the strongly coordinated neutral complexes X1-pyr, no second MA insertion and no β-H elimination (except for DIPP2-pyrMA-2,1) were observed for the 2,1-insertion product X2-pyrMA-2,1. The cationic complexes X1+-A exhibited high catalytic activities for ethylene dimerization, affording butenes (C4) with a high selectivity of up to 97.7% (1-butene: 99.3%). Differences in activities and selectivities suggest that the phosphine-sulfonamide ligands remain coordinated to the metal center in a bidentate fashion in the catalytically active species. By comparison, the neutral complexes X1-acetone, X1-dmso, and X1-pyr showed very low activity towards ethylene to give traces of oligomers. DFT analyses taking into account the two possible coordination modes (O or N) of the sulfonamide ligand for the cationic system CF31+ suggested that the experimentally observed high activity in ethylene dimerization is the result of a facile first ethylene insertion into the O-coordinated PdMe isomer and

  2. Solid State Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator for 3-, 4- and 6-Junction Solar Cell Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I was successful in delivering a complete prototype of the proposed innovation, an LED-based, solid state, large area, pulsed, solar simulator (ssLAPSS)....

  3. High-Efficiency, Ka-Band Solid-State Power Amplifier Utilizing GaN Technology, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuinStar Technology proposes to develop a high-efficiency, solid-state power amplifier (SSPA), operating at Ka-band frequencies, for high data rate, long range space...

  4. 75 FR 807 - Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program II; Revision to General Tolerance Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    .... pubescens Ruiz & Pav., Capsicum spp.; (12) Roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa L.; (13) Scarlet eggplant, Solanum..., specialty crop producers, pesticide registrants, the environment, or human health. No crop group tolerance... Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997) does not apply to this proposed rule...

  5. Papiliochrome II pigment reduces the angle dependency of structural wing colouration in nireus group papilionids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Vukusic, Peter; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    The wings of four papilionid butterfly species of the nireus group, Papilio bromius, P. epiphorbas, P. nireus and P. oribazus, are marked by blue-green coloured bands surrounded by black margins. The cover scales in the coloured bands contain a violet-absorbing, blue-fluorescing pigment. The

  6. Altered expression patterns of group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J. J. G.; Wolswijk, G.; Bö, L.; van der Valk, P.; Polman, C. H.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for glutamate receptors in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we have focused specifically on the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. The expression of group I (mGluR1alpha and

  7. Palladium(II)-catalyzed ortho-olefination of arenes applying sulfoxides as remote directing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binjie; Shen, Chuang; Yao, Jinzhong; Yin, Hong; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-01-03

    A novel palladium-catalyzed ortho-C(sp(2))-H olefination protocol has been developed by the use of sulfoxide as the directing group. Importantly, relatively remote coordination can be accessed to achieve the ortho olefination of benzyl, 2-arylethyl, and 3-arylpropenyl sulfoxide substrates, and the olefinated sulfoxide can be easily transformed to other functionalities.

  8. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Urban Planning and Construction. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European Climate Change Policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to climate change impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national, regional and local level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on urban planning and infrastructure in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the urban planning sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting. Some of the other stakeholder meetings, such as the meeting on human health, have a strong connection with the urban planning agenda. Therefore, some actions in the sector report on adaptation and human health relate to urban planning and infrastructure considerations

  9. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Water Management. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European climate change policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to Climate Change Impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national and regional level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on the water cycle and water resources management and prediction of extreme events in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the Water Resources sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting on 11 April, 2006

  10. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species.

  11. Population genomic analysis of strain variation in Leptospirillum group II bacteria involved in acid mine drainage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sheri L; Dibartolo, Genevieve; Denef, Vincent J; Goltsman, Daniela S Aliaga; Thelen, Michael P; Banfield, Jillian F

    2008-07-22

    Deeply sampled community genomic (metagenomic) datasets enable comprehensive analysis of heterogeneity in natural microbial populations. In this study, we used sequence data obtained from the dominant member of a low-diversity natural chemoautotrophic microbial community to determine how coexisting closely related individuals differ from each other in terms of gene sequence and gene content, and to uncover evidence of evolutionary processes that occur over short timescales. DNA sequence obtained from an acid mine drainage biofilm was reconstructed, taking into account the effects of strain variation, to generate a nearly complete genome tiling path for a Leptospirillum group II species closely related to L. ferriphilum (sampling depth approximately 20x). The population is dominated by one sequence type, yet we detected evidence for relatively abundant variants (>99.5% sequence identity to the dominant type) at multiple loci, and a few rare variants. Blocks of other Leptospirillum group II types ( approximately 94% sequence identity) have recombined into one or more variants. Variant blocks of both types are more numerous near the origin of replication. Heterogeneity in genetic potential within the population arises from localized variation in gene content, typically focused in integrated plasmid/phage-like regions. Some laterally transferred gene blocks encode physiologically important genes, including quorum-sensing genes of the LuxIR system. Overall, results suggest inter- and intrapopulation genetic exchange involving distinct parental genome types and implicate gain and loss of phage and plasmid genes in recent evolution of this Leptospirillum group II population. Population genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms indicate variation between closely related strains is not maintained by positive selection, suggesting that these regions do not represent adaptive differences between strains. Thus, the most likely explanation for the observed patterns of

  12. Population genomic analysis of strain variation in Leptospirillum group II bacteria involved in acid mine drainage formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri L Simmons

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Deeply sampled community genomic (metagenomic datasets enable comprehensive analysis of heterogeneity in natural microbial populations. In this study, we used sequence data obtained from the dominant member of a low-diversity natural chemoautotrophic microbial community to determine how coexisting closely related individuals differ from each other in terms of gene sequence and gene content, and to uncover evidence of evolutionary processes that occur over short timescales. DNA sequence obtained from an acid mine drainage biofilm was reconstructed, taking into account the effects of strain variation, to generate a nearly complete genome tiling path for a Leptospirillum group II species closely related to L. ferriphilum (sampling depth approximately 20x. The population is dominated by one sequence type, yet we detected evidence for relatively abundant variants (>99.5% sequence identity to the dominant type at multiple loci, and a few rare variants. Blocks of other Leptospirillum group II types ( approximately 94% sequence identity have recombined into one or more variants. Variant blocks of both types are more numerous near the origin of replication. Heterogeneity in genetic potential within the population arises from localized variation in gene content, typically focused in integrated plasmid/phage-like regions. Some laterally transferred gene blocks encode physiologically important genes, including quorum-sensing genes of the LuxIR system. Overall, results suggest inter- and intrapopulation genetic exchange involving distinct parental genome types and implicate gain and loss of phage and plasmid genes in recent evolution of this Leptospirillum group II population. Population genetic analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms indicate variation between closely related strains is not maintained by positive selection, suggesting that these regions do not represent adaptive differences between strains. Thus, the most likely explanation for the

  13. IDENTIFYING THE YOUNG LOW-MASS STARS WITHIN 25 pc. II. DISTANCES, KINEMATICS, AND GROUP MEMBERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Anglada-Escude, Guillem [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Reid, I. Neill [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tamura, Motohide, E-mail: shkolnik@lowell.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-10

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of {approx}<300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of {approx}<25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young ({approx}<3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and {beta} Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages {approx}<150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event.

  14. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-01-01

    This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition

  15. On E-discretization of tori of compact simple Lie groups. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrivnák, Jiří; Juránek, Michal

    2017-10-01

    Ten types of discrete Fourier transforms of Weyl orbit functions are developed. Generalizing one-dimensional cosine, sine, and exponential, each type of the Weyl orbit function represents an exponential symmetrized with respect to a subgroup of the Weyl group. Fundamental domains of even affine and dual even affine Weyl groups, governing the argument and label symmetries of the even orbit functions, are determined. The discrete orthogonality relations are formulated on finite sets of points from the refinements of the dual weight lattices. Explicit counting formulas for the number of points of the discrete transforms are deduced. Real-valued Hartley orbit functions are introduced, and all ten types of the corresponding discrete Hartley transforms are detailed.

  16. Hypersurfaces in Pn with 1-parameter symmetry groups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessis, Andrew du; Wall, C.T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We assume V a hypersurface of degree d in with isolated singularities and not a cone, admitting a group G of linear symmetries. In earlier work we treated the case when G is semi-simple; here we analyse the unipotent case. Our first main result lists the possible groups G. In each case we discuss...... the geometry of the action, reduce V to a normal form, find the singular points, study their nature, and calculate the Milnor numbers. The Tjurina number τ(V) ≤ (d − 1) n–2(d 2 − 3d + 3): we call V oversymmetric if this value is attained. We calculate τ in many cases, and characterise the oversymmetric...

  17. Unbounded representations of symmetry groups in gauge quantum field theory. II. Integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelkel, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    Within the gauge quantum field theory of the Wightman--Garding type, the integration of representations of Lie algebras is investigated. By means of the covariance condition (substitution rules) for the basic fields, it is shown that a form skew-symmetric representation of a Lie algebra can be integrated to a form isometric and in general unbounded representation of the universal covering group of a corresponding Lie group provided the conditions (Nelson, Sternheimer, etc.), which are well known for the case of Hilbert or Banach representations, hold. If a form isometric representation leaves the subspace from which the physical Hilbert space is obtained via factorization and completion invariant, then the same is proved to be true for its differential. Conversely, a necessary and sufficient condition is derived for the transmission of the invariance of this subspace under a form skew-symmetric representation of a Lie algebra to its integral

  18. Insights into functional-group-tolerant polymerization catalysis with phosphine-sulfonamide palladium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Zhongbao; Falivene, Laura; Wucher, Philipp; Roesle, Philipp; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Göttker-Schnetmann, Inigo; Mecking, Stefan

    2015-01-26

    Two series of cationic palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6 H4 )2 PC6 H4 SO2 NHC6 H3 (2,6-R(1) ,R(2) )]PdMe}2 [A]2 ((X) 1(+) -A: R(1) =R(2) =H: (H) 1(+) -A; R(1) =R(2) =CH(CH3 )2 : (DIPP) 1(+) -A; R(1) =H, R(2) =CF3 : (CF3) 1(+) -A; A=BF4 or SbF6 ) and neutral palladium(II) methyl complexes {[(2-MeOC6 H4 )2 PC6 H4 SO2 NC6 H3 (2,6-R(1) ,R(2) )]PdMe(L)} ((X) 1-acetone: L=acetone; (X) 1-dmso: L=dimethyl sulfoxide; (X) 1-pyr: L=pyridine) chelated by a phosphine-sulfonamide were synthesized and fully characterized. Stoichiometric insertion of methyl acrylate (MA) into all complexes revealed that a 2,1 regiochemistry dominates in the first insertion of MA. Subsequently, for the cationic complexes (X) 1(+) -A, β-H elimination from the 2,1-insertion product (X) 2(+) -AMA-2,1 is overwhelmingly favored over a second MA insertion to yield two major products (X) 4(+) -AMA-1,2 and (X) 5(+) -AMA . By contrast, for the weakly coordinated neutral complexes (X) 1-acetone and (X) 1-dmso, a second MA insertion of the 2,1-insertion product (X) 2MA-2,1 is faster than β-H elimination and gives (X) 3MA as major products. For the strongly coordinated neutral complexes (X) 1-pyr, no second MA insertion and no β-H elimination (except for (DIPP) 2-pyrMA-2,1 ) were observed for the 2,1-insertion product (X) 2-pyrMA-2,1 . The cationic complexes (X) 1(+) -A exhibited high catalytic activities for ethylene dimerization, affording butenes (C4 ) with a high selectivity of up to 97.7 % (1-butene: 99.3 %). Differences in activities and selectivities suggest that the phosphine-sulfonamide ligands remain coordinated to the metal center in a bidentate fashion in the catalytically active species. By comparison, the neutral complexes (X) 1-acetone, (X) 1-dmso, and (X) 1-pyr showed very low activity towards ethylene to give traces of oligomers. DFT analyses taking into account the two possible coordination modes (O or N) of the sulfonamide ligand for the cationic system (CF3) 1(+) suggested

  19. Cu(ii)-catalyzed sulfide construction: both aryl groups utilization of intermolecular and intramolecular diaryliodonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Wei, Jianpeng; Fan, Qiaoling; Jiang, Xuefeng

    2017-03-07

    A sulfur-iodine exchange protocol of diaryliodonium salts with inorganic sulfur salt was developed. Both aryl groups in the diaryliodonium salt were fully exerted in this transformation. Five- to eight-membered sulfur-containing heterocycles were achieved. Note that [1]benzothieno-[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (BTBT) (an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) material) and Zaltoprofen were efficiently established through this method.

  20. GALAXIES IN X-RAY GROUPS. II. A WEAK LENSING STUDY OF HALO CENTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Matthew R.; Ma, Chung-Pei [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Leauthaud, Alexie; Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rykoff, Eli S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tinker, Jeremy L. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Massey, Richard [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Mei, Simona, E-mail: mgeorge@astro.berkeley.edu [Bureau des Galaxies, Etoiles, Physique, Instrumentation (GEPI), University of Paris Denis Diderot, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-09-20

    Locating the centers of dark matter halos is critical for understanding the mass profiles of halos, as well as the formation and evolution of the massive galaxies that they host. The task is observationally challenging because we cannot observe halos directly, and tracers such as bright galaxies or X-ray emission from hot plasma are imperfect. In this paper, we quantify the consequences of miscentering on the weak lensing signal from a sample of 129 X-ray-selected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field with redshifts 0 < z < 1 and halo masses in the range 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. By measuring the stacked lensing signal around eight different candidate centers (such as the brightest member galaxy, the mean position of all member galaxies, or the X-ray centroid), we determine which candidates best trace the center of mass in halos. In this sample of groups, we find that massive galaxies near the X-ray centroids trace the center of mass to {approx}< 75 kpc, while the X-ray position and centroids based on the mean position of member galaxies have larger offsets primarily due to the statistical uncertainties in their positions (typically {approx}50-150 kpc). Approximately 30% of groups in our sample have ambiguous centers with multiple bright or massive galaxies, and some of these groups show disturbed mass profiles that are not well fit by standard models, suggesting that they are merging systems. We find that halo mass estimates from stacked weak lensing can be biased low by 5%-30% if inaccurate centers are used and the issue of miscentering is not addressed.

  1. Identifying the Young Low-mass Stars within 25 pc. II. Distances, Kinematics, and Group Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-01

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of lsim300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of lsim25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young (lsim3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and β Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages lsim150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, the du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Subaru Telescope. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial

  2. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive solid phase extraction of cadmium(II) and lead(II) using a hybrid nanoadsorbent composed of graphene and the zeolite clinoptilolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazaghi, Mehri; Mousavi, Hassan Zavvar; Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Rashidi, Ali Morad

    2015-01-01

    We describe a hybrid nanoadsorbent prepared by depositing graphene on the zeolite clinoptilolite by chemical vapor deposition. The resulting sorbent is well suited for the preconcentration of lead(II) and cadmium(II) by ultrasound-assisted dispersive micro solid–phase extraction. An extraction unit has been designed and manufactured that facilitates handling of small sample volumes. The effects of sample pH, amount of sorbent, concentration and volume of elution and time of ultrasonic bath were investigated. The nanoadsorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, all of which revealed the high surface area of the graphene sheets on the clinoptilolite. The extraction recoveries when using the new nanoadsorbent are 97 % (as opposed to a mere 10 % in case of clinoptilolite only). It is assumed that the graphene sheets located around the porous structure of clinoptilolite are acting as a barrier against macromolecules potentially existing in the sample matrices. The method was applied to the determination of lead and cadmium in water and human serum samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The detection limits were as low as 70 and 4 ng L −1 for Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively. The accuracy of the method was underpinned by correct analysis of a standard reference material (SRM: 203105 Seronorm Trace Elements Serum L-2). (author)

  3. Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons in Solids and Liquids. V. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Inelastic Scattering of Neurons in Solids and Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-01-15

    The Chalk River Symposium on Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons in Solids and Liquids was the International Atomic Energy Agency's second symposium held on this subject. The previous one was held in 1960 in Vienna and the very first international meeting in this field took place in 1957 in Stockholm. At the Stockholm meeting only 11 papers from six countries were presented; this was the very beginning of a rapidly developing new branch of physics. At the Vienna Symposium there were 50 papers from 12 countries. At Chalk River 67 papers from 13 countries and three international organizations, the European Atomic Energy Community, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and the International Atomic Energy Agency, were presented and discussed. In several other countries, either research in this field has already begun or preparations to start it are under way. This is an indication that the interest in using inelastic scattering of neutrons as a method to study the internal dynamics of solids, liquids and molecules is continuously increasing. On the other hand, a deeper knowledge of the dynamic properties of moderators plays an important role in the understanding of the process of thermalization of neutrons. The latter study is of special importance in promoting advances in nuclear reactor technology. In the light of these developments the International Atomic Energy Agency, with the co-sponsorship of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, organized the Symposium at Chalk River from 10 to 14 September 1962 on the generous invitation of the Government of Canada and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.

  4. Aggressiveness between genetic groups I and II of isolates of Cercospora zeae-maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Mathioni, Sandra Marisa; Carvalho,; Brunelli, Kátia Regiane; Beló, André; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the gray leaf spot disease (GLS) caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, was not considered an important pathogen of maize (Zea mays, L.) in Brazil. However, the recent adoption of agronomical practices such as no-tillage and cultivation under central pivot irrigation systems increased the incidence and severity to the extent that GLS is now one of the most important diseases of maize. Isolates of C. zeae-maydis can be distinguished by two genetic groups (...

  5. Working group II report: Production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main discussions of the Working Group on the Production and Dynamics of High Brightness Beams. The following topics are covered in this paper. Proposed new electron sources and needed research on existing sources is covered. The discussions on issues relating to the description of phase space on non-thermalized electron beam distributions and the theoretical modeling on non-thermalized electron beam distributions is presented. Finally, the present status of the theoretical modeling of beam transport in bends is given

  6. Acetylenes bearing Aromatic Terminal Groups. : II 13C-NMR Spectra of Monosubstituted Diphenylacetylenes

    OpenAIRE

    野本, 健雄; Nomoto, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Six monosubstituted diphenylacetylenes, p-X-C6H4-C≡C-C6H5 1 (Ⅹ=NMe2, NH2, OMe, Cl, and NO2), were synthesized, and 13C-NMR spectra of their acetylenic carbons were measured. Hammett plots of the chemical shifts of the acetylenic α-13C and β-13C (against substituent constants σ) respectively showed a linear relationship, eXCept for β-13C on NMe2 and NH2 groups. The effects of substituents on 13C-Chemical shifts of diphenylacetylenes and effeciency of the C≡C bonds in transmitting the substitue...

  7. Constructive tensorial group field theory II: the {U(1)-T^4_4} model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoche, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we continue our program of non-pertubative constructions of tensorial group field theories (TGFT). We prove analyticity and Borel summability in a suitable domain of the coupling constant of the simplest super-renormalizable TGFT which contains some ultraviolet divergencies, namely the color-symmetric quartic melonic rank-four model with Abelian gauge invariance, nicknamed . We use a multiscale loop vertex expansion. It is an extension of the loop vertex expansion (the basic constructive technique for non-local theories) which is required for theories that involve non-trivial renormalization.

  8. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanobeads containing imidazole groups for removal of Cu(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerkmen, Deniz; Yilmaz, Erkut [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Oztuerk, Nevra; Akgoel, Sinan [Department of Chemistry, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-08-01

    Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) nanobeads with an average size of 300 nm in diameter and with a polydispersity index of 1.156 were produced by a surfactant free emulsion polymerization. Specific surface area of the PHEMA nanobeads was found to be 996 m{sup 2}/g. Imidazole containing 3-(2-imidazoline-1-yl)propyl(triethoxysilane) (IMEO) was used as a metal-chelating ligand. IMEO was covalently attached to the nanobeads. PHEMA-IMEO nanobeads were used for the removal of copper(II) ions from aqueous solutions. To evaluate the degree of IMEO loading, the PHEMA nanobeads were subjected to Si analysis by using flame atomizer atomic absorption spectrometer and it was estimated as 973 {mu}mol IMEO/g of polymer. The PHEMA nanobeads were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in about 8 min. The adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions onto the PHEMA nanobeads was negligible (0.2 mg/g). The IMEO attachment into the PHEMA nanobeads significantly increased the Cu{sup 2+} adsorption capacity (58 mg/g). Adsorption capacity of the PHEMA-IMEO nanobeads increased significantly with increasing concentration. The adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions increased with increasing pH and reached a plateau value at around pH 5.0. Competitive heavy metal adsorption from aqueous solutions containing Cu{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} was also investigated. The adsorption capacities are 61.4 mg/g (966.9 {mu}mol/g) for Cu{sup 2+}; 180.5 mg/g (899.8 {mu}mol/g) for Hg{sup 2+}; 34.9 mg/g (310.5 {mu}mol/g) for Cd{sup 2+} and 14.3 mg/g (69 {mu}mol/g) for Pb{sup 2+}. The affinity order in molar basis is observed as Cu{sup 2+} > Hg{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Pb{sup 2+}. These results may be considered as an indication of higher specificity of the PHEMA-IMEO nanobeads for the Cu{sup 2+} comparing to other ions. Consecutive adsorption and elution operations showed the feasibility of repeated use for PHEMA

  9. A Tetrazine-Labile Vinyl Ether Benzyloxycarbonyl Protecting Group (VeZ): An Orthogonal Tool for Solid-Phase Peptide Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staderini, Matteo; Gambardella, Alessia; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Bradley, Mark

    2018-06-01

    The vinyl ether benzyloxycarbonyl (VeZ) protecting group is selectively cleaved by treatment with tetrazines via an inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction. This represents a new orthogonal protecting group for solid-phase peptide synthesis, with Fmoc-Lys(VeZ)-OH as a versatile alternative to Fmoc-Lys(Alloc)-OH and Fmoc-Lys(Dde)-OH, as demonstrated by the synthesis of two biologically relevant cyclic peptides.

  10. Mutations in the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron that retain mobility in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Lisa M

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that form conserved secondary and tertiary structures. In order to determine which of the conserved structural elements are required for mobility, a series of domain and sub-domain deletions were made in the Lactococcus lactis group II intron (Ll.LtrB and tested for mobility in a genetic assay. Point mutations in domains V and VI were also tested. Results The largest deletion that could be made without severely compromising mobility was 158 nucleotides in DIVb(1–2. This mutant had a mobility frequency comparable to the wild-type Ll.LtrB intron (ΔORF construct. Hence, all subsequent mutations were done in this mutant background. Deletion of DIIb reduced mobility to approximately 18% of wild-type, while another deletion in domain II (nts 404–459 was mobile to a minor extent. Only two deletions in DI and none in DIII were tolerated. Some mobility was also observed for a DIVa deletion mutant. Of the three point mutants at position G3 in DV, only G3A retained mobility. In DVI, deletion of the branch-point nucleotide abolished mobility, but the presence of any nucleotide at the branch-point position restored mobility to some extent. Conclusions The smallest intron capable of efficient retrohoming was 725 nucleotides, comprising the DIVb(1–2 and DII(iia,b deletions. The tertiary elements found to be nonessential for mobility were alpha, kappa and eta. In DV, only the G3A mutant was mobile. A branch-point residue is required for intron mobility.

  11. Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics studies of chitosan-based solid phase nanoparticles as sorbent for lead (II) cations from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaker, Medhat A., E-mail: drmashaker@yahoo.com [Current address: Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Jeddah, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Permanent address: Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Damanhour University, Damanhour (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    Ternary nanoparticles of chitosan, non-viable biomass (Pseudomonas sp.) and gelatin, CPG were synthesized by chemical crosslinking method and applied as a novel and cost-effective solid phase to adsorb Pb(II) cations from aqueous solution. Characterization of the fabricated CPG nanoparticles and their complexation behavior were extensively interrogated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), FTIR, TGA, XRD and SEM techniques. The extent of adsorption was found to be a function of medium pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration and temperature. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin–Radushkevich and Redlich–Peterson models were used to illustrate the isotherms of the adsorption system. The adsorption of Pb(II) cations onto CPG best-fits the Langmuir isotherm model which predicts two stoichiometric temperature-independent adsorption sites, A and B with variable capacities, 35.4 and 91.1 mg g{sup −1}, respectively and removal capacity above 90%. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption process was physical, spontaneous, and endothermic. The adsorption rate is influenced by temperature and the adsorption kinetic is well confirmed with pseudo-second-order equation compared with three other investigated kinetic models. Present study indicated potential applications of CPG nanoparticles as excellent natural and promising solid phase for Pb(II) extraction in wastewater treatment. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Kinetics and thermodynamics of Pb{sup 2+} biosorption onto CPG nanoparticles are studied. • Adsorption kinetic data are best modeled using second-order rate equations. • The Pb{sup 2}adsorption onto CPG was physical diffusion controlled reaction. • The experimental equilibrium results well fit the Langmuir model. • The thermodynamics show endothermic, favorable and spontaneous adsorption processes.

  12. French Case Study: Pluralist Expertise Group on Uranium Mines in Limousin. Annex II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    The uranium mining and milling industry once played a major strategic and economic role in France. After the definitive cessation of mining and milling activities in 2001, more than 200 sites are currently in the closure and post-closure phases. Decisions required in this frame raise particular difficulties because of the sensitivity of some technical issues and the strong scrutiny and requirements of local and national non-governmental organizations. This is particularly true in Limousin, the region that stands at the heart of the national uranium history. In order to deal with this complex and disputed topic, the ministries of environment, health and industry recently decided to set up a Pluralist Expertise Group (GEP) with the aim of analysing and providing a critical point of view on the various technical documents prepared by the operator, AREVA NC, about the surveillance and control of its former mining sites in the department of Haute-Vienne in the Limousin region, and then providing recommendations to public authorities to improve the current situation. This expert group presents their reports to the local committee for nuclear information.

  13. New strings for old Veneziano amplitudes. II. Group-theoretic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, A. L.

    2006-09-01

    In this part of our four parts work we use theory of polynomial invariants of finite pseudo-reflection groups in order to reconstruct both the Veneziano and Veneziano-like (tachyon-free) amplitudes and the generating function reproducing these amplitudes. We demonstrate that such generating function and amplitudes associated with it can be recovered with help of finite dimensional exactly solvableN=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model known earlier from works of Witten, Stone and others. Using the Lefschetz isomorphism theorem we replace traditional supersymmetric calculations by the group-theoretic thus solving the Veneziano model exactly using standard methods of representation theory. Mathematical correctness of our arguments relies on important theorems by Shepard and Todd, Serre and Solomon proven respectively in the early 50s and 60s and documented in the monograph by Bourbaki. Based on these theorems, we explain why the developed formalism leaves all known results of conformal field theories unchanged. We also explain why these theorems impose stringent requirements connecting analytical properties of scattering amplitudes with symmetries of space-time in which such amplitudes act.

  14. Physics implications of flat directions in free fermionic superstring models. II. Renormalization group analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, G.; Cvetic, M.; Everett, L.; Langacker, P.; Wang, J.; Espinosa, J.R.; Everett, L.

    1999-01-01

    We continue the investigation of the physics implications of a class of flat directions for a prototype quasi-realistic free fermionic string model (CHL5), building upon the results of a previous paper in which the complete mass spectrum and effective trilinear couplings of the observable sector were calculated to all orders in the superpotential. We introduce soft supersymmetry breaking mass parameters into the model, and investigate the gauge symmetry breaking patterns and the renormalization group analysis for two representative flat directions, which leave an additional U(1) ' as well as the SM gauge group unbroken at the string scale. We study symmetry breaking patterns that lead to a phenomenologically acceptable Z-Z ' hierarchy, M Z ' ∼O(1 TeV) and 10 12 GeV for electroweak and intermediate scale U(1) ' symmetry breaking, respectively, and the associated mass spectra after electroweak symmetry breaking. The fermion mass spectrum exhibits unrealistic features, including massless exotic fermions, but has an interesting d-quark hierarchy and associated CKM matrix in one case. There are (some) non-canonical effective μ terms, which lead to a non-minimal Higgs sector with more than two Higgs doublets involved in the symmetry breaking, and a rich structure of Higgs particles, charginos, and neutralinos, some of which, however, are massless or ultralight. In the electroweak scale cases the scale of supersymmetry breaking is set by the Z ' mass, with the sparticle masses in the several TeV range. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  15. Associations of anti-beta2-glycoprotein I autoantibodies with HLA class II alleles in three ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, F C; Thiagarajan, P; Ahn, C; Reveille, J D

    1999-02-01

    To determine any HLA associations with anti-beta2-glycoprotein I (anti-beta2GPI) antibodies in a large, retrospectively studied, multiethnic group of 262 patients with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or another connective tissue disease. Anti-beta2GPI antibodies were detected in sera using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HLA class II alleles (DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1) were determined by DNA oligotyping. The HLA-DQB1*0302 (DQ8) allele, typically carried on HLA-DR4 haplotypes, was associated with anti-beta2GPI when compared with both anti-beta2GPI-negative SLE patients and ethnically matched normal controls, especially in Mexican Americans and, to a lesser extent, in whites. Similarly, when ethnic groups were combined, HLA-DQB1*0302, as well as HLA-DQB1*03 alleles overall (DQB1*0301, *0302, and *0303), were strongly correlated with anti-beta2GPI antibodies. The HLA-DR6 (DR13) haplotype DRB1*1302; DQB1*0604/5 was also significantly increased, primarily in blacks. HLA-DR7 was not significantly increased in any of these 3 ethnic groups, and HLA-DR53 (DRB4*0101) was increased in Mexican Americans only. Certain HLA class II haplotypes genetically influence the expression of antibodies to beta2GPI, an important autoimmune response in the APS, but there are variations in HLA associations among different ethnic groups.

  16. Report of the SUGRA Working Group for Run II of the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, V.; Flattum, E.; Falk, T.; Abel, S.; Accomando, E.; Anderson, G.; Arnowitt, R.; Azzi, P.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Beenakker, W.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E.; Berger, M.; Brhlik, M.; Blazek, T.; Blessing, S.; Bokhari, W.; Bruner, N.; Carena, M.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, D.; Chankowski, P.; Chen, C.H.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Cho, G.C.; Claes, D.; Demina, R.; Done, J.; Duflot, L.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Eboli, O.J.P.; Eno, S.; Feng, J.; Ganis, G.; Gold, M.; Gregores, E.M.; Hagiwara, K.; Han, T.; Harris, B.; Hikasa, K.; Holck, C.; Kao, C.; Kato, Y.; Klasen, M.; Keung, W.Y.; Kramer, M.; Lammel, S.; Li, T.J.; Lykken, J.D.; Magro, M.; Mani, S.; Matchev, K.T.; Mangano, M.; Mercadante, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nachtman, J.; Nath, P.; Nojiri, M.M.; Nomerotski, A.; Norman, D.; Oishi, R.; Ono, K.; Paige, F.; Paterno, M.; Parke, S.; Pierce, D.; Pilaftsis, A.; Plehn, T.; Pompos, A.; Polonksy, N.; Pokorski, S.; Quintana, P.; Roco, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Seiya, Y.; Smith, C.; Spira, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Sullivan, Z.; Szalapski, R.; Tannenbaum, B.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Wang, Y.; White, J.; Williams, H.H.; Worcester, M.; Worm, S.; Zhang, R.J.; Zielinski, M.

    2000-01-01

    We present an analysis of the discovery reach for supersymmetric particles at the upgraded Tevatron collider, assuming that SUSY breaking results in universal soft breaking parameters at the grand unification scale, and that the lightest supersymmetric particle is stable and neutral. We first present a review of the literature, including the issues of unification, renormalization group evolution of the supersymmetry breaking parameters and the effect of radiative corrections on the effective low energy couplings and masses of the theory. We consider the experimental bounds coming from direct searches and those arising indirectly from precision data, cosmology and the requirement of vacuum stability. The issues of flavor and CP-violation are also addressed. The main subject of this study is to update sparticle production cross sections, make improved estimates of backgrounds, delineate the discovery reach in the supergravity framework, and examine how this might vary when assumptions about universality of soft...

  17. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  18. Group theoretical approach to quantum fields in de Sitter space II. The complementary and discrete series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Euihun; Mourad, Jihad; Parentani, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    We use an algebraic approach based on representations of de Sitter group to construct covariant quantum fields in arbitrary dimensions. We study the complementary and the discrete series which correspond to light and massless fields and which lead new feature with respect to the massive principal series we previously studied (hep-th/0606119). When considering the complementary series, we make use of a non-trivial scalar product in order to get local expressions in the position representation. Based on these, we construct a family of covariant canonical fields parametrized by SU(1, 1)/U(1). Each of these correspond to the dS invariant alpha-vacua. The behavior of the modes at asymptotic times brings another difficulty as it is incompatible with the usual definition of the in and out vacua. We propose a generalized notion of these vacua which reduces to the usual conformal vacuum in the conformally massless limit. When considering the massless discrete series we find that no covariant field obeys the canonical commutation relations. To further analyze this singular case, we consider the massless limit of the complementary scalar fields we previously found. We obtain canonical fields with a deformed representation by zero modes. The zero modes have a dS invariant vacuum with singular norm. We propose a regularization by a compactification of the scalar field and a dS invariant definition of the vertex operators. The resulting two-point functions are dS invariant and have a universal logarithmic infrared divergence

  19. Different centre of pressure patterns within the golf stroke II: group-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, K A; Best, R J

    2007-05-01

    Although the golf coaching literature stresses the importance of weight transfer during the swing, research has been conflicting or lacking statistical support. A potential problem with previous studies is that no attempt was made to account for different movement strategies in the golf swing. This study evaluated the relationship between centre of pressure measures and club head velocity within two previously identified swing styles, the "Front Foot" and "Reverse" styles. Thirty-nine Front Foot golfers and 19 Reverse golfers performed swings with a driver while standing on two force plates. From the force plate data, centre of pressure displacement, velocity, range, and timing parameters were calculated. Correlation and regression analysis indicated that a larger range of centre of pressure and a more rapid centre of pressure movement in the downswing was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact for the Front Foot group. For the Reverse golfers, positioning the centre of pressure further from the back foot at late backswing and a more rapid centre of pressure transfer towards the back foot at ball contact was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact. This study has highlighted the importance of identifying different movement strategies before evaluating performance measures, as different parameters were found to be important for the Front Foot and Reverse styles.

  20. High-order-harmonic generation from solids: The contributions of the Bloch wave packets moving at the group and phase velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tao-Yuan; Huang, Xiao-Huan; Bian, Xue-Bin

    2018-01-01

    We study numerically the Bloch electron wave-packet dynamics in periodic potentials to simulate laser-solid interactions. We introduce an alternative perspective in the coordinate space combined with the motion of the Bloch electron wave packets moving at group and phase velocities under the laser fields. This model interprets the origins of the two contributions (intra- and interband transitions) in the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes by investigating the local and global behaviours of the wave packets. It also elucidates the underlying physical picture of the HHG intensity enhancement by means of carrier-envelope phase, chirp, and inhomogeneous fields. It provides a deep insight into the emission of high-order harmonics from solids. This model is instructive for experimental measurements and provides an alternative avenue to distinguish mechanisms of the HHG from solids in different laser fields.

  1. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA - II. Non-thermal diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Marco; Richter, Laura; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; de Blok, W. J. G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2015-04-01

    Our closest neighbours, the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, are extremely quiescent and dim objects, where thermal and non-thermal diffuse emissions lack, so far, of detection. In order to possibly study the dSph interstellar medium, deep observations are required. They could reveal non-thermal emissions associated with the very low level of star formation, or to particle dark matter annihilating or decaying in the dSph halo. In this work, we employ radio observations of six dSphs, conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in the frequency band 1.1-3.1 GHz, to test the presence of a diffuse component over typical scales of few arcmin and at an rms sensitivity below 0.05 mJy beam-1. We observed the dSph fields with both a compact array and long baselines. Short spacings led to a synthesized beam of about 1 arcmin and were used for the extended emission search. The high-resolution data mapped background sources, which in turn were subtracted in the short-baseline maps, to reduce their confusion limit. We found no significant detection of a diffuse radio continuum component. After a detailed discussion on the modelling of the cosmic ray (CR) electron distribution and on the dSph magnetic properties, we present bounds on several physical quantities related to the dSphs, such that the total radio flux, the angular shape of the radio emissivity, the equipartition magnetic field, and the injection and equilibrium distributions of CR electrons. Finally, we discuss the connection to far-infrared and X-ray observations.

  2. Threshold and flavor effects in the renormalization group equations of the MSSM. II. Dimensionful couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, Andrew D.; Tata, Xerxes

    2009-01-01

    We reexamine the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGEs) for the dimensionful parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with broken supersymmetry, allowing for arbitrary flavor structure of the soft SUSY-breaking parameters. We include threshold effects by evaluating the β-functions in a sequence of (nonsupersymmetric) effective theories with heavy particles decoupled at the scale of their mass. We present the most general form for high-scale, soft SUSY-breaking parameters that obtains if we assume that the supersymmetry-breaking mechanism does not introduce new intergenerational couplings. This form, possibly amended to allow additional sources of flavor-violation, serves as a boundary condition for solving the RGEs for the dimensionful MSSM parameters. We then present illustrative examples of numerical solutions to the RGEs. We find that in a SUSY grand unified theory with the scale of SUSY scalars split from that of gauginos and higgsinos, the gaugino mass unification condition may be violated by O(10%). As another illustration, we show that in mSUGRA, the rate for the flavor-violating t-tilde 1 →cZ-tilde 1 decay obtained using the complete RGE solution is smaller than that obtained using the commonly used 'single-step' integration of the RGEs by a factor 10-25, and so may qualitatively change expectations for topologies from top-squark pair production at colliders. Together with the RGEs for dimensionless couplings presented in a companion paper, the RGEs in Appendix 2 of this paper form a complete set of one-loop MSSM RGEs that include threshold and flavor-effects necessary for two-loop accuracy.

  3. Exon sequence requirements for excision in vivo of the bacterial group II intron RmInt1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Nicolás

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II intron splicing proceeds through two sequential transesterification reactions in which the 5' and 3'-exons are joined together and the lariat intron is released. The intron-encoded protein (IEP assists the splicing of the intron in vivo and remains bound to the excised intron lariat RNA in a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP that promotes intron mobility. Exon recognition occurs through base-pairing interactions between two guide sequences on the ribozyme domain dI known as EBS1 and EBS2 and two stretches of sequence known as IBS1 and IBS2 on the 5' exon, whereas the 3' exon is recognized through interaction with the sequence immediately upstream from EBS1 [(δ-δ' interaction (subgroup IIA] or with a nucleotide [(EBS3-IBS3 interaction (subgroup IIB and IIC] located in the coordination-loop of dI. The δ nucleotide is involved in base pairing with another intron residue (δ' in subgroup IIB introns and this interaction facilitates base pairing between the 5' exon and the intron. Results In this study, we investigated nucleotide requirements in the distal 5'- and 3' exon regions, EBS-IBS interactions and δ-δ' pairing for excision of the group IIB intron RmInt1 in vivo. We found that the EBS1-IBS1 interaction was required and sufficient for RmInt1 excision. In addition, we provide evidence for the occurrence of canonical δ-δ' pairing and its importance for the intron excision in vivo. Conclusions The excision in vivo of the RmInt1 intron is a favored process, with very few constraints for sequence recognition in both the 5' and 3'-exons. Our results contribute to understand how group II introns spread in nature, and might facilitate the use of RmInt1 in gene targeting.

  4. Solid hydrogen and deuterium. II. Pressure and compressibility calculated by a lowest-order constrained-variation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, G.; Ostgaard, E.

    1988-01-01

    The pressure and the compressibility of solid H 2 and D 2 are obtained from ground-state energies calculated by means of a modified variational lowest order constrained-variation (LOCV) method. Both fcc and hcp structures are considered, but results are given for the fcc structure only. The pressure and the compressibility are calculated or estimated from the dependence of the ground-state energy on density or molar volume, generally in a density region of 0.65σ -3 to 1.3σ -3 , corresponding to a molar volume of 0.65σ -3 to 1.3σ -3 , corresponding to a molar volume of 12-24 cm 3 mole, where σ = 2.958 angstrom, and the calculations are done for five different two-body potentials. Theoretical results for the pressure are 340-460 atm for solid H 2 at a particle density of 0.82σ -3 or a molar volume of 19 cm 3 /mole, and 370-490 atm for solid 4 He at a particle density of 0.92σ -3 or a molar volume of 17 cm 3 /mole. The corresponding experimental results are 650 and 700 atm, respectively. Theoretical results for the compressibility are 210 times 10 -6 to 260 times 10 -6 atm -1 for solid H 2 at a particle density of 0.82σ -3 or a molar volume of 19 cm 3 /mole, and 150 times 10 -6 to 180 times 10 -6 atm -1 for solid D 2 at a particle density of 0.92σ -3 or a molar volume of 17 cm 3 mole. The corresponding experimental results are 180 times 10 -6 and 140 times 10 -6 atm -1 , respectively. The agreement with experimental results is better for higher densities

  5. A Draft Science Management Plan for Returned Samples from Mars: Recommendations from the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltigin, T.; Lange, C.; Mugnuolo, R.; Smith, C.

    2018-04-01

    This paper summarizes the findings and recommendations of the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group, an international team comprising 38 members from 16 countries and agencies.

  6. Influence of group II metals on Radium-226 concentration ratios in the native green plum (Buchanania obovata) from the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, Peter; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, uptake of Ra from soil, and the influence of group II metals on Ra uptake, into the stones and edible flesh of the fruit of the wild green plum, Buchanania obovata, was investigated. Selective extraction of the exchangeable fraction of the soil samples was undertaken but was not shown to more reliably predict Ra uptake than total soil Ra activity concentration. Comparison of the group II metal to Ca ratios (i.e. Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Ra/Ca) in the flesh with exchangeable Ca shows that Ca outcompetes group II metals for root uptake and that the uptake pathway discriminated against group II metals relative to ionic radius, with uptake of Ca > Sr > Ba >> Ra. Flesh and stone analysis showed that movement of group II metals to these components of the plant, after root uptake, was strongly related. This supports the hypothesis that Sr, Ba and Ra are being taken up as analogue elements, and follow the same uptake and translocation pathways, with Ca. Comparison with previously reported data from a native passion fruit supports the use of total soil CRs on natural, undisturbed sites. As exchangeable CRs for Ra reach a saturation value it may be possible to make more precise predictions using selective extraction techniques for contaminated or disturbed sites. - Highlights: • We studied uptake of Ra-226 from soil into Buchanania obovata. • The influence of group II metals (Sr, Ba and Ca) on Ra uptake was investigated. • The exchangeable Ra fraction of the soil was not a more reliable predictor of Ra uptake than total soil Ra. • Ca outcompetes group II metals Sr, Ba and Ra for root uptake. • Uptake discriminated against group II metals relative to ionic radius, with uptake of Ca > Sr > Ba >> Ra.

  7. Permian plants from the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, Northern Altiplano of Bolivia: II. The morphogenus Glossopteris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Iannuzzi

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Fossil plants belonging to the morphogenera Glossopteris, Pecopteris and Asterotheca were collected from the upper part of the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, near the town of San Pablo de Tiquina, on the southeastern shore of Lake Titicaca (northern Altiplano, Bolivia. This paper presents the first description of specimens of the morphogenus Glossopteris from Bolivia. The Bolivian specimens of Glossopteris consist of poorly-preserved impressions, although they present the diagnostic features of this morphogenus. They are fragments of leaves with secondary veins of taeniopterid-type, typical of glossopterids from Late Permian deposits of Gondwana. The only species of Pecopteris confirmed in the first part of this study, i.e. P. dolianitii Rösler and Rohn (see Vieira et al. 2004, was previously reported from the Late Permian beds of the Rio do Rasto and Estrada Nova formations in the Paraná Basin (southern Brazil. Therefore, a Late Permian age is proposed for the fossil plant-bearing beds of the Chutani Formation based on the analyzed assemblage. The phytogeographic implications of this new find are briefly analyzed.Plantas fósseis, pertencentes aos morfo-gêneros Glossopteris, Pecopteris e Asterotheca, foram coletadas na porção superior da seção aflorante da Formação Chutani, próxima ao povoado de San Pablo de Tiquina, sudeste do lago Titicaca (Altiplano norte, Bolívia. Este trabalho apresenta a primeira descrição de espécimes do morfo-gênero Glossopteris provenientes da Bolívia. Os espécimes estudados de Glossopteris consistem em impressões foliares pobremente preservadas nas quais feições diagnósticas estão presentes. Os fragmentos foliares apresentam venação secundária do tipo teniopteróide, uma característica típica de glossopterídeas encontradas em depósitos do Permiano Superior do Gondwana. Por sua vez, a única espécie de Pecopteris confirmada para estes níveis da Formação Chutani, i.e. P. dolianitii

  8. Structural observations of heterometallic uranyl copper(II) carboxylates and their solid-state topotactic transformation upon dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchowka, Jakub; Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry

    2013-02-04

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic copper with aromatic polycarboxylic acids gave rise to the formation of five heterometallic UO(2)(2+)-Cu(2+) coordination polymers: (UO(2))Cu(H(2)O)(2)(1,2-bdc)(2) (1; 1,2-bdc = phthalate), (UO(2))Cu(H(2)O)(2)(btec)⋅4 H(2)O (2) and (UO(2))Cu(btec) (2'; btec = pyromellitate), (UO(2))(2)Cu(H(2)O)(4)(mel) (3; mel = mellitate), and (UO(2))(2)O(OH)(2)Cu(H(2)O)(2)(1,3-bdc)⋅H(2)O (4; 1,3-bdc = isophthlalate). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of compound 1 revealed 2D layers of chains of UO(8) and CuO(4)(H(2)O)(2) units that were connected through the phthalate ligands. In compound 2, these sheets were connected to each other through the two additional carboxylate arms of the pyromellitate, thus resulting in a 3D open-framework with 1D channels that trapped water molecules. Upon heating, free and bonded water species (from Cu-OH(2)) were evacuated from the structure. This thermal transition was followed by in situ XRD and IR spectroscopy. Heating induced a solid-state topotactic transformation with the formation of a new set of Cu-O interactions in the crystalline anhydrous structure (2'), in order to keep the square-planar environment around the copper centers. The structure of compound 3 was built up from trinuclear motifs, in which one copper center, CuO(4)(OH(2))(2), was linked to two uranium units, UO(5)(H(2)O)(2). The assembly of this trimer, "U(2)Cu", with the mellitate generated a 3D network. Complex 4 contained a tetranuclear uranyl core of UO(5)(OH)(2) and UO(6)(OH) units that were linked to two copper centers, CuO(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(2), which were then connected to each other through isophthalate ligands and U=O-Cu interactions to create a 3D structure. The common structural feature of these different compounds is a bridging oxo group of U=O-Cu type, which is reflected by apical Cu-O distances in the range 2.350(3)-2.745(5) Å. In the case of a shorter Cu-O distance, a slight lengthening

  9. Structural observations of heterometallic uranyl copper(II) carboxylates and their solid-state topotactic transformation upon dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olchowka, Jakub; Falaise, Clement; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic copper with aromatic polycarboxylic acids gave rise to the formation of five heterometallic UO 2 2+ -Cu 2+ coordination polymers: (UO 2 )Cu(H 2 O) 2 (1,2-bdc) 2 (1; 1,2-bdc=phthalate), (UO 2 )Cu(H 2 O) 2 (btec).4 H 2 O (2) and (UO 2 )Cu(btec) (2'; btec=pyromellitate), (UO 2 ) 2 Cu(H 2 O) 4 (mel) (3; mel=mellitate), and (UO 2 ) 2 O(OH) 2 Cu(H 2 O) 2 (1,3-bdc).H 2 O (4; 1,3-bdc=isophthlalate). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of compound 1 revealed 2D layers of chains of UO 8 and CuO 4 (H 2 O) 2 units that were connected through the phthalate ligands. In compound 2, these sheets were connected to each other through the two additional carboxylate arms of the pyromellitate, thus resulting in a 3D open-framework with 1D channels that trapped water molecules. Upon heating, free and bonded water species (from Cu-OH 2 ) were evacuated from the structure. This thermal transition was followed by in situ XRD and IR spectroscopy. Heating induced a solid-state topotactic transformation with the formation of a new set of Cu-O interactions in the crystalline anhydrous structure (2'), in order to keep the square-planar environment around the copper centers. The structure of compound 3 was built up from trinuclear motifs, in which one copper center, CuO 4 (OH 2 ) 2 , was linked to two uranium units, UO 5 (H 2 O) 2 . The assembly of this trimer, ''U 2 Cu'', with the mellitate generated a 3D network. Complex 4 contained a tetranuclear uranyl core of UO 5 (OH) 2 and UO 6 (OH) units that were linked to two copper centers, CuO(OH) 2 (H 2 O) 2 , which were then connected to each other through isophthalate ligands and U=O-Cu interactions to create a 3D structure. The common structural feature of these different compounds is a bridging oxo group of U=O-Cu type, which is reflected by apical Cu-O distances in the range 2.350(3)-2.745(5) Aa. In the case of a shorter Cu-O distance, a slight

  10. Structural observations of heterometallic uranyl copper(II) carboxylates and their solid-state topotactic transformation upon dehydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olchowka, Jakub; Falaise, Clement; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry [Unite de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide (UCCS), UMR CNRS 8181, Universite de Lille Nord de France, USTL-ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2013-02-04

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate and metallic copper with aromatic polycarboxylic acids gave rise to the formation of five heterometallic UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination polymers: (UO{sub 2})Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(1,2-bdc){sub 2} (1; 1,2-bdc=phthalate), (UO{sub 2})Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(btec).4 H{sub 2}O (2) and (UO{sub 2})Cu(btec) (2'; btec=pyromellitate), (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(mel) (3; mel=mellitate), and (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}O(OH){sub 2}Cu(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(1,3-bdc).H{sub 2}O (4; 1,3-bdc=isophthlalate). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of compound 1 revealed 2D layers of chains of UO{sub 8} and CuO{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} units that were connected through the phthalate ligands. In compound 2, these sheets were connected to each other through the two additional carboxylate arms of the pyromellitate, thus resulting in a 3D open-framework with 1D channels that trapped water molecules. Upon heating, free and bonded water species (from Cu-OH{sub 2}) were evacuated from the structure. This thermal transition was followed by in situ XRD and IR spectroscopy. Heating induced a solid-state topotactic transformation with the formation of a new set of Cu-O interactions in the crystalline anhydrous structure (2'), in order to keep the square-planar environment around the copper centers. The structure of compound 3 was built up from trinuclear motifs, in which one copper center, CuO{sub 4}(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}, was linked to two uranium units, UO{sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. The assembly of this trimer, ''U{sub 2}Cu'', with the mellitate generated a 3D network. Complex 4 contained a tetranuclear uranyl core of UO{sub 5}(OH){sub 2} and UO{sub 6}(OH) units that were linked to two copper centers, CuO(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, which were then connected to each other through isophthalate ligands and U=O-Cu interactions to create a 3D structure. The common structural feature of these different compounds is

  11. Metastable Innershell Molecular State (MIMS II: K-shell X-ray satellites in heavy ion impact on solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young K. Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastable Innershell Molecular State (MIMS, an innershell-bound ultra-high-energy molecule, was previously proposed to explain a ∼40% efficiency of soft-X-ray generation in ∼0.05 keV/amu nanoparticle impact on solids. Here, the MIMS model has been extended and applied to interpreting the experimental K-shell X-ray satellite spectra for more than 40 years in keV-MeV/amu heavy-ion impact on solids. The binding energies of the K-shell MIMS of elements from Al to Ti were determined to be 80–200 eV. The successful extension of the model to the K-shell MIMS confirms that all elements in the periodic table and their combinations are subjected to the MIMS formation.

  12. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Hidefumi, E-mail: mimura@marianna-u.ac.jp [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki, E-mail: arai-y3111@mvh.biglobe.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com; Takeuchi, Yoshito, E-mail: yotake62@qg8.so-net.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Miki, Tsuneharu, E-mail: tmiki@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Urology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo, E-mail: gobara@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sakuhara, Yusuke, E-mail: yusaku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamamoto, Takanobu, E-mail: tyamamot@tcc.pref.tochigi.lg.jp [Tochigi Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sato, Yozo, E-mail: ysato@aichi-cc.jp [Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu, E-mail: susumu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  13. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Hidefumi; Arai, Yasuaki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Sone, Miyuki; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Miki, Tsuneharu; Gobara, Hideo; Sakuhara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Sato, Yozo; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  14. Evolutionary Profiling of Group II Pyridoxal-Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylases Suggests Expansion and Functional Diversification of Histidine Decarboxylases in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP-dependent enzymes are one of the most important enzymes involved in plant N metabolism. Here, we explored the evolution of group II PLP-dependent decarboxylases (PLP_deC, including aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, glutamate decarboxylase, and histidine decarboxylase in the plant lineage. Gene identification analysis revealed a higher number of genes encoding PLP_deC in higher plants than in lower plants. Expression profiling of PLP_deC orthologs and syntelogs in (L. Heynh., pepper ( L., and tomato ( L. pointed toward conserved as well as distinct roles in developmental processes such as fruit maturation and ripening and abiotic stress responses. We further characterized a putative promoter of tomato ripening-associated gene ( operating in a complex regulatory circuit. Our analysis provides a firm basis for further in-depth exploration of the PLP_deC gene family, particularly in the economically important Solanaceae family.

  15. Changes in magnetic properties from solid state to solution in a trinuclear linear copper(II) complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koval, I.A.; Akhideno, H.; Tanase, S.; Belle, C.; Duboc, C.; Saint-Aman, E.; Gamez, P.; Tooke, D.M.; Spek, A.L.; Pierre, J.-L.; Reedijk, J.

    2007-01-01

    A linear trinuclear copper(II) complex containing phenoxido- and alkoxido-bridges between the metal centers has been isolated and structurally characterized. The complex cation consists of a linear array of three copper ions, assembled by means of two doubly deprotonated ligands. The octahedral

  16. Two dimensional modeling of elastic wave propagation in solids containing cracks with rough surfaces and friction - Part II: Numerical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Steven; Aleshin, Vladislav; Truyaert, Kevin; Bou Matar, Olivier; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2018-01-01

    Our study aims at the creation of a numerical toolbox that describes wave propagation in samples containing internal contacts (e.g. cracks, delaminations, debondings, imperfect intergranular joints) of known geometry with postulated contact interaction laws including friction. The code consists of two entities: the contact model and the solid mechanics module. Part I of the paper concerns an in-depth description of a constitutive model for realistic contacts or cracks that takes into account the roughness of the contact faces and the associated effects of friction and hysteresis. In the crack model, three different contact states can be recognized: contact loss, total sliding and partial slip. Normal (clapping) interactions between the crack faces are implemented using a quadratic stress-displacement relation, whereas tangential (friction) interactions were introduced using the Coulomb friction law for the total sliding case, and the Method of Memory Diagrams (MMD) in case of partial slip. In the present part of the paper, we integrate the developed crack model into finite element software in order to simulate elastic wave propagation in a solid material containing internal contacts or cracks. We therefore implemented the comprehensive crack model in MATLAB® and introduced it in the Structural Mechanics Module of COMSOL Multiphysics®. The potential of the approach for ultrasound based inspection of solids with cracks showing acoustic nonlinearity is demonstrated by means of an example of shear wave propagation in an aluminum sample containing a single crack with rough surfaces and friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Distributed mixed-integer fuzzy hierarchical programming for municipal solid waste management. Part II: scheme analysis and mechanism revelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guanhui; Huang, Guohe; Dong, Cong; Xu, Ye; Chen, Jiapei; Chen, Xiujuan; Li, Kailong

    2017-03-01

    As presented in the first companion paper, distributed mixed-integer fuzzy hierarchical programming (DMIFHP) was developed for municipal solid waste management (MSWM) under complexities of heterogeneities, hierarchy, discreteness, and interactions. Beijing was selected as a representative case. This paper focuses on presenting the obtained schemes and the revealed mechanisms of the Beijing MSWM system. The optimal MSWM schemes for Beijing under various solid waste treatment policies and their differences are deliberated. The impacts of facility expansion, hierarchy, and spatial heterogeneities and potential extensions of DMIFHP are also discussed. A few of findings are revealed from the results and a series of comparisons and analyses. For instance, DMIFHP is capable of robustly reflecting these complexities in MSWM systems, especially for Beijing. The optimal MSWM schemes are of fragmented patterns due to the dominant role of the proximity principle in allocating solid waste treatment resources, and they are closely related to regulated ratios of landfilling, incineration, and composting. Communities without significant differences among distances to different types of treatment facilities are more sensitive to these ratios than others. The complexities of hierarchy and heterogeneities pose significant impacts on MSWM practices. Spatial dislocation of MSW generation rates and facility capacities caused by unreasonable planning in the past may result in insufficient utilization of treatment capacities under substantial influences of transportation costs. The problems of unreasonable MSWM planning, e.g., severe imbalance among different technologies and complete vacancy of ten facilities, should be gained deliberation of the public and the municipal or local governments in Beijing. These findings are helpful for gaining insights into MSWM systems under these complexities, mitigating key challenges in the planning of these systems, improving the related management

  18. Selective Solid-Phase Extraction of Zinc(II) from Environmental Water Samples Using Ion Imprinted Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniri, Elham; Panahi, Homayon Ahmad; Aghdam, Khaledeh; Sharif, Amir Abdollah Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    A simple ion imprinted amino-functionalized sorbent was synthesized by coupling activated carbon with iminodiacetic acid, a functional compound for metal chelating, through cyanoric chloride spacer. The resulting sorbent has been characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis and evaluated for the preconcentration and determination of trace Zn(II) in environmental water samples. The optimum pH value for sorption of the metal ion was 6-7.5. The sorption capacity of the functionalized sorbent was 66.6 mg/g. The chelating sorbent can be reused for 10 cycles of sorption-desorption without any significant change in sorption capacity. A recovery of 100% was obtained for the metal ion with 0.5 M nitric acid as the eluent. Compared with nonimprinted polymer particles, the prepared Zn-imprinted sorbent showed high adsorption capacity, significant selectivity, and good site accessibility for Zn(II). Scatchard analysis revealed that the homogeneous binding sites were formed in the polymer. The equilibrium sorption data of Zn(II) by modified resin were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Redlich-Peterson models. Based on equilibrium adsorption data, the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin constants were determined as 0.139, 12.82, and 2.34, respectively, at 25°C.

  19. Carbon deposition thresholds on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anodes II. Steam:carbon ratio and current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, J.; Kesler, O.

    2015-03-01

    For the second part of a two part publication, coking thresholds with respect to molar steam:carbon ratio (SC) and current density in nickel-based solid oxide fuel cells were determined. Anode-supported button cell samples were exposed to 2-component and 5-component gas mixtures with 1 ≤ SC ≤ 2 and zero fuel utilization for 10 h, followed by measurement of the resulting carbon mass. The effect of current density was explored by measuring carbon mass under conditions known to be prone to coking while increasing the current density until the cell was carbon-free. The SC coking thresholds were measured to be ∼1.04 and ∼1.18 at 600 and 700 °C, respectively. Current density experiments validated the thresholds measured with respect to fuel utilization and steam:carbon ratio. Coking thresholds at 600 °C could be predicted with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations when the Gibbs free energy of carbon was appropriately modified. Here, the Gibbs free energy of carbon on nickel-based anode support cermets was measured to be -6.91 ± 0.08 kJ mol-1. The results of this two part publication show that thermodynamic equilibrium calculations with appropriate modification to the Gibbs free energy of solid-phase carbon can be used to predict coking thresholds on nickel-based anodes at 600-700 °C.

  20. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2014-01-01

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  1. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-03-10

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  2. Synthesis, structural characterization, and thermal stability studies of heteroleptic cadmium(II) dithiocarbamate with different pyridyl groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Hosten, Eric C.

    2018-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization and crystal structures of three chloroform solvated adducts of cadmium with mixed ligands of N-alkyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate and pyridine, 2,2-bipyridine and 1, 10 phenanthroline represented as [CdL1L2 (py)2]·CHCl3(1), [CdL1L2bpy]•CHCl3(2), and [CdL1L2phen]•CHCl3(3) (LI = N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate, L2 = N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate, py = pyridine, bpy = 2,2-bipyridine and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) respectively are reported. Complex 1, which crystallized in the monoclinic space group P-1, is a centrosymmetric dimeric structure where each Cd center is bonded to two monodentate pyridine, a bidentate terminal dithiocarbamate, and another bidentate bridging dithiocarbamate to form a four-membered ring. Complex 2 crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with four discrete monomeric molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure presents a cadmium atom coordinated by two sulphur atoms of a dithiocarbamate ligand and two nitrogen atoms of the 2,2‧-bipyridine to form a CdS4N2 fragment, thus giving the structure around the Cd atom a distorted trigonal prism geometry. Complex 3 contains two discrete monomeric molecules of (phenanthroline) (N, N-methyl phenyl-N, N-ethyl phenyl dithiocarbamato)cadmium (II) per unit cell, and the complex crystallized in the triclinic space group P-1. The structure showed that the Cd atom is bonded to two bidentate dithiocarbamate ligands and to one bidentate phenanthroline ligand in a distorted trigonal prism geometry. All the compounds resulted in CdS as residue upon thermal decomposition process conducted under inert atmosphere.

  3. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems – Part II: Methodological guidance for a better practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurent, Alexis; Clavreul, Julie; Bernstad, Anna

    2014-01-01

    conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements......Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper...... compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All...

  4. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems – Part II: Methodological guidance for a better practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, Alexis; Clavreul, Julie; Bernstad, Anna; Bakas, Ioannis; Niero, Monia; Gentil, Emmanuel; Christensen, Thomas H.; Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We perform a critical review of 222 LCA studies of solid waste management systems. • We analyse the past LCA practice against the ISO standard and ILCD Handbook guidance. • Malpractices exist in many methodological aspects with large variations among studies. • Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. • We provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements and the ILCD Handbook guidelines for each major step within the goal definition, scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation phases of the methodology. Results show that malpractices exist in several aspects of the LCA with large differences across studies. Examples are a frequent neglect of the goal definition, a frequent lack of transparency and precision in the definition of the scope of the study, e.g. an unclear delimitation of the system boundaries, a truncated impact coverage, difficulties in capturing influential local specificities such as representative waste compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs

  5. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems – Part II: Methodological guidance for a better practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, Alexis, E-mail: alau@dtu.dk [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Clavreul, Julie [Residual Resources Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bernstad, Anna [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bakas, Ioannis [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Niero, Monia [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); ECO – Ecosystems and Environmental Sustainability, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Gentil, Emmanuel [Copenhagen Resource Institute, 1215 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Residual Resources Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hauschild, Michael Z. [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • We perform a critical review of 222 LCA studies of solid waste management systems. • We analyse the past LCA practice against the ISO standard and ILCD Handbook guidance. • Malpractices exist in many methodological aspects with large variations among studies. • Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. • We provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements and the ILCD Handbook guidelines for each major step within the goal definition, scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation phases of the methodology. Results show that malpractices exist in several aspects of the LCA with large differences across studies. Examples are a frequent neglect of the goal definition, a frequent lack of transparency and precision in the definition of the scope of the study, e.g. an unclear delimitation of the system boundaries, a truncated impact coverage, difficulties in capturing influential local specificities such as representative waste compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs.

  6. Preparation, in-vitro and in-vivo evaluation of spray-dried ternary solid dispersion of biopharmaceutics classification system class II model drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidi, Sharan K; Jena, Sunil K; Ahuja, Bhupesh K; Devasari, Naresh; Suresh, Sarasija

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of a novel spray-dried ternary solid dispersion (TSD) on the dissolution rate and bioavailability of a biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class II model drug, atorvastatin calcium trihydrate (ATC), and evaluate its in-vitro and in-vivo performance. TSD of ATC was prepared by spray-drying method employing ethanol/water solvent systems. The TSD formulations, composed of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC E5) and nicotinamide, were optimized by rotatable central composite design. Physicochemical characterization along with dissolution, stability and pharmacokinetic study of optimized TSD was evaluated. The optimized TSD was found to be amorphous with spherical shape morphology. It exhibited a fourfold increase in dissolution rate in comparison to ATC, with a considerable enhancement in oral bioavailability (relative bioavailability of 134.11%). Physicochemical characterization and dissolution study of optimized TSD at the end of stability studies clearly indicated that the stability of optimized TSD was due to hydrogen bonding between drug and HPMC E5 and nicotinamide. This bonding remained unaffected even under stressful conditions of high temperature and humidity. The TSD exhibits a significant increase in dissolution rate, and for this reason should be useful as an efficacious tool to enhance the bioavailability of BCS class II drug molecule, ATC. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  7. From chemolithoautotrophs to electrolithoautotrophs: CO2 fixation by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria coupled with direct uptake of electrons from solid electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takumi; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    At deep-sea vent systems, hydrothermal emissions rich in reductive chemicals replace solar energy as fuels to support microbial carbon assimilation. Until recently, all the microbial components at vent systems have been assumed to be fostered by the primary production of chemolithoautotrophs; however, both the laboratory and on-site studies demonstrated electrical current generation at vent systems and have suggested that a portion of microbial carbon assimilation is stimulated by the direct uptake of electrons from electrically conductive minerals. Here we show that chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, switches the electron source for carbon assimilation from diffusible Fe(2+) ions to an electrode under the condition that electrical current is the only source of energy and electrons. Site-specific marking of a cytochrome aa3 complex (aa3 complex) and a cytochrome bc1 complex (bc1 complex) in viable cells demonstrated that the electrons taken directly from an electrode are used for O2 reduction via a down-hill pathway, which generates proton motive force that is used for pushing the electrons to NAD(+) through a bc1 complex. Activation of carbon dioxide fixation by a direct electron uptake was also confirmed by the clear potential dependency of cell growth. These results reveal a previously unknown bioenergetic versatility of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria to use solid electron sources and will help with understanding carbon assimilation of microbial components living in electronically conductive chimney habitats.

  8. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXIV. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties of two Cu(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with tetradentate N-donor ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, M.; Potočňák, I.; Dušek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 409, JAN (2014), s. 441-448 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : structure analysis * low-dimensional compounds * cyanido group Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.046, year: 2014

  9. Cobalamin Protection against Oxidative Stress in the Acidophilic Iron-oxidizing Bacterium Leptospirillum group II CF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Paz Levicán

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Leptospirillum are aerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the phylum Nitrospira. They are important members of microbial communities that catalyze the biomining of sulfidic ores, thereby solubilizing metal ions. These microorganisms live under extremely acidic and metal-loaded environments and thus must tolerate high concentrations of reactive oxygen species. Cobalamin (vitamin B12 is a cobalt-containing tetrapyrrole cofactor involved in intramolecular rearrangement reactions and has recently been suggested to be an intracellular antioxidant. In this work, we investigated the effect of the exogenous addition of cobalamin on oxidative stress parameters in Leptospirillum group II strain CF-1. Our results revealed that the external supplementation of cobalamin reduces the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the damage to biomolecules, and also stimulates the growth and survival of cells exposed to oxidative stress exerted by ferric ion, hydrogen peroxide, chromate and diamide. Furthermore, exposure of strain CF-1 to oxidative stress elicitors resulted in the transcriptional activation of the cbiA gene encoding CbiA of the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. Altogether, these data suggest that cobalamin plays an important role in redox protection of Leptospirillum strain CF-1, supporting survival of this microorganism under extremely oxidative environmental conditions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of cobalamin against oxidative stress may help to develop strategies to make biomining processes more effective.

  10. Members of the amylovora group of Erwinia are cellulolytic and possess genes homologous to the type II secretion pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riekki, R; Palomäki, T; Virtaharju, O; Kokko, H; Romantschuk, M; Saarilahti, H T

    2000-07-01

    A cellulase-producing clone was isolated from a genomic library of the Erwinia rhapontici (Millard) Burkholder strain NCPPB2989. The corresponding gene, named celA, encodes an endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) with the extremely low pH optimum of 3.4 and a temperature optimum between 40 and 50 degrees C. A single ORF of 999 nt was found to be responsible for the Cel activity. The corresponding protein, named CelA, showed 67% identity to the endoglucanase Y of E. chrysanthemi and 51.5% identity to the endoglucanase of Cellulomonas uda, and thus belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase family 8. The celA gene, or its homologue, was found to be present in all E. rhapontici isolates analysed, in E. chrysanthemi, and in E. amylovora. The presence of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in the amylovora group of Erwinia spp. had not previously been established. Furthermore, the DNA of both E. rhapontici and E. amylovora was found to exhibit homology to genes encoding the type II (GSP) secretion pathway, which is known to be responsible for extracellular targeting of cellulases and pectinases in Erwinia spp. that cause soft rotting, such as E. carotovora and E. chrysanthemi. Secretion of the CelA protein by E. rhapontici could not be verified. However, the CelA protein itself was found to include the information necessary for heterologous secretion by E. chrysanthemi.

  11. Novel chelating resin with cyanoguanidine group: Useful recyclable materials for Hg(II) removal in aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaojie; Li Yanfeng; Ye Zhengfang; Yang Liuqing; Zhou Lincheng; Wang Liyuan

    2011-01-01

    A novel chelating resin containing cyanoguanidine moiety has been successfully prepared by the functionalizing reaction of a macroporous bead based on chloromethylated copolymer of styrene-divinylbenzene (CMPS) with dicyandiamide (DCDA) in the presence of phase transfer catalyst. The Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed in the characterization of the resulting chelating resin, meanwhile, the adsorption properties of the resin for Hg(II) were investigated by batch and column methods. The results indicated that the resin displayed a marked advantage in Hg(II) binding capacity, and the saturated adsorption capacity estimated from the Langmuir model was dramatically up to 1077 mg g -1 at 45 deg. C. Furthermore, it was found that the resin was able to selectively separate Hg(II) from multicomponent solutions with Zn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Mg(II). The desorption process of Hg(II) was tested with different eluents and the ratio of the highest recovery reached to 96% under eluting condition of 1 M HCl + 10% thiourea. Consequently, the resulting chelating resin would provide a potential application for treatment process of Hg(II) containing wastewater.

  12. HEXAGA-II. A two-dimensional multi-group neutron diffusion programme for a uniform triangular mesh with arbitrary group scattering for the IBM/370-168 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicki, Z.

    1976-05-01

    This report presents the AGA two-sweep iterative methods belonging to the family of factorization techniques in their practical application in the HEXAGA-II two-dimensional programme to obtain the numerical solution to the multi-group, time-independent, (real and/or adjoint) neutron diffusion equations for a fine uniform triangular mesh. An arbitrary group scattering model is permitted. The report written for the users provides the description of input and output. The use of HEXAGA-II is illustrated by two sample reactor problems. (orig.) [de

  13. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  14. Beck Depression Inventory-II: Factor Analyses with Three Groups of Midlife Women of African Descent in the Midwest, the South, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Faye A; Yarandi, Hossein; Evans, Edris; Still, Carolyn; Mickels, Prince; Hassan, Mona; Campbell, Doris; Conic, Ruzica

    2018-03-01

    This research encompasses a factor analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), which involves three groups of midlife women of African descent who reside in the Midwest, the South, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The purpose of the study was to determine the factor structure of the BDI-II when administered to a sample of women aged 40-65 of African descent who reside in the three distinct geographical regions of the United States. A correlational, descriptive design was used, and 536 women of African descent were invited to participate in face-to-face interviews that transpired in community settings. Results of the factor analysis revealed a two-factor explanation. Factor one included symptoms such as punishment feelings and pessimism (cognitive), and the second factor included symptoms such as tiredness and loss of energy (somatic-affective). The application of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among the three groups of women generated specific information about each group and common findings across the groups. Knowledge gained from the research could help to guide specific intervention programs for the three groups of women, and explicate the common approaches that could be used for the three groups.

  15. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems--part II: methodological guidance for a better practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Alexis; Clavreul, Julie; Bernstad, Anna; Bakas, Ioannis; Niero, Monia; Gentil, Emmanuel; Christensen, Thomas H; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2014-03-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements and the ILCD Handbook guidelines for each major step within the goal definition, scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation phases of the methodology. Results show that malpractices exist in several aspects of the LCA with large differences across studies. Examples are a frequent neglect of the goal definition, a frequent lack of transparency and precision in the definition of the scope of the study, e.g. an unclear delimitation of the system boundaries, a truncated impact coverage, difficulties in capturing influential local specificities such as representative waste compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling microbiological and chemical processes in municipal solid waste bioreactor, Part II: Application of numerical model BIOKEMOD-3P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, Nitin A; Reinhart, Debra R; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    2010-02-01

    Biodegradation process modeling of municipal solid waste (MSW) bioreactor landfills requires the knowledge of various process reactions and corresponding kinetic parameters. Mechanistic models available to date are able to simulate biodegradation processes with the help of pre-defined species and reactions. Some of these models consider the effect of critical parameters such as moisture content, pH, and temperature. Biomass concentration is a vital parameter for any biomass growth model and often not compared with field and laboratory results. A more complex biodegradation model includes a large number of chemical and microbiological species. Increasing the number of species and user defined process reactions in the simulation requires a robust numerical tool. A generalized microbiological and chemical model, BIOKEMOD-3P, was developed to simulate biodegradation processes in three-phases (Gawande et al. 2009). This paper presents the application of this model to simulate laboratory-scale MSW bioreactors under anaerobic conditions. BIOKEMOD-3P was able to closely simulate the experimental data. The results from this study may help in application of this model to full-scale landfill operation.

  17. Propagation of shock waves in elastic solids caused by cavitation microjet impact. II: Application in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, P; Chuong, C J; Preminger, G M

    1993-07-01

    To better understand the mechanism of stone fragmentation during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), the model developed in Part I [P. Zhong and C.J. Chuong, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94, 19-28 (1993)] is applied to study cavitation microjet impingement and its resultant shock wave propagation in renal calculi. Impact pressure at the stone boundary and stress, strain at the propagating shock fronts in the stone were calculated for typical ESWL loading conditions. At the anterior surface of the stone, the jet induced compressive stress can vary from 0.82 approximately 4 times that of the water hammer pressure depending on the contact angles; whereas the jet-induced shear stress can achieve its maximum, with a magnitude of 30% approximately 54% of the water hammer pressure, near the detachment of the longitudinal (or P) wave in the solid. Comparison of model predictions with material failure strengths of renal calculi suggests that jet impact can lead to stone surface erosion by combined compressive and shear loadings at the jet impacting surface, and spalling failure by tensile forces at the distal surface of the stone. Comparing responses from four different stone types suggests that cystine is the most difficult stone to fragment in ESWL, as observed from clinical experience.

  18. Siting a municipal solid waste disposal facility, part II: the effects of external criteria on the final decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korucu, M Kemal; Karademir, Aykan

    2014-02-01

    The procedure of a multi-criteria decision analysis supported by the geographic information systems was applied to the site selection process of a planning municipal solid waste management practice based on twelve different scenarios. The scenarios included two different decision tree modes and two different weighting models for three different area requirements. The suitability rankings of the suitable sites obtained from the application of the decision procedure for the scenarios were assessed by a factorial experimental design concerning the effect of some external criteria on the final decision of the site selection process. The external criteria used in the factorial experimental design were defined as "Risk perception and approval of stakeholders" and "Visibility". The effects of the presence of these criteria in the decision trees were evaluated in detail. For a quantitative expression of the differentiations observed in the suitability rankings, the ranking data were subjected to ANOVA test after a normalization process. Then the results of these tests were evaluated by Tukey test to measure the effects of external criteria on the final decision. The results of Tukey tests indicated that the involvement of the external criteria into the decision trees produced statistically meaningful differentiations in the suitability rankings. Since the external criteria could cause considerable external costs during the operation of the disposal facilities, the presence of these criteria in the decision tree in addition to the other criteria related to environmental and legislative requisites could prevent subsequent external costs in the first place.

  19. Strategies for the solid-phase diversification of poly-L-proline-type II peptide mimic scaffolds and peptide scaffolds through guanidinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemer, Stevenson; Wurthmann, Alexander; Mamai, Ahmed; Madalengoitia, José S

    2008-10-03

    A strategy for the solid-phase diversification of PPII mimic scaffolds through guanidinylation is presented. The approach involves the synthesis N-Pmc-N'-alkyl thioureas as diversification reagents. Analogues of Fmoc-Orn(Mtt)-OH can be incorporated into a growing peptide chain on Wang resin. Side chain deprotection with 1% TFA/CH2Cl2 followed by EDCI-mediated reaction of N-Pmc-N'-alkyl thioureas with the side chain amine affords arginine analogues with modified guanidine head groups. The scope, limitations, and incidental chemistry are discussed.

  20. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  1. A quantum mechanical alternative to the Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-11-21

    The theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups have recently been given a consistent quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate (i.e., coherence-damping) processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in the condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broader temperature range than is commonly thought.

  2. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups has recently been given a consistently quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate, i.e., coherence-damping processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broad temperature range than is commonly thought.

  3. Solid-State Gas Adsorption Studies with Discrete Palladium(II) [Pd2 (L)4 ]4+ Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Dan; White, Keith F; Lewis, James E M; Vasdev, Roan A S; Abrahams, Brendan F; Crowley, James D

    2017-08-04

    The need for effective CO 2 capture systems remains high, and due to their tunability, metallosupramolecular architectures are an attractive option for gas sorption. While the use of extended metal organic frameworks for gas adsorption has been extensively explored, the exploitation of discrete metallocage architectures to bind gases remains in its infancy. Herein the solid state gas adsorption properties of a series of [Pd 2 (L) 4 ] 4+ lantern shaped coordination cages (L = variants of 2,6-bis(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)pyridine), which had solvent accessible internal cavities suitable for gas binding, have been investigated. The cages showed little interaction with dinitrogen gas but were able to take up CO 2 . The best performing cage reversibly sorbed 1.4 mol CO 2 per mol cage at 298 K, and 2.3 mol CO 2 per mol cage at 258 K (1 bar). The enthalpy of binding was calculated to be 25-35 kJ mol -1 , across the number of equivalents bound, while DFT calculations on the CO 2 binding in the cage gave ΔE for the cage-CO 2 interaction of 23-28 kJ mol -1 , across the same range. DFT modelling suggested that the binding mode is a hydrogen bond between the carbonyl oxygen of CO 2 and the internally directed hydrogen atoms of the cage. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effect of solid-meal caloric content on gastric emptying kinetics of solids and liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, J L; Siegel, J A; Mortelmans, L; van Cutsem, E; van den Maegdenbergh, V; de Roo, M

    1989-08-01

    In this study, we have evaluated the effect of the caloric content of a physiological test meal on the gastric emptying kinetics of solids and liquids. 22 healthy male volunteers were studied in two groups matched for age. After an overnight fast, each volunteer underwent the same test procedure; in the first group (G I), 10 volunteers received a meal consisting of bread, 111In-DTPA water and 1 scrambled egg labeled with 99mTc-labelled sulphur colloid; in the second group (G II) 12 volunteers were given the same meal but with 2 labeled eggs in order to increase the caloric content of the solid phase meal. Simultaneous anterior and posterior images were recorded using a dual-headed gamma camera. Solid and liquid geometric mean data were analyzed to determine the lag phase, the emptying rate and the half-emptying time for both solids and liquids. Solid and liquid gastric half-emptying times were significantly prolonged in G II compared to G I volunteers. For the solid phased, the delay was accounted for by a longer lag phase and a decrease in the equilibrium emptying rate. The emptying rate of the liquid phase was significantly decreased in G II compared to G I. Within each group, no statistically significant difference was observed between solid and liquid emptying rates. We conclude that the caloric content of the solid portion of a meal not only alters the emptying of the solid phase but also affects the emptying of the liquid component of the meal.

  5. Effect of solid-meal caloric content on gastric emptying kinetics of solids and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbain, J.L.; Mortelmans, L.; Cutsem, E. van; Maegdenbergh, V. van den; Roo, M. de

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we have evaluated the effect of the caloric content of a physiological test meal on the gastric emptying kinetics of solids and liquids. 22 healthy male volunteers were studied in two groups matched for age. After an overnight fast, each volunteer underwent the same test procedure; in the first group (G I), 10 volunteers received a meal consisting of bread, 111 In-DTPA water and 1 scrambled egg labeled with 99m Tc-labelled sulphur colloid; in the second group (G II) 12 volunteers were given the same meal but with 2 labeled eggs in order to increase the caloric content of the solid phase meal. Simultaneous anterior and posterior images were recorded using a dual-headed gamma camera. Solid and liquid geometric mean data were analyzed to determine the lag phase, the emptying rate and the half-emptying time for both solids and liquids. Solid and liquid gastric half-emptying times were significantly prolonged in G II compared to G I volunteers. For the solid phased, the delay was accounted for by a longer lag phase and a decrease in the equilibrium emptying rate. The emptying rate of the liquid phase was significantly decreased in G II compared to G I. Within each group, no statistically significant difference was observed between solid and liquid emptying rates. We conclude that the caloric content of the solid portion of a meal not only alters the emptying of the solid phase but also affects the emptying of the liquid component of the meal. (orig.) [de

  6. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF 6 and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  7. Site-specific, insertional inactivation of incA in Chlamydia trachomatis using a group II intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cayla M; Fisher, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate, intracellular bacterial pathogen that has until more recently remained recalcitrant to genetic manipulation. However, the field still remains hindered by the absence of tools to create selectable, targeted chromosomal mutations. Previous work with mobile group II introns demonstrated that they can be retargeted by altering DNA sequences within the intron's substrate recognition region to create site-specific gene insertions. This platform (marketed as TargeTron™, Sigma) has been successfully employed in a variety of bacteria. We subsequently modified TargeTron™ for use in C. trachomatis and as proof of principle used our system to insertionally inactivate incA, a chromosomal gene encoding a protein required for homotypic fusion of chlamydial inclusions. C. trachomatis incA::GII(bla) mutants were selected with ampicillin and plaque purified clones were then isolated for genotypic and phenotypic analysis. PCR, Southern blotting, and DNA sequencing verified proper GII(bla) insertion, while continuous passaging in the absence of selection demonstrated that the insertion was stable. As seen with naturally occurring IncA(-) mutants, light and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of non-fusogenic inclusions in cells infected with the incA::GII(bla) mutants at a multiplicity of infection greater than one. Lack of IncA production by mutant clones was further confirmed by Western blotting. Ultimately, the ease of retargeting the intron, ability to select for mutants, and intron stability in the absence of selection makes this method a powerful addition to the growing chlamydial molecular toolbox.

  8. Thermodynamics. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Thermodynamics with Emphasis on Nuclear Materials and Atomic Transport in Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermodynamics of nuclear materials is vital to the design of reactor fuels and moderating and cooling systems, in fact all facets of nuclear plant operation that involve mixtures of, or contact between, two or more elements in single- or multi-phase systems. The steep thermal gradients and the high temperatures involved in nuclear technology pose special problems for engineers and thermodynamicists, who have found that extrapolation of low-temperature data to high temperatures very often proves invalid. For this reason, standard thermodynamic techniques such as calorimetry and EMF-methods have been extended into high-temperature regions. Since the Agency's last conference on this subject, also held in Vienna (Thermodynamics of Nuclear Materials, 1962), there have been notable advances in calorimetry performed at temperatures greater than 1000°C, and in the use of EMF cells with solid electrolytes operated at similar temperatures. Significant advances have also been made in measuring diffusion parameters at the higher temperatures. An important field covered in this Symposium was the correlation of such atomic transport data with thermodynamic data, a prerequisite if the nuclear engineer is to incorporate diffusion results into his normal process- assessment techniques. Finally the Symposium suggested the requirements for good critical tables. The mere compiling of such data is no longer sufficient; the compiler must have free access to all the data of a particular experiment, he must have an intimate knowledge of experimental work in this field and he must weight every figure quoted in the light of his experience. As a step in this direction, the Agency has called on the services of many well-known experts and is preparing a number of monographs giving critical assessments of thermodynamic data and phase-diagrams for many of the elements of interest in reactor design. Most of the countries engaged in research in thermodynamics were represented at

  9. Thermodynamics. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Thermodynamics with Emphasis on Nuclear Materials and Atomic Transport in Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-02-15

    Knowledge of the thermodynamics of nuclear materials is vital to the design of reactor fuels and moderating and cooling systems, in fact all facets of nuclear plant operation that involve mixtures of, or contact between, two or more elements in single- or multi-phase systems. The steep thermal gradients and the high temperatures involved in nuclear technology pose special problems for engineers and thermodynamicists, who have found that extrapolation of low-temperature data to high temperatures very often proves invalid. For this reason, standard thermodynamic techniques such as calorimetry and EMF-methods have been extended into high-temperature regions. Since the Agency's last conference on this subject, also held in Vienna (Thermodynamics of Nuclear Materials, 1962), there have been notable advances in calorimetry performed at temperatures greater than 1000 Degree-Sign C, and in the use of EMF cells with solid electrolytes operated at similar temperatures. Significant advances have also been made in measuring diffusion parameters at the higher temperatures. An important field covered in this Symposium was the correlation of such atomic transport data with thermodynamic data, a prerequisite if the nuclear engineer is to incorporate diffusion results into his normal process- assessment techniques. Finally the Symposium suggested the requirements for good critical tables. The mere compiling of such data is no longer sufficient; the compiler must have free access to all the data of a particular experiment, he must have an intimate knowledge of experimental work in this field and he must weight every figure quoted in the light of his experience. As a step in this direction, the Agency has called on the services of many well-known experts and is preparing a number of monographs giving critical assessments of thermodynamic data and phase-diagrams for many of the elements of interest in reactor design. Most of the countries engaged in research in thermodynamics were

  10. Solid-phase extraction of the alcohol abuse biomarker phosphatidylethanol using newly synthesized polymeric sorbent materials containing quaternary heterocyclic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Mariana; Jagadeesan, Kishore Kumar; Billing, Johan; Yilmaz, Ecevit; Laurell, Thomas; Ekström, Simon

    2017-10-13

    Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is an interesting biomarker finding increased use for detecting long term alcohol abuse with high specificity and sensitivity. Prior to detection, sample preparation is an unavoidable step in the work-flow of PEth analysis and new protocols may facilitate it. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) is a versatile sample preparation method widely spread in biomedical laboratories due to its simplicity of use and the possibility of automation. In this work, SPE was used for the first time to directly extract PEth from spiked human plasma and spiked human blood. A library of polymeric SPE materials with different surface functionalities was screened for PEth extraction in order to identify the surface characteristics that control PEth retention and recovery. The plasma samples were diluted 1:10 (v/v) in water and spiked at different concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 5μM. The library of SPE materials was then evaluated using the proposed SPE method and detection was done by LC-MS/MS. One SPE material efficiently retained and recovered PEth from spiked human plasma. With this insight, four new SPE materials were formulated and synthesized based on the surface characteristics of the best SPE material found in the first screening. These new materials were tested with spiked human blood, to better mimic a real clinical sample. All the newly synthetized materials outperformed the pre-existing commercially available materials. Recovery values for the new SPE materials were found between 29.5% and 48.6% for the extraction of PEth in spiked blood. A material based on quaternized 1-vinylimidazole with a poly(trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) backbone was found suitable for PEth extraction in spiked blood showing the highest analyte recovery in this experiment, 48.6%±6.4%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Solid state and dynamic solution structures of O-carbamidine amidoximes gives further insight into the mechanism of zinc(II)-mediated generation of 1,2,4-oxadiazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, Kirill I.; Novikov, Alexander S.; Tolstoy, Peter M.; Bolotin, Dmitrii S.; Bokach, Nadezhda A.; Zolotarev, Andrey A.; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu.

    2016-05-01

    Three new iminium salts [H2Ndbnd C(R)ONdbnd C(R‧)NH2](p-TolSO3)·½H2O ([1-3](p-TolSO3)·½H2O; R/R‧ = NMe2/PhCH21, NMe2/p-BrC6H42, N(CH2)5/p-BrC6H43) were synthesized via ZnII-mediated amidoxime-cyanamide coupling and their solid structures were studied by X-ray diffraction. Solution structure and conformational changes of [1-3](p-TolSO3)·½H2O were studied by dynamic NMR. The obtained quantitative data were supported by DFT calculations. All the obtained results help to understand the relative stability of the salts [H2Ndbnd C(R)ONdbnd C(R‧)NH2](X) (R = NAlk2, Alk, Ar) and give a further insight into the mechanism of ZnII-mediated generation of 1,2,4-oxadiazoles. The electron delocalization and sesquialteral bonds in the [H2Ndbnd C(NR2)ONdbnd C(R‧)NH2]+ system was recognized by estimation of values of activation energy barriers (14-18 kcal/mol by DNMR and 16-17 kcal/mol by DFT calculations) for the rotation around the CN bonds for the NR2 groups and inspection of the solid-state X-ray data along with the Wiberg bond indices (intermediate single/double bond order for the CN distances). This electron delocalization is responsible for the stabilization of the positively charged iminium cation. The moderate strength hydrogen bonding between the oxime N atom and the =NH2 group, which is verified from the X-ray, DNMR experiments, and by using quantum chemical calculations, stabilizes the iminium salt, but it is still weak to prevent the heterocyclization. Theoretical calculations of the heterocyclization of [H2Ndbnd C(R)ONdbnd C(R‧)NH2]+ to 1,2,4-oxadiazoles demonstrated that it is kinetically hindered to a greater extent for R = NAlk2 and this explains their lower reactivity as compared to the iminium salts with R = Alk, Ar.

  12. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method; NF ISO 7097-1. Technologie du combustible nucleaire. Dosage de l'uranium dans des solutions, l'hexafluorure d'uranium et des solides. Partie 1: reduction par fer (II) / oxydation par bichromate de potassium / methode par titrage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF{sub 6} and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  13. One-step immobilization of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) via vapor-surface sol-gel deposition towards solid-state electrochemiluminescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Lei; Yang Xiurong

    2008-01-01

    A novel method for immobilization of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 ) on electrode surfaces based on the vapor-surface sol-gel deposition strategy is first demonstrated in this paper. Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 immobilized sol-gel (Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 /sol-gel) films were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and field-emitted scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). These results showed that Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 was successfully incorporated into the silica sol-gel film. It was found that many irregular Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 /sol-gel clusters were formed on surfaces through one deposition and thick sol-gel films were observed after further deposition. Electrochemical properties and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) behaviors of Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 /sol-gel films could be easily adjusted by deposition numbers and time. At last, the Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 /sol-gel film modified electrode was used for solid-state ECL detection of tripropylamine. The linear range was from 5.8 x 10 -8 to 2.4 x 10 -4 M with the detection limit of 5 nM, which was three orders of magnitude lower than that from pure Nafion-modified electrodes. The ECL sensor also exhibited high stability, and still remained 92% response after being stored in air for 35 days. This method for immobilization of Ru(bpy) 3 Cl 2 is simple, convenient and low-cost relative to others, so it shows promising applications in solid-state ECL detection

  14. Multiplicity dependence of matrix-induced frequency shifts for atomic transitions of the group 12 metals in rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, S.L.; Cartland, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic resonances of the group 12 metal atoms, Hg, Cd, and Zn, undergo frequency shifts from the gas phase atomic line when trapped in rare gas matrices of Ar, Kr, and Xe at 12 K. As expected, the shifts are approximately linear in polarizability of the rare gas, but the slope of this line depends on whether the transition in question is 1 P 1 left-arrow 1 S 0 or 3 P 1 left-arrow 1 S 0 . Thus the matrix-induced frequency shift is dependent on the singlet or triplet nature of the excited state as well as on the matrix material. This dependence on multiplicity is discussed in terms of interactions between the excited-state atomic orbitals and the matrix. The results are compared to matrix studies of other metals and to related gas-phase work on diatomic van der Waals complexes of group 12 metals with rare gases

  15. The orphan germinant receptor protein GerXAO (but not GerX3b) is essential for L-alanine induced germination in Clostridium botulinum Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Jason; Carter, Andrew T; Pye, Hannah V; Peck, Michael W

    2018-05-04

    Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic spore forming bacterium that produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin that causes a severe and fatal neuro-paralytic disease of humans and animals (botulism). C. botulinum Group II is a psychrotrophic saccharolytic bacterium that forms spores of moderate heat resistance and is a particular hazard in minimally heated chilled foods. Spore germination is a fundamental process that allows the spore to transition to a vegetative cell and typically involves a germinant receptor (GR) that responds to environmental signals. Analysis of C. botulinum Group II genomes shows they contain a single GR cluster (gerX3b), and an additional single gerA subunit (gerXAO). Spores of C. botulinum Group II strain Eklund 17B germinated in response to the addition of L-alanine, but did not germinate following the addition of exogenous Ca 2+ -DPA. Insertional inactivation experiments in this strain unexpectedly revealed that the orphan GR GerXAO is essential for L-alanine stimulated germination. GerX3bA and GerX3bC affected the germination rate but were unable to induce germination in the absence of GerXAO. No role could be identified for GerX3bB. This is the first study to identify the functional germination receptor of C. botulinum Group II.

  16. Report / Institut für Experimentelle Physik II

    OpenAIRE

    Grundmann, Marius

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Experimental Physics II of Universität Leipzig welcomes you to read its activity report 2001. In the following some statistics about the structure of the institute, the people involved, and the teaching activities are summarized. The core of the report is built by the scientific activity reports - arranged according to the groups making up the institute: solid-state optics and acoustics, semiconductor physics, nuclear solid-state physics, physics of dielectric solids, super...

  17. Disposal Notifications and Quarterly Membership Updates for the Utility Solid Waste Group Members’ Risk-Based Approvals to Dispose of PCB Remediation Waste Under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 761.61(c)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal Notifications and Quarterly Membership Updates for the Utility Solid Waste Group Members’ Risk-Based Approvals to Dispose of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Remediation Waste Under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 761.61(c)

  18. Controllable Synthesis of Atomically Thin Type-II Weyl Semimetal WTe2 Nanosheets: An Advanced Electrode Material for All-Solid-State Flexible Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Fu, Wei; Zeng, Qingsheng; Lin, Junhao; Yan, Cheng; Lai, Zhuangchai; Tang, Bijun; Suenaga, Kazu; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Compared with 2D S-based and Se-based transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), Te-based TMDs display much better electrical conductivities, which will be beneficial to enhance the capacitances in supercapacitors. However, to date, the reports about the applications of Te-based TMDs in supercapacitors are quite rare. Herein, the first supercapacitor example of the Te-based TMD is reported: the type-II Weyl semimetal 1Td WTe 2 . It is demonstrated that single crystals of 1Td WTe 2 can be exfoliated into the nanosheets with 2-7 layers by liquid-phase exfoliation, which are assembled into air-stable films and further all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors. The resulting supercapacitors deliver a mass capacitance of 221 F g -1 and a stack capacitance of 74 F cm -3 . Furthermore, they also show excellent volumetric energy and power densities of 0.01 Wh cm -3 and 83.6 W cm -3 , respectively, superior to the commercial 4V/500 µAh Li thin-film battery and the commercial 3V/300 µAh Al electrolytic capacitor, in association with outstanding mechanical flexibility and superior cycling stability (capacitance retention of ≈91% after 5500 cycles). These results indicate that the 1Td WTe 2 nanosheet is a promising flexible electrode material for high-performance energy storage devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Solid polymer electrolytes based on alternating copolymers of vinyl ethers with methoxy oligo(ethyleneoxy)ethyl groups and vinylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takahito; Fujita, Katsuhito; Inoue, Kentaro; Iwama, Hiroki; Kondoh, Kensaku; Uno, Takahiro; Kubo, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of alternating copolymers of vinyl ethers and vinylene carbonate. • Preparation of polymer electrolytes based on the alternating copolymers with LiTFSI. • Structure-property relationship for alternating copolymers-based electrolytes. • Interfacial stability between polymer electrolytes with lithium metal electrode. - Abstract: Alternating copolymers (poly(1a-g-alt-VC)) of vinyl ethers with various methoxy oligo(ethyleneoxy)ethyl groups and vinylene carbonate (VC) were prepared, and the thermal and electrochemical properties of their polymer electrolytes with LiTFSI and interfacial stability between the polymer electrolyte and Li metal electrode were investigated. T g 's increased linearly with salt contents, and decreased with an increase in the chain length of methoxy oligo(ethyleneoxy)ethyl groups in the vinyl ethers at constant salt concentration. The slopes of T g vs. [Li]/[O] were identical, independent of the polymer structure. The ionic conductivities of the polymer electrolytes increased with increasing the side-chain ethyleneoxy (EO) unit length of the vinyl ether unit in the alternating copolymers, and also their temperature dependences became relatively smaller in the polymer electrolytes having longer EO units in the vinyl ethers. The highest ionic conductivity, 1.2 × 10 −4 S/cm at 30 °C, was obtained in the alternating copolymer with a side-chain EO unit length of 23.5 in the vinyl ether unit. Ion transport coupled with the segmental motion of the polymer is dominant in these polymer electrolytes. Interfacial resistance increased gradually with contact time, indicative of the formation of passivation films on the Li metal electrode. These polymer electrolytes are thermally stable and have large electrochemical windows of use

  20. Characterization of Secondary Solid Wastes in Trench Water in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.A.; Kent, T.E.

    1994-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that new liquid waste streams, generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 and other sites, can be treated at the existing wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet discharge requirements without producing hazardous secondary solid wastes. Previous bench and pilot-scale treatability studies have shown that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants and that the secondary solid wastes produced were not hazardous when treating water from two trenches in WAG 6. This study used WAG 6 trench water spiked with the minimum concentration of Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) constituents (chemicals that can make a waste hazardous) found in any groundwater samples at ORNL. The Wastewater Treatment Test Facility (WTTF), a 0.5 L/min pilot plant that simulates the treatment capabilities of the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWPT) and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP), was used for this test. This test system, which is able to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for TCLP testing, was operated for a 59-d test period with a minimum of problems and downtime. The pilot plant operating data verified that WAG 6 trench waters, spiked with the minimum concentration of TCLP contaminants measured to date, can be treated at the PWTP and NRWTP to meet current discharge limits. The results of the TCLP analysis indicated that none of the secondary solid wastes produced during the treatment of these wastewaters will be considered hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

  1. Biosphere modelling for the assessment of radioactive waste repositories: the development of a common basis by the BIOMOVS II working group on reference biospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanDorp, F.

    1996-01-01

    Performance criteria for radioactive waste repositories are often expressed in terms of dose or risk. The characteristics of biosphere modelling for performance assessment are that: a) potential release occurs in the distant future, b) reliable predictions of human behaviour at the time of release are impracticable, and c) the biosphere is not considered to be a barrier. For these and other reasons, many unexplained differences have arisen in the approaches to biosphere modelling. The BIOMOVS II Working Group on Reference Biospheres has developed a) a recommended methodology for biosphere model development, b) a structured electronic list of features, events and processes (FEPs), and c) an illustrative example of the recommended methodology. The Working Group has successfully tested the Interaction Matrix (or Rock Engineering Systems, RES) approach for developing conceptual models. The BIOMOVS II Working Groups on Reference Biospheres and Complementary Studies have achieved considerable harmonisation in approaches to biosphere modelling. (author)

  2. Selective and sensitive fluorescence-shift probes based on two dansyl groups for mercury(ii) ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Jun; Liu, Jialun; Deng, Lefang; Zhao, Meili; Deng, Zhifu; Li, Xutian; Tang, Jian; Yang, Liting

    2014-11-01

    Two probes ( and ) bearing two dansyl fluorophores were synthesized and applied to the detection of mercury(ii) ions in aqueous solution. These probes exhibited a selective response to Hg(2+) in a buffered solution, with high sensitivity and a unique fluorescence response signal which displayed a blue-shift effect in the fluorescence emission peak. The Hg(2+) recognition mechanisms of the probes were determined by NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that probe and mercury(ii) ions formed an unusual 2:2 stoichiometric ratio complex, while probe and Hg(2+) formed a multidentate complex with a stoichiometric ratio of 2:1.

  3. Orientation and Order of the Amide Group of Sphingomyelin in Bilayers Determined by Solid-State NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Maeta, Yoshiko; Murata, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol) are considered essential for the formation of lipid rafts; however, the types of molecular interactions involved in this process, such as intermolecular hydrogen bonding, are not well understood. Since, unlike other phospholipids, SM is characterized by the presence of an amide group, it is essential to determine the orientation of the amide and its order in the lipid bilayers to understand the nature of the hydrogen bonds in lipid rafts. For this study, 1′-13C-2-15N-labeled and 2′-13C-2-15N-labeled SMs were prepared, and the rotational-axis direction and order parameters of the SM amide in bilayers were determined based on 13C and 15N chemical-shift anisotropies and intramolecular 13C-15N dipole coupling constants. Results revealed that the amide orientation was minimally affected by Chol, whereas the order was enhanced significantly in its presence. Thus, Chol likely promotes the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond network involving the SM amide without significantly changing its orientation, providing a higher order to the SM amide. To our knowledge, this study offers new insight into the significance of the SM amide orientation with regard to molecular recognition in lipid rafts, and therefore provides a deeper understanding of the mechanism of their formation. PMID:26083921

  4. Characterization of secondary solid waste anticipated from the treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that new liquid waste streams, generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6, can be treated adequately by existing wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) without producing hazardous secondary solid wastes. Previous bench-scale treatable studies indicated that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants although additional study was required in order to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment A 0.5-L/min pilot plant was designed and constructed to accurately simulate the treatment capabilities of ORNL fill-scale (490 L/min) treatment facilities-the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). This new test system was able to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for US Environmental Protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system was operated for a 45-d test period with a minimum of problems and downtime. The pilot plant operating data verified that the WAG 6 trench waters can be treated at the PWTP and NRWTP to meet the discharge limits. The results of TCLP testing indicate that none of the secondary solid wastes will be considered hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

  5. A group find of the bronze coins struck under Philip II and Alexander III from Svoboda near Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Militký, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2013), s. 147-160 ISSN 0546-9414 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24707S Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : Macedonia * Bulgaria * Philip II * hoard Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  6. Safety comparison of four types of rabies vaccines in patients with WHO category II animal exposure: An observation based on different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Lu, Sha; Zhu, Zhenggang; Zhang, Man; Hu, Quan; Fang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the safeties of 4 types of rabies vaccines for patients with WHO category II animal exposure, especially in different age groups.A total of 4000 patients with WHO category II animal exposure were randomly divided into 4 vaccine groups, and were respectively given with Vaccines A, B, C, and D. And subjects in each vaccine group were divided into 4 age groups (≤5, 5-18, 19-60, and ≥60-year-old groups). Then adverse events (including local and systemic ones) were recorded and compared. Consequently, except for Vaccine B, patients under the age of 5 in Groups A, C, and D suffered from more adverse reactions than those in other age groups. Furthermore, for the children aged less than 5 years, incidence of adverse events following administration of Vaccine B, with the dose of 0.5 mL and production of bioreactor systems, was significantly lower than Vaccines A and D.Our data showed that rabies vaccines with smaller doses and more advanced processing techniques are of relatively high safety for the patients, especially for the young children.

  7. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site's self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy

  8. Simulation of thermal stresses in anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell stacks. Part II: Loss of gas-tightness, electrical contact and thermal buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajo, Arata; Wuillemin, Zacharie; Van herle, Jan; Favrat, Daniel

    Structural stability issues in planar solid oxide fuel cells arise from the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the components. The stress state at operating temperature is the superposition of several contributions, which differ depending on the component. First, the cells accumulate residual stresses due to the sintering phase during the manufacturing process. Further, the load applied during assembly of the stack to ensure electric contact and flatten the cells prevents a completely stress-free expansion of each component during the heat-up. Finally, thermal gradients cause additional stresses in operation. The temperature profile generated by a thermo-electrochemical model implemented in an equation-oriented process modelling tool (gPROMS) was imported into finite-element software (ABAQUS) to calculate the distribution of stress and contact pressure on all components of a standard solid oxide fuel cell repeat unit. The different layers of the cell in exception of the cathode, i.e. anode, electrolyte and compensating layer were considered in the analysis to account for the cell curvature. Both steady-state and dynamic simulations were performed, with an emphasis on the cycling of the electrical load. The study includes two different types of cell, operation under both thermal partial oxidation and internal steam-methane reforming and two different initial thicknesses of the air and fuel compressive sealing gaskets. The results generated by the models are presented in two papers: Part I focuses on cell cracking. In the present paper, Part II, the occurrences of loss of gas-tightness in the compressive gaskets and/or electrical contact in the gas diffusion layer were identified. In addition, the dependence on temperature of both coefficients of thermal expansion and Young's modulus of the metallic interconnect (MIC) were implemented in the finite-element model to compute the plastic deformation, while the possibilities of thermal buckling

  9. Sunitinib in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a clinical and pharmacodynamic phase II multicenter study of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckstein, Rena; Kuruvilla, John; Chua, Neil; Lee, Christina; Macdonald, David A; Al-Tourah, Abdulwahab J; Foo, Alison H; Walsh, Wendy; Ivy, S Percy; Crump, Michael; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A

    2011-05-01

    There are limited effective therapies for most patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We conducted a phase II trial of the multi-targeted vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, 37.5 mg given orally once daily in adult patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. Of 19 enrolled patients, 17 eligible patients were evaluable for toxicity and 15 for response. No objective responses were seen and nine patients achieved stable disease (median duration 3.4 months). As a result, the study was closed at the end of the first stage. Grades 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 29% and 35%, respectively. There was no relationship between change in circulating endothelial cell numbers (CECs) and bidimensional tumor burden over time. Despite some activity in solid tumors, sunitinib showed no evidence of response in relapsed/refractory DLBCL and had greater than expected hematologic toxicity.

  10. Aggressiveness between genetic groups I and II of isolates of Cercospora zeae-maydis Agressividade entre isolados dos grupos genéticos I e II de Cercospora zeae-maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Marisa Mathioni

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years, the gray leaf spot disease (GLS caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, was not considered an important pathogen of maize (Zea mays, L. in Brazil. However, the recent adoption of agronomical practices such as no-tillage and cultivation under central pivot irrigation systems increased the incidence and severity to the extent that GLS is now one of the most important diseases of maize. Isolates of C. zeae-maydis can be distinguished by two genetic groups (I and II based on AFLP markers and on polymorphisms of the ITS and 5.8S rDNA regions. Until now, however, the biological implications of this distinction remain unclear. This study investigated whether isolates from the two genetic groups differ in aggressiveness towards maize. For this, symptoms of a susceptible hybrid were evaluated under greenhouse conditions with 9 and 11 isolates of C. zeae-maydis from groups I and II, respectively. Plants in the V3 growth stage were inoculated by placing sorghum seeds colonized with the pathogen in the leaf whorl and symptoms were evaluated with a visual rating scale 30 days later. On average, isolates of genetic group II were more aggressive than those of group I, with mean disease scores of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively. Differences were also observed between experiments, which suggested that group I and II might also differ in their fitness under different environments. This is the first report on differences in aggressiveness between the two genetic groups of C. zeae-maydis.Durante muitos anos, a cercosporiose, causada pelo fungo Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, não foi considerada importante para a cultura do milho (Zea mays, L. no Brasil. Entretanto, a recente utilização de práticas culturais como o plantio direto e o cultivo sob pivôs centrais favoreceram o aumento de sua severidade e incidência, de forma que a doença é hoje considerada uma das mais importantes da cultura. Isolados de C. zeae

  11. Evaluating Production of Cyclopentyl Tetraethers by Marine Group II Euryarchaeota in the Pearl River Estuary and Coastal South China Sea: Potential Impact on the TEX86 Paleothermometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xiang Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available TEX86 [TetraEther indeX of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs with 86 carbon atoms] has been widely applied to reconstruct (paleo- sea surface temperature. Marine Group I (MG-I Thaumarchaeota were thought to be the primary source of GDGTs constituting the TEX86 formula; however, recent research has suggested that Marine Group II (MG-II Euryarchaeota may also contribute significantly to the GDGT pool in the ocean. Little is known regarding the potential impact of MG-II Euryarchaeota-derived GDGTs on TEX86 values recorded in marine sediments. In this study, we assessed the relationship between distributions of GDGTs and MG-II Euryarchaeota and evaluated its potential effect on the TEX86 proxy. Lipid and DNA analyses were performed on suspended particulate matter and surface sediments collected along a salinity gradient from the lower Pearl River (river water and its estuary (mixing water to the coastal South China Sea (SCS, seawater. TEX86-derived temperatures from the water column and surface sediments were significantly correlated and both were lower than satellite-based temperatures. The ring index (RI values in these environments were higher than predicted from the calculated TEX86-RI correlation, indicating that the GDGT pool in the water column of the PR estuary and coastal SCS comprises relatively more cyclopentane rings, which thereby altered TEX86 values. Furthermore, the abundance of MG-II Euryarchaeota 16S rRNA gene in the mixing water was two to three orders of magnitude higher than those observed in the river or seawater. Significant linear correlations were observed between the gene abundance ratio of MG-II Euryarchaeota to total archaea and the fractional abundance of GDGTs with cyclopentane rings. Collectively, these results suggest that MG-II Euryarchaeota likely produce a large proportion of GDGTs with 1–4 cyclopentane moieties, which may bias TEX86 values in the water column and sediments. As such, valid

  12. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 11: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    President Clinton has directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy, Hazel O'Leary, has directed that a Department of Energy project be initiated to develop options and recommendations for the safe storage of these materials in the interim. A step in the process is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of facilities throughout the Department. The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group was formed to produce the Project and Assessment Plans, to manage the assessments and to produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The plans established the approach and methodology for the assessment. The Project Plan specifies a Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to examine each of the twelve DOE sites with significant holdings of plutonium. The Assessment Plan describes the methodology that the Site Assessment Team (SAT) used to report on the plutonium holdings for each specific site.This report provides results of the assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  13. THE VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION OF NEARBY STARS FROM HIPPARCOS DATA. II. THE NATURE OF THE LOW-VELOCITY MOVING GROUPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo; Hogg, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The velocity distribution of nearby stars (∼<100 pc) contains many overdensities or 'moving groups', clumps of comoving stars, that are inconsistent with the standard assumption of an axisymmetric, time-independent, and steady-state Galaxy. We study the age and metallicity properties of the low-velocity moving groups based on the reconstruction of the local velocity distribution in Paper I of this series. We perform stringent, conservative hypothesis testing to establish for each of these moving groups whether it could conceivably consist of a coeval population of stars. We conclude that they do not: the moving groups are neither trivially associated with their eponymous open clusters nor with any other inhomogeneous star formation event. Concerning a possible dynamical origin of the moving groups, we test whether any of the moving groups has a higher or lower metallicity than the background population of thin disk stars, as would generically be the case if the moving groups are associated with resonances of the bar or spiral structure. We find clear evidence that the Hyades moving group has higher than average metallicity and weak evidence that the Sirius moving group has lower than average metallicity, which could indicate that these two groups are related to the inner Lindblad resonance of the spiral structure. Further, we find weak evidence that the Hercules moving group has higher than average metallicity, as would be the case if it is associated with the bar's outer Lindblad resonance. The Pleiades moving group shows no clear metallicity anomaly, arguing against a common dynamical origin for the Hyades and Pleiades groups. Overall, however, the moving groups are barely distinguishable from the background population of stars, raising the likelihood that the moving groups are associated with transient perturbations.

  14. Blockade of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors produces hyper-locomotion in cocaine pre-exposed rats by interactions with dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung Shin; Jang, Ju Kyong; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    2008-09-01

    It was previously reported that blockade of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) produces hyper-locomotion in rats previously exposed to amphetamine, indicating that group II mGluRs are well positioned to modulate the expression of behavioral sensitization by amphetamine. The present study further examined the locomotor activating effects of specific blockade of these receptors after cocaine pre-exposures. First, rats were pre-exposed to seven daily injections of cocaine (15mg/kg, IP). When challenged the next day with an injection of either saline or the group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 (0.5, 1.0 or 2.5mg/kg, IP), they produced hyper-locomotor activity, measured by infrared beam interruptions, to LY341495 compared to saline in a dose-dependent manner. Second, rats were pre-exposed to either saline or seven daily injections of cocaine (15mg/kg, IP). Three weeks later, when they were challenged with an injection of either saline or LY341495 (1.0mg/kg, IP), only rats pre-exposed to cocaine produced hyper-locomotor activity to LY341495 compared to saline. These effects, however, were not present when dopamine D1 (SCH23390; 5 or 10microg/kg), but not D2 (eticlopride; 10 or 50microg/kg), receptor antagonist was pre-injected, indicating that this cocaine-induced hyper-locomotor activity to LY341495 may be mediated in dopamine D1 receptor-dependent manner. These results suggest that group II mGluRs may be adapted to interact with dopaminergic neuronal signaling in mediating the sensitized locomotor activity produced by repeated cocaine pre-exposures.

  15. A solid-state sensor based on ruthenium (II) complex immobilized on polytyramine film for the simultaneous determination of dopamine, ascorbic acid and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaish, Emad A.; Al-Ajmi, Khawla Y.; Al-Harthi, Salim H.

    2014-01-01

    A solid-state sensor based on a polytyramine (Pty) film deposited on a glassy carbon electrode doped with a tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)Ru(II) complex (Ru/Pty/GCE) was constructed electrochemically. The surface morphology of the film modified electrode was characterized using electrochemical and surface scanning techniques. A redox property represented by a [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 3+/2+ couple immobilized at the Pty moiety was characterized using typical voltammetric techniques. A distinct Ru 3d peak obtained at 280.9 eV confirms doping of the Ru species onto the Pty moiety characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images demonstrate that incorporation of Ru decreases the surface roughness of the native Pty film modified electrode. The Ru/Pty/GCE exhibits efficient electrochemical sensing toward the oxidation of dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) in their mixture. Three well-defined peaks were resolved with a large peak to peak separation and the detection limits of AA, DA and UA are brought down to 0.31, 0.08 and 0.58 μM, respectively. Interference studies and application for DA determination in real samples were conducted with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • XPS data confirm doping of ruthenium onto the polytyramine moiety. • The voltammetric signals of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid are well defined. • The sensor is stable and offers a large adsorption facility for all species. • The sensor is highly sensitive to dopamine oxidation. • The sensor is applied to a real sample with a satisfactory recovery percentage

  16. Design concept of the high-resolution end-station PEAXIS at BESSY II: Wide-Q-range RIXS and XPS measurements on solids, solutions, and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieutenant, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.lieutenant@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hofmann, Tommy, E-mail: tommy.hofmann@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schulz, Christian, E-mail: schulz-c@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Yablonskikh, Mikhail V., E-mail: mikhail.yablonskikh@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Habicht, Klaus, E-mail: habicht@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Aziz, Emad F., E-mail: emad.aziz@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji 444-8585, Okazaki (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Continuous rotation of the RIXS arm allowing truly Q-dependent measurements. • A systematic way to assess all RIXS spectrometer parameters using a figure of merit. • An analytical calculation of the energy dependent settings of a RIXS spectrometer. • Robustness analysis of spectrometer parameters for tolerances in engineering design. - Abstract: The design of a soft X-ray end-station for the Berlin Electron Synchrotron BESSY II is presented. It will be used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) and Angle-dependent X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AdXPS) studies for energy material science. In RIXS-mode the instrument operates with two spherical Variable Line Space (VLS) gratings for energy resolving measurements in two overlapping energy ranges from 200 to 1200 eV. The end-station will allow measurements of solid samples, solutions and interfaces in a wide range of experimental conditions with high energy resolution covering a large Q-range realized by a continuous rotation of the RIXS detector arm by 120°. Besides the description of this end-station, a systematic way is shown for the design of a RIXS instrument assessing the grating parameters based on existing theories and for the calculation of optimal instrument settings as a function of photon energy. Different grating inclinations, line densities, groove shapes and RIXS instrument lengths were investigated. Possible parameter combinations were calculated analytically and the resulting instrument performance was determined by ray-tracing simulations using the simulation package RAY. The performance of the RIXS instrument was evaluated by choosing the product of the intensity at the detector and the square of the resolving power as figure of merit to optimize the spectrometer. The robustness of the optimized parameters has been checked in order to define tolerance parameters for the engineering design of the spectrometer.

  17. Ultrasonic assisted dispersive solid-phase microextraction of Eriochrome Cyanine R from water sample on ultrasonically synthesized lead (II) dioxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Experimental design methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Sonia; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Mansoorkhani, Mohammad Javad Khoshnood; Asfaram, Arash; Bazrafshan, Ali Akbar; Purkait, Mihir Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The present research focus on designing an appropriate dispersive solid-phase microextraction (UA-DSPME) for preconcentration and determination of Eriochrome Cyanine R (ECR) in aqueous solutions with aid of sonication using lead (II) dioxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (PbO-NPs-AC). This material was fully identified with XRD and SEM. Influence of pH, amounts of sorbent, type and volume of eluent, and sonication time on response properties were investigated and optimized by central composite design (CCD) combined with surface response methodology using STATISTICA. Among different solvents, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was selected as an efficient eluent, which its combination by present nanoparticles and application of ultrasound waves led to enhancement in mass transfer. The predicted maximum extraction (100%) under the optimum conditions of the process variables viz. pH 4.5, eluent 200μL, adsorbent dosage 2.5mg and 5min sonication was close to the experimental value (99.50%). at optimum conditions some experimental features like wide 5-2000ngmL -1 ECR, low detection limit (0.43ngmL -1 , S/N=3:1) and good repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviation, <5.5%, n=12) indicate versatility in successful applicability of present method for real sample analysis. Investigation of accuracy by spiking known concentration of ECR over 200-600ngmL -1 gave mean recoveries from 94.850% to 101.42% under optimal conditions. The procedure was also applied for the pre-concentration and subsequent determination of ECR in tap and waste waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A solid-state sensor based on ruthenium (II) complex immobilized on polytyramine film for the simultaneous determination of dopamine, ascorbic acid and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khudaish, Emad A., E-mail: ejoudi@squ.edu.om [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science, Chemistry Department, PO Box 36, PC 123 Muscat (Oman); Al-Ajmi, Khawla Y. [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science, Chemistry Department, PO Box 36, PC 123 Muscat (Oman); Al-Harthi, Salim H. [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science, Department of Physics, PO Box 36, PC 123 Muscat (Oman)

    2014-08-01

    A solid-state sensor based on a polytyramine (Pty) film deposited on a glassy carbon electrode doped with a tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)Ru(II) complex (Ru/Pty/GCE) was constructed electrochemically. The surface morphology of the film modified electrode was characterized using electrochemical and surface scanning techniques. A redox property represented by a [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 3+/2+} couple immobilized at the Pty moiety was characterized using typical voltammetric techniques. A distinct Ru 3d peak obtained at 280.9 eV confirms doping of the Ru species onto the Pty moiety characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images demonstrate that incorporation of Ru decreases the surface roughness of the native Pty film modified electrode. The Ru/Pty/GCE exhibits efficient electrochemical sensing toward the oxidation of dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) in their mixture. Three well-defined peaks were resolved with a large peak to peak separation and the detection limits of AA, DA and UA are brought down to 0.31, 0.08 and 0.58 μM, respectively. Interference studies and application for DA determination in real samples were conducted with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • XPS data confirm doping of ruthenium onto the polytyramine moiety. • The voltammetric signals of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid are well defined. • The sensor is stable and offers a large adsorption facility for all species. • The sensor is highly sensitive to dopamine oxidation. • The sensor is applied to a real sample with a satisfactory recovery percentage.

  19. Solid-State Polymerization of Poly(Ethylene Furanoate Biobased Polyester, II: An Efficient and Facile Method to Synthesize High Molecular Weight Polyester Appropriate for Food Packaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejib Kasmi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to synthesize, through a facile strategy, high molecular weight poly(ethylene furanoate (PEF, which could be applicable in food packaging applications. The efficient method to generate PEF with high molecular weight consists of carrying out a first solid-state polycondensation under vacuum for 6 h reaction time at 205 °C for the resulting polymer from two-step melt polycondensation process, which is catalyzed by tetrabutyl titanate (TBT. A remelting step was thereafter applied for 15 min at 250 °C for the obtained polyester. Thus, the PEF sample was ground into powder, and was then crystallized for 6 h at 170 °C. This polyester is then submitted to a second solid-state polycondensation (SSP carried out at different reaction times (1, 2, 3.5, and 5 h and temperatures 190, 200, and 205 °C, under vacuum. Ultimately, a significant increase in intrinsic viscosity is observed with only 5 h reaction time at 205 °C during the second SSP being needed to obtain very high molecular weight PEF polymer greater than 1 dL/g, which sufficient for manufacturing purposes. Intrinsic viscosity (IV, carboxyl end-group content (–COOH, and thermal properties, via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, were measured for all resultant polyesters. Thanks to the post-polymerization process, DSC results showed that the melting temperatures of the prepared PEF samples were steadily enhanced in an obvious way as a function of reaction time and temperature increase. It was revealed, as was expected for all SSP samples, that the intrinsic viscosity and the average molecular weight of PEF polyester increased with increasing SSP time and temperature, whereas the number of carboxyl end-group concentration was decreased. A simple kinetic model was also developed and used to predict the time evolution of polyesters IV, as well as the carboxyl and hydroxyl end-groups of PEF during the SSP.

  20. Production of Group II and III base oils by hybrid route using brazilian crude; Producao de oleos basicos lubrificantes dos grupos II e III pela rota hibrida ou mista a partir de petroleo brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Wlamir Soares; Fontes, Anita Eleonora Ferreira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a series of pilot plant tests made at PETROBRAS Research Centre, considering hydrotreatment and solvent dewaxing steps, to produce group II and group III lube base oils from Baiano Light crude feeds (Brazilian crude). RLAM Refinery has been using Baiano light crude to produce group I base oils by conventional route and in the pilot plant studies, two types of process scheme were tested. In the first one, an industrial run was performed at RLAM Refinery, including distillation, dewaxing and extraction and the light raffinate was used as a feed for a hydrotreatment pilot plant, followed by a distillation to remove the front ends. In the second scheme, another industrial run was performed, including distillation and dewaxing steps and the medium dewaxed oil was used as a charge for a hydrotreatment followed by distillation and dewaxing pilot plant tests. Products of excellent quality were obtained. Due to their high viscosity indexes (from 96 to 126), low contaminants levels (sulfur < 5 ppm and nitrogen < 5 ppm) and low aromatic content (CA < 2 %), the lube base oils produced are therefore classified as group II and group III. The main advantages of this route are related to the base oils quality improvements with low investment and more flexibility in terms of crude source. (author)

  1. Host Factors Influencing the Retrohoming Pathway of Group II Intron RmInt1, Which Has an Intron-Encoded Protein Naturally Devoid of Endonuclease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Nisa-Martínez

    Full Text Available Bacterial group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs and mobile retroelements that have an open reading frame encoding an intron-encoded protein (IEP with reverse transcriptase (RT and RNA splicing or maturase activity. Some IEPs carry a DNA endonuclease (En domain, which is required to cleave the bottom strand downstream from the intron-insertion site for target DNA-primed reverse transcription (TPRT of the inserted intron RNA. Host factors complete the insertion of the intron. By contrast, the major retrohoming pathway of introns with IEPs naturally lacking endonuclease activity, like the Sinorhizobium meliloti intron RmInt1, is thought to involve insertion of the intron RNA into the template for lagging strand DNA synthesis ahead of the replication fork, with possible use of the nascent strand to prime reverse transcription of the intron RNA. The host factors influencing the retrohoming pathway of such introns have not yet been described. Here, we identify key candidates likely to be involved in early and late steps of RmInt1 retrohoming. Some of these host factors are common to En+ group II intron retrohoming, but some have different functions. Our results also suggest that the retrohoming process of RmInt1 may be less dependent on the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration than those of other group II introns.

  2. The differentiation of the character of solid lesions in the breast in the compression sonoelastography. Part II: Diagnostic value of BIRADS-US classification, Tsukuba score and FLR ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Sonoelastography is a dynamically developing method of ultrasound examination used to differentiate the character of focal lesions in the breasts. The aim of the Part II of the study is to determine the usefulness of sonoelastography in the differentiation diagnosis of focal breast lesions including the evaluation of the diagnostic value of Tsukuba score and FLR ratio in characterizing solid lesions in the breasts. Furthermore, the paper provides a comparison of classic B-mode imaging and son...

  3. Low-cost route for synthesis of mesoporous silica materials with high silanol groups and their application for Cu(II) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yangang; Huang Sujun; Kang Shifei; Zhang Chengli; Li Xi

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple and low-cost route to synthesize mesoporous silica materials with high silanol groups has been demonstrated by means of a sol–gel process using citric acid as the template and acid catalyst, further studies on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto the representative amine-functionalized mesoporous silica showed that it had a high Cu(II) removal efficiency. Highlights: ► A low-cost route to synthesize mesoporous silica with high silanol groups was demonstrated. ► Citric acid as the template and acid catalyst for the reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate. ► Water extraction method was an effective technique to remove template which can be recycled. ► The mesoporous silica with high silanol groups was easily modified by functional groups. ► A high Cu(II) removal efficiency on the amine-functionalized mesoporous silica. - Abstract: We report a simple and low-cost route for the synthesis of mesoporous silica materials with high silanol groups by means of a sol–gel process using citric acid as the template, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the silica source under aqueous solution system. The citric acid can directly work as an acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of TEOS besides the function as a pore-forming agent in the synthesis. It was found that by using a water extraction method the citric acid template in as-prepared mesoporous silica composite can be easily removed and a high degree of silanol groups were retained in the mesopores, moreover, the citric acid template in the filtrate can be recycled after being dried. The structural properties of the obtained mesoporous silica materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and nitrogen adsorption–desorption analysis. Furthermore, an adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution on the representative amine-functionalized mesoporous silica was investigated

  4. The differentiation of the character of solid lesions in the breast in the compression sonoelastography. Part II: Diagnostic value of BIRADS-US classification, Tsukuba score and FLR ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dobruch-Sobczak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sonoelastography is a dynamically developing method of ultrasound examination used to differentiate the character of focal lesions in the breasts. The aim of the Part II of the study is to determine the usefulness of sonoelastography in the differentiation diagnosis of focal breast lesions including the evaluation of the diagnostic value of Tsukuba score and FLR ratio in characterizing solid lesions in the breasts. Furthermore, the paper provides a comparison of classic B-mode imaging and sonoelastography. Material and methods: From January to July 2010 in the Ultrasound Department of the Cancer Centre, The Institute of Maria Skłodowska-Curie, 375 breast ultrasound examinations were conducted. The examined group included patients who in B-mode examinations presented indications for pathological verification. They were 80 women aged between 17 and 83 (mean age was 50 with 99 solid focal lesions in the breasts. All patients underwent: the interview, physical examination, B-mode ultrasound examination and elastography of the mammary glands and axillary fossae. The visualized lesions were evaluated according to BIRADS-US classification and Tsukuba score as well as FLR ratio was calculated. In all cases, the histopathological and/or cytological verification of the tested lesions was obtained. Results: In the group of 80 patients, the examination revealed 39 malignant neoplastic lesions and 60 benign ones. The mean age of women with malignant neoplasms was 55.07 (SD=10.54, and with benign lesions – 46.9 (SD=15.47. In order to identify threshold values that distinguish benign lesions from malignant ones, a comparative analysis of statistical models based on BIRADS-US classification and Tsukuba score was conducted and the cut-off value for FLR was assumed. The sensitivity and specificity values for BIRADS-US 4/5 were 76.92% and 96.67% and for Tsukuba 3/4 – 64.1% and 98.33% respectively. The assumed FLR threshold value to differentiate between

  5. The differentiation of the character of solid lesions in the breast in the compression sonoelastography. Part II: Diagnostic value of BIRADS-US classification, Tsukuba score and FLR ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2013-03-01

    Sonoelastography is a dynamically developing method of ultrasound examination used to differentiate the character of focal lesions in the breasts. The aim of the Part II of the study is to determine the usefulness of sonoelastography in the differentiation diagnosis of focal breast lesions including the evaluation of the diagnostic value of Tsukuba score and FLR ratio in characterizing solid lesions in the breasts. Furthermore, the paper provides a comparison of classic B-mode imaging and sonoelastography. From January to July 2010 in the Ultrasound Department of the Cancer Centre, The Institute of Maria Skłodowska-Curie, 375 breast ultrasound examinations were conducted. The examined group included patients who in B-mode examinations presented indications for pathological verification. They were 80 women aged between 17 and 83 (mean age was 50) with 99 solid focal lesions in the breasts. All patients underwent: the interview, physical examination, B-mode ultrasound examination and elastography of the mammary glands and axillary fossae. The visualized lesions were evaluated according to BIRADS-US classification and Tsukuba score as well as FLR ratio was calculated. In all cases, the histopathological and/or cytological verification of the tested lesions was obtained. In the group of 80 patients, the examination revealed 39 malignant neoplastic lesions and 60 benign ones. The mean age of women with malignant neoplasms was 55.07 (SD = 10.54), and with benign lesions - 46.9 (SD = 15.47). In order to identify threshold values that distinguish benign lesions from malignant ones, a comparative analysis of statistical models based on BIRADS-US classification and Tsukuba score was conducted and the cut-off value for FLR was assumed. The sensitivity and specificity values for BIRADS-US 4/5 were 76.92% and 96.67% and for Tsukuba 3/4 - 64.1% and 98.33% respectively. The assumed FLR threshold value to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions in the breasts equaled 3

  6. Substituted group and side chain effects for the porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin derivatives: A DFT and TD-DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Chin-Kuen; Chuang, Wen-Hua; Wang, Bo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The DFT/B3LYP/LANL2DZ and TD-DFT calculations have been performed to generate the optimized structures, electronic and photo-physical properties for the porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin (metalloporphyrin) derivatives. The substituted group and side chain effects for these derivatives are discussed in this study. According to the calculation results, the side chain moiety extends the π-delocalization length from the porphyrin core to the side chain moiety. The substituted group with a stronger electron-donating ability increases the energy level of highest occupied molecular orbital (E HOMO ). The side chain moiety with a lower resonance energy decreases E HOMO , the energy level of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ), and the energy gap (E g ) between HOMO and LUMO in the porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin derivatives. The natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis determines the possible electron transfer mechanism from the electron-donating to -withdrawing groups (the side chain moiety) in these porphyrin derivatives. The projected density of state (PDOS) analysis shows that the electron-donating group affects the electron density distribution in both HOMO and LUMO, and the side chain moiety influence the electron density distribution in LUMO. The calculated photo-physical properties (absorption wavelengths and the related oscillator strength, f) in dichloromethane environment for porphyrin and zinc(II)–porphyrin derivatives have been simulated by using the TD-DFT method within the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM). The present of both of the substituted group and the side chain moiety in these derivatives results in a red shift and broadening of the range of the absorption peaks of the Q/Soret band as compared to porphin. -- Highlights: • Side chain moiety extends the π-delocalization for the porphyrins. • Substituted group increases the energy of highest occupied molecular orbital. • Side chain moiety influences the Q/Soret band of

  7. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Erkan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Ocsoy, Ismail [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Nanotechnology Research Center (ERNAM), Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Ozdemir, Nalan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey)

    2016-02-04

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L{sup −1} and 8.8 μg L{sup −1}, respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. - Highlights: • The synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers is reported. • The nanoflowers were utilized for solid phase microextraction of

  8. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) sources and nature of solid extraction sorbent on recoverable DOM composition: Implication into potential lability of different compound groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Jae-Eun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Hur, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Noting the source-dependent properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this study explored the recoverable compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE) of two common sorbents (C18 and PPL) eluted with methanol solvent for contrasting DOM sources via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Fresh algae and leaf litter extracts DOM, one riverine DOM, and one upstream lacustrine DOM were selected for the comparison. C18 sorbent was generally found to extract more diverse molecular formula, relatively higher molecular weight, and more heteroatomic DOM compounds within the studied mass range than PPL sorbent except for the leaf litter extract. Even with the same sorbent, the main molecular features of the two end member DOM were distributed on different sides of the axes of a multivariate ordination, indicating the source-dependent characteristics of the recoverable compounds by the sorbents. In addition, further examination of the molecular formula uniquely present in the two end members and the upstream lake DOM suggested that proteinaceous, tannin-like, and heteroatomic DOM constituents might be potential compound groups which are labile and easily degraded during their mobilization into downstream watershed. This study provides new insights into the sorbent selectivity of DOM from diverse sources and potential lability of various compound groups.

  9. Brightest group galaxies - II: the relative contribution of BGGs to the total baryon content of groups at z < 1.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozaliasl, Ghassem; Finoguenov, Alexis; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Ilbert, Olivier; Wuyts, Stijn; McCracken, Henry J.; Montanari, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    We performed a detailed study of the evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) and their relative contribution to the total baryon budget within R200 (f^{BGG}_{b,200}). The sample comprises 407 BGGs selected from X-ray groups (M200 = 1012.8-1014 M⊙) out to z ˜ 1.3 identified in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), XMM Large-Scale Structure survey (XMM-LSS), and the All-Wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) fields. We find that BGGs constitute two distinct populations of quiescent and star-forming galaxies and their mean SFR is ˜2 dex higher than the median SFR at z 2 dex. We take into account the halo mass growth of groups in selecting the sample of BGGs and find that the mean (median) stellar mass of BGGs has grown by 0.3 dex since z = 1.3 to the present day. We show that up to ˜ 45 per cent of the stellar mass growth in a star-forming BGG can be due to its star formation activity. With respect to f^{BGG}_{b,200}, we find it to increase with decreasing redshift by ˜0.35 dex, while decreasing with halo mass in a redshift-dependent manner. We show that the slope of the relation between f^{BGG}_{b,200} and halo mass increases negatively with decreasing redshift. This trend is driven by an insufficient star formation in BGGs, compared to the halo growth rate. We separately show the BGGs with the 20 per cent highest f^{BGG}_{b,200} are generally non-star-forming galaxies and grow in mass by processes not related to star formation (e.g. dry mergers and tidal striping). We present the M⋆-Mh and M⋆/Mh-Mh relations and compare them with semi-analytic model predictions and a number of results from the literature. We quantify the intrinsic scatter in stellar mass of BGGs at fixed halo mass (σ _{log M_{\\star}}) and find that σ _{{log }M_{\\star}} increases from 0.3 dex at z ˜ 0.2-0.5 dex at z ˜ 1.0 due to the bimodal distribution of stellar mass.

  10. Biotechnological applications of mobile group II introns and their reverse transcriptases: gene targeting, RNA-seq, and non-coding RNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyeart, Peter J; Mohr, Georg; Ellington, Andrew D; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2014-01-13

    Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons that combine the activities of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a ribozyme) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase to insert site-specifically into DNA. They recognize DNA target sites largely by base pairing of sequences within the intron RNA and achieve high DNA target specificity by using the ribozyme active site to couple correct base pairing to RNA-catalyzed intron integration. Algorithms have been developed to program the DNA target site specificity of several mobile group II introns, allowing them to be made into 'targetrons.' Targetrons function for gene targeting in a wide variety of bacteria and typically integrate at efficiencies high enough to be screened easily by colony PCR, without the need for selectable markers. Targetrons have found wide application in microbiological research, enabling gene targeting and genetic engineering of bacteria that had been intractable to other methods. Recently, a thermostable targetron has been developed for use in bacterial thermophiles, and new methods have been developed for using targetrons to position recombinase recognition sites, enabling large-scale genome-editing operations, such as deletions, inversions, insertions, and 'cut-and-pastes' (that is, translocation of large DNA segments), in a wide range of bacteria at high efficiency. Using targetrons in eukaryotes presents challenges due to the difficulties of nuclear localization and sub-optimal magnesium concentrations, although supplementation with magnesium can increase integration efficiency, and directed evolution is being employed to overcome these barriers. Finally, spurred by new methods for expressing group II intron reverse transcriptases that yield large amounts of highly active protein, thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases from bacterial thermophiles are being used as research tools for a variety of applications, including qRT-PCR and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The

  11. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 12: Working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of March 15, 1994, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the ES ampersand H vulnerabilities of the inventory of plutonium (Pu) in storage. Pu in intact nuclear weapons, spent fuel and transuranic (TRU) waste not colocated with other Pu was excluded from this assessment. The DOE Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project and Assessment Plans, will also manage the overall DOE complex assessments and produce a final report for the Secretary of Energy by September 30, 1994. The Project Plan and Assessment Plan for this assessment, and which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study, were issued on April 25, 1994. This report contains the assessment of the Pantex Plant

  12. I. Cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II). Aquation equilibria and isotopic exchange of chloride ligands with free chloride and tetrachloroplatinate(II). II. The Szilard--Chalmers effect in solid-state systems containing the octa-μ3-chloro-octahedro-hexamolybdenum(II) cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.W.

    1976-06-01

    A titration technique was utilized to determine the equilibrium quotients for the first and second aquation steps of cis-Pt(NH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 . At 25.0 0 C and an ionic strength of 0.318 M the first and second aquation equilibrium constants are: K 1 = 3.63 +- 0.22 x 10 -3 M, ΔH 1 0 = 3.4 kcal and K 2 = 1.11 +- 0.14 x 10 -4 M, ΔH 2 0 = 10 kcal. In the ternary system, cis-Pt(NH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 :PtCl 4 2- :Cl - , the kinetics of isotopic exchange of chlorine was investigated. In addition to the expected route of exchange via aquation, a direct exchange of chlorine ligands between cis-Pt(NH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 and PtCl 4 2- occurred which is described by the rate expression. Separation procedures were devised for partial resolution of component yields resulting from dissolving a neutron-irradiated sample of (H 3 O) 2 [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 6 ] . 6H 2 O in 1.5 N HCl. A recrystallization procedure was formulated to determine the retention of activity in the parent compound of molybdenum(II) chloride clusters after neutron irradiation. The retention found in an aqueous 1.5 N HCl solution containing 1 percent (H 3 O) 2 [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 6 ] . 6H 2 O is 0.64 percent. For a solid sample of (H 3 O) 2 [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 6 ] . 6H 2 O aged 24 hours in Dry Ice after neutron irradiation, a retention of 7.0 percent was observed. Under the same conditions, a sample of (Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 with 0.8 percent and 2.7 percent water had retentions of 25.0 percent and 11.1 percent, respectively. Effects of thermal annealing and gamma ray treatment on solid samples of [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] . 2H 2 O were investigated

  13. On-line separation and preconcentration of lead(II) by solid-phase extraction using activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange and its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A; Shiraz, A Zendegi

    2008-02-11

    Activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange in a mini-column was used for the highly selective separation and preconcentration of Pb(II) ions. An on-line system for enrichment and the determination of Pb(II) was carried out on flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The conditions of preconcentration and quantitative recovery of Pb(II) from diluted solution, such as pH of aqueous phase, amount of the sorbent, volume of the solutions and flow variables were studied as well as effect of potential interfering ions. Under the optimum conditions, Pb(II) in an aqueous sample was concentrated about 200-fold and the detection limit was 0.4 ng mL(-1) Pb(II). The adsorption capacity of the solid phase was 0.20mg of lead per one gram of the modified activated carbon. The modified activated carbon is stable for several treatments of sample solutions without the need for using any chemical reagent. The recovery of lead(II) from river water, waste water, tap water, and in the following reference materials: SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW-07605 tea were obtained in the range of 97-104% by the proposed method.

  14. On-line separation and preconcentration of lead(II) by solid-phase extraction using activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange and its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Shiraz, A. Zendegi

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange in a mini-column was used for the highly selective separation and preconcentration of Pb(II) ions. An on-line system for enrichment and the determination of Pb(II) was carried out on flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The conditions of preconcentration and quantitative recovery of Pb(II) from diluted solution, such as pH of aqueous phase, amount of the sorbent, volume of the solutions and flow variables were studied as well as effect of potential interfering ions. Under the optimum conditions, Pb(II) in an aqueous sample was concentrated about 200-fold and the detection limit was 0.4 ng mL -1 Pb(II). The adsorption capacity of the solid phase was 0.20 mg of lead per one gram of the modified activated carbon. The modified activated carbon is stable for several treatments of sample solutions without the need for using any chemical reagent. The recovery of lead(II) from river water, waste water, tap water, and in the following reference materials: SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW-07605 tea were obtained in the range of 97-104% by the proposed method

  15. On-line separation and preconcentration of lead(II) by solid-phase extraction using activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange and its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensafi, Ali A. [College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Ensafi@cc.iut.ac.ir; Shiraz, A. Zendegi [College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-02-11

    Activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange in a mini-column was used for the highly selective separation and preconcentration of Pb(II) ions. An on-line system for enrichment and the determination of Pb(II) was carried out on flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The conditions of preconcentration and quantitative recovery of Pb(II) from diluted solution, such as pH of aqueous phase, amount of the sorbent, volume of the solutions and flow variables were studied as well as effect of potential interfering ions. Under the optimum conditions, Pb(II) in an aqueous sample was concentrated about 200-fold and the detection limit was 0.4 ng mL{sup -1} Pb(II). The adsorption capacity of the solid phase was 0.20 mg of lead per one gram of the modified activated carbon. The modified activated carbon is stable for several treatments of sample solutions without the need for using any chemical reagent. The recovery of lead(II) from river water, waste water, tap water, and in the following reference materials: SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW-07605 tea were obtained in the range of 97-104% by the proposed method.

  16. Self-assembly of novel manganese (II) compounds based on bifunctional-group ligands: Synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Juan-zhi; Lu, Li-ping; Zhu, Miao-li; Feng, Si-si

    2018-06-01

    Four manganese (II) compounds are obtained by the reaction of manganese salts, triazole-derivatives and auxiliary reagents in aqueous solution or mix-solvents by routine or hydrothermal reactions. X-ray crystal structure analyses reveal that a neutral 0D compound [Mn(Hmctrz)2(H2O)2] (1) (H2mctrz = 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid) displays a centro-symmetric mononuclear octahedral entity with two Hmctrz- anions and two water molecules; two neutral 2D clusters [Mn(Hdctrz)(H2O)2]n (2) (H3dctrz = 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dicarboxylic acid) and [Mn2(pbtrz)(btca)]n·4nH2O (3) (pbtrz = 1,3-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-propane&H4btca = benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid) possess layer structures with Hdctrz2- linkers (2) and Mn(II)-pbtrz-Mn(II) building blocks periodically extended by μ-btca4- connectors (3); [Mn(pbtrz)]n·nOAc·nOH (4) shows a 3D diamond-shaped cationic framework with the anion void volume of 49.2%. Nitrogenous bases are used as the auxiliary ligand in compound 3 and the temple ligand in compounds 1, 2, and 4. Compounds 1-4 show antiferromagnetic coupling that has been fitted by different models with the molecular field approximate with D = - 0.129(1) cm-1 for 1, J = - 0.354(4) cm-1 for 2 and J = - 0.696(6) cm-1 for 3, respectively. The magnetic differences can be related to different superexchange interactions transmitted by the crystal lattice and/or the zero field splitting (ZFS) of the 6A1g single-ion states of 1 and the syn-anti-COO- of 2 as well as the mixed magnetic bridges of μ1-O and μ-pbtrz-μ-COO- of 3.

  17. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 9, Oak Ridge Site working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Plutonium Environmental Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) Vulnerability Assessment at the Oak Ridge (OR) Site was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the ES ampersand H vulnerabilities arising from the storage and handling of its current plutonium holdings. The term open-quotes ES ampersand H Vulnerabilityclose quotes is defined for the purpose of this project to mean conditions or weaknesses that could lead to unnecessary or increased radiation exposure of workers, release of radioactive materials to the environment, or radiation exposure to the public. This assessment was intended to take a open-quotes snap-shotclose quotes of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Y-12 Plant's plutonium holdings and associated ES ampersand H vulnerabilities in the time frame of June 1 994. This vulnerability assessment process began with the OR Site Assessment Team (SAT) generating a self-assessment report including proposed vulnerabilities. The SAT identified 55 facilities which contain plutonium and other transuranics they considered might be in-scope for purposes of this study. The Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT), however, determined that 37 of the facilities actually contained only out-of-scope material (e.g., transuranic material not colocated with plutonium or transuranic (TRU) waste). The WGAT performed an independent assessment of the SATs report, conducted facility walkdowns, and reviewed reference documents such as Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), emergency preparedness plans, and procedures. The results of the WGAT review and open-quotes walkdownsclose quotes (a term as used here incorporating tours, document reviews, and detailed discussions with cognizant personnel) are discussed in Section 3.0. The ES ampersand H vulnerabilities that were identified are documented in Appendix A

  18. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedreza Mazlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type II diabetes mellitus, who had been referred to Parsian Diabetes clinic of Mashhad in 2014, were divided into two groups of intervention and control. The group counseling program was performed in five 1.5-hour sessions with 3-day intervals, and each groups consisted of 8 to 10 people. The content of the meetings was problems in nutrition, exercise, diabetes mellitus disease, diabetes-related mental health problems, diabetes medications, and self-control of blood glucose. Researcher-made diabetes care questionnaire was filled and HbA1c test was measured before and two months after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 11.5 using paired sample and independent t-tests. Results: In this study,27.3 percent of the subjects were male and 72.7 were female with the mean age of 49.1 ± 8.3. The scores of physiological aspect of self-care and HbA1C of the diabetic patients before the intervention was not significantly different between the groups; but in the post-intervention phase, the self-care in intervention group (49.1±5.8 significantly increased compared to the control group (31.8±12.2 (p

  19. Synthesis and characterization of near-IR absorbing metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines modified with aromatic azo groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes Özçeşmeci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanine complexes bearing peripheral (E-4-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yldiazenyl units have been synthesized. Novel phthalonitrile derivative required for the preparation of phthalocyanine complexes was prepared by coupling 4-aminophthalonitrile and 2-naphthol. The structures of these new compounds were characterized by using elemental analyses, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In the UV-Vis spectra a broad absorption band appears for phthalocyanine complexes at around 450–500 nm resulting from azo-group introduced onto the phthalocyanine ring. The photophysical properties of metal-free and zinc(II phthalocyanines were studied in tetrahydrofuran.

  20. Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt theorems and generalized Casimir invariants for some infinite-dimensional Lie groups: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ton-That, Tuong

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper we gave a generalization of the notion of Casimir invariant differential operators for the infinite-dimensional Lie groups GL ∞ (C) (or equivalently, for its Lie algebra gj ∞ (C)). In this paper we give a generalization of the Casimir invariant differential operators for a class of infinite-dimensional Lie groups (or equivalently, for their Lie algebras) which contains the infinite-dimensional complex classical groups. These infinite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, are inductive limits of finite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, with some additional properties. These groups or their Lie algebras act via the generalized adjoint representations on projective limits of certain chains of vector spaces of universal enveloping algebras. Then the generalized Casimir operators are the invariants of the generalized adjoint representations. In order to be able to explicitly compute the Casimir operators one needs a basis for the universal enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra. The Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) theorem gives an explicit construction of such a basis. Thus in the first part of this paper we give a generalization of the PBW theorem for inductive limits of Lie algebras. In the last part of this paper a generalization of the very important theorem in representation theory, namely the Chevalley-Racah theorem, is also discussed

  1. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, and phosphate ester cleavage properties of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine copper(II) complexes with guanidinium pendant groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousoff, Matthew J; Tjioe, Linda; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone

    2008-10-06

    Three new derivatives of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (DPA) featuring ethylguanidinium (L (1)), propylguanidinium (L (2)), or butylguanidinium (L (3)) pendant groups have been prepared by the reaction of N, N- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)alkane-alpha,omega-diamines with 1 H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine hydrochloride. The corresponding mononuclear copper(II) complexes were prepared by reacting the ligands with copper(II) nitrate and were isolated as [Cu(LH (+))(OH 2)](ClO 4) 3. xNaClO 4. yH 2O ( C1: L = L (1), x = 2, y = 3; C2: L = L (2), x = 2, y = 4; C3: L = L (3), x = 1, y = 0) following cation exchange purification. Recrystallization yielded crystals of composition [Cu(LH (+))(X)](ClO 4) 3.X ( C1': L = L (1), X = MeOH; C2': L = L (2), X = H 2O; C3': L = L (3), X = H 2O), which were suitable for X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of C1', C2', and C3' indicate that the DPA moieties of the ligands coordinate to the copper(II) centers in a meridional fashion, with a water or methanol molecule occupying the fourth basal position. Weakly bound perchlorate anions located in the axial positions complete the distorted octahedral coordination spheres. The noncoordinating, monoprotonated guanidinium groups project away from the Cu(II)-DPA units and are involved in extensive charge-assisted hydrogen-bonding interactions with cocrystallized water/methanol molecules and perchlorate anions within the crystal lattices. The copper(II) complexes were tested for their ability to promote the cleavage of two model phosphodiesters, bis( p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) and uridine-3'- p-nitrophenylphosphate (UpNP), as well as supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBR 322). While the presence of the guanidine pendants was found to be detrimental to BNPP cleavage efficiency, the functionalized complexes were found to cleave plasmid DNA and, in some cases, the model ribose phosphate diester, UpNP, at a faster rate than the parent copper(II) complex of DPA.

  2. Criteria to average out the chemical shift anisotropy in solid-state NMR when irradiated with BABA I, BABA II, and C7 radiofrequency pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane Mananga, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Floquet-Magnus expansion is used to study the effect of chemical shift anisotropy in solid-state NMR of rotating solids. The chemical shift interaction is irradiated with two types of radiofrequency pulse sequences: BABA and C7. The criteria for the chemical shift anisotropy to be averaged out in each rotor period are obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analytical solutions for non-linear conversion of a porous solid particle in a gas–II. Non-isothermal conversion and numerical verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, Gerrit; Brouwers, J.J.H.

    1990-01-01

    In Part I, analytical solutions were given for the non-linear isothermal heterogeneous conversion of a porous solid particle. Account was taken of a reaction rate of general order with respect to the gas reactant, intrinsic reaction surface area and effective pore diffusion, which change with solid

  4. Analytical solutions for non-linear conversion of a porous solid particle in a gas : II. non-isothermal conversion and numerical verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, G.; Brouwers, J.J.H.

    1990-01-01

    In Part I, analytical solutions were given for the non-linear isothermal heterogeneous conversion of a porous solid particle. Account was taken of a reaction rate of general order with respect to the gas reactant, intrinsic reaction surface area and effective pore diffusion, which change with solid

  5. Solid-state NMR detection of 14N-13C dipolar couplings between amino acid side groups provides constraints on amyloid fibril architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, David A

    2011-02-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) is a powerful technique for the structural analysis of amyloid fibrils. With suitable isotope labelling patterns, SSNMR can provide constraints on the secondary structure, alignment and registration of β-strands within amyloid fibrils and identify the tertiary and quaternary contacts defining the packing of the β-sheet layers. Detection of (14)N-(13)C dipolar couplings may provide potentially useful additional structural constraints on β-sheet packing within amyloid fibrils but has not until now been exploited for this purpose. Here a frequency-selective, transfer of population in double resonance SSNMR experiment is used to detect a weak (14)N-(13)C dipolar coupling in amyloid-like fibrils of the peptide H(2)N-SNNFGAILSS-COOH, which was uniformly (13)C and (15)N labelled across the four C-terminal amino acids. The (14)N-(13)C interatomic distance between leucine and asparagine side groups is constrained between 2.4 and 3.8 Å, which allows current structural models of the β-spine arrangement within the fibrils to be refined. This procedure could be useful for the general structural analysis of other proteins in condensed phases and environments, such as biological membranes. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Geologic report of the Maquoketa Shale, New Albany Shale, and Borden Group rocks in the Illinois Basin as potential solid waste repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droste, J.B.; Vitaliano, C.J.

    1976-06-01

    We have evaluated the Illinois Basin in order to select a ''target site'' for a possible solid nuclear waste repository. In the process we have been mindful of geology (particularly stratigraphy and lithology and structure), terrane, population density, land use, land ownership and accessibility. After taking these restrictions into account, we have singled out a strip of land in south central Indiana in which we have selected four potential sites worthy of further exploration. In three of the sites the geology, lithology, and depth below the surface are more than adequate for crypt purposes in two separate formations--the Maquoketa Shale of the Ordovician System and the New Albany Shale-Borden Group of the Upper Devonian-Mississippian Systems. The interval between the two is several hundred feet. The geology and associated features in the fourth site are undoubtedly similar to those in the first three. In all four selections a sizeable proportion of the land is in public ownership and the population density in the nonpublicly owned land is low. The geology, lithology, and position of the target formations have been projected into the sites in question from data provided by drill core records of the Indiana Geological Survey. Precise details would, of course, require exploratory drilling on the selected site

  7. Mono-uridylation of pre-microRNA as a key step in the biogenesis of group II let-7 microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Inha; Ha, Minju; Lim, Jaechul; Yoon, Mi-Jeong; Park, Jong-Eun; Kwon, S Chul; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V Narry

    2012-10-26

    RNase III Drosha initiates microRNA (miRNA) maturation by cleaving a primary miRNA transcript and releasing a pre-miRNA with a 2 nt 3' overhang. Dicer recognizes the 2 nt 3' overhang structure to selectively process pre-miRNAs. Here, we find that, unlike prototypic pre-miRNAs (group I), group II pre-miRNAs acquire a shorter (1 nt) 3' overhang from Drosha processing and therefore require a 3'-end mono-uridylation for Dicer processing. The majority of let-7 and miR-105 belong to group II. We identify TUT7/ZCCHC6, TUT4/ZCCHC11, and TUT2/PAPD4/GLD2 as the terminal uridylyl transferases responsible for pre-miRNA mono-uridylation. The TUTs act specifically on dsRNAs with a 1 nt 3' overhang, thereby creating a 2 nt 3' overhang. Depletion of TUTs reduces let-7 levels and disrupts let-7 function. Although the let-7 suppressor, Lin28, induces inhibitory oligo-uridylation in embryonic stem cells, mono-uridylation occurs in somatic cells lacking Lin28 to promote let-7 biogenesis. Our study reveals functional duality of uridylation and introduces TUT7/4/2 as components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biosphere modelling for the assessment of radioactive waste repositories; the development of a common basis by the BIOMOVS II reference biospheres working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, F. van; Egan, M.; Kessler, J.H.; Nilsson, S.; Pinedo, P.; Smith, G.; Torres, C.

    1998-01-01

    Performance criteria for radioactive waste repositories are often expressed in terms of dose or risk. The characteristics of biosphere modelling for performance assessment are that: (a) potential release occurs in the distant future, (b) reliable predictions of human behaviour at the time of release are impracticable, and (c) the biosphere is not considered to be a barrier as the geosphere and the engineered barriers. For these and other reasons, differences have arisen in the approaches to biosphere modelling for repository dose and risk assessment. The BIOMOVS II Reference Biospheres Working Group has developed (a) a recommended methodology for biosphere model development, (b) a structured list of features, events and processes (FEPs) which the model should describe, and (c) an illustrative example of the recommended methodology. The Working Group has successfully tested the Interaction Matrix (or Rock Engineering Systems, RES) approach for developing conceptual models. The BIOMOVS II Working Groups on Reference Biospheres and Complementary Studies have laid the basis for considerable harmonisation in approaches to biosphere modelling of long term radionuclide releases. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Bridge Busters: The 397th Bombardment Group (Medium) and the B-26 Marauder in World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    wooded area of Foret de Blois , the group delivered relatively accurate attacks but noted no secondary explosions. Poor weather stopped them from bombing...Loire 88 7-Aug-44 Ammunition Dump Foret De Blois 89 8-Aug-44 Railroad Bridge/ Embankment Mantes Gassicourt 90 8-Aug-44 Coastal Defense

  10. Phase II trial of cisplatin in advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, J T; Blessing, J A; Homesley, H D; Berek, J S; Creasman, W T

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina no longer amenable to control with surgery and/or radiotherapy were entered into a phase II study of cisplatin 50 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks. Two were deemed ineligible because of a primary site of origin other than vagina. Two were deemed inevaluable, one because of the lack of measurable disease and the other because she never received drug. The remaining 22 included a variety of histologies (16 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenosquamous carcinomas, 1 clear cell carcinoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, and 2 carcinomas not otherwise specified). One complete responder was observed among the 16 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Adverse effects were tolerable and were essentially those reported in other series. These results suggest that cisplatin has insignificant activity in advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina at least at the dose and schedule tested. No comment can be made regarding the activity of cisplatin in other histologies.

  11. A comparative gene analysis with rice identified orthologous group II HKT genes and their association with Na(+) concentration in bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Oldach, Klaus H; Francki, Michael G

    2016-01-19

    Although the HKT transporter genes ascertain some of the key determinants of crop salt tolerance mechanisms, the diversity and functional role of group II HKT genes are not clearly understood in bread wheat. The advanced knowledge on rice HKT and whole genome sequence was, therefore, used in comparative gene analysis to identify orthologous wheat group II HKT genes and their role in trait variation under different saline environments. The four group II HKTs in rice identified two orthologous gene families from bread wheat, including the known TaHKT2;1 gene family and a new distinctly different gene family designated as TaHKT2;2. A single copy of TaHKT2;2 was found on each homeologous chromosome arm 7AL, 7BL and 7DL and each gene was expressed in leaf blade, sheath and root tissues under non-stressed and at 200 mM salt stressed conditions. The proteins encoded by genes of the TaHKT2;2 family revealed more than 93% amino acid sequence identity but ≤52% amino acid identity compared to the proteins encoded by TaHKT2;1 family. Specifically, variations in known critical domains predicted functional differences between the two protein families. Similar to orthologous rice genes on chromosome 6L, TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;2 genes were located approximately 3 kb apart on wheat chromosomes 7AL, 7BL and 7DL, forming a static syntenic block in the two species. The chromosomal region on 7AL containing TaHKT2;1 7AL-1 co-located with QTL for shoot Na(+) concentration and yield in some saline environments. The differences in copy number, genes sequences and encoded proteins between TaHKT2;2 homeologous genes and other group II HKT gene families within and across species likely reflect functional diversity for ion selectivity and transport in plants. Evidence indicated that neither TaHKT2;2 nor TaHKT2;1 were associated with primary root Na(+) uptake but TaHKT2;1 may be associated with trait variation for Na(+) exclusion and yield in some but not all saline environments.

  12. New solid phase extractors for selective separation and preconcentration of mercury (II) based on silica gel immobilized aliphatic amines 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde Schiff's bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, Ezzat M.; Saleh, Mohamed B.; Ahmed, Salwa A.

    2004-01-01

    2-Thiophenecarboxaldhyde is chemically bonded to silica gel surface immobilized monoamine, ethylenediamine and diethylenetriamine by a simple Schiff's base reaction to produce three new SP-extractors, phases (I-III). The selectivity properties of these phases toward Hg(II) uptake as well as eight other metal ions: Ca(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) were extensively studied and evaluated as a function of pH of metal ion solution and equilibrium shaking time by the batch equilibrium technique. The data obtained clearly indicate that the new SP-extractors have the highest affinity for retention of Hg(II) ion. Their Hg(II) uptake in mmol g -1 and distribution coefficient as log K d values are always higher than the uptake of any other metal ion along the range of pH used (pH 1.0-10.0). The uptake of Hg(II) using phase I was 2.0 mmol g -1 (log K d 6.6) at pH 1.0 and 2.0. 1.8 mmol g -1 (log K d 4.25), 1.6 mmol g -1 (log K d 3.90) and 1.08 mmol g -1 (log K d 3.37) at pH 3.0, 5.0 and 8.0, respectively. Selective separation of Hg(II) from the other eight coexisting metal ions under investigation was achieved successfully using phase I at pH 2.0 either under static or dynamic conditions. Hg(II) was completely retained while Ca(II), Co(II) and Cd(II) ions were not retained. Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Pb(II) and Fe(III) showed very low percentage retention values to be 0.74, 0.97, 3.5 and 6.3%, respectively. Moreover, the high recovery values (95.5 ± 0.5, 95.8 ± 0.5 and 99.0% ± 1.0) of percolating two liters of doubly distilled water, drinking tap water and Nile river water spiked with 5 ng/l of Hg(II) over 100 mg of phase I packed in a minicolumn and used as a thin layer enrichment bed demonstrate the accuracy and validity of the new SP-extractors for preconcentration of the ultratrace amount of spiked Hg(II) prior to the determination by borohydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with no matrix interference. The detection

  13. A Tentative Research on the Education of Teacher by "Adlerian Psychology" (II) : Using Structured Group Encounter Method

    OpenAIRE

    柴山, 謙二; シバヤマ, ケンジ; Shibayama, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    This is a tentative research on the education of teacher explored in Adlerian Psychology that used the structured group encounter method. The purpose of teacher education by Adlerian Psychology is to develop and deepen social interests of teachers, and to learn this theory and psychological techniques at school. The process of short-time workshop for teachers who were specialized in guidance for pupils was designed and documented for the education of teacher, and the author participated in th...

  14. Ajout d’équivalents des groupes alimentaires au Questionnaire canadien de fréquence alimentaire II pour estimer l’Indice canadien de saine alimentation-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria McInerney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Il a été prouvé qu’un régime alimentaire de piètre qualité augmente le risque de maladies chroniques courantes susceptibles de nuire à la qualité de vie et d'alourdir le fardeau qui pèse sur le système de santé. Les recommandations fondées sur des données probantes du Guide alimentaire canadien (GAC fournissent des conseils nutritionnels destinés à améliorer la qualité du régime alimentaire. L’Indice canadien de saine alimentation (ICSA, un outil de mesure de la qualité du régime alimentaire, permet d'évaluer la conformité au GAC. Le Questionnaire canadien de fréquence alimentaire II (QFA-C II [Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II, C-DHQ II], mis au point récemment, pourrait quant à lui servir à estimer l’ICSA au sein de la population canadienne si on pouvait ajouter à sa base de données sur les éléments nutritifs les équivalents des groupes alimentaires (correspondant aux portions du GAC. Nous décrivons dans cet article des méthodes destinées à enrichir cette base de données sur les éléments nutritifs du QFA-C II en vue d’estimer l’ICSA. Méthodologie : Nous avons créé des équivalents des groupes alimentaires à partir de données provenant de diverses bases de données sur les aliments et les éléments nutritifs, en particulier l’Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes, cycle 2.2 Nutrition de 2004. Nous avons ajouté ces variables à la base de données sur les éléments nutritifs du QFA-C II. Nous avons déterminé les scores de l’ICSA et avons effectué des analyses descriptives pour les participants qui ont répondu au QFA-C II dans le cadre d’une étude transversale canadienne. Résultats : Le score moyen de l’ICSA dans notre échantillon de 446 adultes de 20 à 83 ans était de 64,4 (écart-type : 10,8. Les femmes, les non-fumeurs et les personnes ayant un niveau de scolarité supérieur au secondaire ont obtenu de manière statistiquement

  15. The health risk levels of different age groups of residents living in the vicinity of municipal solid waste incinerator posed by PCDD/Fs in atmosphere and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiafu; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Tingting; Hao, Huawei; Wu, Hao; Wang, Lili; Chen, Yuxing; Xing, Limin; Niu, Zhiguang

    2018-08-01

    In our study, health risk levels of different age groups of residents living in the vicinity of a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) posed by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in atmosphere and soil were evaluated. The toxic equivalent concentrations of PCDD/Fs (TEQ) in surrounding atmosphere and soil of studied MSWI were 0.05-0.12 pg I-TEQ Nm -3 and 7.622-15.450 ng I-TEQ kg -1 , respectively. The PCDFs/PCDDs (F/D) values of PCDD/Fs in surrounding atmosphere of studied MSWI ranged from 0.40 to 5.90 with a mean of 1.80, suggesting that the PCDD/Fs mainly came from combustion sources and studied MSWI could be a key source of PCDD/Fs in surrounding atmosphere. The F/D ratios of PCDD/Fs in surrounding soil ranged from 0.18 to 1.81 with a mean of 0.90, suggesting combustion is not the mainly sources of PCDD/Fs in surrounding soil, and studied MSWI may have limited influence on PCDD/Fs in surrounding soil. O8CDD and 2,3,4,7,8-P5CDF could be the total PCDD/Fs and TEQ indicators in surrounding atmosphere of studied MSWI, respectively. The carcinogenic risk (CR) values of PCDD/Fs in surrounding atmosphere and soil for children, teens and adults were 1.24E-06, 9.06E-07 and 4.41E-06, respectively, suggesting that the potential cancer risk occurred but the risk was at acceptable levels for both children and adults (risk for teens was negligible (risk (non-CR) values of three age groups were lower than 1, indicating that no obvious non-carcinogenic effects occurred. Inhalation of air was the largest contributor of health risk (both CR and non-CR) for three age groups. In addition, a comparison of the health risk between PCDD/Fs and other emerging contaminants and traditional pollutants in soil and atmosphere was performed, which will help us have a good view of the health risk levels of PCDD/Fs in surrounding environment of MWSI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 affect estrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, C S; Roodi, N; Yee, C J; Bailey, L R; Jensen, R A; Bustin, M; Parl, F F

    1997-07-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to a family of ligand-inducible nuclear receptors that exert their effects by binding to cis-acting DNA elements in the regulatory region of target genes. The detailed mechanisms by which ER interacts with the estrogen response element (ERE) and affects transcription still remain to be elucidated. To study the ER-ERE interaction and transcription initiation, we employed purified recombinant ER expressed in both the baculovirus-Sf9 and his-tagged bacterial systems. The effect of high-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and purified recombinant TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 on ER-ERE binding and transcription initiation were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vitro transcription from an ERE-containing template (pERE2LovTATA), respectively. We find that purified, recombinant ER fails to bind to ERE in spite of high ligand-binding activity and electrophoretic and immunological properties identical to ER in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. HMG-1 interacts with ER and promotes ER-ERE binding in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The effectiveness of HMG-1 to stimulate ER-ERE binding in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay depends on the sequence flanking the ERE consensus as well as the position of the latter in the oligonucleotide. We find that TAF(II)30 has no effect on ER-ERE binding either alone or in combination with ER and HMG-1. Although HMG-1 promotes ER-ERE binding, it fails to stimulate transcription initiation either in the presence or absence of hormone. In contrast, TAF(II)30, while not affecting ER-ERE binding, stimulates transcription initiation 20-fold in the presence of HMG-1. These results indicate that HMG-1 and TAF(II)30 act in sequence, the former acting to promote ER-ERE binding followed by the latter to stimulate transcription initiation.

  17. An Industrial Ecology Approach to Municipal Solid Waste Management: II. Case Studies for Recovering Energy from the Organic Fraction of MSW

    Science.gov (United States)

    The organic fraction of municipal solid waste provides abundant opportunities for industrial ecology-based symbiotic use. Energy production, economics, and environmental aspects are analyzed for four alternatives based on different technologies: incineration with energy recovery...

  18. The synthesis of corncobs (zea mays) active charcoal and water hyacinth (eichornia crassipes) adsorbent to adsorb Pb(II) with it’s analysis using solid-phase spectrophotometry (sps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputro, S.; Masykuri, M.; Mahardiani, L.; Kurniastuti, D.

    2018-03-01

    This research aim to examine the effect of the combination between corncobs and water hyacinth to adsorb lead (II), the most effective combination have determined by compared the ratio of corncobs adsorbent and water hyacinth to the increasing adsorption of the Pb(II), prove the effectiveness of the solid-phase spectrophotometry (sps) to determine the levels of Pb(II) as the result of the corncobs active charcoal adsorption and water hyacinth in the level of µg/L. The research method used is experimental method. The data collecting technique is carried out by several stages, which are carbonization using muffle furnace at a temperature of 350°C for 1.5 hours, activation of the corncobs charcoal and water hyacinth using HCl 1M and HCl 5M activator, contacting the adsorbent of corncobs active charcoal and water hyacinth with liquid waste simulation of Pb(II) using variation of corncobns and water hyacinth, 1:0; 0:1; 1:1; 2:1; 1:2, analysis of Pb(II) using an sps, characterization of corncobs active charcoal adsorbent and water hyacinth using FTIR. Research results show that the combined effect of activated charcoal corncobs and water hyacinth can increase the ability of the adsorbent to absorb Pb(II), the optimum adsorbent mass ratio of 1:1 with the absorption level of 90.33%, SPS is an effective method to analyze the decreasing level of Pb(II) as the adsorbtion result of the corncobs active charcoal and water hyacinth in the level of µg/L, with the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.06 µg/L.

  19. pH-specific hydrothermal assembly of binary and ternary Pb(II)-(O,N-carboxylic acid) metal organic framework compounds: correlation of aqueous solution speciation with variable dimensionality solid-state lattice architecture and spectroscopic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, C; Perikli, M; Raptopoulou, C P; Terzis, A; Psycharis, V; Mateescu, C; Jakusch, T; Kiss, T; Bertmer, M; Salifoglou, A

    2012-09-03

    Hydrothermal pH-specific reactivity in the binary/ternary systems of Pb(II) with the carboxylic acids N-hydroxyethyl-iminodiacetic acid (Heida), 1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (Dpot), and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) afforded the new well-defined crystalline compounds [Pb(Heida)](n)·nH(2)O(1), [Pb(Phen)(Heida)]·4H(2)O(2), and [Pb(3)(NO(3))(Dpot)](n)(3). All compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, solution or/and solid-state NMR, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structures in 1-2 reveal the presence of a Pb(II) center coordinated to one Heida ligand, with 1 exhibiting a two-dimensional (2D) lattice extending to a three-dimensional (3D) one through H-bonding interactions. The concurrent aqueous speciation study of the binary Pb(II)-Heida system projects species complementing the synthetic efforts, thereby lending credence to a global structural speciation strategy in investigating binary/ternary Pb(II)-Heida/Phen systems. The involvement of Phen in 2 projects the significance of nature and reactivity potential of N-aromatic chelators, disrupting the binary lattice in 1 and influencing the nature of the ultimately arising ternary 3D lattice. 3 is a ternary coordination polymer, where Pb(II)-Dpot coordination leads to a 2D metal-organic-framework material with unique architecture. The collective physicochemical properties of 1-3 formulate the salient features of variable dimensionality metal-organic-framework lattices in binary/ternary Pb(II)-(hydroxy-carboxylate) structures, based on which new Pb(II) materials with distinct architecture and spectroscopic signature can be rationally designed and pursued synthetically.

  20. A Chemical Eight Group Separation Method for Routine Use in Gamma Spectrometric Analysis. II. Detailed analytical schema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K

    1961-06-15

    A detailed ion-exchange procedure for the separation of chemical elements in eight groups suitable for subsequent gamma spectrometric analysis is described. The method has been in use for gamma spectrometry of some inorganic - but mostly organic - samples for one year. The separation time for inorganic samples, is usually about 1.5 hours and for organic samples as least 2 hours. One man can separate and count three samples per day. In comparative measurements of short-lived isotopes in biological material 10-12 elements can be analysed thus making possible 30 - 35 determinations per day for one man.

  1. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - II. AGB, RSG stars and dust production in IC10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Ventura, P.; Limongi, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Marini, E.; Rossi, C.

    2018-06-01

    We study the evolved stellar population of the Local Group galaxy IC10, with the aim of characterizing the individual sources observed and to derive global information on the galaxy, primarily the star formation history and the dust production rate. To this aim, we use evolutionary sequences of low- and intermediate-mass (M account for 40% of the sources brighter than the tip of the red giant branch. Most of these stars descend from ˜1.1 - 1.3 M⊙ progenitors, formed during the major epoch of star formation, which occurred ˜2.5 Gyr ago. The presence of a significant number of bright stars indicates that IC10 has been site of significant star formation in recent epochs and currently hosts a group of massive stars in the core helium-burning phase. Dust production in this galaxy is largely dominated by carbon stars; the overall dust production rate estimated is 7 × 10-6 M⊙/yr.

  2. Flavonoid content in ethanolic extracts of selected raw and traditionally processed indigenous foods consumed by vulnerable groups of Kenya: antioxidant and type II diabetes-related functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunyanga, Catherine N; Imungi, Jasper K; Okoth, Michael W; Biesalski, Hans K; Vadivel, Vellingiri

    2011-08-01

    The present study evaluated the flavonoid content, antioxidant as well as type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition activities of ethanolic extract of certain raw and traditionally processed indigenous food ingredients including cereals, legumes, oil seeds, tubers, vegetables and leafy vegetables, which are commonly consumed by vulnerable groups in Kenya. The vegetables exhibited higher flavonoid content (50-703 mg/100 g) when compared with the grains (47-343 mg/100 g). The ethanolic extract of presently studied food ingredients revealed 33-93% DPPH radical scavenging capacity, 486-6,389 mmol Fe(II)/g reducing power, 19-43% α-amylase inhibition activity and 14-68% α-glucosidase inhibition activity. Among the different food-stuffs, the drumstick and amaranth leaves exhibited significantly higher flavonoid content with excellent functional properties. Roasting of grains and cooking of vegetables were found to be suitable processing methods in preserving the functional properties. Hence, such viable processing techniques for respective food samples will be considered in the formulation of functional supplementary foods for vulnerable groups in Kenya.

  3. Inhibition of toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B in meat products by using a reduced level of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Lindström, Miia; Puolanne, Eero; Niemistö, Markku; Korkeala, Hannu

    2012-07-01

    The effect of three different concentrations of sodium nitrite (0, 75, and 120 mg/kg) on growth and toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B was studied in Finnish wiener-type sausage, bologna-type sausage, and cooked ham. A low level of inoculum (2.0 log CFU/g) was used for wiener-type sausage and bologna-type sausage, and both low (2.0 log CFU/g) and high (4.0 log CFU/g) levels were used for cooked ham. The products were formulated and processed under simulated commercial conditions and stored at 8°C for 5 weeks. C. botulinum counts were determined in five replicate samples of each nitrite concentration at 1, 3, and 5 weeks after thermal processing. All samples were positive for C. botulinum type B. The highest C. botulinum counts were detected in nitrite-free products. Toxigenesis was observed in nitrite-free products during storage, but products containing either 75 or 120 mg/kg nitrite remained nontoxic during the 5-week study period, suggesting that spores surviving the heat treatment were unable to germinate and develop into a toxic culture in the presence of nitrite. The results suggest that the safety of processed meat products with respect to group II C. botulinum type B can be maintained even with a reduced concentration (75 mg/kg) of sodium nitrite.

  4. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); LeCompte, Tom [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Marshall, Zach [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borgland, Anders [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Viren, Brett [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nugent, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Asai, Makato [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bauerdick, Lothar [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Finkel, Hal [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gottlieb, Steve [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Hoeche, Stefan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sheldon, Paul [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vay, Jean-Luc [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Elmer, Peter [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kirby, Michael [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Patton, Simon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Potekhin, Maxim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gutsche, Oliver [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lyon, Adam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Petravick, Don [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)

    2015-10-29

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  5. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  6. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Ocsoy, Ismail; Ozdemir, Nalan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-02-04

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L(-)(1) and 8.8 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Environmental Sensitivity in Nuclear Emergencies in Rural and Semi-natural Environments. Report of Working Group 8, Environmental Sensitivity of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by comparison with measured values in the environment or by comparing them with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. The programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in transfer data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. The following topics were addressed in nine working groups: Reference Approaches for Human Dose Assessment - Working Group 1: Reference Methodologies for Controlling Discharges of Routine Releases; - Working Group 2: Reference Approaches to Modelling for Management and Remediation at NORM and Legacy Sites; - Working Group 3: Reference Models for Waste Disposal Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment; - Working Group 4: Biota Modelling; - Working Group 5: Wildlife Transfer Coefficient Handbook; - Working Group 6: Biota Dose

  8. Apparatus for dynamic and static measurements of mechanical properties of solids and of flux-lattice in type-II superconductors at low frequency (10 - 5-10 Hz) and temperature (4.7-500 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, G.; Benoit, W.

    1990-12-01

    A forced torsional pendulum which permits us to examine anelastic mechanical properties of solids as well as for flux-lattice in type-II superconductors, has been built to explore the low frequency and low temperature range. It works on the principle of dynamic frequency response function measurement and appears to be a powerful instrument for studying structural defect motions as well as flux line dynamics. As an additional quantity, the magnetization or the plastic strain can be statically measured by the same apparatus.

  9. Human mtDNA hypervariable regions, HVR I and II, hint at deep common maternal founder and subsequent maternal gene flow in Indian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swarkar; Saha, Anjana; Rai, Ekta; Bhat, Audesh; Bamezai, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    We have analysed the hypervariable regions (HVR I and II) of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in individuals from Uttar Pradesh (UP), Bihar (BI) and Punjab (PUNJ), belonging to the Indo-European linguistic group, and from South India (SI), that have their linguistic roots in Dravidian language. Our analysis revealed the presence of known and novel mutations in both hypervariable regions in the studied population groups. Median joining network analyses based on mtDNA showed extensive overlap in mtDNA lineages despite the extensive cultural and linguistic diversity. MDS plot analysis based on Fst distances suggested increased maternal genetic proximity for the studied population groups compared with other world populations. Mismatch distribution curves, respective neighbour joining trees and other statistical analyses showed that there were significant expansions. The study revealed an ancient common ancestry for the studied population groups, most probably through common founder female lineage(s), and also indicated that human migrations occurred (maybe across and within the Indian subcontinent) even after the initial phase of female migration to India.

  10. Environmental monitoring recovery of solid wastes in Muribeca (Brasil). 2 part; Monitoreo ambiental de la recuperacion del vertedero de residuos solidos de Muribeca, Brasil-II parte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juca, J. F. T.; Monteiro, V. E. D.; Melo, M. C.

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive program of studying and monitoring the in situ performance of Muribeca Landfill, Physical, chemical and biological properties of the solid waste were analyzing in order to understand the mechanics of the landfill, the waste biodegradation process and the contamination level of air, liquids and subsoil. the parameters monitored in this investigation involve from leachate and gases generation to salts variations and the evolution of bacteria growth. Climate variation, among several others environment parameters, that affects solid waste degradation in sanitary landfills, were also controlled. Temperature, settlement, physical-chemical parameters, pathogenic microorganisms determination (quantitative and qualitative) and phyto toxicity are also part of this study. Secondary determinations as: moisture content, volatile solids, pH, grains density, and metals evaluation in different depths were also investigated. (Author) 23 refs.

  11. Synthesis, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of terpyridine Zn(II) complexes based on carbazole derivative with polyether group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming; Liu, Yanqiu; Wang, Hui; Luo, Junshan; Li, Dandan; Zhang, Shengyi; Li, Shengli; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    Four novel Zn(II) terpyridine complexes (ZnLCl2, ZnLBr2, ZnLI2, ZnL(SCN)2) based on carbazole derivative group were designed, synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including absorption and one-photon excited fluorescence, two-photon absorption (TPA) and optical power limiting (OPL) were further investigated systematically and interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations (TD-DFT). The influences of different solvents on the absorption and One-Photon Excited Fluorescence (OPEF) spectral behavior, quantum yields and the lifetime of the chromophores have been investigated in detail. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by open/closed aperture Z-scan measurements using femtosecond pulse laser in the range from 680 to 1080 nm. These results revealed that ZnLCl2 and ZnLBr2 exhibited strong two-photon absorption and ZnLCl2 showed superior optical power limiting property.

  12. Phase I results of a phase I/II study of weekly nab-paclitaxel in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours: A collaboration with innovative therapies for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; Casanova, Michela; Chisholm, Julia C; Berlanga, Pablo; Chastagner, Pascal B; Baruchel, Sylvain; Amoroso, Loredana; Melcón, Soledad Gallego; Gerber, Nicolas U; Bisogno, Gianni; Fagioli, Franca; Geoerger, Birgit; Glade Bender, Julia L; Aerts, Isabelle; Bergeron, Christophe; Hingorani, Pooja; Elias, Ileana; Simcock, Mathew; Ferrara, Stefano; Le Bruchec, Yvan; Slepetis, Ruta; Chen, Nianhang; Vassal, Gilles

    2018-06-21

    nab-Paclitaxel has demonstrated efficacy in adults with solid tumours and preclinical activity in paediatric solid tumour models. Results from phase I of a phase I/II study in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours treated with nab-paclitaxel are reported. Patients with recurrent/refractory extracranial solid tumours received nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks at 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, or 270 mg/m 2 (rolling-6 dose-escalation) to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Sixty-four patients were treated. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 dizziness at 120 mg/m 2 and grade 4 neutropenia >7 days at 270 mg/m 2 . The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were haematologic, including neutropenia (36%), leukopenia (36%) and lymphopenia (25%). Although the MTD was not reached, 270 mg/m 2 was declared non-tolerable due to grade 3/4 toxicities during cycles 1-2 (neutropenia, n = 5/7; skin toxicity, n = 2/7; peripheral neuropathy, n = 1/7). Of 58 efficacy-evaluable patients, complete response occurred in one patient (2%; Ewing sarcoma) and partial responses in four patients (7%; rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, renal tumour with pulmonary metastases [high-grade, malignant] and sarcoma not otherwise specified); all responses occurred at ≥210 mg/m 2 . Thirteen patients (22%) had stable disease (5 lasting ≥16 weeks) per RECIST. nab-Paclitaxel 240 mg/m 2 qw3/4 (nearly double the adult recommended monotherapy dose for this schedule in metastatic breast cancer) was selected as the RP2D based on the tolerability profile, pharmacokinetics and antitumour activity. Phase II is currently enrolling patients with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT01962103. 2013-000144-26. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The mitochondrial LSU rRNA group II intron of Ustilago maydis encodes an active homing endonuclease likely involved in intron mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Pfeifer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The a2 mating type locus gene lga2 is critical for uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance during sexual development of Ustilago maydis. Specifically, the absence of lga2 results in biparental inheritance, along with efficient transfer of intronic regions in the large subunit rRNA gene between parental molecules. However, the underlying role of the predicted LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene I-UmaI located within the group II intron LRII1 has remained unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the enzymatic activity of I-UmaI in vitro based on expression of a tagged full-length and a naturally occurring mutant derivative, which harbors only the N-terminal LAGLIDADG domain. This confirmed Mg²⁺-dependent endonuclease activity and cleavage at the LRII1 insertion site to generate four base pair extensions with 3' overhangs. Specifically, I-UmaI recognizes an asymmetric DNA sequence with a minimum length of 14 base pairs (5'-GACGGGAAGACCCT-3' and tolerates subtle base pair substitutions within the homing site. Enzymatic analysis of the mutant variant indicated a correlation between the activity in vitro and intron homing. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that putatively functional or former functional I-UmaI homologs are confined to a few members within the Ustilaginales and Agaricales, including the phylogenetically distant species Lentinula edodes, and are linked to group II introns inserted into homologous positions in the LSU rDNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data provide strong evidence that intron homing efficiently operates under conditions of biparental inheritance in U. maydis. Conversely, uniparental inheritance may be critical to restrict the transmission of mobile introns. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that I-UmaI-associated introns have been acquired independently in distant taxa and are more widespread than anticipated from available genomic data.

  14. Biologic determinants of tumor recurrence in stage II colon cancer: validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score in cancer and leukemia group B (CALGB) 9581.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venook, Alan P; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lopatin, Margarita; Ye, Xing; Lee, Mark; Friedman, Paula N; Frankel, Wendy; Clark-Langone, Kim; Millward, Carl; Shak, Steven; Goldberg, Richard M; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Warren, Robert S; Schilsky, Richard L; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2013-05-10

    A greater understanding of the biology of tumor recurrence should improve adjuvant treatment decision making. We conducted a validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score (RS), a quantitative assay integrating stromal response and cell cycle gene expression, in tumor specimens from patients enrolled onto Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581. CALGB 9581 randomly assigned 1,713 patients with stage II colon cancer to treatment with edrecolomab or observation and found no survival difference. The analysis reported here included all patients with available tissue and recurrence (n = 162) and a random (approximately 1:3) selection of nonrecurring patients. RS was assessed in 690 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using prespecified genes and a previously validated algorithm. Association of RS and recurrence was analyzed by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. Continuous RS was significantly associated with risk of recurrence (P = .013) as was mismatch repair (MMR) gene deficiency (P = .044). In multivariate analyses, RS was the strongest predictor of recurrence (P = .004), independent of T stage, MMR, number of nodes examined, grade, and lymphovascular invasion. In T3 MMR-intact (MMR-I) patients, prespecified low and high RS groups had average 5-year recurrence risks of 13% (95% CI, 10% to 16%) and 21% (95% CI, 16% to 26%), respectively. The 12-gene RS predicts recurrence in stage II colon cancer in CALGB 9581. This is consistent with the importance of stromal response and cell cycle gene expression in colon tumor recurrence. RS appears to be most discerning for patients with T3 MMR-I tumors, although markers such as grade and lymphovascular invasion did not add value in this subset of patients.

  15. IR spectroscopy study of SBA-15 silicas functionalized with the ethylthiocarbamidepropyl groups and their interactions with Ag(I) and Hg(II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Inna V.; Nazarchuk, Galyna I.; Václavíková, Miroslava; Zub, Yuriy L.

    2018-04-01

    Mesoporous structure of silica is determined by the type of template, but the introduction of functional groups during the synthesis has additional influence. The structure of SBA-15 may be violated by the introduction of long functions, such as ≡Si(CH2)3NHC(=S)NHC2H5. These ethylthiocarbamidepropyl groups can form complexes with metal ions in thiol or thione tautomeric forms. We determined that the 2D hexagonal p6 mm structure is preserved for SBA-15 with thiourea groups at maximal TEOS:trifunctional silane ratio (mol) = 10:2, which was confirmed by TEM and by the presence of an intense reflex in the small-angle region of diffractograms of the final product. It was shown that the obtained sorbents possess high kinetic characteristics. The experimental data fit pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, but the rate constants depend on the content of functional groups in the surface layer. Template Pluronic P-123 defines the porosity of functional mesoporous silica materials even at increasing content of trifunctional silane in the initial solution. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that thione form of thiourea ligand is prevalent on the surface of pores of mesoporous samples. However, during the sorption of silver(I) ions, there are both thione and thiol forms on the surface. Thione form is transformed into thiol with increasing concentration of mercury(II) ions in the sorption solution. Adsorption experiments showed that the SBA-15 silicas functionalized with ethylthiocarbamidepropyl groups had high selectivity for silver(I) ions and could concentrate Ag(I) ions from metal ions mixture at pH 2.

  16. Nominal group technique-elicited barriers and facilitators to following the Dietary Guidelines for solid fats and added sugars in children: The HEALTH Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US population has a high intake of discretionary solid fats and added sugars (SoFAS) which currently exceeds federal dietary recommendations. The goal of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to following the DGA. Thirty-eight 5th grade children across six Human Nutrition Resear...

  17. Solid state protonic conductors II for fuel cells and sensors. Proceedings of the European workshop on solid state materials for low to medium temperature fuel cells and monitors, with special emphasis on proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, J B; Jensen, J; Kleitz, M [eds.

    1983-01-01

    Solid electrolytes for chemical sensing, energy storage and conversion have been actively researched and developed since the early sixties. The zirconia fuel-cell electrolyser, the sodium-sulphur rechargeable battery, the oxygen sensor and lithium batteries can all be cited as significant developments from the field. Although of great potential the solid protonic conductors have somehow been ignored by comparison to the great interest that has been shown in, e.g., the lithium conductors. The long absence of any good, stable protonic conductors could easily explain this. The presence of water in the protonic conductors eliminates the possibility of high-temperature preparation and hence of conventional ceramic processing. Since solid electrolytes are used as dense ceramic membranes, difficulties with the fabrication of protonic electrilytes has been a strong disincentive. However, techniques have been developed for fabricating dense composite membranes; these contain free, but immobilized water that is lost at relatively low temperatures. Framework hydrates hold their water to higher temperatures. Although low-temperature ion-exchange preparations are possible, they yield weak ceramics. Nevertheless, their support on strong substrates, as reported in this conference, may provide an alternate way forward. A second workshop was organised on this theme at Hindsgavl Castle, Denmark, 1982. The aim was to compare the progress made in laboratories in Denmark, France and U.K. and also to review present and and future applications of fuel cells in a broader sense. Thirty scientists and representatives from the Commission of the European Communities, European Space Agency and the Daish Ministry of Energy participated. The proceedings cover all the papers of the workshop and the main comments and suggestions proposed during the discussions.

  18. Optimisation of environmental gas cleaning routes for solid wastes cogeneration systems. Part II - Analysis of waste incineration combined gas/steam cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, Marcelo R.; Perrella Balestieri, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    In the first paper of this paper (Part I), conditions were presented for the gas cleaning technological route for environomic optimisation of a cogeneration system based in a thermal cycle with municipal solid waste incineration. In this second part, an environomic analysis is presented of a cogeneration system comprising a combined cycle composed of a gas cycle burning natural gas with a heat recovery steam generator with no supplementary burning and a steam cycle burning municipal solid wastes (MSW) to which will be added a pure back pressure steam turbine (another one) of pure condensation. This analysis aims to select, concerning some scenarios, the best atmospheric pollutant emission control routes (rc) according to the investment cost minimisation, operation and social damage criteria. In this study, a comparison is also performed with the results obtained in the Case Study presented in Part I

  19. Testes de toxicidade aguda através de bioensaios no extrato solubilizado dos resíduos classe II A - não inertes e classe II B - inertes Acute toxicity tests by bioassays applied to the solubilized extracts of solid wastes class II A - non inerts and class II B - inerts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nébora Liz Vendramin Brasil Rodrigues

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A grande diversidade de substâncias potencialmente tóxicas contribuem para a deterioração do meio ambiente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi propor a utilização de bioensaios, através de testes de toxicidade aguda com Daphnia magna e Vibrio fischeri, como mais um parâmetro a ser analisado no extrato solubilizado dos resíduos que, segundo a NBR 10004/04 fossem classificados como classe II A - não inertes ou classe II B - inertes. Realizaram-se, também, testes de toxicidade no drenado dos aterros classe II A e II B. Verificou-se que a toxicidade foi constatada nos extratos solubilizados dos 18 resíduos analisados e que, apenas três das amostras estariam próprias para lançamento, ou seja os resíduos 04, 14 e 15. Já, a toxicidade encontrada no drenado dos aterros, ficou muito superior do que a toxicidade de cada extrato solubilizado analisado separadamente.A great diversity of substances potencially toxic contributes to the deterioration of the environment. The aim of this research was to propose the use of bioassays using Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, as another parameter to be analyzed in the solubilized extraction of waste according to NBR 10004/04 and classified as class II A - non inerts or class II B - inerts. Besides, another test was performed to measure the level of toxicity in the drainage of the landfill class II A and II B. It was verified that the toxicity found in the solubilized extracts of the 18 wastes analysed.Only 3 wastes (04, 14 and 15 were within the emission limits. On the other hand the toxicity found in the drainage of the landfill, from which all the samples came from, was much higher than the individual one.

  20. Radioactive pollution of the Chernobyl cooling pond bottom sediments. II. Distribution of 137Cs, 241Am, 90Sr in a solid phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Pirnach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The second part of complex research of the Chernobyl cooling pond bottom sediments are presented Data about vertical distribution of radioactive pollution 137Cs, 241Am, 90Sr in a solid phase of sediments are received. Distribution coefficients 137Cs and 90Sr, selectivity coefficients of their exchange with similar cations and physical-chemical forms are defined. Results of research of radionuclide chemical recovery from the sediment samples are analyzed.

  1. Application of mercapto-silica polymerized high internal phase emulsions for the solid-phase extraction and preconcentration of trace lead(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rihui; Ruan, Guihua; Chen, Zhengyi; Du, Fuyou; Li, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    A new class of solid-phase extraction column prepared with grafted mercapto-silica polymerized high internal phase emulsion particles was used for the preconcentration of trace lead. First, mercapto-silica polymerized high internal phase emulsion particles were synthesized by using high internal phase emulsion polymerization and carefully assembled in a polyethylene syringe column. The influences of various parameters including adsorption pH value, adsorption and desorption solvents, flow rate of the adsorption and desorption procedure were optimized, respectively, and the suitable uploading sample volumes, adsorption capacity, and reusability of solid phase extraction column were also investigated. Under the optimum conditions, Pb(2+) could be preconcentrated quantitatively over a wide pH range (2.0-5.0). In the presence of foreign ions, such as Na(+) , K(+) , Ca(2+) , Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , Cu(2+) , Fe(2+) , Cd(2+) , Cl(-) and NO3 (-) , Pb(2+) could be recovered successfully. The prepared solid-phase extraction column performed with high stability and desirable durability, which allowed more than 100 replicate extractions without measurable changes of performance. The feasibility of the developed method was further validated by the extraction of Pb(2+) in rice samples. At three spiked levels of 40.0, 200 and 800 μg/kg, the average recoveries for Pb(2+) in rice samples ranged from 87.3 to 105.2%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. An Ionic 1,4-Bis(styrylbenzene-Based Fluorescent Probe for Mercury(II Detection in Water via Deprotection of the Thioacetal Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sang Le

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Highly sensitive and selective mercury detection in aqueous media is urgently needed because mercury poisoning usually results from exposure to water-soluble forms of mercury by inhalation and/or ingesting. An ionic conjugated oligoelectrolye (M1Q based on 1,4-bis(styrylbenzene was synthesized as a fluorescent mercury(II probe. The thioacetal moiety and quaternized ammonium group were incorporated for Hg2+ recognition and water solubility. A neutral Hg2+ probe (M1 was also prepared based on the same molecular backbone, and their sensor characteristics were investigated in a mixture of acetonitrile/water and in water. In the presence of Hg2+, the thioacetal group was converted to aldehyde functionality, and the resulting photoluminescence intensity decreased. In water, M1Q successfully demonstrated highly sensitive detection, showing a binding toward Hg2+ that was ~15 times stronger and a signal on/off ratio twice as high, compared to M1 in acetonitrile/water. The thioacetal deprotection by Hg2+ ions was substantially facilitated in water without an organic cosolvent. The limit of detection was measured to be 7 nM with a detection range of 10–180 nM in 100% aqueous medium.

  3. Assignment of solid-state 13C and 1H NMR spectra of paramagnetic Ni(II) acetylacetonate complexes aided by first-principles computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouf, Syed Awais; Jakobsen, Vibe Boel; Mareš, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in computational methodology allowed for first-principles calculations of the nuclear shielding tensor for a series of paramagnetic nickel(II) acetylacetonate complexes, [Ni(acac)2L2] with L = H2O, D2O, NH3, ND3, and PMe2Ph have provided detailed insight into the origin of the par......Recent advances in computational methodology allowed for first-principles calculations of the nuclear shielding tensor for a series of paramagnetic nickel(II) acetylacetonate complexes, [Ni(acac)2L2] with L = H2O, D2O, NH3, ND3, and PMe2Ph have provided detailed insight into the origin...

  4. Combined effect of diuron and simazine on photosystem II photochemistry in a sandy soil and soil amended with solid olive-mill waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Cox, Lucía; Cornejo, Juan; Figueroa, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)- = 1,1-dimethylurea) and simazine (6-chloro-N(2), N(4)-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) are soil-applied herbicides used in olive crops. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of these herbicides on Photosystem II photochemistry of Olea europaea L., and whether the amendment of soil with an organic waste (OW) from olive oil production industry modifies this effect. For this purpose, herbicide soil adsorption studies, with unamended and OW-amended soil, and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements in adult olive leaves, after one, two and three weeks of soil herbicide treatment and/or OW amendment, were performed. Soil application of these herbicides reduced the efficiency of Photosystem II photochemistry of olive trees due to chronic photoinhibition, and this effect is counterbalanced by the addition of OW to the soil. OW reduces herbicide uptake by the plant due to an increase in herbicide adsorption.

  5. Synthesis and application of novel ion-imprinted polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective solid phase extraction of lead(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayazi, Maryam, E-mail: maryam.fayazi@yahoo.com [Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taher, Mohammad Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush [Department of Environment, Institute of Science and High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Graduate University of Advanced Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud, E-mail: m.ghaneimotlagh@yahoo.com [Young Researchers Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    In this study, novel magnetic ion-imprinted polymer (MIIP) nanoparticles were utilized for the sensitive and selective detection of Pb(II) ions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The Pb(II)-imprinted polymer was synthesized by using 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl) pyrazine (TPPZ) as the chelating agent and magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MMWCNTs) as the carrier. The synthesized MIIP materials were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various analytical parameters such as extraction and desorption time, eluent type and concentration, pH and sample volume were systematically examined. The selectivity of MIIP sorbent for Pb(II) ions in the presence of some cations was also evaluated. The limit of detection (LOD, 3S{sub b}) and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 8, c = 25 ng L{sup −1}) were found to be 2.4 ng L{sup −1} and 5.6%, respectively. The maximum sorption capacity of the MIIP for Pb(II) was found to be 48.1 mg g{sup −1}. Finally, the proposed analytical procedure was successfully applied to monitoring lead in human hair and water samples with satisfactory results for the spiked samples. - Highlights: • A selective and sensitive method based on MSPE-GFAAS was proposed. • The MIIP nanoparticles were characterized using FE-SEM, XRD, VSM and FT-IR techniques. • The synthesized MIIP material is efficient at extracting lead ions. • The method was applied to determine lead ions in several real samples.

  6. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  7. Transfer of Tritium in the Environment after Accidental Releases from Nuclear Facilities. Report of Working Group 7 Tritium Accidents of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (Emras II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Tritium Accidents Working Group

  8. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-15

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group.

  9. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  10. Characterization of a solid deuterium converter for ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) in the framework of the Mini-D{sub 2} project at the FRM-II reactor in Munich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorella, D.

    2007-02-07

    Spontaneous breaking of fundamental symmetries is an attractive topic in modern particles physic. Understanding qualitative and quantitative the parameters involved in these kind of processes could help to explain the unbalanced presence in the universe of matter (baryons) with respect to antimatter (anti-baryons). Due to their intrinsic properties, ultra cold neutrons (UCN) are excellent candidates in experiments measuring with high level of accuracy parameters like the electric dipole moment (EDM), the axial-vector coupling constant (g{sub A}), the neutron lifetime ({tau}{sub n}) or in search of quantum effect of gravity. In this work are presented several contributions in the framework of the Mini-D2 project, an innovative strong UCN source under construction at the FRM-II reactor in Munich. An important component of this facility, the solid deuterium UCN converter, is one subject of the thesis. (orig.)

  11. Characterization of a solid deuterium converter for ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) in the framework of the Mini-D2 project at the FRM-II reactor in Munich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorella, D.

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous breaking of fundamental symmetries is an attractive topic in modern particles physic. Understanding qualitative and quantitative the parameters involved in these kind of processes could help to explain the unbalanced presence in the universe of matter (baryons) with respect to antimatter (anti-baryons). Due to their intrinsic properties, ultra cold neutrons (UCN) are excellent candidates in experiments measuring with high level of accuracy parameters like the electric dipole moment (EDM), the axial-vector coupling constant (g A ), the neutron lifetime (τ n ) or in search of quantum effect of gravity. In this work are presented several contributions in the framework of the Mini-D2 project, an innovative strong UCN source under construction at the FRM-II reactor in Munich. An important component of this facility, the solid deuterium UCN converter, is one subject of the thesis. (orig.)

  12. Structure and conformational dynamics of the domain 5 RNA hairpin of a bacterial group II intron revealed by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlaner, Maria; Sigel, Roland K O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2013-10-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) data obtained for a 35-nucleotide RNA segment of a bacterial group II intron indicate a helical hairpin structure in which three parts, a terminal pentaloop, a bulge, and a G-A mismatch, display no Watson-Crick base pairing. The 668 NOE upper distance bounds for atom pairs are insufficient to uniquely determine the conformation of these segments. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations including time-averaged distance restraints have been used to obtain a conformational ensemble compatible with the observed NMR data. The ensemble shows alternating hydrogen bonding patterns for the mentioned segments. In particular, in the pentaloop and in the bulge, the hydrogen bonding networks correspond to distinct conformational clusters that could not be captured by using conventional single-structure refinement techniques. This implies that, to obtain a realistic picture of the conformational ensemble of such flexible biomolecules, it is necessary to properly account for the conformational variability in the structure refinement of RNA fragments.

  13. Phase II trial of paclitaxel and cisplatin in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 9430.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Mauer, Ann M; Hodgson, Lydia D; Herndon, James E; Lynch, Thomas J; Green, Mark R; Vokes, Everett E

    2008-11-01

    Cancer and Leukemia Group B trial 9430 was a randomized phase II trial which investigated the safety and activity of four novel doublets in untreated extensive stage small cell lung cancer. The results of the paclitaxel and cisplatin arm have not been reported. Patients received paclitaxel 230 mg/m followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m on day 1 every 21 days. All patients received granulocyte colony stimulating factor 5 microg/kg/d beginning on day 3 of each cycle. The patient characteristics of the 34 patients assigned to this treatment arm were: median age 61.5 years (range 41-82), male (76%), performance status 0 (41%), 1 (32%), and 2 (26%). An objective response was observed in 23 patients (68%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 49-83%); 2 complete responses (6%) and 21 partial responses (62%). Median progression-free survival time was 5.6 months (95% CI: 4.8-7.1 month), and median overall survival time was 7.7 months (95% CI: 7.2-12.6 months). The 1-year survival rate observed was 29% (95% CI: 15-45%). Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia was observed in 5 (15%) and 4 (12%) patients, respectively. Two patients developed febrile neutropenia including one patient who died of neutropenic sepsis. Grade 3/4 nonhematologic observed were: sensory neuropathy in eight patients (24%); and hyperglycemia, malaise and nausea were all observed in four patients (12%). Cancer and Leukemia Group B will not pursue further investigation of paclitaxel and cisplatin due to the modest activity and the toxicity observed on this trial.

  14. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by

  15. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part II, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Lazic, S.; Plecas, I.; Voko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  16. Influence of phosphate buffer and proteins on the potentiometric response of a polymeric membrane-based solid-contact Pb(II) ion-selective electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joon, Narender Kumar; He, Ning; Wagner, Michal

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the influence of phosphate buffer and proteins on the potentiometric response of a polymeric membrane-based solid-contact Pb2+-selective electrode (Pb2+-ISE) was studied. The effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption at the surface of the ion-selective membrane combined...... ions studied (Cu2+, Cd2+). Conditioning of the Pb2+-ISE in 0.01 mol dm–3 PBS resulted in a super-Nernstian response which was related to fixation/extraction of Pb2+ in the ion-selective membrane via precipitation of Pb3(PO4)2 by PO43– anions present in PBS. By conditioning of the Pb2+-ISE in 0.01 mol...

  17. Solid Lipid Particles for Oral Delivery of Peptide and Protein Drugs II - The Digestion of Trilaurin Protects Desmopressin from Proteolytic Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Zhang, Long; Müllertz, Anette

    2014-01-01

    , which is the same rank order as the lipid degradation rate. A reverse rank order was found for the protection of desmopressin from enzymatic degradation due to spatial separation of desmopressin from the protease. TG12 accelerated the release of desmopressin from all lipid particles when added as either...... and protease was determined. Trilaurin (TG12), trimyristin (TG14), tripalmitin (TG16), and tristearin (TG18) were used as lipid excipients to produce solid lipid microparticles. RESULTS: In the presence of lipase, the rate of drug release from different lipid particles was in the order of TG14 > TG16 > TG18...... drug-free microparticles to the lipolysis medium or incorporated in TG16 particles. Additionally, TG12 particles protected desmopressin from degradation when present in the lipolysis medium with the other lipid microparticles. CONCLUSIONS: TG12 is a very interesting lipid for oral lipid formulations...

  18. Preoperative therapy with pazopanib in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma: a phase II window-of-opportunity study by the German Interdisciplinary Sarcoma Group (GISG-04/NOPASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Jakob, Jens; Kasper, Bernd; Nowak, Kai; Pilz, Lothar R; Attenberger, Ulrike; Gaiser, Timo; Egerer, Gerlinde; Fröhling, Stefan; Derigs, Hans-Günter; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Hohenberger, Peter

    2016-01-06

    For resectable soft tissue sarcoma (STS), radical surgery, usually combined with radiotherapy, is the mainstay of treatment and the only potentially curative modality. Since surgery is often complicated by large tumour size and extensive tumour vasculature, preoperative treatment strategies with the aim of devitalising the tumour are being explored. One option is treatment with antiangiogenic drugs. The multikinase inhibitor pazopanib, which possesses pronounced antiangiogenic effects, has shown activity in metastatic and unresectable STS, but has so far not been tested in the preoperative setting. This open-label, multicentre phase II window-of-opportunity trial assesses pazopanib as preoperative treatment of resectable STS. Participants receive a 21-day course of pazopanib 800 mg daily during wait time for surgery. Major eligibility criteria are resectable, high-risk adult STS of any location, or metachronous solitary STS metastasis for which resection is planned, and adequate organ function and performance status. The trial uses an exact single-stage design. The primary end point is metabolic response rate (MRR), that is, the proportion of patients with >50% reduction of the mean standardised uptake value (SUVmean) in post-treatment compared to pre-treatment fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT. The MRR below which the treatment is considered ineffective is 0.2. The MRR above which the treatment warrants further exploration is 0.4. With a type I error of 5% and a power of 80%, the sample size is 35 evaluable patients, with 12 or more responders as threshold. Main secondary end points are histopathological and MRI response, resectability, toxicity, recurrence-free and overall survival. In a translational substudy, endothelial progenitor cells and vascular epithelial growth factor receptor are analysed as potential prognostic and predictive markers. Approval by the ethics committee II, University of Heidelberg, Germany (2012-019F-MA), German Federal

  19. Study protocol of a phase IB/II clinical trial of metformin and chloroquine in patients with IDH1-mutated or IDH2-mutated solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Coelen, Robert J S; Khurshed, Mohammed; Roos, Eva; Caan, Matthan W A; van Linde, Myra E; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde; Bramer, Jos A M; Bovée, Judith V M G; Mathôt, Ron A; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Vandertop, W Peter; Gelderblom, Hans; van Gulik, Thomas M; Wilmink, Johanna W

    2017-06-10

    High-grade chondrosarcoma, high-grade glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are aggressive types of cancer with a dismal outcome. This is due to the lack of effective treatment options, emphasising the need for novel therapies. Mutations in the genes IDH1 and IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) occur in 60% of chondrosarcoma, 80% of WHO grade II-IV glioma and 20% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. IDH1/2 -mutated cancer cells produce the oncometabolite D -2-hydroxyglutarate ( D -2HG) and are metabolically vulnerable to treatment with the oral antidiabetic metformin and the oral antimalarial drug chloroquine. We describe a dose-finding phase Ib/II clinical trial, in which patients with IDH1/2 -mutated chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are treated with a combination of metformin and chloroquine. Dose escalation is performed according to a 3+3 dose-escalation scheme. The primary objective is to determine the maximum tolerated dose to establish the recommended dose for a phase II clinical trial. Secondary objectives of the study include (1) determination of pharmacokinetics and toxic effects of the study therapy, for which metformin and chloroquine serum levels will be determined over time; (2) investigation of tumour responses to metformin plus chloroquine in IDH1/2 -mutated cancers using CT/MRI scans; and (3) whether tumour responses can be measured by non-invasive D -2HG measurements (mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy) of tumour tissue, serum, urine, and/or bile or next-generation sequencing of circulating tumour DNA (liquid biopsies). This study may open a novel treatment avenue for IDH1/2 -mutated high-grade chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma by repurposing the combination of two inexpensive drugs that are already approved for other indications. This study has been approved by the medical-ethical review committee of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The report

  20. Decomposition yields of the functional groups in gamma-radiolysis of the potassium and N,N'-dibenzylethylenediamine salts of benzylpenicillin in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziegielewski, J.O.

    1976-01-01

    The yields of particular groups in the potassium of benzylpenicillin and benzatine penicillin were determined by the NMR method. The total yields of groups are in agreement with the total radiation decomposition yields of the penicillin molecules, as determined by the spectrophotometric, polarimetric and iodometric methods. (author)

  1. Edible oil structures at low and intermediate concentrations. II. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering of in situ tristearin solids in triolein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronel, Fernanda; Ilavsky, Jan; Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Pink, David A.

    2013-12-01

    Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering has been used for the first time to elucidate, in situ, the aggregation structure of a model edible oil system. The three-dimensional nano- to micro-structure of tristearin solid particles in triolein solvent was investigated using 5, 10, 15, and 20% solids. Three different sample preparation procedures were investigated: two slow cooling rates of 0.5°/min, case 1 (22 days of storage at room temperature) and case 2 (no storage), and one fast cooling of 30°/min, case 3 (no storage). The length scale investigated, by using the Bonse-Hart camera at beamline ID-15D at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, covered the range from 300 Å to 10 μm. The unified fit and the Guinier-Porod models in the Irena software were used to fit the data. The former was used to fit 3 structural levels. Level 1 structures showed that the primary scatterers were essentially 2-dimensional objects for the three cases. The scatterers possessed lateral dimensions between 1000 and 4300 Å. This is consistent with the sizes of crystalline nanoplatelets present which were observed using cryo-TEM. Level 2 structures were aggregates possessing radii of gyration, Rg2 between 1800 Å and 12000 Å and fractal dimensions of either D2=1 for case 3 or 1.8≤D2≤2.1 for case 1 and case 2. D2 = 1 is consistent with unaggregated 1-dimensional objects. 1.8 ≤ D2 ≤ 2.1 is consistent with these 1-dimensional objects (below) forming structures characteristic of diffusion or reaction limited cluster-cluster aggregation. Level 3 structures showed that the spatial distribution of the level 2 structures was uniform, on the average, for case 1, with fractal dimension D3≈3 while for case 2 and case 3 the fractal dimension was D3≈2.2, which suggested that the large-scale distribution had not come to equilibrium. The Guinier-Porod model showed that the structures giving rise to the aggregates with a fractal dimension given by D2 in the unified fit level 2

  2. Microbial Mineral Transformations at the Fe(II)/Fe(III) Redox Boundary for Solid Phase Capture of Strontium and Other Metal/Radionuclide Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, F.G.; Roden, E.E.

    2000-01-01

    The migration of 90 Sr in groundwater is a significant environmental concern at former nuclear weapons production sites in the US and abroad. Although retardation of 90 Sr transport relative to mean groundwater velocity is known to occur in contaminated aquifers, Sr 2+ does not sorb as strongly to iron oxides and other mineral phases as do other metal-radionuclides contaminants. Thus, some potential exists for extensive 90 Sr migration from sources of contamination. Chemical or biological processes capable of retarding or immobilizing Sr 2+ in groundwater environments are of interest from the standpoint of understanding controls on subsurface Sr 2+ migration. In addition, it may be possible to exploit such processes for remediation of subsurface Sr contamination. In this study the authors examined the potential for the solid phase sorption and incorporation of Sr 2+ into carbonate minerals formed during microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction as a first step toward evaluating whether this process could be used to promote retardation of 90 Sr migrations in anaerobic subsurface environments. The demonstration of Sr 2+ capture in carbonate mineral phases formed during bacterial HFO reduction and urea hydrolysis suggests that microbial carbonate mineral formation could contribute to Sr 2+ retardation in groundwater environments. This process may also provide a mechanism for subsurface remediation of Sr 2+ and other divalent metal contaminants that form insoluble carbonate precipitates

  3. High-performance electrodes for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells with doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte. II. La(Sr)CoO 3 cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Toru; Miura, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Maric, Radenka; Ohara, Satoshi; Zhang, Xinge; Mukai, Kazuo; Fukui, Takehisa

    The reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with 0.5 mm thick La 0.9Sr 0.1Ga 0.8Mg 0.2O 3- α (LSGM) electrolyte, La 0.6Sr 0.4CoO 3- δ (LSCo) cathode, and Ni-(CeO 2) 0.8(SmO 1.5) 0.2 (SDC) cermet anode showed an excellent initial performance, and high maximum power density, 0.47 W/cm 2, at 800°C. The results were comparable to those for the conventional SOFC with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, La(Sr)MnO 3-YSZ cathode and Ni-YSZ cermet anode at 1000°C. Using an LSCo powder prepared by spray pyrolysis, and selecting appropriate sintering temperatures, the lowest cathodic polarization of about 25 mV at 300 mA/cm 2 was measured for a cathode prepared by sintering at 1000°C. Life time cell test results, however, showed that the polarization of the LSCo cathode increased with operating time. From EPMA results, this behavior was considered to be related to the interdiffusion of the elements at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Calcination of LSCo powder could be a possible way to suppress this interdiffusion at the interface.

  4. Transport of solid commodities via freight pipeline: freight pipeline technology. Volume II. First year final report. [Slurry, pneumatic, pneumo-capsule, and hydro-capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandi, I.; Gimm, K.K.

    1976-07-01

    In order to determine the feasibility of pipeline as an intercity freight transportation mode, it was necessary to examine its technological feasibility and reliability. This report describes the technology of the major generic freight pipelines in terms of both historical and current trends and operations. Additionally, it presents a state-of-the-art review of calculating energy requirements of various generic freight pipelines. It was concluded that slurry and pneumatic pipelines are technologically feasible and reliable. There are many commercial installations of both types operating around the world. Based on European experience with pneumo-capsule pipelines for mail delivery and Russian gravel- and sand-transport installations, it appears that a pneumo-capsule pipeline is a technologically feasible and operationally reliable mode for transport of solids. Since no commercial pneumo-capsule pipeline installations yet exist in the U.S., it seems desirable that a service demonstration of the advantages and feasibility of this mode of transport be undertaken to attract the shippers' confidence. Hydro-capsule pipelines are technologically feasible, but its reliability within a commercial environment remains to be tested.

  5. Protein structural studies by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy aided by a compact cyclen-type Cu(II) binding tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Ishita; Gao, Min; Arachchige, Rajith J.; Nadaud, Philippe S. [The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Cunningham, Timothy F.; Saxena, Sunil [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Information Technology (United States); Jaroniec, Christopher P., E-mail: jaroniec@chemistry.ohio-state.edu [The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) are a rich source of structural information in protein solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that PRE measurements in natively diamagnetic proteins are facilitated by a thiol-reactive compact, cyclen-based, high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding tag, 1-[2-(pyridin-2-yldisulfanyl)ethyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (TETAC), that overcomes the key shortcomings associated with the use of larger, more flexible metal-binding tags. Using the TETAC–Cu{sup 2+} K28C mutant of B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G as a model, we find that amino acid residues located within ∼10 Å of the Cu{sup 2+} center experience considerable transverse PREs leading to severely attenuated resonances in 2D {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C correlation spectra. For more distant residues, electron–nucleus distances are accessible via quantitative measurements of longitudinal PREs, and we demonstrate such measurements for {sup 15}N–Cu{sup 2+} distances up to ∼20 Å.

  6. The role of binary and many-centre molecular interactions in spin crossover in the solid state. Part II. Non-ideality parameters defined via binary molecular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudriavtsev, A.B.; Linert, W.

    2005-01-01

    Parameters of the formalism [1-6] describing spin crossover in the solid state have been defined via molecular potentials in model systems of neutral and ionic complexes. In the first instance Lennard-Jones and electric dipole-dipole potentials have been used whereas in ionic systems Lennard-Jones and electric point-charge potentials have been used. Electric dipole-dipole interaction of neutral complexes brings about a positive excess energy controlled by the difference of electric dipole moments of HS and LS molecules. Differences of the order of Δμ = 1-2D cause an abrupt spin crossover in systems with T 1/2 = 100-150K. Magnetic coupling contributes both to the excess energy and excess entropy, however the overall effect is equivalent to a modest positive excess energy. Ionic systems in the absence of specific interactions are characterized by very small excess energies corresponding to practically linear van't Hoff plots. Detectable positive and negative excess energies in these systems may arise from interactions of ligands belonging to neighbouring complexes. The HOMO-LUMO overlap in HS-LS pairs can bring about a nontrivial variation of the shape of transition curves. Examples of regression analysis of experimental transition curves in terms of molecular potentials are given. (author)

  7. Enhancing the contribution and role of practitioner knowledge in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC Working Group (WG II process: Insights from UK workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Howarth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective critically assesses how the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC could facilitate a closer alignment of its activities and include lessons drawn from the policy and decision-making communities working on the ground at the regional/local levels. The objective is to facilitate practitioner input into the detailed choice of topics and priorities for IPCC review and in the conclusions drawn (we define practitioners as those engaged in the development and application of practical responses to climate change on the ground. By means of a series of workshops with academics, policy officials and decision-makers in the United Kingdom, the research reported here illuminates how the IPCC’s Working Group II (WGII has been used in the past to inform decision-making and how practitioner responses to climate change could better inform the IPCC process in the future. In particular, we recommend three key actions. Firstly that IPCC WGII should incorporate more practitioners as authors to improve the awareness and understanding amongst the writing teams of the nature and detail of decisions being made in response to climate change; secondly a practitioner-led IPCC Special Report should be commissioned on good-practice responses to climate change; and thirdly a new body should be created, attached to the IPCC, to synthesise and report on good practice on climate response strategies in a timely manner. By adopting these recommendations, the IPCC could become more directly useful to decision-makers working on adaptation at the national, regional and local levels and enable more actionable decision-making.

  8. Safety and efficacy of high-dose tamoxifen and sulindac for desmoid tumor in children: results of a Children's Oncology Group (COG) phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X; Anderson, James R; Hill, D Ashley; Henry, David; Spunt, Sheri L; Meyer, William; Kao, Simon; Hoffer, Fredric A; Grier, Holcombe E; Hawkins, Douglas S; Raney, R Beverly

    2013-07-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor, DT) is a soft tissue neoplasm prone to recurrence despite complete surgical resection. Numerous small retrospective reports suggest that non-cytotoxic chemotherapy using tamoxifen and sulindac may be effective for DT. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of tamoxifen and sulindac in a prospective phase II study within the Children's Oncology Group. Eligible patients were <19 years of age who had measurable DT that was recurrent or not amenable to surgery or radiation. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received tamoxifen and sulindac daily for 12 months or until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Fifty-nine eligible patients were enrolled from 2004 to 2009; 78% were 10-18 years old. Twenty-two (38%) were previously untreated; 15 (41%) of the remaining 37 enrolling with recurrent DT had prior systemic chemotherapy and six (16%) had prior radiation. No life-threatening toxicity was reported. Twelve (40%) of 30 females developed ovarian cysts, which were asymptomatic in 11 cases. Ten patients completed therapy without disease progression or discontinuing treatment. Responses included four partial and one complete (5/59, 8%). The estimated 2-year PFS and survival rates were 36% (95% confidence interval: 0.23-0.48) and 96%, respectively. All three deaths were due to progressive DT. Tamoxifen and sulindac caused few serious side effects in children with DT, although ovarian cysts were common. However, the combination showed relatively little activity as measured by response and PFS rates. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Safety and Efficacy of High-Dose Tamoxifen and Sulindac for Desmoid Tumor in Children: Results of a Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Phase II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X.; Anderson, James R.; Hill, D. Ashley; Henry, David; Spunt, Sheri L.; Meyer, William; Kao, Simon; Hoffer, Fredric A.; Grier, Holcombe E.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Raney, R. Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Background Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor, DT) is a soft tissue neoplasm prone to recurrence despite complete surgical resection. Numerous small retrospective reports suggest that non-cytotoxic chemotherapy using tamoxifen and sulindac may be effective for DT. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of tamoxifen and sulindac in a prospective phase II study within the Children’s Oncology Group. Procedures Eligible patients were <19 years of age who had measurable DT that was recurrent or not amenable to surgery or radiation. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received tamoxifen and sulindac daily for 12 months or until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results Fifty-nine eligible patients were enrolled from 2004 to 2009; 78% were 10–18 years old. Twenty-two (38%) were previously untreated; 15 (41%) of the remaining 37 enrolling with recurrent DT had prior systemic chemotherapy and six (16%) had prior radiation. No life-threatening toxicity was reported. Twelve (40%) of 30 females developed ovarian cysts, which were asymptomatic in 11 cases. Ten patients completed therapy without disease progression or discontinuing treatment. Responses included four partial and one complete (5/59, 8%). The estimated 2-year PFS and survival rates were 36% (95% confidence interval: 0.23–0.48) and 96%, respectively. All three deaths were due to progressive DT. Conclusions Tamoxifen and sulindac caused few serious side effects in children with DT, although ovarian cysts were common. However, the combination showed relatively little activity as measured by response and PFS rates. PMID:23281268

  10. Misonidazole and unconventional radiation in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a phase II study of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ydrach, A.A.; Marcial, V.A.; Parsons, J.; Concannon, J.; Asbell, S.O.; George, F.

    1982-01-01

    This is a report on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Protocol78-32, a Phase I/II prospective study aimed at determining tolerance, tumor response, and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus treated with unorthodox fractionation radiotherapy combined with misonidazole. Misonidazole was administered by mouth 4 to 6 hr prior to radiation, at a dose of 1.0 to 1.25 Gm/.m 2 ; blood levels were measured at about 4 hr after intake of the drug and reported in micrograms/ml. Radiotherapy was administered at 4 to 6 hr post-misonidazole dose and given with 400 rad fractions, alternating 2 or 3 times/week, up to 4,800 rad. A total of 43 patients were entered; 26 are evaluated for survival at 1 year post accession. Thirty patients (88%) received the planned radiation course. Twenty-eight patients (78%) received the planned misonidazole dosage. Tumor response, evaluated in 18 patients, showed a complete regression (C.R.) in only 2 patients (11%); and partial response (P.R.) in 6 patients (33%). Eight patients (44%) showed no tumor response to planned therapy. Toxicity was acceptable and in 38 evaluated patients only 4 reported (11%) nausea and vomiting, 7 reported mild paresthesias (18%). The median survival was only five months. In 26 patients evaluated for 1 year survival determination, only 1 survived (3.8%) this period. In view of the poor tumor response and low survival observed, we do not recommend that this particular fractionation regimen with misonidazole be used in a Phase III randomized trial in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

  11. A long-term self-managed handwriting intervention for people with Parkinson's disease: results from the control group of a phase II randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Johnny; Franssen, Marloes; Winward, Charlotte; Izadi, Hooshang; Meaney, Andy; Mahmoud, Wala; Bogdanovic, Marko; Tims, Martin; Wade, Derick; Dawes, Helen

    2017-12-01

    To report on the control group of a trial primarily designed to investigate exercise for improving mobility in people with Parkinson's disease (pwP). The control group undertook a handwriting intervention to control for attention and time spent practising a specific activity. Secondary analysis of a two-arm parallel phase II randomized controlled trial with blind assessment. Community. PwP able to walk ⩾100 m and with no contraindication to exercise were recruited from the Thames Valley, UK, and randomized (1:1) to exercise or handwriting, via a concealed computer-generated list. Handwriting was undertaken at home and exercise in community facilities; both were delivered through workbooks with monthly support visits and involved practice for 1 hour, twice weekly, over a period of six months. Handwriting was assessed, at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months, using a pangram giving writing speed, amplitude (area) and progressive reduction in amplitude (ratio). The Movement Disorder Society (MDS)-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) item 2.7 measured self-reported handwriting deficits. In all, 105 pwP were recruited (analysed: n  = 51 handwriting, n  = 54 exercise). A total of 40 pwP adhered to the handwriting programme, most completing ⩾1 session/week. Moderate effects were found for amplitude (total area: d = 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.11 to 0.7; P = 0.13) in favour of handwriting over a period of12 months; effects for writing speed and ratio parameters were small ≤0.11. Self-reported handwriting difficulties also favoured handwriting (UPDRS 2.7: odds ratio (OR) = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.91; P = 0.02). No adverse effects were reported. PwP generally adhere to self-directed home handwriting which may provide benefit with minimal risk. Encouraging effects were found in writing amplitude and, moreover, perceived ability.

  12. Prospective randomized phase II study of FOLFIRI versus FOLFOX7 in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a Chinese Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Wen, Feng; Zhou, Chengya; Qiu, Meng; Liu, Jiyan; Chen, Jing; Yi, Cheng; Li, Zhiping; Luo, Deyun; Xu, Feng; Cai, Xiaohong; Bi, Feng

    2017-11-17

    Until now, no standard chemotherapy has been widely accepted for advanced gastric cancer (GC). The current research aimed to compare folinic acid, fluorouracil with irinotecan (mFOLFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX7) as first-line treatments in patients with locally advanced GC in an open, randomized, phase II study. Previously untreated metastatic or recurrent GC patients with measurable disease received mFOLFIRI (arm A) or mFOLFOX7 (arm B) every 2 weeks. The defined second-line treatment was mFOLFOX7 for arm A and mFOLFIRI for arm B. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease control rate (DCR) and toxicity. The evaluable population consisted of 128 patients (54 in arm A; 74 in arm B). Median PFS of arm A was 2.9 months (m) (95% confidence interval, CI , 1.9 to 4.1 m) versus 4.1 m (95% CI , 3.2 to 4.8 m) for arm B ( p = 0.109). Median OS was 9.9 months (95% CI , 6.0 to 13.5 m) for arm A versus 12.0 m for arm B (95% CI , 10.3 to 13.7m; p = 0.431). DCRs for arm A and arm B were 59.3% and 66.3%, respectively ( p = 0.850). In subgroup analysis of the patients who completed both treatment lines per protocol, the median first-line PFS was 2.1 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7arm versus 8.0 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI arm ( p = 0.053), and the median second-line PFS values were 1.2 m versus 5.1 m ( p = 0.287). Total PFS and OS were 8.1m and 11.0 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7 group compared with 12.2m and 20.2 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI group ( p = 0.008, p = 0.030). Both regimens were well-tolerated with acceptable and manageable toxicities. Hence, there was no significant difference in the PFS or DCR. However, mFOLFOX7 followed by mFOLFIRI might have a better OS.

  13. Probing adenine rings and backbone linkages using base specific isotope-edited Raman spectroscopy: application to group II intron ribozyme domain V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Dayie, T Kwaku; Carey, Paul R

    2010-04-27

    Raman difference spectroscopy is used to probe the properties of a 36-nt RNA molecule, "D5", which lies at the heart of the catalytic apparatus in group II introns. For D5 that has all of its adenine residues labeled with (13)C and (15)N and utilizing Raman difference spectroscopy, we identify the conformationally sensitive -C-O-P-O-C- stretching modes of the unlabeled bonds adjacent to adenine bases, as well as the adenine ring modes themselves. The phosphodiester modes can be assigned to individual adenine residues based on earlier NMR data. The effect of Mg(2+) binding was explored by analyzing the Raman difference spectra for [D5 + Mg(2+)] minus [D5 no Mg(2+)], for D5 unlabeled, or D5 labeled with (13)C/(15)N-enriched adenine. In both sets of data we assign differential features to G ring modes perturbed by Mg(2+) binding at the N7 position. In the A-labeled spectra we attribute a Raman differential near 1450 cm(-1) and changes of intensity at 1296 cm(-1) to Mg binding at the N7 position of adenine bases. The A and G bases involved in Mg(2+) binding again can be identified using earlier NMR results. For the unlabeled D5, a change in the C-O-P-O-C stretch profile at 811 cm(-1) upon magnesium binding is due to a "tightening up" (in the sense of a more rigid molecule with less dynamic interchange among competing ribose conformers) of the D5 structure. For adenine-labeled D5, small changes in the adenine backbone bond signatures in the 810-830 cm(-1) region suggest that small conformational changes occur in the tetraloop and bulge regions upon binding of Mg(2+). The PO(2)(-) stretching vibration, near 1100 cm(-1), from the nonbridging phosphate groups, probes the effect of Mg(2+)-hydrate inner-sphere interactions that cause an upshift. In turn, the upshift is modulated by the presence of monovalent cations since in the presence of Na(+) and Li(+) the upshift is 23 +/- 2 cm(-1) while in the presence of K(+) and Cs(+) it is 13 +/- 3 cm(-1), a finding that correlates

  14. Edible oil structures at low and intermediate concentrations. II. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering of in situ tristearin solids in triolein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyronel, Fernanda; Marangoni, Alejandro G. [Food Science Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Ilavsky, Jan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S Cass Ave., Bldg. 434D, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Mazzanti, Gianfranco [Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Pink, David A. [Food Science Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Physics Department, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada)

    2013-12-21

    Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering has been used for the first time to elucidate, in situ, the aggregation structure of a model edible oil system. The three-dimensional nano- to micro-structure of tristearin solid particles in triolein solvent was investigated using 5, 10, 15, and 20% solids. Three different sample preparation procedures were investigated: two slow cooling rates of 0.5°/min, case 1 (22 days of storage at room temperature) and case 2 (no storage), and one fast cooling of 30°/min, case 3 (no storage). The length scale investigated, by using the Bonse-Hart camera at beamline ID-15D at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, covered the range from 300 Å to 10 μm. The unified fit and the Guinier-Porod models in the Irena software were used to fit the data. The former was used to fit 3 structural levels. Level 1 structures showed that the primary scatterers were essentially 2-dimensional objects for the three cases. The scatterers possessed lateral dimensions between 1000 and 4300 Å. This is consistent with the sizes of crystalline nanoplatelets present which were observed using cryo-TEM. Level 2 structures were aggregates possessing radii of gyration, R{sub g2} between 1800 Å and 12000 Å and fractal dimensions of either D{sub 2}=1 for case 3 or 1.8≤D{sub 2}≤2.1 for case 1 and case 2. D{sub 2} = 1 is consistent with unaggregated 1-dimensional objects. 1.8 ≤ D{sub 2} ≤ 2.1 is consistent with these 1-dimensional objects (below) forming structures characteristic of diffusion or reaction limited cluster-cluster aggregation. Level 3 structures showed that the spatial distribution of the level 2 structures was uniform, on the average, for case 1, with fractal dimension D{sub 3}≈3 while for case 2 and case 3 the fractal dimension was D{sub 3}≈2.2, which suggested that the large-scale distribution had not come to equilibrium. The Guinier-Porod model showed that the structures giving rise to the aggregates

  15. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part II: Constraint methodology of hydrodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Oxarango, L; Duquennoi, C; Touze-Foltz, N; Forquet, N; Clément, R

    2016-09-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactors. To ensure optimal water content distribution, bioreactor operators need tools to design leachate injection systems. Prediction of leachate flow by subsurface flow modelling could provide useful information for the design of such systems. However, hydrodynamic models require additional data to constrain them and to assess hydrodynamic parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a suitable method to study leachate infiltration at the landfill scale. It can provide spatially distributed information which is useful for constraining hydrodynamic models. However, this geophysical method does not allow ERT users to directly measure water content in waste. The MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to delineate the infiltration area precisely during time-lapse ERT survey in order to avoid the use of empirical petrophysical relationships, which are not adapted to a heterogeneous medium such as waste. The infiltration shapes and hydrodynamic information extracted with MICS were used to constrain hydrodynamic models in assessing parameters. The constraint methodology developed in this paper was tested on two hydrodynamic models: an equilibrium model where, flow within the waste medium is estimated using a single continuum approach and a non-equilibrium model where flow is estimated using a dual continuum approach. The latter represents leachate flows into fractures. Finally, this methodology provides insight to identify the advantages and limitations of hydrodynamic models. Furthermore, we suggest an explanation for the large volume detected by MICS when a small volume of leachate is injected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure and Heme-Independent Peroxidase Activity of a Fully-Coordinated Mononuclear Mn(II) Complex with a Schiff-Base Tripodal Ligand Containing Three Imidazole Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Shuranjan; Lee, Hong In [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Do Hyun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lah, Myoung Soo [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    New complex [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sub 2}[Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 5}·3H{sub 2}O, where H{sub 3}L is tris{2-(4-imidazolyl)methyliminoethyl} amine (imtren), has been prepared by reacting manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate with the imtren ligand in methanol. X-ray crystallographic study revealed that the imtren ligand hexadentately binds to Mn(II) ion through the three Schiff-base imine N atoms and three imidazole N atoms with a distorted octahedral geometry, and the apical tertiary amine N atom of the ligand pseudo-coordinates to Mn(II), forming overall a pseudo-seven coordination environment. The hydrogen-bonds between imidazole and imidazolate of [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sup 0.5+} complex ions are extended to build a 2D puckered network with trigonal voids. [Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sup 2+} complex ions constitutes another extended 2D puckered layer without hydrogen bonds. Two layers are wedged each other to constitute overall stack of the crystal. Peroxidase activity of complex 1 was examined by observing the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)- 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of complex 1. Generation of ABTS{sup +·} was observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies, indicating that the complex 1, a fully-coordinated mononuclear Mn(II) complex with nitrogen-only ligand, has a heme-independent peroxidase activity.

  17. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris have characteristics in common with LMW RNA group II Sinorhizobium meliloti of Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella from soils of mainland Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several isolates from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canaries, had electrophoretic LMW RNA patterns identical with a less common pattern within S. meliloti (assigned as group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northe...

  18. Results of a collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding the reproducibility and robustness of the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS390 and DYS393 in a PCR pentaplex format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carracedo, A; Beckmann, A; Bengs, A

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative exercise was carried out by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in the frame work of the STADNAP program, i.e. standardization of DNA profiling in Europe, in order to evaluate the performance of a Y-chromosome STR pentaplex, which includes the loci DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS...

  19. Solid-phase peptide synthesis of isotocin with amide of asparagine protected with 1-tetralinyl. Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid (tfmsa deprotection, cleavage and air oxidation of mercapto groups to disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir O. Yusuf

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Isotocin, a nonapeptide amide, was synthesised on a benzhydryl-resin using the Boc-strategy. Benzyl group was used in the protection of the side-chains of tyrosine, serine and cysteine. Tetralinyl group was used to protect asparagine side-chain. TFMSA-TFA-thioanisole-1,2-ethanedithiol (2:20:2:1 v/v was used on the peptide-resin under different cleavage conditions to obtain isotocin in a one-pot reaction. The cleavage at 40 °C for two hours gave isotocin quantitatively. Isotocin could be isolated in 61% yield.

  20. Real-time RT-PCR high-resolution melting curve analysis and multiplex RT-PCR to detect and differentiate grapevine leafroll-associated associated virus 3 variant groups I, II, III and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Rachelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3 is the main contributing agent of leafroll disease worldwide. Four of the six GLRaV-3 variant groups known have been found in South Africa, but their individual contribution to leafroll disease is unknown. In order to study the pathogenesis of leafroll disease, a sensitive and accurate diagnostic assay is required that can detect different variant groups of GLRaV-3. Methods In this study, a one-step real-time RT-PCR, followed by high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and identification of GLRaV-3 variants of groups I, II, III and VI, was developed. A melting point confidence interval for each variant group was calculated to include at least 90% of all melting points observed. A multiplex RT-PCR protocol was developed to these four variant groups in order to assess the efficacy of the real-time RT-PCR HRM assay. Results A universal primer set for GLRaV-3 targeting the heat shock protein 70 homologue (Hsp70h gene of GLRaV-3 was designed that is able to detect GLRaV-3 variant groups I, II, III and VI and differentiate between them with high-resolution melting curve analysis. The real-time RT-PCR HRM and the multiplex RT-PCR were optimized using 121 GLRaV-3 positive samples. Due to a considerable variation in melting profile observed within each GLRaV-3 group, a confidence interval of above 90% was calculated for each variant group, based on the range and distribution of melting points. The intervals of groups I and II could not be distinguished and a 95% joint confidence interval was calculated for simultaneous detection of group I and II variants. An additional primer pair targeting GLRaV-3 ORF1a was developed that can be used in a subsequent real-time RT-PCR HRM to differentiate between variants of groups I and II. Additionally, the multiplex RT-PCR successfully validated 94.64% of the infections detected with the real-time RT-PCR HRM

  1. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  2. Solid and liquid biofuels markets in Finland. A study on international biofuels trade. IEA bioenergy task 40 and EUROBIONET II. Country report of Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinimoe, J.; Alakangas, E.

    2006-01-01

    This study considered the current situation of solid and liquid biofuels markets and international biofuels trade in Finland and identified the challenges of the emerging international biofuels markets for Finland. The fact that industry consumes more than half of the total primary energy, widely applied combined heat and power production (CHP) and a high share of biofuels in the total energy consumption are specific to the Finnish energy system. One third of the electricity is generated in CHP plants. As much as 27% of the total energy consumption is met by using wood and peat, which makes Finland the leading country in the use of biofuels. Finland has made a commitment to maintain greenhouse gas emissions at the 1990 level at the highest during the period 2008-2012. The Finnish energy policy aims to achieve the target, and a variety of measures are taken to promote the use of renewable energy sources and especially wood fuels. In this study, the wooden raw material streams of the forest industry were included the international biofuels trade in addition to biomass streams that are traded for energy production. In 2004, as much as 45% of the raw wood imported into Finland ended up in energy production. The total international trading of biofuels was evaluated at 72 PJ, of which the majority, 58 PJ, was raw wood. About 22% of wood based energy in Finland originated from imported raw wood. Tall oil and wood pellets composed the largest export streams of biofuels. The annual turnover of international biofuels trade was estimated at about euro 90 million for direct trade and at about euro 190 million for indirect trade. The forest industry as the biggest user of wood, and the producer and user of wood fuels has a central position in biomass and biofuels markets in Finland. Lately, the international aspects of Finnish biofuels markets have been emphasised as the import of raw wood and the export of wood pellets have increased. Expanding the use of biofuels in the road

  3. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure and conductometry studying of a number of new Schiff base complexes; a new example of binuclear square pyramidal geometry of Cu(II) complex bridged with an oxo group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Alavipour, Ehsan

    2015-11-01

    Three new binuclear Cu(II), Mn(II), Co(II) complexes [Cu2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (1), [Mn2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (2), and [Co2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (3), {L = 1,3-bis(2-((Z)-(2-aminopropylimino)methyl)phenoxy)propan-2-ol} have been synthesized. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis of complex 1 showed that the complex is binuclear and all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of ligand (N4O3) are coordinated to two Cu(II) center ions. In addition, the crystal structure studying shows, a perchlorate ion has been bridged to the Cu(II) metal centers. However, two distorted square pyramidal Cu(II) ions are bridged asymmetrically by a perchlorate ion and oxygen of hydroxyl group of Schiff base ligand. In addition, the conductometry behaviors of all complexes were studied in acetonitrile solution.

  4. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXVIII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of two copper(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with 1,2-diaminopropane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavra, M.; Potočňák, I.; Dušek, Michal; Čižmár, E.; Ozerov, M.; Zvyagin, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 225, May (2015), s. 202-208 ISSN 0022-4596 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spectroscopic studies * magnetic properties * crystal structure * [Pt(CN) ]2- anion * 1,2-diaminopropane Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.265, year: 2015

  5. Influence of welded boundaries in anelastic media on energy flow, and characteristics of P, S-I, and S-II waves: Observational evidence for inhomogeneous body waves in low-loss solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Glassmoyer, Gary; Wennerberg, Leif

    1986-10-01

    A general computer code, developed to calculate anelastic reflection-refraction coefficients, energy flow, and the physical characteristics for general P, S-I, and S-II waves, quantitatively describes physical characteristics for wave fields in anelastic media that do not exist in elastic media. Consideration of wave fields incident on boundaries between anelastic media shows that scattered wave fields experience reductions in phase and energy speeds, increases in maximum attenuation and Q-1, and directions of maximum energy flow distinct from phase propagation. Each of these changes in physical characteristics are shown to vary with angle of incidence. Finite relaxation times for anelastic media result in energy flow due to interaction of superimposed radiation fields and contribute to energy flow across anelastic boundaries for all angles of incidence. Agreement of theoretical and numerical results with laboratory measurements argues for the validity of the theoretical and numerical formulations incorporating inhomogeneous wave fields. The agreement attests to the applicability of the model and helps confirm the existence of inhomogeneous body waves and their associated set of distinct physical characteristics in the earth. The existence of such body waves in layered, low-loss anelastic solids implies the need to reformulate some seismological models of the earth. The exact anelastic formulation for a liquid-solid interface with no low-loss approximations predicts the existence of a range of angles of incidence or an anelastic Rayleigh window, through which significant amounts of energy are transmitted across the boundary. The window accounts for the discrepancy apparent between measured reflection data presented in early textbooks and predictions based on classical elasticity theory. Characteristics of the anelastic Rayleigh window are expected to be evident in certain sets of wide-angle, ocean-bottom reflection data and to be useful in estimating Q-1 for some

  6. Nanocrystalline solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiter, H.

    1991-01-01

    Nanocrystalline solids are polycrystals, the crystal size of which is a few (typically 1 to 10) nanometres so that 50% or more of the solid consists of incoherent interfaces between crystals of different orientations. Solids consisting primarily of internal interfaces represent a separate class of atomic structures because the atomic arrangement formed in the core of an interface is known to be an arrangement of minimum energy in the potential field of the two adjacent crystal lattices with different crystallographic orientations on either side of the boundary core. These boundary conditions result in atomic structures in the interfacial cores which cannot be formed elsewhere (e.g. in glasses or perfect crystals). Nanocrystalline solids are of interest for the following four reasons: (1) Nanocrystalline solids exhibit an atomic structure which differs from that of the two known solid states: the crystalline (with long-range order) and the glassy (with short-range order). (2) The properties of nanocrystalline solids differ (in some cases by several orders of magnitude) from those of glasses and/or crystals with the same chemical composition, which suggests that they may be utilized technologically in the future. (3) Nanocrystalline solids seem to permit the alloying of conventionally immiscible components. (4) If small (1 to 10 nm diameter) solid droplets with a glassy structure are consolidated (instead of small crystals), a new type of glass, called nanoglass, is obtained. Such glasses seem to differ structurally from conventional glasses. (orig.)

  7. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  8. Part I. Analyzing the distribution of gas law questions in chemistry textbooks. Part II. Chlorine-35 NQR spectra of group 1 and silver dichloromethanesulfonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Gabriel

    Part I. Two studies involving the gas law questions in eight high school and Advanced Placement/college chemistry textbooks were performed using loglinear analysis to look for associations among six variables. These variables included Bloom's Taxonomy (higher-order, lower-order), Book Type (high school, college), Question Format (multiple-choice, problem, short answer), Question Placement (in-chapter, end-of-chapter, test bank), Representation (macroscopic, microscopic, symbolic), and Arkansas Science Standard (conceptual, mathematical; gas laws, pressure conversion, stoichiometry). The first study, involving the conceptual gas law questions, found the Book Type and Question Placement variables had the biggest impact, each appearing in 5 of the 11 significant associations. The second study, involving the mathematical gas law questions, found the Question Placement had the biggest impact, appearing in 7 of the 11 significant associations, followed by Book Type and the Arkansas Science Standard variables, which appeared in 5 of the 11 significant associations. These studies showed that compared to the high school books, college books have fewer multiple-choice questions (compared to short-answer and problem questions), fewer in-chapter questions (compared to end-of-chapter and test bank questions), fewer questions in the chapters and more questions at the end of the chapters and fewer multiple-choice questions in and at the end of the books and more multiple-choice questions in the test banks. Part II. The dichloromethanesulfonate salts of several +1 charged cations, M+Cl2CHSO3 - (M = Li, Na, K, Rb Ag, Cs Tl) were synthesized and studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Dichloromethanesulfonic acid was prepared by the methanolysis of dichloromethanesulfonyl chloride, which was neutralized with the metal carbonates to produce the corresponding metal dichloromethanesulfonate salts. This study completed the NQR investigation of the family of chloroacetates

  9. Syntheses, X-ray structures, solid state high-field electron paramagnetic resonance, and density-functional theory investigations on chloro and aqua Mn(II) mononuclear complexes with amino-pyridine pentadentate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hureau, Christelle; Groni, Sihem; Guillot, Régis; Blondin, Geneviève; Duboc, Carole; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie

    2008-10-20

    The two pentadentate amino-pyridine ligands L5(2) and L5(3) (L5(2) and L5(3) stand for the N-methyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine and the N-methyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)propane-1,3-diamine, respectively) were used to synthesize four mononuclear Mn(II) complexes, namely [(L5(2))MnCl](PF6) (1(PF6)), [(L5(3))MnCl](PF6) (2(PF6)), [(L5(2))Mn(OH2)](BPh4)2 (3(BPh4)2), and [(L5(3))Mn(OH2)](BPh4)2 (4(BPh4)2). The X-ray diffraction studies revealed different configurations for the ligand L5(n) (n = 2, 3) depending on the sixth exogenous ligand and/or the counterion. Solid state high-field electron paramagnetic resonance spectra were recorded on complexes 1-4 as on previously described mononuclear Mn(II) systems with tetra- or hexadentate amino-pyridine ligands. Positive and negative axial zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters D were determined whose absolute values ranged from 0.090 to 0.180 cm(-1). Density-functional theory calculations were performed unraveling that, in contrast with chloro systems, the spin-spin and spin-orbit coupling contributions to the D-parameter are comparable for mixed N,O-coordination sphere complexes.

  10. Na/Ca Intermixing around Silicate and Phosphate Groups in Bioactive Phosphosilicate Glasses Revealed by Heteronuclear Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Renny; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias

    2015-04-30

    We characterize the intermixing of network-modifying Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions around the silicate (QSi(n)) and phosphate (QP(n)) tetrahedra in a series of 16 Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses, whose P content and silicate network connectivity were varied independently. The set includes both bioactive and bioinactive compositions and also encompasses two soda-lime-silicate members devoid of P, as well as two CaO–SiO2 glasses and one Na2O–SiO2–P2O5 glass. The various Si/P↔Na/Ca contacts were probed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations together with heteronuclear magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimentation utilizing (23)Na{(31)P} and (23)Na{(29)Si} REDOR, as well as (31)P{ (23)Na} and (29)Si{(23)Na} REAPDOR. We introduce an approach for quantifying the extent of Na(+)/Ca(2+) ordering around a given QP(n) or QSi(n) group, encoded by the preference factor 0⩽ PM ⩽ 1 conveying the relative weights of a random cation intermixing (PM = 0) and complete preference/ordering (PM = 1) for one of the species M, which represents either Na(+) or Ca(2+). The MD-derived preference factors reveal phosphate and silicate species surrounded by Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions intermixed nearly randomly (PM ≲ 0.15), except for the QSi(4) and QSi(1) groups, which manifest more significant cation ordering with preference for Na+ and Ca2+, respectively. The overall weak preferences are essentially independent of the Si and P contents of the glass, whereas PM primarily correlates with the total amount of network modifiers: as the latter is increased, the Na/Ca distribution around the {QP(0), QSi(1), QSi(2)} groups with preference for Ca2(+ )tend to randomize (i.e., PCa decreases), while the PNa-values grow slightly for the {QP(1), QSi(3), QSi(4)} species already preferring coordination of Na. The set of experimental preference factors {PCa} for the orthophosphate (QP(0)) groups extracted from (31)P{(23)Na} REAPDOR NMR-derived M2(P–Na) dipolar second moments agrees

  11. Solid State Studies Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1974-12-31

    Research is summarized on fuel, fertile, and cladding materials. Results of studies in the field of solid state sciences are also reported. It was found during the studies on the thermal diffusion release of /sup 133/Xe from irradiated thoria--urania powders that during prolonged annealing at high temperatures, there were several sudden burst releases of /sup 133/Xe as a function of time. These sudden bursts appear to be related to the particle size of the powders. Studies on the phase composition of U/sub 3/O/sub 8//su established that the phase obtained at room temperature after heating at 850 deg K is always oxygen deficient. Results of studies on the different modifications of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ indicated that the so-called delta-phase has a crystal structure almost identical with the beta-phase, yet there were differences in the heats of transition of each of these phases to the alpha-U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ phase at 130 deg C. Studies on fast neutron damage in stainless steel were initiated and results related to damage by void formation were obtained even when the fluencies were only moderately high. Studies on the phase transformations in solids brought out the unusual phase transition behavior of KNO/sub 3/. It was established that the phase transformation attributed to the orthorhombic (II) to the trigonal (I) transition at 129 deg C is essentially a 2-step transition. Results of differential scanning colorimeter (DSC) studies also revealed a peculiar feature which is as yet not understood, namely that on cooling, differential thermal analysis (DTA) showed a III to II phase transition; this is not seen in the DSC. The capabilities of the DSC technique to delineate temperatures of magnetic transitions were demonstrated by studying the transitions in a number of standard substances (metals, alloys, and compounds). In studies on KMnF/sub 3/, it was further demonstrated that the DSC technique is superior in measuring and detecting the heats of crystallographic and

  12. Solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The article drawn up within the framework of 'the assessment of the state of the environment in Lebanon' provides an overview of solid waste management, and assesses future wastes volume and waste disposal issues.In particular it addresses the following concerns: - Long term projections of solid waste arisings (i.e. domestic, industrial, such commercial wastes, vehicle types, construction waste, waste oils, hazardous toxic wastes and finally hospital and clinical wastes) are described. - Appropriate disposal routes, and strategies for reducing volumes for final disposal - Balance between municipal and industrial solid waste generation and disposal/treatment and - environmental impacts (aesthetics, human health, natural environment )of existing dumps, and the potential impact of government plans for construction of solid waste facilities). Possible policies for institutional reform within the waste management sector are proposed. Tables provides estimations of generation rates and distribution of wastes in different regions of Lebanon. Laws related to solid waste management are summarized

  13. Lineage II (Serovar 1/2a and 1/2c) Human Listeria monocytogenes Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Types Divided into PFGE Groups Using the Band Patterns Below 145.5 kb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valladares, Gloria; Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise; Goering, Richard V; Tham, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Among 504 clinical lineage II isolates of Listeria monocytogenes isolated during 1958-2010 in Sweden, 119 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types (AscI) have been identified based on the number and distribution of all banding patterns in each DNA profile. In this study, these types were further divided into PFGE groups based on the configuration of small bands with sizes kb. The 504 isolates included 483 serovar 1/2a isolates distributed into 114 PFGE types and 21 serovar 1/2c isolates distributed into 9 PFGE types; these were further divided into 21 PFGE groups. PFGE group, that is, configuration of small bands below 145.5 kb, and serovars were correlated. L. monocytogenes isolates belonging to PFGE groups A, B, C, E, F, H, K, L, M, S, V, W, Y, and Ö-6 to Ö-12 shared serovar 1/2a, with one exception. PFGE group E also included two PFGE types sharing serovar 1/2c and four PFGE types belonging to either serovar 1/2a or 1/2c. Isolates belonging to PFGE group N shared serovar 1/2c. In contrast to lineage I isolates, small fragments kb were visible in all L. monocytogenes isolates belonging to lineage II. In the results from both the present and previous studies, the genomic region of small bands was genetically more conservative than in large bands. The distribution of these small bands established the relatedness of strains and defined a genetic marker for both lineages I and II, while also establishing their serogroup. The division of L. monocytogenes PFGE types into PFGE groups is advantageous as the profile of every new isolate can be identified easily and quickly through first studying the PFGE group affiliation of the isolate based on the smaller band patterns kb, and then identifying the PFGE type based on the band patterns >145.5 kb.

  14. Exploration and exploitation of homologous series of bis(acrylamidoalkanes containing pyridyl and phenyl groups: β-sheet versus two-dimensional layers in solid-state photochemical [2 + 2] reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Garai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The homologous series of phenyl and pyridyl substituted bis(acrylamidoalkanes have been synthesized with the aim of systematic analysis of their crystal structures and their solid-state [2 + 2] reactivities. The changes in the crystal structures with respect to a small change in the molecular structure, that is by varying alkyl spacers between acrylamides and/or by varying the end groups (phenyl, 2-pyridyl, 3-pyridyl, 4-pyridyl on the C-terminal of the amide, were analyzed in terms of hydrogen-bonding interference (N—H...Npy versus N—H...O=C and network geometries. In this series, a greater tendency towards the formation of N—H...O hydrogen bonds (β-sheets and two-dimensional networks over N—H...N hydrogen bonds was observed. Among all the structures seven structures were found to have the required alignments of double bonds for the [2 + 2] reaction such that the formations of single dimer, double dimer and polymer are facilitated. However, only four structures were found to exhibit such a solid-state [2 + 2] reaction to form a single dimer and polymers. The two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding layer via N—H...O hydrogen bonds was found to promote solid-state [2 + 2] photo-polymerization in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal manner. Such two-dimensional layers were encountered only when the spacer between acryl amide moieties is butyl. Only four out of the 16 derivatives were found to form hydrates, two each from 2-pyridyl and 4-pyridyl derivatives. The water molecules in these structures govern the hydrogen-bonding networks by the formation of an octameric water cluster and one-dimensional zigzag water chains. The trends in the melting points and densities were also analyzed.

  15. Filamentation and light bullet formation dynamics in solid-state dielectric media with weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gražulevičiūtė, I; Garejev, N; Majus, D; Tamošauskas, G; A Dubietis; Jukna, V

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of measurements, which characterize filamentation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses in the space–time domain, as captured by means of three-dimensional imaging technique in sapphire and fused silica, in the wavelength range of 1.45–2.25 μm, accessing the regimes of weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD). In the regime of weak anomalous GVD (at 1.45 μm), pulse splitting into two sub-pulses producing a pair of light bullets with spectrally shifted carrier frequencies in both nonlinear media is observed. In contrast, in the regimes of moderate (at 1.8 μm) and strong (at 2.25 μm) anomalous GVD we observe notably different transient dynamics, which however lead to the formation of a single self-compressed quasistationary light bullet with an universal spatiotemporal shape comprised of an extended ring-shaped periphery and a localized intense core that carries the self-compressed pulse. (paper)

  16. Filamentation and light bullet formation dynamics in solid-state dielectric media with weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gražulevičiūtė, I.; Garejev, N.; Majus, D.; Jukna, V.; Tamošauskas, G.; Dubietis, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a series of measurements, which characterize filamentation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses in the space-time domain, as captured by means of three-dimensional imaging technique in sapphire and fused silica, in the wavelength range of 1.45-2.25 μm, accessing the regimes of weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD). In the regime of weak anomalous GVD (at 1.45 μm), pulse splitting into two sub-pulses producing a pair of light bullets with spectrally shifted carrier frequencies in both nonlinear media is observed. In contrast, in the regimes of moderate (at 1.8 μm) and strong (at 2.25 μm) anomalous GVD we observe notably different transient dynamics, which however lead to the formation of a single self-compressed quasistationary light bullet with an universal spatiotemporal shape comprised of an extended ring-shaped periphery and a localized intense core that carries the self-compressed pulse.

  17. Quantum technologies for solid state physics using cold trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler

    2014-01-01

    The quantum states of ions are perfectly controlled, and may be used for fundamental research in quantum physics, as highlighted by the Nobel Prize given to Dave Wineland in 2012. Two directions of quantum technologies, followed by the Mainz group, have high impact on solid state physics: I) The delivery of single cold ions on demand for the deterministic doping of solid state materials with nm spatial precision to generate design-structures optimized for quantum processors. II) The simulation of solid state relevant Hamiltonians with AMO systems of one or two dimensional arrays of trapped ions. I will talk about the recent progress in both fields. http://www.quantenbit.de/#Number Sign#/publications/(author)

  18. Irinotecan in patients with relapsed or cisplatin-refractory germ cell cancer: a phase II study of the German Testicular Cancer Study Group

    OpenAIRE

    Kollmannsberger, C; Rick, O; Klaproth, H; Kubin, T; Sayer, H G; Hentrich, M; Welslau, M; Mayer, F; Kuczyk, M; Spott, C; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2002-01-01

    Despite generally high cure rates in patients with metastatic germ cell cancer, patients with progressive disease on first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy or with relapsed disease following high-dose salvage therapy exhibit a very poor prognosis. Irinotecan has shown antitumour activity in human testicular tumour xenografts in nude mice. We have performed a phase II study examining the single agent activity of irinotecan in patients with metastatic relapsed or cisplatin-refractory germ cell...

  19. U-Pb (SHRIMP II) Age of zircons from ash tuffs of the upper vendian Chernyi Kamen formation (Sylvitsa group, Middle Urals)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronkin, Yu.L.; Grazhdankin, D.V.; Maslov, A.V.; Mizens, G.A.; Matukov, D.I.; Krupenin, M.T.; Petrov, G.A.; Lepikhina, O.P.; Kornilova, A.Yu.

    2006-01-01

    To make more precise the model of correlation of the Middle Urals western slope upper vendian layers with the White Sea remote layers one carried out the SHRIMP-II procedure base U-Pb-dating of the volcanogenic zircons from the ash tuffs and of the volcanogenic zircon enclosing argillites of the Middle Urals Chernyi Kamen formation. The obtained age value of the studied zircons equal to 557+-13 million years is in line with the geological data [ru

  20. Comparison of the performance of different modified graphene oxide nanosheets for the extraction of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from natural samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayar, Omid; Mehrani, Kheirollah; Mehrani, Azadeh; Hoseinzadeh, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanosheets were modified with amino groups and the resulting material was used as a sorbent for the extraction of cadmium and lead ions. The nanosheets were characterized by IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and elemental analysis. The effects of sample pH, eluent parameters (type, concentration and volume of eluent), flow rates (of both sample and eluent), and of a variety of other ions on the efficiency of the extraction of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were optimized. Following solid phase extraction, the elements were determined by FAAS. The limits of detection are <0.9 μg L −1 for Pb(II) and <5 ng L −1 for Cd(II). The relative standard deviations are <2.2 %. The method was validated by analyzing several certified reference materials and was then used for Pb(II) and Cd(II) determination in natural waters and vegetables. (author)

  1. Effect of pre-pyrolysis mode on simultaneous introduction of nitrogen/oxygen-containing functional groups into the structure of bagasse-based mesoporous carbon and its influence on Cu(II) adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zeqing; Li, Kunquan

    2018-03-01

    A convenient effective microwave pre-pyrolysis treatment to synthesize biomass-based mesoporous carbon with higher nitrogen/oxygen-chelating adsorption for Cu(II) is reported here, in which phosphoric acid impregnated bagasse was used as a microwave absorber and porogen. For comparison, conventional electric-heating pyrolyzed carbon was prepared and doped with nitrogen/oxygen groups. Nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and batch adsorption were employed to investigate the effects of the two pre-pyrolysis modes on the sample physicochemical and Cu(II) adsorptive properties. The 22-min-microwave-pyrolyzed bagasse mesoporous activated carbon (MBAC, 85.32% mesoporosity) contained 10.52% O, which is 3.94% more than electric-heating pyrolyzed mesoporous activated carbon (89.52% mesoporosity). After electrophilic aromatic substitutions of N/O doping, the former possessed more N (5.83%) and more O (21.40%), confirming that time-saving energy-efficient microwave pyrolysis favors the formation of defective C/O atoms in or at the edges of the graphite layer of MBAC, which are highly active and tend to act as preferred reactive positions for the doping of N/O-containing groups simultaneously compared with conventional electric-heating pyrolysis. These N and O species existed mainly as COOH, OH, NH and NH 2 functional groups, and were confirmed by XPS to be active sites for metal binding via electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding, a chelate effect and complexation, resulting in the great enhancement of Cu(II) adsorption. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic fitting further proved that Cu(II) adsorption by N/O-doped MBAC is ascribed mainly to chemisorption. Therefore, rapid microwave pre-pyrolysis provides a promising route to prepare excellent-performance N/O-doped carbon adsorbents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Capillary gas chromatography of alkylbenzenes II. Correlations between the structures and methylene group increments and differences in retention indices of isomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sojak, L.; Janak, J.; Rijks, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The contribution to gas chromatographic retention behaviour of methylene group increments and differences in the retention indices (dI) of isomers of alkylbenzenes up to C16 on squalane and acetyltri-n-butyl citrate was studied. The methylene group increments appear to vary over a wide range (60–100

  3. Temozolomide in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer with and without brain metastases. a phase II study of the EORTC Lung Cancer Group (08965).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziadziuszko, R; Ardizzoni, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Smit, E.F.; Price, A; Debruyne, C.; Legrand, C; Giaccone, G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the activity of single-agent temozolomide in two groups of chemotherapy-naive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, with (12 patients) and without (13 patients) brain metastases (BM). Patients in both groups were treated with temozolomide 200 mg/m(2)/day,

  4. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  5. Decontamination of alpha-bearing solid wastes and plutonium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehly, G.; Madic, C.; Lecomte, M.; Bourges, J.; Saulze, J.L.; Broudic, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear activities in the Radiochemistry building of Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Center concern principally the study of fuel reprocessing and the production of transuranium isotopes. During these activities solid wastes are produced. In order to improve the management of these wastes, it has been decided to build new facilities: a group of three glove-boxes named ELISE for the treatment of α active solid waste and a hot-cell, PROLIXE, for the treatment of solid wastes. Leaching processes were developed in order to: decontaminate these wastes and recover actinide elements, particularly the highly valuable plutonium, from the leachates. The processes developed are sufficiently flexible to be able to accommodate solid wastes produced in other facilities. Laboratory studies were conducted to develop the leaching process based on the use of electrogenerated Ag(II) species which is particularly suitable to provoke the dissolution of PuO 2 . Successful exhaustive Pu decontaminations with DF(Pu) higher than 10 4 were achieved for the first time during the treatment of stainless steel PuO 2 cans (future MELOX plant) by electrogenerated Ag (II) in nitric acid medium

  6. Space groups for solid state scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Glazer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensively revised - essentially rewritten - new edition of the 1990 edition (described as ""extremely useful"" by MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS and as ""understandable and comprehensive"" by Scitech) guides readers through the dense array of mathematical information in the International Tables Volume A. Thus, most scientists seeking to understand a crystal structure publication can do this from this book without necessarily having to consult the International Tables themselves. This remains the only book aimed at non-crystallographers devoted to teaching them about crystallogr

  7. Algebra II workbook for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Sterling, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    To succeed in Algebra II, start practicing now Algebra II builds on your Algebra I skills to prepare you for trigonometry, calculus, and a of myriad STEM topics. Working through practice problems helps students better ingest and retain lesson content, creating a solid foundation to build on for future success. Algebra II Workbook For Dummies, 2nd Edition helps you learn Algebra II by doing Algebra II. Author and math professor Mary Jane Sterling walks you through the entire course, showing you how to approach and solve the problems you encounter in class. You'll begin by refreshing your Algebr

  8. Solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed

    1993-06-15

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group : determination of selected herbicides and their degradation products in water using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, J.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Scribner, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for the extraction and analysis of eight herbicides and five degradation products using solid-phase extraction from natural water samples followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is presented in this report. This method was developed for dimethenamid; flufenacet; fluometuron and its degradation products, demethylfluometuron (DMFM), 3-(trifluromethyl)phenylurea (TFMPU), 3-(trifluromethyl)-aniline (TFMA); molinate; norflurazon and its degradation product, demethylnorflurazon; pendamethalin; the degradation product of prometryn, deisopropylprometryn; propanil; and trifluralin. The eight herbicides are used primarily in the southern United States where cotton, rice, and soybeans are produced. The exceptions are dimethenamid and flufenacet, which are used on corn in the Midwest. Water samples received by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas, are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then passed through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica (C-18) to extract the compounds. The herbicides and their degradation products are removed from the column by ethyl acetate elution. The eluate is evaporated under nitrogen, and components then are separated, identified, and quantified by injecting an aliquot of the concentrated extract into a high-resolution, fused-silica capillary column of a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer under selected-ion mode. Method detection limits ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ?g/L for all compounds with the exception of TFMPU, which has a method detection limit of 0.32 ?g/L. The mean absolute recovery is 107 percent. This method for the determination of herbicides and their degradation products is valuable for acquiring information about water quality and compound fate and transport in water.

  10. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  11. Exatecan in pretreated adult patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: results of a phase II--study of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichardt, P; Nielsen, Ole Steen; Bauer, S

    2007-01-01

    No standard treatment is established for patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma after previous chemotherapy with anthracyclines and ifosfamide, given either in combination or sequentially. Exatecan (DX-8951f) is a totally synthetic analogue of the topoisomerase I-inhibitor camptothecin, which...... was synthesised to impart increased aqueous solubility, greater tumour efficacy, and less toxicity than camptothecin itself, topotecan or irinotecan. Since some activity against soft tissue sarcomas, especially leiomyosarcomas, has been reported for topoisomerase I-inhibitors, a study with a new and more potent...... agent seemed justified. We report on a prospective multicentre phase II study of Exatecan in adult soft tissue sarcomas failing 1 or 2 lines of chemotherapy in advanced phase, performed within the STBSG of EORTC. Thirty-nine patients (16 leiomyosarcomas and 23 other histologies) were included in two...

  12. The Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic Survey (SIMES). II. Enhanced Nuclear Accretion Rate in Galaxy Groups at z ∼ 0.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, I.; Rodighiero, G.; Teplitz, H. I.; Scarlata, C. M.; Franceschini, A.; Berta, S.; Barrufet, L.; Vaccari, M.; Bonato, M.; Ciesla, L.; Zanella, A.; Carraro, R.; Mancini, C.; Puglisi, A.; Malkan, M.; Mei, S.; Marchetti, L.; Colbert, J.; Sedgwick, C.; Serjeant, S.; Pearson, C.; Radovich, M.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Covone, G.

    2018-04-01

    For a sample of star-forming galaxies in the redshift interval 0.15 < z < 0.3, we study how both the relative strength of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) infrared emission, compared to that due to the star formation (SF), and the numerical fraction of AGNs change as a function of the total stellar mass of the hosting galaxy group ({M}group}* ) between 1010.25 and 1011.9 M ⊙. Using a multicomponent spectral energy distribution SED fitting analysis, we separate the contribution of stars, AGN torus, and star formation to the total emission at different wavelengths. This technique is applied to a new multiwavelength data set in the SIMES field (23 not-redundant photometric bands), spanning the wavelength range from the UV (GALEX) to the far-IR (Herschel) and including crucial AKARI and WISE mid-IR observations (4.5 μm < λ < 24 μm), where the black hole thermal emission is stronger. This new photometric catalog, which includes our best photo-z estimates, is released through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). Groups are identified through a friends-of-friends algorithm (∼62% purity, ∼51% completeness). We identified a total of 45 galaxies requiring an AGN emission component, 35 of which are in groups and 10 in the field. We find the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) ∝ ({M}group}* {)}1.21+/- 0.27 and (BHAR/SFR) ∝ ({M}group}* {)}1.04+/- 0.24, while, in the same range of {M}group}* , we do not observe any sensible change in the numerical fraction of AGNs. Our results indicate that the nuclear activity (i.e., the BHAR and the BHAR/SFR ratio) is enhanced when galaxies are located in more massive and richer groups.

  13. Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved Using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource-Constrained Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Henry; Morrow, Melanie; Davis, Thomas; Borger, Sarah; Weiss, Jennifer; DeCoster, Mary; Ricca, Jim; Ernst, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The Care Group approach, described in detail in a companion paper in this journal, uses volunteers to convey health promotion messages to their neighbors. This article summarizes the available evidence on the effectiveness of the Care Group approach, drawing on articles published in the peer-reviewed literature as well as data from unpublished but publicly available project evaluations and summary analyses of these evaluations. When implemented by strong international NGOs with adequate fundi...

  14. Sorption Mechanisms of Cesium on Cu II2Fe II(CN) 6and Cu II3[Fe III(CN) 6] 2Hexacyanoferrates and Their Relation to the Crystalline Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrault, S.; Jimenez, B.; Garnier, E.; Fedoroff, M.; Jones, D. J.; Loos-Neskovic, C.

    1998-12-01

    CuII2FeII(CN)6·xH2O and CuII3[FeIII(CN)6]2·xH2O can be prepared with reproducible chemical compositions and structures after careful washing. They have cubicFmoverline3mstructures with iron vacancies. In CuII2FeII(CN)6, copper occupies two different sites: Cu1 in position 4blinked to Fe through the CN groups, and Cu2 not linked to the CN groups and partially occupying the interstitial 24epositions. The second type of site is not present in CuII3[FeIII(CN)6]2. Sorption kinetics and isotherms were determined for cesium on both hexacyanoferrates by batch experiments. On CuII3[FeIII(CN)6]2, the maximum uptake is only 0.073 Cs/Fe (at./at.). On CuII2FeII(CN)6, the uptake reaches 1.5 Cs/Fe. The sorption kinetics include at least two steps: at1/2variation until approximately 72 h and then a slow evolution studied up to 6 months. The sorption mechanism is complex. The main process seems to be diffusion of ion pairs, followed by a reorganization of the solid, resulting in one or more new solid phases. The presence of the Cu2 site seems to play a favorable role in the sorption. Owing to its good midterm stability and the first rapid step of exchange, CuII2FeII(CN)6·xH2O seems to be one of the most promising compounds for the recovery of cesium from nuclear liquid wastes.

  15. Seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid and the associated brain damage are prevented by group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mares, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-04-01

    The present study has examined the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC) in the model of seizures induced in immature 12-day-old rats by bilateral intracerebroventricular infusion of dl-homocysteic acid (DL-HCA, 600 nmol/side). For biochemical analyses, rat pups were sacrificed during generalized clonic-tonic seizures, approximately 45-50 min after infusion. Comparable time intervals were used for sacrificing the pups which had received 2R,4R-APDC. Low doses of 2R,4R-APDC (0.05 nmol/side) provided a pronounced anticonvulsant effect which was abolished by pretreatment with a selective group II mGluR antagonist LY341495. Generalized clonic-tonic seizures were completely suppressed and cortical energy metabolite changes which normally accompany these seizures were either normalized (decrease of glucose and glycogen) or markedly reduced (an accumulation of lactate). EEG recordings support the marked anticonvulsant effect of 2R,4R-APDC, nevertheless, this was only partial. In spite of the absence of obvious motor phenomena, isolated spikes or even short periods of partial ictal activity could be observed. Isolated spikes could also be seen in some animals after application of 2R,4R-APDC alone, reflecting most likely subclinical proconvulsant activity of this agonist. The neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-APDC was evaluated after 24 h and 6 days of survival following DL-HCA-induced seizures. Massive neuronal degeneration, as revealed by Fluoro-Jade B staining, was observed in a number of brain regions following infusion of DL-HCA alone (seizure group), whereas 2R,4R-APDC pretreatment provided substantial neuroprotection. The present findings support the possibility that group II mGluRs are a promising target for a novel approach to treating epilepsy.

  16. The electronic structures of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, B R

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Structures of Solids aims to provide students of solid state physics with the essential concepts they will need in considering properties of solids that depend on their electronic structures and idea of the electronic character of particular materials and groups of materials. The book first discusses the electronic structure of atoms, including hydrogen atom and many-electron atom. The text also underscores bonding between atoms and electrons in metals. Discussions focus on bonding energies and structures in the solid elements, eigenstates of free-electron gas, and electrical co

  17. Removal of Cu (II and Zn (II from water with natural adsorbents from cassava agroindustry residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schwantes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current study employs solid residues from the processing industry of the cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz (bark, bagasse and bark + bagasse as natural adsorbents for the removal of metal ions Cu(II and Zn(II from contaminated water. The first stage comprised surface morphological characterization (SEM, determination of functional groups (IR, point of zero charge and the composition of naturally existent minerals in the biomass. Further, tests were carried out to evaluate the sorption process by kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies. The adsorbents showed a surface with favorable adsorption characteristics, with adsorption sites possibly derived from lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. The dynamic equilibrium time for adsorption was 60 min. Results followed pseudo-second-order, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich models, suggesting a chemisorption monolayer. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the biosorption process of Cu and Zn was endothermic, spontaneous or independent according to conditions. Results showed that the studied materials were potential biosorbents in the decontamination of water contaminated by Cu(II and Zn(II. Thus, the above practice complements the final stages of the cassava production chain of cassava, with a new disposal of solid residues from the cassava agroindustry activity.

  18. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 6: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    President Clinton directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary directed the Department of Energy to develop options and plans for the interim safe storage of these materials. One step in this direction is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of DOE facilities by a open-quotes Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group.close quotes In this effort, the working group developed a Project Plan and an Assessment Plan which basically laid out the approach and methodology for the assessments. The plans were issued on April 25, 1994. The Project Plan specifies a WGAT for each site with significant holdings of plutonium. Also, the plan requires that each site form a Site Assessment Team (SAT) to provide the self assessment for the project. Additionally, the working group was tasked with managing the assessments at each site, and providing the results in a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994

  19. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII): Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII) and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII) is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative) selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII. Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00) programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00). Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3). A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (π) with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative) selection, geographical clustering of haplotypes

  20. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII: Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Yik Fong

    Full Text Available Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII.Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00 programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00. Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3.A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd and nucleotide diversity (π with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative selection, geographical clustering of

  1. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  2. Large-scale parallel configuration interaction. II. Two- and four-component double-group general active space implementation with application to BiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Fleig, Timo

    2010-01-01

    We present a parallel implementation of a large-scale relativistic double-group configuration interaction CIprogram. It is applicable with a large variety of two- and four-component Hamiltonians. The parallel algorithm is based on a distributed data model in combination with a static load balanci...

  3. Pan-enteric dysmotility, impaired quality of life and alexithymia in a large group of patients meeting ROME II criteria for irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Portincasa, Piero; Moschetta, Antonio; Baldassarre, Giuseppe; Altomare, Donato F.; Palasciano, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Psychological factors, altered motility and sensation disorders of the intestine can be variably associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Such aspects have not been investigated simultaneously. The aim of this paper was to evaluate gastrointestinal motility and symptoms, psychological spectrum and quality of life in a large group of IBS patients in southern Italy.

  4. A phase II study of sunitinib in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian and primary peritoneal carcinoma: an NCIC Clinical Trials Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, J J; Oza, A M; Chalchal, H I; Grimshaw, R; Ellard, S L; Lee, U; Hirte, H; Sederias, J; Ivy, S P; Eisenhauer, E A

    2011-02-01

    Sunitinib is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We conducted a two-stage phase II study to evaluate the objective response rate of oral sunitinib in recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Eligibility required measurable disease and one or two prior chemotherapies, at least one platinum based. Platinum-sensitive or -resistant disease was allowed. Initial dose schedule was sunitinib 50 mg daily, 4 of 6 weeks. Observation of fluid accumulations during off-treatment periods resulted in adoption of continuous 37.5 mg daily dosing in the second stage of accrual. Of 30 eligible patients, most had serous histology (67%), were platinum sensitive (73%) and had two prior chemotherapies (60%). One partial response (3.3%) and three CA125 responses (10%) were observed, all in platinum-sensitive patients using intermittent dosing. Sixteen (53%) had stable disease. Five had >30% decrease in measurable disease. Overall median progression-free survival was 4.1 months. Common adverse events included fatigue, gastrointestinal symptoms, hand-foot syndrome and hypertension. No gastrointestinal perforation occurred. Single-agent sunitinib has modest activity in recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, but only at the 50 mg intermittent dose schedule, suggesting that dose and schedule may be vital considerations in further evaluation of sunitinib in this cancer setting.

  5. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part II: 2-Methylfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed. PMID:24518895

  6. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part II: 2-Methylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed.

  7. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip = 2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5 ± 1.4) × 105 M-1 in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  8. The Staphylococcus aureus group II biotin protein ligase BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and requires the DNA binding domain for full enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Sarah K; Cronan, John E

    2016-11-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that functions in transcriptional regulation of the genes of biotin biosynthesis and transport. The Staphylococcus aureus Group II BPL which is called BirA has been reported to bind an imperfect inverted repeat located upstream of the biotin synthesis operon. DNA binding by other Group II BPLs requires dimerization of the protein which is triggered by synthesis of biotinoyl-AMP (biotinoyl-adenylate), the intermediate in the ligation of biotin to its cognate target proteins. However, the S. aureus BirA was reported to dimerize and bind DNA in the absence of biotin or biotinoyl-AMP (Soares da Costa et al. (2014) Mol Microbiol 91: 110-120). These in vitro results argued that the protein would be unable to respond to the levels of biotin or acceptor proteins and thus would lack the regulatory properties of the other characterized BirA proteins. We tested the regulatory function of the protein using an in vivo model system and examined its DNA binding properties in vitro using electrophoretic mobility shift and fluorescence anisotropy analyses. We report that the S. aureus BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and that the prior data can be attributed to artifacts of mobility shift analyses. We also report that deletion of the DNA binding domain of the S. aureus BirA results in loss of virtually all of its ligation activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Part 5: Argonne National Laboratory - west working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Based on the site visit and walkdowns, the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) considers the Site Assessment Team (SAT) report and question sets to be a factual assessment of the facilities. As a result of the Site and WGAT's reviews, six vulnerabilities were identified for further consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group preparing the final report. All six vulnerabilities were discussed among the respective site teams members and facility experts and agreement was reached. The vulnerabilities by facility identified by the SAT and WGAT are described below. No ranking or priority is implied by the order in which they are listed. In addition the WGAT identified and included issues for the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) and DOE line management organizations that are not explicit Environment Safety ampersand Health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities

  10. Aggressiveness between genetic groups I and II of isolates of Cercospora zeae-maydis Agressividade entre isolados dos grupos genéticos I e II de Cercospora zeae-maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Marisa Mathioni; Carvalho; Kátia Regiane Brunelli; André Beló; Luis Eduardo Aranha Camargo

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the gray leaf spot disease (GLS) caused by the fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis Tehon & Daniels, was not considered an important pathogen of maize (Zea mays, L.) in Brazil. However, the recent adoption of agronomical practices such as no-tillage and cultivation under central pivot irrigation systems increased the incidence and severity to the extent that GLS is now one of the most important diseases of maize. Isolates of C. zeae-maydis can be distinguished by two genetic groups (...

  11. Outcome of Children With Metastatic Medulloblastoma Treated With Carboplatin During Craniospinal Radiotherapy: A Children's Oncology Group Phase I/II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakacki, Regina I.; Burger, Peter C.; Zhou, Tianni; Holmes, Emiko J.; Kocak, Mehmet; Onar, Arzu; Goldwein, Joel; Mehta, Minesh; Packer, Roger J.; Tarbell, Nancy; Fitz, Charles; Vezina, Gilbert; Hilden, Joanne; Pollack, Ian F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the feasibility of administering carboplatin as a radiosensitizer during craniospinal radiation therapy (CSRT) to patients with high-risk medulloblastomas (MBs) and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and we report the outcome in the subset with metastatic (M+) MB. Patients and Methods After surgery, patients received 36 Gy CSRT with boosts to sites of disease. During radiation, patients received 15 to 30 doses of carboplatin (30-45 mg/m2/dose), along with vincristine (VCR) once per week for 6 weeks. Patients on regimen A received 6 months of maintenance chemotherapy (MC) with cyclophosphamide and VCR. Once the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of carboplatin was determined, cisplatin was added to the MC (regimen B). Results In all, 161 eligible patients (median age, 8.7 years; range, 3.1 to 21.6 years) were enrolled. Myelosuppression was dose limiting and 35 mg/m2/dose × 30 was determined to be the RP2D of carboplatin. Twenty-nine (36%) of 81 patients with M+ MB had diffuse anaplasia. Four patients were taken off study within 11 months of completing radiotherapy for presumed metastatic progression and are long-term survivors following palliative chemotherapy. Excluding these four patients, 5-year overall survival ± SE and progression-free survival ± SE for M+ patients treated at the RP2D on regimen A was 82% ± 9% and 71% ± 11% versus 68% ± 10% and 59% ± 10% on regimen B (P = .36). There was no difference in survival by M stage. Anaplasia was a negative predictor of outcome. Conclusion The use of carboplatin as a radiosensitizer is a promising strategy for patients with M+ MB. Early progression should be confirmed by biopsy. PMID:22665539

  12. Cetuximab as second-line therapy in patients with metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma: A phase II Southwest Oncology Group Study (S0415)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Philip J.; Goldman, Bryan; Iqbal, Syma; Leichman, Lawrence P.; Zhang, Wu; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Blanke, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal adenocarcinomas commonly express the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). This trial assessed the six month overall survival probability in metastatic esophageal cancer patients treated with cetuximab as second line therapy. Methods This was a multicenter, open-label phase II study of single agent cetuximab for metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma patients who failed one prior chemotherapy regimen. Adequate organ function and Zubrod performance status of 0-2 were required. Patients received cetuximab 400mg/m2 IV on week one, and 250 mg/m2 IV weekly thereafter. The primary objective was to determine 6 month overall survival. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, response rate, and toxicity. Tumor tissue was collected for correlative studies. Results Sixty-three patients were registered, with 8 ineligible or never treated. Fifty-five eligible patients (male=49, female=6; median age=61.2 years [range 30.7-88.5]) were enrolled. Twenty patients survived > 6 months for a 6-month overall survival rate of 36% (95% CI: 24%, 50%). The median overall survival was 4.0 months (95% CI: 3.2, 5.9). Median progression-free survival was 1.8 months (95% CI: 1.7, 1.9). One partial response and 2 unconfirmed partial responses were observed. Two patients experienced grade 4 fatigue. There was one treatment-related death due to pneumonitis. Germline polymorphisms of EGFR, EGF, IL-8, COX-2, VEGF, CCND1, NRP1 and Kras mutational status were not associated with response or survival. Conclusions The 6-month overall survival rate of 36% observed on this study failed to meet the primary survival objective. Thus, cetuximab alone cannot be recommended in the second-line treatment of metastatic esophageal cancer. PMID:20631636

  13. Vorinostat in refractory soft tissue sarcomas - Results of a multi-centre phase II trial of the German Soft Tissue Sarcoma and Bone Tumour Working Group (AIO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas; Mayer-Steinacker, Regine; Mayer, Frank; Grünwald, Viktor; Schütte, Jochen; Hartmann, Jörg T; Kasper, Bernd; Hüsing, Johannes; Hajda, Jacek; Ottawa, Gregor; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Mikus, Gerd; Burhenne, Jürgen; Lehmann, Lorenz; Heilig, Christoph E; Ho, Anthony D; Egerer, Gerlinde

    2016-09-01

    New treatment options for patients with metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma are urgently needed. Preclinical studies suggested activity of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. A multi-centre, open-label, non-randomised phase II trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of vorinostat in patients with locally advanced or metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma failing 1st-line anthracycline-based chemotherapy was initiated. Patients were treated with vorinostat 400 mg po qd for 28 d followed by a treatment-free period of 7 d, representing a treatment cycle of 5 weeks. Restaging was performed every three cycles or at clinical progression. Between 06/10 and 09/13, 40 Soft Tissue Sarcoma patients were treated with vorinostat at seven participating centres. Patients had received 1 (n=8, 20%), 2 (n=10, 25%) or ≥3 (n=22, 55%) previous lines of chemotherapy. Best response after three cycles of treatment was stable disease (n=9, 23%). Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 3.2 and 12.3 months, respectively. Six patients showed long-lasting disease stabilisation for up to ten cycles. Statistical analyses failed to identify baseline predictive markers in this subgroup. Major toxicities (grade ≥III) included haematological toxicity (n=6, 15%) gastrointestinal disorders (n=5, 13%), fatigue (n=4, 10%), musculoskeletal pain (n=4, 10%), and pneumonia (n=2, 5%). In a heavily pre-treated patient population, objective response to vorinostat was low. However, a small subgroup of patients had long-lasting disease stabilisation. Further studies aiming to identify predictive markers for treatment response as well as exploration of combination regimens are warranted. NCT00918489 (ClinicalTrials.gov) EudraCT-number: 2008-008513-19. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor group II and III activators against MPP(+)-induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: the impact of cell differentiation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantas, D; Greda, A; Golda, S; Korostynski, M; Grygier, B; Roman, A; Pilc, A; Lason, W

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have documented that metabotropic glutamate receptors from group II and III (mGluR II/III) are a potential target in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, the neuroprotective effects of particular mGluR II/III subtypes in relation to PD pathology are recognized only partially. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various mGluR II/III activators in the in vitro model of PD using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line and mitochondrial neurotoxin MPP(+). We demonstrated that all tested mGluR ligands: mGluR II agonist - LY354740, mGluR III agonist - ACPT-I, mGluR4 PAM - VU0361737, mGluR8 agonist - (S)-3,4-DCPG, mGluR8 PAM - AZ12216052 and mGluR7 allosteric agonist - AMN082 were protective against MPP(+)-evoked cell damage in undifferentiated (UN-) SH-SY5Y cells with the highest neuroprotection mediated by mGluR8-specific agents. However, in retinoic acid- differentiated (RA-) SH-SY5Y cells we found protection mediated only by mGluR8 activators. We also demonstrated the cell proliferation stimulating effect for mGluR4 and mGluR8 PAMs. Next, we showed that the protection mediated by mGluR II/III activators in UN-SH-SY5Y was not accompanied by the modulation of caspase-3 activity, however, a decrease in the number of apoptotic nuclei was found. Finally, we showed that the inhibitor of necroptosis, necrostatin-1 blocked the mGluR III-mediated protection. Altogether our comparative in vitro data add a further proof to neuroprotective effects of mGluR agonists or PAMs and point to mGluR8 as a promising target for neuroprotective interventions in PD. The results also suggest the participation of necroptosis-related molecular pathways in neuroprotective effects of mGluR III activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 10: Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of March 15, 1994, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of the inventory of plutonium in storage. Plutonium in intact nuclear weapons and spent fuel were excluded from this study. The DOE Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project and Assessment Plans, will also manage the open-quote snap-shot close-quote assessments and produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The Project Plan and Assessment Plan to accomplish this study, and which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study, were issued on April 25, 1994

  16. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXVIII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of two copper(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with 1,2-diaminopropane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, Martin; Potočňák, Ivan; Dušek, Michal; Čižmár, Erik; Ozerov, Mykhaylo; Zvyagin, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Violet crystals of ([Cu(pn) 2 ] 2 [Pt(CN) 4 ])[Pt(CN) 4 ]·2H 2 O (1, pn=1,2-diaminopropane) and blue crystals of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n ·nH 2 O (2) were prepared under hydrothermal conditions and characterized using elemental analysis, IR and UV–vis spectroscopy and by X-ray crystal structure analysis. Different number of ν(C≡N) absorption bands of these two compounds reflects their different structures. An X-ray crystal structure analysis has shown that complex 1 is of ionic character and is formed from trinuclear [Cu(pn) 2 –Pt(CN) 4 –Cu(pn) 2 ] 2+ complex cation and discrete [Pt(CN) 4 ] 2– anion together with two molecules of crystal water. On the other hand, complex 2 is of polymeric character and is formed by 2D networks of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n composition and completed by n molecules of crystal water. Magnetic measurements show the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange interaction in complex 1 (Θ=–0.2 K), while the magnetic susceptibility of complex 2 is well described by the model of uniform S=1/2 spin chain with exchange interaction J/k B =–1.64 K. - Graphical abstract: Two complexes of different structural types from the system Cu(II) – 1,2–diaminopropane – [Pt(CN) 4 ] 2– have been isolated. These were characterized by IR and UV–VIS spectroscopy, X–ray crystal structure analysis together with the magnetic measurements. On one hand ([Cu(pn) 2 ] 2 [Pt(CN) 4 ])[Pt(CN) 4 ]∙2H 2 O is of ionic character and is formed from trinuclear complex cation and discrete anion together with two molecules of crystal water. On the other hand, [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n ∙nH 2 O is of polymeric character and is formed by 2D networks of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN) 4 ] n composition and completed by n molecules of crystal water. - Highlights: • Two complexes of different compositions from one system have been isolated. • First complex is of ionic character and second one is of polymeric character. • Polymeric complex described as a spin chain in contrast to

  17. Physical aspects of total-body irradiation at the Middlesex Hospital (UCL group of hospitals), London 1988 - 1993: II. In vivo planning and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planskoy, B.; Tapper, P. D.; Bedford, A. M.; Davis, F. M.

    1996-11-01

    Part II of this paper gives the results of applying the TBI methods described in part I, to in vivo patient planning and dosimetry. Patients are planned on nine CT based body slices, five of which pass through the lungs. Planned doses are verified with ten silicon diodes applied bi-laterally to five body sites, at each treatment. LiF TLDs are applied to seven other body sites at the first treatment only. For 84 patients and at least 1016 measurements per body site with the diodes, the mean measured total doses agreed with planned doses within at most 2% except at lung levels, where the mean measured dose was 3% too low. Standard deviations of the measurements about the mean were between 2.4 and 3.1%. For the LiF TLDs, the mean measured doses for all seven body sites were within of planned doses. A separate assessment of measured entrance and transmitted doses showed that the former agreed well with planned doses, but that the latter tended to be low, especially over the lungs, and that they had a wider dispersion. Possible reasons for this are discussed. These results show measurement uncertainties similar to those for non-TBI treatments of Nilsson et al, Leunens et al and Essers et al. An analysis of the treatment plans showed a mean dose inhomogeneity in the body (75 patients, nine slices) of (1 s.d.) and in the lungs (40 patients, five slices) of (1 s.d.). The conclusions are that, overall, the methods are reasonably satisfactory but that, with an extra effort, even closer agreement between measured and planned doses and a further limited reduction in the body dose inhomogeneity could be obtained. However, if it were thought desirable to make a substantial reduction in the dose inhomogeneity in the body and lungs, this could only be achieved with the available equipment by changing from lateral to anterior - posterior irradiation and any potential advantages of this change would have to be balanced against a likely deterioration in patient comfort and an

  18. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus carboplatin plus paclitaxel in platinum sensitive ovarian cancer patients: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briasoulis Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-based combinations are the standard second-line treatment for platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC. This randomized phase II study was undertaken in order to compare the combination of carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (LD with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP in this setting. Methods Patients with histologically confirmed recurrent OC, at the time of or more than 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy, were randomized to six cycles of CP (carboplatin AUC5 + paclitaxel 175 mg/m2, d1q21 or CLD (carboplatin AUC5 + pegylated LD 45 mg/m2, d1q28. Results A total of 189 eligible patients (CP 96, CLD 93, with a median age of 63 years, median Performance Status (PS 0 and a median platinum free interval (PFI of 16.5 months, entered the study. Discontinuation due to toxicity was higher in the CP patients (13.5% versus 3%, P = 0.016. The overall response rate was similar: CP 58% versus CLD 51%, P = 0.309 (Complete Response; CR 34% versus 23% and there was no statistical difference in time-to-progression (TTP or overall survival (OS; TTP 10.8 months CP versus 11.8 CLD, P = 0.904; OS 29.4 months CP versus 24.7 CLD, P = 0.454. No toxic deaths were recorded. Neutropenia was the most commonly seen severe toxicity (CP 30% versus CLD 35%. More frequent in CLD were severe thrombocytopenia (11% versus 2%, P = 0.016, skin toxicity and Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE grade 1-2 (38% versus 9%, PP = 0.029, 20% versus 5%, P = 0.003. PS and PFI were independent prognostic factors for TTP and OS. Conclusions The combination of pegylated LD with carboplatin is effective, showing less neurotoxicity and alopecia than paclitaxel-carboplatin. It thus warrants a further phase III evaluation as an alternative treatment option for platinum-sensitive OC patients. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000436279

  19. Development of clinical dosage forms for a poorly water-soluble drug II: formulation and characterization of a novel solid microemulsion preconcentrate system for oral delivery of a poorly water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Hynes, Sara R; Haefele, Thomas F; Pudipeddi, Madhu; Royce, Alan E; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2009-05-01

    The solution of a poorly water-soluble drug in a liquid lipid-surfactant mixture, which served as a microemulsion preconcentrate, was converted into a solid form by incorporating it in a solid polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix. The solid microemulsion preconcentrates thus formed consisted of Capmul PG8 (propylene glycol monocaprylate) as oil, Cremophor EL (polyoxyl 35 castor oil) as surfactant, and hydrophilic polymer PEG 3350 as solid matrix. The drug (aqueous solubility: 0.17 microg/mL at pH 1-8 and 25 degrees C) was dissolved in a melt of the mixture at 65-70 degrees C and then the hot solution was filled into hard gelatin capsules; the liquid gradually solidified upon cooling below 55 degrees C. The solid system was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and the dispersion testing in water. It was confirmed that a solid microemulsion preconcentrate is a two-phase system, where clusters of crystalline PEG 3350 formed the solid structure (m.p. 55-60 degrees C) and the liquid microemulsion preconcentrate dispersed in between PEG 3350 crystals as a separate phase. The drug remained dissolved in the liquid phase. In vitro release testing showed that the preconcentrate dispersed readily in water forming a microemulsion with the drug dissolved in the oil particles (PEG 3350 did not interfere with the process of self-microemulsification.

  20. Mature Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing 5-Flourouracil with Leucovorin to 5-Flourouracil with Levamisole as Adjuvant Therapy of Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer- The Israel Cooperative Oncology Group (ICOG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Figer, Aviram Nissan, Adi Shani, Riva Borovick, Mariana Stiener, Mario Baras, Herbert R. Freund, Aaron Sulkes, Alexander Stojadinovic, Tamar Peretz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was shown in patients with Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. This study evaluates long-term (10-year outcome in patients with CRC randomly assigned to adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5FU+LV or 5-FU/Levamisole (5FU+LEV.Methods: Between 1990 and 1995, 398 patients with curatively resected Stage II-III CRC were randomly assigned to adjuvant 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV for 12 months.Results: No difference was evident in 10-year relapse-free or overall survival between study groups. Grade III toxicity was similar between groups; however, neurotoxicity was significantly greater with 5FU+LEV (p=0.02 and gastrointestinal toxicity with 5FU+LV (p=0.03. Female patients treated with 5FU+LEV had improved overall survival.Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment of CRC is still based on leucovorin modulated fluorouracil. The long-term follow-up results of this trial indicate that the adjuvant treatment of Stage II-III CRC with 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV is equally effective. The finding of improved survival in female subjects treated with 5FU+LEV warrants further study to determine if Levamisole is a better modulator of 5-FU than Leucovorin in this patient subset.

  1. Innovation management based on proactive engagement of customers: A case study on LEGO Group. Part II: Challenge of engaging the digital customer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasilcăi, S.; Rusu, G.

    2015-11-01

    To foster the development of innovative products and new technologies, nowadays companies use an open innovation system, encouraging stakeholders to contribute, using the companies’ online platforms for open innovation or social media, bringing and sharing creative solutions and ideas in order to respond to challenging needs the company directly expresses. Accordingly, the current research continues the analysis of the LEGO Group innovation efforts, aiming to provide a case study approach based on describing the most important projects and online instruments company uses to interact with customers and other external stakeholders. Thus, by analysing the experience of the company in developing projects of involving stakeholders in the innovation processes, the article emphasizes the objective of these past projects developed by LEGO Group, outlining their objectives regarding the focus on the product or process innovation, the team management and stakeholders involved in the innovation actions and the results they obtained. Moreover, the case study highlights the features of the most important online instruments LEGO Group uses at the moment for engaging LEGO fans, children, parents, and other external stakeholders in developing new LEGO sets. Thus, LEGO online instruments provide the opportunity for customers to be creative and to respond to LEGO management team challenges. Accordingly, LEGO involve customers in bringing innovative ideas for LEGO sets through LEGO Ideas instrument, which aims to engage customers in submitting projects, voting and supporting ideas and also sharing them on social media. Also, the research emphasizes the role of supporting the open dialogue and interaction with customers and other external stakeholders through LEGO.com Create & Share Galleries instrument, using their creativity to upload innovative models in the public galleries. The continuous challenges LEGO launches for their fans create a long-term connection between company and

  2. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  3. Highly sensitive, colorimetric detection of mercury(II) in aqueous media by quaternary ammonium group-capped gold nanoparticles at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingbin; Qu, Weisi; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Jiang, Xingyu

    2010-12-01

    We provide a highly sensitive and selective assay to detect Hg(2+) in aqueous solutions using gold nanoparticles modified with quaternary ammonium group-terminated thiols at room temperature. The mechanism is the abstraction of thiols by Hg(2+) that led to the aggregation of nanoparticles. With the assistance of solar light irradiation, the detection limit can be as low as 30 nM, which satisfies the guideline concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water set by the WHO. In addition, the dynamic range of detection is wide (3 × 10(-8)-1 × 10(-2) M). This range, to our best knowledge, is the widest one that has been reported so far in gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based assays for Hg(2+).

  4. Evaluation of Countermeasures Effectiveness in a Radioactively Contaminated Urban Area Using METRO-K : The Implementation of Scenarios Designed by the EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Jeong, Hae Sun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2012-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group within the EMRAS-2 (Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety, Phase 2), which has been supported by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), has designed some types of accidental scenarios to test and improve the capabilities of models used for evaluation of radioactive contamination in urban areas. For the comparison of the results predicted from the different models, the absorbed doses in air were analyzed as a function of time following the accident with consideration of countermeasures to be taken. Two kinds of considerations were performed to find the dependency of the predicted results. One is the 'accidental season', i.e. summer and winter, in which an event of radioactive contamination takes place in a specified urban area. Likewise, the 'rainfall intensity' on the day of an event was also considered with the option of 1) no rain, 2) light rain, and 3) heavy rain. The results predicted using a domestic model of METRO-K have been submitted to the Urban Areas Working Group for the intercomparison with those of other models. In this study, as a part of these results using METRO-K, the countermeasures effectiveness in terms of dose reduction was analyzed and presented for the ground floor of a 24-story business building in a specified urban area. As a result, it was found that the countermeasures effectiveness is distinctly dependent on the rainfall intensity on the day of an event, and season when an event takes place. It is related to the different deposition amount of the radionuclides to the surfaces and different behavior on the surfaces following a deposition, and different effectiveness from countermeasures. In conclusion, a selection of appropriate countermeasures with consideration of various environmental conditions may be important to minimize and optimize the socio-economic costs as well as radiation-induced health detriments.

  5. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 8: Argonne National Laboratory - East and New Brunswick Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group Assessment Team No. 1 (WGAT-1) visited Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), located at the ANL-Illinois site, from May 23 through May 27 and June 6 through June 10, 1994. The objective of the WGAT-1, the ANL-E Site Assessment Team (SAT), and the NBL SAT was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities arising at ANL-E and NBL from the storage and handling of the Department's current plutonium holdings. During the first visit to the site (May 23-27), WGAT-1 toured various site facilities and, after each tour, met with SAT members to conduct 'table-top' discussions. In addition, various briefings were given to ANL-E management, NBL management, and DOE management. During the second visit (June 6-10), WGAT-1 completed their assessment report, and met with various site technical representatives

  6. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal studies of the copper(II) aspartame chloride complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, S.; Coşkun, E.; Naumov, P.; Biçer, E.; Bulut, İ.; İçbudak, H.; Çakır, O.

    2002-08-01

    Aspartame adduct of copper(II) chloride Cu(Asp) 2Cl 2·2H 2O (Asp=aspartame) is synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, UV/vis, ESR spectroscopies, TG, DTG, DTA measurements and molecular mechanics calculations. Aqueous solution of the green solid absorbs strongly at 774 and 367 nm. According to the FT IR spectra, the aspartame moiety coordinates to the copper(II) ion via its carboxylate ends, whereas the ammonium terminal groups give rise to hydrogen bonding network with the water, the chloride ions or neighboring carboxylate groups. The results suggest tetragonally distorted octahedral environment of the copper ions.

  8. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group II - Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Fikret Tözüm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 2 was to review and update the existing data concerning clinical and genetic methods of diagnostics of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF overview including analysis of enzymes and biomarkers and microbial profiles from implants. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  9. Ion Sensor Properties of Fluorescent Schiff Bases Carrying Dipicolylamine Groups. A Simple Spectrofluorimetric Method to Determine Cu (II) in Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlı, Elvan; Mısır, Miraç Nedim; Alp, Hakan; Ak, Tuğba; Özbek, Nurhayat; Ocak, Ümmühan; Ocak, Miraç

    2017-09-01

    Four fluorescent Schiff bases carrying dipicolylamine groups were designed and synthesized to determine their ion sensor properties in partial aqueous solution. The corresponding amine compound and the aldehyde compounds such as 1-naphthaldehyde, 9-anthraldehyde, phenanthrene-9-carboxaldehyde and 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde were used to prepare the new Schiff bases. The influence of many metal cations and anions on the spectroscopic properties of the ligands was investigated in ethanol-water (1:1) by means of emission spectrometry. From the spectrofluorimetric titrations, the complexation stoichiometry and complex stability constants of the ligands with Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ and Hg 2+ ions were determined. The ligands did not interact with the anions. However, the Schiff base derived from phenanthrene-9-carboxaldehyde showed sensitivity for Cu 2+ among the tested metal ions. The phenanthrene-based Schiff base was used as analytical ligand for the simple and fast determination of Cu 2+ ion in water samples. A modified standard addition method was used to eliminate matrix effect. The linear range was from 0.3 mg/L to 3.8 μg/L. Detection and quantification limits were 0.14 and 0.43 mg/L, respectively. Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) for copper in drinking water according to EPA is 1.3 mg/L. The proposed method has high sensitivity to determine copper in drinking waters.

  10. Inhomogeneous ordered states and translational nature of the gauge group in the Landau continuum theory: II. Applications of the general theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginsky, A. Ya.

    2007-01-01

    A group theory approach to description of phase transitions to an inhomogeneous ordered state, proposed in the preceding paper, is applied to two problems. First, a theory of the state of a liquid-crystalline smectic type-A phase under the action of uniaxial pressure is developed. Second, a model of strengthening in quasicrystals is constructed. According to the proposed approach, the so-called elastic dislocations always appear during the phase transitions in an inhomogeneous deformed state in addition to static dislocations, which are caused by peculiarities of the crystal growth or by other features in the prehistory of a sample. The density of static dislocations weakly depends on the external factors, whereas the density of elastic dislocations depends on the state. An analogy between the proposed theory of the inhomogeneous ordered state and the quantum-field theory of interaction between material fields is considered. On this basis, the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau equation for the superconducting state is derived using the principle of locality of the transformation properties of the superconducting order parameter with respect to temporal translations

  11. Double role of the hydroxy group of phosphoryl in palladium(II)-catalyzed ortho-olefination: a combined experimental and theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liu; Yuan, Hang; Fu, Tingting; Wang, Tao; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Yufen

    2014-01-03

    Density functional theory calculations have been carried out on Pd-catalyzed phosphoryl-directed ortho-olefination to probe the origin of the significant reactivity difference between methyl hydrogen benzylphosphonates and dimethyl benzylphosphonates. The overall catalytic cycle is found to include four basic steps: C-H bond activation, transmetalation, reductive elimination, and recycling of catalyst, each of which is constituted from different steps. Our calculations reveal that the hydroxy group of phosphoryl plays a crucial role almost in all steps, which can not only stabilize the intermediates and transition states by intramolecular hydrogen bonds but also act as a proton donor so that the η(1)-CH3COO(-) ligand could be protonated to form a neutral acetic acid for easy removal. These findings explain why only the methyl hydrogen benzylphosphonates and methyl hydrogen phenylphosphates were found to be suitable reaction partners. Our mechanistic findings are further supported by theoretical prediction of Pd-catalyzed ortho-olefination using methyl hydrogen phenylphosphonate, which is verified by experimental observations that the desired product was formed in a moderate yield.

  12. Pressurized liquid extraction using water/isopropanol coupled with solid-phase extraction cleanup for semivolatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and alkylated PAH homolog groups in sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Zaugg, S.D.; Burbank, T.L.; Olson, M.C.; Iverson, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are recognized as environmentally relevant for their potential adverse effects on human and ecosystem health. This paper describes a method to determine the distribution of PAH and alkylated homolog groups in sediment samples. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), coupled with solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup, was developed to decrease sample preparation time, to reduce solvent consumption, and to minimize background interferences for full-scan GC-MS analysis. Recoveries from spiked Ottawa sand, environmental stream sediment, and commercially available topsoil, fortified at 1.5-15 ??g per compound, averaged 94.6 ?? 7.8%, 90.7 ?? 5.8% and 92.8 ?? 12.8%, respectively. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds ranged from 20 to 302 ??g/kg, based on 25 g samples. Results from 28 environmental sediment samples, excluding homologs, show 35 of 41 compounds (85.4%) were detected in at least one sample with concentrations ranging from 20 to 100,000 ??g/kg. The most frequently detected compound, 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene, was detected in 23 of the 28 (82%) environmental samples with a concentration ranging from 15 to 907 ??g/kg. The results from the 28 environmental sediment samples for the homolog series showed that 27 of 28 (96%) samples had at least one homolog series present at concentrations ranging from 20 to 89,000 ??g/kg. The most frequently detected homolog series, C2-alkylated naphthalene, was detected in 26 of the 28 (93%) environmental samples with a concentration ranging from 25 to 3900 ??g/kg. Results for a standard reference material using dichloromethane Soxhlet-based extraction also are compared. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phase II trial of interleukin 2, interferon alpha, and 5-fluorouracil in metastatic renal cell cancer: a cytokine working group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcher, J P; Logan, T; Gordon, M; Sosman, J; Weiss, G; Margolin, K; Plasse, T; Mier, J; Lotze, M; Clark, J; Atkins, M

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential efficacy of alternating two outpatient regimens for the treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer. These regimens consisted of 4 weeks of recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) plus IFN-alpha2B followed by 4 weeks of 5-fluorouracil plus IFN-alpha2B. Fifty patients meeting eligibility criteria of previous Cytokine Working Group studies were treated on an outpatient basis. Patients received s.c. rIL-2 (Proleukin; Chiron, Emeryville, CA) during weeks 1-4 of the 8-week regimen. During weeks 1 and 4, the dosage for rIL-2 was 10 MIU/m2 twice daily on days 3-5, and the dosage for IFN-alpha2B (Intron; Schering Plough, Kenilworth, NJ) was 6 MIU/m2 on day 1. During weeks 2 and 3, the dosage for rIL-2 was 5 MIU/m2 on days 1, 3, and 5, and the dosage for IFN-alpha2B was 6 MIU/m2 on days 1, 3, 5. During weeks 5-8, 5-fluorouracil (750 mg/m2) was administered once weekly by i.v. infusion, and IFN-alpha2B (9 MIU/mZ) was administered as a s.c. injection three times weekly. Throughout the treatment, an assessment of quality of life was made and a symptom-distress scale was evaluated. There were two patients with complete responses (CRs) and seven with partial responses (PRs) for an objective response rate of 18% (95% confidence interval, 10-25). The median response duration was 8 months (range, 3-51+ months). The CRs lasted 5 months and 51+ months and the PRs ranged from 3+ to 18 months. After completing at least one course of treatment, eight patients (three with PR, one with minor response, four with stable disease) became CRs after surgery for remaining metastatic disease. Six remain alive at 43+ to 53+ months, and 5 remain disease-free since surgery. The median survival of the study group is 17.5 months, with a maximal follow-up of 53+ months. The range in survival is 1-53+ months. Toxicity was primarily constitutional. and treatment modifications were designed to maintain toxicity at grade 2/3. The most common toxicities during

  14. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group--Determination of Triazine and Phenylurea Herbicides and Their Degradation Products in Water Using Solid-Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, E. A; Strahan, A. P; Thurman, E. M

    2002-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of 7 triazine and phenylurea herbicides and 12 of their degradation products in natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography...

  15. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas appearing as part-solid ground-glass nodules: Is measuring solid component size a better prognostic indicator?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Eui Jin; Ryu, Youngjin; Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, 101, Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Tae [Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Whan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Lung Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-02

    To assess whether measuring the solid portion of adenocarcinomas appearing as part-solid ground-glass nodules (GGNs) can predict a patient's prognosis accurately and how the prognosis corresponds to that of solid nodules. 501 patients (solid nodule group, 304; part-solid GGN group, 197) underwent curative surgery for stage I adenocarcinomas. Maximal diameters of the whole lesion including ground-glass opacities (D{sub whole}) and solid components only (D{sub solid}) were measured on CT. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated from the date of surgery. D{sub solid} was a significant prognostic factor in the part-solid GGN group, while D{sub whole} was not. Part-solid GGNs with D{sub solid} ≤2 cm showed significantly better DFS (P = 0.016) and OS (P = 0.004) than solid nodules; however, those with D{sub solid} >2 cm did not show a significant difference. Hazard ratio (HR) for increase in D{sub solid} was significantly greater in part-solid GGNs than in solid nodules (P = 0.009). For OS, HR for increase in D{sub solid} was greater in part-solid GGNs than in solid nodule, which was marginally not significant (P = 0.060). D{sub solid} was better than D{sub whole} for prognosis prediction of adenocarcinomas appearing as part-solid GGNs. In addition, the influence of D{sub solid} on prognosis in the part-solid GGN group was greater than in the solid nodule group. (orig.)

  16. Enhanced catalytic four-electron dioxygen (O2) and two-electron hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction with a copper(II) complex possessing a pendant ligand pivalamido group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Saya; Peterson, Ryan L; Ohkubo, Kei; Karlin, Kenneth D; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-05-01

    A copper complex, [(PV-tmpa)Cu(II)](ClO4)2 (1) [PV-tmpa = bis(pyrid-2-ylmethyl){[6-(pivalamido)pyrid-2-yl]methyl}amine], acts as a more efficient catalyst for the four-electron reduction of O2 by decamethylferrocene (Fc*) in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid (CF3COOH) in acetone as compared with the corresponding copper complex without a pivalamido group, [(tmpa)Cu(II)](ClO4)2 (2) (tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). The rate constant (k(obs)) of formation of decamethylferrocenium ion (Fc*(+)) in the catalytic four-electron reduction of O2 by Fc* in the presence of a large excess CF3COOH and O2 obeyed first-order kinetics. The k(obs) value was proportional to the concentration of catalyst 1 or 2, whereas the k(obs) value remained constant irrespective of the concentration of CF3COOH or O2. This indicates that electron transfer from Fc* to 1 or 2 is the rate-determining step in the catalytic cycle of the four-electron reduction of O2 by Fc* in the presence of CF3COOH. The second-order catalytic rate constant (k(cat)) for 1 is 4 times larger than the corresponding value determined for 2. With the pivalamido group in 1 compared to 2, the Cu(II)/Cu(I) potentials are -0.23 and -0.05 V vs SCE, respectively. However, during catalytic turnover, the CF3COO(-) anion present readily binds to 2 shifting the resulting complex's redox potential to -0.35 V. The pivalamido group in 1 is found to inhibit anion binding. The overall effect is to make 1 easier to reduce (relative to 2) during catalysis, accounting for the relative k(cat) values observed. 1 is also an excellent catalyst for the two-electron two-proton reduction of H2O2 to water and is also more efficient than is 2. For both complexes, reaction rates are greater than for the overall four-electron O2-reduction to water, an important asset in the design of catalysts for the latter.

  17. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  18. Studies in solid state ionics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakes, D.; Rosenkranz, J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed over 10 years by the high temperature chemistry group are reviewed. Attention was paid to different aspects of ionic solids from the point of view of practical as well as theoretical needs of nuclear technology. Thus ceramic fuel compound like uranates, urania-thoria system, solid electrolytes based on oxides and ionics transformations were studied under reactor irradiation. (author) 13 figs., 3 tabs., 46 refs

  19. Lixiviation of plutonium contaminated solid wastes by aqueous solution of electro-generated reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarande, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    This study concerns the development of the new concept for the decontamination of plutonium bearing solid wastes, based on the lixiviation of the wastes using electro-generated reducing agents. First, a comparative study of the kinetics of the dissolution of pure PuO 2 (prepared by calcination of Pu (IV) oxalate at 450 C) in sulfuric acid media, with different reducing agents, was realized. Qualitatively these reagents can be sorted in three groups: 1 / fast kinetics for Cr(II), V(II) and U(III); 2 / slow kinetics for Ti(III); 3 / very slow kinetics for V(III) and U(VI). In order to contribute to the design of an electrochemical reactor for the generation of the reducing agents usable for the lixiviation of plutonium bearing solid wastes, the study of the diffusion coefficients of both oxidized and reduced forms of different redox couples, at different temperatures, was undertaken. The results of this study also permits, from the knowledge of the diffusional activation energy of the ions, to conclude that the dissolution of pure plutonium dioxide under the action of these reducing agents is not diffusion limited. The feasibility of the plutonium decontamination treatment of synthetic or real solid wastes was then studied at laboratory scale using electro-generated V(II), which is with Cr(II) among the best reagents. The efficiency of the treatment was good, (80 pc Pu solubilisation yield), especially in the case of cellulosic or miscellaneous organic wastes. (author) [fr

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