WorldWideScience

Sample records for group identification based

  1. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order manip

  2. Any of them will do: In-group identification, out-group entitativity, and gang membership as predictors of group-based retribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Eduardo A; Wenborne, Lisa; Peers, Madeline; Alleyne, Emma; Ellis, Kirsty

    2015-05-01

    In non-gang populations, the degree of identification with an in-group and perceptions of out-group entitativity, the perception of an out-group as bonded or unified, are important contributors to group-based aggression or vicarious retribution. The link between these factors and group-based aggression, however, has not been examined in the context of street gangs. The current study assessed the relationship among in-group identification, perceptions of out-group entitativity, and the willingness to retaliate against members of rival groups who did not themselves attack the in-group among juvenile gang and non-gang members in London. Our results showed the predicted membership (gang/non-gang) × in-group identification × entitativity interaction. Decomposition of the three-way interaction by membership revealed a significant identification × entitativity interaction for gang, but not for non-gang members. More specifically, gang members who identify more strongly with their gang and perceived a rival group as high on entitativity were more willing to retaliate against any of them. In addition, entitativity was a significant predictor of group-based aggression after controlling for gender, in-group identification, and gang membership. Our results are consistent with socio-psychological theories of group-based aggression and support the proposal that such theories are applicable for understanding gang-related violence. Aggr. Behav. 41:242-252, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Improved system blind identification based on second-order cyclostationary statistics: A group delay approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V S Giridhar; S V Narasimhan

    2000-04-01

    An improved system blind identification method based on second-order cyclostationary statistics and the properties of group delay, has been proposed. This is achieved by applying a correction to the estimated phase (by the spectral correlation density of the system output) for the poles, in the group delay domain. The results indicate a significant improvement in system blind identification, in terms of root mean square error. Depending upon the signal-to-noise ratio, the improvement in percentage normalized mean square error ranges between 20 and 50%.

  4. Viridans Group Streptococci clinical isolates: MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry versus gene sequence-based identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Angeletti

    Full Text Available Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS species-level identification is fundamental for patients management. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS has been used for VGS identification but discrimination within the Mitis group resulted difficult. In this study, VGS identifications with two MALDI-TOF instruments, the Biotyper (Bruker and the VITEK MS (bioMérieux have been compared to those derived from tuf, soda and rpoB genes sequencing. VGS isolates were clustered and a dendrogram constructed using the Biotyper 3.0 software (Bruker. RpoB gene sequencing resulted the most sensitive and specific molecular method for S. pneumonia identification and was used as reference method. The sensitivity and the specificity of the VITEK MS in S. pneumonia identification were 100%, while the Biotyper resulted less specific (92.4%. In non pneumococcal VGS strains, the group-level correlation between rpoB and the Biotyper was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 61% after database upgrading (than 37% before upgrading. The group-level correlation between rpoB and the VITEK MS was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 36% and increases at 69% if isolates identified as S. mitis/S. oralis are included. The less accurate performance of the VITEK MS in VGS identification within the Mitis group was due to the inability to discriminate between S. mitis and S. oralis. Conversely, the Biotyper, after the release of the upgraded database, was able to discriminate between the two species. In the dendrogram, VGS strains from the same group were grouped into the same cluster and had a good correspondence with the gene-based clustering reported by other authors, thus confirming the validity of the upgraded version of the database. Data from this study demonstrated that MALDI-TOF technique can represent a rapid and cost saving method for VGS identification even within the Mitis group but improvements of spectra

  5. Unclonable Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Dupont, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    We introduce and motivate the concept of unclonable group identification, that provides maximal protection against sharing of identities while still protecting the anonymity of users. We prove that the notion can be realized from any one-way function and suggest a more efficient implementation...

  6. Towards Open-World Person Re-Identification by One-Shot Group-Based Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei-Shi; Gong, Shaogang; Xiang, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Solving the problem of matching people across non-overlapping multi-camera views, known as person re-identification (re-id), has received increasing interests in computer vision. In a real-world application scenario, a watch-list (gallery set) of a handful of known target people are provided with very few (in many cases only a single) image(s) (shots) per target. Existing re-id methods are largely unsuitable to address this open-world re-id challenge because they are designed for (1) a closed-world scenario where the gallery and probe sets are assumed to contain exactly the same people, (2) person-wise identification whereby the model attempts to verify exhaustively against each individual in the gallery set, and (3) learning a matching model using multi-shots. In this paper, a novel transfer local relative distance comparison (t-LRDC) model is formulated to address the open-world person re-identification problem by one-shot group-based verification. The model is designed to mine and transfer useful information from a labelled open-world non-target dataset. Extensive experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms both non-transfer learning and existing transfer learning based re-id methods.

  7. How Perspective-Taking Helps and Hinders Group-Based Guilt as a Function of Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zebel, Sven; Doosje, Bertjan; Spears, Russell

    2009-01-01

    In two studies we hypothesized that outgroup perspective-taking promotes group-based guilt among weakly identified perpetrator group members, but hinders it among higher identifiers. In Study 1, native Dutch participants (N = 153) confronted their group's past mistreatment of outgroups, while perspe

  8. BOX-PCR-based identification of bacterial species belonging to Pseudomonas syringae: P. viridiflava group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abi S.A. Marques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic characteristics and genetic fingerprints of a collection of 120 bacterial strains, belonging to Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato group, P. viridiflava and reference bacteria were evaluated, with the aim of species identification. The numerical analysis of 119 nutritional characteristics did not show patterns that would help with identification. Regarding the genetic fingerprinting, the results of the present study supported the observation that BOX-PCR seems to be able to identify bacterial strains at species level. After numerical analyses of the bar-codes, all pathovars belonging to each one of the nine described genomospecies were clustered together at a distance of 0.72, and could be separated at genomic species level. Two P. syringae strains of unknown pathovars (CFBP 3650 and CFBP 3662 and the three P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were grouped in two extra clusters and might eventually constitute two new species. This genomic species clustering was particularly evident for genomospecies 4, which gathered P. syringae pvs. atropurpurea, coronafaciens, garçae, oryzae, porri, striafaciens, and zizaniae at a noticeably low distance.

  9. Team reasoning and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hindriks, Frank

    The team reasoning approach explains cooperation in terms of group identification, which in turn is explicated in terms of agency transformation and payoff transformation. Empirical research in social psychology is consistent with the significance of agency and payoff transformation. However, it

  10. Pride, Shame and Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salice, Alessandro; Montes Sanchez, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Self-conscious emotions such as shame and pride are emotions that typically focus on the self of the person who feels them. In other words, the intentional object of these emotions is assumed to be the subject that experiences them. Many reasons speak in its favor and yet this account seems...... to leave a question open: how to cash out those cases in which one genuinely feels ashamed or proud of what someone else does? This paper contends that such cases do not necessarily challenge the idea that shame and pride are about the emoting subject. Rather, we claim that some of the most paradigmatic...... of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject’s conative states like desires or intentions....

  11. Pride, Shame and Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salice, Alessandro; Montes Sanchez, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Self-conscious emotions such as shame and pride are emotions that typically focus on the self of the person who feels them. In other words, the intentional object of these emotions is assumed to be the subject that experiences them. Many reasons speak in its favor and yet this account seems...... to leave a question open: how to cash out those cases in which one genuinely feels ashamed or proud of what someone else does? This paper contends that such cases do not necessarily challenge the idea that shame and pride are about the emoting subject. Rather, we claim that some of the most paradigmatic...... of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject’s conative states like desires or intentions....

  12. Pride, Shame and Group Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eSalice

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-conscious emotions such as shame and pride are emotions that typically focus on the self of the person who feels them. In other words, the intentional object of these emotions is assumed to be the subject that experiences them. Many reasons speak in its favor and yet this account seems to leave a question open: how to cash out those cases in which one genuinely feels ashamed or proud of what someone else does?This paper contends that such cases do not necessarily challenge the idea that shame and pride are about the emoting subject. Rather, we claim that some of the most paradigmatic scenarios of shame and pride induced by others can be accommodated by taking seriously the consideration that, in such cases, the subject group-identifies with the other. This is the idea that, in feeling these forms of shame or pride, the subject is conceiving of herself as a member of the same group as the subject acting shamefully or in an admirable way. In other words, these peculiar emotive responses are elicited in the subject insofar as, and to the extent that, she is (or sees herself as being a member of a group – the group to which those who act shamefully or admirably also belong.By looking into the way in which the notion of group identification can allow for an account of hetero-induced shame and pride, this paper attempts to achieve a sort of mutual enlightenment that brings to light not only an important and generally neglected form of self-conscious emotions, but also relevant features of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject’s conative states like desires or intentions.

  13. Does group efficacy increase group identification? Resolving their paradoxical relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Leach, Colin Wayne; Spears, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Although group identification and group efficacy are both important predictors of collective action against collective disadvantage, there is mixed evidence for their (causal) relationship. Meta-analytic and correlational evidence suggests an overall positive relationship that has been interpreted a

  14. Ego, Alter and Object: explaining Personal Involvement with a Social Object Based on Perceived Collective Involvement and Group Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Wachelke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at testing a model to predict personal involvement with a social object which was inspired by the social psychological triangle proposed by Moscovici. The triangle bridges three essential aspects of social psychology: the individual, the Other and a social object. It was operationalized as an empirical model to explain personal involvement with a social topic from two predictors: perceived collective involvement of group members with the same topic and group identification. The sample was formed by 805 Brazilian undergraduates. The participants completed scales that measured their identification with university students, their perception of students' involvement with two social objects, university course or job, and their own personal involvement with those topics. Regression analyses supported the hypothesis that group identification, perceived collective involvement and their interaction maintained positive relations with personal involvement. Discussion focuses on the relativity of results to specific objects, the complexity of determinant factors of personal involvement and the pertinence of the triangular look to characterize social psychological research.

  15. Improved system identification with Renormalization Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Guo; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Yong

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes an improved system identification method with Renormalization Group. Renormalization Group is applied to a fine data set to obtain a coarse data set. The least squares algorithm is performed on the coarse data set. The theoretical analysis under certain conditions shows that the parameter estimation error could be reduced. The proposed method is illustrated with examples.

  16. Group identification in Indonesian stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurriyadi Suparno, Ervano; Jo, Sung Kyun; Lim, Kyuseong; Purqon, Acep; Kim, Soo Yong

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic of Indonesian stock market is interesting especially because it represents developing countries. We investigate the dynamics and structures by using Random Matrix Theory (RMT). Here, we analyze the cross-correlation of the fluctuations of the daily closing price of stocks from the Indonesian Stock Exchange (IDX) between January 1, 2007, and October 28, 2014. The eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix consists of noise which is filtered out using the random matrix as a control. The bulk of the eigenvalue distribution conforms to the random matrix, allowing the separation of random noise from original data which is the deviating eigenvalues. From the deviating eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors, we identify the intrinsic normal modes of the system and interpret their meaning based on qualitative and quantitative approach. The results show that the largest eigenvector represents the market-wide effect which has a predominantly common influence toward all stocks. The other eigenvectors represent highly correlated groups within the system. Furthermore, identification of the largest components of the eigenvectors shows the sector or background of the correlated groups. Interestingly, the result shows that there are mainly two clusters within IDX, natural and non-natural resource companies. We then decompose the correlation matrix to investigate the contribution of the correlated groups to the total correlation, and we find that IDX is still driven mainly by the market-wide effect.

  17. Structure-based approach to the identification of a novel group of selective glucosamine analogue inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi glucokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Edward L; Deinema, Mason S; Kearns, Sean P; Frey, Tyler A; Tanghe, Scott; Perry, Kay; Roy, Timothy A; Gracz, Hanna S; Rodriguez, Ana; D'Antonio, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Glucokinase and hexokinase from pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi are potential drug targets for antiparasitic chemotherapy of Chagas' disease. These glucose kinases phosphorylate d-glucose with co-substrate ATP and yield glucose 6-phosphate and are involved in essential metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. An inhibitor class was conceived that is selective for T. cruzi glucokinase (TcGlcK) using structure-based drug design involving glucosamine having a linker from the C2 amino that terminates with a hydrophobic group either being phenyl, p-hydroxyphenyl, or dioxobenzo[b]thiophenyl groups. The synthesis and characterization for two of the four compounds are presented while the other two compounds were commercially available. Four high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of TcGlcK inhibitor complexes are reported along with enzyme inhibition constants (Ki) for TcGlcK and Homo sapiens hexokinase IV (HsHxKIV). These glucosamine analogue inhibitors include three strongly selective TcGlcK inhibitors and a fourth inhibitor, benzoyl glucosamine (BENZ-GlcN), which is a similar variant exhibiting a shorter linker. Carboxybenzyl glucosamine (CBZ-GlcN) was found to be the strongest glucokinase inhibitor known to date, having a Ki of 0.71±0.05μM. Also reported are two biologically active inhibitors against in vitro T. cruzi culture that were BENZ-GlcN and CBZ-GlcN, with intracellular amastigote growth inhibition IC50 values of 16.08±0.16μM and 48.73±0.69μM, respectively. These compounds revealed little to no toxicity against mammalian NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and provide a key starting point for further drug development with this class of compound.

  18. Nationalism and patriotism: national identification and out-group rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummendey, A; Klink, A; Brown, R

    2001-06-01

    It is argued that the differentiation between nationalism and patriotism proposed in the literature can be seen as analogous to judgments based on different types of comparisons: intergroup comparisons with other nations are associated with intergroup behaviour that corresponds to nationalism, whereas temporal or standard comparisons are linked with behaviour that corresponds to patriotism. Four studies (N = 103, 107, 96 and 105) conducted in Germany and Britain examined the hypothesis that national identification and in-group evaluation only show a reliable relationship with out-group rejection under an intergroup comparison orientation. Participants were primed with either an intergroup comparison, a temporal comparison or no explicit comparison orientation. A subsequent questionnaire assessed in-group (own country) identification, in-group evaluation (i.e. national pride) and rejection of national out-groups. Across all four studies, both in-group identification and in-group evaluation show a stronger correlation with out-group derogation if participants were primed with an intergroup comparison orientation compared to temporal and control conditions. Results are discussed with regard to nationalism and patriotism as well as Hinkle and Brown's (1990) model on relational vs. autonomous orientations.

  19. Evaluation of a novel real-time PCR test based on the ssrA gene for the identification of group B streptococci in vaginal swabs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wernecke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the implementation of prevention guidelines, early-onset group B streptococci (GBS) disease remains a cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Strategies to identify women who are at risk of transmitting GBS to their infant and the administration of intrapartum antibiotics have greatly reduced the incidence of neonatal GBS disease. However, there is a requirement for a rapid diagnostic test for GBS that can be carried out in a labour ward setting especially for women whose GBS colonisation status is unknown at the time of delivery. We report the design and evaluation of a real-time PCR test (RiboSEQ GBS test) for the identification of GBS in vaginal swabs from pregnant women. METHODS: The qualitative real-time PCR RiboSEQ GBS test was designed based on the bacterial ssrA gene and incorporates a competitive internal standard control. The analytical sensitivity of the test was established using crude lysate extracted from serial dilutions of overnight GBS culture using the IDI Lysis kit. Specificity studies were performed using DNA prepared from a panel of GBS strains, related streptococci and other species found in the genital tract environment. The RiboSEQ GBS test was evaluated on 159 vaginal swabs from pregnant women and compared with the GeneOhm StrepB Assay and culture for the identification of GBS. RESULTS: The RiboSEQ GBS test is specific and has an analytical sensitivity of 1-10 cell equivalents. The RiboSEQ GBS test was 96.4% sensitive and 95.8% specific compared to "gold standard" culture for the identification of GBS in vaginal swabs from pregnant women. In this study, the RiboSEQ GBS test performed slightly better than the commercial BD GeneOhm StrepB Assay which gave a sensitivity of 94.6% and a specificity of 89.6% compared to culture. CONCLUSION: The RiboSEQ GBS test is a valuable method for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of GBS in pregnant women. This study also validates the ssrA gene as a suitable and

  20. Evaluation of a novel real-time PCR test based on the ssrA gene for the identification of group B streptococci in vaginal swabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the implementation of prevention guidelines, early-onset group B streptococci (GBS disease remains a cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Strategies to identify women who are at risk of transmitting GBS to their infant and the administration of intrapartum antibiotics have greatly reduced the incidence of neonatal GBS disease. However, there is a requirement for a rapid diagnostic test for GBS that can be carried out in a labour ward setting especially for women whose GBS colonisation status is unknown at the time of delivery. We report the design and evaluation of a real-time PCR test (RiboSEQ GBS test for the identification of GBS in vaginal swabs from pregnant women. Methods The qualitative real-time PCR RiboSEQ GBS test was designed based on the bacterial ssrA gene and incorporates a competitive internal standard control. The analytical sensitivity of the test was established using crude lysate extracted from serial dilutions of overnight GBS culture using the IDI Lysis kit. Specificity studies were performed using DNA prepared from a panel of GBS strains, related streptococci and other species found in the genital tract environment. The RiboSEQ GBS test was evaluated on 159 vaginal swabs from pregnant women and compared with the GeneOhm™ StrepB Assay and culture for the identification of GBS. Results The RiboSEQ GBS test is specific and has an analytical sensitivity of 1-10 cell equivalents. The RiboSEQ GBS test was 96.4% sensitive and 95.8% specific compared to "gold standard" culture for the identification of GBS in vaginal swabs from pregnant women. In this study, the RiboSEQ GBS test performed slightly better than the commercial BD GeneOhm™ StrepB Assay which gave a sensitivity of 94.6% and a specificity of 89.6% compared to culture. Conclusion The RiboSEQ GBS test is a valuable method for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of GBS in pregnant women. This study also validates the

  1. Group Based Interference Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yanjun; Chen, Rui; Yao, Junliang

    2010-01-01

    in $K$-user single-input single-output (SISO) frequency selective fading interference channels, it is shown that the achievable multiplexing gain is almost surely $K/2$ by using interference alignment (IA). However when the signaling dimensions is limited, allocating all the resource to all the users simultaneously is not optimal. According to this problem, a group based interference alignment (GIA) scheme is proposed and a search algorithm is designed to get the group patterns and the resource allocation among them. Analysis results show that our proposed scheme achieves a higher multiplexing gain when the resource is limited.

  2. Deciphering the Crowd: Modeling and Identification of Pedestrian Group Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Hagita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Associating attributes to pedestrians in a crowd is relevant for various areas like surveillance, customer profiling and service providing. The attributes of interest greatly depend on the application domain and might involve such social relations as friends or family as well as the hierarchy of the group including the leader or subordinates. Nevertheless, the complex social setting inherently complicates this task. We attack this problem by exploiting the small group structures in the crowd. The relations among individuals and their peers within a social group are reliable indicators of social attributes. To that end, this paper identifies social groups based on explicit motion models integrated through a hypothesis testing scheme. We develop two models relating positional and directional relations. A pair of pedestrians is identified as belonging to the same group or not by utilizing the two models in parallel, which defines a compound hypothesis testing scheme. By testing the proposed approach on three datasets with different environmental properties and group characteristics, it is demonstrated that we achieve an identification accuracy of 87% to 99%. The contribution of this study lies in its definition of positional and directional relation models, its description of compound evaluations, and the resolution of ambiguities with our proposed uncertainty measure based on the local and global indicators of group relation.

  3. Printed Identification Key or Web-Based Identification Guide: An Effective Tool for Species Identification?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Edison E. dela Cruz; Pangilinan, Ma. Victoria B.; Rodrigo A. Litao

    2012-01-01

    Species identification is often done with the aid of traditional dichotomous keys. This printed material is based on one’s decision between two alternatives, which is followed by another pair of alternatives until the final species name is reached. With the advent of internet technology, the use of an online database offers an updatable and accumulative approach to species identification. It can also be accessed anytime, and this is very useful for fast-changing groups of organisms. In this p...

  4. Cluster identification based on correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, L S

    2012-04-01

    The problem addressed is the identification of cooperating agents based on correlations created as a result of the joint action of these and other agents. A systematic method for using correlations beyond second moments is developed. The technique is applied to a didactic example, the identification of alphabet letters based on correlations among the pixels used in an image of the letter. As in this example, agents can belong to more than one cluster. Moreover, the identification scheme does not require that the patterns be known ahead of time.

  5. Religious and national group identification in adolescence: a study among three religious groups in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng Tseung-Wong, Caroline; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2013-01-01

    Religious group identification is an important but understudied social identity. The present study investigates religious group identification among adolescents of different faiths (Hindu, Muslim, Christian) living in multicultural Mauritius. It further explores how religious and national group identities come together among religious majority and minority adolescents. For three age groups (11 to 19 years, N = 2152) we examined the strength of adolescents' religious and national group identification, the associations between these two identities, and the relationships to global self-esteem. Across age and religious group, participants reported stronger identification with their religious group than with the nation. Identification with both categories declined with age, with the exception of Muslims, whose strong religious identification was found across adolescence. The association between religious and national identification was positive, albeit stronger for the majority group of Hindus and for early adolescents. We examined the manner in which religious and national identities come together using a direct self-identification measure and by combining the separate continuous measures of identification. Four distinct clusters of identification (predominant religious identifiers, dual identifiers, neutrals, and separate individuals) that were differently associated with global self-esteem were found. Dual identifiers reported the highest level of global self-esteem. The clusters of identification did not fully correspond to the findings for the direct self-identification measure. The results are discussed in terms of the meaning of dual identity and the positive manner in which adolescents can manage their multiple identities while taking into account the ideological framework in which those identities are played out.

  6. Variable identification in group method of data handling methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez, E-mail: martinez@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bueno, Elaine Inacio [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Group Method of Data Handling - GMDH is a combinatorial multi-layer algorithm in which a network of layers and nodes is generated using a number of inputs from the data stream being evaluated. The GMDH network topology has been traditionally determined using a layer by layer pruning process based on a preselected criterion of what constitutes the best nodes at each level. The traditional GMDH method is based on an underlying assumption that the data can be modeled by using an approximation of the Volterra Series or Kolmorgorov-Gabor polynomial. A Monitoring and Diagnosis System was developed based on GMDH and Artificial Neural Network - ANN methodologies, and applied to the IPEN research Reactor IEA-R1. The GMDH was used to study the best set of variables to be used to train an ANN, resulting in a best monitoring variable estimative. The system performs the monitoring by comparing these estimative calculated values with measured ones. The IPEN Reactor Data Acquisition System is composed of 58 variables (process and nuclear variables). As the GMDH is a self-organizing methodology, the input variables choice is made automatically, and the real input variables used in the Monitoring and Diagnosis System were not showed in the final result. This work presents a study of variable identification of GMDH methodology by means of an algorithm that works in parallel with the GMDH algorithm and traces the initial variables paths, resulting in an identification of the variables that composes the best Monitoring and Diagnosis Model. (author)

  7. Variable identification in group method of data handling methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez, E-mail: martinez@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bueno, Elaine Inacio [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Group Method of Data Handling - GMDH is a combinatorial multi-layer algorithm in which a network of layers and nodes is generated using a number of inputs from the data stream being evaluated. The GMDH network topology has been traditionally determined using a layer by layer pruning process based on a preselected criterion of what constitutes the best nodes at each level. The traditional GMDH method is based on an underlying assumption that the data can be modeled by using an approximation of the Volterra Series or Kolmorgorov-Gabor polynomial. A Monitoring and Diagnosis System was developed based on GMDH and Artificial Neural Network - ANN methodologies, and applied to the IPEN research Reactor IEA-R1. The GMDH was used to study the best set of variables to be used to train an ANN, resulting in a best monitoring variable estimative. The system performs the monitoring by comparing these estimative calculated values with measured ones. The IPEN Reactor Data Acquisition System is composed of 58 variables (process and nuclear variables). As the GMDH is a self-organizing methodology, the input variables choice is made automatically, and the real input variables used in the Monitoring and Diagnosis System were not showed in the final result. This work presents a study of variable identification of GMDH methodology by means of an algorithm that works in parallel with the GMDH algorithm and traces the initial variables paths, resulting in an identification of the variables that composes the best Monitoring and Diagnosis Model. (author)

  8. Fostering group identification and creativity in diverse groups: the role of individuation and self-verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, William B; Kwan, Virginia S Y; Polzer, Jeffrey T; Milton, Laurie P

    2003-11-01

    A longitudinal study examined the interplay of identity negotiation processes and diversity in small groups of master's of business administration (MBA) students. When perceivers formed relatively positive impressions of other group members, higher diversity predicted more individuation of targets. When perceivers formed relatively neutral impressions of other group members, however, higher diversity predicted less individuation of targets. Individuation at the outset of the semester predicted self-verification effects several weeks later, and self-verification, in turn, predicted group identification and creative task performance. The authors conclude that contrary to self-categorization theory, fostering individuation and self-verification in diverse groups may maximize group identification and productivity.

  9. Youth crowds and substance use: the impact of perceived group norm and multiple group identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkooijen, Kirsten T; de Vries, Nanne K; Nielsen, Gert A

    2007-03-01

    The impact of group identity on adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use was examined through a postal survey. The study included adolescents who identified with 1 subgroup (n = 1425) as well as adolescents who identified with 2 (n = 895) or 3 (n = 339) subgroups. The results showed that identification with the pop, skate/hip-hop, techno, and hippie subgroups was associated with higher risks of substance use, whereas identification with the sporty, quiet, computer nerd, and religious subgroups was associated with lower risks. Perceived group norm mediated the group identity-substance use relationship. Furthermore, identification with multiple groups with corresponding norm increased norm-consistent substance use, whereas identification with multiple groups with opposing norms reduced normative behavior. Implications for health promotion are discussed. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Mental Health Support Groups, Stigma, and Self-Esteem : Positive and Negative Implications of Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crabtree, Jason W.; Haslam, S. Alexander; Postmes, Tom; Haslam, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Research into the relationship between stigmatization and well-being suggests that identification with a stigmatized group can buffer individuals from the adverse effects of stigma. In part, this is because social identification is hypothesized to provide a basis for social support which increases

  11. Mental Health Support Groups, Stigma, and Self-Esteem : Positive and Negative Implications of Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crabtree, Jason W.; Haslam, S. Alexander; Postmes, Tom; Haslam, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Research into the relationship between stigmatization and well-being suggests that identification with a stigmatized group can buffer individuals from the adverse effects of stigma. In part, this is because social identification is hypothesized to provide a basis for social support which increases r

  12. Perceived Justice and Group Identification The Moderating Role of Previous Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipponen, Jukka; Wisse, Barbara; Perala, Janne

    2011-01-01

    Temporal dynamics have hardly been considered in the fields of organizational justice and group identification, yet addressing intra-individual change trajectories over time may lead to a fuller understanding of the relationship between justice and identification. Therefore, this study investigated

  13. Perceived Justice and Group Identification The Moderating Role of Previous Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipponen, Jukka; Wisse, Barbara; Perala, Janne

    2011-01-01

    Temporal dynamics have hardly been considered in the fields of organizational justice and group identification, yet addressing intra-individual change trajectories over time may lead to a fuller understanding of the relationship between justice and identification. Therefore, this study investigated

  14. [Identification and grouping of pain patients according to claims data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, A; Schiffhorst, G; Thoma, R; Strick, K; Gries, C; Becker, A; Treede, R-D; Müller-Schwefe, G; Casser, H-R; Luley, C; Höer, A; Ujeyl, M; Gothe, H; Kugler, J; Glaeske, G; Häussler, B

    2010-02-01

    The ICD classification does not provide the opportunity to adequately identify pain patients. Therefore we developed an alternative method for the identification and classification of pain patients which is based on prescription and diagnoses data from the year 2006 of one nationwide sickness fund (DAK) and which is led by two main assumptions: 1. Beneficiaries without prescription of an analgetic drug but with a diagnosis pattern that is characteristic of patients who are treated with opioids are also likely to be pain patients. 2. Each combination of diagnosis groups can be traced back to one primary diagnosis out of a diagnosis group according to the patient classification system CCS (Clinical Classifications Software). The selection of this diagnosis group (CCS) allows for the allocation of the beneficiary to only one pain type. As a result we identified 65 combinations of CCS diagnosis groups--aggregated to nine "CCS pain types"--to which 77.1% of all patients with at least two opioid prescriptions can be allocated: 26.3% to pain due to arthrosis, 18.0% to pain due to intervertebral disc illnesses, 13.1% to other specific back pain, 6.7% to neuropathic pain, 4.5% to unspecific back pain, 4.2% to headache, 2.4% to pain after traumatic fractures, 1.3% to pain of multimorbid, high-maintenance patients, and 0.6% to cancer pain. Based on our method beneficiaries who have a high probability of suffering from moderate to strong pain can be identified and included in further claims data analyses of health care delivery and utilization pattern of pain-related disorders in Germany.

  15. GIS-based identification of areas that have resource potential for critical minerals in six Selected Groups of Deposit Types in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Susan M.; Jones, III, James V.; Hayes, Timothy S.

    2016-11-16

    each 12-digit hydrologic unit through color shading. Accompanying tables describe the data layers employed to score favorability for the presence of each mineral deposit group, the values assigned for specific analysis parameters, and the relative weighting of each data layer that contributes to estimated measures of potential and certainty. Core datasets used include the Alaska Geochemical Database, Version 2.0 (AGDB2); the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS) web-based geochemical database; the digital “Geologic Map of Alaska;” the Alaska Resource Data File (ARDF); and aerial gamma-ray surveys flown as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program by the U.S. Department of Energy.Maps accompanying this report illustrate the scores for estimated mineral resource potential for the six deposit groups for the state of Alaska. Areas that have known potential, as well as new areas that were not previously known to have potential, for the targeted minerals and deposit groups are identified and described. Numerous areas in Alaska, some of them large, have high potential for one or more of the selected groups of deposit types within Alaska.ContributorsMatthew Granitto, Timothy S. Hayes, James V. Jones, III, Susan M. Karl, Keith A. Labay, Jeffrey L. Mauk, Jeanine M. Schmidt, Nora B. Shew, Erin Todd, Bronwen Wang, Melanie B. Werdon, and Douglas B. Yager

  16. FGO: A novel ontology for identification of ligand functional group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2007-01-01

    Small molecules play crucial role in the modulation of biological functions by interacting with specific macromolecules. Hence small molecule interactions are captured by a variety of experimental methods to estimate and propose correlations between molecular structures to their biological activities. The tremendous expanse in publicly available small molecules is also driving new efforts to better understand interactions involving small molecules particularly in area of drug docking and pharmacogenomics. We have studied and designed a functional group identification system with the associated ontology for it. The functional group identification system can detect the functional group components from given ligand structure with specific coordinate information. Functional group ontology (FGO) proposed by us is a structured classification of chemical functional group which acts as an important source of prior knowledge that may be automatically integrated to support identification, categorization and predictive data analysis tasks. We have used a new annotation method which can be used to construct the original structure from given ontological expression using exact coordinate information. Here, we also discuss about ontology-driven similarity measure of functional groups and uses of such novel ontology for pharmacophore searching and de-novo ligand designing. PMID:18288335

  17. Different groups, different motives: identity motives underlying changes in identification with novel groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Matt; Vignoles, Vivian L

    2012-08-01

    Social identification is known to have wide-reaching implications, but theorists disagree about the underlying motives. Integrating motivated identity construction theory with recent social identity research, the authors predicted which motives underlie identification with two types of groups: interpersonal networks and social categories. In a five-wave longitudinal study of social identity processes among 268 new university residents, multilevel analyses showed that motives involved in identity enactment processes--self-esteem, belonging, and efficacy--significantly predicted within-person changes in identification with flatmates (an interpersonal network group), whereas motives involved in identity definition processes--meaning, self-esteem, and distinctiveness--significantly predicted within-person changes in identification with halls of residence (an abstract social category). This article discusses implications for research into identity motives and social identity.

  18. Identification based on facial parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanov Zorica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two opposing views dominate face identification literature, one suggesting that the face is processed as a whole and another suggesting analysis based on parts. Our research tried to establish which of these two is the dominant strategy and our results fell in the direction of analysis based on parts. The faces were covered with a mask and the participants were uncovering different parts, one at the time, in an attempt to identify a person. Already at the level of a single facial feature, such as mouth or eye and top of the nose, some observers were capable to establish the identity of a familiar face. Identification is exceptionally successful when a small assembly of facial parts is visible, such as eye, eyebrow and the top of the nose. Some facial parts are not very informative on their own but do enhance recognition when given as a part of such an assembly. Novel finding here is importance of the top of the nose for the face identification. Additionally observers have a preference toward the left side of the face. Typically subjects view the elements in the following order: left eye, left eyebrow, right eye, lips, region between the eyes, right eyebrow, region between the eyebrows, left check, right cheek. When observers are not in a position to see eyes, eyebrows or top of the nose, they go for lips first and then region between the eyebrows, region between the eyes, left check, right cheek and finally chin.

  19. Rapid, High-Throughput Identification of Anthrax-Causing and Emetic Bacillus cereus Group Genome Assemblies via BTyper, a Computational Tool for Virulence-Based Classification of Bacillus cereus Group Isolates by Using Nucleotide Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Laura M.; Miller, Rachel A.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Bacillus cereus group comprises nine species, several of which are pathogenic. Differentiating between isolates that may cause disease and those that do not is a matter of public health and economic importance, but it can be particularly challenging due to the high genomic similarity within the group. To this end, we have developed BTyper, a computational tool that employs a combination of (i) virulence gene-based typing, (ii) multilocus sequence typing (MLST), (iii) panC clade typing, and (iv) rpoB allelic typing to rapidly classify B. cereus group isolates using nucleotide sequencing data. BTyper was applied to a set of 662 B. cereus group genome assemblies to (i) identify anthrax-associated genes in non-B. anthracis members of the B. cereus group, and (ii) identify assemblies from B. cereus group strains with emetic potential. With BTyper, the anthrax toxin genes cya, lef, and pagA were detected in 8 genomes classified by the NCBI as B. cereus that clustered into two distinct groups using k-medoids clustering, while either the B. anthracis poly-γ-d-glutamate capsule biosynthesis genes capABCDE or the hyaluronic acid capsule hasA gene was detected in an additional 16 assemblies classified as either B. cereus or Bacillus thuringiensis isolated from clinical, environmental, and food sources. The emetic toxin genes cesABCD were detected in 24 assemblies belonging to panC clades III and VI that had been isolated from food, clinical, and environmental settings. The command line version of BTyper is available at https://github.com/lmc297/BTyper. In addition, BMiner, a companion application for analyzing multiple BTyper output files in aggregate, can be found at https://github.com/lmc297/BMiner. IMPORTANCE Bacillus cereus is a foodborne pathogen that is estimated to cause tens of thousands of illnesses each year in the United States alone. Even with molecular methods, it can be difficult to distinguish nonpathogenic B. cereus group isolates from their

  20. Rapid, high-throughput identification of anthrax-causing and emetic Bacillus cereus group genome assemblies using BTyper, a computational tool for virulence-based classification of Bacillus cereus group isolates using nucleotide sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Laura M; Kovac, Jasna; Miller, Rachel A; Wiedmann, Martin

    2017-06-16

    The Bacillus cereus group comprises nine species, several of which are pathogenic. Differentiating between isolates that may cause disease and those that do not is a matter of public health and economic importance, but can be particularly challenging due to the high genomic similarity of the group. To this end, we have developed BTyper, a computational tool that employs a combination of (i) virulence gene-based typing, (ii) multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), (iii) panC clade typing, and (iv) rpoB allelic typing to rapidly classify B. cereus group isolates using nucleotide sequencing data. BTyper was applied to a set of 662 B. cereus group genome assemblies to (i) identify anthrax-associated genes in non-B. anthracis members of the B. cereus group, and (iI) identify assemblies from B. cereus group strains with emetic potential. With BTyper, anthrax toxin genes cya, lef and pagA were detected in 8 genomes classified in NCBI as B. cereus that clustered into two distinct groups using k-medoids clustering, while B. anthracis poly-γ-D-glutamate capsule biosynthesis genes capABCDE or hyaluronic acid capsule gene hasA were detected in an additional 16 assemblies classified as either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis isolated from clinical, environmental, and food sources. Emetic toxin genes cesABCD were detected in 24 assemblies belonging to panC clades III and VI that had been isolated from food, clinical, and environmental settings. The command line version of BTyper is available at https://github.com/lmc297/BTyper In addition, BMiner, a companion application for analyzing multiple BTyper output files in aggregate, can be found at https://github.com/lmc297/BMinerImportanceBacillus cereus is a foodborne pathogen that is estimated to cause tens of thousands of illnesses each year in the United States alone. Even with molecular methods, it can be difficult to distinguish non-pathogenic B. cereus group isolates from their pathogenic counterparts, including the human pathogen B

  1. GIS-based identification of areas with mineral resource potential for six selected deposit groups, Bureau of Land Management Central Yukon Planning Area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James V.; Karl, Susan M.; Labay, Keith A.; Shew, Nora B.; Granitto, Matthew; Hayes, Timothy S.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Todd, Erin; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    This study, covering the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Central Yukon Planning Area (CYPA), Alaska, was prepared to aid BLM mineral resource management planning. Estimated mineral resource potential and certainty are mapped for six selected mineral deposit groups: (1) rare earth element (REE) deposits associated with peralkaline to carbonatitic intrusive igneous rocks, (2) placer and paleoplacer gold, (3) platinum group element (PGE) deposits associated with mafic and ultramafic intrusive igneous rocks, (4) carbonate-hosted copper deposits, (5) sandstone uranium deposits, and (6) tin-tungsten-molybdenum-fluorspar deposits associated with specialized granites. These six deposit groups include most of the strategic and critical elements of greatest interest in current exploration.

  2. Printed Identification Key or Web-Based Identification Guide: An Effective Tool for Species Identification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Edison E. dela Cruz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Species identification is often done with the aid of traditional dichotomous keys. This printed material is based on one’s decision between two alternatives, which is followed by another pair of alternatives until the final species name is reached. With the advent of internet technology, the use of an online database offers an updatable and accumulative approach to species identification. It can also be accessed anytime, and this is very useful for fast-changing groups of organisms. In this paper, we report the preference of sophomore Bachelor of Science (B.Sc. in Microbiology students to two identification guides as a tool in taxonomy. We wish to test our hypothesis that today’s students will prefer to use web-based ID guides over printed dichotomous keys. We also describe how these printed dichotomous key and web-based ID guides were used by the students as one of their laboratory activities in the course Biology of Algae and Fungi.  

  3. Evaluation of a novel real-time PCR test based on the ssrA gene for the identification of group B streptococci in vaginal swabs

    OpenAIRE

    Barry Thomas; Morrison John; Sharma Vimla; Mullen Ciara; Wernecke Martina; Maher Majella; Smith Terry

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the implementation of prevention guidelines, early-onset group B streptococci (GBS) disease remains a cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Strategies to identify women who are at risk of transmitting GBS to their infant and the administration of intrapartum antibiotics have greatly reduced the incidence of neonatal GBS disease. However, there is a requirement for a rapid diagnostic test for GBS that can be carried out in a labour ward setting especi...

  4. Ethnic Group Identification and Group Evaluation Among Minority and Majority Groups : Testing the Multiculturalism Hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyten, Maykel J. A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Following social identity theory, the author hypothesized that members of minority groups are more likely than majority group members to endorse multiculturalism more strongly and assimilationist thinking less strongly. In addition, the multiculturalism hypothesis proposes that the more minority gro

  5. Ethnic group identification and group evaluation among minority and majority groups: testing the multiculturalism hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyten, Maykel

    2005-01-01

    Following social identity theory, the author hypothesized that members of minority groups are more likely than majority group members to endorse multiculturalism more strongly and assimilationist thinking less strongly. In addition, the multiculturalism hypothesis proposes that the more minority groups endorse the ideology of multiculturalism (or assimilationism), the more (or less) likely they will be to identify with their ethnic in-group and to show positive in-group evaluation. In contrast, the more majority group members endorse multiculturalism (or assimilationism), the less (or more) likely they are to identify with their ethnic group and to show negative out-group evaluation. Results from 4 studies (correlational and experimental) provide support for this hypothesis among Dutch and Turkish participants living in the Netherlands.

  6. Feel Like You Belong: On the Bidirectional Link Between Emotional Fit and Group Identification in Task Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen eDelvaux

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Three studies investigated the association between members’ group identification and the emotional fit with their group. In the first study, a cross-sectional study in a large organization, we replicated earlier research by showing that group identification and emotional fit are positively associated, using a broader range of emotions and using profile correlations to measure group members’ emotional fit. In addition, in two longitudinal studies, where groups of students were followed at several time points during their collaboration on a project, we tested the directionality of the relationship between group identification and emotional fit. The results showed a bidirectional, positive link between group identification and emotional fit, such that group identification and emotional fit either mutually reinforce or mutually dampen each other over time. We discuss how these findings increase insights in group functioning and how they may be used to change group processes for better or worse.

  7. Does personality explain in-group identification and discrimination? Evidence from the minimal group paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Katherine J; Turner, John C; Haslam, S Alexander; Ryan, Michelle K; Bizumic, Boris; Subasic, Emina

    2007-09-01

    The idea that a person's personality can help explain prejudice has a long history in social psychology. The classic counter-argument has been that prejudice is much more a function of people's group memberships and the nature of intergroup relations rather than individual differences. Bringing these two lines of research together, it has been suggested that personality factors may not only affect intergroup discrimination directly, but also indirectly by predisposing some individuals to identify more strongly with some relevant in-group membership. Two experiments were conducted to investigate this possibility. The participants completed various personality measures (e.g. authoritarianism, personal need for structure and ethnocentrism as well as social dominance orientation (SDO) in Experiment 2). They were then assigned to minimal groups either randomly, by choice, or (supposedly) on the basis of attitudinal similarity. In Experiment 2, the minimal group paradigm was also adapted to examine the role of SDO. Overall, there was no evidence of significant relationships between traditional personality measures and either in-group identification or discrimination. In-group identification alone emerged as the strongest predictor of discrimination. There was evidence that those participants who scored higher in SDO were more likely to act in ways that supported the creation of a power hierarchy. The implications for broader understanding of prejudice are discussed.

  8. WiFi-based person identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-10-01

    There has been increased interest in WIFI devices equipped with multiple antennas, which brings various wireless sensing applications such as localization, gesture identification and motion tracking. WIFI-based sensing has a lot of benefits such as device Free, which has shown great potential in smart scenarios. In this paper, we present WIP, a system that can distinguish a person from a small group of people. We prove that Channel State Information (CSI) can identify a person's gait. From the related-work, different people have different gait features. Thus the CSI-based gait features can be used to identify a person. We then proposed a machine-learning model-ANN to classify different person. The results show that ANN has a good performance in our scenario.

  9. Systematic analysis of group identification in stock markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Jeong, Hawoong

    2005-10-01

    We propose improved methods to identify stock groups using the correlation matrix of stock price changes. By filtering out the market-wide effect and the random noise, we construct the correlation matrix of stock groups in which nontrivial high correlations between stocks are found. Using the filtered correlation matrix, we successfully identify the multiple stock groups without any extra knowledge of the stocks by the optimization of the matrix representation and the percolation approach to the correlation-based network of stocks. These methods drastically reduce the ambiguities while finding stock groups using the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix.

  10. CEAI: CCM based Email Authorship Identification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2013-01-01

    content features. It is observed that the use of such features in the authorship identification process has a positive impact on the accuracy of the authorship identification task. We performed experiments to justify our arguments and compared the results with other base line models. Experimental results...

  11. IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF AEROSOL POLAR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS BEARING CARBOXYLIC AND/OR HYDROXYL GROUPS. 1. METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, a new analytical technique was developed for the identification and quantification of multi-functional compounds containing simultaneously at least one hydroxyl or one carboxylic group, or both. This technique is based on derivatizing first the carboxylic group(s) ...

  12. Sticking together or falling apart : In-group identification as a psychological determinant of group commitment versus individual mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellemers, N; Spears, R; Doosje, B

    1997-01-01

    Two experiments investigated how in-group identification, manipulated with a bogus pipeline technique affects group members' desire for individual mobility to another group. In the first experiment (N = 88), the in-group had low status, and group boundaries were either permeable or impermeable. Low

  13. Parameter identification and synchronization for uncertain network group with different structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengren; Lü, Ling; Sun, Ying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Wenjun; Sun, Ao

    2016-09-01

    We design a novel synchronization technique to research the synchronization of network group constituted of uncertain networks with different structures. Based on Lyapunov theorem, the selection principles of the control inputs and the parameter identification laws of the networks are determined, and synchronization conditions of the network group are obtained. Some numerical simulations are provided to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the synchronization technique. We find that the network number, the number of network nodes and network connections indeed will not affect the stability of synchronization of network group.

  14. Multifinger Feature Level Fusion Based Fingerprint Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen N

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint based authentication systems are one of the cost-effective biometric authentication techniques employed for personal identification. As the data base population increases, fast identification/recognition algorithms are required with high accuracy. Accuracy can be increased using multimodal evidences collected by multiple biometric traits. In this work, consecutive fingerprint images are taken, global singularities are located using directional field strength and their local orientation vector is formulated with respect to the base line of the finger. Featurelevel fusion is carried out and a 32 element feature template is obtained. A matching score is formulated for the identification and 100% accuracy was obtained for a database of 300 persons. The polygonal feature vector helps to reduce the size of the feature database from the present 70-100 minutiae features to just 32 features and also a lower matching threshold can be fixed compared to single finger based identification

  15. Iris Identification Technology Based on Multiwavelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Lian-xin; Ma Fu-ming; Xu Tao; Li Zhi-hui; Wu Deng-feng

    2005-01-01

    A new method for iris identification based on multiwavelets is proposed. By means of the properties of multiwavelets,such as orthogonality, symmetry, vanishing moments and approximation order, the iris texture can be simply presented. A brief overview of muhiwavelets is presented at first. Iris identification system and iris texture feature presentation and recognition based on multiwavelets are introduced subsequently. And the experiment indicates the validity of this method finally.

  16. Self-stereotyping in the face of threats to group status and distinctiveness : The role of group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, R; Doosje, B; Ellemers, N

    1997-01-01

    In four studies, effects of self-perceived or public-perceived threats to group status or group distinctiveness on self-stereotyping (defined as similarity to prototypical in-group members) were investigated for people with high or low in-group identification. The main prediction was that high and l

  17. Self-stereotyping in the face of threats to group status and distinctiveness : The role of group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, R; Doosje, B; Ellemers, N

    In four studies, effects of self-perceived or public-perceived threats to group status or group distinctiveness on self-stereotyping (defined as similarity to prototypical in-group members) were investigated for people with high or low in-group identification. The main prediction was that high and

  18. ''We are, therefore we should'' : evidence that in-group identification mediates the acquisition of in-group norms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livingstone, Andrew G.; Haslam, S. Alexander; Postmes, Tom; Jetten, Jolanda

    2011-01-01

    In 2 field studies (Ns = 71 and 113), we tested the prediction that in-group identification would mediate the acquisition of group norms by new group members. Study 1 demonstrated that participants surveyed after a team-development program reported greater awareness of in-group norms of teamwork and

  19. Leakproof secret sharing protocols with applications to group identification scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG ChunMing; GAO ShuHong

    2012-01-01

    In a traditional (t,n)-threshold secret sharing scheme,t or more honest participants can reconstruct the secret K.In the reconstruction process,the individual shares and the secret key K are revealed,hence K is shared once only. In this paper,we firstly give the definition of leakproof secret sharing scheme which is composed of a distribution protocol and a proof protocol,then propose two leakproof secret sharing protocols,a computationally secure protocol and an information-theoretically secure protocol.In our protocols,t or more participants can jointly prove that they hold the secret K by using a multi-prover zero-knowledge argument of knowledge.As a result,the secret K will be shared for as many times as desired.Furthermore,each participant can detect the dealer in the distribution protocol from cheating,and any verifier can prevent non-qualified set of participants in proof protocol from cheating.As an example of the practical impact of our work we use our techniques to construct group identification schemes with zero-knowledge.

  20. Group-level self-definition and self-investment: A hierarchical (multicomponent) model of in-group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; van Zomeren, M.; Zebel, S.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Pennekamp, S.F.; Doosje, B.; Ouwerkerk, J.W.; Spears, R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research shows individuals' identification with in-groups to be psychologically important and socially consequential. However, there is little agreement about how identification should be conceptualized or measured. On the basis of previous work, the authors identified 5 specific components

  1. Group-level self-definition and self-investment : A hierarchical (multicomponent) model of in-group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, Colin Wayne; van Zomeren, Martijn; Zebel, Sven; Vliek, Michael L. W.; Pennekamp, Sjoerd F.; Doosje, Bertjan; Ouwerkerk, Jaap W.; Spears, Russell

    Recent research shows individuals' identification with in-groups to be psychologically important and socially consequential. However, there is little agreement about how identification should be conceptualized or measured. On the basis of previous work, the authors identified 5 specific components

  2. Group-level self-definition and self-investment : A hierarchical (multicomponent) model of in-group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, Colin Wayne; van Zomeren, Martijn; Zebel, Sven; Vliek, Michael L. W.; Pennekamp, Sjoerd F.; Doosje, Bertjan; Ouwerkerk, Jaap W.; Spears, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Recent research shows individuals' identification with in-groups to be psychologically important and socially consequential. However, there is little agreement about how identification should be conceptualized or measured. On the basis of previous work, the authors identified 5 specific components o

  3. Interactive Effects of Work Group and Organizational Identification on Job Satisfaction and Extra-Role Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dick, Rolf; van Knippenberg, Daan; Kerschreiter, Rudolf; Hertel, Guido; Wieseke, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Past research has focused on the differential relationships of organizational and work group identification with attitudes and behavior. However, no systematic effort has been undertaken yet to explore interactive effects "between" these foci of identification. We predicted that in cases of positive overlap of identifications (i.e. high work group…

  4. CEAI: CCM based Email Authorship Identification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a model for email authorship identification (EAI) by employing a Cluster-based Classification (CCM) technique. Traditionally, stylometric features have been successfully employed in various authorship analysis tasks; we extend the traditional feature-set to include some...... more interesting and effective features for email authorship identification (e.g. the last punctuation mark used in an email, the tendency of an author to use capitalization at the start of an email, or the punctuation after a greeting or farewell). We also included Info Gain feature selection based...... reveal that the proposed CCM-based email authorship identification model, along with the proposed feature set, outperforms the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM)-based models, as well as the models proposed by Iqbal et al. [1, 2]. The proposed model attains an accuracy rate of 94% for 10...

  5. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the "fuzzy species" strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment.

  6. Rapid identification of strains belonging to the Mycobacterium abscessus group through erm(41) gene pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shiomi; Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Tomita, Motohisa; Okada, Masaji; Shimada, Ryoko; Hayashi, Seiji

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium massiliense lung infections have different clarithromycin susceptibilities, making proper identification important; however, standard multi-gene sequencing in clinical laboratories is laborious and time consuming. We developed a pyrosequencing-based method for rapid identification of strains belonging to the M. abscessus group by targeting erm(41). We examined 55 isolates from new pulmonary M. abscessus infections and identified 28 M. abscessus, 25 M. massiliense, and 2 Mycobacterium bolletii isolates. Multi-gene sequencing of 16S rRNA, hsp65, rpoB, and the 16S-23S ITS region was concordant with the results of erm(41) pyrosequencing; thus, the M. abscessus group can be identified by single-nucleotide polymorphisms in erm(41). The method also enables rapid identification of polymorphic, inducible clarithromycin-resistant sequevars (T28 or C28). Pyrosequencing of erm(41) is a rapid, reliable, high-throughput alternative method for identifying and characterizing M. abscessus species. Further testing of a diverse collection of isolates is necessary to demonstrate the discriminatory power of erm(41) sequencing to differentiating species with this highly divergent group.

  7. Method of classify identification of group technology based on the diffuse prior distribution%基于扩散先验分布的成组技术分类识别方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐宁; 蔡晋; 李原; 张开富

    2012-01-01

    The classify identification is one of the most widely used methods of statistical analysis. The classify identification is used to explain the geometric model of object by matching geometric features and the description of features. To obtain the features of productions is the key point of the classify identification. In view of part-equipment group optimized network model, a method of Bayesian inference is given. These studies classify the parts and equipments by the diffuse prior distribution of Bayesian inference classification. According to the judgment of forecast density function of sample, the posterior probability ratio and the identification rules to classify the samples are set.%分类识别方法是实际应用中最为广泛的统计分析方法之一,特征识别是对对象几何模型进行解释,通过匹配几何特征部分与特征的形式描述来实现.提取产品特征信息是特征识别的难点.结合零件-设备成组优化的网络模型,提出一种基于贝叶斯推理的扩散先验分布的识别算法.依据成组技术的零件分类编码系统对零件设备进行成组分类,通过扩散先验分布的贝叶斯推理分类识别方法,根据待判别样品的预报密度函数,建立后验概率比和分类识别规则,对待识别样本进行判别分类.

  8. Toward a unifying model of identification with groups: integrating theoretical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccas, Sonia; Sagiv, Lilach; Schwartz, Shalom; Halevy, Nir; Eidelson, Roy

    2008-08-01

    Building on the contributions of diverse theoretical approaches, the authors present a multidimensional model of group identification. Integrating conceptions from the social identity perspective with those from research on individualism-collectivism, nationalism- patriotism, and identification with organizations, we propose four conceptually distinct modes of identification: importance (how much I view the group as part of who I am), commitment (how much I want to benefit the group), superiority (how much I view my group as superior to other groups), and deference (how much I honor, revere, and submit to the group's norms, symbols, and leaders). We present an instrument for assessing the four modes of identification and review initial empirical findings that validate the proposed model and show its utility in understanding antecedents and consequences of identification.

  9. A personal touch to diversity : Self-anchoring increases minority members' identification in a diverse group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, Ruth; Otten, Sabine; Hansen, Nina

    2013-01-01

    In diverse groups, minority members often indicate lower levels of identification and perceived acceptance than majority members. To date, we know relatively little about how the cognitive definition of the self may impact on identification with a diverse group. In this research, we argue that when

  10. Toward an Automated Identification of Anastrepha Fruit Flies in the fraterculus group (Diptera, Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perre, P; Faria, F A; Jorge, L R; Rocha, A; Torres, R S; Souza-Filho, M F; Lewinsohn, T M; Zucchi, R A

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we assess image analysis techniques as automatic identifiers of three Anastrepha species of quarantine importance, Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann), Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart), and Anastrepha sororcula Zucchi, based on wing and aculeus images. The right wing and aculeus of 100 individuals of each species were mounted on microscope slides, and images were captured with a stereomicroscope and light microscope. For wing image analysis, we used the color descriptor Local Color Histogram; for aculei, we used the contour descriptor Edge Orientation Autocorrelogram. A Support Vector Machine classifier was used in the final stage of wing and aculeus classification. Very accurate species identifications were obtained based on wing and aculeus images, with average accuracies of 94 and 95%, respectively. These results are comparable to previous identification results based on morphometric techniques and to the results achieved by experienced entomologists. Wing and aculeus images produced equally accurate classifications, greatly facilitating the identification of these species. The proposed technique is therefore a promising option for separating these three closely related species in the fraterculus group.

  11. Genotyping of 75 SNPs using arrays for individual identification in five population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Wu, Lawrence Shih Hsin; Lin, Chun-Yen; Huang, Tsun-Ying; Yin, Hsiang-I; Tseng, Li-Hui; Lee, James Chun-I

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing offers promise to forensic genetics. Various strategies and panels for analyzing SNP markers for individual identification have been published. However, the best panels with fewer identity SNPs for all major population groups are still under discussion. This study aimed to find more autosomal SNPs with high heterozygosity for individual identification among Asian populations. Ninety-six autosomal SNPs of 502 DNA samples from unrelated individuals of five population groups (208 Taiwanese Han, 83 Filipinos, 62 Thais, 69 Indonesians, and 80 individuals with European, Near Eastern, or South Asian ancestry) were analyzed using arrays in an initial screening, and 75 SNPs (group A, 46 newly selected SNPs; groups B, 29 SNPs based on a previous SNP panel) were selected for further statistical analyses. Some SNPs with high heterozygosity from Asian populations were identified. The combined random match probability of the best 40 and 45 SNPs was between 3.16 × 10(-17) and 7.75 × 10(-17) and between 2.33 × 10(-19) and 7.00 × 10(-19), respectively, in all five populations. These loci offer comparable power to short tandem repeats (STRs) for routine forensic profiling. In this study, we demonstrated the population genetic characteristics and forensic parameters of 75 SNPs with high heterozygosity from five population groups. This SNPs panel can provide valuable genotypic information and can be helpful in forensic casework for individual identification among these populations.

  12. Support for Kurdish language rights in Turkey : The roles of ethnic group, group identifications, contact, and intergroup perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Çelebi, Elif; Verkuyten, Maykel; Smyrnioti, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    The question of Kurdish language rights has been a central issue in the Turkish–Kurdish conflict. The current study examined endorsement of Kurdish language rights in relation to intergroup factors (i.e. group identifications, cross-group friendships, perceived discrimination, and perceived out-grou

  13. Speaker Identification Based on Fractal Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯丽敏; 王朔中

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses application of fractal dimensions to speech processing. Generalized dimensions of arbitrary orders and associated fractal parameters are used in speaker identification. A characteristic vactor based on these parameters is formed, and a recognition criterion definded in order to identify individual speakers. Experimental results show the usefulness of fractal dimensions in characterizing speaker identity.

  14. Transform Domain Fingerprint Identification Based on DTCWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossy P. George

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological biometric characteristics are better compared to behavioral biometric identification of human beings to identify a person. In this paper, we propose Transform Domain Fingerprint Identification Based on DTCWT. The original Fingerprint is cropped and resized to suitable dimension to apply DTCWT. The DTCWT is applied on Fingerprint to generate coefficient which form features. The performance analysis is discussed with different levels of DTCWT and also with different sizes of Fingerprint database. It is observed that the recognition rate is better in the case of level 7 compared to other levels of DTCWT.

  15. Stakeholder Groups of Public and Private Universities in the Czech Republic – Identification, Categorization and Prioritization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slabá Marie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With regard to changes in the environment of tertiary education and tertiary educational systems, universities are now unlikely to succeed as ‘separated closed’ institutions that are unresponsive to their environment and stakeholders. Stakeholder analysis is considered as an important part of university management and marketing and universities have to take care of key stakeholder groups and build long term relationships with them. This paper focuses on the stakeholder analysis and adopts the stake-holder theory and analysis for the needs of the Czech market of tertiary education. This paper analyses results of the author’s online questionnaire that provided the input for data analysis deploying basic descriptive analysis and first steps of stakeholder analysis – identification, categorization and prioritization. Results of author’s research show that there are only slight differences between public and private universities and their perspective concerning generic stakeholder groups of universities. However the research revealed two controversial stakeholder groups – donors and competitors. In comparison with other stakeholder groups perception of these two stakeholder groups by public and private universities is very different. Stakeholder groups of public and private universities were categorized into four basic groups - primary internal stakeholder groups, primary external stakeholder groups, secondary internal stakeholder groups, and secondary external stakeholder groups. Primary internal and external stakeholder groups which are crucial for survival of universities are the most important stakeholder groups for universities. The author identified ten most important stakeholder groups for public and private universities separately, based on assigned priorities that will be used for further research.

  16. Gait Correlation Analysis Based Human Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human gait identification aims to identify people by a sequence of walking images. Comparing with fingerprint or iris based identification, the most important advantage of gait identification is that it can be done at a distance. In this paper, silhouette correlation analysis based human identification approach is proposed. By background subtracting algorithm, the moving silhouette figure can be extracted from the walking images sequence. Every pixel in the silhouette has three dimensions: horizontal axis (x, vertical axis (y, and temporal axis (t. By moving every pixel in the silhouette image along these three dimensions, we can get a new silhouette. The correlation result between the original silhouette and the new one can be used as the raw feature of human gait. Discrete Fourier transform is used to extract features from this correlation result. Then, these features are normalized to minimize the affection of noise. Primary component analysis method is used to reduce the features’ dimensions. Experiment based on CASIA database shows that this method has an encouraging recognition performance.

  17. EFFECTIVE MULTI-RESOLUTION TRANSFORM IDENTIFICATION FOR CHARACTERIZATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF TEXTURE GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arivazhagan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Texture classification is important in applications of computer image analysis for characterization or classification of images based on local spatial variations of intensity or color. Texture can be defined as consisting of mutually related elements. This paper proposes an experimental approach for identification of suitable multi-resolution transform for characterization and classification of different texture groups based on statistical and co-occurrence features derived from multi-resolution transformed sub bands. The statistical and co-occurrence feature sets are extracted for various multi-resolution transforms such as Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT, Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT, Double Density Wavelet Transform (DDWT and Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DTCWT and then, the transform that maximizes the texture classification performance for the particular texture group is identified.

  18. Transformational leadership and group potency in small military units: The mediating role of group identification and cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos García-Guiu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we examined an exploratory model to assess the relationship between transformational leadership and group potency and analyze the mediating role of group identification and cohesion. The research was conducted with squads of the Spanish Army. The sample was composed of 243 members of 51 squads of operational units. Our findings highlighted the importance of the transformational leadership style of command of non-commissioned officers (NCOs due to its positive relationship with the group potency of the squad. We also analyzed the indirect relationships between transformational leadership and group identification and group cohesion and found that the latter variables played a mediating role between transformational leadership and group potency. The conclusions of this study are relevant due to the growing importance of transformational leadership and actions implemented at lower levels of the command chain for the success of missions of security organizations and defense.

  19. The virtual group identification process: a virtual educational community case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Ping; Young, Mei-Lein

    2008-02-01

    Because the Internet provides an alternative forum for the social interaction of professional groups, understanding how these groups form as virtual communities (VCs) in cyberspace is crucial. In this study, we observe the social interactions of teachers belonging to the largest VC in Taiwan and analyze discourse on an important educational policy, using content analysis to ascertain how virtual group identity is established. Our primary findings show that among the seven identity categories characterizing professional virtual group identity, both alliance and kinship types of identities are the main forces behind the formation of a virtual group. In contrast, the affection, attachment, bonding, closeness, and nostalgia types of identities show minimal effect. Moreover, leadership of the virtual group plays a critical role in the group setting, and participants play a part in restoring a positive sense of self or in shaping the group identity as they encounter threats in this dynamic environment.

  20. The Formation of Group Affect and Team Effectiveness : The Moderating Role of Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanghe, Jacqueline; Wisse, Barbara; van der Flier, Henk

    2010-01-01

    In the current research we use the social identity perspective to enhance our understanding of group affect (i.e. a collectively shared pattern of affective states among group members). Because higher identification (i.e. the extent to which group members define themselves in terms of their group me

  1. Group-based Compunction and Anger: Their Antecedents and Consequences in Relation to Colonial Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Figueiredo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Group-based emotions can be experienced by group members for the past misdeeds of their ingroup towards an outgroup.. The present study examines distinct antecedents and consequences of group-based compunction and anger in two countries with a history of colonization (Portugal, N = 280 and the Netherlands, N = 184. While previous research has focused mainly on ingroup-focused antecedents of group-based emotions, such as ingroup identification and perceptions of responsibility, our research also analyzed outgroup-focused variables, such as outgroup identification and meta-perceptions. Multiple group structural equation modeling showed that group-based compunction and group-based anger have similar antecedents (exonerating cognitions, collectivism, outgroup identification and meta-perceptions. Furthermore, the results showed that the two emotions have distinct but related consequences for the improvement of intergroup relations (compensation, subjective importance of discussing the past and forgiveness assignment.

  2. Using Web-Based Key Character and Classification Instruction for Teaching Undergraduate Students Insect Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golick, Douglas A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Steckelberg, Allen L.; Brooks, David. W.; Higley, Leon G.; Fowler, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether undergraduate students receiving web-based instruction based on traditional, key character, or classification instruction differed in their performance of insect identification tasks. All groups showed a significant improvement in insect identifications on pre- and post-two-dimensional picture…

  3. Systematic analysis of group identification in stock markets

    OpenAIRE

    Dong-Hee Kim; Hawoong Jeong

    2005-01-01

    We propose improved methods to identify stock groups using the correlation matrix of stock price changes. By filtering out the marketwide effect and the random noise, we construct the correlation matrix of stock groups in which nontrivial high correlations between stocks are found. Using the filtered correlation matrix, we successfully identify the multiple stock groups without any extra knowledge of the stocks by the optimization of the matrix representation and the percolation approach to t...

  4. Some Intersections and Identifications in Integral Group Rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Karan; Deepak Kumar

    2002-05-01

    Let be the integral group ring of a group and () its augmentation ideal. For a free group and a normal subgroup of , the intersection $I^{n+1}(F) \\cap I^n(R)$ is determined for all ≥ 1. The subgroups $F \\cap (1+ZFI(R)I(F)I(S))$ and $F \\cap (1+I(R)I^3(F))$ of are identified when and are arbitrary subgroups of .

  5. When group members go against the grain : An ironic interactive effect of group identification and normative content on healthy eating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banas, Kasia; Cruwys, Tegan; de Wit, John B F; Johnston, Marie; Haslam, S Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Three studies were conducted to examine the effect of group identification and normative content of social identities on healthy eating intentions and behaviour. In Study 1 (N = 87) Australian participants were shown images that portrayed a norm of healthy vs. unhealthy behaviour among Australians.

  6. Phylogenetic invariants for group-based models

    CERN Document Server

    Donten-Bury, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate properties of algebraic varieties representing group-based phylogenetic models. We give the (first) example of a nonnormal general group-based model for an abelian group. Following Kaie Kubjas we also determine some invariants of group-based models showing that the associated varieties do not have to be deformation equivalent. We propose a method of generating many phylogenetic invariants and in particular we show that our approach gives the whole ideal of the claw tree for 3-Kimura model under the assumption of the conjecture of Sturmfels and Sullivant. This, combined with the results of Sturmfels and Sullivant, would enable to determine all phylogenetic invariants for any tree for 3-Kimura model and possibly for other group-based models.

  7. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups.

  8. National Identification and Collective Emotions as Predictors of Pro-Social Attitudes Toward Islamic Minority Groups in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mashuri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the role of Indonesian Moslem majority’s national identification, collective emotions of pride and guilt in predicting their support in helping members of Islamic minority and their perceived inclusion towards this group. Data from this study (N = 182 demonstrated that, in line with our prediction, support for minority helping significantly predicted perceived inclusion. We also hypothesized and found that collective pride and collective guilt directly predicted the minority helping. Finally, national identification had significant direct effects on both collective pride and collective guilt. These findings shed light on the importance of collective emotions and national identification in giving rise to pro-social attitudes of Indonesian Moslem majority towards members of Islamic minority. Implications of the research findings were discussed with reference to theories of group-based emotion and intergroup helping, and to practical strategies Indonesian government can apply to recognize Islamic minorities.

  9. Automatic Screening of Missing Objects and Identification with Group Coding of RF Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vijayaraju

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Here the container of the shipping based phenomena it is a collection of the objects in a well oriented fashion by which there is a group oriented fashion related to the well efficient strategy of the objects based on the physical phenomena in a well efficient fashion respectively. Here by the enabling of the radio frequency identification based strategy in which object identification takes place in the system in a well efficient fashion and followed by the container oriented strategy in a well effective fashion respectively. Here there is a problem with respect to the present strategy in which there is a problem with respect to the design oriented mechanism by which there is a no proper analysis takes place for the accurate identification of the objects based on the missing strategy plays a major role in the system based aspect respectively. Here a new technique is proposed in order to overcome the problem of the previous method here the present design oriented powerful strategy includes the object oriented determination of the ID based on the user oriented phenomena in a well effective manner where the data related to the strategy of the missing strategy plays a major role in the system based aspect in a well effective fashion by which that is from the perfect analysis takes place from the same phenomena without the help of the entire database n a well respective fashion takes place in the system respectively. Here the main key aspect of the present method is to effectively divide the entire data related to the particular aspect and define based on the present strategy in a well effective manner in which there is coordination has to be maintained in the system based aspect respectively. Simulations have been conducted on the present method and a lot of analysis takes place on the large number of the data sets in a well oriented fashion with respect to the different environmental conditions where there is an accurate analysis with respect to

  10. Realization-Based System Identification with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel N.

    The identification of dynamic system behavior from experimentally measured or computationally simulated data is fundamental to the fields of control system design, modal analysis, and defect detection. In this dissertation, methods for system identification are developed based on classical linear system realization theory. The common methods of state-space realization from a measured, discrete-time impulse response are generalized to the following additional types of experiments: measured step responses, arbitrary sets of input-output data, and estimated cross-covariance functions of input-output data. The methods are particularly well suited to systems with large input and/or output dimension, for which classical system identification methods based on maximum likelihood estimation may fail due to their reliance on non-convex optimizations. The realization-based methods by themselves require a finite number of linear algebraic operations. Because these methods implicitly optimize cost functions that are linear in state-space parameters, they may be augmented with convex constraints to form convex optimization problems. Several common behavioral constraints are translated into eigenvalue constraints stated as linear matrix inequalities, and the realization-based methods are converted into semidefinite programming problems. Some additional constraints on transient and steady-state behavior are derived and incorporated into a quadratic program, which is solved following the semidefinite program. The newly developed realization-based methods are applied to two experiments: the aeroelastic response of a fighter aircraft and the transient thermal behavior of a light-emitting diode. The algorithms for each experiment are implemented in two freely available software packages.

  11. When are emotions related to group-based appraisals? A comparison between group-based emotions and general group emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, Toon; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y

    2014-12-01

    In the literature on emotions in intergroup relations, it is not always clear how exactly emotions are group-related. Here, we distinguish between emotions that involve appraisals of immediate group concerns (i.e., group-based emotions) and emotions that do not. Recently, general group emotions, measured by asking people how they feel "as a group member" but without specifying an object for these emotions, have been conceptualized as reflecting appraisals of group concerns. In contrast, we propose that general group emotions are best seen as emotions about belonging to a group. In two studies, general group emotions were closely related to emotions that are explicitly measured as belonging emotions. Two further studies showed that general group emotions were not related to appraisals of immediate group concerns, whereas group-based emotions were. We argue for more specificity regarding the group-level aspects of emotion that are tapped by emotion measures.

  12. Direction Identification System of Garlic Clove Based on Machine Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfill the requirements of seeding direction of garlic cloves, the paper proposed a research method of garlic clove direction identification based on machine vision, it expounded the theory of garlic clove direction identification, stated the arithmetic of it, designed the direction identification device of it, then developed the control system of garlic clove direction identification based on machine vision, at last tested the garlic clove direction identification, and the result of the experiment certificated that the rate of garlic clove direction identification could reach to more than 97%, and it demonstrated that the research is of high feasibility and technological values.

  13. Identification of the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group I Gene, FANCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine C. Dorsman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the gene underlying Fanconi anemia (FA complementation group I we studied informative FA-I families by a genome-wide linkage analysis, which resulted in 4 candidate regions together encompassing 351 genes. Candidates were selected via bioinformatics and data mining on the basis of their resemblance to other FA genes/proteins acting in the FA pathway, such as: degree of evolutionary conservation, presence of nuclear localization signals and pattern of tissue-dependent expression. We found a candidate, KIAA1794 on chromosome 15q25-26, to be mutated in 8 affected individuals previously assigned to complementation group I. Western blots of endogenous FANCI indicated that functionally active KIAA1794 protein is lacking in FA-I individuals. Knock-down of KIAA1794 expression by siRNA in HeLa cells caused excessive chromosomal breakage induced by mitomycin C, a hallmark of FA cells. Furthermore, phenotypic reversion of a patient-derived cell line was associated with a secondary genetic alteration at the KIAA1794 locus. These data add up to two conclusions. First, KIAA1794 is a FA gene. Second, this gene is identical to FANCI, since the patient cell lines found mutated in this study included the reference cell line for group I, EUFA592.

  14. When group members go against the grain: An ironic interactive effect of group identification and normative content on healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Kasia; Cruwys, Tegan; de Wit, John B F; Johnston, Marie; Haslam, S Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Three studies were conducted to examine the effect of group identification and normative content of social identities on healthy eating intentions and behaviour. In Study 1 (N = 87) Australian participants were shown images that portrayed a norm of healthy vs. unhealthy behaviour among Australians. Participants' choices from an online restaurant menu were used to calculate energy content as the dependent variable. In Study 2 (N = 117), female participants were assigned to a healthy or unhealthy norm condition. The dependent variable was the amount of food eaten in a taste test. Social group identification was measured in both studies. In Study 3 (N = 117), both American identification and healthiness norm were experimentally manipulated, and participants' choices from an online restaurant menu constituted the dependent variable. In all three studies, the healthiness norm presented interacted with participants' group identification to predict eating behaviour. Contrary to what would be predicted under the traditional normative social influence account, higher identifiers chose higher energy food from an online menu and ate more food in a taste test when presented with information about their in-group members behaving healthily. The exact psychological mechanism responsible for these results remains unclear, but the pattern of means can be interpreted as evidence of vicarious licensing, whereby participants feel less motivated to make healthy food choices after being presented with content suggesting that other in-group members are engaging in healthy behaviour. These results suggest a more complex interplay between group membership and norms than has previously been proposed.

  15. FINDING FOSSIL GROUPS: OPTICAL IDENTIFICATION AND X-RAY CONFIRMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Eric D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rykoff, Eli S. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dupke, Renato A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Proctor, Robert N. [Departamento de Astronomia, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lopes de Oliveira, Raimundo [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Garmire, Gordon P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Koester, Benjamin P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); McKay, Timothy A., E-mail: milleric@mit.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We report the discovery of 12 new fossil groups (FGs) of galaxies, systems dominated by a single giant elliptical galaxy and cluster-scale gravitational potential, but lacking the population of bright galaxies typically seen in galaxy clusters. These FGs, selected from the maxBCG optical cluster catalog, were detected in snapshot observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We detail the highly successful selection method, with an 80% success rate in identifying 12 FGs from our target sample of 15 candidates. For 11 of the systems, we determine the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and hydrostatic mass, which do not deviate significantly from expectations for normal systems, spanning a range typical of rich groups and poor clusters of galaxies. A small number of detected FGs are morphologically irregular, possibly due to past mergers, interaction of the intra-group medium with a central active galactic nucleus (AGN), or superposition of multiple massive halos. Two-thirds of the X-ray-detected FGs exhibit X-ray emission associated with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), although we are unable to distinguish between AGN and extended thermal galaxy emission using the current data. This sample representing a large increase in the number of known FGs, will be invaluable for future planned observations to determine FG temperature, gas density, metal abundance, and mass distributions, and to compare to normal (non-fossil) systems. Finally, the presence of a population of galaxy-poor systems may bias mass function determinations that measure richness from galaxy counts. When used to constrain power spectrum normalization and {Omega}{sub m}, these biased mass functions may in turn bias these results.

  16. The Identification of Talents in Socially Underprivileged Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bertoni, Alicia Lucino; de Carranza, Maria Cristina Vesco

    Maintaining that the environment in general and schools in particular largely influence whether an individual's talents will be identified/encouraged or ignored/discouraged, the document focuses on ways to identify and stimulate talents in socially underprivileged individuals. The study was based on two approaches. The first approach, systems…

  17. The Identification of Talents in Socially Underprivileged Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bertoni, Alicia Lucino; de Carranza, Maria Cristina Vesco

    Maintaining that the environment in general and schools in particular largely influence whether an individual's talents will be identified/encouraged or ignored/discouraged, the document focuses on ways to identify and stimulate talents in socially underprivileged individuals. The study was based on two approaches. The first approach, systems…

  18. [Effectiveness of enneagram group counseling for self-identification and depression in nursing college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Seop; Yoon, Jeong Ah; Do, Keong Jin

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of enneagram group counseling program on self-identification and depression in nursing college students. Three groups, categorized by how the students solve their conflicts, were selected to identify changes from the program. A quasi-experimental study with a non-equivalent control group and pre posttest design was used. Participants were assigned to the experimental group (n=30) or control group (n=33). The experimental group participated in enneagram group counseling program for 38 hours through eight sessions covering four different topics. Collected data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, t-test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Total self-identity score for the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups for depression scores. The Assertive and Compliant groups demonstrated significant change in self-identification while the Withdrawn groups did not reveal any change. Results indicate that the enneagram group counseling program is very effective in establishing positive self-identification for nursing college students who face developmental crisis and stressful situations. It is also expected that this program would be useful to enhance the students' confidence through a deeper understanding and acceptance of themselves.

  19. The political downside of dual identity: group identifications and religious political mobilization of Muslim minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinovic, Borja; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2014-12-01

    Research on the political mobilization of ethnic minorities has shown that dual ethno-national identification facilitates involvement in political action on behalf of the ethnic group. This study extends this research by proposing that a dual identity can impede political mobilization on behalf of another relevant in-group--the religious community - especially if this in-group is not accepted by the wider society. Using a sample of 641 Muslims of Turkish origin living in Germany and the Netherlands, dual ethno-national identity (Turkish-German/Turkish-Dutch) was examined in relation to religious Muslim identification and religious political mobilization. Dual identity was expected to be indirectly related to lower mobilization via decreased religious group identification. Further, this mediating process was predicted to be stronger for Turkish Muslims who perceived relatively high religious group discrimination. In both countries we found support for the mediating hypothesis, however, the moderating role of discrimination was confirmed only for the Netherlands. Turkish-Dutch identification was associated with lower support for religious political mobilization because of lower Muslim identification only for Turkish-Dutch participants who perceived high levels of discrimination. These findings indicate that a strong dual (ethno-national) identity can undermine minority members' support for political rights and actions on behalf of a third relevant in-group, and therefore qualify the social psychological benefits of the dual identity model.

  20. Children's Subjective Identification with Social Groups: A Group-Reference Effect Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mark; Sani, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    A study is reported that seeks to examine 5-, 7-, and 10-year-old children's internalization of in-groups within the self-concept. Methodologically, the study draws upon the self-reference effect, extending it to the group-level identity. In particular, it was found that participants' encoding of information with reference to in-groups (family,…

  1. Escaping the Self: Identity, Group Identification and Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hardie-Bick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article draws on the early work of Erich Fromm. In Escape from Freedom Fromm (1969 [1941] directly addressed the psychological mechanisms of escape modern individuals employ to protect themselves from feelings of ontological insecurity and existential estrangement. The article builds on Fromm’s analysis by discussing the significance of his escape mechanisms for understanding the dynamic psychological attractions of identifying with entitative groups. Fromm’s work will be discussed in relation to Hogg’s recent work on uncertainty-identity theory. The aim of the article is to examine the advantages of combining Fromm’s psychoanalytic analysis with Hogg’s uncertainty-identity theory and to highlight the potential this approach has for understanding why groups engage in violent and destructive behaviour. Este artículo se inspira en las primeras obras de Erich Fromm. En El miedo a la libertad, Fromm (1969 [1941] abordó directamente los mecanismos psicológicos de evasión que los individuos modernos emplean para protegerse de los sentimientos de inseguridad ontológica y distanciamiento existencial. Este artículo se basa en el análisis de Fromm exponiendo el significado de sus mecanismos de evasión para entender las atracciones psicológicas dinámicas de identificación con grupos entitativos. Se analizará la obra de Fromm en relación con la obra reciente de Hogg sobre la teoría de incertidumbre identitaria. El objetivo del artículo es examinar las ventajas de combinar el análisis psicoanalítico de Fromm con la teoría de incertidumbre identitaria de Hogg, y destacar el potencial que tiene esta aproximación para comprender por qué los grupos adoptan un comportamiento violento y destructivo. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2875737

  2. Group representations, error bases and quantum codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, E

    1996-01-01

    This report continues the discussion of unitary error bases and quantum codes. Nice error bases are characterized in terms of the existence of certain characters in a group. A general construction for error bases which are non-abelian over the center is given. The method for obtaining codes due to Calderbank et al. is generalized and expressed purely in representation theoretic terms. The significance of the inertia subgroup both for constructing codes and obtaining the set of transversally implementable operations is demonstrated.

  3. Does group identification facilitate or prevent collective guilt about past misdeeds? Resolving the paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Olivier; Licata, Laurent; Pierucci, Sabrina

    2011-09-01

    The influence of group identification on collective guilt and attitudes towards reparation was examined in the context of the Belgian colonization of Congo. People should experience collective emotions to the extent that being a member of the relevant group is part of their self-concept. Yet, the acknowledgement of ingroup responsibility for past misdeeds is particularly threatening for high identifiers and may lead to defensive reactions aimed at avoiding guilt. We therefore predicted, and found, a curvilinear effect of identification on collective guilt. Attitudes towards reparation of past wrongdoings were also assessed and yielded a linear trend: identification predicted less favourable attitudes towards reparation but this effect was marginally stronger as identification increased.

  4. When are emotions related to group-based appraisals? : A comparison between group-based emotions and general group emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, Toon; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the literature on emotions in intergroup relations, it is not always clear how exactly emotions are group-related. Here, we distinguish between emotions that involve appraisals of immediate group concerns (i.e., group-based emotions) and emotions that do not. Recently, general group emotions, mea

  5. Identification of group A Streptococcus antigenic determinants upregulated in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Kowthar Y; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G; Chang, Peter; Bast, Darrin J; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D; de Azavedo, Joyce C S

    2005-09-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes a range of diseases in humans, from mild noninvasive infections to severe invasive infections. The molecular basis for the varying severity of disease remains unclear. We identified genes expressed during invasive disease using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT), applied for the first time in a gram-positive organism. Convalescent-phase sera from patients with invasive disease were pooled, adsorbed against antigens derived from in vitro-grown GAS, and used to screen a GAS genomic expression library. A murine model of invasive GAS disease was included as an additional source of sera for screening. Sequencing DNA inserts from clones reactive with both human and mouse sera indicated 16 open reading frames with homology to genes involved in metabolic activity to genes of unknown function. Of these, seven genes were assessed for their differential expression by quantitative real-time PCR both in vivo, utilizing a murine model of invasive GAS disease, and in vitro at different time points of growth. Three gene products-a putative penicillin-binding protein 1A, a putative lipoprotein, and a conserved hypothetical protein homologous to a putative translation initiation inhibitor in Vibrio vulnificus-were upregulated in vivo, suggesting that these genes play a role during invasive disease.

  6. Identification of voters with interest groups improves the electoral chances of the challenger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sadiraj; J. Tuinstra; F. van Winden

    2010-01-01

    This short paper investigates the consequences of voters identifying with special interest groups in a spatial model of electoral competition. We show that by effectively coordinating voting behavior, identification with interest groups leads to an increase in the size of the winning set, that is, t

  7. Study on the Process of Gender Identification : Process by Children in Kindergarten Peer Groups

    OpenAIRE

    大滝, 世津子; Setsuko, OHTAKI; 東京大学大学院; Graduate School, The University of Tokyo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the formation of groups in kindergarten and the process of gender identification by children through their kindergarten life. In the field of sociology of education in Japan, there have been some studies on the process of gender identification. However, they have focused on the intensification process of gender categories, but tended to ignore the trigger that leads children to recognize their own "correct" gender, and how they ...

  8. Privacy Preserving Recommendation System Based on Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Shang; Hui, Yuk; Hui, Pan; Cuff, Paul; Kulkarni, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Recommendation systems have received considerable attention in the recent decades. Yet with the development of information technology and social media, the risk in revealing private data to service providers has been a growing concern to more and more users. Trade-offs between quality and privacy in recommendation systems naturally arise. In this paper, we present a privacy preserving recommendation framework based on groups. The main idea is to use groups as a natural middleware to preserve ...

  9. Grouping Optimization Based on Social Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Chang Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouping based on social relationships is a complex problem since the social relationships within a group usually form a complicated network. To solve the problem, a novel approach which uses a combined sociometry and genetic algorithm (CSGA is presented. A new nonlinear relation model derived from the sociometry is established to measure the social relationships, which are then used as the basis in genetic algorithm (GA program to optimize the grouping. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, three real datasets collected from a famous college in Taiwan were utilized. Experimental results show that CSGA optimizes the grouping effectively and efficiently and students are very satisfied with the grouping results, feel the proposed approach interesting, and show a high repeat intention of using it. In addition, a paired sample t-test shows that the overall satisfaction on the proposed CSGA approach is significantly higher than the random method.

  10. Distribution of Diego blood group alleles and identification of four novel mutations on exon 19 of SLC4A1 gene in the Chinese Han population by polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X G; He, J; He, Y M; Tao, S D; Ying, Y L; Zhu, F M; Lv, H J; Yan, L X

    2011-04-01

    The Diego blood group system plays an important role in transfusion medicine. Genotyping of DI1 and DI2 alleles is helpful for the investigation into haemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) and for the development of rare blood group databases. Here, we set up a polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) method for genotyping of Diego blood group alleles. Specific primers for exon 19 of the solute carrier family 4, anion exchanger, member1 (SLC4A1) gene were designed, and our PCR-SBT method was established and optimized for Diego genotyping. A total of 1053 samples from the Chinese Han population and the family members of a rare proband with DI1/DI1 genotype were investigated by the PCR-SBT method. An allele-specific primer PCR (PCR-ASP) was used to verify the reliability of the PCR-SBT method. The frequencies of DI1 and DI2 alleles in the Chinese Han population were 0.0247 and 0.9753, respectively. Six new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in the sequenced regions of the SLC4A1 gene, and four novel SNPs located in the exon 19, in which one SNP could cause an amino acid alteration of Ala858Ser on erythrocyte anion exchanger protein 1. The genotypes for Diego blood group were identical among 41 selected samples with PCR-ASP and PCR-SBT. The PCR-SBT method can be used in Diego genotyping as a substitute of serological technique when the antisera is lacking and was suitable for screening large numbers of donors in rare blood group databases. © 2010 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2010 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. Grouping in object recognition: the role of a Gestalt law in letter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelli, Denis G; Majaj, Najib J; Raizman, Noah; Christian, Christopher J; Kim, Edward; Palomares, Melanie C

    2009-02-01

    The Gestalt psychologists reported a set of laws describing how vision groups elements to recognize objects. The Gestalt laws "prescribe for us what we are to recognize 'as one thing'" (Kohler, 1920). Were they right? Does object recognition involve grouping? Tests of the laws of grouping have been favourable, but mostly assessed only detection, not identification, of the compound object. The grouping of elements seen in the detection experiments with lattices and "snakes in the grass" is compelling, but falls far short of the vivid everyday experience of recognizing a familiar, meaningful, named thing, which mediates the ordinary identification of an object. Thus, after nearly a century, there is hardly any evidence that grouping plays a role in ordinary object recognition. To assess grouping in object recognition, we made letters out of grating patches and measured threshold contrast for identifying these letters in visual noise as a function of perturbation of grating orientation, phase, and offset. We define a new measure, "wiggle", to characterize the degree to which these various perturbations violate the Gestalt law of good continuation. We find that efficiency for letter identification is inversely proportional to wiggle and is wholly determined by wiggle, independent of how the wiggle was produced. Thus the effects of three different kinds of shape perturbation on letter identifiability are predicted by a single measure of goodness of continuation. This shows that letter identification obeys the Gestalt law of good continuation and may be the first confirmation of the original Gestalt claim that object recognition involves grouping.

  12. Unity through Diversity: Value-in-Diversity Beliefs, Work Group Diversity, and Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. van Knippenberg (Daan); S.A. Haslam (Alexander); M.J. Platow (Michael)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractResearch on work group diversity has more or less neglected the possibility that reactions to diversity may be informed by individuals' beliefs about the value of diversity (vs. homogeneity) for their work group. We studied the role of such diversity beliefs as a moderator of the relatio

  13. Unity through Diversity: Value-in-Diversity Beliefs, Work Group Diversity, and Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. van Knippenberg (Daan); S.A. Haslam (Alexander); M.J. Platow (Michael)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractResearch on work group diversity has more or less neglected the possibility that reactions to diversity may be informed by individuals' beliefs about the value of diversity (vs. homogeneity) for their work group. We studied the role of such diversity beliefs as a moderator of the relatio

  14. CRFs based de-identification of medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Guan, Yi; Cheng, Jianyi; Cen, Keting; Hua, Wenlan

    2016-01-01

    De-identification is a shared task of the 2014 i2b2/UTHealth challenge. The purpose of this task is to remove protected health information (PHI) from medical records. In this paper, we propose a novel de-identifier, WI-deId, based on conditional random fields (CRFs). A preprocessing module, which tokenizes the medical records using regular expressions and an off-the-shelf tokenizer, is introduced, and three groups of features are extracted to train the de-identifier model. The experiment shows that our system is effective in the de-identification of medical records, achieving a micro-F1 of 0.9232 at the i2b2 strict entity evaluation level. PMID:26315662

  15. Progress of DNA-based Methods for Species Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhen; ZHANG Su-hua; WANG Zheng; BIAN Ying-nan; LI Cheng-tao

    2015-01-01

    Species identification of biological samples is widely used in such fields as forensic science and food industry. A variety of accurate and reliable methods have been developed in recent years. The cur-rent reviewshows common target genes and screening criteria suitable for species identification, and de-scribed various DNA-based molecular biology methods about species identification. Additionally, it dis-cusses the future development of species identification combined with real-time PCR and sequencing technologies.

  16. Victimization of high performers: the roles of envy and work group identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Glomb, Theresa M

    2014-07-01

    Drawing from victim precipitation, social comparison, and identity theories, this study develops and tests an integrative model of the victimization of high-performing employees. We examine envy as an explanatory mechanism of the victimization of high performers from fellow group members and propose work group identification as a moderator of this envy mechanism. Study 1, in a sample of 4,874 university staff employees in 339 work groups, supports the proposition that high performers are more likely to be targets of victimization. In Study 2, multisource data collected at 2 time points (217 employees in 67 work groups in 3 organizations), supports the proposition that high performers are more likely to be targets of victimization because of fellow group members' envy, and work group identification mitigates the mediated relationship.

  17. Perceived Ethnic Discrimination and Problem Behaviors in Muslim Immigrant Early Adolescents : Moderating Effects of Ethnic, Religious, and National Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, Marlies; Stevens, Gonneke W. J. M.; Verkuijten, Maykel

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has identified ethnic group identification as a moderator in the relationship between perceived ethnic discrimination and problem behaviors in ethnic minority children. However, little is known about the influence of religious and host national identification on this relationship.

  18. Survival associated pathway identification with group Lp penalized global AUC maximization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhenqiu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been demonstrated that genes in a cell do not act independently. They interact with one another to complete certain biological processes or to implement certain molecular functions. How to incorporate biological pathways or functional groups into the model and identify survival associated gene pathways is still a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative gradient based method for survival analysis with group Lp penalized global AUC summary maximization. Unlike LASSO, Lp (p 1. We first extend Lp for individual gene identification to group Lp penalty for pathway selection, and then develop a novel iterative gradient algorithm for penalized global AUC summary maximization (IGGAUCS. This method incorporates the genetic pathways into global AUC summary maximization and identifies survival associated pathways instead of individual genes. The tuning parameters are determined using 10-fold cross validation with training data only. The prediction performance is evaluated using test data. We apply the proposed method to survival outcome analysis with gene expression profile and identify multiple pathways simultaneously. Experimental results with simulation and gene expression data demonstrate that the proposed procedures can be used for identifying important biological pathways that are related to survival phenotype and for building a parsimonious model for predicting the survival times.

  19. Shared leadership and group identification in healthcare: The leadership beliefs of clinicians working in interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Craig; Mason, Barbara

    2017-02-28

    Despite the proposed benefits of applying shared and distributed leadership models in healthcare, few studies have explored the leadership beliefs of clinicians and ascertained whether differences exist between professions. The current article aims to address these gaps and, additionally, examine whether clinicians' leadership beliefs are associated with the strength of their professional and team identifications. An online survey was responded to by 229 healthcare workers from community interprofessional teams in mental health settings across the East of England. No differences emerged between professional groups in their leadership beliefs; all professions reported a high level of agreement with shared leadership. A positive association emerged between professional identification and shared leadership in that participants who expressed the strongest level of profession identification also reported the greatest agreement with shared leadership. The same association was demonstrated for team identification and shared leadership. The findings highlight the important link between group identification and leadership beliefs, suggesting that strategies that promote strong professional and team identifications in interprofessional teams are likely to be conducive to clinicians supporting principles of shared leadership. Future research is needed to strengthen this link and examine the leadership practices of healthcare workers.

  20. Identification and standardization of maneuvers based upon operational flight data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yongjun; Dong Jiang; Liu Xiaodong; Zhang Lixin

    2015-01-01

    To find a way of loads analysis from operational flight data for advanced aircraft, maneuver identification and standardization jobs are conducted in this paper. For thousands of sor-ties from one aircraft, after studying the flight attitude when performing actions, the start and end time of the maneuvers can be determined. According to those time points, various types of maneu-vers during the flight are extracted in the form of multi-parameters time histories. By analyzing the numerical range and curve shape of those parameters, a characteristic data library is established to model all types of maneuvers. Based on this library, a computer procedure using pattern-recogni-tion theory is programmed to conduct automatic maneuver identification with high accuracy. In that way, operational loads are classified according to maneuver type. For a group of identified maneuvers of the same type, after the processes of time normalization, trace shifting, as well as aver-aging and smoothing, the idealization standard time history of each maneuver type is established. Finally, the typical load statuses are determined successfully based on standard maneuvers. The proposed method of maneuver identification and standardization is able to derive operational loads effectively, and might be applied to monitoring loads in Individual Aircraft Tracking Program (IATP).

  1. LDEF materials special investigation group's data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, John W.; Funk, Joan G.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of and contained a wide array of materials, representing the largest collection of materials flown for space exposure and returned for ground-based analyses to date. The results and implications of the data from these materials are the foundation on which future space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been tasked with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the space user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. The format and content of the data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task are discussed. The hardware and software requirements for each of the three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases.

  2. Youth crowds and substance use: The impact of perceived group norm and multiple group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; Vries, de N.K.; Nielsen, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of group identity on adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use was examined through a postal survey. The study included adolescents who identified with 1 subgroup (n = 1425) as well as adolescents who identified with 2 (n = 895) or 3 (n = 339) subgroups. The results showed that ident

  3. Youth crowds and substance use: The impact of perceived group norm and multiple group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; Vries, de N.K.; Nielsen, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of group identity on adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use was examined through a postal survey. The study included adolescents who identified with 1 subgroup (n = 1425) as well as adolescents who identified with 2 (n = 895) or 3 (n = 339) subgroups. The results showed that ident

  4. Electronic Elections Based on Group Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Malina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with electronic elections and votingsystems. The paper presents a secure electronic voting solutionfor small and medium groups of voters. The proposed solutionis based on modern cryptographic schemes such as ElGamalencryption and a group signature scheme that keeps user privacy,ballot authenticity and confidentiality. The solution offers a userrevocation that can be accomplished only by the cooperation oftwo system entities. The solution is experimentally implementedand tested and the performance results are measured. The resultsdemonstrate that the solution is practical and can be run onvarious devices such as PCs, laptops, smartphones, etc.

  5. GROUPING OBJECTS BASED ON THEIR APPEARANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altamirano Robles Luis Carlos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of clustering algorithms for partition to establish a hierarchical structure in a library of object models based on appearance is deployed. The main contribution corresponds to a novel and intuitive algorithm for clustering of models based on their appearance, closer to “human behavior”. This divides the complete set into subclasses. Immediately, divides each of these in a number of predefined groups to complete the levels of hierarchy that the user wants. Whose main purpose is to obtain a competitive classification compared to what a human would perform.

  6. Friendship group identification, multidimensional self-concept, and experience of developmental tasks in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Mark; MacKenzie, Liam; Hewitt, Lisa A

    2006-08-01

    This study applied a social identity perspective to the study of adolescent self-concept and social development. British adolescents aged 14-15 years (N=114) completed a questionnaire which asked them to: (i) rate their degree of identification with a school-based friendship group; (ii) complete a measure of multi-dimensional self-concept; and (iii) report their experiences of a variety of personal, relational and socio-institutional (e.g., achieving economic independence) developmental tasks. Compared to low identifiers, participants who were highly identified with a friendship group reported highest levels of self-esteem; and these differences were most marked in non-academic domains of self. High identifiers also displayed higher levels of general self-esteem and reported more positive experiences of personal and relational developmental tasks. The discussion focuses on the potential benefits to understanding of social developmental processes that can be derived from a consideration of adolescents' subjective appraisals of their peer relations.

  7. Attributions to Discrimination and Self-Esteem: The Role of Group Identification and Appraisals

    OpenAIRE

    Eccleston, Collette P.; Major, Brenda N.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This study tested the hypothesis that appraisals of discrimination (i.e. its perceived severity, global aspects, stability, and uncontrollability) mediate the relationship between attributions to discrimination and personal self-esteem. It also tested three models of how ethnic group identification is related to discrimination attributions, discrimination appraisals, and personal self-esteem. In ...

  8. The political downside of dual identity : Group identifications and religious political mobilization of Muslim minorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinovic, Borja; Verkuijten, Maykel

    2014-01-01

    Research on the political mobilization of ethnic minorities has shown that dual ethno-national identification facilitates involvement in political action on behalf of the ethnic group. This study extends this research by proposing that a dual identity can impede political mobilization on behalf of a

  9. Command Control Group Behaviors. Objective 1. A Methodology for and Identification of Command Control Group Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    recordings were DD I JAN 73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED i SECUPITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (K4hen Data Entered) ’Ii...numbers of per- sonnet and 2weapons we now have at our disposal. The command and control (C ) process is one such factor where deficiencies invite...OBSERVATIONAL TASKS Position Codes: 01 10 S1 02 20 S2 03 Brigade 3 30 S3 04 40 S4 05 50 XO 06 60 Entire Group 07 70 Commander (71-"A" Co, 72-"B" Co, 73 -"C" Co

  10. OpenCV Based Disease Identification of Mango Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash Sethupathy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims in classifying and identifying the diseases of mango leaves for Indian agriculture. K-means algorithm is chosen for the disease segmentation, and the disease classification and identification is carried out using the SVM classifier. Disease identification based on analysis of patches or discoloring of leaf will hold good for some of the plant diseases, but some other diseases which will deform the leaf shape cannot be identified based on the same method. In this case leaf shape based disease identification has to be performed. Based on this analysis two topics are addressed in this research paper. (1 Disease identification using the OpenCV libraries (2 Leaf shape based disease identification.

  11. Image-based air target identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glais, Thierry; Ayoun, Andre

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents the main results obtained through a study on aircraft identification and attitude estimation conducted by Thomson TRT Defense for the French Ministry of Defense/Direction Generale de l'Armement/Direction des Constructions Aeronautiques. The purpose of this study was automatic assistance to aircraft identification. Indeed, modern fight airplanes are equipped with optronic systems capable of detecting and tracking enemy aircraft. In order to react quickly, the pilot must know at least the target type and possibly its identity. Recognition of the target type and attitude is obtained by matching the observed image with patterns belonging to a database. Two matching algorithms, which have been tested, are presented. The first one, based on the contour Fourier transform, needs the complete target silhouette extraction. The second one, belonging to the class of prediction and verification algorithms, compares the individual parts of the target to the database and is able to recognize the target, even when it is partially occluded or ill-segmented due to the lack of contrast between the target and its environment. An original feature of the algorithm stays in a validation process which increases the reliability of transmitted answers. In case of low confidence, no answer is provided. In addition, successive answers are consolidated. This strategy is interesting especially for image sequences where the tracked airplane achieves attitude evolution or even simply flies over various backgrounds. The main output of this study is the parametric analysis of various factors which influence performance such as contrast, background complexity, distance, attitude and type. The evaluation method, largely based on image synthesis (including image sequences), allows fine interpretation of statistical results. Misclassification errors occur when resolution is not sufficient or when complex backgrounds cause erroneous segmentation. Best results are obtained when the

  12. A new tool for the molecular identification of Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group: the glass slide microarray approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblauwe, I; de Witte, J C; de Deken, G; de Deken, R; Madder, M; van Erk, S; Hoza, F A; Lathouwers, D; Geysen, D

    2012-03-01

    Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are potential vectors of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV 8), which was introduced into central Western Europe in 2006. Correct morphological species identification of Obsoletus group females is especially difficult and molecular identification is the method of choice. In this study we present a new molecular tool based on probe hybridization using a DNA microarray format to identify Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group. The internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) gene sequences of 55 Culicoides belonging to 13 different species were determined and used, together with 19 Culicoides ITS1 sequences sourced from GenBank, to design species-specific probes for the microarray test. This test was evaluated using the amplified ITS1 sequences of another 85 Culicoides specimens, belonging to 11 species. The microarray test successfully identified all samples (100%) of the Obsoletus group, identifying each specimen to species level within the group. This test has several advantages over existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular tools, including possible capability for parallel analysis of many species, high sensitivity and specificity, and low background signal noise. Hand-spotting of the microarray slide and the use of detection chemistry make this alternative technique affordable and feasible for any diagnostic laboratory with PCR facilities.

  13. The Impact of Merger Status and Relative Representation on Identification with a Merger Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Boen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment tested to what extent identification with a new merger group is determined by the status of that merger group and by the relative representation of the pre-merger ingroup. One hundred university students were assigned to a team of 'inductive' thinkers, and were later merged with a team of 'deductive' thinkers to form a team of 'analyst' thinkers. The status of the merger group (low, high and the relative representation of the ingroup into the novel merger group (low, high were manipulated. Participants identified more with the merger group in the high than in the low status condition, and they identified more in the high than in the low representation condition. The predicted interaction between relative representation and merger status was not significant. However, relative representation did interact with participants' pre-merger identification: Pre- and post-merger identification were positively related when the ingroup was highly represented, but 'negatively' when the ingroup was lowly represented.

  14. Known-Groups and Concurrent Validity of the Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Zhu

    Full Text Available The Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT is a new test designed to assess the tone identification abilities of children with hearing impairment (HI. Evidence for reliability and sensitivity has been reported. The present study aimed to evaluate the known-groups and concurrent validity of the MTIT.The MTIT and Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility test (MPSI were administered in quiet and in noise conditions. The known-groups validity was evaluated by comparing the performance of the MTIT on children with two different levels of HI. The MPSI was included to evaluate the concurrent validity of the MTIT.81 children with HI were recruited in the present study. They were Mandarin-speaking children with profound HI (mean age = 9; 0, n = 41 and with moderate to severe HI (mean age = 8; 9, n = 40.Scores on the MTIT differed between the two groups with different hearing levels suggesting good known-groups validity. A strong relationship between tone and sentence perception both in quiet and in noise provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity.The present study confirmed that the MTIT has good known-groups validity and provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity. The MTIT could be used to evaluate tone identification ability in children with HI with confidence.

  15. 一种基于情感倾向分析的网络团体意见领袖识别算法%Networking Groups Opinion Leader Identification Algorithms Based on Sentiment Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖宇; 许炜; 夏霖

    2012-01-01

    意见领袖对网络舆情的产生和发展有着重要的指引作用,挖掘和识别网络社区中的意见领袖有重要的现实意义.结合聚类算法和分类算法的优势,提出一种基于话题内容分析的兴趣团体发现方法,以有效识别出兴趣团体.并通过分析用户回帖情感倾向来计算用户间链接的权重.在此基础上,提出了一种新的LeaderRank意见领袖发现算法,通过实验证明该算法能有效提高意见领袖挖掘的准确度.%Opinion leaders are core users in online communities, which can guide the direction of public opinion. We proposed a method to find the interest group based on topic content analysis, which combines the advantages of clustering and classification algorithms. Then we used the method of sentiment analysis to define the authority value as the weight of the link between users. On this basis,an algorithm named LeaderRank was proposed to identify the opinion leaders in BBS,and experiments indicate that LeaderRank algorithm can effectively improve the accuracy of leaders mining.

  16. The application of artificial intelligence for the identification of the maceral groups and mineral components of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarczuk, Mariusz; Skiba, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The correct and consistent identification of the petrographic properties of coal is an important issue for researchers in the fields of mining and geology. As part of the study described in this paper, investigations concerning the application of artificial intelligence methods for the identification of the aforementioned characteristics were carried out. The methods in question were used to identify the maceral groups of coal, i.e. vitrinite, inertinite, and liptinite. Additionally, an attempt was made to identify some non-organic minerals. The analyses were performed using pattern recognition techniques (NN, kNN), as well as artificial neural network techniques (a multilayer perceptron - MLP). The classification process was carried out using microscopy images of polished sections of coals. A multidimensional feature space was defined, which made it possible to classify the discussed structures automatically, based on the methods of pattern recognition and algorithms of the artificial neural networks. Also, from the study we assessed the impact of the parameters for which the applied methods proved effective upon the final outcome of the classification procedure. The result of the analyses was a high percentage (over 97%) of correct classifications of maceral groups and mineral components. The paper discusses also an attempt to analyze particular macerals of the inertinite group. It was demonstrated that using artificial neural networks to this end makes it possible to classify the macerals properly in over 91% of cases. Thus, it was proved that artificial intelligence methods can be successfully applied for the identification of selected petrographic features of coal.

  17. INDIVIDUAL COMMUNICATION TRANSMITTER IDENTIFICATION BASED ON MULTIFRACTAL ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Chunhui; Wei Ping; Lou Zhiyou; Xiao Xianci

    2005-01-01

    In this letter, the communication transmitter transient signals are analyzed based on the time-variant hierarchy exponents of multifractal analysis. The species of optimized sample set is selected as the template of transmitter identification, so that the individual communication transmitter identification can be realized. The turn-on signals of four transmitters are used in the simulation. The experimental results show that the multifractal character of transmitter transient signals is an effective character of individual transmitter identification.

  18. Ligand-based identification of environmental estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, C.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Oprea, T.I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chae, K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) paradigm, was used to examine the estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinities of a series of structurally diverse natural, synthetic, and environmental chemicals of interest. The CoMFA/3D-QSAR model is statistically robust and internally consistent, and successfully illustrates that the overall steric and electrostatic properties of structurally diverse ligands for the estrogen receptor are both necessary and sufficient to describe the binding affinity. The ability of the model to accurately predict the ER binding affinity of an external test set of molecules suggests that structure-based 3D-QSAR models may be used to supplement the process of endocrine disrupter identification through prioritization of novel compounds for bioassay. The general application of this 3D-QSAR model within a toxicological framework is, at present, limited only by the quantity and quality of biological data for relevant biomarkers of toxicity and hormonal responsiveness. 28 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Arabic writer identification based on diacritic's features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliki, Makki; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2012-06-01

    Natural languages like Arabic, Kurdish, Farsi (Persian), Urdu, and any other similar languages have many features, which make them different from other languages like Latin's script. One of these important features is diacritics. These diacritics are classified as: compulsory like dots which are used to identify/differentiate letters, and optional like short vowels which are used to emphasis consonants. Most indigenous and well trained writers often do not use all or some of these second class of diacritics, and expert readers can infer their presence within the context of the writer text. In this paper, we investigate the use of diacritics shapes and other characteristic as parameters of feature vectors for Arabic writer identification/verification. Segmentation techniques are used to extract the diacritics-based feature vectors from examples of Arabic handwritten text. The results of evaluation test will be presented, which has been carried out on an in-house database of 50 writers. Also the viability of using diacritics for writer recognition will be demonstrated.

  20. Team-oriented leadership: the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessner, Steffen R; van Knippenberg, Daan; van Ginkel, Wendy; Sleebos, Ed

    2013-07-01

    We examined the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification on team-oriented behavior of leaders, thus extending the social identity perspective on leadership to the study of leader behavior. An experimental study (N = 152) supported our hypothesis that leader accountability relates more strongly to team-oriented behavior for group nonprototypical leaders than for group prototypical leaders. A multisource field study with leaders (N = 64) and their followers (N = 209) indicated that this interactive effect is more pronounced for leaders who identify more strongly with their team. We discuss how these findings further develop the social identity analysis of leadership.

  1. Personal value preferences, group identifications, and cultural practices of Palestinian Israelis working in close contact with Jewish Israelis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Abu Kheit, Ayat

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the connection between personal value preferences, group identifications, and cultural practices among Palestinian Israelis working in close contact with the Jewish population in Israel. One hundred twenty-two Palestinian Israelis participated in the study. The participants were employed in different professional positions in the Tel Aviv Metropolitan area and were recruited to the study using the snowball technique. A stronger national identification was associated with a higher preference for the security and conformity values, and a lower preference for the humility values. A stronger ethnic identification was associated with a lower preference for the security, power, and stimulation values. Group identifications mediated the connection between personal value preferences and cultural practices. A longer time working in close contact with the majority group and less frequent visits home were associated with a greater adherence to the majority group's cultural practices but not with adherence to the ethnic group's practices and not with the group identifications.

  2. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huygens Flavia

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data.

  3. Identification of an active ID-like group of SINEs in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, David H; Jamison, Nicole

    2007-09-01

    The mouse genome consists of five known families of SINEs: B1, B2, B4/RSINE, ID, and MIR. Using RT-PCR we identified a germ-line transcript that demonstrates 92.7% sequence identity to ID (excluding primer sequence), yet a BLAST search identified numerous matches of 100% sequence identity. We analyzed four of these elements for their presence in orthologous genes in strains and subspecies of Mus musculus as well as other species of Mus using a PCR-based assay. All four analyzed elements were identified either only in M. musculus or exclusively in both M. musculus and M. domesticus, indicative of recent integrations. In conjunction with the identification of transcripts, we present an active ID-like group of elements that is not derived from the proposed BC1 master gene of ID elements. A BLAST of the rat genome indicated that these elements were not in the rat. Therefore, this family of SINEs has recently evolved, and since it has thus far been observed mainly in M. musculus, we refer to this family as MMIDL.

  4. Young and older emotional faces: are there age group differences in expression identification and memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Natalie C; Johnson, Marcia K

    2009-06-01

    Studies have found that older compared with young adults are less able to identify facial expressions and have worse memory for negative than for positive faces, but those studies have used only young faces. Studies finding that both age groups are more accurate at recognizing faces of their own than other ages have used mostly neutral faces. Thus, age differences in processing faces may not extend to older faces, and preferential memory for own age faces may not extend to emotional faces. To investigate these possibilities, young and older participants viewed young and older faces presented either with happy, angry, or neutral expressions; participants identified the expressions displayed and then completed a surprise face recognition task. Older compared with young participants were less able to identify expressions of angry young and older faces and (based on participants' categorizations) remembered angry faces less well than happy faces. There was no evidence of an own age bias in memory, but self-reported frequency of contact with young and older adults and awareness of own emotions played a role in expression identification of and memory for young and older faces.

  5. Intelligent Storage System Based on Automatic Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarovszki Peter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes RFID technology in conjunction with warehouse management systems. Article also deals with automatic identification and data capture technologies and each processes, which are used in warehouse management system. It describes processes from entering goods into production to identification of goods and also palletizing, storing, bin transferring and removing goods from warehouse. Article focuses on utilizing AMP middleware in WMS processes in Nowadays, the identification of goods in most warehouses is carried through barcodes. In this article we want to specify, how can be processes described above identified through RFID technology. All results are verified by measurement in our AIDC laboratory, which is located at the University of Žilina, and also in Laboratory of Automatic Identification Goods and Services located in GS1 Slovakia. The results of our research bring the new point of view and indicate the ways using of RFID technology in warehouse management system.

  6. Biased evaluations of in-group and out-group spectator behavior at sporting events: the importance of team identification and threats to social identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wann, Daniel L; Grieve, Frederick G

    2005-10-01

    Previous researchers have demonstrated that sport fans often exhibit in-group bias by reporting more positive evaluations of fellow in-group fans than of rival out-group fans. The authors designed the present investigation to extend previous research by replicating past efforts in a field setting and to advance our understanding of the impact of social identity threat. The present authors hypothesized that, in addition to the base-level in-group bias effect, the bias effect would be most pronounced in situations involving a threat to one's social identity. The authors believed that fans of a losing team and fans of a home team would experience threats to their identity and, consequently, exhibit particularly high levels of in-group favoritism. Further, because past researchers had shown that one's level of group identification plays a vital role in social perception, the present authors predicted an interaction in which the greatest amount of bias would be exhibited by highly identified fans rooting for a home team that had lost. Data gathered from spectators (N = 148) at 2 North American college basketball games confirmed the authors' expectations, with the exception that the supporters of the winning team reported higher levels of bias. The authors discussed the factors underlying the unexpected game outcome effect and the use of in-group bias as a coping strategy.

  7. Ingroup identification and group-level narcissism as predictors of U.S. citizens' attitudes and behavior toward Arab immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Patricia A; Kenworthy, Jared B; Popan, Jason R

    2010-09-01

    In four studies, the authors explored factors contributing to negative attitudes and behavior toward Arab immigrants in the United States. In Study 1, Americans reported greater threat from Arabs, compared to other groups (e.g., Latino, Asian). In Study 2, they tested the effects of ingroup identification and group-level narcissism on attitudes toward Arab, Latino, Asian, and European immigrants. Identification interacted with group narcissism in predicting attitudes toward Arab (but not other) immigrants, such that identification predicted negative attitudes toward Arab immigrants only at mean and high levels of group narcissism. Study 3 explored the convergent and discriminant validity of the group narcissism construct. In Study 4, the authors added a behavioral dependent measure. Again, ingroup identification predicted negative behavior and attitudes toward an Arab immigrant group (but not comparison groups) only at mean and high levels of group narcissism. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  8. Roles Distribution and Group Identification in Sport Teams with Joint-Consistent Interaction Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Kolosov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents comparative analysis of differentiated space choice, presenting subjectively perceived ground of concrete athlete personal activity within Ukrainian National Fencing Team (13 women and 12 men. The received data gives reasons to believe that role repertoire of the team depends on team identification, but at the same time it has impact on activity redistribution inside the group, significant for competition actions regulation and optimal formation determination.

  9. Rapid method for identification of group B streptococci in neonatal blood cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, R. L.; Harada, W A

    1981-01-01

    A rapid technique used for the identification of Streptococcus agalactiae, Lancefield group B, from the blood cultures of two neonatal infants is reported. The method utilized the Phadebact Streptococcus Test System (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Piscataway, N.J.) and the supernatant from 13- and 14-h blood cultures. Additional studies with simulated neonatal blood cultures revealed that this method was reproducible. Additional studies also revealed that some non-specific agglutination did occur, wh...

  10. Roles Distribution and Group Identification in Sport Teams with Joint-Consistent Interaction Mode

    OpenAIRE

    A.B. Kolosov; S.M. Voutenko

    2012-01-01

    The article presents comparative analysis of differentiated space choice, presenting subjectively perceived ground of concrete athlete personal activity within Ukrainian National Fencing Team (13 women and 12 men). The received data gives reasons to believe that role repertoire of the team depends on team identification, but at the same time it has impact on activity redistribution inside the group, significant for competition actions regulation and optimal formation determination.

  11. Gaussian process based recursive system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüher, Jakub; Šimandl, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of recursive system identification using nonparametric Gaussian process model. Non-linear stochastic system in consideration is affine in control and given in the input-output form. The use of recursive Gaussian process algorithm for non-linear system identification is proposed to alleviate the computational burden of full Gaussian process. The problem of an online hyper-parameter estimation is handled using proposed ad-hoc procedure. The approach to system identification using recursive Gaussian process is compared with full Gaussian process in terms of model error and uncertainty as well as computational demands. Using Monte Carlo simulations it is shown, that the use of recursive Gaussian process with an ad-hoc learning procedure offers converging estimates of hyper-parameters and constant computational demands.

  12. Reduced order observer based identification of base isolated buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satish Nagarajaiah; Prasad Dharap

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify system parameters from the recorded response of base isolated buildings, such as USC hospital building, during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Full state measurements are not available for identification. Additionally, the response is nonlinear due to the yielding of the lead-rubber bearings. Two new approaches are presented in this paper to solve the aforementioned problems. First, a reduced order observer is used to estimate the unmeasured states. Second, a least squares technique with time segments is developed to identify the piece-wise linear system properties. The observer is used to estimate the initial conditions needed for the time segmented identification. A series of equivalent linear system parameters are identified in different time segments. It is shown that the change in system parameters, such as frequencies and damping ratios, due to nonlinear behavior of the lead-rubber bearings, are reliably estimated using the presented technique. It is shown that the response was reduced due to yielding of the lead-rubber bearings and period lengthening.

  13. Automatic Language Identification with Discriminative Language Characterization Based on SVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Hongbin; Li, Ming; Lu, Ping; Yan, Yonghong

    Robust automatic language identification (LID) is the task of identifying the language from a short utterance spoken by an unknown speaker. The mainstream approaches include parallel phone recognition language modeling (PPRLM), support vector machine (SVM) and the general Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). These systems map the cepstral features of spoken utterances into high level scores by classifiers. In this paper, in order to increase the dimension of the score vector and alleviate the inter-speaker variability within the same language, multiple data groups based on supervised speaker clustering are employed to generate the discriminative language characterization score vectors (DLCSV). The back-end SVM classifiers are used to model the probability distribution of each target language in the DLCSV space. Finally, the output scores of back-end classifiers are calibrated by a pair-wise posterior probability estimation (PPPE) algorithm. The proposed language identification frameworks are evaluated on 2003 NIST Language Recognition Evaluation (LRE) databases and the experiments show that the system described in this paper produces comparable results to the existing systems. Especially, the SVM framework achieves an equal error rate (EER) of 4.0% in the 30-second task and outperforms the state-of-art systems by more than 30% relative error reduction. Besides, the performances of proposed PPRLM and GMMs algorithms achieve an EER of 5.1% and 5.0% respectively.

  14. Assigning unique identification numbers to new user accounts and groups in a computing environment with multiple registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRobertis, Christopher V.; Lu, Yantian T.

    2010-02-23

    A method, system, and program storage device for creating a new user account or user group with a unique identification number in a computing environment having multiple user registries is provided. In response to receiving a command to create a new user account or user group, an operating system of a clustered computing environment automatically checks multiple registries configured for the operating system to determine whether a candidate identification number for the new user account or user group has been assigned already to one or more existing user accounts or groups, respectively. The operating system automatically assigns the candidate identification number to the new user account or user group created in a target user registry if the checking indicates that the candidate identification number has not been assigned already to any of the existing user accounts or user groups, respectively.

  15. Social Identification and Interpersonal Communication in Computer-Mediated Communication: What You Do versus Who You Are in Virtual Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoming; Walther, Joseph B.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of interpersonal communication and intergroup identification on members' evaluations of computer-mediated groups. Participants (N= 256) in 64 four-person groups interacted through synchronous computer chat. Subgroup assignments to minimal groups instilled significantly greater in-group versus out-group…

  16. Rapid plant identification using species- and group-specific primers targeting chloroplast DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Wallinger

    Full Text Available Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae, the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory.

  17. Realpolitik versus fair process: moderating effects of group identification on acceptance of political decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kwok; Tong, Kwok-Kit; Lind, E Allan

    2007-03-01

    Three studies examined the effects of perceived procedural justice and the favorability of a group-level outcome on the endorsement of a group-level decision and the evaluation of the authority responsible for the decision. Results showed that, contrary to findings usually seen with individual-level decisions, collective outcome favorability was more important than procedural justice in influencing the endorsement of the decision. Furthermore, increased identification with the group reduced the importance of procedural justice but accentuated the importance of collective outcome favorability. With regard to the evaluation of the authority, the results were similar to those obtained in individual-level decisions: Procedural fairness mattered more than collective outcome favorability.

  18. Identification and classification of high risk groups for Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis using an artificial neural network based on occupational histories: a retrospective cohort study - article no. 366

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.B.; Tang, Z.F.; Yang, Y.L.; Weng, D.; Sun, G.; Duan, Z.W.; Chen, J. [China Medical University, Shenyang (China). School of Public Health

    2009-09-15

    Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a preventable, but not fully curable occupational lung disease. More and more coal miners are likely to be at risk of developing CWP owing to an increase in coal production and utilization, especially in developing countries. Coal miners with different occupational categories and durations of dust exposure may be at different levels of risk for CWP. It is necessary to identify and classify different levels of risk for CWP in coal miners with different work histories. In this way, we can recommend different intervals for medical examinations according to different levels of risk for CWP. Our findings may provide a basis for further emending the measures of CWP prevention and control. The study was performed using longitudinal retrospective data in the Tiefa Colliery in China. A three-layer artificial neural network with 6 input variables, 15 neurons in the hidden layer, and 1 output neuron was developed in conjunction with coal miners' occupational exposure data. The duration of dust exposure and occupational category were the two most important factors for CWP. Coal miners at different levels of risk for CWP could be classified by the three-layer neural network analysis based on occupational history.

  19. Species identification of Streptococcus bovis group isolates causing bacteremia: a comparison of two MALDI-TOF MS systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agergaard, Charlotte N; Knudsen, Elisa; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Christensen, Jens J; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2017-02-20

    This study compared two MALDI-TOF MS systems (Biotyper and VITEK MS) on clinical Streptococcus bovis group isolates (n=66). The VITEK MS gave fewer misidentifications and a higher rate of correct identifications than the Biotyper. Only the identification of S. lutetiensis by the VITEK MS was reliable. Additional optimization of the available system databases is needed.

  20. Nonlinear system identification based on internal recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscasu, Gheorghe; Codres, Bogdan; Stancu, Alexandru; Murariu, Gabriel

    2009-04-01

    A novel approach for nonlinear complex system identification based on internal recurrent neural networks (IRNN) is proposed in this paper. The computational complexity of neural identification can be greatly reduced if the whole system is decomposed into several subsystems. This approach employs internal state estimation when no measurements coming from the sensors are available for the system states. A modified backpropagation algorithm is introduced in order to train the IRNN for nonlinear system identification. The performance of the proposed design approach is proven on a car simulator case study.

  1. Modifying the ECC-based grouping-proof RFID system to increase inpatient medication safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wen-Tsai; Chiou, Shin-Yan; Lu, Erl-Huei; Chang, Henry Ker-Chang

    2014-09-01

    RFID technology is increasingly used in applications that require tracking, identification, and authentication. It attaches RFID-readable tags to objects for identification and execution of specific RFID-enabled applications. Recently, research has focused on the use of grouping-proofs for preserving privacy in RFID applications, wherein a proof of two or more tags must be simultaneously scanned. In 2010, a privacy-preserving grouping proof protocol for RFID based on ECC in public-key cryptosystem was proposed but was shown to be vulnerable to tracking attacks. A proposed enhancement protocol was also shown to have defects which prevented proper execution. In 2012, Lin et al. proposed a more efficient RFID ECC-based grouping proof protocol to promote inpatient medication safety. However, we found this protocol is also vulnerable to tracking and impersonation attacks. We then propose a secure privacy-preserving RFID grouping proof protocol for inpatient medication safety and demonstrate its resistance to such attacks.

  2. A Hybrid Model for Individual Identification Based on Keystroke Data in Japanese Free Text Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samura, Toshiharu; Nishimura, Haruhiko

    We have investigated several characteristics of keystroke dynamics in Japanese free text typing. We performed experiments on 189 subjects, representing three groups according to the number of letters they could type in five minutes. In this experiment, we extracted the feature indices from the keystroke timing for each alphabet single letter and for two-letter combinations composed of consonant and vowel pairs in Japanese text. Taking into account two identification methods using weighted Euclidean distance (WED) and Vector Disorder (VD), we proposed their hybrid model for individual identification based on keystroke data in Japanese free text typing. By evaluating the personal identification for the three groups, its high performance was confirmed in proportion to the typing level of the group.

  3. From "we" to "me": Group identification enhances perceived personal control with consequences for health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, Katharine H; Haslam, S Alexander; Cruwys, Tegan; Branscombe, Nyla R; Ysseldyk, Renate; Heldreth, Courtney

    2015-07-01

    There is growing recognition that identification with social groups can protect and enhance health and well-being, thereby constituting a kind of "social cure." The present research explores the role of control as a novel mediator of the relationship between shared group identity and well-being. Five studies provide evidence for this process. Group identification predicted significantly greater perceived personal control across 47 countries (Study 1), and in groups that had experienced success and failure (Study 2). The relationship was observed longitudinally (Study 3) and experimentally (Study 4). Manipulated group identification also buffered a loss of personal control (Study 5). Across the studies, perceived personal control mediated social cure effects in political, academic, community, and national groups. The findings reveal that the personal benefits of social groups come not only from their ability to make people feel good, but also from their ability to make people feel capable and in control of their lives.

  4. Propagator-based methods for recursive subspace model identification

    OpenAIRE

    Mercère, Guillaume; Bako, Laurent; Lecoeuche, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The problem of the online identification of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) state-space models in the framework of discrete-time subspace methods is considered in this paper. Several algorithms, based on a recursive formulation of the MIMO output error state-space (MOESP) identification class, are developed. The main goals of the proposed methods are to circumvent the huge complexity of eigenvalues or singular values decomposition techniques used by the offline algorit...

  5. Role of gender norms and group identification on hypothetical and experimental pain tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Gregory J; Schwegler, Andria F; Theodore, Brian R; Fuchs, Perry N

    2007-05-01

    Previous research indicates that men typically tolerate more pain in experimental settings than women. One likely explanation for these group differences in pain tolerance is conformity to traditional, gender group social norms (i.e., the ideal man is masculine and tolerates more pain; the ideal woman is feminine and tolerates less pain). According to self-categorization theory, norms guide behavior to the degree that group members adopt the group identity. Therefore, high-identifying men are expected to conform to gender norms and tolerate more pain than high-identifying women who conform to different gender norms as a guide for their behavior. We conducted two studies to investigate whether gender group identification moderates individuals' conformity to pain tolerance and reporting norms. In the first study, participants indicated their gender identification and expected tolerance of a hypothetical painful stimulus. As anticipated, high-identifying men reported significantly greater pain tolerance than high-identifying women. No differences existed between low-identifying men and women. To determine if self-reported pain tolerance in a role-playing scenario corresponds to actual pain tolerance in an experimental setting, the second study examined pain tolerance to a noxious stimulus induced by electrical stimulation of the index finger. The experimental outcome revealed that high-identifying men tolerated more painful stimulation than high-identifying women. Further, high-identifying men tolerated more pain than low-identifying men. These results highlight the influence of social norms on behavior and suggest the need to further explore the role of norms in pain reporting behaviors.

  6. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy and Identification of Unique Severity Groups in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kathleen A; Zhu, Shijun; Johantgen, Meg; Kessler, Michael D; Renn, Cynthia; Beutler, Andreas S; Kanwar, Rahul; Ambulos, Nicholas; Cavaletti, Guido; Bruna, Jordi; Briani, Chiara; Argyriou, Andreas A; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Dorsey, Susan G

    2017-07-22

    Oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) is a dose limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin and affects most colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. OIPN is commonly evaluated by patient symptom report, using scales to reflect impairment. They do not discriminate between unique grouping of symptoms and signs, which impedes prompt identification of OIPN. Our study objective was to identify clusters of symptoms and signs that differentiated underlying clinical severity and segregated patients within our population into OIPN subgroups. Chemotherapy naïve CRC patients (N=148) receiving oxaliplatin were administered the Total Neuropathy Score clinical (TNSc(©)), which includes symptom report (sensory, motor, autonomic) and sensory examination (pin sense, vibration, reflexes). The TNSc(©) was administered prior to chemotherapy initiation (T0), and following cumulative doses of oxaliplatin 510-520 mg/m(2) (T1) and 1020-1040 mg/ m(2) of oxaliplain (T2). Using mean T2 TNSc(©) scores, latent class analysis (LCA) grouped patients into OIPN severity cohorts. LCA categorized patients into 4 distinct OIPN groups: low symptoms and low signs (N=54); low symptoms and intermediate signs (n=44); low symptoms and high signs (n=21); and high symptoms and high signs (n=29). No differences were noted among OIPN groups on age, sex, chemotherapy regimen, or cumulative oxaliplatin dose. We identified OIPN patient groups with distinct symptoms/signs, demonstrating variability of OIPN presentation regardless of cumulative oxaliplatin dose. Over half of the sample had positive findings on OIPN examination despite little or no symptoms. Sensory examination of all patients receiving oxaliplatin is indicated for timely identification of OIPN, which will allow earlier symptom management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. An Analysis of Organizational Justice and Organizational Identification Relation Based on Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Ali Riza; Dülker, Ayse Pinar; Altin, Fatih; Çelik, Filiz; Dalkiran, Merve; Yulcu, Nazmiye Tuba; Tekin, Selim; Deniz, Ünal

    2017-01-01

    This study intends to analyze the relation between organizational justice and organizational identification based on teachers' perceptions. The study group consists of 1,223 teachers working at secondary and high-schools during the 2015-2016 academic year in 14 county towns of Balikesir in Turkey. The data was collected by Organizational Justice…

  8. Molecular identification of two vegetative compatibility groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwood, Michael J; Viljoen, Altus; Mostert, Glaudina; McLeod, Adéle

    2012-02-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae, which causes basal rot of onion, consists of seven vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs 0420 to 0426) and several single-member VCGs (SMVs). F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae populations in South Africa and Colorado each consist of one main VCG (namely, VCG 0425 and 0421, respectively). The aim of this study was to develop sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers for the identification of VCGs 0425 and 0421, using 79 previously characterized F. oxysporum isolates. A second aim was to investigate the prevalence of VCG 0425 among 88 uncharacterized South African onion F. oxysporum isolates using (i) the developed SCAR markers and (ii) inter-retrotransposon (IR)- and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting. Only two RAPD primers provided informative fingerprints for VCG 0425 isolates but these could not be developed into SCAR markers, although they provided diagnostic fragments for differentiation of VCG 0425 from VCG 0421. IR fingerprinting data were used to develop a multiplex IR-SCAR polymerase chain reaction method for the identification of VCG 0421, VCG 0425, and SMV 4 isolates as a group. Molecular identification of the uncharacterized collection of 88 F. oxysporum isolates (65 F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae and 23 F. oxysporum isolates nonpathogenic to onion) confirmed that VCG 0425 is the main VCG in South Africa, with all but 3 of the 65 F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae isolates having the molecular characteristics of this VCG. Genotyping and VCG testing showed that two of the three aforementioned isolates were new SMVs (SMV 6 and SMV 7), whereas the third (previously known as SMV 3) now belongs to VGC 0247.

  9. CEAI: CCM-based email authorship identification model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwat Nizamani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a model for email authorship identification (EAI by employing a Cluster-based Classification (CCM technique. Traditionally, stylometric features have been successfully employed in various authorship analysis tasks; we extend the traditional feature set to include some more interesting and effective features for email authorship identification (e.g., the last punctuation mark used in an email, the tendency of an author to use capitalization at the start of an email, or the punctuation after a greeting or farewell. We also included Info Gain feature selection based content features. It is observed that the use of such features in the authorship identification process has a positive impact on the accuracy of the authorship identification task. We performed experiments to justify our arguments and compared the results with other base line models. Experimental results reveal that the proposed CCM-based email authorship identification model, along with the proposed feature set, outperforms the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM-based models, as well as the models proposed by Iqbal et al. (2010, 2013 [1,2]. The proposed model attains an accuracy rate of 94% for 10 authors, 89% for 25 authors, and 81% for 50 authors, respectively on Enron dataset, while 89.5% accuracy has been achieved on authors’ constructed real email dataset. The results on Enron dataset have been achieved on quite a large number of authors as compared to the models proposed by Iqbal et al. [1,2].

  10. Social identification when an in-group identity is unclear : The role of self-anchoring and self-stereotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, Ruth; Otten, Sabine; Hansen, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The present paper investigates how people identify with groups depending on the clarity of a group's identity content. According to self-categorization theory, self-stereotyping (i.e., projection of group prototypes onto self) should be the cognitive process underlying social identification. We argu

  11. System identification based approach to dynamic weighing revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Meller, Michał; Pietrzak, Przemysław

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic weighing, i.e., weighing of objects in motion, without stopping them on the weighing platform, allows one to increase the rate of operation of automatic weighing systems, used in industrial production processes, without compromising their accuracy. Since the classical identification-based approach to dynamic weighing, based on the second-order mass-spring-damper model of the weighing system, does not yield satisfactory results when applied to conveyor belt type checkweighers, several extensions of this technique are examined. Experiments confirm that when appropriately modified the identification-based approach becomes a reliable tool for dynamic mass measurement in checkweighers.

  12. Group Membership Based Authorization to CADC Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, A.; Dowler, P.; Gaudet, S.; Hill, N.

    2012-09-01

    The Group Membership Service (GMS), implemented at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC), is a prototype of what could eventually be an IVOA standard for a distributed and interoperable group membership protocol. Group membership is the core authorization concept that enables teamwork and collaboration amongst astronomers accessing distributed resources and services. The service integrates and complements other access control related IVOA standards such as single-sign-on (SSO) using X.509 proxy certificates and the Credential Delegation Protocol (CDP). The GMS has been used at CADC for several years now, initially as a subsystem and then as a stand-alone Web service. It is part of the authorization mechanism for controlling the access to restricted Web resources as well as the VOSpace service hosted by the CADC. We present the role that GMS plays within the access control system at the CADC, including the functionality of the service and how the different CADC services make use of it to assert user authorization to resources. We also describe the main advantages and challenges of using the service as well as future work to increase its robustness and functionality.

  13. An Event Grouping Based Algorithm for University Course Timetabling Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Kralev, Velin; Kraleva, Radoslava; Yurukov, Borislav

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the study of an event grouping based algorithm for a university course timetabling problem. Several publications which discuss the problem and some approaches for its solution are analyzed. The grouping of events in groups with an equal number of events in each group is not applicable to all input data sets. For this reason, a universal approach to all possible groupings of events in commensurate in size groups is proposed here. Also, an implementation of an algorithm base...

  14. An Event Grouping Based Algorithm for University Course Timetabling Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Kralev, Velin; Kraleva, Radoslava; Yurukov, Borislav

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the study of an event grouping based algorithm for a university course timetabling problem. Several publications which discuss the problem and some approaches for its solution are analyzed. The grouping of events in groups with an equal number of events in each group is not applicable to all input data sets. For this reason, a universal approach to all possible groupings of events in commensurate in size groups is proposed here. Also, an implementation of an algorithm base...

  15. Evaluating Peptide Mass Fingerprinting-based Protein Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Senthilkumar; Damodaran; Troy; D.; Wood; Priyadharsini; Nagarajan; Richard; A.; Rabin

    2007-01-01

    Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry (MS) is an essential step in pro- teomic studies and is typically accomplished by either peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) or amino acid sequencing of the peptide. Although sequence information from MS/MS analysis can be used to validate PMF-based protein identification, it may not be practical when analyzing a large number of proteins and when high- throughput MS/MS instrumentation is not readily available. At present, a vast majority of proteomic studies employ PMF. However, there are huge disparities in criteria used to identify proteins using PMF. Therefore, to reduce incorrect protein identification using PMF, and also to increase confidence in PMF-based protein identification without accompanying MS/MS analysis, definitive guiding principles are essential. To this end, we propose a value-based scoring system that provides guidance on evaluating when PMF-based protein identification can be deemed sufficient without accompanying amino acid sequence data from MS/MS analysis.

  16. Phytophthora-ID.org: A sequence-based Phytophthora identification tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.J. Grünwald; F.N. Martin; M.M. Larsen; C.M. Sullivan; C.M. Press; M.D. Coffey; E.M. Hansen; J.L. Parke

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary species identification relies strongly on sequence-based identification, yet resources for identification of many fungal and oomycete pathogens are rare. We developed two web-based, searchable databases for rapid identification of Phytophthora spp. based on sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) or the cytochrome oxidase...

  17. FPGA Implementation for GMM-Based Speaker Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaklen EhKan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In today's society, highly accurate personal identification systems are required. Passwords or pin numbers can be forgotten or forged and are no longer considered to offer a high level of security. The use of biological features, biometrics, is becoming widely accepted as the next level for security systems. Biometric-based speaker identification is a method of identifying persons from their voice. Speaker-specific characteristics exist in speech signals due to different speakers having different resonances of the vocal tract. These differences can be exploited by extracting feature vectors such as Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs from the speech signal. A well-known statistical modelling process, the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM, then models the distribution of each speaker's MFCCs in a multidimensional acoustic space. The GMM-based speaker identification system has features that make it promising for hardware acceleration. This paper describes the hardware implementation for classification of a text-independent GMM-based speaker identification system. The aim was to produce a system that can perform simultaneous identification of large numbers of voice streams in real time. This has important potential applications in security and in automated call centre applications. A speedup factor of ninety was achieved compared to a software implementation on a standard PC.

  18. GROUP: A gossip based building community protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Baraglia R.; Dazzi P.; Mordacchini M.; Ricci L; Alessi L.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of communities of peers characterized by similar interests is currently a challenging research area. To ease the diffusion of relevant data to interested peers, similarity based overlays define links between similar peers by exploiting a similarity function. However, existing solutions neither give a clear definition of peer communities nor define a clear strategy to partition the peers into communities. As a consequence, the spread of the information cannot be confined within a...

  19. 3-D Storm Automatic Identification Based on Mathematical Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Lei; ZHENG Yongguang; WANG Hongqing; LIN Yinjing

    2009-01-01

    The strom identification, tracking, and forecasting method is one of the important nowcasting techniques. Accurate storm identification is a prerequisite for successful storm tracking and forecasting. Storm identi-fication faces two difficulties: one is false merger and the other is failure to isolate adjacent storms within a cluster of storms. The TITAN (Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis, and Nowcasting) algo-rithm is apt to identify adjacent storm cells as one storm because it uses a single refiectivity threshold. The SCIT (Storm Cell Identification and Tracking) algorithm uses seven reflectivity thresholds and therefore is capable of isolating adjacent storm cells, but it discards the results identified by the lower threshold, leading to the loss of the internal structure information of storms. Both TITAN and SCIT have the problem of failing to satisfactorily identify false merger. To overcome these shortcomings, this paper proposes a novel approach based on mathematical morphology. The approach first applies the single threshold identification followed by implementing an erosion process to mitigate the false merger problem. During multi-threshold identification stages, dilation operation is performed against the storm cells which are just obtained by the higher threshold identification, until the storm edges touch each other or touch the edges of the previous storms identified by the lower threshold. The results of experiment show that by combining the strengths of the dilation and erosion operations, this approach is able to mitigate the false merger problem as well as maintain the internal structure of sub-storms when isolating storms within a cluster of storms.

  20. VALIDATION OF AN ALGORITHM FOR NONMETALLIC INTRAOCULAR FOREIGN BODIES' COMPOSITION IDENTIFICATION BASED ON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseiev, Elad; Barequet, Dana; Zunz, Eran; Barak, Adiel; Mardor, Yael; Last, David; Goez, David; Segal, Zvi; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-09-01

    To validate and evaluate the accuracy of an algorithm for the identification of nonmetallic intraocular foreign body composition based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. An algorithm for the identification of 10 nonmetallic materials based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has been previously determined in an ex vivo porcine model. Materials were classified into 4 groups (plastic, glass, stone, and wood). The algorithm was tested by 40 ophthalmologists, which completed a questionnaire including 10 sets of computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of eyes with intraocular foreign bodies and were asked to use the algorithm to identify their compositions. Rates of exact material identification and group identification were measured. Exact material identification was achieved in 42.75% of the cases, and correct group identification in 65%. Using the algorithm, 6 of the materials were exactly identified by over 50% of the participants, and 7 were correctly classified according to their groups by over 75% of the materials. The algorithm was validated and was found to enable correct identification of nonmetallic intraocular foreign body composition in the majority of cases. This is the first study to report and validate a clinical tool allowing intraocular foreign body composition based on their appearance in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, which was previously impossible.

  1. Contemporary nucleic acid-based molecular techniques for detection, identification, and characterization of Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mianzhi, Yao; Shah, Nagendra P

    2017-03-24

    Bifidobacteria are one of the most important bacterial groups found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Medical and food industry researchers have focused on bifidobacteria because of their health-promoting properties. Researchers have historically relied on classic phenotypic approaches (culture and biochemical tests) for detection and identification of bifidobacteria. Those approaches still have values for the identification and detection of some bifidobacterial species, but they are often labor-intensive and time-consuming and can be problematic in differentiating closely related species. Rapid, accurate, and reliable methods for detection, identification, and characterization of bifidobacteria in a mixed bacterial population have become a major challenge. The advent of nucleic acid-based molecular techniques has significantly advanced isolation and detection of bifidobacteria. Diverse nucleic acid-based molecular techniques have been employed, including hybridization, target amplification, and fingerprinting. Certain techniques enable the detection, characterization, and identification at genus-, species-, and strains-levels, whereas others allow typing of species or strains of bifidobacteria. In this review, an overview of methodological principle, technique complexity, and application of various nucleic acid-based molecular techniques for detection, identification, and characterization of bifidobacteria is presented. Advantages and limitations of each technique are discussed, and significant findings based on particular techniques are also highlighted.

  2. Dynamic Object Identification with SOM-based neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Averkin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article a number of neural networks based on self-organizing maps, that can be successfully used for dynamic object identification, is described. Unique SOM-based modular neural networks with vector quantized associative memory and recurrent self-organizing maps as modules are presented. The structured algorithms of learning and operation of such SOM-based neural networks are described in details, also some experimental results and comparison with some other neural networks are given.

  3. Research of mine water source identification based on LIF technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mengran; Yan, Pengcheng

    2016-09-01

    According to the problem that traditional chemical methods to the mine water source identification takes a long time, put forward a method for rapid source identification system of mine water inrush based on the technology of laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Emphatically analyzes the basic principle of LIF technology. The hardware composition of LIF system are analyzed and the related modules were selected. Through the fluorescence experiment with the water samples of coal mine in the LIF system, fluorescence spectra of water samples are got. Traditional water source identification mainly according to the ion concentration representative of the water, but it is hard to analysis the ion concentration of the water from the fluorescence spectra. This paper proposes a simple and practical method of rapid identification of water by fluorescence spectrum, which measure the space distance between unknown water samples and standard samples, and then based on the clustering analysis, the category of the unknown water sample can be get. Water source identification for unknown samples verified the reliability of the LIF system, and solve the problem that the current coal mine can't have a better real-time and online monitoring on water inrush, which is of great significance for coal mine safety in production.

  4. Measuring the drinking behaviour of individual pigs housed in group using radio frequency identification (RFID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselyne, J; Adriaens, I; Huybrechts, T; De Ketelaere, B; Millet, S; Vangeyte, J; Van Nuffel, A; Saeys, W

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the drinking behaviour of pigs may indicate health, welfare or productivity problems. Automated monitoring and analysis of drinking behaviour could allow problems to be detected, thus improving farm productivity. A high frequency radio frequency identification (HF RFID) system was designed to register the drinking behaviour of individual pigs. HF RFID antennas were placed around four nipple drinkers and connected to a reader via a multiplexer. A total of 55 growing-finishing pigs were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) ear tags, one in each ear. RFID-based drinking visits were created from the RFID registrations using a bout criterion and a minimum and maximum duration criterion. The HF RFID system was successfully validated by comparing RFID-based visits with visual observations and flow meter measurements based on visit overlap. Sensitivity was at least 92%, specificity 93%, precision 90% and accuracy 93%. RFID-based drinking duration had a high correlation with observed drinking duration (R 2=0.88) and water usage (R 2=0.71). The number of registrations after applying the visit criteria had an even higher correlation with the same two variables (R 2=0.90 and 0.75, respectively). There was also a correlation between number of RFID visits and number of observed visits (R 2=0.84). The system provides good quality information about the drinking behaviour of individual pigs. As health or other problems affect the pigs' drinking behaviour, analysis of the RFID data could allow problems to be detected and signalled to the farmer. This information can help to improve the productivity and economics of the farm as well as the health and welfare of the pigs.

  5. Manufacturing Phenomena or Preserving Phenomena? Core Issues in the Identification of Peer Social Groups with Social Cognitive Mapping Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Xie, Hongling

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on the "Multiple Meanings of Peer Groups in Social Cognitive Mapping," Thomas W. Farmer and Hongling Xie discuss core issues in the identification of peer social groups in natural settings using the social cognitive mapping (SCM) procedures. Farmer and Xie applaud the authors for their efforts to advance the study of…

  6. Manufacturing Phenomena or Preserving Phenomena? Core Issues in the Identification of Peer Social Groups with Social Cognitive Mapping Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Xie, Hongling

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on the "Multiple Meanings of Peer Groups in Social Cognitive Mapping," Thomas W. Farmer and Hongling Xie discuss core issues in the identification of peer social groups in natural settings using the social cognitive mapping (SCM) procedures. Farmer and Xie applaud the authors for their efforts to advance the study of…

  7. Identification of Maximum Road Friction Coefficient and Optimal Slip Ratio Based on Road Type Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hsin; WANG Bo; LU Pingping; XU Liang

    2014-01-01

    The identification of maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio is crucial to vehicle dynamics and control. However, it is always not easy to identify the maximum road friction coefficient with high robustness and good adaptability to various vehicle operating conditions. The existing investigations on robust identification of maximum road friction coefficient are unsatisfactory. In this paper, an identification approach based on road type recognition is proposed for the robust identification of maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio. The instantaneous road friction coefficient is estimated through the recursive least square with a forgetting factor method based on the single wheel model, and the estimated road friction coefficient and slip ratio are grouped in a set of samples in a small time interval before the current time, which are updated with time progressing. The current road type is recognized by comparing the samples of the estimated road friction coefficient with the standard road friction coefficient of each typical road, and the minimum statistical error is used as the recognition principle to improve identification robustness. Once the road type is recognized, the maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio are determined. The numerical simulation tests are conducted on two typical road friction conditions(single-friction and joint-friction) by using CarSim software. The test results show that there is little identification error between the identified maximum road friction coefficient and the pre-set value in CarSim. The proposed identification method has good robustness performance to external disturbances and good adaptability to various vehicle operating conditions and road variations, and the identification results can be used for the adjustment of vehicle active safety control strategies.

  8. Text-based language identification for the South African languages

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, G

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigate the performance of text-based language identification systems on the 11 official languages of South Africa, when n-gram statistics are used as features for classification. In particular, the authors compare support vector...

  9. A quantum identification scheme based on polarization modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Guang-Qiang; Zeng Gui-Hua

    2005-01-01

    Aquantum idetification scheme including registration and identification phases is proposed.The user' passwords are transmitted by qubit string and recorded as set of quantum operators.The security of the proposed scheme is guarateed by the no-coloning theorem.Based on photon polarization modulation,an experimental approach is also designed to implement our proposed scheme.

  10. Group Contribution Based Process Flowsheet Synthesis, Design and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; d'Anterroches, Loïc

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a process-group-contribution Method to model. simulate and synthesize a flowsheet. The process-group based representation of a flowsheet together with a process "property" model are presented. The process-group based synthesis method is developed on the basis of the computer...

  11. System Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesman, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary System Identification Introduction.- Part I: Data-based Identification.- System Response Methods.- Frequency Response Methods.- Correlation Methods.- Part II: Time-invariant Systems Identification.- Static Systems Identification.- Dynamic Systems Identification.- Part III: Time-varying

  12. Nonlinear system identification and control based on modular neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscasu, Gheorghe; Codres, Bogdan

    2011-08-01

    A new approach for nonlinear system identification and control based on modular neural networks (MNN) is proposed in this paper. The computational complexity of neural identification can be greatly reduced if the whole system is decomposed into several subsystems. This is obtained using a partitioning algorithm. Each local nonlinear model is associated with a nonlinear controller. These are also implemented by neural networks. The switching between the neural controllers is done by a dynamical switcher, also implemented by neural networks, that tracks the different operating points. The proposed multiple modelling and control strategy has been successfully tested on simulated laboratory scale liquid-level system.

  13. FUZZY IDENTIFICATION METHOD BASED ON A NEW OBJECTIVE FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method of fuzzy identification based on a new objective function is proposed. The method could deal with the issue that input variables of a system have an effect on the input space while output variables of the system do not exert an influence on the input space in the proposed objective functions of fuzzy clustering. The method could simultaneously solve the problems about structure identification and parameter estimation; thus it makes the fuzzy model become optimal. Simulation example demonstrates that the method could identify non-linear systems and obviously improve modeling accuracy.

  14. Ontology-based specification, identification and analysis of perioperative risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uciteli, Alexandr; Neumann, Juliane; Tahar, Kais; Saleh, Kutaiba; Stucke, Stephan; Faulbrück-Röhr, Sebastian; Kaeding, André; Specht, Martin; Schmidt, Tobias; Neumuth, Thomas; Besting, Andreas; Stegemann, Dominik; Portheine, Frank; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-09-06

    Medical personnel in hospitals often works under great physical and mental strain. In medical decision-making, errors can never be completely ruled out. Several studies have shown that between 50 and 60% of adverse events could have been avoided through better organization, more attention or more effective security procedures. Critical situations especially arise during interdisciplinary collaboration and the use of complex medical technology, for example during surgical interventions and in perioperative settings (the period of time before, during and after surgical intervention). In this paper, we present an ontology and an ontology-based software system, which can identify risks across medical processes and supports the avoidance of errors in particular in the perioperative setting. We developed a practicable definition of the risk notion, which is easily understandable by the medical staff and is usable for the software tools. Based on this definition, we developed a Risk Identification Ontology (RIO) and used it for the specification and the identification of perioperative risks. An agent system was developed, which gathers risk-relevant data during the whole perioperative treatment process from various sources and provides it for risk identification and analysis in a centralized fashion. The results of such an analysis are provided to the medical personnel in form of context-sensitive hints and alerts. For the identification of the ontologically specified risks, we developed an ontology-based software module, called Ontology-based Risk Detector (OntoRiDe). About 20 risks relating to cochlear implantation (CI) have already been implemented. Comprehensive testing has indicated the correctness of the data acquisition, risk identification and analysis components, as well as the web-based visualization of results.

  15. Efficient Identification Using a Prime-Feature-Based Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Haq, Shaiq A.; Valente, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Identification of authorized train drivers through biometrics is a growing area of interest in locomotive radio remote control systems. The existing technique of password authentication is not very reliable and potentially unauthorized personnel may also operate the system on behalf of the operator....... Fingerprint identification system, implemented on PC/104 based real-time systems, can accurately identify the operator. Traditionally, the uniqueness of a fingerprint is determined by the overall pattern of ridges and valleys as well as the local ridge anomalies e.g., a ridge bifurcation or a ridge ending...... in this paper. The technique involves identifying the most prominent feature of the fingerprint and searching only for that feature in the database to expedite the search process. The proposed architect provides efficient matching process and indexing feature for identification is unique....

  16. Validation of a Bayesian-based isotope identification algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, C.J.; Stinnett, J., E-mail: stinnettjacob@gmail.com

    2015-06-01

    Handheld radio-isotope identifiers (RIIDs) are widely used in Homeland Security and other nuclear safety applications. However, most commercially available devices have serious problems in their ability to correctly identify isotopes. It has been reported that this flaw is largely due to the overly simplistic identification algorithms on-board the RIIDs. This paper reports on the experimental validation of a new isotope identification algorithm using a Bayesian statistics approach to identify the source while allowing for calibration drift and unknown shielding. We present here results on further testing of this algorithm and a study on the observed variation in the gamma peak energies and areas from a wavelet-based peak identification algorithm.

  17. Compressed Sensing Based Fingerprint Identification for Wireless Transmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caidan Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing fingerprint identification techniques are unable to distinguish different wireless transmitters, whose emitted signals are highly attenuated, long-distance propagating, and of strong similarity to their transient waveforms. Therefore, this paper proposes a new method to identify different wireless transmitters based on compressed sensing. A data acquisition system is designed to capture the wireless transmitter signals. Complex analytical wavelet transform is used to obtain the envelope of the transient signal, and the corresponding features are extracted by using the compressed sensing theory. Feature selection utilizing minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR is employed to obtain the optimal feature subsets for identification. The results show that the proposed method is more efficient for the identification of wireless transmitters with similar transient waveforms.

  18. Life at Both Ends of the Ladder: Education-Based Identification and Its Association With Well-Being and Social Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, Toon; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Spears, Russell; Manstead, Antony S R

    2015-09-01

    Level of formal education is an important divide in contemporary societies; it is positively related to health, well-being, and social attitudes such as tolerance for minorities and interest in politics. We investigated whether education-based identification is a common underlying factor of these education effects. Indeed, education-based identification was stronger among the higher educated, especially for identification aspects that encompass education-based group esteem (i.e., the belief that one's educational group is worthy and that others think so, too). Furthermore, while group esteem had beneficial effects across educational levels, aspects of identification that were unrelated to group esteem had positive effects for the higher educated but not for the less educated. Thus, the less educated do not benefit from the psychologically nourishing effect of identification that exists for other groups. The stigma and responsibility related to low education could be a common explanation for a wide range of outcomes.

  19. When talking makes you feel like a group: The emergence of group-based emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzerbyt, Vincent; Kuppens, Toon; Mathieu, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Group-based emotions are emotional reactions to group concerns and have been shown to emerge when people appraise events while endorsing a specific social identity. Here we investigate whether discussing a group-relevant event with other group members affects emotional reactions in a similar way. In two experiments, we confronted participants with an unfair group-relevant event, while manipulating their social identity and whether they discussed the event or an unrelated topic. Our major finding is that having group members discuss the unfair group-relevant event led to emotions that were more negative than in the irrelevant discussion and comparable to those observed when social identity had been made salient explicitly beforehand. Moreover, it also generated group-based appraisals of injustice (Experiment 1) and group-based identity (Experiment 2). This research sheds new light not only on the consequences of within-group sharing of emotions for the unfolding of intergroup relations but also on the nature of group-based emotions.

  20. Sequence-Based Identification of Aerobic Actinomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Wallace, Richard J.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Taylor, Tony; Imperatrice, Carol; Leonard, Deborah G. B.; Wilson, Rebecca W.; Mann, Linda; Jost, Kenneth C.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the utility of 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing for identifying clinically significant species of aerobic actinomycetes. A total of 28 reference strains and 71 clinical isolates that included members of the genera Streptomyces, Gordonia, and Tsukamurella and 10 taxa of Nocardia were studied. Methods of nonsequencing analyses included growth and biochemical analysis, PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of the 439-bp Telenti fragment of the 65 hsp gene, susceptibility testing, and, for selected isolates, high-performance liquid chromatography. Many of the isolates were included in prior taxonomic studies. Sequencing of Nocardia species revealed that members of the group were generally most closely related to the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strains. However, the sequences of Nocardia transvalensis, N. otitidiscaviarum, and N. nova isolates were highly variable; and it is likely that each of these species contains multiple species. We propose that these three species be designated complexes until they are more taxonomically defined. The sequences of several taxa did not match any recognized species. Among other aerobic actinomycetes, each group most closely resembled the associated reference strain, but with some divergence. The study demonstrates the ability of partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify members of the aerobic actinomycetes, but the study also shows that a high degree of sequence divergence exists within many species and that many taxa within the Nocardia spp. are unnamed at present. A major unresolved issue is the type strain of N. asteroides, as the present one (ATCC 19247), chosen before the availability of molecular analysis, does not represent any of the common taxa associated with clinical nocardiosis. PMID:15184431

  1. Point Groups Based on Methane and Adamantane (Td) Skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shinsaku

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for constructing point groups based on the symmetric parent molecules of methane and adamantane. Intended for use in teaching concepts such as subgroups and cosets to beginners in group theory. (TW)

  2. A signal delection theory-based analysis of American English vowel identification and production performance by native speakers of Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambacher, Stephen; Martens, William; Kakehi, Kazuhiko

    2005-04-01

    The identification and production performance by two groups of native Japanese of the American English (AE) vowels /æ/, /a/, /squflg/, /squflg/, /squflg/ was measured before and after a six-week, identification training program. A signal detection theory (SDT) analysis of the confusion data, as measured by d', revealed that all five AE vowels were more identifiable by the experimental trained group than the control untrained group. The d' results showed that /squflg/ was less identifiable than /squflg/ in the pretest, even though the percentage identification rate for /squflg/ was slightly greater than that for /squflg/. Both groups productions of a list of CVCs, each containing one of the target AE vowels, were presented to a group of native AE listeners in a series of identification tasks. The d' results revealed that the AE listeners could more sensitively identify the experimental groups post-test vowel productions than they could the control groups. SDT analysis also clarified an additional potentially confusing result: /squflg/ was somewhat less identifiable than /squflg/, despite the fact that the percentage identification rate for /squflg/ was higher. Overall, the SDT-based analysis served to change the pattern of results observed for L2 vowel identification and influenced the interpretation of the data.

  3. Network Applications for Group-Based Learning: Is More Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veen, Jan; Collis, Betty; Jones, Val

    2003-01-01

    Group-based learning is being introduced into many settings in higher education. Is this a sustainable development with respect to the resources required? Under what conditions can group-based learning be applied successfully in distance education and in increasingly flexible campus-based learning? Can networked support facilitate and enrich…

  4. A Text Categorization Algorithm Based on Sense Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Giving further consideration on linguistic feature, this study proposes an algorithm of Chinese text categorization based on sense group. The algorithm extracts sense group by analyzing syntactic and semantic properties of Chinese texts and builds the category sense group library. SVM is used for the experiment of text categorization. The experimental results show that the precision and recall of the new algorithm based on sense group is better than that of traditional algorithms.

  5. A Shearlets-based Edge Identification Algorithem for Infrared Image

    OpenAIRE

    Rui-bin ZOU; Cai-cheng SHI

    2013-01-01

    A shearlets-based edge identification algorithem for infrared image is proposed. The algorithem demonstrates the performance of edge detection based on shearlets, combines with the edge hysteresis thresholding, designs steps of edge detection, which is proper to use in infrared images.Simultaneously, with the advantage of edge geometric features provided by the shearlets, infrared image were extracted the direction information of edge of Infrared image, and classified. In computer simulations...

  6. Recording-based identification of site liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yuxian; Zhang Yushan; Liang Jianwen; Ray Ruichong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Reconnaissance reports and pertinent research on seismic hazards show that liquefaction is one of the key sources of damage to geotechnical and structural engineering systems. Therefore, identifying site liquefaction conditions plays an important role in seismic hazard mitigation. One of the widely used approaches for detecting liquefaction is based on the time-frequency analysis of ground motion recordings, in which short-time Fourier transform is typically used. It is known that recordings at a site with liquefaction are the result of nonlinear responses of seismic waves propagating in the liquefied layers underneath the site. Moreover, Fourier transform is not effective in characterizing such dynamic features as time-dependent frequency of the recordings rooted in nonlinear responses. Therefore, the aforementioned approach may not be intrinsically effective in detecting liquefaction. An alternative to the Fourier-based approach is presented in this study,which proposes time-frequency analysis of earthquake ground motion recordings with the aid of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), and offers justification for the HHT in addressing the liquefaction features shown in the recordings. The paper then defines the predominant instantaneous frequency (PIF) and introduces the PIF-related motion features to identify liquefaction conditions at a given site. Analysis of 29 recorded data sets at different site conditions shows that the proposed approach is effective in detecting site liquefaction in comparison with other methods.

  7. Recording-based identification of site liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxian; Zhang, Yushan; Liang, Jianwen; Zhang, Ray Ruichong

    2005-12-01

    Reconnaissance reports and pertinent research on seismic hazards show that liquefaction is one of the key sources of damage to geotechnical and structural engineering systems. Therefore, identifying site liquefaction conditions plays an important role in seismic hazard mitigation. One of the widely used approaches for detecting liquefaction is based on the time-frequency analysis of ground motion recordings, in which short-time Fourier transform is typically used. It is known that recordings at a site with liquefaction are the result of nonlinear responses of seismic waves propagating in the liquefied layers underneath the site. Moreover, Fourier transform is not effective in characterizing such dynamic features as time-dependent frequency of the recordings rooted in nonlinear responses. Therefore, the aforementioned approach may not be intrinsically effective in detecting liquefaction. An alternative to the Fourier-based approach is presented in this study, which proposes time-frequency analysis of earthquake ground motion recordings with the aid of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), and offers justification for the HHT in addressing the liquefaction features shown in the recordings. The paper then defines the predominant instantaneous frequency (PIF) and introduces the PIF-related motion features to identify liquefaction conditions at a given site. Analysis of 29 recorded data sets at different site conditions shows that the proposed approach is effective in detecting site liquefaction in comparison with other methods.

  8. Group-constrained sparse fMRI connectivity modeling for mild cognitive impairment identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Chong-Yaw; Yap, Pew-Thian; Zhang, Daoqiang; Wang, Lihong; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-03-01

    Emergence of advanced network analysis techniques utilizing resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) has enabled a more comprehensive understanding of neurological disorders at a whole-brain level. However, inferring brain connectivity from R-fMRI is a challenging task, particularly when the ultimate goal is to achieve good control-patient classification performance, owing to perplexing noise effects, curse of dimensionality, and inter-subject variability. Incorporating sparsity into connectivity modeling may be a possible solution to partially remedy this problem since most biological networks are intrinsically sparse. Nevertheless, sparsity constraint, when applied at an individual level, will inevitably cause inter-subject variability and hence degrade classification performance. To this end, we formulate the R-fMRI time series of each region of interest (ROI) as a linear representation of time series of other ROIs to infer sparse connectivity networks that are topologically identical across individuals. This formulation allows simultaneous selection of a common set of ROIs across subjects so that their linear combination is best in estimating the time series of the considered ROI. Specifically, l 1-norm is imposed on each subject to filter out spurious or insignificant connections to produce sparse networks. A group-constraint is hence imposed via multi-task learning using a l 2-norm to encourage consistent non-zero connections across subjects. This group-constraint is crucial since the network topology is identical for all subjects while still preserving individual information via different connectivity values. We validated the proposed modeling in mild cognitive impairment identification and promising results achieved demonstrate its superiority in disease characterization, particularly greater sensitivity to early stage brain pathologies. The inferred group-constrained sparse network is found to be biologically plausible and is highly

  9. Face Identification by SIFT-based Complete Graph Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Kisku, Dakshina Ranjan; Grosso, Enrico; Tistarelli, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new face identification system based on Graph Matching Technique on SIFT features extracted from face images. Although SIFT features have been successfully used for general object detection and recognition, only recently they were applied to face recognition. This paper further investigates the performance of identification techniques based on Graph matching topology drawn on SIFT features which are invariant to rotation, scaling and translation. Face projections on images, represented by a graph, can be matched onto new images by maximizing a similarity function taking into account spatial distortions and the similarities of the local features. Two graph based matching techniques have been investigated to deal with false pair assignment and reducing the number of features to find the optimal feature set between database and query face SIFT features. The experimental results, performed on the BANCA database, demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system for automatic face identifi...

  10. Identification of a novel group of bacteria in sludge from a deteriorated biological phosphorus removal reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Liu, Wen-Tso; Filipe, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The microbial diversity of a deteriorated biological phosphorus removal reactor was investigated by methods not requiring direct cultivation. The reactor was fed with media containing acetate and high levels of phosphate (P/C weight ratio, 8:100) but failed to completely remove phosphate in the e...... obtained by the PCR-based DGGE method. Further, based on electron microscopy and standard staining microscopic analysis, this novel group was able to accumulate granule inclusions, possibly consisting of polyhydroxyalkanoate, inside the cells....

  11. Identification of Managerial Competencies in Knowledge-based Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Königová Martina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Managerial competencies identification and development are important tools of human resources management that is aimed at achieving strategic organizational goals. Due to current dynamic development and changes, more and more attention is being paid to the personality of managers and their competencies, since they are viewed as important sources of achieving a competitive advantage. The objective of this article is to identify managerial competencies in the process of filling vacant working positions in knowledge-based organizations in the Czech Republic. The objective was determined with reference to the Czech Science Foundation GACR research project which focuses on the identification of managerial competencies in knowledge-based organizations in the Czech Republic. This identification within the frame of the research project is primarily designed and subsequently realised on the basis of content analysis of media communications such as advertisements - a means through which knowledge- based organizations search for suitable candidates for vacant managerial positions. The first part of the article deals with theoretical approaches to knowledge-based organizations and issues on competencies. The second part evaluates the outcomes of the survey carried out, and also summarizes the basic steps of the application of competencies. The final part summarizes the benefits and difficulties of applying the competency-based approach as a tool of efficient management of organizations for the purpose of achieving a competitive advantage.

  12. 3D ear identification based on sparse representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person's identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point)-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm.

  13. Lithofacies identification using multiple adaptive resonance theory neural networks and group decision expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-C.; Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Chen, H.-C.; Rocky, Durrans S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithofacies identification supplies qualitative information about rocks. Lithofacies represent rock textures and are important components of hydrocarbon reservoir description. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly and different geologists may provide different interpretations. In this paper, we present a low-cost intelligent system consisting of three adaptive resonance theory neural networks and a rule-based expert system to consistently and objectively identify lithofacies from well-log data. The input data are altered into different forms representing different perspectives of observation of lithofacies. Each form of input is processed by a different adaptive resonance theory neural network. Among these three adaptive resonance theory neural networks, one neural network processes the raw continuous data, another processes categorial data, and the third processes fuzzy-set data. Outputs from these three networks are then combined by the expert system using fuzzy inference to determine to which facies the input data should be assigned. Rules are prioritized to emphasize the importance of firing order. This new approach combines the learning ability of neural networks, the adaptability of fuzzy logic, and the expertise of geologists to infer facies of the rocks. This approach is applied to the Appleton Field, an oil field located in Escambia County, Alabama. The hybrid intelligence system predicts lithofacies identity from log data with 87.6% accuracy. This prediction is more accurate than those of single adaptive resonance theory networks, 79.3%, 68.0% and 66.0%, using raw, fuzzy-set, and categorical data, respectively, and by an error-backpropagation neural network, 57.3%. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Group Activities in Task-based Communicative Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓一琳; 王宇澄

    2005-01-01

    In a task-based communicative classroom, group activities are effective ways to devdop students' 4 basic language skills. However, not all group activities can reach the expected results. English teachers should pay attention to some aspects in organizing a classroom group activity.

  15. Identification of copy number variants defining genomic differences among major human groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Armengol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the genetic contribution to phenotype variation of human groups is necessary to elucidate differences in disease predisposition and response to pharmaceutical treatments in different human populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the genome-wide profile of structural variation on pooled samples from the three populations studied in the HapMap project by comparative genome hybridization (CGH in different array platforms. We have identified and experimentally validated 33 genomic loci that show significant copy number differences from one population to the other. Interestingly, we found an enrichment of genes related to environment adaptation (immune response, lipid metabolism and extracellular space within these regions and the study of expression data revealed that more than half of the copy number variants (CNVs translate into gene-expression differences among populations, suggesting that they could have functional consequences. In addition, the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are in linkage disequilibrium with the copy number alleles allowed us to detect evidences of population differentiation and recent selection at the nucleotide variation level. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our results provide a comprehensive view of relevant copy number changes that might play a role in phenotypic differences among major human populations, and generate a list of interesting candidates for future studies.

  16. Simultaneous geologic scenario identification and flow model calibration with group-sparsity formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Azarang; Jafarpour, Behnam

    2016-06-01

    Adopting representative geologic connectivity scenarios is critical for reliable modeling and prediction of flow and transport processes in subsurface environments. Geologic scenarios are often developed by integrating several sources of information, including knowledge of the depositional environment, qualitative and quantitative data such as outcrop and well logs, and process-based geologic modeling. In general, flow and transport response data are usually not included in constructing geologic scenarios for a basin. Instead, these data are typically matched using a given prior geologic scenario as constraint. Since data limitations, modeling assumptions and subjective interpretations can lead to significant uncertainty in the adopted geologic scenarios, flow and transport data may also be useful for constraining the uncertainty in proposed geologic scenarios. Constraining geologic scenarios with flow-related data opens an interesting and challenging research area, which goes beyond the traditional model calibration formulations where the geologic scenario is assumed given. In this paper, a novel concept, known as group-sparsity regularization, is proposed as an effective formulation to constrain the uncertainty in the prior geologic scenario during subsurface flow model calibration. Given a collection of model realizations from several plausible geologic scenarios, the proposed method first applies the truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) to compactly represent the models from each geologic scenario. The TSVD basis for representing each scenario forms a distinct group. The proposed approach searches over these groups (i.e., geologic scenarios) to eliminate inconsistent groups that are not supported by the observed flow/pressure data. The group-sparsity regularization minimizes a l1/l2mixed norm, where the l2-norm quantifies the contribution of each group and operates on the coefficients within the groups while the l1-norm, having a selection property, is

  17. Identification of a Novel Group of Bacteria in Sludge from a Deteriorated Biological Phosphorus Removal Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Alex T.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Filipe, Carlos; Grady, Leslie; Molin, Søren; Stahl, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The microbial diversity of a deteriorated biological phosphorus removal reactor was investigated by methods not requiring direct cultivation. The reactor was fed with media containing acetate and high levels of phosphate (P/C weight ratio, 8:100) but failed to completely remove phosphate in the effluent and showed very limited biological phosphorus removal activity. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA was used to investigate the bacterial diversity. Up to 11 DGGE bands representing at least 11 different sequence types were observed; DNA from the 6 most dominant of these bands was further isolated and sequenced. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the partial 16S rRNA sequences suggested that one sequence type was affiliated with the alpha subclass of the Proteobacteria, one was associated with the Legionella group of the gamma subclass of the Proteobacteria, and the remaining four formed a novel group of the gamma subclass of the Proteobacteria with no close relationship to any previously described species. The novel group represented approximately 75% of the PCR-amplified DNA, based on the DGGE band intensities. Two oligonucleotide rRNA probes for this novel group were designed and used in a whole-cell hybridization analysis to investigate the abundance of this novel group in situ. The bacteria were coccoid and 3 to 4 μm in diameter and represented approximately 35% of the total population, suggesting a relatively close agreement with the results obtained by the PCR-based DGGE method. Further, based on electron microscopy and standard staining microscopic analysis, this novel group was able to accumulate granule inclusions, possibly consisting of polyhydroxyalkanoate, inside the cells. PMID:10049891

  18. High prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from Uganda and their identification using sizes of intergenic spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Ryo; Qiu, Yongjin; Igarashi, Manabu; Magona, Joseph W; Zhou, Lijia; Ito, Kimihito; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2013-12-01

    The spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria transmitted by ticks that cause several tick-borne rickettsioses in humans worldwide. This study was intended to determine the prevalence of SFG rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from 7 districts across Uganda. In addition to sequencing of gltA and ompA genes, identification of Rickettsia species based on the sizes of highly variable intergenic spacers, namely, dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet) was carried out. Application of multiplex PCR for simultaneous amplification of 3 spacers combined with capillary electrophoresis separation allowed simple, accurate, and high-throughput fragment sizing with considerable time and cost savings. Rickettsia genus-specific real-time PCR detected 136 positives out of 140 samples, giving an overall prevalence of 97.1%. Most samples (n=113) had a size combination of 225, 195, and 341 bp for dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet), respectively, which was identical to that of R. africae, a causative agent of African tick bite fever. In addition, several samples had size variants in either dksA-xerC or rpmE-tRNA(fMet). Nonetheless, the partial sequences of gltA and ompA genes of samples of all size combinations showed the greatest similarity to R. africae (99.3-100% for gltA and 98.1-100% for ompA). Given these results, it is highly possible that the tested ticks were infected with R. africae or closely related species. This is a first report on molecular genetic detection of R. africae and its high endemicity in Uganda. Clinicians in this country should be aware of this pathogen as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness. This study provided a starting point for the development of Rickettsia species identification based on the sizes of intergenic spacers. The procedure is simple, rapid, and cost-effective to perform; hence it might be particularly well suited for preliminary species identification in epidemiological investigations. The results

  19. GPR-Based Landmine Detection and Identification Using Multiple Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Hee Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to identify landmines in various burial conditions. A ground penetration radar is used to generate data set, which is then processed to reduce the ground effect and noise to obtain landmine signals. Principal components and Fourier coefficients of the landmine signals are computed, which are used as features of each landmine for detection and identification. A database is constructed based on the features of various types of landmines and the ground conditions, including the different levels of moisture and types of ground and the burial depths of the landmines. Detection and identification is performed by searching for features in the database. For a robust decision, the counting method and the Mahalanobis distance-based likelihood ratio test method are employed. Four landmines, different in size and material, are considered as examples that demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method for detecting and identifying landmines.

  20. Identification of protein superfamily from structure- based sequence motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The structure-based sequence motif of the distant proteins in evolution, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) Ⅰ and Ⅱ superfamilies, as an example, has been defined by the structural comparison, structure-based sequence alignment and analyses on substitution patterns of residues in common sequence conserved regions. And the phosphatases Ⅰ and Ⅱ can be correctly identified together by the structure-based PTP sequence motif from SWISS-PROT and TrEBML databases. The results show that the correct rates of identification are over 98%. This is the first time to identify PTP Ⅰ and Ⅱ together by this motif.

  1. Research of internet worm warning system based on system identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao ZHOU; Guanzhong DAI; Huimin YE

    2006-01-01

    The frequent explosion of Internet worms has been one of the most serious problems in cyberspace security.In this paper, by analyzing the worm's propagation model, we propose a new worm warning system based on the method of system identification, and use recursive least squares algorithm to estimate the worm's infection rate. The simulation result shows the method we adopted is an efficient way to conduct Internet worm warning.

  2. Mass spectrometry based protein identification with accurate statistical significance assignment

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Assigning statistical significance accurately has become increasingly important as meta data of many types, often assembled in hierarchies, are constructed and combined for further biological analyses. Statistical inaccuracy of meta data at any level may propagate to downstream analyses, undermining the validity of scientific conclusions thus drawn. From the perspective of mass spectrometry based proteomics, even though accurate statistics for peptide identification can now be ach...

  3. Crosscumulants Based Approaches for the Structure Identification of Volterra Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Houda Mathlouthi; Kamel Abederrahim; Faouzi Msahli; Gerard Favier

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of structure identification of Volterra models. It consists in estimating the model order and the memory lcngth of each kernel. Two methods based on input-output crosscumulants arc developed. The first one uses zero mean independent and identically distributed Ganssian input, and the second one concerns a symmetric input sequence. Simulations are performed on six models having different orders and kernel memory lengths to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed methods.

  4. Support Vector Machine for Behavior-Based Driver Identification System

    OpenAIRE

    Huihuan Qian; Yongsheng Ou; Xinyu Wu; Xiaoning Meng; Yangsheng Xu

    2010-01-01

    We present an intelligent driver identification system to handle vehicle theft based on modeling dynamic human behaviors. We propose to recognize illegitimate drivers through their driving behaviors. Since human driving behaviors belong to a dynamic biometrical feature which is complex and difficult to imitate compared with static features such as passwords and fingerprints, we find that this novel idea of utilizing human dynamic features for enhanced security applicat...

  5. Use of a Serotype-Specific DNA Microarray for Identification of Group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae)

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Linyan; Wang, Quan; Li, Yayue; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu

    2006-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) is an important cause of sepsis and meningitis. Nine GBS serotypes, based on capsular polysaccharide (CPS) antigens, have been described. Their distribution varies worldwide and needs to be monitored to understand the epidemiology of GBS disease and inform the development of vaccines. In this study, we sequenced cpsH of GBS serotype II (cpsHII) and compared it with that of the other eight serotypes to identify serotype-specific regions. We...

  6. Minimal axiom group of similarity-based rough set model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jian-hua; PAN Yun-he

    2006-01-01

    Rough set axiomatization is one aspect of rough set study to characterize rough set theory using dependable and minimal axiom groups.Thus,rough set theory can be studied by logic and axiom system methods.The classical rough set theory is based on equivalence relation,but the rough set theory based on similarity relation has wide applications in the real world.To characterize similarity-based rough set theory,an axiom group named S,consisting of 3 axioms,is proposed.The reliability of the axiom group,which shows that characterizing of rough set theory based on similarity relation is rational,is proved.Simultaneously,the minimization of the axiom group,which requests that each axiom is an equation and independent,is proved.The axiom group is helpful to research rough set theory by logic and axiom system methods.

  7. Development and In silico Evaluation of Large-Scale Metabolite Identification Methods using Functional Group Detection for Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Mitchell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale identification of metabolites is key to elucidating and modeling metabolism at the systems level. Advances in metabolomics technologies, particularly ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry enable comprehensive and rapid analysis of metabolites. However, a significant barrier to meaningful data interpretation is the identification of a wide range of metabolites including unknowns and the determination of their role(s in various metabolic networks. Chemoselective (CS probes to tag metabolite functional groups combined with high mass accuracy provide additional structural constraints for metabolite identification and quantification. We have developed a novel algorithm, Chemically Aware Substructure Search (CASS that efficiently detects functional groups within existing metabolite databases, allowing for combined molecular formula and functional group (from CS tagging queries to aid in metabolite identification without a priori knowledge. Analysis of the isomeric compounds in both Human Metabolome Database (HMDB and KEGG Ligand demonstrated a high percentage of isomeric molecular formulae (43% and 28% respectively, indicating the necessity for techniques such as CS-tagging. Furthermore, these two databases have only moderate overlap in molecular formulae. Thus, it is prudent to use multiple databases in metabolite assignment, since each major metabolite database represents different portions of metabolism within the biosphere. In silico analysis of various CS-tagging strategies under different conditions for adduct formation demonstrate that combined FT-MS derived molecular formulae and CS-tagging can uniquely identify up to 71% of KEGG and 37% of the combined KEGG/HMDB database versus 41% and 17% respectively without adduct formation. This difference between database isomer disambiguation highlights the strength of CS-tagging for non-lipid metabolite identification. However, unique identification of complex lipids still needs

  8. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Standards and Requirements Identification Document (SRID) Requirements Management System and Requirements Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, A.L.

    2000-11-30

    The current Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) for the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP), River Protection Project (RPP), CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), will use a computer based requirements management system. The system will serve as a tool to assist in identifying, capturing, and maintaining the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) requirements and links to implementing procedures and other documents. By managing requirements as one integrated set, CHG will be able to carry out its mission more efficiently and effectively. CHG has chosen the Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System (DOORS{trademark}) as the preferred computer based requirements management system. Accordingly, the S/RID program will use DOORS{trademark}. DOORS{trademark} will replace the Environmental Requirements Management Interface (ERMI) system as the tool for S/RID data management. The DOORS{trademark} S/RID test project currently resides on the DOORSTM test server. The S/RID project will be migrated to the DOORS{trademark} production server. After the migration the S/RID project will be considered a production project and will no longer reside on the test server.

  9. Diagnosis and Model Based Identification of a Coupling Misalignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pennacchi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the application of two different diagnostic techniques aimed to identify the most important faults in rotating machinery as well as on the simulation and prediction of the frequency response of rotating machines. The application of the two diagnostics techniques, the orbit shape analysis and the model based identification in the frequency domain, is described by means of an experimental case study that concerns a gas turbine-generator unit of a small power plant whose rotor-train was affected by an angular misalignment in a flexible coupling, caused by a wrong machine assembling. The fault type is identified by means of the orbit shape analysis, then the equivalent bending moments, which enable the shaft experimental vibrations to be simulated, have been identified using a model based identification method. These excitations have been used to predict the machine vibrations in a large rotating speed range inside which no monitoring data were available. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of identification of coupling misalignment and prediction of the consequent machine behaviour in an actual size rotating machinery. The successful results obtained emphasise the usefulness of integrating common condition monitoring techniques with diagnostic strategies.

  10. Target identification of natural products and bioactive compounds using affinity-based probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sijun; Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Chenyu; Yao, Samantha C L; Yao, Shao Q

    2016-05-04

    Covering: 2010 to 2014.Advances in isolation, synthesis and screening strategies have made many bioactive substances available. However, in most cases their putative biological targets remain unknown. Herein, we highlight recent advances in target identification of natural products and bioactive compounds by using affinity-based probes. Aided by photoaffinity labelling, this strategy can capture potential cellular targets (on and off) of a natural product or bioactive compound in live cells directly, even when the compound-target interaction is reversible with moderate affinity. The knowledge of these targets may help uncover molecular pathways and new therapeutics for currently untreatable diseases. In this highlight, we will introduce the development of various photoactivatable groups, their synthesis and applications in target identification of natural products and bioactive compounds, with a focus on work done in recent years and from our laboratory. We will further discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each group and the outlooks for this novel proteome-wide profiling strategy.

  11. FRACTIONAL ORDER SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION BASED ON GENETIC ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAZIN Z. OTHMAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available System identification deals with estimating the plant parameters under control using input-output measuring data. Most of practical plants have fractional order dynamic properties which are based on integration and differentiation of noninteger order. In this work the structure and the parameters of fractional order unknown transfer function are estimated using input-output data. Integer order Least Squares identification is used first to confirm the structure (order of the unknown transfer function. Then, Genetic Algorithms (GAs is followed to find the most accurate fractional order estimate that represents the system. Illustrative examples are presented in which fractional order transfer functions are identified in a way that faithfully estimates the dynamics of the unknown plants.

  12. Identification of collagen-based materials in cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Daniel P; Buckley, Michael; Promise, Ellen; Trauger, Sunia A; Holdcraft, T Rose

    2013-09-07

    All stakeholders in cultural heritage share an interest in fabrication methods and material technology. Until now methods for analysis of organic materials, particularly proteins, have not been widely available to researchers at cultural institutions. This paper will describe an analytical method for the identification of collagen-based materials from soft tissue sources and show examples of its application to diverse museum objects. The method, peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF), uses enzymatic digestion of extracted proteins to produce a mixture of peptides. The mass spectrum of the mixture contains characteristic marker ions-a peptide mass fingerprint-which are compared to species-specific markers from references as the basis of identification. Preliminary results indicate that analysis of materials from aged samples, several different tissue types, and tanned or untanned materials yields comparable PMF results. Significantly, PMF is simple, rapid, sensitive and specific, has been implemented in a museum laboratory, and is being practiced successfully by non-specialists.

  13. P2P worm detection based on application identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Chunhe; SHI Yunping; LI Xiaojian; GAO Wei

    2007-01-01

    P2P worm exploits common vulnerabilities and spreads through peer-to-peer networks.Despite being recognized as a potential and deadly threat to the Internet recently,few relevant countermeasures are found in extant literature.Once it breaks out,a P2P worm could result in unpredictable losses.Based on propagation characteristics of the worm,this paper presents a detection method called PWD (P2P Worm Detection),which is designed based on application identification and unknown worm detection.Simulation result and LAN-environment experiment result both indicate that PWD is an effective method to detect and block P2P worms.

  14. Network Traffic Anomalies Identification Based on Classification Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Račys

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A problem of network traffic anomalies detection in the computer networks is analyzed. Overview of anomalies detection methods is given then advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are analyzed. Model for the traffic anomalies detection was developed based on IBM SPSS Modeler and is used to analyze SNMP data of the router. Investigation of the traffic anomalies was done using three classification methods and different sets of the learning data. Based on the results of investigation it was determined that C5.1 decision tree method has the largest accuracy and performance and can be successfully used for identification of the network traffic anomalies.

  15. User Identification Detector Based on Power of R Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-jiang; YU Quan; LIU Yuan-an

    2005-01-01

    To avoid the inaccurate estimation of the active user's number and the corresponding performance degradation, a novel POR-based User Identification Detector (UID) is proposed for the Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) systems. The new detector adopts the Power of R (POR) technique and the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) method, which does not require the estimation of active users' number, and obtains lower false alarm probability than the subspace-based UID in the multipath channels. However, from our analysis, increasing the order m does not improve the performance. Therefore, when m is one, the performance of the new detector is maximal.

  16. Professional Identification of Psychosocial Problems among Children from Ethnic Minority Groups: Room for Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, M.R.; Bekkema, N.; Wiefferink, C.H.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of child health care professionals (CHP) in identifying psychosocial problems among children originating from industrialized and nonindustrialized countries and to assess whether parental concerns enhance CHP problem-identification. Study design: During routine

  17. 3D ear identification based on sparse representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    Full Text Available Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person's identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm.

  18. Identification, genetic diversity and cereulide producing ability of Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from Beninese traditional fermented food condiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2010-08-15

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is often detected in spontaneously fermented African foods but is rarely identified to species level. Only some of the B. cereus group species are reported to be pathogenic to humans and identification to species level is necessary to estimate the safety of these products. In the present study, a total of 19 Bacillus cereus group spp. isolated from afitin, iru and sonru, three spontaneously fermented African locust (Parkia biglobosa) bean based condiments produced in Benin, were investigated. The strains were isolated at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 48 h fermentation time. By using phenotypic and genotypic methods all of the isolates could be identified as B. cereus sensu stricto. The isolates were grouped according to their PM13 PCR (random amplification of polymorphic DNA PCR) fingerprint and formed two major clusters, one of which contained eight strains isolated from afitin (cluster 1). Highly similar PM13 profiles were obtained for seven of the isolates, one from afitin, one from iru and five from sonru (cluster 2). Four of the isolates, one from afitin and three from sonru, did not form any particular cluster. The PM13 profiles of cluster 2 isolates were identical to those which are specific to emetic toxin producers. Cereulide production of these isolates was confirmed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. This is the first report on cereulide producing B. cereus in African fermented foods. Occurrence of the opportunistic human pathogen B. cereus, which is able to produce emetic toxin in afitin, iru and sonru, could impose a health hazard. Interestingly, no reports on food poisoning from the consumption of the fermented condiments exist.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Peptide Mimics of Blood Group A Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoming TANG; Lin WANG; Lihua HU; Yirong LI; Tianpen CUI; Juan XIONG; Lifang DOU

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate peptide mimics of carbohydrate blood group A antigen, a phage display 12-met peptide library was screened with a monoclonal antibody against blood group A antigen, NaM87-1F6. The antibody-binding properties of the selected phage peptides were evaluated by phage ELISA and phage capture assay. The peptides were co-expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. RBC agglutination inhibition assay was performed to assess the natural blood group A antigen-mimicking ability of the fusion proteins. The results showed that seven phage clones selected bound to NaM87-1F6 specifically, among which, 6 clones bore the same peptide sequence, EYWYCGMNRTGC and another harbored a different one QIWYERTLPFrF. The two peptides were successfully expressed at the N terminal of GST protein. Both of the fusion proteins inhibited the RBC agglutination mediated by anti-A serum in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggested that the fusion proteins based on the selected peptides could mimic the blood group A an- tigen and might be used as anti-A antibody-adsorbing materials when immunoabsorption was applied in ABO incompatible transplantation.

  20. Identification of critical paralog groups with indispensable roles in the regulation of signaling flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modos, Dezso; Brooks, Johanne; Fazekas, David; Ari, Eszter; Vellai, Tibor; Csermely, Peter; Korcsmaros, Tamas; Lenti, Katalin

    2016-12-06

    Extensive cross-talk between signaling pathways is required to integrate the myriad of extracellular signal combinations at the cellular level. Gene duplication events may lead to the emergence of novel functions, leaving groups of similar genes - termed paralogs - in the genome. To distinguish critical paralog groups (CPGs) from other paralogs in human signaling networks, we developed a signaling network-based method using cross-talk annotation and tissue-specific signaling flow analysis. 75 CPGs were found with higher degree, betweenness centrality, closeness, and 'bowtieness' when compared to other paralogs or other proteins in the signaling network. CPGs had higher diversity in all these measures, with more varied biological functions and more specific post-transcriptional regulation than non-critical paralog groups (non-CPG). Using TGF-beta, Notch and MAPK pathways as examples, SMAD2/3, NOTCH1/2/3 and MEK3/6-p38 CPGs were found to regulate the signaling flow of their respective pathways. Additionally, CPGs showed a higher mutation rate in both inherited diseases and cancer, and were enriched in drug targets. In conclusion, the results revealed two distinct types of paralog groups in the signaling network: CPGs and non-CPGs. Thus highlighting the importance of CPGs as compared to non-CPGs in drug discovery and disease pathogenesis.

  1. Identification of Partitions in a Homogeneous Activity Group Using Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available People in public areas often appear in groups. People with homogeneous coarse-grained activities may be further divided into subgroups depending on more fine-grained behavioral differences. Automatically identifying these subgroups can benefit a variety of applications for group members. In this work, we focus on identifying such subgroups in a homogeneous activity group (i.e., a group of people who perform the same coarse-grained activity at the same time. We present a generic framework using sensors built in commodity mobile devices. Specifically, we propose a two-stage process, sensing modality selection given a coarse-grained activity, followed by multimodal clustering to identify subgroups. We develop one early fusion and one late fusion multimodal clustering algorithm. We evaluate our approaches using multiple datasets; two of them are with the same activity while the other has a different activity. The evaluation results show that the proposed multimodal-based approaches outperform existing work that uses only one single sensing modality and they also work in scenarios when manually selecting one sensing modality fails.

  2. Personality traits and group-based information behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. The relationship between hypothesised behaviour resulting from a personality test and actual information behaviour resulting from a group-based assignment process is addressed in this paper. Methods. Three voluntary groups of ten librarianship and information science students were...... but there were also deviations, which were found that seemed to be related to the group-work context. The importance of studying personality traits in context has further been confirmed....

  3. Personality traits and group-based information behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. The relationship between hypothesised behaviour resulting from a personality test and actual information behaviour resulting from a group-based assignment process is addressed in this paper. Methods. Three voluntary groups of ten librarianship and information science students were....... Information behaviour associated with personality traits was identified, but the presence of personality effects tended to vary with the perceived presence of the social context. Conclusions. Some matches were identified between group members' personality traits and their actual information behaviour...

  4. Recognition of online handwritten Gurmukhi characters based on zone and stroke identification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KARUN VERMA; R K SHARMA

    2017-05-01

    Handwriting recognition is a technique that converts handwritten characters into a machine-processable format. Handwritten characters can either be presented to machine online or offline. A good amount of research in this area has been carried out for English, Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages. Research is also going on for Indian languages on developing online handwriting recognition systems. Headline and baseline are common features in most Indic languages which divide a character into three zones, namely, upper, middle andlower zones. Identification of headline and baseline is a major task for classification of strokes located in these three zones. A zone identification algorithm is proposed and tested in this text for online handwriting recognitionof Gurmukhi script. The strokes are grouped into these separate zones and are recognized based on respective support vector machine model for each zone. A rule-based approach has also been applied and tested for generation of characters from the set of recognized strokes. In this work, an accuracy of 95.3% has been achieved for zone identification and an accuracy of 74.8% has been achieved for character identification for Gurmukhi script. This accuracy has been achieved when the recognition engines of three zones were tested onthe dataset of 428 characters each written by 10 users.

  5. Innovation:CBT-based support groups for postnatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Pat

    Postnatal depression can have serious implications for mother/child bonding and damage relationships between parents. Approaches to treat it need to overcome barriers that have led to high attrition in some group or clinic-based postnatal depression treatment studies. This retrospective evaluation explored the benefits of offering postnatally depressed mothers group support based on cognitive behavioural therapy. It helped to improve women's self-esteem and self-worth and to make them feel safe and supported.

  6. A Time-Space Domain Information Fusion Method for Specific Emitter Identification Based on Dempster-Shafer Evidence Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Cao, Ying; Yang, Lin; He, Zichang

    2017-08-28

    Specific emitter identification plays an important role in contemporary military affairs. However, most of the existing specific emitter identification methods haven't taken into account the processing of uncertain information. Therefore, this paper proposes a time-space domain information fusion method based on Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, which has the ability to deal with uncertain information in the process of specific emitter identification. In this paper, radars will generate a group of evidence respectively based on the information they obtained, and our main task is to fuse the multiple groups of evidence to get a reasonable result. Within the framework of recursive centralized fusion model, the proposed method incorporates a correlation coefficient, which measures the relevance between evidence and a quantum mechanical approach, which is based on the parameters of radar itself. The simulation results of an illustrative example demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively deal with uncertain information and get a reasonable recognition result.

  7. HOC Based Blind Identification of Hydroturbine Shaft Volterra System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the quadratic Volterra system simplified from the hydroturbine shaft system, a blind identification method based on the third-order cumulants and a reversely recursive method are proposed. The input sequence of the system under consideration is an unobservable independent identically distributed (i.i.d., zero-mean and non-Gaussian stationary signal, and the observed signals are the superposition of the system output signal and Gaussian noise. To calculate the third-order moment of the output signal, a computer loop judgment method is put forward to determine the coefficient. When using optimization method to identify the time domain kernels, we combined the traditional optimization algorithm (direct search method with genetic algorithm (GA and constituted the hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA. Finally, according to the prototype observation signal and the time domain kernel parameters obtained from identification, the input signal of the system can be gained recursively. To test the proposed method, three numerical experiments and engineering application have been carried out. The results show that the method is applicable to the blind identification of the hydroturbine shaft system and has strong universality; the input signal obtained by the reversely recursive method can be approximately taken as the random excitation acted on the runner of the hydroturbine shaft system.

  8. Identification of Haptic Based Guiding Using Hard Reins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Anuradha; Dasgupta, Prokar; Althoefer, Kaspar; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents identifications of human-human interaction in which one person with limited auditory and visual perception of the environment (a follower) is guided by an agent with full perceptual capabilities (a guider) via a hard rein along a given path. We investigate several identifications of the interaction between the guider and the follower such as computational models that map states of the follower to actions of the guider and the computational basis of the guider to modulate the force on the rein in response to the trust level of the follower. Based on experimental identification systems on human demonstrations show that the guider and the follower experience learning for an optimal stable state-dependent novel 3rd and 2nd order auto-regressive predictive and reactive control policies respectively. By modeling the follower’s dynamics using a time varying virtual damped inertial system, we found that the coefficient of virtual damping is most appropriate to explain the trust level of the follower at any given time. Moreover, we present the stability of the extracted guiding policy when it was implemented on a planar 1-DoF robotic arm. Our findings provide a theoretical basis to design advanced human-robot interaction algorithms applicable to a variety of situations where a human requires the assistance of a robot to perceive the environment. PMID:26201076

  9. Identification of Haptic Based Guiding Using Hard Reins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Ranasinghe

    Full Text Available This paper presents identifications of human-human interaction in which one person with limited auditory and visual perception of the environment (a follower is guided by an agent with full perceptual capabilities (a guider via a hard rein along a given path. We investigate several identifications of the interaction between the guider and the follower such as computational models that map states of the follower to actions of the guider and the computational basis of the guider to modulate the force on the rein in response to the trust level of the follower. Based on experimental identification systems on human demonstrations show that the guider and the follower experience learning for an optimal stable state-dependent novel 3rd and 2nd order auto-regressive predictive and reactive control policies respectively. By modeling the follower's dynamics using a time varying virtual damped inertial system, we found that the coefficient of virtual damping is most appropriate to explain the trust level of the follower at any given time. Moreover, we present the stability of the extracted guiding policy when it was implemented on a planar 1-DoF robotic arm. Our findings provide a theoretical basis to design advanced human-robot interaction algorithms applicable to a variety of situations where a human requires the assistance of a robot to perceive the environment.

  10. Identification of psychobiological stressors among HIV-positive women. HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center (HNRC) Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, S J; Patterson, T L; Temoshok, L R; McCutchan, J A; Straits-Tröster, K A; Chandler, J L; Grant, I

    1993-01-01

    This research describes major stressors in the lives of women who have been infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Thirty-one HIV antibody positive (HIV+) women infected primarily through heterosexual contact participated in a two hour semi-structured interview detailing the circumstances, context, and consequences of all stressful life events and difficulties experienced within the preceding six months. Qualitative methods of data analyses were utilized (Miles & Huberman, 1984). HIV-related life events and difficulties were classified into primary and secondary stressors based on the stress process model (Pearlin et al., 1981). Problems arising directly from one's seropositivity were defined as primary stressors. Stressful life events and difficulties occurring in other role areas were defined as secondary stressors. Six categories of HIV-related stressors were identified and quantified. Primary stressors were health-related, and included both gynecological problems (e.g., amenorrhea) and general symptoms of HIV infection (e.g., fatigue). Secondary stressors related to child and family (e.g., future guardianship of children), marital/partner relations (e.g., disclosure of HIV+ status), occupation (e.g., arranging time-off for medical appointments), economic problems (e.g., insurance "hassles"), and social network events (e.g., death of friends from AIDS). This research indicates that HIV-positive women are exposed to multiple stressors; some may be viewed as unique to women, whereas others may be considered common to both sexes. Identification of stressors has implications for the design of medical and psychiatric interventions for women.

  11. Performance study on Gossip-based group key distribution protocal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Yan; Ma Jiaqing; Zhong Yiping; Zhang Shiyong

    2006-01-01

    Group key distribution is faced with two important problems, i.e. reliability and scalability, to support security multicast for large and dynamic groups. With group member increasing, traditional reliable multicast protocol can not deal with them fully. Gossip-based group key distribution idea for wide-area dissemination was provided. It is based on an gossip-based loss recovery control mechanism. It can provide a probabilistic reliable guarantee for a information dissemination to reach every group member, which can achieve scalability and reliability. To achieve full reliability, three layers protocol model in group key distribution was provided. One is best effect layer, which provides unreliable dissemination. Other is gossip-based loss recovery layer, which provides probabilistic reliable guarantee. Last is vsync-based layer, which provide deterministic loss recovery. We integrate probabilistic loss recovery method with deterministic one. The model possess scalability that probabilistic method has and full reliability prosthesis by vsync-based. To evaluate the effectiveness of gossip technique in scalable and reliable multicast protocols. We have compared gossip protocol with other reliable multicast protocols. Experimental result shows that gossip protocol has better scalability than other.

  12. Identification and remediation of reading difficulties based on successive processing deficits and delay in general reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churches, Melinda; Skuy, Mervyn; Das, J P

    2002-12-01

    Widespread learning problems among South African children are associated with the apartheid era and show a need for effective reading programs. In selecting these programs, it is useful to differentiate between children with dyslexia and children whose reading is poor because teaching was inadequate. In this study, the Woodcock Tests of Reading Mastery-Revised and tests modelled on the Cognitive Assessment System were used to define a group of children with deficits in successive processing associated with dyslexia and a group of children with general reading delay. There were two girls and five boys in each group. For the children with successive processing deficit, the mean age was 9 yr., 8 mo. For the other group, mean age was 9 yr., 3 mo. Control groups were matched for age and sex and kind of reading difficulty. The first group received Das's PASS Reading Enhancement Program, and the second participated in a remedial program based on Whole Language principles. The treatment groups received 24 1-hr. long sessions. Gains in successive processing were shown for the first group, as measured by the tests modelled on Cognitive Assessment System subtests but not for the second group. Both groups showed gains in phonics and word identification, relative to their respective control groups, suggesting the respective intervention program was effective for each group.

  13. Hazard identification by methods of animal-based toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, S M; Greig, J B; Bridges, J W; Carere, A; Carpy, A J M; Galli, C L; Kleiner, J; Knudsen, I; Koëter, H B W M; Levy, L S; Madsen, C; Mayer, S; Narbonne, J-F; Pfannkuch, F; Prodanchuk, M G; Smith, M R; Steinberg, P

    2002-01-01

    This paper is one of several prepared under the project "Food Safety In Europe: Risk Assessment of Chemicals in Food and Diet" (FOSIE), a European Commission Concerted Action Programme, organised by the International Life Sciences Institute, Europe (ILSI). The aim of the FOSIE project is to review the current state of the science of risk assessment of chemicals in food and diet, by consideration of the four stages of risk assessment, that is, hazard identification, hazard characterisation, exposure assessment and risk characterisation. The contribution of animal-based methods in toxicology to hazard identification of chemicals in food and diet is discussed. The importance of first applying existing technical and chemical knowledge to the design of safety testing programs for food chemicals is emphasised. There is consideration of the presently available and commonly used toxicity testing approaches and methodologies, including acute and repeated dose toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity and food allergy. They are considered from the perspective of whether they are appropriate for assessing food chemicals and whether they are adequate to detect currently known or anticipated hazards from food. Gaps in knowledge and future research needs are identified; research on these could lead to improvements in the methods of hazard identification for food chemicals. The potential impact of some emerging techniques and toxicological issues on hazard identification for food chemicals, such as new measurement techniques, the use of transgenic animals, assessment of hormone balance and the possibilities for conducting studies in which common human diseases have been modelled, is also considered.

  14. SVM Based Identification of Psychological Personality Using Handwritten Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Asra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification of Personality is a complex process. To ease this process, a model is developed using cursive handwriting. Area based, width based and height based thresholds are set for only character selection, word selection and line selection. The rest is considered as noise. Followed by feature vector construction. Slope feature using slope calculation, shape features and edge detection done using Sobel filter and direction histogram is considered. Based on the direction of handwriting the analysis was done. Writing which rises to the right shows optimism and cheerfulness. Sagging to the right shows physical or mental weariness. The lines which are straight, reveals over-control to compensate for an inner fear of loss of control.The analysis was done using single line and multiple lines. Simple techniques have provided good results. The results using single line were 95% and multiple lines were 91%.The classification is done using SVM classifier.

  15. Identification of an imino group indispensable for cleavage by a small ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C; Volpini, Rosaria; Heller, Moriah G; Krucinska, Jolanta; Cristalli, Gloria; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2009-05-06

    The hairpin ribozyme is a small, noncoding RNA (ncRNA) that catalyzes a site-specific phosphodiester bond cleavage reaction. Prior biochemical and structural analyses pinpointed the amidine moiety of base Ade38 as a key functional group in catalysis, but base changes designed to probe function resulted in localized misfolding of the active site. To define the requirements for chemical activity using a conservative modification, we synthesized and incorporated N1-deazaadenosine into the full-length ribozyme construct. This single-atom variant severely impairs activity, although the active-site fold remains intact in the accompanying crystal structures. The results demonstrate the essentiality of the imino moiety as well as the importance of its interaction with the substrate in the precatalytic and transition-state conformations. This work demonstrates the efficacy of single-atom approaches in the analysis of ncRNA structure-function relationships.

  16. ADHD GROUP RISK SCREENING BASED ON GAME BIOFEEDBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Jafarova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To organize the systematic selection and formation of risk groups regarding attention disorder, the algorithm of screening diagnostics for primary school students was developed using game biofeedback based on     heart     rate     and     time     of    response    to     suddenly    appearing    stimuli (test     "Rally".    Proposedareclassificationrules for including the subjects into the risk group, the intermediate group, and the group with satisfactory test results.

  17. Identification of snails within the Bulinus africanus group from East Africa by multiplex SNaPshotäanalysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cytochrome oxidase subunit I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stothard JR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of populations of Bulinus nasutus and B. globosus from East Africa is unreliable using characters of the shell. In this paper, a molecular method of identification is presented for each species based on DNA sequence variation within the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI as detected by a novel multiplexed SNaPshotTM assay. In total, snails from 7 localities from coastal Kenya were typed using this assay and variation within shell morphology was compared to reference material from Zanzibar. Four locations were found to contain B. nasutus and 2 locations were found to contain B. globosus. A mixed population containing both B. nasutus and B. globosus was found at Kinango. Morphometric variation between samples was considerable and UPGMA cluster analysis failed to differentiate species. The multiplex SNaPshotTM assay is an important development for more precise methods of identification of B. africanus group snails. The assay could be further broadened for identification of other snail intermediate host species.

  18. A Model for Peer Group Counseling Based on Role-Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettkin, Larry; Snyder, Lester

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of group counseling was to promote new social learning involving identification with other group members, leading to expanded field perception and insight into the projection of thoughts, feelings and motives onto others. (Author)

  19. More Efficient VLR Group Signature Based on DTDH Assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Ma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In VLR (verifier-local revocation group signature, only verifiers are involved in the revocation of a member, while signers are not. Thus the VLR group signature schemes are suitable for mobile environments. To meet the requirement of speediness, reducing computation costs and shortening signature length are two requirements at the current research of VLR group signatures. A new VLR group signature is proposed based on q-SDH assumption and DTDH assumption. Compared with the existing VLR group signatures based on DTDH assumption, the  proposed scheme not only has the shortest signature size, but also has the lowest computation costs , and can be applicable to mobile environments such as IEEE 802.1x.  

  20. A Lightweight RFID Grouping-Proof Protocol Based on Parallel Mode and DHCP Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicai Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID grouping-proof protocol is to generate an evidence of the simultaneous existence of a group of tags and it has been applied to many different fields. For current grouping-proof protocols, there still exist some flaws such as low grouping-proof efficiency, being vulnerable to trace attack and information leakage. To improve the secure performance and efficiency, we propose a lightweight RFID grouping-proof protocol based on parallel mode and DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol mechanism. Our protocol involves multiple readers and multiple tag groups. During the grouping-proof period, one reader and one tag group are chosen by the verifier by means of DHCP mechanism. When only a part of the tags of the chosen group exist, the protocol can also give the evidence of their co-existence. Our protocol utilizes parallel communication mode between reader and tags so as to ensure its grouping-proof efficiency. It only uses Hash function to complete the mutual authentication among verifier, readers and tags. It can preserve the privacy of the RFID system and resist the attacks such as eavesdropping, replay, trace and impersonation. Therefore the protocol is secure, flexible and efficient. It only uses some lightweight operations such as Hash function and a pseudorandom number generator. Therefore it is very suitable to some low-cost RFID systems.

  1. A tree-based model for homogeneous groupings of multinomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae Young

    2005-11-30

    The motivation of this paper is to provide a tree-based method for grouping multinomial data according to their classification probability vectors. We produce an initial tree by binary recursive partitioning whereby multinomials are successively split into two subsets and the splits are determined by maximizing the likelihood function. If the number of multinomials k is too large, we propose to order the multinomials, and then build the initial tree based on a dramatically smaller number k-1 of possible splits. The tree is then pruned from the bottom up. The pruning process involves a sequence of hypothesis tests of a single homogeneous group against the alternative that there are two distinct, internally homogeneous groups. As pruning criteria, the Bayesian information criterion and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test are proposed. The tree-based model is illustrated on genetic sequence data. Homogeneous groupings of genetic sequences present new opportunities to understand and align these sequences.

  2. Method of Fire Image Identification Based on Optimization Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In view of some distinctive characteristics of the early-stage flame image, a corresponding method of characteristic extraction is presented. Also introduced is the application of the improved BP algorithm based on the optimization theory to identifying fire image characteristics. First the optimization of BP neural network adopting Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm with the property of quadratic convergence is discussed, and then a new system of fire image identification is devised. Plenty of experiments and field tests have proved that this system can detect the early-stage fire flame quickly and reliably.

  3. Highly sensitive passive radio frequency identification based sensor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissenwasser, J; Vellekoop, M; Heer, R

    2010-02-01

    A novel platform for sensor applications based on radio frequency (rf) identification technology, where passive tags are powered by the rf-field of a reader, is presented. The sophisticated energy harvesting system of the tag enables a blanking of the rf-field for a defined period, while supplying the tag electronics with a highly stable voltage and a power of 25 mW for 100 ms. During this time, span measurements can be performed without interferences of the rf-field. The presented tags work without batteries and are designed for impedance measurements on microbiological cell cultures under physiological relevant conditions as well as in harsh environments.

  4. Highly sensitive passive radio frequency identification based sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissenwasser, J.; Vellekoop, M.; Heer, R.

    2010-02-01

    A novel platform for sensor applications based on radio frequency (rf) identification technology, where passive tags are powered by the rf-field of a reader, is presented. The sophisticated energy harvesting system of the tag enables a blanking of the rf-field for a defined period, while supplying the tag electronics with a highly stable voltage and a power of 25 mW for 100 ms. During this time, span measurements can be performed without interferences of the rf-field. The presented tags work without batteries and are designed for impedance measurements on microbiological cell cultures under physiological relevant conditions as well as in harsh environments.

  5. Chaos identification based on CMAC with replacing eligibility learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yan-zhong

    2009-01-01

    In the conventional CMAC learning scheme, the correcting amounts of errors are equally distributed into all addressed weight, regardless the temporal credibility of those weights. In order to solve the temporal credit assignment problem of the CMAC, an improved CMAC neural network based on replacing eligibility learning concept was designed. The proposed improved leaning approach uses the replacing eligibility learning concept of the reinforcement learning to improve the prediction capability. The simulations for chaotic system identification show that the improved CMAC neural network is effective.

  6. A Clock Fingerprints-Based Approach for Wireless Transmitter Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Caidan; Xie, Liang; Huang, Lianfen; Yao, Yan

    Cognitive radio (CR) was proposed as one of the promising solutions for low spectrum utilization. However, security problems such as the primary user emulation (PUE) attack severely limit its applications. In this paper, we propose a clock fingerprints-based authentication approach to prevent PUE attacks in CR networks with the help of curve fitting and classifier. An experimental setup was constructed using the WLAN cards and software radio devices, and the corresponding results show that satisfied identification can be achieved for wireless transmitters.

  7. Metabolite identification for mass spectrometry-based metabolomics using multiple types of correlated ion information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Ke-Shiuan; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chen, Yet-Ran; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Ann; Lih, T Mamie; Chang, Hui-Yin; Huang, Ching-jang; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Pan, Wen-Harn; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2015-02-17

    Metabolite identification remains a bottleneck in mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics. Currently, this process relies heavily on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra generated separately for peaks of interest identified from previous MS runs. Such a delayed and labor-intensive procedure creates a barrier to automation. Further, information embedded in MS data has not been used to its full extent for metabolite identification. Multimers, adducts, multiply charged ions, and fragments of given metabolites occupy a substantial proportion (40-80%) of the peaks of a quantitation result. However, extensive information on these derivatives, especially fragments, may facilitate metabolite identification. We propose a procedure with automation capability to group and annotate peaks associated with the same metabolite in the quantitation results of opposite modes and to integrate this information for metabolite identification. In addition to the conventional mass and isotope ratio matches, we would match annotated fragments with low-energy MS/MS spectra in public databases. For identification of metabolites without accessible MS/MS spectra, we have developed characteristic fragment and common substructure matches. The accuracy and effectiveness of the procedure were evaluated using one public and two in-house liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data sets. The procedure accurately identified 89% of 28 standard metabolites with derivative ions in the data sets. With respect to effectiveness, the procedure confidently identified the correct chemical formula of at least 42% of metabolites with derivative ions via MS/MS spectrum, characteristic fragment, and common substructure matches. The confidence level was determined according to the fulfilled identification criteria of various matches and relative retention time.

  8. Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-04

    The Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group has screened six prospective demonstration projects for consideration by the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT). These projects include the Kirtland Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the March Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the McClellan Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the Williams Air Force Base Demonstration Project, and two demonstration projects under the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence. A seventh project (Port Hueneme Naval Construction Battalion Center) was added to list of prospective demonstrations after the September 1993 Working Group Meeting. This demonstration project has not been screened by the working group. Two additional Air Force remediation programs are also under consideration and are described in Section 6 of this document. The following information on prospective demonstrations was collected by the Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group to assist the DOIT Committee in making Phase 1 Demonstration Project recommendations. The remainder of this report is organized into seven sections: Work Group Charter`s mission and vision; contamination problems, current technology limitations, and institutional and regulatory barriers to technology development and commercialization, and work force issues; screening process for initial Phase 1 demonstration technologies and sites; demonstration descriptions -- good matches;demonstration descriptions -- close matches; additional candidate demonstration projects; and next steps.

  9. Group sparsity based airborne wide angle SAR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhonghao; Zhang, Bingchen; Bi, Hui; Lin, Yun; Wu, Yirong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a group sparsity based wide angle synthetic aperture radar (WASAR) imaging model and propose a novel algorithm called backprojection based group complex approximate message passing (GCAMP-BP) to recover the anisotropic scene. Compare to conventional backprojection based complex approximate message passing (CAMP-BP) algorithm for the recovery of isotropic scene, the proposed method accommodates aspect dependent scattering behavior better and can produce better imagery. Simulated and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Identification and Control of a Cylindrical Tank Based on System Identification Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Mol Paul

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in the process control industry has made difficulties in controlling processes which are highly complex in nature. System identification provides a better solution for this problem with the help of identification models. In this paper ARX,ARMAX,BJ and OE models were used for the identification of a cylindrical tank and Ziegler Nichols tuning method to develop the controller for controlling the level of the tank. The proposed method provides simple and accurate models and thereby improving the efficency of identification process. MATLAB and LABView softwares were used here for identification and controlling.

  11. Support for multiculturalism and minority rights : the role of national identification and out-group threat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Support for multiculturalism and minority rights is examined in three studies among ethnic Dutch participants. Three models are tested for how national identification is related to perceived realistic and symbolic threats and to levels of support. Findings in all three studies are most in agreement

  12. Morphological and molecular identification of species of the Obsoletus group (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Achim; Kristensen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    segment of the maxillary palp and the number and location of hairs on the first abdominal tergit. Validation of the quick stereomicroscope identification method was achieved by morphometric measurements and a molecular marker. In all cases, both methods verified the quick morphological species...

  13. Identification of strategies to facilitate organ donation among African Americans using the nominal group technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Jayme E; Qu, Haiyan; Shewchuk, Richard; Mannon, Roslyn B; Gaston, Robert; Segev, Dorry L; Mannon, Elinor C; Martin, Michelle Y

    2015-02-06

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by ESRD, but few receive a living donor kidney transplant. Surveys assessing attitudes toward donation have shown that African Americans are less likely to express a willingness to donate their own organs. Studies aimed at understanding factors that may facilitate the willingness of African Americans to become organ donors are needed. A novel formative research method was used (the nominal group technique) to identify and prioritize strategies for facilitating increases in organ donation among church-attending African Americans. Four nominal group technique panel interviews were convened (three community and one clergy). Each community panel represented a distinct local church; the clergy panel represented five distinct faith-based denominations. Before nominal group technique interviews, participants completed a questionnaire that assessed willingness to become a donor; 28 African-American adults (≥19 years old) participated in the study. In total, 66.7% of participants identified knowledge- or education-related strategies as most important strategies in facilitating willingness to become an organ donor, a view that was even more pronounced among clergy. Three of four nominal group technique panels rated a knowledge-based strategy as the most important and included strategies, such as information on donor involvement and donation-related risks; 29.6% of participants indicated that they disagreed with deceased donation, and 37% of participants disagreed with living donation. Community participants' reservations about becoming an organ donor were similar for living (38.1%) and deceased (33.4%) donation; in contrast, clergy participants were more likely to express reservations about living donation (33.3% versus 16.7%). These data indicate a greater opposition to living donation compared with donation after one's death among African Americans and suggest that improving knowledge about organ donation, particularly

  14. Collaborative processes in species identification using an internet-based taxonomic resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontkanen, Jani; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick; Hartikainen-Ahia, Anu; Åhlberg, Mauri

    2016-01-01

    Visual databases are increasingly important resources through which individuals and groups can undertake species identification. This paper reports research on the collaborative processes undertaken by pre-service teacher students when working in small groups to identify birds using an Internet-based taxonomic resource. The student groups are conceptualised as 'knowledge-building communities' working in a 'joint problem space' comprising the collective knowledge of the participants interacting with the taxonomic database. Collaborative group work and associated dialogue were recorded with digital video. The recordings were analysed for the categories of dialogue and the categories of knowledge used by the students as they interacted with the taxonomic database and how they drew on their previous experiences of identifying birds. The outcomes are discussed in the context of the interplay of individual and social processes and the interplay between abstraction and lived experience in the joint problem space.

  15. Activity-based sleep-wake identification in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Edward; Sazonova, Nadezhda; Schuckers, Stephanie; Neuman, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Actigraphy offers one of the best-known alternatives to polysomnography for sleep-wake identification. The advantages of actigraphy include high accuracy, simplicity of use and low intrusiveness. These features allow the use of actigraphy for determining sleep-wake states in such highly sensitive groups as infants. This study utilizes a motion sensor (accelerometer) for a dual purpose: to determine an infant's position in the crib and to identify sleep-wake states. The accelerometer was positioned over the sacral region on the infant's diaper, unlike commonly used attachment to an ankle. Opposed to broadly used discriminant analysis, this study utilized logistic regression and neural networks as predictors. The accuracy of predicted sleep-wake states was established in comparison to the sleep-wake states recorded by technicians in a polysomnograph study. Both statistical and neural predictors of this study provide an accuracy of approximately 77-92% which is comparable to similar studies achieving prediction rates of 85-95%, thus validating the suggested methodology. The results support the use of body motion as a simple and reliable method for determining sleep-wake states in infants. Nonlinear mapping capabilities of the neural network benefit the accuracy of sleep-wake state identification. Utilization of the accelerometer for the dual purpose allows us to minimize intrusiveness of home infant monitors.

  16. Writers Identification Based on Multiple Windows Features Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhil, Murad Saadi; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2016-03-01

    Now a days, writer identification is at high demand to identify the original writer of the script at high accuracy. The one of the main challenge in writer identification is how to extract the discriminative features of different authors' scripts to classify precisely. In this paper, the adaptive division method on the offline Latin script has been implemented using several variant window sizes. Fragments of binarized text a set of features are extracted and classified into clusters in the form of groups or classes. Finally, the proposed approach in this paper has been tested on various parameters in terms of text division and window sizes. It is observed that selection of the right window size yields a well positioned window division. The proposed approach is tested on IAM standard dataset (IAM, Institut für Informatik und angewandte Mathematik, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland) that is a constraint free script database. Finally, achieved results are compared with several techniques reported in the literature.

  17. A multi-algorithm-based automatic person identification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monwar, Md. Maruf; Gavrilova, Marina

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometric is an emerging area of research that aims at increasing the reliability of biometric systems through utilizing more than one biometric in decision-making process. In this work, we develop a multi-algorithm based multimodal biometric system utilizing face and ear features and rank and decision fusion approach. We use multilayer perceptron network and fisherimage approaches for individual face and ear recognition. After face and ear recognition, we integrate the results of the two face matchers using rank level fusion approach. We experiment with highest rank method, Borda count method, logistic regression method and Markov chain method of rank level fusion approach. Due to the better recognition performance we employ Markov chain approach to combine face decisions. Similarly, we get combined ear decision. These two decisions are combined for final identification decision. We try with 'AND'/'OR' rule, majority voting rule and weighted majority voting rule of decision fusion approach. From the experiment results, we observed that weighted majority voting rule works better than any other decision fusion approaches and hence, we incorporate this fusion approach for the final identification decision. The final results indicate that using multi algorithm based can certainly improve the recognition performance of multibiometric systems.

  18. SVM Classifiers: The Objects Identification on the Base of Their Hyperspectral Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidova Liliya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the objects identification on the base of their hyperspectral features has been considered. It is offered to use the SVM classifiers on the base of the modified PSO algorithm, adapted to specifics of the problem of the objects identification on the base of their hyperspectral features. The results of the objects identification on the base of their hyperspectral features with using of the SVM classifiers have been presented.

  19. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  20. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  1. A modified PCR-SSP method for the identification of ABO blood group antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, J; Darke, C

    2003-08-01

    The ABO blood group antigens are carbohydrate molecules synthesized by the glycosyltransferases encoded by the ABO gene on chromosome 9. Kidney transplantation across the ABO barrier generally leads to rapid humoral graft rejection due to the presence of naturally occurring antibodies to the A and B antigens. We have developed a method for ABO typing our cadaveric organ donors by the polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The method uses 12 primers in eight PCR mixtures and is performed under the same conditions as our routine HLA-A, B, C PCR-SSP typing. The PCR-SSP-based types of 166 regular blood donors and 148 cadaveric organ donors all showed total concordance with their serologically assigned ABO groups. Six individuals possessing the ABO A subgroups (A3, Ax and Aend) all typed as A1 by PCR-SSP, as expected. PCR-SSP is an appropriate method for ABO typing of cadaveric organ donors and, importantly, enables both ABO and HLA typing to be performed on the same DNA material.

  2. Study of Biometric Identification Method Based on Naked Footprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raji Rafiu King

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The scale of deployment of biometric identity-verification systems has recently seen an enormous increase owing to the need for more secure and reliable way of identifying people. Footprint identification which can be defined as the measurement of footprint features for recognizing the identity of a user has surfaced recently. This study is based on a biometric personal identification method using static footprint features viz. friction ridge / texture and foot shape / silhouette. To begin with, naked footprints of users are captured; images then undergo pre processing followed by the extraction of two features; shape using Gradient Vector Flow (GVF) snake model and minutiae extraction respectively. Matching is then effected based on these two features followed by a fusion of these two results for either a reject or accept decision. Our shape matching feature is based on cosine similarity while the texture one is based on miniature score matching. The results from our research establish that the naked footprint is a credible biometric feature as two barefoot impressions of an individual match perfectly while that of two different persons shows a great deal of dissimilarity. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.29-35 How to cite this article: King

  3. Identification of epsilon martensite in a Fe-based shape memory alloy by means of EBSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, K; Van Caenegem, N; Raabe, D

    2009-01-01

    Ferrous shape memory alloys (SMAs) are often thought to become a new, important group of SMAs. The shape memory effect in these alloys is based on the reversible, stress-induced martensitic transformation of austenite to epsilon martensite. The identification and quantification of epsilon martensite is crucial when evaluating the shape memory behaviour of this material. Previous work displayed that promising results were obtained when studying the evolution of the amount of epsilon martensite after different processing steps with Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD). The present work will discuss in detail, on the one hand, the challenges and opportunities arising during the identification of epsilon martensite by means of EBSD and, on the other hand, the possible interpretations that might be given to these findings. It will be illustrated that although the specific nature of the austenite to epsilon martensite transformation can still cause some points of discussion, EBSD has a high potential for identifying epsilon martensite.

  4. Risk Identification for the Construction Phases of the Large Bridge Based on WBS-RBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Fu Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available For the construction environment of large bridges is complex and there are too much uncertain factors during the course of the construction, it is difficult for the general method of risk identification to identify the risks wholly and systematically. This study presents a new method of risk identification with modular analysis based on WBS-RBS (Work Breakdown Structure-Risk Breakdown Structure. For the purpose of the better application of this new method in the risk identification of large bridges, a BCICS (Bridge Construction Information Classification System suitable for construction phase of large bridges was established based on the information classification system of ISO (International Standardization Organization. In order to provide a uniform communication language for the risk analysis personnel, the WBS of the construction of large bridges was established, which was beneficial to the judgment of the matrix elements of the RBM (Risk Breakdown Structure applying the method of NGT (Nominal Group Technique. The coding system based on BCICS and RBS presented in this study is convenient for the modularized computer storage of the risk information of large bridges in construction phase and has great contribution to establishing the risk database of large bridges in construction phase

  5. Identification of rainy periods from ground based microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Vittoria Bosisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study aiming at detecting rainy data in measurements collected by a dual band ground-based radiometer. The proposed criterion is based on the ratio of the brightness temperatures observed in the 20-30 GHz band without need of any ancillary information. A major result obtained from the probability density of the ratio computed over one month of data is the identification of threshold values between clear sky, cloudy sky and rainy sky, respectively. A linear fit performed by using radiometric data and concurrent rain gauge measurements shows a correlation coefficient equal to 0.56 between the temperature ratio and the observed precipitation.

  6. A model-based approach to human identification using ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Mark; Irvine, John M.; Wendelken, Suzanne

    2009-05-01

    Biometrics, such as fingerprint, iris scan, and face recognition, offer methods for identifying individuals based on a unique physiological measurement. Recent studies indicate that a person's electrocardiogram (ECG) may also provide a unique biometric signature. Current techniques for identification using ECG rely on empirical methods for extracting features from the ECG signal. This paper presents an alternative approach based on a time-domain model of the ECG trace. Because Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) models form a rich class of descriptors for representing the structure of periodic time series data, they are well-suited to characterizing the ECG signal. We present a method for modeling the ECG, extracting features from the model representation, and identifying individuals using these features.

  7. Are groups more or less than the sum of their members? The moderating role of individual identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Roy F; Ainsworth, Sarah E; Vohs, Kathleen D

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to make a theoretical and empirical case for the importance of differentiated identities for group function. Research on groups has found that groups sometimes perform better and other times perform worse than the sum of their individual members. Differentiation of selves is a crucial moderator. We propose a heuristic framework that divides formation of work or task groups into two steps. One step emphasizes shared common identity and promotes emotional bonds. In the other step, which we emphasize, group members take increasingly differentiated roles that improve performance through specialization, moral responsibility, and efficiency. Pathologies of groups (e.g., social loafing, depletion of shared resources/commons dilemmas, failure to pool information, groupthink) are linked to submerging the individual self in the group. These pathologies are decreased when selves are differentiated, such as by individual rewards, individual competition, accountability, responsibility, and public identification. Differentiating individual selves contributes to many of the best outcomes of groups, such as with social facilitation, wisdom-of-crowds effects, and division of labor. Anonymous confidentiality may hamper differentiation by allowing people to blend into the group (so that selfish or lazy efforts are not punished), but it may also facilitate differentiation by enabling people to think and judge without pressure to conform. Acquiring a unique role within the group can promote belongingness by making oneself irreplaceable.

  8. Potential Energy Surfaces Using Algebraic Methods Based on Unitary Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Lemus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reviews the recent advances to estimate the potential energy surfaces through algebraic methods based on the unitary groups used to describe the molecular vibrational degrees of freedom. The basic idea is to introduce the unitary group approach in the context of the traditional approach, where the Hamiltonian is expanded in terms of coordinates and momenta. In the presentation of this paper, several representative molecular systems that permit to illustrate both the different algebraic approaches as well as the usual problems encountered in the vibrational description in terms of internal coordinates are presented. Methods based on coherent states are also discussed.

  9. A Group Signature Based Electronic Toll Pricing System

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xihui; Mauw, Sjouke; Pang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    With the prevalence and development of GNSS technologies, location-based vehicle services (LBVS) have experienced a rapid growth in recent years. However, location is a sensitive and private piece of information, so the design and development of such services just take the clients' privacy concerns into account. In this paper, we propose a new electronic toll pricing system based on group signatures, which provides a strong guarantee for the clients' anonymity within groups. Our system achieves a balance between privacy and the communication overhead imposed upon the users.

  10. Identification of gas powered motor propulsion group for small unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldziej, Daniel; Walendziuk, Wojciech; Mirek, Karol

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims at the dynamics identification of gas powered motor propulsion applied in remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) of the small or medium class. In subsequent chapters, the criteria indicating the choice of an electric or a gas power system are described. Moreover, the classification and characteristics of gas powered motor propulsions are presented. The main body of the article contains a laboratory stand dedicated to test the fumes from the motor propulsions in order to measure their static and dynamic characteristics. A wireless solution of acquiring the measurement data from the laboratory stand reflecting real working conditions of the repulsion is suggested. In further parts, the dynamics identification is done, and the transfer function of the object is presented.

  11. Measuring the drinking behaviour of individual pigs housed in group using radio frequency identification (RFID)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the drinking behaviour of pigs may indicate health, welfare or productivity problems. Automated monitoring and analysis of drinking behaviour could allow problems to be detected, thus improving farm productivity. A high frequency radio frequency identification (HF RFID) system was designed to register the drinking behaviour of individual pigs. HF RFID antennas were placed around four nipple drinkers and connected to a reader via a multiplexer. A total of 55 growing-finishing pigs w...

  12. Identification of Hammerstein Model Based on Quantum Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Hai Li

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear system identification is a main topic of modern identification. A new method for nonlinear system identification is presented by using Quantum Genetic Algorithm(QGA).The problems of nonlinear system identification are cast as function optimization overprameter space,and the Quantum Genetic Algorithm is adopted to solve the optimization problem. Simulation experiments show that: compared with the genetic algorithm, quantum genetic algorithm is an effective swarm intelligence algorith...

  13. Identification of Orientia tsutsugamushi,spotted fever group and typhus group Rickettsia by duplex and nested PCR methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M-C Luan; D-Z Yu; L Tang; L-J Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To identify members of genera of rickettsia and O.tsutsugamushi simultaneously.Methods:Rapid and duplex and nested PCR methods have been established by designing primers based on the conserved re-gions of heat shock protein GroEL gene.345 mouse viscera samples including liver,spleen and kidney,96 Xe-nopsylla cheopis and 32 chiggers collected from Hongta areas of Yuxi city,Yunnan province were tested by the new PCR methods.Results:The result of the study showed that the new PCR methods could identify most members of genera -Rickettsia and Orientia simultaneously with 100% specificity and its sensitivity could test one copy per microliter.The results of detection prevalence of rickettsioses in mouse,flea and mites DNA sam-ples showed that the total rickettsia infection rate in mouse was 34.78% (120 /345).The total infection rates in R.typhi,O.t Karp and R.sibirica of mouse samples were 28.12% (97 /345),19.71% (68 /345)and 0. 29% (1 /345)respectively.Co-infection rates in R.typhi and O.t Karp of mouse samples were 13.33% (46 /345).O.t Karp type has been the main epidemic strain in these areas.Conclusion:We concluded that this PCR method could be used to detect multi-genera rickettsia simultaneously.Molecular evidences provided in this and previous studies strongly support that Hongta areas of Yuxi city are a natural focus for typhus and scrub typhus with the common occurrence of their confection.

  14. Subspace-based identification of discrete time-delay system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang LIU; Jia-chen MA

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the identification problems of a class of linear stochastic time-delay systems with unknown delayed states in this study. A time-delay system is expressed as a delay differential equation with a single delay in the state vector. We first derive an equivalent linear time-invariant (LTI) system for the time-delay system using a state augmentation technique. Then a conventional subspace identification method is used to estimate augmented system matrices and Kalman state sequences up to a similarity transformation. To obtain a state-space model for the time-delay system, an alternate convex search (ACS) algorithm is presented to find a similarity transformation that takes the identified augmented system back to a form so that the time-delay system can be recovered. Finally, we reconstruct the Kalman state sequences based on the similarity transformation. The time-delay system matrices under the same state-space basis can be recovered from the Kalman state sequences and input-output data by solving two least squares problems. Numerical examples are to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Compressive-Sensing-Based Structure Identification for Multilayer Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Guofeng; Wu, Xiaoqun; Wang, Yingfei; Hu, Mi; Lu, Jun-An; Chen, Guanrong

    2017-02-13

    The coexistence of multiple types of interactions within social, technological, and biological networks has motivated the study of the multilayer nature of real-world networks. Meanwhile, identifying network structures from dynamical observations is an essential issue pervading over the current research on complex networks. This paper addresses the problem of structure identification for multilayer networks, which is an important topic but involves a challenging inverse problem. To clearly reveal the formalism, the simplest two-layer network model is considered and a new approach to identifying the structure of one layer is proposed. Specifically, if the interested layer is sparsely connected and the node behaviors of the other layer are observable at a few time points, then a theoretical framework is established based on compressive sensing and regularization. Some numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the identification scheme, its requirement of a relatively small number of observations, as well as its robustness against small noise. It is noteworthy that the framework can be straightforwardly extended to multilayer networks, thus applicable to a variety of real-world complex systems.

  16. Identification of a rare blood group, "Bombay (Oh) phenotype," in Bhuyan tribe of Northwestern Orissa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgir, R S

    2007-09-01

    Blood group serology plays a vital role in transfusion medicine. The Bombay (Oh) phenotype is characterized by the absence of A, B, and H antigens on red cells and occurs rarely, especially in tribal populations of India. This is a field-based random population study in the Bhuyan tribal community. The study reports three cases of the rare Bombay (Oh) phenotype for the first time in the Bhuyan tribe of Sundargarh district in North-Western Orissa. Taking informed consent, red blood cells of 836 Bhuyan subjects were tested with three antisera, i.e., anti-A, anti-B, and anti-H (lectin) for forward reaction. Agglutinations of plasma with A, B, and O (H) red cells (reverse reaction) were also tested for the presence or absence of antibodies in the serum. Specialized tests like absorption-elution, titration of naturally occurring antibodies at different temperatures, inhibition of anti-H by O saliva secretor, and determination of secretor status were performed. Three cases of a rare blood group, Bombay (Oh) phenotype, (2 out of 244 Khandayat Bhuyan and 1 out of 379 Paudi Bhuyan from Hemgiri and Lahunipara blocks, respectively) in the Bhuyan tribe of Sundargarh district in North-Western Orissa were detected, giving an incidence of 1 in 122 in Khandayat Bhuyan and 1 in 379 in Paudi Bhuyan, with an average of 1 in 278 among the Bhuyan tribal population. This incidence is high in comparison to earlier studies reported from India. The practice of tribal and territorial endogamy in a smaller effective populations (for example, there are only 3,521 individuals in Paudi Bhuyan) results in smaller marital distance and inbreeding, leading to increased homozygous expression of rare recessive genetic characters like the Bombay (Oh) phenotype. This study further testifies that the incidence is higher in those states of India where the consanguinity is a common practice.

  17. Identification of a rare blood group, "Bombay (Oh phenotype," in Bhuyan tribe of Northwestern Orissa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgir R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood group serology plays a vital role in transfusion medicine. The Bombay (Oh phenotype is characterized by the absence of A, B, and H antigens on red cells and occurs rarely, especially in tribal populations of India. Aims and Objectives: This is a field-based random population study in the Bhuyan tribal community. The study reports three cases of the rare Bombay (Oh phenotype for the first time in the Bhuyan tribe of Sundargarh district in North-Western Orissa. Materials and Methods: Taking informed consent, red blood cells of 836 Bhuyan subjects were tested with three antisera, i.e., anti-A, anti-B, and anti-H (lectin for forward reaction. Agglutinations of plasma with A, B, and O (H red cells (reverse reaction were also tested for the presence or absence of antibodies in the serum. Specialized tests like absorption-elution, titration of naturally occurring antibodies at different temperatures, inhibition of anti-H by O saliva secretor, and determination of secretor status were performed. Results: Three cases of a rare blood group, Bombay (Oh phenotype, (2 out of 244 Khandayat Bhuyan and 1 out of 379 Paudi Bhuyan from Hemgiri and Lahunipara blocks, respectively in the Bhuyan tribe of Sundargarh district in North-Western Orissa were detected, giving an incidence of 1 in 122 in Khandayat Bhuyan and 1 in 379 in Paudi Bhuyan, with an average of 1 in 278 among the Bhuyan tribal population. This incidence is high in comparison to earlier studies reported from India. Conclusions: The practice of tribal and territorial endogamy in a smaller effective populations (for example, there are only 3,521 individuals in Paudi Bhuyan results in smaller marital distance and inbreeding, leading to increased homozygous expression of rare recessive genetic characters like the Bombay (Oh phenotype. This study further testifies that the incidence is higher in those states of India where the consanguinity is a common practice.

  18. Group participants' experiences of a patient-directed group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers-Jewell, Kate; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Thomas, Rae; Reidlinger, Dianne P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals who participated in a group-based education program, including their motivators in relation to their diabetes management, and the perceived impact of group interactions on participants' experiences and motivation for self-management. Understanding individuals diagnosed with diabetes experiences of group-based education for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus may guide the development and facilitation of these programs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all individuals who participated in the intervention. Using thematic analysis underpinned by self-determination theory, we developed themes that explored participants' motivators in relation to diabetes management and the impact of group interactions on their experiences and motivation. The key themes included knowledge, experience, group interactions and motivation. Participants perceived that the group interactions facilitated further learning and increased motivation, achieved through normalization, peer identification or by talking with, and learning from the experience of others. The results support the use of patient-centred programs that prioritize group interactions over the didactic presentation of content, which may address relevant psychological needs of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and improve their motivation and health behaviours. Future group-based education programs may benefit from the use of self-determination theory as a framework for intervention design to enhance participant motivation.

  19. Cleaners' experiences with group-based workplace physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Lasse; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how work-site health promotion intervention, by involving group-based physical coordination training, may increase participants’ social awareness of new ways to use the body. Purpose: We investigated cleaners’ experiences with a one-year health promotion intervention...... involving group-based physical coordination training (PCT) during working hours. Design: We conducted a qualitative evaluation using method triangulation; continuous unfocused participant observation during the whole intervention, semi-structured focus group interview, and individual written evaluations one...... for implementation seem to be important for sustained effects of health-promotion interventions in the workplace. Originality: The social character of the physical training facilitated a community of practice, which potentially supported the learning of new competencies, and how to improve the organization...

  20. Multicultural competence and evidence-based practice in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric C; Kakkad, Dhruvi; Balzano, Julie

    2008-11-01

    The multicultural competence (MC) and evidence-based practice (EBP) initiatives have each generated healthy debates in the mental health field, with ample implications for clinical training and practice. Using two case illustrations, we highlight practical challenges and prospects in the intersection of MC and EBP. To facilitate complementary practice of MC and EBP, we offer strategies for the group therapist as a "local clinical scientist" to deliver culturally responsive treatments. We stress the importance of cultural adaptation of EBP models, namely, modifying evidence-based interventions that involve changes in service delivery, in the nature of the therapeutic relationship, or in components of the treatment itself to accommodate the cultural beliefs and behaviors of racial-cultural minority clients. Cultural adaptation of EBP in group therapy needs to be grounded in developmental contextualism and social justice. We discuss the two cases with an eye toward advancing multicultural competence in group therapy.

  1. Reducing Social Loafing in Group-Based Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Social loafing in group-based projects is a common problem for college teachers. This problem has received great attention, including a Quick Fix article by Stevens (2007), whose recommendations remain useful today, particularly the mechanism for peer evaluations--a key strategy for reducing social loafing. Since the publication of Stevens's…

  2. Fullerene-based Anchoring Groups for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christian A.; Ding, Dapeng; Sørensen, Jakob Kryger

    2008-01-01

    We present results on a new fullerene-based anchoring group for molecular electronics. Using lithographic mechanically controllable break junctions in vacuum we have determined the conductance and stability of single-molecule junctions of 1,4-bis(fullero[c]pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzene. The compound can...

  3. WWW-based environments for collaborative group work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Since 1994, we have been involved in the design and use of a series of WWW-based environments to support collaborative group work for students in a technical university in The Netherlands. These environments, and the course re-design that accompanies each new environment, began in April 1994 and con

  4. Synthesis and Crystal Structures of Schiff Bases Bearing Ferrocenylphenyl Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan XU; Yong FU; Mao Ping SONG; Yang Jie WU

    2005-01-01

    The Schiff bases bearing ferrocenylphenyl and diferrocenylphenyl groups were synthesized by the reactions of m-ferrocenylaniline with salicylaldehyde or 1, 4-bis (2'-formylphenyl)-1, 4-dioxabutane. The title compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and X-ray structural determination.

  5. Classification and Target Group Selection Based Upon Frequent Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); R. Potharst (Rob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this technical report , two new algorithms based upon frequent patterns are proposed. One algorithm is a classification method. The other one is an algorithm for target group selection. In both algorithms, first of all, the collection of frequent patterns in the training set is constr

  6. MedLeaf: Mobile Application for Medicinal Plant Identification Based on Leaf Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desta Sandya Prasvita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research proposes MedLeaf as a new mobile application for medicinal plants identification based on leaf image. The application runs on the Android operating system. MedLeaf has two main functionalities, i.e. medicinal plants identification and document searching of medicinal plant. We used Local Binary Pattern to extract leaf texture and Probabilistic Neural Network to classify the image. In this research, we used30 species of Indonesian medicinal plants and each species consists of 48 digital leaf images. To evaluate user satisfaction of the application we used questionnaire based on heuristic evaluation. The evaluation result shows that MedLeaf is promising for medicinal plants identification. MedLeaf will help botanical garden or natural reserve park management to identify medicinal plant, discover new plant species, plant taxonomy and so on. Also, it will help individual, groups and communities to find unused and undeveloped their skill to optimize the potential of medicinal plants. As the results, MedLeaf will increase of their resources, capitals, and economic wealth.

  7. Risks identification and ranking using AHP and group decision making technique: Presenting “R index”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Fazli

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns in project development is to detect all sorts of risks associated with a particular project. The main objective of this article is to identify the risks in the construction project and to grade them based on their importance on the project. The designed indicator in this paper is the combinational model of the Analytical Hierarchal Process (AHP method and the group decision – making applied for risks measurement and ranking. This indicator is called "R" which includes three main steps: creating the risks broken structure (RBS, obtaining each risk weight and efficacy, and finally performing the model to rank the risks. A questionnaire is used for gathering data. Based on the results of this survey, there are important risks associated with construction projects. There we need to use some guidelines to reduce the inherent risks including recognition of the common risks beside the political risks; suggestion of a simple, understandable, and practical model; and using plenty of the experts and specialists' opinions through applying step. After analyzing data, the final result from applying R index showed that the risk “economic changes / currency rate and inflation change" has the most importance for the analysis. In the other words, if these risks occur, the project may face with the more threats and it is suggested that an organization should centralize its equipment, personnel, cost, and time on the risk more than ever. The most obvious issue in this paper is a tremendous difference between an importance of the financial risks and the other risks.

  8. Sensor network based vehicle classification and license plate identification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, Janette Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brennan, Sean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosten, Edward J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raby, Eric Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kulathumani, Vinod K [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Typically, for energy efficiency and scalability purposes, sensor networks have been used in the context of environmental and traffic monitoring applications in which operations at the sensor level are not computationally intensive. But increasingly, sensor network applications require data and compute intensive sensors such video cameras and microphones. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of two such systems: a vehicle classifier based on acoustic signals and a license plate identification system using a camera. The systems are implemented in an energy-efficient manner to the extent possible using commercially available hardware, the Mica motes and the Stargate platform. Our experience in designing these systems leads us to consider an alternate more flexible, modular, low-power mote architecture that uses a combination of FPGAs, specialized embedded processing units and sensor data acquisition systems.

  9. Fuzzy-Rule-Based Object Identification Methodology for NAVI System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalyn R. Porle

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an object identification methodology applied in a navigation assistance for visually impaired (NAVI system. The NAVI has a single board processing system (SBPS, a digital video camera mounted headgear, and a pair of stereo earphones. The captured image from the camera is processed by the SBPS to generate a specially structured stereo sound suitable for vision impaired people in understanding the presence of objects/obstacles in front of them. The image processing stage is designed to identify the objects in the captured image. Edge detection and edge-linking procedures are applied in the processing of image. A concept of object preference is included in the image processing scheme and this concept is realized using a fuzzy-rule base. The blind users are trained with the stereo sound produced by NAVI for achieving a collision-free autonomous navigation.

  10. Eye movement identification based on accumulated time feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baobao; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Jiande; Yan, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Eye movement is a new kind of feature for biometrical recognition, it has many advantages compared with other features such as fingerprint, face, and iris. It is not only a sort of static characteristics, but also a combination of brain activity and muscle behavior, which makes it effective to prevent spoofing attack. In addition, eye movements can be incorporated with faces, iris and other features recorded from the face region into multimode systems. In this paper, we do an exploring study on eye movement identification based on the eye movement datasets provided by Komogortsev et al. in 2011 with different classification methods. The time of saccade and fixation are extracted from the eye movement data as the eye movement features. Furthermore, the performance analysis was conducted on different classification methods such as the BP, RBF, ELMAN and SVM in order to provide a reference to the future research in this field.

  11. Optimization-based topology identification of complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Sheng-Xue; Chen Li; He Yi-Gang

    2011-01-01

    In many cases,the topological structures of a complex network are unknown or uncertain,and it is of significance to identify the exact topological structure.An optimization-based method of identifying the topological structure of a complex network is proposed in this paper.Identification of the exact network topological structure is converted into a minimal optimization problem by using the estimated network.Then,an improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem.Compared with the previous adaptive synchronizationbased method,the proposed method is simple and effective and is particularly valid to identify the topological structure of synchronization complex networks.In some cases where the states of a complex network are only partially observable,the exact topological structure of a network can also be identified by using the proposed method.Finally,numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  13. Crack identification for rotating machines based on a nonlinear approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalini, A. A., Jr.; Sanches, L.; Bachschmid, N.; Steffen, V., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous contribution, a crack identification methodology based on a nonlinear approach was proposed. The technique uses external applied diagnostic forces at certain frequencies attaining combinational resonances, together with a pseudo-random optimization code, known as Differential Evolution, in order to characterize the signatures of the crack in the spectral responses of the flexible rotor. The conditions under which combinational resonances appear were determined by using the method of multiple scales. In real conditions, the breathing phenomenon arises from the stress and strain distribution on the cross-sectional area of the crack. This mechanism behavior follows the static and dynamic loads acting on the rotor. Therefore, the breathing crack can be simulated according to the Mayes' model, in which the crack transition from fully opened to fully closed is described by a cosine function. However, many contributions try to represent the crack behavior by machining a small notch on the shaft instead of the fatigue process. In this paper, the open and breathing crack models are compared regarding their dynamic behavior and the efficiency of the proposed identification technique. The additional flexibility introduced by the crack is calculated by using the linear fracture mechanics theory (LFM). The open crack model is based on LFM and the breathing crack model corresponds to the Mayes' model, which combines LFM with a given breathing mechanism. For illustration purposes, a rotor composed by a horizontal flexible shaft, two rigid discs, and two self-aligning ball bearings is used to compose a finite element model of the system. Then, numerical simulation is performed to determine the dynamic behavior of the rotor. Finally, the results of the inverse problem conveyed show that the methodology is a reliable tool that is able to estimate satisfactorily the location and depth of the crack.

  14. Group-based sparse representation for image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Debin; Gao, Wen

    2014-08-01

    Traditional patch-based sparse representation modeling of natural images usually suffer from two problems. First, it has to solve a large-scale optimization problem with high computational complexity in dictionary learning. Second, each patch is considered independently in dictionary learning and sparse coding, which ignores the relationship among patches, resulting in inaccurate sparse coding coefficients. In this paper, instead of using patch as the basic unit of sparse representation, we exploit the concept of group as the basic unit of sparse representation, which is composed of nonlocal patches with similar structures, and establish a novel sparse representation modeling of natural images, called group-based sparse representation (GSR). The proposed GSR is able to sparsely represent natural images in the domain of group, which enforces the intrinsic local sparsity and nonlocal self-similarity of images simultaneously in a unified framework. In addition, an effective self-adaptive dictionary learning method for each group with low complexity is designed, rather than dictionary learning from natural images. To make GSR tractable and robust, a split Bregman-based technique is developed to solve the proposed GSR-driven ℓ0 minimization problem for image restoration efficiently. Extensive experiments on image inpainting, image deblurring and image compressive sensing recovery manifest that the proposed GSR modeling outperforms many current state-of-the-art schemes in both peak signal-to-noise ratio and visual perception.

  15. An overview of modal-based damage identification methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Engineering Analysis Group

    1997-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of methods that examine changes in measured vibration response to detect, locate, and characterize damage in structural and mechanical systems. The basic idea behind this technology is that modal parameters (notably frequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping) are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, damping, and stiffness). Therefore, changes in the physical properties will cause detectable changes in the modal properties. The motivation for the development of this technology is first provided. The methods are then categorized according to various criteria such as the level of damage detection provided, model-based vs. non-model-based methods and linear vs. nonlinear methods. This overview is limited to methods that can be adapted to a wide range of structures (i.e., are not dependent on a particular assumed model form for the system such as beam-bending behavior and methods and that are not based on updating finite element models). Next, the methods are described in general terms including difficulties associated with their implementation and their fidelity. Past, current and future-planned applications of this technology to actual engineering systems are summarized. The paper concludes with a discussion of critical issues for future research in the area of modal-based damage identification.

  16. Correction of group refraction index based on pulse trains interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Aketagawa, Masato

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new concept for an unconventional type of two-color method for interferometry-based length measurements based on the adjacent pulse repetition interval length (APRIL), which is the physical length associated with the pulse repetition period. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that if the wavelength-based two-color method can eliminate the inhomogeneous disturbance of effects caused by the phase refractive index, then the APRIL-based two-color method can eliminate the air turbulence of errors induced by the group refractive index. We show that our analysis will benefit the pulse-laser-based two-color method, which secures traceability to the definition of the meter.

  17. Analog Group Delay Equalizers Design Based on Evolutionary Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laipert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a design method of the analog all-pass filter designated for equalization of the group delay frequency response of the analog filter. This method is based on usage of evolutionary algorithm, the Differential Evolution algorithm in particular. We are able to design such equalizers to be obtained equal-ripple group delay frequency response in the pass-band of the low-pass filter. The procedure works automatically without an input estimation. The method is presented on solving practical examples.

  18. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees’ Organizational Identification? A Perspective From the Group Engagement Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran eHameed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The literature examines the impact of firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR activities on employees’ organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed towards external stakeholders and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed towards employees activities influence employees’ organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees’ identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees’ calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail.

  19. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective from the Group Engagement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Imran; Riaz, Zahid; Arain, Ghulam A; Farooq, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The literature examines the impact of firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities on employees' organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed toward external stakeholders) and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed toward employees) activities influence employees' organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees' identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions) moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees' calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail.

  20. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective from the Group Engagement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Imran; Riaz, Zahid; Arain, Ghulam A.; Farooq, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The literature examines the impact of firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities on employees' organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed toward external stakeholders) and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed toward employees) activities influence employees' organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees' identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions) moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees' calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail. PMID:27303345

  1. A framework for grouping nanoparticles based on their measurable characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayes CM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Christie M Sayes,1–3 P Alex Smith,2 Ivan V Ivanov3 1Center for Aerosol and Nanomaterials Engineering, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA Background: There is a need to take a broader look at nanotoxicological studies. Eventually, the field will demand that some generalizations be made. To begin to address this issue, we posed a question: are metal colloids on the nanometer-size scale a homogeneous group? In general, most people can agree that the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials can be linked and related to their induced toxicological responses. Methods: The focus of this study was to determine how a set of selected physicochemical properties of five specific metal-based colloidal materials on the nanometer-size scale – silver, copper, nickel, iron, and zinc – could be used as nanodescriptors that facilitate the grouping of these metal-based colloids. Results: The example of the framework pipeline processing provided in this paper shows the utility of specific statistical and pattern recognition techniques in grouping nanoparticles based on experimental data about their physicochemical properties. Interestingly, the results of the analyses suggest that a seemingly homogeneous group of nanoparticles could be separated into sub-groups depending on interdependencies observed in their nanodescriptors. Conclusion: These particles represent an important category of nanomaterials that are currently mass produced. Each has been reputed to induce toxicological and/or cytotoxicological effects. Here, we propose an experimental methodology coupled with mathematical and statistical modeling that can serve as a prototype for a rigorous framework that aids in the ability to group nanomaterials together and to facilitate the subsequent analysis of trends in data based on quantitative

  2. System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator Jae-Jun Kim∗ and Brij N. Agrawal † Department of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and Dynamics, Vol. 20, No. 4, July-August 1997, pp. 625-632. 6Schwartz, J. L. and Hall, C. D., “ System Identification of a Spherical Air-Bearing

  3. Parameters Identification of Photovoltaic Cells Based on Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the complex nonlinear model of photovoltaic cells, traditional evolution strategy is easy to fall into the local optimal and its identification time is too long when taking parameters identification, then the difference algorithm is proposed in this study, which is to solve the problems of parameter identification in photovoltaic cell model, where it is very difficult to achieve with other identification algorithms. In this method, the random data is selected as the initial generation; the successful evolution to the next generation is done through a certain strategy of difference algorithm, which can achieve the effective identification of control parameters. It is proved that the method has a good global optimization and the fast convergence ability, and the simulation results are shown that the differential evolution has high identification ability and it is an effective method to identify the parameters of photovoltaic cells, where the photovoltaic cells can be widely used in other places with these parameters.

  4. Robust Gait-Based Person Identification against Walking Speed Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqmar, Muhammad Rasyid; Shinoda, Koichi; Furui, Sadaoki

    Variations in walking speed have a strong impact on gait-based person identification. We propose a method that is robust against walking-speed variations. It is based on a combination of cubic higher-order local auto-correlation (CHLAC), gait silhouette-based principal component analysis (GSP), and a statistical framework using hidden Markov models (HMMs). The CHLAC features capture the within-phase spatio-temporal characteristics of each individual, the GSP features retain more shape/phase information for better gait sequence alignment, and the HMMs classify the ID of each gait even when walking speed changes nonlinearly. We compared the performance of our method with other conventional methods using five different databases, SOTON, USF-NIST, CMU-MoBo, TokyoTech A and TokyoTech B. The proposed method was equal to or better than the others when the speed did not change greatly, and it was significantly better when the speed varied across and within a gait sequence.

  5. Identification of voters with interest groups improves the electoral chances of the challenger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sadiraj; J. Tuinstra; F.A.A.M. van Winden

    2009-01-01

    Interest groups are introduced in a spatial model of electoral competition between two political parties. We show that, by coordinating voting behavior,these interest groups increase the winning set, which is defined as the set of policy platforms for the challenger that will defeat the incumbent. T

  6. Improving the performance of indicator groups for the identification of important areas for species conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Frank Wugt; Bladt, Jesper; Rahbek, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    -Saharan birds and mammals, we assessed factors that influence the effectiveness of indicator groups. We assessed the influence of threatened, endemic, range-restricted, widespread, and large-bodied species by systematically varying their number in indicator groups. We also assessed the influence of taxonomic...

  7. Space Group Debris Imaging Based on Sparse Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Space group debris imaging is difficult with sparse data in low Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF spaceborne radar. To solve this problem in the narrow band system, we propose a method for space group debris imaging based on sparse samples. Due to the diversity of mass, density, and other factors, space group debris typically rotates at a high speed in different ways. We can obtain angular velocity through the autocorrelation function based on the diversity in the angular velocity. The scattering field usually presents strong sparsity, so we can utilize the corresponding measurement matrix to extract the data of different debris and then combine it using the sparse method to reconstruct the image. Furthermore, we can solve the Doppler ambiguity with the measurement matrix in low PRF systems and suppress some energy of other debris. Theoretical analysis confirms the validity of this methodology. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve high-resolution Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR images of space group debris in low PRF systems.

  8. Group Elevator Peak Scheduling Based on Robust Optimization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG, J.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling of Elevator Group Control System (EGCS is a typical combinatorial optimization problem. Uncertain group scheduling under peak traffic flows has become a research focus and difficulty recently. RO (Robust Optimization method is a novel and effective way to deal with uncertain scheduling problem. In this paper, a peak scheduling method based on RO model for multi-elevator system is proposed. The method is immune to the uncertainty of peak traffic flows, optimal scheduling is realized without getting exact numbers of each calling floor's waiting passengers. Specifically, energy-saving oriented multi-objective scheduling price is proposed, RO uncertain peak scheduling model is built to minimize the price. Because RO uncertain model could not be solved directly, RO uncertain model is transformed to RO certain model by elevator scheduling robust counterparts. Because solution space of elevator scheduling is enormous, to solve RO certain model in short time, ant colony solving algorithm for elevator scheduling is proposed. Based on the algorithm, optimal scheduling solutions are found quickly, and group elevators are scheduled according to the solutions. Simulation results show the method could improve scheduling performances effectively in peak pattern. Group elevators' efficient operation is realized by the RO scheduling method.

  9. Image-Based Vehicle Identification Technology for Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G A

    2002-10-08

    The threat of terrorist attacks against US civilian populations is a very real, near-term problem that must be addressed, especially in response to possible use of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Several programs are now being funded by the US Government to put into place means by which the effects of a terrorist attack could be averted or limited through the use of sensors and monitoring technology. Specialized systems that detect certain threat materials, while effective within certain performance limits, cannot generally be used efficiently to track a mobile threat such as a vehicle over a large urban area. The key elements of an effective system are an image feature-based vehicle identification technique and a networked sensor system. We have briefly examined current uses of image and feature recognition techniques to the urban tracking problem and set forth the outlines of a proposal for application of LLNL technologies to this critical problem. The primary contributions of the proposed work lie in filling important needs not addressed by the current program: (1) The ability to create vehicle ''fingerprints,'' or feature information from images to allow automatic identification of vehicles. Currently, the analysis task is done entirely by humans. The goal is to aid the analyst by reducing the amount of data he/she must analyze and reduce errors caused by inattention or lack of training. This capability has broad application to problems associated with extraction of useful features from large data sets. (2) Improvements in the effectiveness of LLNL's WATS (Wide Area Tracking System) by providing it accurate threat vehicle location and velocity. Model predictability is likely to be enhanced by use of more information related to different data sets. We believe that the LLNL can accomplish the proposed tasks and enhance the effectiveness of the system now under development.

  10. Identification of Hammerstein Model Based on Quantum Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hai Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear system identification is a main topic of modern identification. A new method for nonlinear system identification is presented by using Quantum Genetic Algorithm(QGA.The problems of nonlinear system identification are cast as function optimization overprameter space,and the Quantum Genetic Algorithm is adopted to solve the optimization problem. Simulation experiments show that: compared with the genetic algorithm, quantum genetic algorithm is an effective swarm intelligence algorithm, its salient features of the algorithm parameters, small population size, and the use of Quantum gate update populations, greatly improving the recognition in the optimization of speed and accuracy. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Identification of uropathogenic Escherichia coli clonal group A (CgA in hospitalised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens CS Dias

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study provides the first description of healthcare-associated infections with Escherichia coli clonal group A (CgA isolates in Latin America. Isolates were typed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, E. coli phylogenetic grouping, multilocus sequence typing and fimH single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Out of 42 E. coli hospital isolates studied, three belonged to E. coli phylogenetic group D and ST69 and had fimH sequences identical to that of the CgA reference strain ATCC BAA-457. E. coli CgA is another potential source of resistant infections in hospitals.

  12. The identification of group II inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites by electron probe microanalysis of perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornacki, A. S.; Wood, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique developed by Kornacki (1984) for identifying group II Ca/Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites by electron-microprobe analysis of the ZrO2 or Y2O3 content of their perovskite component is demonstrated using material from 20 Allende inclusions. The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with findings obtained by other procedures. Group II inclusions are found to have perovskites generally containing less than 0.10 wt pct ZrO2 and/or Y2O3 (average of several grains), while those of groups I, III, V, and VI have more than 0.25 wt pct ZrO2. Analysis of data on eight Allende Ca/Al-rich inclusions shows that 75 percent of the fine-grained inclusions belong to group II. The implications of these findings for fractionation processes in the primitive solar nebula are indicated.

  13. Identification of a rare blood group, "Bombay (Oh) phenotype," in Bhuyan tribe of Northwestern Orissa, India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balgir, R S

    2007-01-01

    Blood group serology plays a vital role in transfusion medicine. The Bombay (Oh) phenotype is characterized by the absence of A, B, and H antigens on red cells and occurs rarely, especially in tribal populations of India...

  14. Identification of Combat Unit Leader Skills and Leader-Group Interaction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    David L. Hannaraan, Peter B. Wylie, and Edgar L. Shriver Kinton, Inc. I !• and Bruce W. Hamill and Robert H. Sulzen Army Research Institute...LEADER SKILLS AND LEADER-GROUP INTERACTION PROCESSES Kermit F. Henriksen, Donald R. Jones, Jr., David L. Hannaman, Peter B. Wylie, and Edgar 1. Shrlver...depends upon how well group members reuspond to cues and other sources of information regarding the enemy’s movement. Berlo (1974) [ ~has shown that

  15. Detection of diacetyl (caramel odor) in presumptive identification of the "Streptococcus milleri" group.

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, T A; Smith, J.M

    1992-01-01

    The caramel odor associated with the "Streptococcus milleri" group was shown to be attributable to the formation of the metabolite diacetyl. Levels of diacetyl in the 22- to 200-mg/liter range were produced by 68 strains of the "S. milleri" group; apart from one strain of Streptococcus mutans, all 92 other strains of streptococci belonging to 12 species produced < 13 mg of diacetyl per liter. Quantitation of diacetyl levels from cultures of streptococci is suggested as a rapid presumptive tes...

  16. Adding Personality to Gifted Identification: Relationships among Traditional and Personality-Based Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the underutilized tools in gifted identification is personality-based measures. A multiple confirmatory factor analysis was utilized to examine the relationships between traditional identification methods and personality-based measures. The pattern of correlations indicated this model could be measuring two constructs, one related to…

  17. A quasi-modal parameter based system identification procedure with non-proportional hysteretic damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minli; Hahn, Eric J.; Liu, Jike; Lu, Zhongrong

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduced a modal parameter based identification procedure to identify the equivalent system of structures under harmonic excitations. The developed identification technique assumed non-proportional hysteretic damping in the equivalent system, which would be applicable in identifying more general structures. By introducing quasi-modal parameter, modal analysis equation was decoupled under physical coordinate; hence, the modal parameters of each vibration mode are identified independently. Double iteration algorithm was developed to solve the derived non-linear identification equation with complex unknowns. The developed identification procedure was applied to identify the equivalent system of a numerical model in order to evaluate the feasibility of the technique in practice. The identification procedure was also applied to identify an experimental mass and bar rig for validation purpose. Identification results showed that the identification procedure could identify accurately and robustly the equivalent system with non-proportional hysteretic damping assumption; hence, it is likely to be applicable in the field.

  18. Face Veins Based MCMT Technique for Personal Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamta Nath Mishra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Face veins based personal identification is a challenging task in the field of identity verification of a person. It is because many other techniques are not identifying the uniqueness of a person in the universe. This research paper finds the uniqueness of a person on the basis of face veins based technique. In this paper five different persons face veins images have been used with different rotation angles (left/right 900 to 2700 and 3150 . For each person, eight different images at different rotations were used and for each of these images the same minimum cost minutiae tree (MCMT is obtained. Here, Prim‟s or Kruskal‟s algorithm is used for finding the MCMT from a minutiae graph. The MCMT is traversed in pre-order to generate the unique string of vertices and edge lengths. We deviated the edge lengths of each MCMT by five pixels in positive and negative directions for robustness testing. It is observed in our experiments that the traversed string which consists of vertices and edge lengths of MCMT is unique for each person and this unique sequence is correctly identifying a person with an accuracy of above 95%. Further, we have compared the performance of our proposed technique with other standard techniques and it is observed that the proposed technique is giving the promising result.

  19. Specific Emitter Identification Based on the Natural Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Jia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific emitter identification (SEI techniques are often used in civilian and military spectrum-management operations, and they are also applied to support the security and authentication of wireless communication. In this letter, a new SEI method based on the natural measure of the one-dimensional component of the chaotic system is proposed. We find that the natural measures of the one-dimensional components of higher dimensional systems exist and that they are quite diverse for different systems. Based on this principle, the natural measure is used as an RF fingerprint in this letter. The natural measure can solve the problems caused by a small amount of data and a low sample rate. The Kullback–Leibler divergence is used to quantify the difference between the natural measures obtained from diverse emitters and classify them. The data obtained from real application are exploited to test the validity of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed method is not only easy to operate, but also quite effective, even though the amount of data is small and the sample rate is low.

  20. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Based Method for System Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, R E; Lee, C L; Nitao, J J; Hanley, W G

    2002-10-22

    This paper describes a novel methodology for the identification of mechanical systems and structures from vibration response measurements. It combines prior information, observational data and predictive finite element models to produce configurations and system parameter values that are most consistent with the available data and model. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The resulting process enables the estimation of distributions of both individual parameters and system-wide states. Attractive features of this approach include its ability to: (1) provide quantitative measures of the uncertainty of a generated estimate; (2) function effectively when exposed to degraded conditions including: noisy data, incomplete data sets and model misspecification; (3) allow alternative estimates to be produced and compared, and (4) incrementally update initial estimates and analysis as more data becomes available. A series of test cases based on a simple fixed-free cantilever beam is presented. These results demonstrate that the algorithm is able to identify the system, based on the stiffness matrix, given applied force and resultant nodal displacements. Moreover, it effectively identifies locations on the beam where damage (represented by a change in elastic modulus) was specified.

  1. A SINE-based dichotomous key for primate identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herke, Scott W; Xing, Jinchuan; Ray, David A; Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W; Cordaux, Richard; Batzer, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    For DNA samples or 'divorced' tissues, identifying the organism from which they were taken generally requires some type of analytical method. The ideal approach would be robust even in the hands of a novice, requiring minimal equipment, time, and effort. Genotyping SINEs (Short INterspersed Elements) is such an approach as it requires only PCR-related equipment, and the analysis consists solely of interpreting fragment sizes in agarose gels. Modern primate genomes are known to contain lineage-specific insertions of Alu elements (a primate-specific SINE); thus, to demonstrate the utility of this approach, we used members of the Alu family to identify DNA samples from evolutionarily divergent primate species. For each node of a combined phylogenetic tree (56 species; n=8 [Hominids]; 11 [New World monkeys]; 21 [Old World monkeys]; 2 [Tarsiformes]; and, 14 [Strepsirrhines]), we tested loci (>400 in total) from prior phylogenetic studies as well as newly identified elements for their ability to amplify in all 56 species. Ultimately, 195 loci were selected for inclusion in this Alu-based key for primate identification. This dichotomous SINE-based key is best used through hierarchical amplification, with the starting point determined by the level of initial uncertainty regarding sample origin. With newly emerging genome databases, finding informative retrotransposon insertions is becoming much more rapid; thus, the general principle of using SINEs to identify organisms is broadly applicable.

  2. Improvement of job satisfaction and organisational commitment through work group identification: an examination of the quantity surveyors in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Yee Betty Chiu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Though extant literatures in other sectors indicatethat job satisfaction and organizational commitment are important fordetermining individual and organisational outcomes, limited related researchhas been conducted amongst quantity surveyors in Hong Kong. Given cooperativeworking arrangement in the quantity surveying profession, work groupidentification is regarded as an important antecedent for determining jobsatisfaction and organisational commitment. The aim of this study is to examinewhether work group identification improves job satisfaction and organisationalcommitment. A questionnaire survey is conducted to collect data from quantitysurveyors working in private sector. A total of 71 valid responses are obtainedfrom 509 contacted quantity surveyors in Hong Kong. Bivariate correlation andmultiple regression analyses are performed to find the significance ofrelationships among the variables. Data analysis results support mosthypotheses. Work group identification is found to have significant positiveeffect on job satisfaction, affective and normative commitment. The finding isa bold step for quantity surveying companies to improve their quantity surveyors’job satisfaction and commitment level. The role of other contextual and organisationalfactors on job satisfaction and organisational commitment needs to becomplemented for future research.

  3. MRNA-based skin identification for forensic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Visser (Mijke); D. Zubakov (Dmitry); K. Ballantyne (Kaye); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the identification of human skin cells is of important relevance in many forensic cases, there is currently no reliable method available. Here, we present a highly specific and sensitive messenger RNA (mRNA) approach for skin identification, meeting the key requirements in

  4. EM Structure-Based Accelerators Working Group Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, W. D.; Lidia, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    This Working Group (WG) focused on EM Structure-Based Accelerators, which covers a broad area of mechanisms and experiments. Topics covered included dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWA), photonic bandgap accelerators (PBGA), inverse free electron lasers (IFEL), vacuum laser accelerators (VLA), other novel schemes, and supporting analysis and modeling. In addition, this WG was tasked at the Workshop with developing conceptual (strawman) designs for a 1-GeV accelerator system based upon any of the experimentally-proven approaches covered in this WG. Two strawmen designs were developed based upon IFELs and DWAs. The presentations given and strawmen designs indicate great progress has been made in many areas. Proof-of-principle experiments will occur shortly in PBGA and VLA. Other well-proven devices, such as IFELs, are becoming accepted as "workhorse" providers of microbunches.

  5. Fuzzy forecasting based on fuzzy-trend logical relationship groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shyi-Ming; Wang, Nai-Yi

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to predict the Taiwan Stock Exchange Capitalization Weighted Stock Index (TAIEX) based on fuzzy-trend logical relationship groups (FTLRGs). The proposed method divides fuzzy logical relationships into FTLRGs based on the trend of adjacent fuzzy sets appearing in the antecedents of fuzzy logical relationships. First, we apply an automatic clustering algorithm to cluster the historical data into intervals of different lengths. Then, we define fuzzy sets based on these intervals of different lengths. Then, the historical data are fuzzified into fuzzy sets to derive fuzzy logical relationships. Then, we divide the fuzzy logical relationships into FTLRGs for forecasting the TAIEX. Moreover, we also apply the proposed method to forecast the enrollments and the inventory demand, respectively. The experimental results show that the proposed method gets higher average forecasting accuracy rates than the existing methods.

  6. Terrain Identification for Prosthetic Knees Based on Electromyographic Signal Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The features of electromyographic (EMG) signals were investigated while people walking on different terrains, including up and down slopes, up and down stairs, and during level walking at different speeds. The features were used to develop a terrain identification method. The technology can be used to develop an intelligent transfemoral prosthetic limb with terrain identification capability. The EMG signals from 8 hip muscles of 13 healthy persons were recorded as they walked on the different terrains. The signals from the sound side of a transfemoral amputee were also recorded. The features of these signals were obtained using data processing techniques with an identification process developed for the identification of the terrain type. The procedure was simplified by using only the signals from three muscles. The identification process worked well in an intelligent prosthetic knee in a laboratory setting.

  7. Towards a Scalable Group Vehicle-based Security System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Jason M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In August 2014, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) proposed new rulemaking to require V2V communication in light vehicles. To establish trust in the basic safety messages (BSMs) that are exchanged by vehicles to improve driver safety, a vehicle public key infrastructure (VPKI) is required. We outline a system where a group or groups of vehicles manage and generate their own BSM signing keys and authenticating certificates -- a Vehicle-Based Security System (VBSS). Based on our preliminary examination, we assert the mechanisms exist to implement a VBSS that supports V2V communications; however, maintaining uniform trust throughout the system while protecting individual privacy does require reliance on nascent group signature technology which may require a significant amount of communication overhead for trust maintenance. To better evaluate the VBSS approach, we compare it to the proposed Security Credential Management System (SCMS) in four major areas including bootstrapping, pseudonym provisioning, BSM signing and authentication, and revocation. System scale, driver privacy, and the distribution and dynamics of participants make designing an effective VPKI an interesting and challenging problem; no clear-cut strategy exists to satisfy the security and privacy expectations in a highly efficient way. More work is needed in VPKI research, so the life-saving promise of V2V technology can be achieved.

  8. The Communication of "Pure" Group-Based Anger Reduces Tendencies Toward Intergroup Conflict Because It Increases Out-Group Empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Postmes, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining

  9. The Communication of "Pure" Group-Based Anger Reduces Tendencies Toward Intergroup Conflict Because It Increases Out-Group Empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Postmes, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining

  10. The role of focus groups in the identification of user needs and data availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, L.T. (Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)); French, D.K.; Preston, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Federal agencies with survey responsibilities often face competing demands. On the one hand, data users frequently require additional information or more detailed information in order to address current issues. On the other hand, data providers, citing increased respondent burden and, possibly, a lack of specific data, often resist changes to existing survey forms. This article describes how the EIA simplified the development of an expanded version of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) through the use of focus groups. These focus groups defined user needs and examined the feasibility of collecting these data. 1 fig.

  11. BLIG: A New Approach for Sensor Identification, Grouping,and Authorisation in Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2007-01-01

    BLIG (Blinking Led Indicated Grouping) for easy deployment of BSNs on patients in critical situations, including mechanisms for uniquely identifying and grouping sensor nodes belonging to a patient in a secure and trusted way. This approach has been designed in close cooperation with users, and easy......Using body sensor networks (BSN) in critical clinical settings like emergency units in hospitals or in accidents requires that such a network can be deployed, configured, and started in a fast and easy way, while maintaining trust in the network. In this paper we present a novel approach called...

  12. Patient participation in general practice based undergraduate teaching: a focus group study of patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sophie E; Allfrey, Caroline; Jones, Melvyn M; Chana, Jasprit; Abbott, Ciara; Faircloth, Sofia; Higgins, Nicola; Abdullah, Laila

    2017-04-01

    Patients make a crucial contribution to undergraduate medical education. Although a national resource is available for patients participating in research, none is as yet available for education. This study aimed to explore what information patients would like about participation in general practice based undergraduate medical education, and how they would like to obtain this information. Two focus groups were conducted in London-based practices involved in both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Patients both with and without teaching experience were recruited using leaflets, posters, and patient participation groups. An open-ended topic guide explored three areas: perceived barriers that participants anticipated or had experienced; patient roles in medical education; and what help would support participation. Focus groups were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Patients suggested ways of professionalising the teaching process. These were: making information available to patients about confidentiality, iterative consent, and normalising teaching in the practice. Patients highlighted the importance of relationships, making information available about their GPs' involvement in teaching, and initiating student-patient interactions. Participants emphasised educational principles to maximise exchange of information, including active participation of students, patient identification of student learner needs, and exchange of feedback. This study will inform development of patient information resources to support their participation in teaching and access to information both before and during general practice based teaching encounters. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  13. A small group learning model for evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Achkar M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Morhaf Al Achkar, M Kelly Davies Department of Family Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Background: Evidence-based medicine (EBM skills are invaluable tools for residents and practicing physicians. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of small-group learning models in teaching fundamental EBM skills. Methods: The intervention consisted of an EBM bootcamp divided into four 2-hour sessions across 4-week rotations. Residents worked in small groups of three to four to explore fundamentals of EBM through interactive dialogue and mock clinical scenario practice. The intervention’s effectiveness was evaluated using pre- and post-assessments. Results: A total of 40 (93.0% residents out of a potential 43 participated in the EBM bootcamps across the 3 years. There was significant improvement of 3.28 points on self-assessed EBM skills from an average of 9.66–12.945 out of a maximum score of 15 (P=0.000. There was significant improvement of 1.68 points on the EBM skills test from an average of 6.02–7.71 out of a maximum score of 9 (P=0.00. All residents (100% agreed or strongly agreed that EBM is important for a physician’s clinical practice. This view did not change after the training. Conclusion: A brief small-group interactive workshop in EBM basic skills at the start of residency was effective in developing fundamental EBM skills. Keywords: evidence-based medicine, resident training, small group

  14. Understanding multicultural attitudes : The role of group status, identification, friendships, and justifying ideologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Martinovic, Borja

    2006-01-01

    Questions of multiculturalism and the management of cultural diversity are much debated in many countries. The present research aims to further the understanding of people’s attitude toward multiculturalism by examining ethnic majority and minority group adolescents in the Netherlands. In two studie

  15. Group specific internal standard technology (GSIST) for simultaneous identification and quantification of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, Jiri; Yang, Wen-Chu; Regnier, Fred E

    2014-01-14

    Reagents and methods are provided that permit simultaneous analysis of multiple diverse small molecule analytes present in a complex mixture. Samples are labeled with chemically identical but isotopically distince forms of the labeling reagent, and analyzed using mass spectrometry. A single reagent simultaneously derivatizes multiple small molecule analytes having different reactive functional groups.

  16. A simple data base for identification of risk profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munganahalli, D.

    1996-12-31

    Sedco Forex is a drilling contractor that operates approximately 80 rigs on land and offshore worldwide. The HSE management system developed by Sedco Forex is an effort to prevent accidents and minimize losses. An integral part of the HSE management system is establishing risk profiles and thereby minimizing risk and reducing loss exposures. Risk profiles are established based on accident reports, potential accident reports and other risk identification reports (RIR) like the Du Pont STOP system. A rig could fill in as many as 30 accident reports, 30 potential accident reports and 500 STOP cards each year. Statistics are important for an HSE management system, since they are indicators of success or failure of HSE systems. It is however difficult to establish risk profiles based on statistical information, unless tools are available at the rig site to aid with the analysis. Risk profiles are then used to identify important areas in the operation that may require specific attention to minimize the loss exposure. Programs to address the loss exposure can then be identified and implemented with either a local or corporate approach. In January 1995, Sedco Forex implemented a uniform HSE Database on all the rigs worldwide. In one year companywide, the HSE database would contain information on approximately 500 accident and potential accident reports, and 10,000 STOP cards. This paper demonstrates the salient features of the database and describes how it has helped in establishing key risk profiles. It also shows a recent example of how risk profiles have been established at the corporate level and used to identify the key contributing factors to hands and finger injuries. Based on this information, a campaign was launched to minimize the frequency of occurrence and associated loss attributed to hands and fingers accidents.

  17. Contribute to quantitative identification of casting defects based on computer analysis of X-ray images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The forecast of structure and properties of casting is based on results of computer simulation of physical processes which are carried out during the casting processes. For the effective using of simulation system it is necessary to validate mathematica-physical models describing process of casting formation and the creation of local discontinues, witch determinate the casting properties.In the paper the proposition for quantitative validation of VP system using solidification casting defects by information sources of II group (methods of NDT was introduced. It was named the VP/RT validation (virtual prototyping/radiographic testing validation. Nowadays identification of casting defects noticeable on X-ray images bases on comparison of X-ray image of casting with relates to the ASTM. The results of this comparison are often not conclusive because based on operator’s subjective assessment. In the paper the system of quantitative identification of iron casting defects on X-ray images and classification this defects to ASTM class is presented. The methods of pattern recognition and machine learning were applied.

  18. Gas monitoring data anomaly identification based on spatio-temporal correlativity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-song ZHU; Yun-jia WANG; Lian-jiang WEI

    2013-01-01

    Based on spatio-temporal correlativity analysis method,the automatic identification techniques for data anomaly monitoring of coal mining working face gas are presented.The asynchronous correlative characteristics of gas migration in working face airflow direction are qualitatively analyzed.The calculation method of asynchronous correlation delay step and the prediction and inversion formulas of gas concentration changing with time and space after gas emission in the air return roadway are provided.By calculating one hundred and fifty groups of gas sensors data series from a coal mine which have the theoretical correlativity,the correlative coefficient values range of eight kinds of data anomaly is obtained.Then the gas monitoring data anomaly identification algorithm based on spatio-temporal correlativity analysis is accordingly presented.In order to improve the efficiency of analysis,the gas sensors code rules which can express the spatial topological relations are suggested.The experiments indicate that methods presented in this article can effectively compensate the defects of methods based on a single gas sensor monitoring data.

  19. Group-specific multiplex PCR detection systems for the identification of flying insect prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sint

    Full Text Available The applicability of species-specific primers to study feeding interactions is restricted to those ecosystems where the targeted prey species occur. Therefore, group-specific primer pairs, targeting higher taxonomic levels, are often desired to investigate interactions in a range of habitats that do not share the same species but the same groups of prey. Such primers are also valuable to study the diet of generalist predators when next generation sequencing approaches cannot be applied beneficially. Moreover, due to the large range of prey consumed by generalists, it is impossible to investigate the breadth of their diet with species-specific primers, even if multiplexing them. However, only few group-specific primers are available to date and important groups of prey such as flying insects have rarely been targeted. Our aim was to fill this gap and develop group-specific primers suitable to detect and identify the DNA of common taxa of flying insects. The primers were combined in two multiplex PCR systems, which allow a time- and cost-effective screening of samples for DNA of the dipteran subsection Calyptratae (including Anthomyiidae, Calliphoridae, Muscidae, other common dipteran families (Phoridae, Syrphidae, Bibionidae, Chironomidae, Sciaridae, Tipulidae, three orders of flying insects (Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Plecoptera and coniferous aphids within the genus Cinara. The two PCR assays were highly specific and sensitive and their suitability to detect prey was confirmed by testing field-collected dietary samples from arthropods and vertebrates. The PCR assays presented here allow targeting prey at higher taxonomic levels such as family or order and therefore improve our ability to assess (trophic interactions with flying insects in terrestrial and aquatic habitats.

  20. Analysis of ABO blood group subtype identification and serology%ABO血型亚型检测与血清学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何毅勇

    2015-01-01

    目的:通过对ABO血型亚型的检测和血清学分析,探讨ABO亚型的输血安全。方法选取本院输血科43例患者的正反型不符血液标本,检测红细胞ABH抗原、ABO血型系统抗体;并用ABO正反定型、唾液血型物质测定、吸收释放试验等进行血清学检查。结果43例标本共检出ABO血型亚型13种,其中A亚型8例(18.60%),B亚型32例(78.05%),类孟买型1例,cisAB型2例(4.65%)。结论对于ABO血型亚型的鉴定应采用多种血清学方法进行检测,为临床输血提供安全保障。%ObjectiveTo investigate the transfusion safety of ABO blood group subtype through ABO blood group subtype identification and serology analysis.Methods 43 patients whose positive and negative type did not match the blood specimen were chosen.Their ABH antigen of red blood cells and antibody of ABO blood group system were detected.Their serology was checked with application of ABO positive and negative stereotypes,determination of blood group substances in saliva,absorption and release test and so on.ResultsIn these 43 cases,13 cases were diagnosed with ABO blood group subtype,among which 8 were A subtype(18.60%), 32 were B subtype(78.05%),1 was Para-Bombay type and 2 were cisAB type(4.65%). Conclusion Blood group identification of ABO blood group subtype should be checked by a variety of serological methods,which guarantees the safety of clinical blood transfusion.

  1. Diagnosis of GLDAS LSM based aridity index and dryland identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Sadegh; Pande, Saket; Hashemy, Mehdy; Sonneveld, Ben

    2013-04-15

    The identification of dryland areas is crucial for guiding policy aimed at intervening in water-stressed areas and addressing the perennial livelihood or food insecurity of these areas. However, the prevailing aridity indices (such as UNEP aridity index) have methodological limitations that restrict their use in delineating drylands and may be insufficient for decision-making frameworks. In this study, we propose a new aridity index based on based on 3 decades of soil moisture time series by accounting for site-specific soil and vegetation that partitions precipitation into the competing demands of evaporation and runoff. Our proposed aridity index is the frequency at which the dominant soil moisture value at a location is not exceeded by the dominant soil moisture values in all of the other locations. To represent the dominant spatial template of the soil moisture conditions, we extract the first eigenfunction from the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis from 3 GLDAS land surface models (LSMs): VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH at 1 × 1 degree spatial resolution. The EOF analysis reveals that the first eigenfunction explains 33%, 43% and 47% of the VIC, NOAH and MOSAIC models, respectively. We compare each LSM aridity indices with the UNEP aridity index, which is created based on LSM data forcings. The VIC aridity index displays a pattern most closely resembling that of UNEP, although all of the LSM-based indices accurately isolate the dominant dryland areas. The UNEP classification identifies portions of south-central Africa, southeastern United States and eastern India as drier than predicted by all of the LSMs. The NOAH and MOSAIC LSMs categorize portions of southwestern Africa as drier than the other two classifications, while all of the LSMs classify portions of central India as wetter than the UNEP classification. We compare all aridity maps with the long-term average NDVI values. Results show that vegetation cover in areas that the UNEP index classifies as

  2. Structural Identification and Monitoring based on Uncertain/Limited Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatzi Eleni N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to propose a structural identification framework able to exploit both vibrational response and operational condition information in extracting structural models, able to represent the systemspecific structural behavior in its complete operational spectrum. In doing so, a scheme need be derived for the extraction of salient features, which are indicative of structural condition. Such a scheme should account for variations attributed to operational effects, such as environmental and operational load variations, and which likely lie within regular structural condition bounds, versus variations which indicate short- or long-term damage effects. The latter may be achieved via coupling of sparse, yet diverse, monitoring information with appropriate stochastic tools, able to infer the underlying dependences between the monitored input and output data. This in turn allows for extraction of quantities, or features, relating to structural condition, which may further be utilized as performance indicators. The computational tool developed herein for realizing such a framework, termed the PCE-ICA scheme, is based on the use of Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE tool, along with an Independent Component Analysis (ICA algorithm. The benefits of additionally fusing a data-driven system model will further be discussed for the case of complex structural response. The method is assessed via implementation on field data acquired from diverse structural systems, namely a benchmark bridge case study and a wind turbine tower structure, revealing a robust condition assessment tool.

  3. XRF map identification problems based on a PDE electrodeposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgura, Ivonne; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we focus on the following map identification problem (MIP): given a morphochemical reaction–diffusion (RD) PDE system modeling an electrodepostion process, we look for a time t *, belonging to the transient dynamics and a set of parameters \\mathbf{p} , such that the PDE solution, for the morphology h≤ft(x,y,{{t}\\ast};\\mathbf{p}\\right) and for the chemistry θ ≤ft(x,y,{{t}\\ast};\\mathbf{p}\\right) approximates a given experimental map M *. Towards this aim, we introduce a numerical algorithm using singular value decomposition (SVD) and Frobenius norm to give a measure of error distance between experimental maps for h and θ and simulated solutions of the RD-PDE system on a fixed time integration interval. The technique proposed allows quantitative use of microspectroscopy images, such as XRF maps. Specifically, in this work we have modelled the morphology and manganese distributions of nanostructured components of innovative batteries and we have followed their changes resulting from ageing under operating conditions. The availability of quantitative information on space-time evolution of active materials in terms of model parameters will allow dramatic improvements in knowledge-based optimization of battery fabrication and operation.

  4. Paris law parameter identification based on the Extended Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melgar M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft structures are commonly subjected to repeated loading cycles leading to fatigue damage. Fatigue data can be extrapolated by fatigue models which are adopted to describe the fatigue damage behaviour. Such models depend on their parameters for accurate prediction of the fatigue life. Therefore, several methods have been developed for estimating the model parameters for both linear and nonlinear systems. It is useful for a broad class of parameter identification problems when the dynamic model is not known. In this paper, the Paris law is used as fatigue-crack-length growth model on a metallic component under loading cycles. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is proposed as estimation method. Simulated crack length data is used to validate the estimation method. Based on experimental data obtained from fatigue experiment, the crack length and model parameters are estimated. Accurate model parameters allow a more realistic prediction of the fatigue life, consequently, the remaining useful life (RUL of component can be accurately computed. In this sense, maintenance performance could be improved.

  5. FRET-based identification of mRNAs undergoing translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stevens

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept in vitro results demonstrating the feasibility of using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET measurements to distinguish, in real time, between individual ribosomes programmed with several different, short mRNAs. For these measurements we use either the FRET signal generated between two tRNAs labeled with different fluorophores bound simultaneously in adjacent sites to the ribosome (tRNA-tRNA FRET or the FRET signal generated between a labeled tRNA bound to the ribosome and a fluorescent derivative of ribosomal protein L1 (L1-tRNA FRET. With either technique, criteria were developed to identify the mRNAs, taking into account the relative activity of the mRNAs. These criteria enabled identification of the mRNA being translated by a given ribosome to within 95% confidence intervals based on the number of identified FRET traces. To upgrade the approach for natural mRNAs or more complex mixtures, the stoichiometry of labeling should be enhanced and photobleaching reduced. The potential for porting these methods into living cells is discussed.

  6. FRET-based identification of mRNAs undergoing translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Benjamin; Chen, Chunlai; Farrell, Ian; Zhang, Haibo; Kaur, Jaskiran; Broitman, Steven L; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept in vitro results demonstrating the feasibility of using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements to distinguish, in real time, between individual ribosomes programmed with several different, short mRNAs. For these measurements we use either the FRET signal generated between two tRNAs labeled with different fluorophores bound simultaneously in adjacent sites to the ribosome (tRNA-tRNA FRET) or the FRET signal generated between a labeled tRNA bound to the ribosome and a fluorescent derivative of ribosomal protein L1 (L1-tRNA FRET). With either technique, criteria were developed to identify the mRNAs, taking into account the relative activity of the mRNAs. These criteria enabled identification of the mRNA being translated by a given ribosome to within 95% confidence intervals based on the number of identified FRET traces. To upgrade the approach for natural mRNAs or more complex mixtures, the stoichiometry of labeling should be enhanced and photobleaching reduced. The potential for porting these methods into living cells is discussed.

  7. Damage identification in beams by a response surface based technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teidj S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, identification of damage in uniform homogeneous metallic beams was considered through the propagation of non dispersive elastic torsional waves. The proposed damage detection procedure consisted of the following sequence. Giving a localized torque excitation, having the form of a short half-sine pulse, the first step was calculating the transient solution of the resulting torsional wave. This torque could be generated in practice by means of asymmetric laser irradiation of the beam surface. Then, a localized defect assumed to be characterized by an abrupt reduction of beam section area with a given height and extent was placed at a known location of the beam. Next, the response in terms of transverse section rotation rate was obtained for a point situated afterwards the defect, where the sensor was positioned. This last could utilize in practice the concept of laser vibrometry. A parametric study has been conducted after that by using a full factorial design of experiments table and numerical simulations based on a finite difference characteristic scheme. This has enabled the derivation of a response surface model that was shown to represent adequately the response of the system in terms of the following factors: defect extent and severity. The final step was performing the inverse problem solution in order to identify the defect characteristics by using measurement.

  8. Young and Older Emotional Faces: Are there Age-Group Differences in Expression Identification and Memory?

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Studies finding that older compared to young adults are less able to identify facial expressions and have worse memory for negative than positive faces have used only young faces. Studies finding that both age groups are more accurate at recognizing faces of their own than other ages have used mostly neutral faces. Thus, age-differences in processing faces may not extend to older faces, and preferential memory for own-age faces may not extend to emotional faces. To investigate these possibili...

  9. Structural system identification of buildings by a wave method based on a layered Timoshenko beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Mahdi; Todorovska, Maria I.

    2014-03-01

    A layered Timoshenko beam (TB) model of a high-rise building is presented and applied to system identification of a full-scale building from recorded seismic response. This model is a new development in a wave method for earthquake damage detection and structural health monitoring being developed by the authors' research group. The method is based on monitoring changes in the wave properties of the structure, such as the velocity of wave propagation vertically through the structure. This model is an improvement over the previously used layered shear beam (SB) model because it accounts for wave dispersion caused by flexural deformation present in addition to shear. It also accounts for the rotatory inertia and the variation of the building properties with height. The case study is a 54-story steel frame building located in downtown Los Angeles. Recorded accelerations during the Northridge earthquake of 1994 are used for system identification of the NS response. The model parameters are identified by matching, in the least squares sense, the model and observed impulse response functions at all levels where motion was recorded. The model is then used to compute the building vertical phase and group velocities. Impulse responses computed by deconvolution of the recorded motions with the roof response are used, which represent the building response to a virtual source at the roof. The better match of transfer-function amplitudes of the fitted TB model than of previously fitted SB model indicates that the layered TB model is a better physical model for this building.

  10. Captive breeding programs based on family groups in polyploid sturgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscari, Elisa; Pujolar, Jose Martin; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Corradin, Riccardo; Congiu, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In species with long life cycles and discontinuous availability of individuals to reproduction, implementing a long-term captive breeding program can be difficult or impossible. In such cases, managing diversity among familiar groups instead of individuals could become a suitable approach to avoid inbreeding and increase the possibility to accomplish a breeding scheme. This is the case of several sturgeon species including the Adriatic sturgeon, whose recovery depends on the management of a few captive stocks directly descended from the same group of wild parents. In the present study, relatedness among 445 potential breeders was inferred with a novel software for pedigree reconstruction in tetraploids ("BreedingSturgeons"). This information was used to plan a breeding scheme considering familiar groups as breeding units and identifying mating priorities. A two-step strategy is proposed: a short-term breeding program, relying on the 13 remaining F0 individuals of certain wild origin; and a long-term plan based on F1 families. Simulations to evaluate the loss of alleles in the F2 generation under different pairing strategies and assess the number of individuals to breed, costs and logistical aquaculture constraints were performed. The strategy proposed is transferable to the several other tetraploid sturgeon species on the brink of extinction.

  11. Evidence-based practice in group work with incarcerated youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Ashley; Shera, Wes

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the Youth Criminal Justice Act's increased focus on restorative justice, treatment, rehabilitation, and reintegration of youth, many more juvenile offenders require mental health services while resident in youth detention facilities [Youth Criminal Justice Act (2002, c.1). Ottawa: Department of Justice Canada. Retrieved September 19, 2008 from http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/Y-1.5]. Several common characteristics such as violence, aggression, and other antisocial behaviors, associated with criminal behavior, have been identified among male and female offenders. Dialectical behavior therapy, originally developed by Linehan [Linehan, M. M., 1993a. Cognitive-behavioural treatment of borderline personality disorder. New York: Guildford Press] for chronically parasuicidal women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, has been successfully modified for use with other populations, including violent and impulse-oriented male and female adolescents residing in correctional facilities. The intent of this article is to encourage the wider use of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) with young offenders. It includes an extensive review of the evidence-base to date and describes some of the creative modifications that have been made to standard DBT program format to meet the particular needs of various groups in both Canada and the United States. In keeping with the movement toward more evidence-based practice, the authors argue that DBT is a promising approach in group work with incarcerated adolescents and should be more widely used.

  12. Identification of Bodies Exposed to High Temperatures Based on Macroscopic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María Del Socorro Barraza Salcedo; Martha Leonor Rebolledo Cobos

    2016-01-01

      ABSTRACT. Background: Forensic dentistry in cases of incineration provides scientific elements that allow the identification of bodies, by analyzing dental organs, through the isolation of DNA obtained from the pulp...

  13. FN-Identify: Novel Restriction Enzymes-Based Method for Bacterial Identification in Absence of Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mohamed; Ouda, Osama; El-Refy, Ali; El-Feky, Fawzy A; Mosa, Kareem A; Helmy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and restriction analysis of genes like 16S rRNA and HSP60 are intensively used for molecular identification in the microbial communities. With aid of the rapid progress in bioinformatics, genome sequencing became the method of choice for bacterial identification. However, the genome sequencing technology is still out of reach in the developing countries. In this paper, we propose FN-Identify, a sequencing-free method for bacterial identification. FN-Identify exploits the gene sequences data available in GenBank and other databases and the two algorithms that we developed, CreateScheme and GeneIdentify, to create a restriction enzyme-based identification scheme. FN-Identify was tested using three different and diverse bacterial populations (members of Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium groups) in an in silico analysis using restriction enzymes and sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The analysis of the restriction maps of the members of three groups using the fragment numbers information only or along with fragments sizes successfully identified all of the members of the three groups using a minimum of four and maximum of eight restriction enzymes. Our results demonstrate the utility and accuracy of FN-Identify method and its two algorithms as an alternative method that uses the standard microbiology laboratories techniques when the genome sequencing is not available.

  14. FN-Identify: Novel Restriction Enzymes-Based Method for Bacterial Identification in Absence of Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouda, Osama; El-Refy, Ali; El-Feky, Fawzy A.; Mosa, Kareem A.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and restriction analysis of genes like 16S rRNA and HSP60 are intensively used for molecular identification in the microbial communities. With aid of the rapid progress in bioinformatics, genome sequencing became the method of choice for bacterial identification. However, the genome sequencing technology is still out of reach in the developing countries. In this paper, we propose FN-Identify, a sequencing-free method for bacterial identification. FN-Identify exploits the gene sequences data available in GenBank and other databases and the two algorithms that we developed, CreateScheme and GeneIdentify, to create a restriction enzyme-based identification scheme. FN-Identify was tested using three different and diverse bacterial populations (members of Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium groups) in an in silico analysis using restriction enzymes and sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The analysis of the restriction maps of the members of three groups using the fragment numbers information only or along with fragments sizes successfully identified all of the members of the three groups using a minimum of four and maximum of eight restriction enzymes. Our results demonstrate the utility and accuracy of FN-Identify method and its two algorithms as an alternative method that uses the standard microbiology laboratories techniques when the genome sequencing is not available. PMID:26880910

  15. Identification and management of cardiometabolic risk in Canada: a position paper by the cardiometabolic risk working group (executive summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Lawrence A; Fitchett, David H; Gilbert, Richard E; Gupta, Milan; Mancini, G B John; McFarlane, Philip A; Ross, Robert; Teoh, Hwee; Verma, Subodh; Anand, Sonia; Camelon, Kathryn; Chow, Chi-Ming; Cox, Jafna L; Després, Jean-Pierre; Genest, Jacques; Harris, Stewart B; Lau, David C W; Lewanczuk, Richard; Liu, Peter P; Lonn, Eva M; McPherson, Ruth; Poirier, Paul; Qaadri, Shafiq; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Rabkin, Simon W; Sharma, Arya M; Steele, Andrew W; Stone, James A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tobe, Sheldon; Ur, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    With the objectives of clarifying the concepts related to "cardiometabolic risk," "metabolic syndrome" and "risk stratification" and presenting practical strategies to identify and reduce cardiovascular risk in multiethnic patient populations, the Cardiometabolic Working Group presents an executive summary of a detailed analysis and position paper that offers a comprehensive and consolidated approach to the identification and management of cardiometabolic risk. The above concepts overlap and relate to the atherogenic process and development of type 2 diabetes. However, there is confusion about what these terms mean and how they can best be used to improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention. The concepts related to cardiometabolic risk, pathophysiology, and strategies for identification and management (including health behaviours, pharmacotherapy, and surgery) in the multiethnic Canadian population are presented. "Global cardiometabolic risk" is proposed as an umbrella term for a comprehensive list of existing and emerging factors that predict cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Health behaviour interventions (weight loss, physical activity, diet, smoking cessation) in people identified at high cardiometabolic risk are of critical importance given the emerging crisis of obesity and the consequent epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Vascular protective measures (health behaviours for all patients and pharmacotherapy in appropriate patients) are essential to reduce cardiometabolic risk, and there is growing consensus that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to adequately address cardiometabolic risk factors. Health care professionals must also consider ethnicity-related risk factors in order to appropriately evaluate all individuals in their diverse patient populations.

  16. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates.

  17. Identification and characterization of the lamprey high-mobility group box 1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Pang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. We identified a homolog of HMGB1 in the Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica. The Lampetra japonica HMGB1 gene (Lj-HMGB1 has over 70% sequence identity with its homologs in jawed vertebrates. Despite the reasonably high sequence identity with other HMGB1 proteins, Lj-HMGB1 did not group together with these proteins in a phylogenetic analysis. We examined Lj-HMGB1 expression in lymphocyte-like cells, and the kidneys, heart, gills, and intestines of lampreys before and after the animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and concanavalin A (ConA. Lj-HMGB1 was initially expressed at a higher level in the heart, but after treatment with LPS and ConA only the gills demonstrated a significant up-regulation of expression. The recombinant Lj-HMGB1 (rLj-HMGB1 protein bound double-stranded DNA and induced the proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells to a similar extent as human HMGB1. We further revealed that Lj-HMGB1 was able to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory mediator, in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. These results suggest that lampreys use HMGB1 to activate their innate immunity for the purpose of pathogen defense.

  18. Identification of different nutritional status groups in institutionalized elderly people by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Contreras, María José; López, Maria Ángeles; Canteras, Manuel; Candela, María Emilia; Zamora, Salvador; Pérez-Llamas, Francisca

    2014-03-01

    To apply a cluster analysis to groups of individuals of similar characteristics in an attempt to identify undernutrition or the risk of undernutrition in this population. A cross-sectional study. Seven public nursing homes in the province of Murcia, on the Mediterranean coast of Spain. 205 subjects aged 65 and older (131 women and 74 men). Dietary intake (energy and nutrients), anthropometric (body mass index, skinfold thickness, mid-arm muscle circumference, mid-arm muscle area, corrected arm muscle area, waist to hip ratio) and biochemical and haematological (serum albumin, transferrin, total cholesterol, total lymphocyte count). Variables were analyzed by cluster analysis. The results of the cluster analysis, including intake, anthropometric and analytical data showed that, of the 205 elderly subjects, 66 (32.2%) were over - weight/obese, 72 (35.1%) had an adequate nutritional status and 67 (32.7%) were undernourished or at risk of undernutrition. The undernourished or at risk of undernutrition group showed the lowest values for dietary intake and the anthropometric and analytical parameters measured. Our study shows that cluster analysis is a useful statistical method for assessing the nutritional status of institutionalized elderly populations. In contrast, use of the specific reference values frequently described in the literature might fail to detect real cases of undernourishment or those at risk of undernutrition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Group decision-making approach for flood vulnerability identification using the fuzzy VIKOR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G.; Jun, K. S.; Chung, E.-S.

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes an improved group decision making (GDM) framework that combines the VIKOR method with data fuzzification to quantify the spatial flood vulnerability including multiple criteria. In general, GDM method is an effective tool for formulating a compromise solution that involves various decision makers since various stakeholders may have different perspectives on their flood risk/vulnerability management responses. The GDM approach is designed to achieve consensus building that reflects the viewpoints of each participant. The fuzzy VIKOR method was developed to solve multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problems with conflicting and noncommensurable criteria. This comprising method can be used to obtain a nearly ideal solution according to all established criteria. This approach effectively can propose some compromising decisions by combining the GDM method and fuzzy VIKOR method. The spatial flood vulnerability of the southern Han River using the GDM approach combined with the fuzzy VIKOR method was compared with the spatial flood vulnerability using general MCDM methods, such as the fuzzy TOPSIS and classical GDM methods (i.e., Borda, Condorcet, and Copeland). As a result, the proposed fuzzy GDM approach can reduce the uncertainty in the data confidence and weight derivation techniques. Thus, the combination of the GDM approach with the fuzzy VIKOR method can provide robust prioritization because it actively reflects the opinions of various groups and considers uncertainty in the input data.

  20. Identification of threats using linguistics-based knowledge extraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Peter A.

    2008-09-01

    One of the challenges increasingly facing intelligence analysts, along with professionals in many other fields, is the vast amount of data which needs to be reviewed and converted into meaningful information, and ultimately into rational, wise decisions by policy makers. The advent of the world wide web (WWW) has magnified this challenge. A key hypothesis which has guided us is that threats come from ideas (or ideology), and ideas are almost always put into writing before the threats materialize. While in the past the 'writing' might have taken the form of pamphlets or books, today's medium of choice is the WWW, precisely because it is a decentralized, flexible, and low-cost method of reaching a wide audience. However, a factor which complicates matters for the analyst is that material published on the WWW may be in any of a large number of languages. In 'Identification of Threats Using Linguistics-Based Knowledge Extraction', we have sought to use Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and other similar text analysis techniques to map documents from the WWW, in whatever language they were originally written, to a common language-independent vector-based representation. This then opens up a number of possibilities. First, similar documents can be found across language boundaries. Secondly, a set of documents in multiple languages can be visualized in a graphical representation. These alone offer potentially useful tools and capabilities to the intelligence analyst whose knowledge of foreign languages may be limited. Finally, we can test the over-arching hypothesis--that ideology, and more specifically ideology which represents a threat, can be detected solely from the words which express the ideology--by using the vector-based representation of documents to predict additional features (such as the ideology) within a framework based on supervised learning. In this report, we present the results of a three-year project of the same name. We believe

  1. Identification of putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of co-expressed functional groups of genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi NV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum (Pf remains poorly understood. While over half the genes are estimated to be regulated at the transcriptional level, few regulatory motifs and transcription regulators have been found. Results The study seeks to identify putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of 13 functional groups of genes expressed in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle of Pf. Three motif-discovery programs were used for the purpose, and motifs were searched for only on the gene coding strand. Four motifs – the 'G-rich', the 'C-rich', the 'TGTG' and the 'CACA' motifs – were identified, and zero to all four of these occur in the 13 sets of upstream regions. The 'CACA motif' was absent in functional groups expressed during the ring to early trophozoite transition. For functional groups expressed in each transition, the motifs tended to be similar. Upstream motifs in some functional groups showed 'positional conservation' by occurring at similar positions relative to the translational start site (TLS; this increases their significance as regulatory motifs. In the ribonucleotide synthesis, mitochondrial, proteasome and organellar translation machinery genes, G-rich, C-rich, CACA and TGTG motifs, respectively, occur with striking positional conservation. In the organellar translation machinery group, G-rich motifs occur close to the TLS. The same motifs were sometimes identified for multiple functional groups; differences in location and abundance of the motifs appear to ensure different modes of action. Conclusion The identification of positionally conserved over-represented upstream motifs throws light on putative regulatory elements for transcription in Pf.

  2. An interactive Tool for Writer Identification based on Offline Text Dependent Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writer identification is the process of identifying the writer of the document based on their handwriting. The growth of computational engineering, artificial intelligence and pattern recognition fields owes greatly to one of the highly challenged problem of handwriting identification. This paper proposes the computational intelligence technique to develop discriminative model for writer identification based on handwritten documents. Scanned images of handwritten documents are segmented into words and these words are further segmented into characters for word level and character level writer identification. A set of features are extracted from the segmented words and characters. Feature vectors are trained using support vector machine and obtained 94.27% accuracy for word level, 90.10% for character level. An interactive tool has been developed based on the word level writer identification model.

  3. Furios: a web-based tool for identification of Vibrionaceae species using the fur gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Cardoso, Joao; Giubergia, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Gene based methods for identification of species from the Vibrionaceae family have been developed during the last decades to address the limitations of the commonly used 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. Recently, we found that the ferric-uptake regulator gene (fur) can be used as a single identification ...... makes it suitable for any research environment, from academia to industry. Introduction...

  4. Identification, genetic diversity and cereulide producing ability of Bacillus cereus group stains isolated from Beninese traditional fermented food condiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Hansen, Bjarne Munk

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is often detected in spontaneously fermented African foods but is rarely identified to species level. Only some of the B. cereus group species are reported to be pathogenic to humans and identification to species level is necessary to estimate the safety of these products...... which are specific to emetic toxin producers. Cereulide production of these isolates was confirmed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. This is the first report on cereulide producing B. cereus in African fermented foods. Occurrence of the opportunistic human pathogen B. cereus......, which is able to produce emetic toxin in afitin, iru and sonru, could impose a health hazard. Interestingly, no reports on food poisoning from the consumption of the fermented condiments exist....

  5. Development of a multilocus-based approach for sponge (phylum Porifera) identification: refinement and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M M; Sorokin, Shirley J; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-02

    For sponges (phylum Porifera), there is no reliable molecular protocol available for species identification. To address this gap, we developed a multilocus-based Sponge Identification Protocol (SIP) validated by a sample of 37 sponge species belonging to 10 orders from South Australia. The universal barcode COI mtDNA, 28S rRNA gene (D3-D5), and the nuclear ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region were evaluated for their suitability and capacity for sponge identification. The highest Bit Score was applied to infer the identity. The reliability of SIP was validated by phylogenetic analysis. The 28S rRNA gene and COI mtDNA performed better than the ITS region in classifying sponges at various taxonomic levels. A major limitation is that the databases are not well populated and possess low diversity, making it difficult to conduct the molecular identification protocol. The identification is also impacted by the accuracy of the morphological classification of the sponges whose sequences have been submitted to the database. Re-examination of the morphological identification further demonstrated and improved the reliability of sponge identification by SIP. Integrated with morphological identification, the multilocus-based SIP offers an improved protocol for more reliable and effective sponge identification, by coupling the accuracy of different DNA markers.

  6. Development of a multilocus-based approach for sponge (phylum Porifera) identification: refinement and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M. M.; Sorokin, Shirley J.; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    For sponges (phylum Porifera), there is no reliable molecular protocol available for species identification. To address this gap, we developed a multilocus-based Sponge Identification Protocol (SIP) validated by a sample of 37 sponge species belonging to 10 orders from South Australia. The universal barcode COI mtDNA, 28S rRNA gene (D3–D5), and the nuclear ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region were evaluated for their suitability and capacity for sponge identification. The highest Bit Score was applied to infer the identity. The reliability of SIP was validated by phylogenetic analysis. The 28S rRNA gene and COI mtDNA performed better than the ITS region in classifying sponges at various taxonomic levels. A major limitation is that the databases are not well populated and possess low diversity, making it difficult to conduct the molecular identification protocol. The identification is also impacted by the accuracy of the morphological classification of the sponges whose sequences have been submitted to the database. Re-examination of the morphological identification further demonstrated and improved the reliability of sponge identification by SIP. Integrated with morphological identification, the multilocus-based SIP offers an improved protocol for more reliable and effective sponge identification, by coupling the accuracy of different DNA markers. PMID:28150727

  7. Towards the identification of methanogenic archaeal groups as targets of methane mitigation in livestock animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eSt-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In herbivores, enteric methane is a by-product from the digestion of plant biomass by mutualistic gastrointestinal tract (GIT microbial communities. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is not assimilated by the host and is released into the environment where it contributes to climate change. Since enteric methane is exclusively produced by methanogenic archaea, the investigation of mutualistic methanogen communities in the GIT of herbivores has been the subject of ongoing research by a number of research groups. In an effort to uncover trends that would facilitate the development of efficient methane mitigation strategies for livestock species, we have in this review summarized and compared currently available results from published studies on this subject. We also offer our perspectives on the importance of pursuing current research efforts on the sequencing of gut methanogen genomes, as well as investigating their cellular physiology and interactions with other GIT microorganisms.

  8. Hardware Accelerators Targeting a Novel Group Based Packet Classification Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Packet classification is a ubiquitous and key building block for many critical network devices. However, it remains as one of the main bottlenecks faced when designing fast network devices. In this paper, we propose a novel Group Based Search packet classification Algorithm (GBSA that is scalable, fast, and efficient. GBSA consumes an average of 0.4 megabytes of memory for a 10 k rule set. The worst-case classification time per packet is 2 microseconds, and the preprocessing speed is 3 M rules/second based on an Xeon processor operating at 3.4 GHz. When compared with other state-of-the-art classification techniques, the results showed that GBSA outperforms the competition with respect to speed, memory usage, and processing time. Moreover, GBSA is amenable to implementation in hardware. Three different hardware implementations are also presented in this paper including an Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP implementation and two pure Register-Transfer Level (RTL implementations based on Impulse-C and Handel-C flows, respectively. Speedups achieved with these hardware accelerators ranged from 9x to 18x compared with a pure software implementation running on an Xeon processor.

  9. Automated Identification and Characterization of Secondary & Tertiary gamma’ Precipitates in Nickel-Based Superalloys (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    METHODOLOGY A nickel-based superalloy sample (Rene88DT) was cut from a forged disc developed under a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency funded...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4064 AUTOMATED IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SECONDARY & TERTIARY γ’ PRECIPITATES IN NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS ...AUTOMATED IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SECONDARY & TERTIARY γ’ PRECIPITATES IN NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In

  10. Quality score based identification and correction of pyrosequencing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shyamala; Bouzek, Heather; Deng, Wenjie; Larsen, Brendan; Casey, Eleanor; Mullins, James I

    2013-01-01

    Massively-parallel DNA sequencing using the 454/pyrosequencing platform allows in-depth probing of diverse sequence populations, such as within an HIV-1 infected individual. Analysis of this sequence data, however, remains challenging due to the shorter read lengths relative to that obtained by Sanger sequencing as well as errors introduced during DNA template amplification and during pyrosequencing. The ability to distinguish real variation from pyrosequencing errors with high sensitivity and specificity is crucial to interpreting sequence data. We introduce a new algorithm, CorQ (Correction through Quality), which utilizes the inherent base quality in a sequence-specific context to correct for homopolymer and non-homopolymer insertion and deletion (indel) errors. CorQ also takes uneven read mapping into account for correcting pyrosequencing miscall errors and it identifies and corrects carry forward errors. We tested the ability of CorQ to correctly call SNPs on a set of pyrosequences derived from ten viral genomes from an HIV-1 infected individual, as well as on six simulated pyrosequencing datasets generated using non-zero error rates to emulate errors introduced by PCR. When combined with the AmpliconNoise error correction method developed to remove ambiguities in signal intensities, we attained a 97% reduction in indel errors, a 98% reduction in carry forward errors, and >97% specificity of SNP detection. When compared to four other error correction methods, AmpliconNoise+CorQ performed at equal or higher SNP identification specificity, but the sensitivity of SNP detection was consistently higher (>98%) than other methods tested. This combined procedure will therefore permit examination of complex genetic populations with improved accuracy.

  11. When do employees identify? An analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal predictors of training group and organizational identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenbeiss, Kerstin K.; Ottenz, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Organizational research has shown the impact of organizational identification on employees' attitudes and behavior, and its relevance for economic success (Haslam, 2004). Furthermore, the necessity to differentiate levels of identification within organizations has been emphasized (van Knippenberg &

  12. When do employees identify? An analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal predictors of training group and organizational identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenbeiss, Kerstin K.; Ottenz, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Organizational research has shown the impact of organizational identification on employees' attitudes and behavior, and its relevance for economic success (Haslam, 2004). Furthermore, the necessity to differentiate levels of identification within organizations has been emphasized (van Knippenberg &

  13. Salient Feature Identification and Analysis using Kernel-Based Classification Techniques for Synthetic Aperture Radar Automatic Target Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    SALIENT FEATURE IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS USING KERNEL-BASED CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES FOR SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR AUTOMATIC TARGET RECOGNITION...FEATURE IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS USING KERNEL-BASED CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES FOR SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR AUTOMATIC TARGET RECOGNITION THESIS Presented...SALIENT FEATURE IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS USING KERNEL-BASED CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUES FOR SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR AUTOMATIC TARGET RECOGNITION

  14. Uncertainty Analysis of Method-Based Operating Event Groups Ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Šimić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Safe operation and industrial improvements are coming from the technology development and operational experience (OE feedback. A long life span for many industrial facilities makes OE very important. Proper assessment and understanding of OE remains a challenge because of organization system relations, complexity, and number of OE events acquired. One way to improve OE events understanding is to focus their investigation and analyze in detail the most important. The OE ranking method is developed to select the most important events based on the basic event parameters and the analytical hierarchy process applied at the level of event groups. This paper investigates further how uncertainty in the model affects ranking results. An analysis was performed on the set of the two databases from the 20 years of nuclear power plants in France and Germany. From all uncertainties the presented analysis selected ranking indexes as the most relevant for consideration. Here the presented analysis of uncertainty clearly shows that considering uncertainty is important for all results, especially for event groups ranked closely and next to the most important one. Together with the previously performed sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment provides additional insights and a better judgment of the event groups’ importance in further detailed investigation.

  15. Density Based Script Identification of a Multilingual Document Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumaan Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic Pattern Recognition field has witnessed enormous growth in the past few decades. Being an essential element of Pattern Recognition, Document Image Analysis is the procedure of analyzing a document image with the intention of working out the contents so that they can be manipulated as per the requirements at various levels. It involves various procedures like document classification, organizing, conversion, identification and many more. Since a document chiefly contains text, Script Identification has grown to be a very important area of this field. A Script comprises the text of a document or a manuscript. It is a scheme of written characters and symbols used to write a particular language. Languages are written using scripts, but script itself is made up of symbols. Every language has its own set of symbols used for writing it. Sometimes different languages are written using the same script, but with marginal modification. Script Identification has been performed for unilingual, bilingual and multilingual document images. But, negligible work has been reported for Kashmiri script. In this paper, we are analyzing and experimentally testing statistical approach for identification of Kashmiri script in a document image along with Roman, Devanagari & Urdu scripts. The identification is performed on offline machine-printed scripts and yields promising results.

  16. Urban road traffic deaths: data linkage and identification of high-risk population sub-groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Maria Miana Mattos Paixão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study analyzes the profile of deaths from road traffic accidents in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, by linking two public databases, the Information System of the Urban Transportation and Transit Company (BH10 and the Mortality Information System (SIM. The linked database (n = 306 identified a 24% under-recording rate for deaths and differed in the age distribution from the BH10 database and in roadway user category when compared to the mortality database. The mortality rate for road traffic accidents within the city limits was 10.2 per 100,000 thousand, and was higher among men, young adults, and the elderly. Poisson multivariate regression showed a higher mean death rate for motorcycle occupants (rate ratio – RR: 1.81; pedestrians (RR: 1.32; males (RR: 1.24; single/divorced (RR: 1.27; young adults 18-29 years of age (RR: 1.75; elderly (RR: 1.59; and deaths at the crash site (RR: 1.39 when compared to the reference categories. The study unveils the city’s traffic violence, expressed by the large proportion of deaths at the crash site and within the first 24 hours, and confirms the relevance of database linkage for characterizing vulnerable groups and traffic accident mortality in the urban setting.

  17. Factors affecting the identification of phytoplankton groups by means of remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ellen C.; Wrigley, Robert

    1994-01-01

    A literature review was conducted on the state of the art as to whether or not information about communities and populations of phytoplankton in aquatic environments can be derived by remote sensing. In order to arrive at this goal, the spectral characteristics of various types of phytoplankton were compared to determine first, whether there are characteristic differences in pigmentation among the types and second, whether such differences can be detected remotely. In addition to the literature review, an extensive, but not exhaustive, annotated bibliography of the literature that bears on these questions is included as an appendix, since it constitutes a convenient resource for anyone wishing an overview of the field of ocean color. The review found some progress has already been made in remote sensing of assemblages such as coccolithophorid blooms, mats of cyanobacteria, and red tides. Much more information about the composition of algal groups is potentially available by remote sensing particularly in water bodies having higher phytoplankton concentrations, but it will be necessary to develop the remote sensing techniques required for working in so-called Case 2 waters. It is also clear that none of the satellite sensors presently available or soon to be launched is ideal from the point of view of what we might wish to know; it would seem wise to pursue instruments with the planned characteristics of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer-Tilt (MODIS-T) or Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS).

  18. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  19. Identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics based on statistical and textural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Li, Jiao-ting; Long, Min

    2015-03-01

    To discriminate the acquisition pipelines of digital images, a novel scheme for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics is proposed based on statistical and textural features. First, the differences between them are investigated from the view of statistics and texture, and 31 dimensions of feature are acquired for identification. Then, LIBSVM is used for the classification. Finally, the experimental results are presented. The results show that it can achieve an identification accuracy of 97.89% for computer-generated graphics, and an identification accuracy of 97.75% for natural images. The analyses also demonstrate the proposed method has excellent performance, compared with some existing methods based only on statistical features or other features. The method has a great potential to be implemented for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Group Contribution Based Process Flowsheet Synthesis, Design and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Anterroches, Loïc; Gani, Rafiqul

    2005-01-01

    In a group contribution method for pure component property prediction, a molecule is described as a set of groups linked together to form a molecular structure. In the same way, for flowsheet "property" prediction, a flowsheet can be described as a set of process-groups linked together to represent...... provides a contribution to the "property" of the flowsheet, which can be performance in terms of energy consumption, thereby allowing a flowsheet "property" to be calculated, once it is described by the groups. Another feature of this approach is that the process-group attachments provide automatically...... the flowsheet structure. Just as a functional group is a collection of atoms, a process-group is a collection of operations forming an "unit" operation or a set of "unit" operations. The link between the process-groups are the streams similar to the bonds that are attachments to atoms/groups. Each process-group...

  1. Gain Scheduling Control based on Closed-Loop System Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    This paper deals with system identification and gain scheduling control of multi-variable nonlinear systems. We propose a novel scheme where a linear approximation of the system model is obtained in an operating point; then, a Youla-Kucera (YJBK) parameter specifying the difference between...... the first and a second operating point is identified in closed-loop using system identification methods with open-loop properties. Next, a linear controller is designed for this linearised model, and gain scheduling control can subsequently be achieved by interpolating between each controller...

  2. Scientific Opinion on the identification of pesticides to be included in cumulative assessment groups on the basis of their toxicological profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Plant Protection Products and their Residues (PPR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The European Food Safety Authority asked the Panel on Plant Protection Products and their Residues to develop an Opinion on the identification of pesticides to be included in cumulative assessment groups (CAGs on the basis of their toxicological profile. In 2008, the PPR Panel adopted an Opinion on the suitability of existing methodologies for cumulative risk assessment of pesticides and a tiered approach was proposed, which was applied to a selected group of triazole pesticides in 2009. The present Opinion suggests a methodology for grouping of pesticides based on phenomenological effects and provides CAGs for the thyroid and nervous system. This approach can be applied even when the underlying biochemical events mediating the effects are not understood, and is based on a standardised and thorough review of Draft Assessment Reports (DARs supporting the approval of all pesticides in Europe, and on recommendations from the European Commission. Pesticidal active substances exhibiting neurotoxic properties were allocated to CAGs for acute effects on motor, sensory and autonomic divisions of the nervous system and neurochemical endpoints. Chronic effects across the same divisions/endpoints and neuropathological effects were collated. Active substances having adverse effects on the thyroid system were allocated to CAGs for effects either on C-cells/the calcitonin system or on follicular cells/the T3/T4 system. The PPR Panel notes that the resulting groups encompass many pesticides and also that individual pesticides could appear in several groups and therefore the data entries for performing cumulative risk assessment (CRA are of considerable magnitude. Although some CAGs contain a large number of pesticides, little indication of cumulative risk may be inferred from the size of CAGs per se. The PPR Panel recommends that the methodology is implemented for all major organ/systems but the approach used should be considered specific for pesticides.

  3. Reproducing Crystal Binding Modes of Ligand Functional Groups using Site-Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, E. Prabhu; Yu, Wenbo; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    The applicability of a computational method, Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS), to identify regions on a protein surface with which different types of functional groups on low-molecular weight inhibitors interact is demonstrated. The method involves molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a protein in an aqueous solution of chemically diverse small molecules from which probability distributions of fragments types, termed FragMaps, are obtained. In the present application, SILCS simulations are performed with an aqueous solution of 1 M benzene and propane to map the affinity pattern of the protein for aromatic and aliphatic functional groups. In addition, water hydrogen and oxygen atoms serve as probes for hydrogen bond donor and acceptor affinity, respectively. The method is tested using a set of 7 proteins for which crystal structures of complexes with several high affinity inhibitors are known. Good agreement is obtained between FragMaps and the positions of chemically similar functional groups in inhibitors as observed in the X-ray crystallographic structures. Quantitative capabilities of the SILCS approach are demonstrated by converting FragMaps to free energies, termed Grid Free Energies (GFE), and showing correlation between the GFE values and experimental binding affinities. For proteins for which ligand decoy sets are available, GFE values are shown to typically score the crystal conformation and conformations similar to it more favorable than decoys. Additionally, SILCS is tested for its ability to capture the subtle differences in ligand affinity across homologous proteins, information which may be of utility towards specificity-guided drug design. Taken together, our results show that SILCS can recapitulate the known location of functional groups of bound inhibitors for a number of proteins, suggesting that the method may be of utility for rational drug design. PMID:21456594

  4. Group Recommendation Based on the PageRank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Social network greatly improve the social recommendation application, especially the study of group recommendation. The group recommendation, analyze the social factors of the group, such as social and trust relationship between users, as the factors for the prediction model established. In this paper, PageRank algorithm is introduced in the recommendation method to calculate the member’s importance in the group respectively, and to amend the aggregate function of individual preferences. The aggregate function consider the relationship between various users in the group, and optimize the aggregate function according to users different influence on the group, which can better reflect the social characteristics of group. In short, the study on group recommended model and algorithm can take the initiative to find the user's needs. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the methods, which improve the prediction accuracy of the group recommended algorithms.

  5. Gender-based education during clerkships: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Leerdam L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lotte van Leerdam, Lianne Rietveld, Doreth Teunissen, Antoine Lagro-JanssenDepartment of Primary and Community Care, Gender and Women's Health, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsObjectives: One of the goals of the medical master's degree is for a student to become a gender-sensitive doctor by applying knowledge of gender differences in practice. This study aims to investigate, from the students’ perspective, whether gender medicine has been taught in daily practice during clerkship.Methods: A focus group study was conducted among 29 medical students from Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, who had just finished either their internal medicine or surgical clerkships. Data were analyzed in line with the principles of constant comparative analysis.Results: Four focus groups were conducted with 29 participating students. Clinical teachers barely discuss gender differences during students’ clerkships. The students mentioned three main explanatory themes: insufficient knowledge; unawareness; and minor impact. As a result, students feel that they have insufficient competencies to become gender-sensitive doctors.Conclusion: Medical students at our institution perceive that they have received limited exposure to gender-based education after completing two key clinical clerkships. All students feel that they have insufficient knowledge to become gender-sensitive doctors. They suppose that their clinical teachers have insufficient knowledge regarding gender sensitivity, are unaware of gender differences, and the students had the impression that gender is not regarded as an important issue. We suggest that the medical faculty should encourage clinical teachers to improve their knowledge and awareness of gender issues.Keywords: medical education, clerkship, gender, hidden curriculum, clinical teachers

  6. Retinal Identification Based on an Improved Circular Gabor Filter and Scale Invariant Feature Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Xi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Retinal identification based on retinal vasculatures in the retina provides the most secure and accurate means of authentication among biometrics and has primarily been used in combination with access control systems at high security facilities. Recently, there has been much interest in retina identification. As digital retina images always suffer from deformations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT, which is known for its distinctiveness and invariance for scale and rotation, has been introduced to retinal based identification. However, some shortcomings like the difficulty of feature extraction and mismatching exist in SIFT-based identification. To solve these problems, a novel preprocessing method based on the Improved Circular Gabor Transform (ICGF is proposed. After further processing by the iterated spatial anisotropic smooth method, the number of uninformative SIFT keypoints is decreased dramatically. Tested on the VARIA and eight simulated retina databases combining rotation and scaling, the developed method presents promising results and shows robustness to rotations and scale changes.

  7. Late Fusion in Part-based Person Re-identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejbølle, Aske Rasch; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    In person re-identification, the purpose is to match persons across, typically, non-overlapping cameras. This introduces challenges such as occlusion and changes in view and light- ing. In order to overcome these challenges, discriminative features are extracted and used in combination with a su-...

  8. Late Fusion in Part-based Person Re-identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejbølle, Aske Rasch; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    In person re-identification, the purpose is to match persons across, typically, non-overlapping cameras. This introduces challenges such as occlusion and changes in view and light- ing. In order to overcome these challenges, discriminative features are extracted and used in combination with a su...

  9. Whole genome homology-based identification of candidate genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Josephine Erhiakporeh

    2016-07-06

    Jul 6, 2016 ... identification of a set of 75 candidate genes (42, 22 and 11 from Arabidopsis, potato and tomato, ... understanding on the genetic basis of drought tolerance by using the .... Comparative genomics and genes expression assay ... Primer code ... physiological and molecular responses to drought stress.

  10. A security review of proximity identification based smart cards

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lefophane, S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The widely used ISO/IEC 14443 product standard of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology is currently increasingly penetrating the government and public sector applications in South Africa (e.g. National e-ID and public transportation...

  11. Methods and Approaches to Mass Spectroscopy Based Protein Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter is a review of current mass spectrometers and the role in the field of proteomics. Various instruments are discussed and their strengths and weaknesses are highlighted. In addition, the methods of protein identification using a mass spectrometer are explained as well as data vali...

  12. WATERSHED ALGORITHM BASED SEGMENTATION FOR HANDWRITTEN TEXT IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mathivanan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a system for writer identification which involves four processing steps like preprocessing, segmentation, feature extraction and writer identification using neural network. In the preprocessing phase the handwritten text is subjected to slant removal process for segmentation and feature extraction. After this step the text image enters into the process of noise removal and gray level conversion. The preprocessed image is further segmented by using morphological watershed algorithm, where the text lines are segmented into single words and then into single letters. The segmented image is feature extracted by Daubechies’5/3 integer wavelet transform to reduce training complexity [1, 6]. This process is lossless and reversible [10], [14]. These extracted features are given as input to our neural network for writer identification process and a target image is selected for each training process in the 2-layer neural network. With the several trained output data obtained from different target help in text identification. It is a multilingual text analysis which provides simple and efficient text segmentation.

  13. DVD training for depression identification and treatment in older adults: a two-group, randomized, wait-list control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysack, Cathy; Leach, Carrie; Russo, Theresa; Paulson, Daniel; Lichtenberg, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To test the effectiveness of an educational intervention aimed at improving mental health knowledge and skills in occupational therapists working with older rehabilitation patients. METHOD. The DVD-format educational intervention was evaluated using a two-group randomized wait-list control design. Occupational therapists (n = 75) completed a 32-item knowledge questionnaire at three time points. Patient charts were reviewed (n = 960) at 3 months before and 3 and 6 months after DVD training to evaluate clinical practice change. RESULTS. A two-way analysis of variance showed knowledge scores increased significantly for both groups after DVD training. A significant Group × Time interaction and significant main effects for time and group were found. Chart review data also showed significant increases in desired clinical behaviors in both groups after training. The greatest single item of clinical practice change was use of a standardized depression screen. CONCLUSION. DVD-based training can significantly improve mental health practice.

  14. Identification of Dynamic Parameters Based on Pseudo-Parallel Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Feng-yao; MA Zhen-yue; ZHANG Yun-liang

    2007-01-01

    For the parameter identification of dynamic problems, a pseudo-parallel ant colony optimization (PPACO) algorithm based on graph-based ant system (AS) was introduced. On the platform of ANSYS dynamic analysis, the PPACO algorithm was applied to the identification of dynamic parameters successfully. Using simulated data of forces and displacements, elastic modulus E and damping ratio ξ was identified for a designed 3D finite element model, and the detailed identification step was given. Mathematical example and simulation example show that the proposed method has higher precision, faster convergence speed and stronger antinoise ability compared with the standard genetic algorithm and the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithms.

  15. An Identification Model of Health States of Machine Wear Based on Oil Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jun-qing; LI Han-xiong; XUAO Xin-hua

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a modeling procedure for deriving a single value measure based on a regression model, and a method for determining a statistical threshold value as identification criterion of normal or abnormal states of machine wear. A real numerical example is examined by the method and identification criterion presented. The results indicate that the judgments by the presented methods are basically consistent with the real facts, and therefore the method and identification criterion are valuable for judging the normal or abnormal state of machine wear based on oil analysis.

  16. Identification of Fuzzy Inference Systems by Means of a Multiobjective Opposition-Based Space Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new category of fuzzy inference systems with the aid of a multiobjective opposition-based space search algorithm (MOSSA. The proposed MOSSA is essentially a multiobjective space search algorithm improved by using an opposition-based learning that employs a so-called opposite numbers mechanism to speed up the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In the identification of fuzzy inference system, the MOSSA is exploited to carry out the parametric identification of the fuzzy model as well as to realize its structural identification. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed fuzzy models.

  17. Adaptive lag synchronization based topology identification scheme of uncertain general complex dynamical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Y.; Li, R. X.; Han, C. X.; Wang, J.; Cui, S. G.; Deng, B.; Wei, X.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents an adaptive lag synchronization based method for simultaneous identification of topology and parameters of uncertain general complex dynamical networks with and without time delays. Based on Lyapunov stability theorem and LaSalle's invariance principle, an adaptive controller is designed to realize lag synchronization between drive and response systems, meanwhile, identification criteria of network topology and system parameters are obtained. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Discriminative likelihood score weighting based on acoustic-phonetic classification for speaker identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Youngjoo; Kim, Hoirin

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a new discriminative likelihood score weighting technique is proposed for speaker identification. The proposed method employs a discriminative weighting of frame-level log-likelihood scores with acoustic-phonetic classification in the Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-based speaker identification. Experiments performed on the Aurora noise-corrupted TIMIT database showed that the proposed approach provides meaningful performance improvement with an overall relative error reduction of 15.8% over the maximum likelihood-based baseline GMM approach.

  19. Identification of molecular marker and aggressiveness for different groups of Bipolaris sorokiniana isolates causing spot blotch disease in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S K; Sweta; Prasad, L C; Sharma, S; Kumar, S; Prasad, R; Pandey, S P; Chand, R; Joshi, A K

    2007-08-01

    One hundred fifty-five isolates of Bipolaris sorokiniana of wheat were studied for their morphopathological characterization. These isolates were grouped in five categories--black, brown/dull black, gray cottony growth, dull white/greenish black, and white--on the basis of their growth pattern. The frequency of the black suppressed type was maximum (45.63%), whereas the white isolate displayed lowest frequency (6.96%) in the natural population. Twenty RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) primers were used to observe the variability among the identified groups of B. sorokininana. From each group, eight random isolates were investigated. A total of 143 bands were amplified, out of which 107 (74.83%) were polymorphic and 36 (25.17%) were monomorphic. On an average, the total numbers of bands generated per primer were 7.15, of which 5.35 and 1.80 were polymorphic and monomorphic, respectively. Dendrograms based on molecular polymorphism unveiled a considerable amount of diversity among the isolates. Specific DNA bands were identified for selected isolates. The distinct markers appeared to be potential enough to be employed as genetic fingerprints for future strain identification and classification. The study indicated that the RAPD primers provide an easy, rapid, and simple technique for the preliminary assessment of genetic diversity among the fungal isolates.

  20. Understanding participation in a hospital-based HIV support group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-04

    Oct 4, 2009 ... leaders should receive appropriate training and regular debriefing. .... “The support group helps because, even if you feel unhappy about your situation, when you get into the support group you ... pain with each other and we suffer from the same thing.” ... the support group really gives me hope for my life.”.

  1. Escherichia coli phylogenetic group determination and its application in the identification of the major animal source of fecal contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral Luiz A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli strains are commonly found in the gut microflora of warm-blooded animals. These strains can be assigned to one of the four main phylogenetic groups, A, B1, B2 and D, which can be divided into seven subgroups (A0, A1, B1, B22, B23, D1 and D2, according to the combination of the three genetic markers chuA, yjaA and DNA fragment TspE4.C2. Distinct studies have demonstrated that these phylo-groups differ in the presence of virulence factors, ecological niches and life-history. Therefore, the aim of this work was to analyze the distribution of these E. coli phylo-groups in 94 human strains, 13 chicken strains, 50 cow strains, 16 goat strains, 39 pig strains and 29 sheep strains and to verify the potential of this analysis to investigate the source of fecal contamination. Results The results indicated that the distribution of phylogenetic groups, subgroups and genetic markers is non-random in the hosts analyzed. Strains from group B1 were present in all hosts analyzed but were more prevalent in cow, goat and sheep samples. Subgroup B23 was only found in human samples. The diversity and the similarity indexes have indicated a similarity between the E. coli population structure of human and pig samples and among cow, goat and sheep samples. Correspondence analysis using contingence tables of subgroups, groups and genetic markers frequencies allowed the visualization of the differences among animal samples and the identification of the animal source of an external validation set. The classifier tools Binary logistic regression and Partial least square -- discriminant analysis, using the genetic markers profile of the strains, differentiated the herbivorous from the omnivorous strains, with an average error rate of 17%. Conclusions This is the first work, as far as we are aware, that identifies the major source of fecal contamination of a pool of strains instead of a unique strain. We concluded that the analysis of the

  2. Studer Group® ' s evidence-based leadership initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Kristin A; Kash, Bita A; Gamm, Larry D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the implementation of an organizational change initiative--Studer Group®'s Evidence-Based Leadership (EBL)--in two large, US health systems by comparing and contrasting the factors associated with successful implementation and sustainability of the EBL initiative. This comparative case study assesses the responses to two pairs of open-ended questions during in-depth qualitative interviews of leaders and managers at both health systems. Qualitative content analysis was employed to identify major themes. Three themes associated with success and sustainability of EBL emerged at both health systems: leadership; culture; and organizational processes. The theme most frequently identified for both success and sustainability of EBL was culture. In contrast, there was a significant decline in salience of the leadership theme as attention shifts from success in implementation of EBL to sustaining EBL long term. Within the culture theme, accountability, and buy-in were most often cited by interviewees as success factors, while sense of accountability, buy-in, and communication were the most reported factors for sustainability. Cultural factors, such as accountability, staff support, and communication are driving forces of success and sustainability of EBL across both health systems. Leadership, a critical factor in several stages of implementation, appears to be less salient as among factors identified as important to longer term sustainability of EBL.

  3. A Group Recommendation System for Movies based on MAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Paulo VILLAVICENCIO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Providing recommendations to groups of users has become popular in many applications today. Although several group recommendation techniques exist, the generation of items that satisfy all group members in an even way still remains a challenge. To this end, we have developed a multi-agent approach called PUMAS-GR that relies on negotiation techniques to improve group recommendations. We applied PUMAS-GR to the movies domain, and used the monotonic concession protocol to reach a consensus on the movies proposed to a group.

  4. A group signature scheme based on quantum teleportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Xiaojun; Tian Yuan; Ji Liping; Niu Xiamu, E-mail: wxjun36@gmail.co [Information Countermeasure Technique Research Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we present a group signature scheme using quantum teleportation. Different from classical group signature and current quantum signature schemes, which could only deliver either group signature or unconditional security, our scheme guarantees both by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum teleportation. Security analysis proved that our scheme has the characteristics of group signature, non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. Our quantum group signature scheme has a foreseeable application in the e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc.

  5. High resolution, on-line identification of strains from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex based on tandem repeat typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denoeud France

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently available reference methods for the molecular epidemiology of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex either lack sensitivity or are still too tedious and slow for routine application. Recently, tandem repeat typing has emerged as a potential alternative. This report contributes to the development of tandem repeat typing for M. tuberculosis by summarising the existing data, developing additional markers, and setting up a freely accessible, fast, and easy to use, internet-based service for strain identification. Results A collection of 21 VNTRs incorporating 13 previously described loci and 8 newly evaluated markers was used to genotype 90 strains from the M. tuberculosis complex (M. tuberculosis (64 strains, M. bovis (9 strains including 4 BCG representatives, M. africanum (17 strains. Eighty-four different genotypes are defined. Clustering analysis shows that the M. africanum strains fall into three main groups, one of which is closer to the M. tuberculosis strains, and an other one is closer to the M. bovis strains. The resulting data has been made freely accessible over the internet http://bacterial-genotyping.igmors.u-psud.fr/bnserver to allow direct strain identification queries. Conclusions Tandem-repeat typing is a PCR-based assay which may prove to be a powerful complement to the existing epidemiological tools for the M. tuberculosis complex. The number of markers to type depends on the identification precision which is required, so that identification can be achieved quickly at low cost in terms of consumables, technical expertise and equipment.

  6. The communication of "pure" group-based anger reduces tendencies toward intergroup conflict because it increases out-group empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H; Postmes, Tom

    2013-08-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining a positive long-term intergroup relationship, thereby increasing understanding for the situation (in contrast to the communication of the closely related emotion of contempt). Three experiments demonstrate that the communication of group-based anger indeed reduces destructive conflict intentions compared with (a) a control condition (Experiments 1-2), (b) the communication of group-based contempt (Experiment 2), and (c) the communication of a combination of group-based anger and contempt (Experiments 2-3). Moreover, results from all three experiments reveal that empathy mediated the positive effect of communicating "pure" group-based anger. We discuss the implications of these findings for the theory and practice of communicating emotions in intergroup conflicts.

  7. Iterative System Identification and Controller Design with an LMI-Based Framework: Windsurfer-Like Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An LMI-based method for the integrated system identification and controller design is proposed in the paper. We use the fact that a class of a system identification problem results in an LMI optimization problem. By combining LMIs for the system identification and those to obtain a discrete time controller we propose a framework to integrate two steps for the model-based control system design, that is, the system identification and the controller synthesis. The framework enables us to obtain a good model for control and a model-based feedback controller simultaneously in the sense of the closed-loop performance. An iterative design algorithm similar to so-called Windsurfer Approach is presented.

  8. Grouped to Achieve: Are There Benefits to Assigning Students to Heterogeneous Cooperative Learning Groups Based on Pre-Test Scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Arman Karl

    Cooperative learning has been one of the most widely used instructional practices around the world since the early 1980's. Small learning groups have been in existence since the beginning of the human race. These groups have grown in their variance and complexity overtime. Classrooms are getting more diverse every year and instructors need a way to take advantage of this diversity to improve learning. The purpose of this study was to see if heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student achievement can be used as a differentiated instructional strategy to increase students' ability to demonstrate knowledge of science concepts and ability to do engineering design. This study includes two different groups made up of two different middle school science classrooms of 25-30 students. These students were given an engineering design problem to solve within cooperative learning groups. One class was put into heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student's pre-test scores. The other class was grouped based on random assignment. The study measured the difference between each class's pre-post gains, student's responses to a group interaction form and interview questions addressing their perceptions of the makeup of their groups. The findings of the study were that there was no significant difference between learning gains for the treatment and comparison groups. There was a significant difference between the treatment and comparison groups in student perceptions of their group's ability to stay on task and manage their time efficiently. Both the comparison and treatment groups had a positive perception of the composition of their cooperative learning groups.

  9. Stability Analysis of Neural Networks-Based System Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talel Korkobi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper treats some problems related to nonlinear systems identification. A stability analysis neural network model for identifying nonlinear dynamic systems is presented. A constrained adaptive stable backpropagation updating law is presented and used in the proposed identification approach. The proposed backpropagation training algorithm is modified to obtain an adaptive learning rate guarantying convergence stability. The proposed learning rule is the backpropagation algorithm under the condition that the learning rate belongs to a specified range defining the stability domain. Satisfying such condition, unstable phenomena during the learning process are avoided. A Lyapunov analysis leads to the computation of the expression of a convenient adaptive learning rate verifying the convergence stability criteria. Finally, the elaborated training algorithm is applied in several simulations. The results confirm the effectiveness of the CSBP algorithm.

  10. The enhancement of simulation based learning exercises through formalised reflection, focus groups and group presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mawdesley, M.; Long, G.; Al-Jibouri, Saad H.S.; Scott, D.

    2011-01-01

    Computer based simulations and games can be useful tools in teaching aspects of construction project management that are not easily transmitted through traditional lecture based approaches. However, it can be difficult to quantify their utility and it is essential to ensure that students are

  11. Identification of Bodies Exposed to High Temperatures Based on Macroscopic...

    OpenAIRE

    Barraza Salcedo, María del Socorro; Universidad Metropolitana de Barranquilla. Barranquilla; Rebolledo Cobos, Martha Leonor; Universidad Metropolitana de Barranquilla

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Background: Forensic dentistry in cases of incineration provides scientific elements that allow the identification of bodies, by analyzing dental organs, through the isolation of DNA obtained from the pulp as an alternative to confirm the identity of the victim. When the degree of temperature is highly elevated, dental tissues are vulnerable and therefore the DNA pulp is not salvageable, wasting resources and time by lack of standards to identify macroscopic characteristics that ind...

  12. Sensitivity Based Segmentation and Identification in Automatic Speech Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-30

    by a network constructed from phonemic, phonetic , and phonological rules. Regardless of the speech processing system used, Klatt 1 2 has described...analysis, and its use in the segmentation and identification of the phonetic units of speech, that was initiated during the 1982 Summer Faculty Research...practicable framework for incorporation of acoustic- phonetic variance as well as time and talker normalization. XOI iF- ? ’:: .:- .- . . l ] 2 D

  13. DNA-based identification of forensically important Australian Sarcophagidae (Diptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Kelly A; Wallman, James F; Dowton, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The utility of the forensically important Sarcophagidae (Diptera) for time since death estimates has been severely limited, as morphological identification is difficult and thermobiological histories are inadequately documented. A molecular identification method involving the sequencing of a 658-bp 'barcode' fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene from 85 specimens, representing 16 Australian species from varying populations, was evaluated. Nucleotide sequence divergences were calculated using the Kimura-two-parameter distance model and a neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree generated. All species were resolved as reciprocally monophyletic, except Sarcophaga dux. Intraspecific and interspecific variation ranged from 0.000% to 1.499% (SE = 0.044%) and 6.658% to 8.983% (SE = 0.653%), respectively. The COI 'barcode' sequence was found to be suitable for the molecular identification of the studied Australian Sarcophagidae: 96.5% of the examined specimens were assigned to the correct species. Given that the sarcophagid fauna is poorly described, it is feasible that the few incorrectly assigned specimens represent cryptic species. The results of this research will be instrumental for implementation of the Australian Sarcophagidae in forensic entomology.

  14. Dealing with past colonial conflicts: how perceived characteristics of the victimized outgroup can influence the experience of group-based guilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueiredo, A.; Doosje, B.; Pires Valentim, J.; Zebel, S.

    2010-01-01

    An examination of potential outgroup-focused predictors of group-based guilt relating to past colonial conflicts involving Portugal and the Netherlands, specifically, the role of the perceptions of the ingroup towards the victimized outgroup, as well as on outgroup identification and meta-perception

  15. A secure quantum group signature scheme based on Bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejia; Song, Tingting; Zuo, Huijuan; Zhang, Weiwei

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new secure quantum group signature with Bell states, which may have applications in e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc. Compared with the recent quantum group signature protocols, our scheme is focused on the most general situation in practice, i.e. only the arbitrator is trusted and no intermediate information needs to be stored in the signing phase to ensure the security. Furthermore, our scheme has achieved all the characteristics of group signature—anonymity, verifiability, traceability, unforgetability and undeniability, by using some current developed quantum and classical technologies. Finally, a feasible security analysis model for quantum group signature is presented.

  16. Laser identification system based on acousto-optical barcode scanner principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansuvarov, Ruslan A.; Korol, Georgy I.; Preslenev, Leonid N.; Bestugin, Aleksandr R.; Paraskun, Arthur S.

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of the bar code in the modern world is the unique identification of the product, service, or any of their features, so personal and stationary barcode scanners so widely used. One of the important parameters of bar code scanners is their reliability, accuracy of the barcode recognition, response time and performance. Nowadays, the most popular personal barcode scanners contain a mechanical part, which extremely impairs the reliability indices. Group of SUAI engineers has proposed bar code scanner based on laser beam acoustic deflection effect in crystals [RU patent No 156009 issued 4/16/2015] Through the use of an acousto-optic deflector element in barcode scanner described by a group of engineers SUAI, it can be implemented in the manual form factor, and the stationary form factor of a barcode scanner. Being a wave electronic device, an acousto-optic element in the composition of the acousto-optic barcode scanner allows you to clearly establish a mathematical link between the encoded function of the bar code with the accepted input photodetector intensities function that allows you to speak about the great probability of a bar code clear definition. This paper provides a description of the issued patent, the description of the principles of operation based on the mathematical analysis, a description of the layout of the implemented scanner.

  17. UCIMssp: Ubiquitous Computing Identification Mechanism Based on SPKI/SDSI and P2P

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Dao-qing; PU Fang; CAO Qi-ying

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing systems typically have lots of security problems in the area of identification supply by means of classical Public Key Infrastructure(PKI)methods.The limited computing resources,the disconnection network,the classification requirements of ideatification,the requirement of trust transfer and cross identification,the bidirectional identification,the security delegation and the privacy protection etc are all these unsolved problems.In this paper,UCIMssp,a new novel ubiquitous computing identification mechanism based on SPKI/SDSI and Peer-to-Peer(P2P)is presented.SPKI based authorization Is exploited in UCIMssp to solve the above problems in the small-scale ubiquitous computing environment.The DHT and flooding technology of P2P overlay network over the Internet is expanded to solve the routing search in the large-scale ubiquitous computing environment.The architecture of ubiquitous computing environment,the validation of identification requisition,the identification authorization processes and the identification supply processes etc of UCIMssp are described in the paper.The performance analysis shows that UCIMssp is a suitable security solution used in the large-scale ubiquitous computing environment.

  18. Evaluation of a direct fluorescent antibody staining method for rapid identification of members of the bacteroides fragilis group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGirolami, P C; Mepani, C P

    1981-07-01

    A direct fluorescent antibody test kit (Fluorotec-F, Pfizer Inc., New York, New York) designed for rapid identification of members of the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) was evaluated. Tested were 228 clinical specimens (144 direct smears of clinical material, 14 smears of positive blood cultures, and 70 smears of colonies isolated from clinical material) and 49 reference strains of anaerobic bacteria, including 23 members of the BFG. Fluorotec-F detected 68 of 69 (98.5%) members of the BFG, including 55 B. fragilis, 12 B. thetaiotaomicron, and two B. ovatus, identified by cultural methods in all clinical specimens. Three specimens that yielded B. uniformis also fluoresced. Three specimens fluoresced but failed to yield members of the BFG or B. uniformis on culture. Of the 49 reference strains tested, all strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, nd B. uniformis tested were detected by Fluorotec-F, but only five of a total of 14B. vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. ovatus tested fluoresced. Of the 25 reference strains of anaerobic bacteria not belonging to the BFG, none fluoresced except for two strains of B. eggerthii. Direct fluorescent antibody staining of smears of clinical specimens suitable for anaerobic culture is a valuable tool for rapid detection of B. fragilis infections.

  19. A new private communication scheme based on the idea of fault detection and identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Maoyin [Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: maoyinchen@163.com; Zhou Donghua [Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shang Yun [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2006-02-27

    By use of the idea of fault detection and identification, this Letter proposes a new scheme to resolve the problem of chaotic private communication. From the point of view of fault detection and identification the scalar message signal hidden in the chaotic systems can be regarded as the component fault signal, thereby it can be detected and recovered using the model-based methods of fault detection and identification. The famous Duffing oscillator is used to illustrate and verify the effectiveness of this scheme.

  20. Improved fuzzy identification method based on Hough transformation and fuzzy clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘福才; 路平立; 潘江华; 裴润

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an approach that is useful for the identification of a fuzzy model in SISO system. The initial values of cluster centers are identified by the Hough transformation, which considers the linearity and continuity of given input-output data, respectively. For the premise parts parameters identification, we use fuzzy-C-means clustering method. The consequent parameters are identified based on recursive least square. This method not only makes approximation more accurate, but also let computation be simpler and the procedure is realized more easily. Finally, it is shown that this method is useful for the identification of a fuzzy model by simulation.

  1. Nonlinear System Identification via Basis Functions Based Time Domain Volterra Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Edwar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes basis functions based time domain Volterra model for nonlinear system identification. The Volterra kernels are expanded by using complex exponential basis functions and estimated via genetic algorithm (GA. The accuracy and practicability of the proposed method are then assessed experimentally from a scaled 1:100 model of a prototype truss spar platform. Identification results in time and frequency domain are presented and coherent functions are performed to check the quality of the identification results. It is shown that results between experimental data and proposed method are in good agreement.

  2. A METHOD OF ONLINE DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION FOR STRUCTURES BASED ON AMBIENT VIBRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Zhi-yuan; WANG Feng-quan; ZHAO Chun-sheng

    2005-01-01

    A method of damage identification for engineering structures based on ambient vibration is put forward, in which output data are used only. Firstly, it was identification of the statistic parameters to associate with the exterior excitation for undamaged structures.Then it was detection and location of the structural damages for damaged structures. The ambient identification method includes a theoretical model and numerical method. The numerical experiment results show the method is precise and effective. This method may be used in health monitoring for bridges and architectures.

  3. The application of reduced absorption cross section on the identification of the compounds with similar function-groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Zuo, Jian; Mu, Kai-jun; Zhang, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Liang-liang; Zhang, Lei-wei; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2013-08-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy is a powerful tool for materials investigation. The low frequency vibrations were usually investigated by means of absorption coefficient regardless of the refractive index. It leads to the disregard of some inherent low-frequency vibrational information of the chemical compounds. Moreover, due to the scattering inside the sample, there are some distortions of the absorption features, so that the absorption dependent material identification is not valid enough. Here, a statistical parameter named reduced absorption cross section (RACS) is introduced. This can not only help us investigate the molecular dynamics but also distinguish one chemical compound with another which has similar function-groups. Experiments are carried out on L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine and the different mass ratios of their mixtures as an example of the application of RACS. The results come out that the RACS spectrum of L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine reserve the spectral fingerprint information of absorption spectrum. The log plot of RACSs of the two amino acids show power-law behavior σR(~ν) ~ (ν~α), and there is a linear relation between the wavenumber and the RACS in the double logarithmic plot. The exponents α, at the same time, are the slopes of the RACS curves in the double logarithmic plot. The big differences of the exponents α between the two amino acids and their mixtures can be seen visually from the slopes of the RACS curves. So we can use RACS analytical method to distinguish some complex compounds with similar function-groups and mixtures from another which has similar absorption peaks in THz region.

  4. Current algorithmic solutions for peptide-based proteomics data generation and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopmann, Michael R; Moritz, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Peptide-based proteomic data sets are ever increasing in size and complexity. These data sets provide computational challenges when attempting to quickly analyze spectra and obtain correct protein identifications. Database search and de novo algorithms must consider high-resolution MS/MS spectra and alternative fragmentation methods. Protein inference is a tricky problem when analyzing large data sets of degenerate peptide identifications. Combining multiple algorithms for improved peptide identification puts significant strain on computational systems when investigating large data sets. This review highlights some of the recent developments in peptide and protein identification algorithms for analyzing shotgun mass spectrometry data when encountering the aforementioned hurdles. Also explored are the roles that analytical pipelines, public spectral libraries, and cloud computing play in the evolution of peptide-based proteomics.

  5. [A Study of the Relationship Among Genetic Distances, NIR Spectra Distances, and NIR-Based Identification Model Performance of the Seeds of Maize Iinbred Lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Jia, Shi-qiang; Wang, Chun-ying; Liu, Zhe; Gu, Jian-cheng; Zhai, Wei; Li, Shao-ming; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Zhu, De-hai; Huang, Hua-jun; An, Dong

    2015-09-01

    This paper explored the relationship among genetic distances, NIR spectra distances and NIR-based identification model performance of the seeds of maize inbred lines. Using 3 groups (total 15 pairs) of maize inbred lines whose genetic distaches are different as experimental materials, we calculates the genetic distance between these seeds with SSR markers and uses Euclidean distance between distributed center points of maize NIR spectrum in the PCA space as the distances of NIR spectrum. BPR method is used to build identification model of inbred lines and the identification accuracy is used as a measure of model identification performance. The results showed that, the correlation of genetic distance and spectra distancesis 0.9868, and it has a correlation of 0.9110 with the identification accuracy, which is highly correlated. This means near-Infrared spectrum of seedscan reflect genetic relationship of maize inbred lines. The smaller the genetic distance, the smaller the distance of spectrum, the poorer ability of model to identify. In practical application, near infrared spectrum analysis technology has the potential to be used to analyze maize inbred genetic relations, contributing much to genetic breeding, identification of species, purity sorting and so on. What's more, when creating a NIR-based identification model, the impact of the maize inbred lines which have closer genetic relationship should be fully considered.

  6. Organizational respect dampens the impact of group-based relative deprivation on willingness to protest pay cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Danny; Huo, Yuen J; Smith, Heather J

    2015-03-01

    Although group-based relative deprivation predicts people's willingness to protest unfair outcomes, perceiving that one's subgroup is respected increases employees' support for organizations. An integration of these perspectives suggests that subgroup respect will dampen the impact of group-based relative deprivation on workers' responses to unfair organizational outcomes. We examined this hypothesis among university faculty (N = 804) who underwent a system-wide pay cut. As expected, group-based relative deprivation predicted protest intentions. This relationship was, however, muted among those who believed university administrators treated their area of expertise (i.e., their subgroup) with a high (vs. low) level of respect. Moderated mediation analyses confirmed that group-based relative deprivation had a conditional indirect effect on protest intentions via participants' (dis)identification with their university at low to moderate, but not high, levels of subgroup respect. Our finding that satisfying relational needs can attenuate responses to group-based relative deprivation demonstrates the benefits of integrating insights from distinct research traditions. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Do children trust based on group membership or prior accuracy? The role of novel group membership in children's trust decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elashi, Fadwa B; Mills, Candice M

    2014-12-01

    Two experiments examined how an informant's group membership can influence children's trust decisions. Participants (3- to 7-year-olds, N=162) were assigned to either the red or blue group based on their selection of a red or blue apron and watched an in-group and out-group informant provide conflicting names for a set of novel objects. When asked which informant they would prefer to rely on for new information, nearly all age groups trusted the in-group informant. Children then watched as each informant varied in accuracy by labeling either all or none of four familiar items accurately and were then asked which informant's labels they preferred for learning new information. When the in-group informant had previously demonstrated accuracy, children continued to trust the in-group informant for new information. In contrast, when the in-group informant had previously demonstrated inaccuracy, children were unsure who to trust, with only 6- and 7-year-olds showing a decrease in their trust for the inaccurate in-group informant. These findings demonstrate that group membership can skew how children encode new information and can make children uncertain about whom to trust for information.

  8. Language Identification of Web Pages Based on Improved N-gram Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Yew Choong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Language identification of written text in the domain of Latin-script based languages is a well-studied research field. However, new challenges arise when it is applied to non-Latin-script based languages, especially for Asian languages web pages. The objective of this paper is to propose and evaluate the effectiveness of adapting Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Biblical texts as a training corpus, together with two new heuristics to improve an n-gram based language identification algorithm for Asian languages. Extension of the training corpus produced improved accuracy. Improvement was also achieved by using byte-sequence based HTML parser and a HTML character entities converter. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated based on a written text corpus of 1,660 web pages, spanning 182 languages from Asia, Africa, the Americas, Europe and Oceania. Experimental result showed that the algorithm achieved a language identification accuracy rate of 94.04%.

  9. Taste Identification of Tea Through a Fuzzy Neural Network Based on Fuzzy C-means Clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yan; ZHOU Chun-guang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy neural network model based on Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm to realize the taste identification of tea. The proposed method can acquire the fuzzy subset and its membership function in an automatic way with the aid of FCM clustering algorithm. Moreover, we improve the fuzzy weighted inference approach. The proposed model is illustrated with the simulation of taste identification of tea.

  10. Identification of biochemical network modules based on shortest retroactive distances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Vivek Sridharan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Modularity analysis offers a route to better understand the organization of cellular biochemical networks as well as to derive practically useful, simplified models of these complex systems. While there is general agreement regarding the qualitative properties of a biochemical module, there is no clear consensus on the quantitative criteria that may be used to systematically derive these modules. In this work, we investigate cyclical interactions as the defining characteristic of a biochemical module. We utilize a round trip distance metric, termed Shortest Retroactive Distance (ShReD, to characterize the retroactive connectivity between any two reactions in a biochemical network and to group together network components that mutually influence each other. We evaluate the metric on two types of networks that feature feedback interactions: (i epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling and (ii liver metabolism supporting drug transformation. For both networks, the ShReD partitions found hierarchically arranged modules that confirm biological intuition. In addition, the partitions also revealed modules that are less intuitive. In particular, ShReD-based partition of the metabolic network identified a 'redox' module that couples reactions of glucose, pyruvate, lipid and drug metabolism through shared production and consumption of NADPH. Our results suggest that retroactive interactions arising from feedback loops and metabolic cycles significantly contribute to the modularity of biochemical networks. For metabolic networks, cofactors play an important role as allosteric effectors that mediate the retroactive interactions.

  11. Flare forecasting based on sunspot-groups characteristics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Contarino, Lidia; Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Spadaro, Daniele; Guglielmino, Salvatore L; Battiato, Viviana

    2009-01-01

    ... accurate flare forecasting. In order to give a contribution to this aspect, we focused our attention on the characteristics that must be fulfilled by sunspot-groups in order to be flare-productive...

  12. Polydiphenylacetylene with Schiff Base End Groups: Synthesis and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Radostina; Jossifov, Christo

    The carbonyl-olefin exchange reaction is a new reaction between carbonyl group and olefin double bond, which has a formal similarity with the olefin metathesis - one carbon atom in the latter is replaced with an oxygen atom. Till now the new reaction is performed successfully only when the two functional groups (carbonyl group and olefin double bond) are in one molecule and are conjugated. The α, β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (substituted propenones) are the compounds with such a structure. They polymerize giving substituted polyacetylenes. The chain propagation step of this polymerization is in fact the carbonyl-olefin exchange reaction. The question arises: is it possible the carbonyl-olefin exchange reaction to take place when the two functional groups are not in one molecule and are not conjugated, and could this reaction become an alternative of the existing carbonyl olefination reactions?

  13. Bryophytes for Beginners: The Usability of a Printed Dichotomous Key versus a Multi-Access Computer-Based Key for Bryophyte Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.; Smith, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes are a rewarding study group in field biology and the UK bryophyte flora has international importance to biodiversity conservation. We designed an identification key to common woodland moss species and compared the usability of two formats, web-based multi-access and printed dichotomous key, with undergraduate students. The rate of…

  14. Discrimination, attribution, and racial group identification: implications for psychological distress among Black Americans in the National Survey of American Life (2001-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Lincoln, Karen D; Jackson, James S

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that experiencing discrimination may contribute to poor mental health among Black Americans. However, few studies have distinguished between discrimination attributed to race versus other forms of discrimination or have compared differences in their psychological implications. Using nationally representative data on 5,191 Black Americans in the National Survey of American Life (NSAL; 2001-2003), this study examined serious psychological distress (SPD) in relation to discrimination attributed to racial versus nonracial causes and also investigated whether racial group identification may be a buffer. We found that discrimination was associated with greater odds of SPD, regardless of attribution. Racial attributions were associated with higher odds of SPD compared with attributions to nonracial causes for each level of discrimination. High racial group identification buffered the negative effect of moderate levels of both racially and nonracially attributed discrimination. Our results provide evidence for the negative influence of discrimination on SPD among Black Americans and indicate that high racial group identification may somewhat mitigate their negative mental health effects. Our study suggests that discrimination and racial group identification should be addressed to protect against psychological distress among Black Americans. © 2011 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  15. [Home based and group based exercise programs in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, S; Costa, S; Mesquita, C; Duarte, J

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation of the joints of the spine and sacroiliac and to a lesser percentage of the peripheral joints. It is a debilitating condition which reduces quality of life in patients with AS. The practice of physical therapy is recommended as non-pharmacological treatment as well as the treatment and prevention of associated deformities. To collect and summarize the available evidence in scientific databases to realize the effectiveness of home based and group based programs in patients with AS. Systematic review, where articles for the study were collected from scientific database PubMed. We have found 65 articles with publication date between January 1, 2004 and January 31, 2014. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established to make the selection of articles to include in the study. All investigators provided their agreement in presencial meeting for a final selection, and at a later stage, the articles were read in full by the three investigators. The present systematic review includes eight randomized controlled trials. All articles show functional benefits in patients with AS subject to exercise programs in group based and / or home based. From the eight articles, 4 addressed programs conducted in home based context and 4 addressed in group based context programs. There appears to be evidence that the programs carried out based on group are more effective than those home based conducted in patients with AS. It was concluded also be advantageous to carry out home based exercise programs than the absence of any exercise program..

  16. Home based and group based exercise programs in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation of the joints of the spine and sacroiliac and to a lesser percentage of the peripheral joints. It is a debilitating condition which reduces quality of life in patients with AS. The practice of physical therapy is recommended as non-pharmacological treatment as well as the treatment and prevention of associated deformities. Objective: To collect and summarize the available evidence in scientific databases to realize the effectiveness of home based and group based programs in patients with AS. Methods: Systematic review, where articles for the study were collected from scientific database PubMed. We have found 65 articles with publication date between January 1, 2004 and January 31, 2014. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established to make the selection of articles to include in the study. All investigators provided their agreement in presencial meeting for a final selection, and at a later stage, the articles were read in full by the three investigators. Results: The present systematic review includes eight randomized controlled trials. All articles show functional benefits in patients with AS subject to exercise programs in group based and / or home based. From the eight articles, 4 addressed programs conducted in home based context and 4 addressed in group based context programs. Conclusion: There appears to be evidence that the programs carried out based on group are more effective than those home based conducted in patients with AS. It was concluded also be advantageous to carry out home based exercise programs than the absence of any exercise program.

  17. A forward model-based validation of cardiovascular system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical evaluation of a cardiovascular system identification method that we previously developed for the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and instantaneous lung volume. The method provides a dynamical characterization of the important autonomic and mechanical mechanisms responsible for coupling the fluctuations (inverse modeling). To carry out the evaluation, we developed a computational model of the cardiovascular system capable of generating realistic beat-to-beat variability (forward modeling). We applied the method to data generated from the forward model and compared the resulting estimated dynamics with the actual dynamics of the forward model, which were either precisely known or easily determined. We found that the estimated dynamics corresponded to the actual dynamics and that this correspondence was robust to forward model uncertainty. We also demonstrated the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in parameters characterizing autonomic function in the forward model. These results provide confidence in the performance of the cardiovascular system identification method when applied to experimental data.

  18. Network output controllability-based method for drug target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Shen, Yichao; Li, Min; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Biomolecules do not perform their functions alone, but interactively with one another to form so called biomolecular networks. It is well known that a complex disease stems from the malfunctions of corresponding biomolecular networks. Therefore, one of important tasks is to identify drug targets from biomolecular networks. In this study, the drug target identification is formulated as a problem of finding steering nodes in biomolecular networks while the concept of network output controllability is applied to the problem of drug target identification. By applying control signals to these steering nodes, the biomolecular networks are expected to be transited from one state to another. A graph-theoretic algorithm has been proposed to find a minimum set of steering nodes in biomolecular networks which can be a potential set of drug targets. Application results of the method to real biomolecular networks show that identified potential drug targets are in agreement with existing research results. This indicates that the method can generate testable predictions and provide insights into experimental design of drug discovery.

  19. Online Databases for Taxonomy and Identification of Pathogenic Fungi and Proposal for a Cloud-Based Dynamic Data Network Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Peralam Yegneswaran; Irinyi, Laszlo; Halliday, Catriona; Chen, Sharon; Robert, Vincent; Meyer, Wieland

    2017-04-01

    The increase in public online databases dedicated to fungal identification is noteworthy. This can be attributed to improved access to molecular approaches to characterize fungi, as well as to delineate species within specific fungal groups in the last 2 decades, leading to an ever-increasing complexity of taxonomic assortments and nomenclatural reassignments. Thus, well-curated fungal databases with substantial accurate sequence data play a pivotal role for further research and diagnostics in the field of mycology. This minireview aims to provide an overview of currently available online databases for the taxonomy and identification of human and animal-pathogenic fungi and calls for the establishment of a cloud-based dynamic data network platform. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Roles of the Amino Group of Purine Bases in the Thermodynamic Stability of DNA Base Pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The energetic aspects of hydrogen-bonded base-pair interactions are important for the design of functional nucleotide analogs and for practical applications of oligonucleotides. The present study investigated the contribution of the 2-amino group of DNA purine bases to the thermodynamic stability of oligonucleotide duplexes under different salt and solvent conditions, using 2'-deoxyriboinosine (I and 2'-deoxyribo-2,6-diaminopurine (D as non-canonical nucleotides. The stability of DNA duplexes was changed by substitution of a single base pair in the following order: G•C > D•T ≈ I•C > A•T > G•T > I•T. The apparent stabilization energy due to the presence of the 2-amino group of G and D varied depending on the salt concentration, and decreased in the water-ethanol mixed solvent. The effects of salt concentration on the thermodynamics of DNA duplexes were found to be partially sequence-dependent, and the 2-amino group of the purine bases might have an influence on the binding of ions to DNA through the formation of a stable base-paired structure. Our results also showed that physiological salt conditions were energetically favorable for complementary base recognition, and conversely, low salt concentration media and ethanol-containing solvents were effective for low stringency oligonucleotide hybridization, in the context of conditions employed in this study.

  1. Note: Model-based identification method of a cable-driven wearable device for arm rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Cable-driven exoskeletons have used active cables to actuate the system and are worn on subjects to provide motion assistance. However, this kind of wearable devices usually contains uncertain kinematic parameters. In this paper, a model-based identification method has been proposed for a cable-driven arm exoskeleton to estimate its uncertainties. The identification method is based on the linearized error model derived from the kinematics of the exoskeleton. Experiment has been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed model-based method in practical application.

  2. Hamas and Israel: Conflicting Strategies of Group-Based Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    with extreme messianic views, the Gush Emunim, were important. One focus of such right wing groups was on symbols of Judaism, and new sources of...Avnery, “An End Forseen,” Gush Shalom, February 2, 2008. 26. It is useful to track the meetings between the U.S. Secretary of State and others and

  3. Gait characteristic analysis and identification based on the iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Yang; Banda, Jacob

    2014-09-12

    Gait identification is a valuable approach to identify humans at a distance. In this paper, gait characteristics are analyzed based on an iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer,and a new approach is proposed for gait identification. Specifically, gait datasets are collected by the triaxial accelerometer and gyrometer embedded in an iPhone. Then, the datasets are processed to extract gait characteristic parameters which include gait frequency, symmetry coefficient, dynamic range and similarity coefficient of characteristic curves. Finally, a weighted voting scheme dependent upon the gait characteristic parameters is proposed forgait identification. Four experiments are implemented to validate the proposed scheme. The attitude and acceleration solutions are verified by simulation. Then the gait characteristics are analyzed by comparing two sets of actual data, and the performance of the weighted voting identification scheme is verified by 40 datasets of 10 subjects.

  4. Online adaptive parameter identification of PMSM based on the dead-time compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Zhou, Fu; Liu, Xia; Hu, Eric

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method of online identification of the parameters of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) by model reference adaptive identification based on Popov Super Stability Theory. Firstly, the relations of parameters in the Field Orientation Control (FOC) system are analysed. Secondly, the proposed identification method of PMSM concerns two parts. In the case of high-speed operation of the motor, the method can accurately identify the inductance in dq-axis and the permanent magnet (PM) flux linkage. On the other hand, in the case of low speed, it can accurately identify the winding resistance of the stator. The method does not require additional excitation signals, but only makes use of motor voltage, current and their deviations. Thirdly, a simple and effective dead-time compensation method has been applied to inhibit the dead-time effects on the parameter identification. At last, the simulation and experiment results clearly demonstrate the validity and feasibility of the method.

  5. Gait Characteristic Analysis and Identification Based on the iPhone’s Accelerometer and Gyrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gait identification is a valuable approach to identify humans at a distance. In thispaper, gait characteristics are analyzed based on an iPhone’s accelerometer and gyrometer,and a new approach is proposed for gait identification. Specifically, gait datasets are collectedby the triaxial accelerometer and gyrometer embedded in an iPhone. Then, the datasets areprocessed to extract gait characteristic parameters which include gait frequency, symmetrycoefficient, dynamic range and similarity coefficient of characteristic curves. Finally, aweighted voting scheme dependent upon the gait characteristic parameters is proposed forgait identification. Four experiments are implemented to validate the proposed scheme. Theattitude and acceleration solutions are verified by simulation. Then the gait characteristicsare analyzed by comparing two sets of actual data, and the performance of the weightedvoting identification scheme is verified by 40 datasets of 10 subjects.

  6. The constitutive compatibility method for identification of material parameters based on full-field measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We revisit here the concept of the constitutive relation error for the identification of elastic material parameters based on image correlation. An additional concept, so called constitutive compatibility of stress, is introduced defining a subspace of the classical space of statically admissible stresses. The key idea is to define stresses as compatible with the observed deformation field through the chosen class of constitutive equation. This makes possible the uncoupling of the identification of stress from the identification of the material parameters. As a result, the global cost of the identification is strongly reduced. This uncoupling also leads to parametrized solutions in cases where the solution is non-unique as demonstrated on 2D numerical examples. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Microarray-based Identification of Novel Biomarkers in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Izuhara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a complicated and diverse disorder affected by genetic and environmental factors. It is widely accepted that it is a Th2-type inflammation originating in lung and caused by inhalation of ubiquitous allergens. The complicated and diverse pathogenesis of this disease yet to be clarified. Functional genomics is the analysis of whole gene expression profiling under given condition, and microarray technology is now the most powerful tool for functional genomics. Several attempts to clarify the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma have been carried out using microarray technology, providing us some novel biomarkers for diagnosis, therapeutic targets or understanding pathogenic mechanisms of bronchial asthma. In this article, we review the outcomes of these analyses by the microarray approach as applied to this disease by focusing on the identification of novel biomarkers.

  8. Acoustical User Identification Based on MFCC Analysis of Keystrokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus Pleva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel approach of person identification using acoustical monitoring of typing the required word on the monitored keyboard. This experiment was motivated by the idea of COST IC1106 (Integrating Biometrics and Forensics for the Digital Age partners to acoustically analyse the captured keystroke dynamics database using widely used time-invariant mathematical models tools. The MFCC (Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients and HMM (Hidden Markov Models was introduced in this experiment, which gives promising results of 99.33% accuracy, when testing 25% of realizations (randomly selected from 100 identifying between 50 users/models. The experiment was repeated for different training/testing configurations and cross-validated, so this first approach could be a good starting point for next research including feature selection algorithms, biometric authentication score normalization, different audio & keyboard setup tests, etc.

  9. The seam offset identification based on support vector regression machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Songsheng; Shi Yonghua; Wang Guorong; Huang Guoxing

    2009-01-01

    The principle of the support vector regression machine(SVR) is first analysed. Then the new data-dependent kernel function is constructed from information geometry perspective. The current waveforms change regularly in accordance with the different horizontal offset when the rotational frequency of the high speed rotational arc sensor is in the range from 15 Hz to 30 Hz. The welding current data is pretreated by wavelet filtering, mean filtering and normalization treatment. The SVR model is constructed by making use of the evolvement laws, the decision function can be achieved by training the SVR and the seam offset can be identified. The experimental results show that the precision of the offset identification can be greatly improved by modifying the SVR and applying mean filtering from the longitudinal direction.

  10. Microcantilver-based DNA hybridization sensors for Salmonella identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ricciardi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The detection of pathogenic microorganisms in foods remains a challenging since the safety of foodstuffs has to be ensured by the food producing companies. Conventional methods for the detection and identification of bacteria mainly rely on specific microbiological and biochemical identification. Biomolecular methods, are commonly used as a support for traditional techniques, thanks to their high sensitivity, specificity and not excessive costs. However, new methods like biosensors for example, can be an exciting alternative to the more traditional tecniques for the detection of pathogens in food. In this study we report Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis DNA detection through a novel class of label-free biosensors: microcantilevers (MCs. In general, MCs can operate as a microbalance and is used to detect the mass of the entities anchored to the cantilever surface using the decrease in the resonant frequency. We use DNA hybridization as model reaction system and for this reason, specific single stranded probe DNA of the pathogen and three different DNA targets (single-stranded complementary DNA, PCR product and serial dilutions of DNA extracted from S. Enteritidis strains were applied. Two protocols were reported in order to allow the probe immobilization on cantilever surface: i MC surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde and an amino-modified DNA probe was used; ii gold-coated sensors and thiolated DNA probes were used in order to generate a covalent bonding (Th-Au. For the first one, measures after hybridization with the PCR product showed related frequency shift 10 times higher than hybridization with complementary probe and detectable signals were obtained at the concentrations of 103 and 106 cfu/mL after hybridization with bacterial DNA. There are currently optimizations of the second protocol, where preliminary results have shown to be more uniform and therefore more precise within each of the

  11. Microorganism Identification Based On MALDI-TOF-MS Fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elssner, Thomas; Kostrzewa, Markus; Maier, Thomas; Kruppa, Gary

    Advances in MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry have enabled the ­development of a rapid, accurate and specific method for the identification of bacteria directly from colonies picked from culture plates, which we have named the MALDI Biotyper. The picked colonies are placed on a target plate, a drop of matrix solution is added, and a pattern of protein molecular weights and intensities, "the protein fingerprint" of the bacteria, is produced by the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. The obtained protein mass fingerprint representing a molecular signature of the microorganism is then matched against a database containing a library of previously measured protein mass fingerprints, and scores for the match to every library entry are produced. An ID is obtained if a score is returned over a pre-set threshold. The sensitivity of the techniques is such that only approximately 104 bacterial cells are needed, meaning that an overnight culture is sufficient, and the results are obtained in minutes after culture. The improvement in time to result over biochemical methods, and the capability to perform a non-targeted identification of bacteria and spores, potentially makes this method suitable for use in the detect-to-treat timeframe in a bioterrorism event. In the case of white-powder samples, the infectious spore is present in sufficient quantity in the powder so that the MALDI Biotyper result can be obtained directly from the white powder, without the need for culture. While spores produce very different patterns from the vegetative colonies of the corresponding bacteria, this problem is overcome by simply including protein fingerprints of the spores in the library. Results on spores can be returned within minutes, making the method suitable for use in the "detect-to-protect" timeframe.

  12. Adaptive Voltage Stability Protection Based on Load Identification Using Phasor Measurement Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Leo; Bak, Claus Leth; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    collapse. In this paper, the online load identification using measurement-based approach based on Phasor Measurement Units (PMU) was proposed to evaluate the proximity to voltage instability in order to prevent voltage collapse. In the scenarios of disturbances, the proximity to voltage collapse...

  13. Subspace-Based Algorithms for Structural Identification, Damage Detection, and Sensor Data Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goursat Maurice

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the theory and practice of covariance-driven output-only and input/output subspace-based identification and detection algorithms. The motivating and investigated application domain is vibration-based structural analysis and health monitoring of mechanical, civil, and aeronautic structures.

  14. Identification of a Bacillus anthracis specific indel in the yeaC gene and development of a rapid pyrosequencing assay for distinguishing B. anthracis from the B. cereus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmod, Nadia Z; Gupta, Radhey S; Shah, Haroun N

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a potential source of bioterrorism. The existing assays for its identification lack specificity due to the close genetic relationship it exhibits to other members of the B. cereus group. Our comparative analyses of protein sequences from Bacillus species have identified a 24 amino acid deletion in a conserved region of the YeaC protein that is uniquely present in B. anthracis. PCR primers based on conserved regions flanking this indel in the Bacillus cereus group of species (viz. Bacillus cereus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, B. mycoides, B. weihenstephnensis and B. pseudomycoides) specifically amplified a 282 bp fragment from all six reference B. anthracis strains, whereas a 354 bp fragment was amplified from 15 other B. cereus group of species/strains. These fragments, due to large size difference, are readily distinguished by means of agarose gel electrophoresis. In contrast to the B. cereus group, no PCR amplification was observed with any of the non-B. cereus group of species/strains. This indel was also used for developing a rapid pyrosequencing assay for the identification of B. anthracis. Its performance was evaluated by examining the presence or absence of this indel in a panel of 81 B. cereus-like isolates from various sources that included 39 B. anthracis strains. Based upon the sequence data from the pyrograms, the yeaC indel was found to be a distinctive characteristic of various B. anthracis strains tested and not found in any other species/strains from these samples. Therefore, this B. anthracis specific indel provides a robust and highly-specific chromosomal marker for the identification of this high-risk pathogen from other members of the B. cereus group independent of a strain's virulence. The pyrosequencing platform also allows for the rapid and simultaneous screening of multiple samples for the presence of this B. anthracis-specific marker.

  15. 78 FR 49281 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and... Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and web-based... Management Working Group (TAMWG) will hold a meeting. Background The TAMWG affords stakeholders...

  16. 78 FR 35312 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and... Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and web-based... Management Working Group (TAMWG) will hold a meeting. Background The TAMWG affords stakeholders...

  17. A DNA-based method for identification of krill species and its application to analysing the diet of marine vertebrate predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, S N; Gales, N J; Tierney, M; Gill, P C; Elliott, N G

    2002-12-01

    Accurate identification of species that are consumed by vertebrate predators is necessary for understanding marine food webs. Morphological methods for identifying prey components after consumption often fail to make accurate identifications of invertebrates because prey morphology becomes damaged during capture, ingestion and digestion. Another disadvantage of morphological methods for prey identification is that they often involve sampling procedures that are disruptive for the predator, such as stomach flushing or lethal collection. We have developed a DNA-based method for identifying species of krill (Crustacea: Malacostraca), an enormously abundant group of invertebrates that are directly consumed by many groups of marine vertebrates. The DNA-based approach allows identification of krill species present in samples of vertebrate stomach contents, vomit, and, more importantly, faeces. Utilizing samples of faeces from vertebrate predators minimizes the impact of dietary studies on the subject animals. We demonstrate our method first on samples of Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) stomach contents, where DNA-based species identification can be confirmed by prey morphology. We then apply the method to faeces of Adelie penguins and to faeces of the endangered pygmy blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda). In each of these cases, krill species consumed by the predators could be identified from their DNA present in faeces or stomach contents.

  18. Novel web service selection model based on discrete group search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jie; Shao, Zhiqing; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Haiteng

    2014-01-01

    In our earlier work, we present a novel formal method for the semiautomatic verification of specifications and for describing web service composition components by using abstract concepts. After verification, the instantiations of components were selected to satisfy the complex service performance constraints. However, selecting an optimal instantiation, which comprises different candidate services for each generic service, from a large number of instantiations is difficult. Therefore, we present a new evolutionary approach on the basis of the discrete group search service (D-GSS) model. With regard to obtaining the optimal multiconstraint instantiation of the complex component, the D-GSS model has competitive performance compared with other service selection models in terms of accuracy, efficiency, and ability to solve high-dimensional service composition component problems. We propose the cost function and the discrete group search optimizer (D-GSO) algorithm and study the convergence of the D-GSS model through verification and test cases.

  19. Blood grouping based on PCR methods and agarose gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2015-01-01

    The study of erythrocyte antigens continues to be an intense field of research, particularly after the development of molecular testing methods. More than 300 specificities have been described by the International Society for Blood Transfusion as belonging to 33 blood group systems. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a central tool for red blood cells (RBC) genotyping. PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis are low cost, easy, and versatile in vitro methods for amplifying defined target DNA (RBC polymorphic region). Multiplex-PCR, AS-PCR (Specific Allele Polymerase Chain Reaction), and RFLP-PCR (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism-Polymerase Chain Reaction) techniques are usually to identify RBC polymorphisms. Furthermore, it is an easy methodology to implement. This chapter describes the PCR methodology and agarose gel electrophoresis to identify the polymorphisms of the Kell, Duffy, Kidd, and MNS blood group systems.

  20. Future Development Strategies for S Group Based on SWOT Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guohui; QI; Ligen; CHEN

    2014-01-01

    In recent years,the real estate development enterprises are facing the gradually increased government’s macro-control,and the increasingly fierce market competition,so it is very imperative to timely adjust and change the enterprises’ development strategies to adapt to the new development situation.With S Group as the study object,we use SWOT analysis to analyze the company’s internal and external environment,study the current situation of the company and the existing problems,and clearly point out the opportunities and challenges facing the company.Finally we put forth some targeted strategic recommendations,in order to provide a reference for the development of S Group.

  1. Examining the effectiveness of discriminant function analysis and cluster analysis in species identification of male field crickets based on their calling songs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Jaiswara

    Full Text Available Traditional taxonomy based on morphology has often failed in accurate species identification owing to the occurrence of cryptic species, which are reproductively isolated but morphologically identical. Molecular data have thus been used to complement morphology in species identification. The sexual advertisement calls in several groups of acoustically communicating animals are species-specific and can thus complement molecular data as non-invasive tools for identification. Several statistical tools and automated identifier algorithms have been used to investigate the efficiency of acoustic signals in species identification. Despite a plethora of such methods, there is a general lack of knowledge regarding the appropriate usage of these methods in specific taxa. In this study, we investigated the performance of two commonly used statistical methods, discriminant function analysis (DFA and cluster analysis, in identification and classification based on acoustic signals of field cricket species belonging to the subfamily Gryllinae. Using a comparative approach we evaluated the optimal number of species and calling song characteristics for both the methods that lead to most accurate classification and identification. The accuracy of classification using DFA was high and was not affected by the number of taxa used. However, a constraint in using discriminant function analysis is the need for a priori classification of songs. Accuracy of classification using cluster analysis, which does not require a priori knowledge, was maximum for 6-7 taxa and decreased significantly when more than ten taxa were analysed together. We also investigated the efficacy of two novel derived acoustic features in improving the accuracy of identification. Our results show that DFA is a reliable statistical tool for species identification using acoustic signals. Our results also show that cluster analysis of acoustic signals in crickets works effectively for species

  2. TXTGate: profiling gene groups with text-based information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenisson, P.; Coessens, B.; Van Vooren, S.

    2004-01-01

    We implemented a framework called TXTGate that combines literature indices of selected public biological resources in a flexible text-mining system designed towards the analysis of groups of genes. By means of tailored vocabularies, term-as well as gene-centric views are offered on selected textual...... fields and MEDLINE abstracts used in LocusLink and the Saccharomyces Genome Database. Subclustering and links to external resources allow for in-depth analysis of the resulting term profiles....

  3. Computational fragment-based binding site identification by ligand competitive saturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgun Guvench

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery using NMR and x-ray crystallographic methods has proven utility but also non-trivial time, materials, and labor costs. Current computational fragment-based approaches circumvent these issues but suffer from limited representations of protein flexibility and solvation effects, leading to difficulties with rigorous ranking of fragment affinities. To overcome these limitations we describe an explicit solvent all-atom molecular dynamics methodology (SILCS: Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation that uses small aliphatic and aromatic molecules plus water molecules to map the affinity pattern of a protein for hydrophobic groups, aromatic groups, hydrogen bond donors, and hydrogen bond acceptors. By simultaneously incorporating ligands representative of all these functionalities, the method is an in silico free energy-based competition assay that generates three-dimensional probability maps of fragment binding (FragMaps indicating favorable fragment:protein interactions. Applied to the two-fold symmetric oncoprotein BCL-6, the SILCS method yields two-fold symmetric FragMaps that recapitulate the crystallographic binding modes of the SMRT and BCOR peptides. These FragMaps account both for important sequence and structure differences in the C-terminal halves of the two peptides and also the high mobility of the BCL-6 His116 sidechain in the peptide-binding groove. Such SILCS FragMaps can be used to qualitatively inform the design of small-molecule inhibitors or as scoring grids for high-throughput in silico docking that incorporate both an atomic-level description of solvation and protein flexibility.

  4. Fuzzy Logic Based Group Maturity Rating for Software Performance Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Driven by market requirements, software services organizations have adopted various software engineering process models (such as capability maturity model (CMM), capability maturity model integration (CMMI), ISO 9001:2000, etc.) and practice of the project management concepts defined in the project management body of knowledge. While this has definitely helped organizations to bring some methods into the software development madness, there always exists a demand for comparing various groups within the organization in terms of the practice of these defined process models. Even though there exist many metrics for comparison, considering the variety of projects in terms of technology, life cycle, etc., finding a single metric that caters to this is a difficult task. This paper proposes a model for arriving at a rating on group maturity within the organization. Considering the linguistic or imprecise and uncertain nature of software measurements, fuzzy logic approach is used for the proposed model. Without the barriers like technology or life cycle difference, the proposed model helps the organization to compare different groups within it with reasonable precision.

  5. Bayesian-Pearson Divergence Estimator Based on Grouped Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BaoxueZhang; QingxunMeng

    2004-01-01

    A new method along with Bayesian approach for estimating the parameter in the distribution function F(x; θ) by using grouped data is developed in this paper. The support of F(x;θ) is divided into disjointed intervals as -∞ = x0 < x1 <… < xk-1 Grouped data are the numbers of observations falling in the intervals. This method can be applied to estimate not only the parameter in one population model but also the parameters in multi-population model which is subject to the order restrictions. For it is not easy to present the prior distribution of the parameter θ in F(x; θ) by grouped data directly, it is considered the prior distribution of the probabilities of observations falling in the intervals denoted by pj(θ) = F(xj; θ) - F(xj-1; θ), j = 1,..., k. The probabilities follow the multivariate distribution and can be regarded as the function of the parameter θ. Pearson divergence D(p; q) is introduced to scale the distance between the probabilities pj(θ),j = 1,..., k and the samples from the posterior distribution (Dirichlet distribution) of the probabilities. Then by minimizing the Pearson divergence D(p;q), the ‘posterior' samples of the parameter θ can be obtained, through which statistical inference including Bayesian-Pearson Divergence Estimator of the parameter can be processed. Simulations and a numerical example emt:loying this method are presented.

  6. Supplier Selection Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets Group Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of suppliers had always been a key point of the supply chain management, directly impact the operation of supply chain. In this context, firstly introduced the study situation of supplier selection, established the evaluation index system based on the research and then puts forward a new method for supplier selection based on intuitionistic fuzzy sets. Finally, using an example to illustrate the application of indicators and the method provides a new method for supplier selection.

  7. Identification of forensic samples by using an infrared-based automatic DNA sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Ugo; Sani, Ilaria; Klintschar, Michael; Cerri, Nicoletta; De Ferrari, Francesco; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa

    2003-06-01

    We have recently introduced a new protocol for analyzing all core loci of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) with an infrared (IR) automatic DNA sequencer (LI-COR 4200). The amplicons were labeled with forward oligonucleotide primers, covalently linked to a new infrared fluorescent molecule (IRDye 800). The alleles were displayed as familiar autoradiogram-like images with real-time detection. This protocol was employed for paternity testing, population studies, and identification of degraded forensic samples. We extensively analyzed some simulated forensic samples and mixed stains (blood, semen, saliva, bones, and fixed archival embedded tissues), comparing the results with donor samples. Sensitivity studies were also performed for the four multiplex systems. Our results show the efficiency, reliability, and accuracy of the IR system for the analysis of forensic samples. We also compared the efficiency of the multiplex protocol with ultraviolet (UV) technology. Paternity tests, undegraded DNA samples, and real forensic samples were analyzed with this approach based on IR technology and with UV-based automatic sequencers in combination with commercially-available kits. The comparability of the results with the widespread UV methods suggests that it is possible to exchange data between laboratories using the same core group of markers but different primer sets and detection methods.

  8. Physics-Based Identification, Modeling and Risk Management for Aeroelastic Flutter and Limit-Cycle Oscillations (LCO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research program will develop a physics-based identification, modeling and risk management infrastructure for aeroelastic transonic flutter and...

  9. Genomic identification of WRKY transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota) and analysis of evolution and homologous groups for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tian, Chang; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-03-15

    WRKY transcription factors belong to one of the largest transcription factor families. These factors possess functions in plant growth and development, signal transduction, and stress response. Here, we identified 95 DcWRKY genes in carrot based on the carrot genomic and transcriptomic data, and divided them into three groups. Phylogenetic analysis of WRKY proteins from carrot and Arabidopsis divided these proteins into seven subgroups. To elucidate the evolution and distribution of WRKY transcription factors in different species, we constructed a schematic of the phylogenetic tree and compared the WRKY family factors among 22 species, which including plants, slime mold and protozoan. An in-depth study was performed to clarify the homologous factor groups of nine divergent taxa in lower and higher plants. Based on the orthologous factors between carrot and Arabidopsis, 38 DcWRKY proteins were calculated to interact with other proteins in the carrot genome. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that DcWRKY20 can interact with DcMAPK1 and DcMAPK4. The expression patterns of the selected DcWRKY genes based on transcriptome data and qRT-PCR suggested that those selected DcWRKY genes are involved in root development, biotic and abiotic stress response. This comprehensive analysis provides a basis for investigating the evolution and function of WRKY genes.

  10. Evaluating Projects Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Group Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Daneshvar Rouyendegh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various methods regarding project selection in different fields. This paper deals with an actual application of construction project selection, using two aggregation operators. First, the opinion of experts is used in a model of group decision making called intuitionistic fuzzy TOPSIS (IFT. Secondly, project evaluation is formulated by dynamic intuitionistic fuzzy weighted averaging (DIFWA. Intuitionistic fuzzy weighted averaging (IFWA operator is utilized to aggregate individual opinions of decision makers (DMs for rating the importance of criteria and alternatives. A numerical example for project selection is given to clarify the main developed result in this paper.

  11. Cleaners' experiences with group-based workplace physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Lasse; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    month post-intervention. We analyzed interview data using Systematic Text Condensation. Findings: Participants learned to use their bodies in new ways. Group training permitted social breaks from work, enforcing colleague unity. Participants did not perceive training as stressful, although working...... for implementation seem to be important for sustained effects of health-promotion interventions in the workplace. Originality: The social character of the physical training facilitated a community of practice, which potentially supported the learning of new competencies, and how to improve the organization...

  12. PASSWORD BASED SCHEME AND GROUP TESTING FOR DEFENDING DDOS ATTACKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinuthala Sruthi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DOS ATTACKS ARE ONE OF THE TOP SECURITY PROBLEMS AFFECTING NETWORKS AND DISRUPTING SERVICES TO LEGITIMATE USERS. THE VITAL STEP IN DEALING WITH THIS PROBLEM IS THE NETWORK'S ABILITY TO DETECT SUCH ATTACKS. APPLICATION DDOS ATTACK, WHICH AIMS AT DISRUPTING APPLICATION SERVICE RATHER THAN DEPLETING THE NETWORK RESOURCE. UP TO NOW ALL THE RESEARCHES MADE ON THIS DDOS ATTACKS ONLY CONCENTRATES EITHER ON NETWORK RESOURCES OR ON APPLICATION SERVERS BUT NOT ON BOTH. IN THIS PAPER WE PROPOSED A SOLUTION FOR BOTH THESE PROBLEMS BY AUTHENTICATION METHODS AND GROUP TESTING.

  13. Nuclide identification algorithm based on K-L transform and neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Liang [Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education (China)], E-mail: cliang00@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Wei Yixiang [Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education (China)

    2009-01-11

    Traditional spectrum analysis algorithm based on peak search is hard to deal with complex overlapped peaks, especially in bad resolution and high background conditions. This paper described a new nuclide identification method based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (K-L transform) and artificial neural networks. By the K-L transform and feature extraction, the nuclide gamma spectrum was compacted. The K-L transform coefficients were used as the neural network's input. The linear associative memory and ADALINE were discussed. Lots of experiments and tests showed that the method was credible and practical, especially suitable for fast nuclide identification.

  14. Nuclide identification algorithm based on K-L transform and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Wei, Yi-Xiang

    2009-01-01

    Traditional spectrum analysis algorithm based on peak search is hard to deal with complex overlapped peaks, especially in bad resolution and high background conditions. This paper described a new nuclide identification method based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (K-L transform) and artificial neural networks. By the K-L transform and feature extraction, the nuclide gamma spectrum was compacted. The K-L transform coefficients were used as the neural network's input. The linear associative memory and ADALINE were discussed. Lots of experiments and tests showed that the method was credible and practical, especially suitable for fast nuclide identification.

  15. A Feature-Weighted Instance-Based Learner for Deep Web Search Interface Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Determining whether a site has a search interface is a crucial priority for further research of deep web databases. This study first reviews the current approaches employed in search interface identification for deep web databases. Then, a novel identification scheme using hybrid features and a feature-weighted instance-based learner is put forward. Experiment results show that the proposed scheme is satisfactory in terms of classification accuracy and our feature-weighted instance-based learner gives better results than classical algorithms such as C4.5, random forest and KNN.

  16. In Search of Autocorrelation Based Vocal Cord Cues for Speaker Identification

    CERN Document Server

    Sahidullah, Md

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a technique to find out vocal source based features from the LP residual of speech signal for automatic speaker identification. Autocorrelation with some specific lag is computed for the residual signal to derive these features. Compared to traditional features like MFCC, PLPCC which represent vocal tract information, these features represent complementary vocal cord information. Our experiment in fusing these two sources of information in representing speaker characteristics yield better speaker identification accuracy. We have used Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based speaker modeling and results are shown on two public databases to validate our proposition.

  17. A Decision Making Method for the Quality Identification of Wines Based on Fuzzy Soft Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wei Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality identification of wines is a crucial one for wine industry. The paper aims to give a decision making approach based on soft fuzzy sets for it. First, based on fuzzy soft sets, calculation steps are given to solve decision making problems. The grey relative coefficient between each alternative with the ideal alternative is calculated by grey relational analysis (GRA. Then, a relative relational degree is defined to determine ranking orders of all alternatives. Finally, an application of our proposed approach demonstrates its practicality and effectiveness in the quality identification of red wines.

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF THE MAIN FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN THE DRY GRASSLANDS OF FESTUCETALIA VALESIACAE FROM NORTH-EASTERN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin MARDARI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant functional traits and plant functional groups are increasingly used to assess the effect of the change in land use on plant species or plant communities, in nature conservation projects, to detect patterns in the expansion some invasive species or to asses the processes of succession or competition in plant communities. In this study, the main objective was to identify the main plant functional groups (based on plant traits which co-exist in different plant communities of the dry grasslands (Festucetalia valesiacae from North-Eastern Romania using the RLQ analysis (considering the plant traits, environment characteristics and vegetation. As RLQ analysis mainly revealed a soil moisture-soil nutrients gradient along the first axis, a transition from species with traits specific to more dry conditions and less available nutrients to moister and higher nutrients availability sites was observed (from perennial species with short flowering range and traits oriented to resources retention in storage organs to annual species with long flowering range and traits oriented to resource acquisition. Plant functional groups were identified using species scores along the first two RLQ axes via k-means clustering which generated six groups displayed along the above mentioned gradients. The floristic composition of the identified functional groups suggested that, in the context of Festucetalia valesiacae vegetation type from North-Eastern Romania, plant communities developed in areas with lower values for soil moisture and nutrients could possibly be richer in autochore and barochore geophyte and hemicryptophyte species with short flowering range and mixed reproduction type. As soil moisture and nutrients increase, in the floristic composition could possibly occur more anthropochore and zoochore therophyte species with long flowering range, mainly reproducing by seeds and, also, some taller endozoochore shrubs species.

  19. Attitudes of older adults in a group-based exercise program towards a blended intervention; a focus-group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Mehra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise programs, older adults participating in such interventions often do not meet the frequency, intensity or duration of exercises needed to gain health benefits. An exercise program that combines the advantages of group-based exercises led by an instructor with tailored home-based exercises can increase the effectiveness. Technology can assist in delivering a personalized program. The aim of the study was to determine the susceptibility of older adults currently participating in a nationwide group-based exercise program to such a blended exercise program. Eight focus-groups were held with adults of 55 years of age or older. Two researchers coded independently the remarks of the 30 participants that were included in the analysis according to the three key concepts of the Self Determination Theory: autonomy, competence and relatedness. The results show that maintaining self-reliance and keeping in touch with others were the main motives to participate in the weekly group-based exercises. Participants recognized benefits of doing additional home-based exercises, but had concerns regarding guidance, safety and motivation. Furthermore, some participants strongly rejected the idea to use technology to support them in doing exercises at home, but the majority was open to it. Insights are discussed how these findings can help design novel interventions that can increase the wellbeing of older adults and preserve an independent living.

  20. System for Anonymous Data Collection Based on Group Signature Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Troják

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an anonymous data collection in the Internet of Things (IoT. the privacy and anonymity of the data source is important for many IoT applications, such as in agriculture, health, and automotive. the proposed data‑collection system provides anonymity for the data sources by applying a cooperation group scheme. the group scheme also provides a low power consumption. the system is built upon the Tor (The Onion Router anonymous network, which is a part of the Internet darknet. the proposed system was designed for the Android devices on the client side and for Java environment on the server side. We evaluated the anonymous data collection in a real‑use scenario that covers selected data acquisition (e.g. signal strength from smartphones triggered by their geographical location change. the results show that the proposed system provides the sufficient data source anonymity, an effective revocation, a low computational cost and a low overhead.