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Sample records for group hmg transcription

  1. Quantitative changes of high mobility group non-histone chromosomal proteins HMG1 and HMG2 during rooster spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva, M; Mezquita, C

    1983-10-17

    The quantitative changes of a group of non-histone chromosomal proteins identified by its solubility, electrophoretic mobility and amino acid analysis as the high mobility group proteins HMG1 and HMG2, were studied throughout rooster spermatogenesis. The ratio HMG1/HMG2 remained constant (0.66 +/- 0.04) during the transition from dividing meiotic and premeiotic cells to nondividing spermatids and from transcriptionally active cells (spermatogonia, spermatocytes and early spermatids) to transcriptionally inactive late spermatids. The ratios HMG1/nucleosomal histone and HMG2/nucleosomal histone increased markedly at the end of spermiogenesis during the transition from nucleohistone to nucleoprotamine when nucleosomes are being disassembled. The high mobility group chromosomal proteins HMG1 and HMG2 were not detectable in the nuclei of rooster spermatozoa.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the control of ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegardt, F G

    1998-10-01

    Mitochondrial and cytosolic HMG-CoA synthases are encoded by two different genes. Control of ketogenesis is exerted by transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. Fasting, cAMP, and fatty acids increase its transcriptional rate, while refeeding and insulin repress it. Fatty acids increase transcription through peroxisomal proliferator regulatory element (PPRE), to which peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) can bind. Other transcription factors such as chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) compete for the PPRE site, modulating the response of PPAR.

  3. Dual function of Ixr1 in transcriptional regulation and recognition of cisplatin-DNA adducts is caused by differential binding through its two HMG-boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizoso-Vázquez, A; Lamas-Maceiras, M; Fernández-Leiro, R; Rico-Díaz, A; Becerra, M; Cerdán, M E

    2017-02-01

    Ixr1 is a transcriptional factor involved in the response to hypoxia, which is also related to DNA repair. It binds to DNA through its two in-tandem high mobility group box (HMG-box) domains. Each function depends on recognition of different DNA structures, B-form DNA at specific consensus sequences for transcriptional regulation, or distorted DNA, like cisplatin-DNA adducts, for DNA repair. However, the contribution of the HMG-box domains in the Ixr1 protein to the formation of different protein-DNA complexes is poorly understood. We have biophysically and biochemically characterized these interactions with specific DNA sequences from the promoters regulated by Ixr1, or with cisplatin-DNA adducts. Both HMG-boxes are necessary for transcriptional regulation, and they are not functionally interchangeable. The in-tandem arrangement of their HMG-boxes is necessary for functional folding and causes sequential cooperative binding to specific DNA sequences, with HMG-box A showing a higher contribution to DNA binding and bending than the HMG-box B. Binding of Ixr1 HMG boxes to specific DNA sequences is entropy driven, whereas binding to platinated DNA is enthalpy driven for HMG-box A and entropy driven for HMG-box B. This is the first proof that HMG-box binding to different DNA structures is associated with predictable thermodynamic differences. Based on our study, we present a model to explain the dual function of Ixr1 in the regulation of gene expression and recognition of distorted DNA structures caused by cisplatin treatment.

  4. The active gene that encodes human High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1) contains introns and maps to chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, S. [Dipartimento di Genetica e di Biologia dei Microrganismi, Milan (Italy); Finelli, P.; Rocchi, M. [Istituto di Genetica, Bari (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    The human genome contains a large number of sequences related to the cDNA for High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1), which so far has hampered the cloning and mapping of the active HMG1 gene. We show that the human HMG1 gene contains introns, while the HMG1-related sequences do not and most likely are retrotransposed pseudogenes. We identified eight YACs from the ICI and CEPH libraries that contain the human HMG1 gene. The HMG1 gene is similar in structure to the previously characterized murine homologue and maps to human chromosome 13 and q12, as determined by in situ hybridization. The mouse Hmg1 gene maps to the telomeric region of murine Chromosome 5, which is syntenic to the human 13q12 band. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  5. HMG Modifications and Nuclear Function

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2010-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins assume important roles in regulating chromatin dynamics, transcriptional activities of genes and other cellular processes. Post-translational modifications of HMG proteins can alter their interactions with DNA and proteins, and consequently, affect their biological activities. Although the mechanisms through which these modifications are involved in regulating biological processes in different cellular contexts are not fully understood, new insights into the...

  6. Effect of high mobility group nonhistone proteins HMG-20 (ubiquitin) and HMG-17 on histone deacetylase activity assayed in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, J; Chiva, M; Vidal, S; Mezquita, C

    1982-03-11

    We have used a method previously described by Reeves and Candido (1) to partially release histone deacetylase from cell nuclei together with putative regulators of the enzyme. Histone deacetylase released from testis cell nuclei and its putative regulators were separated by gel filtration in Sepharose 6B. A peak of low molecular weight contains a heat-stable factor that stimulate histone deacetylase in vitro. Many of the properties of the activator coincide with those of the protein HMG-20 (ubiquitin). Ubiquitin isolated from testis cell nuclei stimulated histone deacetylase in vitro. It has been suggested that HMG-17 partially inhibits histone deacetylase in Fried cell nuclei (2). In our system, HMG-17 shows no inhibitory effect on histone deacetylase activity

  7. Development and degeneration of dorsal root ganglia in the absence of the HMG-domain transcription factor Sox10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenberg-Riethmacher, Eva; Miehe, Michaela; Stolt, Claus C.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The HMG-domain transcription factor Sox10 is essential for the development of various neural crest derived lineages including glia and neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Within the PNS the most striking defect is the complete absence of glial differentiation whereas neurogen......Abstract The HMG-domain transcription factor Sox10 is essential for the development of various neural crest derived lineages including glia and neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Within the PNS the most striking defect is the complete absence of glial differentiation whereas...... neurogenesis seemed initially normal. A degeneration of motoneurons and sensory neurons occurred later in development. The mechanism that leads to the dramatic effects on the neural crest derived cell lineages in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), however, has not been examined up to now. Here, we provide...

  8. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsook, Sarah N; Ni, Joyce; Shahangian, Shokofeh; Vakiloroayaei, Ana; Khan, Naveen; Kwan, Jamie J; Donaldson, Logan W

    2016-01-01

    Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG) domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors.

  9. The HMG box transcription factor Sox4 contributes to the development of the endocrine pancreas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, M.E.; Yang, K.Y.; Kalousova, A.; Janet, L.; Kosaka, Y.; Lynn, F.C.; Wang, J.; Mrejen, C.; Episkopou, V.; Clevers, J.C.; German, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the role of the Sry/hydroxymethylglutaryl box (Sox) transcription factors in the development of the pancreas, we determined the expression pattern of Sox factors in the developing mouse pancreas. By RT-PCR, we detected the presence of multiple Sox family members in both the developing

  10. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 gene maps to the Down syndrome region of human chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in mouse trisomy 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pash, J.; Popescu, N.; Matocha, M.; Rapoport, S.; Bustin, M. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The gene for human high-mobility-group (HMG) chromosomal protein HMG-14 is located in region 21q22.3, a region associated with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, one of the most prevalent human birth defects. The expression of this gene is analyzed in mouse embryos that are trisomic in chromosome 16 and are considered to be an animal model for Down syndrome. RNA blot-hybridization analysis and detailed analysis of HMG-14 protein levels indicate that mouse trisomy 16 embryos have approximately 1.5 times more HMG-14 mRNA and protein than their normal littermates, suggesting a direct gene dosage effect. The HMG-14 gene may be an additional marker for the Down syndrome. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 is a nucleosomal binding protein that may confer distinct properties to the chromatin structure of transcriptionally active genes and therefore may be a contributing factor in the etiology of the syndrome.

  11. Cell differentiation by interaction of two HMG-box proteins: Mat1-Mc activates M cell-specific genes in S.pombe by recruiting the ubiquitous transcription factor Ste11 to weak binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Dooijes, D; Clevers, H

    1997-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mfm1 gene is expressed in an M cell-specific fashion. This regulation requires two HMG-box proteins: the ubiquitous Ste11 transcription factor and the M cell-controlling protein Mat1-Mc. Here we report that the mfm1 promoter contains a single, weak Stell-binding site...

  12. Recent integrations of mammalian Hmg retropseudogenes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eillen Tecle; Leann Zielinski; David H. Kass

    2006-12-01

    We propose that select retropseudogenes of the high mobility group nonhistone chromosomal protein genes have recently integrated into mammalian genomes on the basis of the high sequence identity of the copies to the cDNA sequences derived from the original genes. These include the Hmg1 gene family in mice and the Hmgn2 family in humans. We investigated orthologous loci of several strains and species of Mus for presence or absence of apparently young Hmg1 retropseudogenes. Three of four analysed elements were specific to Mus musculus, two of which were not fixed, indicative of recent evolutionary origins. Additionally, we datamined a presumptive subfamily (Hmgz) of mouse Hmg1, but only identified one true element in the GenBank database, which is not consistent with a separate subfamily status. Two of four analysed Hmgn2 retropseudogenes were specific for the human genome, whereas a third was identified in human, chimpanzee and gorilla genomes, and a fourth additionally found in orangutan but absent in African green monkey. Flanking target-site duplications were consistent with LINE integration sites supporting LINE machinery for their mechanism of amplification. The human Hmgn2 retropseudogenes were full length, whereas the mouse Hmg1 elements were either full length or 3′-truncated at specific positions, most plausibly the result of use of alternative polyadenylation sites. The nature of their recent amplification success in relation to other retropseudogenes is unclear, although availability of a large number of transcripts during gametogenesis may be a reason. It is apparent that retropseudogenes continue to shape mammalian genomes, and may provide insight into the process of retrotransposition, as well as offer potential use as phylogenetic markers.

  13. In vivo identification of promoter elements and transcription factors mediating activation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase by T{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Lindsey R.; Niesen, Melissa I. [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Jaroszeski, Mark [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Ness, Gene C., E-mail: gness@hsc.usf.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2009-07-31

    The promoter elements and transcription factors necessary for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) induction of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) were investigated by transfecting rat livers with wild type and mutant HMGR promoter-luciferase constructs using in vivo electroporation. Mutations in the sterol response element (SRE), nuclear factor-y (NF-Y) site, and the newly identified upstream transcription factor-2 (USF-2) site essentially abolished the T{sub 3} response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that T{sub 3} treatment caused a 4-fold increase in in vivo binding of USF-2 to the HMGR promoter. Co-transfection of the wild type HMGR promoter with siRNAs to USF-2, SREBP-2, or NF-Y nearly abolished the T{sub 3} induction, as measured by promoter activity. These data provide in vivo evidence for functional roles for USF-2, SREBP-2, and NF-Y in mediating the T{sub 3}-induction of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  14. Interactions between HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) and humanε-globin gene promoter(ε-promoter)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins are abundant non-histone proteins in the nuclei of eukaryocytes. It has been shown that HMG proteins may play important roles in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, thebinding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the human ε-globin gene promoter (ε-promo- ter, -177-+1 bp) has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA). We found that HMG1/2 proteins could bind to the naked ε-promoter DNA, however, HMG14/17 could not. Using the in vitro nucleosome recons- titution, we revealed that HMG14/17 could bind to the mononucleosome reconstituted in vitro with ε-promoter,whi- le HMG1/2 could not. Those results indicate that the binding of HMG proteins to ε-promoter is dynamic as the nucleo- some assembling and disassembling. Wespeculated that this selective binding of HMG proteins to ε-promoter might playa critical role in the regulation of ε-globin gene expression.

  15. The HMG-box transcription factor Sox4b is required for pituitary expression of gata2a and specification of thyrotrope and gonadotrope cells in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yobhana; Lopez, Mauricio; Mavropoulos, Anastasia; Motte, Patrick; Martial, Joseph A; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Muller, Marc

    2012-06-01

    The pituitary is a complex gland comprising different cell types each secreting specific hormones. The extensive network of signaling molecules and transcription factors required for determination and terminal differentiation of specific cell types is still not fully understood. The SRY-like HMG-box (SOX) transcription factor Sox4 plays important roles in many developmental processes and has two homologs in zebrafish, Sox4a and Sox4b. We show that the sox4b gene is expressed in the pituitary anlagen starting at 24 h after fertilization (hpf) and later in the entire head region including the pituitary. At 48 hpf, sox4b mRNA colocalizes with that for TSH (tshβ), glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα), and the Zn finger transcription factor Gata2a. Loss of Sox4b function, using morpholino knockdown or expression of a dominant-negative Sox4 mutant, leads to a drastic decrease in tshβ and gsuα expression and reduced levels of gh, whereas other anterior pituitary gland markers including prl, slβ, pomc, and lim3 are not affected. Sox4b is also required for expression of gata2a in the pituitary. Knockdown of gata2a leads to decreased tshβ and gsuα expression at 48 hpf, similar to sox4b morphants. Injection of gata2a mRNA into sox4b morphants rescued tshβ and gsuα expression in thyrotrope cells. Finally, sox4b or gata2a knockdown causes a significant decrease of gonadotropin expression (lhβ and fshβ) at 4 d after fertilization. In summary, our results indicate that Sox4b is expressed in zebrafish during pituitary development and plays a crucial role in the differentiation of thyrotrope and gonadotrope cells through induction of gata2a expression in the developing pituitary.

  16. Haploinsufficiency of SOX5, a member of the SOX (SRY-related HMG-box) family of transcription factors is a cause of intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanze, Ina; Schanze, Denny; Bacino, Carlos A; Douzgou, Sofia; Kerr, Bronwyn; Zenker, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition; the cause is unknown in most non-specific and sporadic cases. To establish an etiological basis in those patients represents a difficult challenge. Over the last years it has become apparent that chromosomal rearrangements below the detection level of conventional karyotyping contribute significantly to the cause of ID. We present three patients with non-specific intellectual disability who all have overlapping microdeletions in the chromosomal region 12p12.1. De novo occurrence of the deletion could be proven in the two cases from which parental samples were available. All three identified deletions have different breakpoints and range in size from 120 kb to 4.9 Mb. The smallest deletion helps to narrow down the critical region to a genomic segment (chr12:23,924,800-24,041,698, build 37/hg19) encompassing only one gene, SOX5. SOX5 is a member of the SOX (SRY-related HMG-box) family of transcription factors shown to play roles in chondroblast function, oligodendrocyte differentiation and migration, as well as ensuring proper development of specific neuronal cell types. Because of these biological functions, mutations in SOX5 are predicted to cause complex disease syndromes, as it is the case for other SOX genes, but such mutations have not yet been identified. Our findings indicate that haploinsufficiency of SOX5 is a cause of intellectual disability without any striking physical anomalies.

  17. Activation of the HIV-1 enhancer by the LEF-1 HMG protein on nucleosome-assembled DNA in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P L; Sheline, C T; Cannon, K; Voz, M L; Pazin, M J; Kadonaga, J T; Jones, K A

    1995-09-01

    Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1) is a regulatory high mobility group (HMG) protein that activates the T cell receptor alpha (TCR alpha) enhancer in a context-restricted manner in T cells. In this paper we demonstrate that the distal region of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enhancer, which contains DNA-binding sites for LEF-1 and Ets-1, also provides a functional context for activation by LEF-1. First, we show that mutations in the LEF-1-binding site inhibit the activity of multimerized copies of the HIV-1 enhancer in Jurkat T cells, and that LEF-1/GAL4 can activate a GAL4-substituted HIV-1 enhancer 80- to 100-fold in vivo. Second, recombinant LEF-1 is shown to activate HIV-1 transcription on chromatin-assembled DNA in vitro. By using a nucleosome-assembly system derived from Drosophila embryos, we find that the packaging of DNA into chromatin in vitro strongly represses HIV-1 transcription and that repression can be counteracted efficiently by preincubation of the DNA with LEF-1 (or LEF-1 and Ets-1) supplemented with fractions containing the promoter-binding protein, Sp1. Addition of TFE-3, which binds to an E-box motif upstream of the LEF-1 and Ets-1 sites, further augments transcription in this system. Individually or collectively, none of the three enhancer-binding proteins (LEF-1, Ets-1, and TFE-3) could activate transcription in the absence of Sp1. A truncation mutant of LEF-1 (HMG-88), which contains the HMG box but lacks the trans-activation domain, did not activate transcription from nucleosomal DNA, indicating that bending of DNA by the HMG domain is not sufficient to activate transcription in vitro. We conclude that transcription activation by LEF-1 in vitro is a chromatin-dependent process that requires a functional trans-activation domain in addition to the HMG domain.

  18. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase induces the UPR pathway in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Hansen, Nadia Jin Storm; Pilon, Marc

    -requiring enzyme-1 (IRE-1), and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6). Using a transgenic GFP reporter strain of the model organism C. elegans, we have recently identified that inhibition of the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMG-CoAR) with Fluvastatin and knock down of HMG-CoAR using RNA interference (RNAi) both...

  19. Isolation and sequencing of the HMG domain of ten Sox genes from Odorrana schmackeri (Amphibia: Anura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Sox (SRY-related HMG-box genes encode a family of transcriptional regulators, which are characterized by a conserved 79-amino acid domain known as HMG-box. They play essential roles in a diverse range of processes including sex determination and the development of the central nervous system (CNS, neural crest and endoderm. In this paper, the HMG domain of ten distinct Sox gene family members (os-Sox2, os-Sox3a, os-Sox3b, os-Sox4, os-Sox11a, os-Sox11b, os-Sox14a, os-Sox14b, os-Sox21a, os-Sox21b were isolated from both male and female Odorrana schmackeri (Boettger, 1892 using PCR, and no sexual differences were found. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the HMG domain suggested that these ten Sox genes are members of the SoxB and SoxC groups. In addition, sequence analysis suggested that four Sox genes (os-Sox3, os-Sox11, os-Sox14, os-Sox21 were duplicated. The duplication-degeneration-complementation model should be implied to explain the evolution and diversity of the Sox gene family in O. schmackeri.

  20. Transcriptional regulation by Polycomb group proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Croce, Luciano; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of transcription that have key roles in stem-cell identity, differentiation and disease. Mechanistically, they function within multiprotein complexes, called Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs), which modify histones (and other proteins......) and silence target genes. The dynamics of PRC1 and PRC2 components has been the focus of recent research. Here we discuss our current knowledge of the PRC complexes, how they are targeted to chromatin and how the high diversity of the PcG proteins allows these complexes to influence cell identity....

  1. Structural basis of human transcription factor Sry-related box 17 binding to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nana; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Hai; Cheng, Zhong; Qian, Huolian; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Sry-related box (Sox) transcription factors share a conserved high-mobility-group box domain (HMG-domain) that binds DNA in the minor groove and bends DNA for further assembly of transcriptional machineries. During organogenesis, each member of the Sox family triggers a specific cell lineage differentiation, indicating that their interactions with DNA are different from each other. Therefore, investigating structural rearrangement of each Sox transcription factor HMG-domain upon binding to DNA would help to elucidate the distinctive molecular mechanism by which they interact with DNA. Previous studies have determined the crystal structures of Sox2 HMG-domain/DNA, Sox4 HMGdomain/ DNA, Sox9 HMG-domain/DNA and Sox17 HMG-domain/DNA complexes. However, major gaps remain in the structural information on the Sox transcription factor HMG-domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human Sox17 HMG-domain alone at 2.4 A resolution. Comparing this structure and the structure of the mouse Sox17 HMGdomain/ DNA complex provides structural understanding of the mechanism of Sox17 binding to DNA. Specifically, after electrostatic interactions attract Sox17 to DNA, Asn73, Ser99, and Trp106 form hydrogen bonds with DNA, Arg70, Lys80, Arg83, His94, and Asn95 on Sox17 undergo conformational changes and form hydrogen bonds with DNA, contributing to the electrostatic interaction between Sox17 and DNA.

  2. DNA intercalators induce specific release of HMG 14, HMG 17 and other DNA-binding proteins from chicken erythrocyte chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, H; Maier, G; Ponstingl, H; Nordheim, A

    1985-01-01

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei were incubated with DNA intercalating agents in order to isolate from chromatin specific DNA-binding proteins whose binding specificity may be determined by DNA secondary and/or tertiary structure. The intercalating agents ethidium bromide (EtBr) and propidium iodide induce the specific release of high mobility group proteins HMG 14 and HMG 17 under low ionic strength conditions. Chloroquine (CQ) intercalation also results in the selective liberation of HMG 14 and HMG 17, but, in addition, selectively releases other nuclear proteins (including histone H1A) in a pH- and ionic strength-dependent fashion. The use of this new 'elutive intercalation' technique for the isolation and purification of 'sequence-specific' and 'helix-specific' DNA-binding proteins is suggested. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:4092697

  3. High mobility group protein DSP1 negatively regulates HSP70 transcription in Crassostrea hongkongensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zongyu; Xu, Delin; Cui, Miao; Zhang, Qizhong, E-mail: zhangqzdr@126.com

    2016-06-10

    HSP70 acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays important roles in facilitating the folding of nascent peptides as well as the refolding or degradation of the denatured proteins. Under stressed conditions, the expression level of HSP70 is upregulated significantly and rapidly, as is known to be achieved by various regulatory factors controlling the transcriptional level. In this study, a high mobility group protein DSP1 was identified by DNA-affinity purification from the nuclear extracts of Crassostrea hongkongensis using the ChHSP70 promoter as a bait. The specific interaction between the prokaryotically expressed ChDSP1 and the FITC-labeled ChHSP70 promoter was confirmed by EMSA analysis. ChDSP1 was shown to negatively regulate ChHSP70 promoter expression by Luciferase Reporter Assay in the heterologous HEK293T cells. Both ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were induced by either thermal or CdCl{sub 2} stress, while the accumulated expression peaks of ChDSP1 were always slightly delayed when compared with that of ChHSP70. This indicates that ChDSP1 is involved, very likely to exert its suppressive role, in the recovery of the ChHSP70 expression from the induced level to its original state. This study is the first to report negative regulator of HSP70 gene transcription, and provides novel insights into the mechanisms controlling heat shock protein expression. -- Highlights: •HMG protein ChDSP1 shows affinity to ChHSP70 promoter in Crassostrea hongkongensis. •ChDSP1 negatively regulates ChHSP70 transcription. •ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were coordinately induced by thermal/Cd stress. •ChDSP1 may contribute to the recovery of the induced ChHSP70 to its original state. •This is the first report regarding negative regulator of HSP70 transcription.

  4. HMG I-like proteins from leaf and nodule nuclei interact with different AT motifs in soybean nodulin promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, K; Laursen, N B; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    1990-01-01

    affinity. The LAT1 and NAT1 factors were released from chromatin by extraction with a low-salt buffer and were soluble in 2% trichloroacetic acid, implying a relationship to high-mobility group (HMG) proteins. DNA binding studies further indicated a functional relationship of these factors to the human HMG...

  5. Polycomb group protein-mediated repression of transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morey, Lluís; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. They form multi-protein complexes that work as transcriptional repressors of several thousand genes controlling differentiation pathways during development. How the PcG proteins work...

  6. HMG-box sequences from microbats homologous to the human SOX30 HMG-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullejos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R; Barragán, M J; Sánchez, A

    2000-01-01

    SOX genes are a family of genes that encode for proteins which are characterised by the presence of a HMG-domain related to that of the mammalian sex-determining gene (SRY). By definition, the DNA binding domain of SOX genes is at least 50% identical to the 79 amino acid HMG domain of the SRY gene. We report here two HMG-box sequences from two microbat species (R. ferrumequinum and P. Pipistrellus) which were PCR amplified using a primer pair specific to the mouse Sry HMG-box. The high percentage of identity of this sequences with the human and mouse SOX30 HMG-box suggests that they are the SOX30 HMG-box for these two bat species.

  7. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the HMG domain of the chondrogenesis master regulator Sox9 in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified DNA element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, Saravanan; Moovarkumudalvan, Balasubramanian; Lescar, Julien; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2015-11-01

    Sox9 is a fundamental sex-determining gene and the master regulator of chondrogenesis, and is involved in the development of various vital organs such as testes, kidney, heart and brain, and in skeletal development. Similar to other known Sox transcription factors, Sox9 recognizes and binds DNA with the consensus sequence C(T/A)TTG(T/A)(T/A) through the highly conserved HMG domain. Nonetheless, the molecular basis of the functional specificity of Sox9 in key developmental processes is still unclear. As an initial step towards a mechanistic understanding of Sox9 transcriptional regulation, the current work describes the details of the purification of the mouse Sox9 HMG domain (mSox9HMG), its crystallization in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified FOXP2 promoter DNA element and the X-ray diffraction data analysis of this complex. The mSox9HMG-FOXP2 promoter DNA complex was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 20% PEG 3350 in 200 mM sodium/potassium phosphate with 100 mM bis-tris propane at pH 8.5. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and the complex crystallized in the tetragonal space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 99.49, c = 45.89 Å. Crystal-packing parameters revealed that asymmetric unit contained one mSox9HMG-FOXP2 promoter DNA complex with an estimated solvent content of 64%.

  8. AKNA: Another AT-hook transcription factor"hooking-up"with inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alison R Moliterno; Linda MS Resar

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies highlight a key role for AT-hook transcription factors as master regulators of fundamental cellular processes involved in development,immune function,cancer,diabetes and other human diseases [1,2].The high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins are an important family of AT-hook chromatin remodeling proteins that orchestrate transcriptional complexes to regulate gene expression [ 1 ].Recent studies have uncovered links between HMG AT-hook transcription factors and inflammation [1-8].

  9. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS). RESULTS: Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46) of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93); p = 0.03) when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. CONCLUSION: HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  10. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher William M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC on tissue microarrays (TMA consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS. Results Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46 of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93; p = 0.03 when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. Conclusion HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  11. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2010-04-01

    Abstract Background Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS). Results Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46) of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93); p = 0.03) when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. Conclusion HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  12. An HMG1-like protein facilitates Wnt signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lily I.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    1999-01-01

    We show that during Caenorhabditis elegans male spicule development, the specification of a glial versus neuronal cell fate in a canonical neurogenic sublineage is dependent on Wnt signaling. Inactivation of a Wnt signaling pathway mediated by the Wnt receptor LIN-17 transforms the SPD sheath cell into its sister, the SPD neuron. We discovered a new mutant, son-1, that displays this same cell fate transformation. The son-1 mutation enhances the phenotypes of reduction-of-function lin-17 mutants in several developmental processes, including vulva development, somatic gonad development, and male tail patterning. son-1 encodes an HMG1/2-like DNA-binding protein and is localized in all cell nuclei through development as revealed by a GFP reporter construct. Disruption of son-1 function by RNA-mediated interference results in the same spicule defect as caused by overexpression of POP-1, a TCF/LEF class HMG protein known to act downstream of the Wnt signaling pathway. Our results provide in vivo evidence for the functional involvement of an HMG1/2-like protein, SON-1, in Wnt signaling. The sequence nonspecific HMG protein SON-1 and the sequence specific HMG protein POP-1 might both act in the Wnt responding cells to regulate gene transcription in opposite directions. PMID:10197987

  13. Characterization of splice variants of the genes encoding human mitochondrial HMG-CoA lyase and HMG-CoA synthase, the main enzymes of the ketogenesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisac, Beatriz; Ramos, Mónica; Arnedo, María; Menao, Sebastián; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Pié, Angeles; de Karam, Juan Carlos; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Giménez, Ignacio; Ramos, Feliciano J; Casals, Nuria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Pié, Juan

    2012-04-01

    The genes HMGCS2 and HMGCL encode the two main enzymes for ketone-body synthesis, mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA lyase. Here, we identify and describe possible splice variants of these genes in human tissues. We detected an alternative transcript of HMGCS2 carrying a deletion of exon 4, and two alternative transcripts of HMGCL with deletions of exons 5 and 6, and exons 5, 6 and 7, respectively. All splice variants maintained the reading frame. However, Western blot studies and overexpression measurements in eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell models did not reveal HL or mHS protein variants. Both genes showed a similar distribution of the inactive variants in different tissues. Surprisingly, the highest percentages were found in tissues where almost no ketone bodies are synthesized: heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Our results suggest that alternative splicing might coordinately block the two main enzymes of ketogenesis in specific human tissues.

  14. High affinity binding of proteins HMG1 and HMG2 to semicatenated DNA loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strauss François

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins HMG1 and HMG2 are two of the most abundant non histone proteins in the nucleus of mammalian cells, and contain a domain of homology with many proteins implicated in the control of development, such as the sex-determination factor Sry and the Sox family of proteins. In vitro studies of interactions of HMG1/2 with DNA have shown that these proteins can bind to many unusual DNA structures, in particular to four-way junctions, with binding affinities of 107 to 109 M-1. Results Here we show that HMG1 and HMG2 bind with a much higher affinity, at least 4 orders of magnitude higher, to a new structure, Form X, which consists of a DNA loop closed at its base by a semicatenated DNA junction, forming a DNA hemicatenane. The binding constant of HMG1 to Form X is higher than 5 × 1012 M-1, and the half-life of the complex is longer than one hour in vitro. Conclusions Of all DNA structures described so far with which HMG1 and HMG2 interact, we have found that Form X, a DNA loop with a semicatenated DNA junction at its base, is the structure with the highest affinity by more than 4 orders of magnitude. This suggests that, if similar structures exist in the cell nucleus, one of the functions of these proteins might be linked to the remarkable property of DNA hemicatenanes to associate two distant regions of the genome in a stable but reversible manner.

  15. Non-histone chromosomal proteins HMG1 and 2 enhance ligation reaction of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaki, S; Yamamoto, M; Yumoto, Y; Shirakawa, H; Yoshida, M; Teraoka, H

    1998-05-08

    DNA ligase IV in a complex with XRCC4 is responsible for DNA end-joining in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and V(D)J recombination. We found that non-histone chromosomal high mobility group (HMG) proteins 1 and 2 enhanced the ligation of linearized pUC119 DNA with DNA ligase IV from rat liver nuclear extract. Intra-molecular and inter-molecular ligations of cohesive-ended and blunt-ended DNA were markedly stimulated by HMG1 and 2. Recombinant HMG2-domain A, B, and (A + B) polypeptides were similarly, but non-identically, effective for the stimulation of DSB ligation reaction. Ligation of single-strand breaks (nicks) was only slightly activated by the HMG proteins. The DNA end-binding Ku protein singly or in combination with the catalytic component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) as the DNA-PK holoenzyme was ineffective for the ligation of linearized pUC119 DNA. Although the stimulatory effect of HMG1 and 2 on ligation of DSB in vitro was not specific to DNA ligase IV, these results suggest that HMG1 and 2 are involved in the final ligation step in DNA end-joining processes of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination.

  16. Bipartite recognition of DNA by TCF/Pangolin is remarkably flexible and contributes to transcriptional responsiveness and tissue specificity of wingless signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary C Archbold

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The T-cell factor (TCF family of transcription factors are major mediators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in metazoans. All TCFs contain a High Mobility Group (HMG domain that possesses specific DNA binding activity. In addition, many TCFs contain a second DNA binding domain, the C-clamp, which binds to DNA motifs referred to as Helper sites. While HMG and Helper sites are both important for the activation of several Wnt dependent cis-regulatory modules (W-CRMs, the rules of what constitutes a functional HMG-Helper site pair are unknown. In this report, we employed a combination of in vitro binding, reporter gene analysis and bioinformatics to address this question, using the Drosophila family member TCF/Pangolin (TCF/Pan as a model. We found that while there were constraints for the orientation and spacing of HMG-Helper pairs, the presence of a Helper site near a HMG site in any orientation increased binding and transcriptional response, with some orientations displaying tissue-specific patterns. We found that altering an HMG-Helper site pair from a sub-optimal to optimal orientation/spacing dramatically increased the responsiveness of a W-CRM in several fly tissues. In addition, we used the knowledge gained to bioinformatically identify two novel W-CRMs, one that was activated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the prothoracic gland, a tissue not previously connected to this pathway. In sum, this work extends the importance of Helper sites in fly W-CRMs and suggests that the type of HMG-Helper pair is a major factor in setting the threshold for Wnt activation and tissue-responsiveness.

  17. Calmodulin-dependent nuclear import of HMG-box family nuclear factors: importance of the role of SRY in sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Delluc-Clavieres, Aurelie; Poon, Ivan K H; Forwood, Jade K; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A

    2010-08-15

    The HMG (high-mobility group)-box-containing chromatin-remodelling factor SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) plays a key role in sex determination. Its role in the nucleus is critically dependent on two NLSs (nuclear localization signals) that flank its HMG domain: the C-terminally located 'beta-NLS' that mediates nuclear transport through Impbeta1 (importin beta1) and the N-terminally located 'CaM-NLS' which is known to recognize the calcium-binding protein CaM (calmodulin). In the present study, we examined a number of missense mutations in the SRY CaM-NLS from human XY sex-reversed females for the first time, showing that they result in significantly reduced nuclear localization of GFP (green fluorescent protein)-SRY fusion proteins in transfected cells compared with wild-type. The CaM antagonist CDZ (calmidazolium chloride) was found to significantly reduce wild-type SRY nuclear accumulation, indicating dependence of SRY nuclear import on CaM. Intriguingly, the CaM-NLS mutants were all resistant to CDZ's effects, implying a loss of interaction with CaM, which was confirmed by direct binding experiments. CaM-binding/resultant nuclear accumulation was the only property of SRY found to be impaired by two of the CaM-NLS mutations, implying that inhibition of CaM-dependent nuclear import is the basis of sex reversal in these cases. Importantly, the CaM-NLS is conserved in other HMG-box-domain-containing proteins such as SOX-2, -9, -10 and HMGN1, all of which were found for the first time to rely on CaM for optimal nuclear localization. CaM-dependent nuclear translocation is thus a common mechanism for this family of important transcription factors.

  18. Vibrio campbellii hmgA-mediated pyomelanization impairs quorum sensing, virulence and cellular fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eWang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Melanization due to the inactivation of the homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase gene (hmgA has been demonstrated to increase stress resistance, persistence and virulence in some bacterial species but such pigmented mutants have not been observed in pathogenic members of the Vibrio Harveyi clade. In this study, we used Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 as model organism to understand how melanization affected cellular phenotype, metabolism and virulence. An in-frame deletion of the hmgA gene resulted in the overproduction of a pigment in cell culture supernatants and cellular membranes that was identified as pyomelanin. Unlike previous demonstrations in Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the pigmented V. campbellii mutant did not show increased UV resistance and was found to be ~2.7 times less virulent than the wild type strain in Penaeus monodon shrimp virulence assays. However, the extracted pyomelanin pigment did confer a higher resistance to oxidative stress when incubated with wild type cells. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses revealed that the hmgA gene deletion and subsequent pyomelanin production negatively effected the expression of 129 genes primarily involved in energy production, amino acid and lipid metabolism, and protein translation and turnover. This transcriptional response was mediated in part by an impairment of the quorum sensing regulon as transcripts of the quorum sensing high cell density master regulator LuxR and other operonic members of this regulon were significantly repressed in the hmgA mutant. Taken together, the results suggest that the pyomelanization of V. campbellii sufficiently impairs the metabolic activities of this organism and renders it less fit and virulent than its isogenic wild type strain.

  19. The Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Alisol Acetates Based on HMG-CoA Reductase and Its Molecular Mechanism

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    Fei Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study measured the impact of alisol B 23-acetate and alisol A 24-acetate, the main active ingredients of the traditional Chinese medicine Alismatis rhizoma, on total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C levels of hyperlipidemic mice. The binding of alisol B 23-acetate and alisol A 24-acetate to the key enzyme involved in the metabolism of TC, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, was studied using the reagent kit method and the western blotting technique combined with a molecular simulation technique. According to the results, alisol acetates significantly lower the TC, TG, and LDL-C concentrations of hyperlipidemic mice, while raising HDL-C concentrations. Alisol acetates lower HMG-CoA reductase activity in a dose-dependent fashion, both in vivo and in vitro. Neither of these alisol acetates significantly lower the protein expression of HMG-CoA. This suggests that alisol acetates lower the TC level via inhibiting the activity of HMG-CoA reductase by its prototype drug, which may exhibit an inhibition effect via directly and competitively binding to HMG-CoA. The side chain of the alisol acetate was the steering group via molecular simulation.

  20. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the HMG domain of the chondrogenesis master regulator Sox9 in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified DNA element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivekanandan, Saravanan; Moovarkumudalvan, Balasubramanian; Lescar, Julien; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.

    2015-10-30

    Sox9 is a fundamental sex-determining gene and the master regulator of chondrogenesis, and is involved in the development of various vital organs such as testes, kidney, heart and brain, and in skeletal development. Similar to other known Sox transcription factors, Sox9 recognizes and binds DNA with the consensus sequence C(T/A)TTG(T/A)(T/A) through the highly conserved HMG domain. Nonetheless, the molecular basis of the functional specificity of Sox9 in key developmental processes is still unclear. As an initial step towards a mechanistic understanding of Sox9 transcriptional regulation, the current work describes the details of the purification of the mouse Sox9 HMG domain (mSox9HMG), its crystallization in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified FOXP2 promoter DNA element and the X-ray diffraction data analysis of this complex. The mSox9HMG–FOXP2 promoter DNA complex was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 20% PEG 3350 in 200 mMsodium/potassium phosphate with 100 mMbis-tris propane at pH 8.5. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and the complex crystallized in the tetragonal space groupP41212, with unit-cell parametersa=b= 99.49,c= 45.89 Å. Crystal-packing parameters revealed that asymmetric unit contained one mSox9HMG–FOXP2 promoter DNA complex with an estimated solvent content of 64%.

  1. Comparative analysis and evolutionary significance of the HMG1 gene in crucian carp,blunt snout bream,and their polyploid progeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Liu; Zhen Liu; Shaojun Liu; Liangguo Liu; Cuiping You; Lin Chen; Huan Zhong; Yun Liu

    2009-01-01

    The full-length mRNA of the high mobility group protein 1 coding gene (HMG1) was obtained by RACE-PCR from red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var.),blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala),and their triploid and tetraploid progeny.The sequence contained an open reading frame of 579 nucleotides coding for 193 amino acids.The nucleotide identity of HMG1 was higher between the tetraploid hybrid and the maternal red crucian carp (99%) than between the tetraploid hybrid and the paternal blunt snout bream (97%).The nucleotide identity between the triploid hybrids and each parent (95%) was lower than that between the parents (98%).The protein identity between the tetraploid hybrid and each parent (100%) was higher than that between the triploid hybrid and each parent (97%).Our results suggest that interspecific hybridization generates a shock to the HMG1 gene in triploid hybrids,causing divergence of nucleotides.The HMG1 protein of the tetraploid hybrids was consistent with that of its parents,which reduced the barrier of cross incompatibility between alleles,providing the basis for the bisexual fertile tetraploid hybrids forming a new polyploid species in nature.The secondary and tertiary structures of the HMG1 protein contain eight helices,three switches,two DNA-binding domains in the N-terminus,and a long acidic tail in the C-terminus.Together,these data suggest that the HMG1 protein plays a role of protein-DNA interactions,facilitating various DNA-dependent activities in the nucleus.We also investigated the phylogeny of fish,amphibian,reptilian,bird,and mammalian HMG1 proteins.Our results suggest that HMG1 is an ancestral protein that has been highly conserved.These data provide clues as to how interspecific hybridization may form polyploid hybrids.

  2. Sex determination in goat by amplification of the HMG box using duplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Yue, Wenbin; Ren, Youshe; Lei, Fulin; Zhao, Junxing

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a fast, accurate and reliable method of determining the sex of goat embryos prior to implantation through amplification of the high-motility-group (HMG) box of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) gene of the goats. Goat specific primers were designed for duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). As an internal control gene, the goat beta-action gene sequence was simultaneously amplified together with the HMG box of goat SRY gene. Males showed both 1 SRY band and 1 beta-action band, but only 1 beta-action band was present in the agarose gel electrophoresis of females. The result indicated that the goat HMG-box sequence motif of SRY was male specific. Afterward, the optimized PCR procedure was applied in 30 embryo biopsies and the biopsied embryos were transferred into 30 recipient female goats. The sex of the 13 kids proved anatomically corresponded to the sex determined by PCR (100% accuracy). Thus, this study showed that this duplex PCR method can be applied to sex the goat pre-implantation embryos and to manipulate the sex ratio of offspring in goat breeding programs.

  3. Pharmacophore identification by molecular modeling and chemometrics: The case of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, U.; Moro, G.; Pitea, D.; Scolastico, S.; Todeschini, R.; Scolastico, C.

    1992-02-01

    A methodology based on molecular modeling and chemometrics is applied to identify the geometrical pharmacophore and the stereoelectronic requirements for the activity in a series of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, an enzyme involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. These inhibitors present two common structural features—a 3,5-dihydroxy heptanoic acid which mimics the active portion of the natural substrate HMG-CoA and a lipophilic region which carries both polar and bulky groups. A total of 432 minimum energy conformations of 11 homologous compounds showing different levels of biological activity are calculated by the molecular mechanics MM2 method. Five atoms are selected as representatives of the relevant fragments of these compounds and three interatomic distances, selected among 10 by means of a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), are used to describe the three-dimensional disposition of these atoms. A cluster analysis procedure, performed on the whole set of conformations described by these three distances, allows the selection of one cluster whose centroid represents a geometrical model for the HMG-CoA reductase pharmacophore and the conformations included are candidates as binding conformations. To obtain a refinement of the geometrical model and to have a better insight into the requirements for the activity of these inhibitors, the Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) distributions are determined by the MNDO semiempirical method.

  4. Increase of a group of PTC(+) transcripts by curcumin through inhibition of the NMD pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dairong; Su, Ruey-Chyi; Zou, Liping; Triggs-Raine, Barbara; Huang, Shangzhi; Xie, Jiuyong

    2015-08-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), an mRNA surveillance mechanism, eliminates premature termination codon-containing (PTC⁺) transcripts. For instance, it maintains the homeostasis of splicing factors and degrades aberrant transcripts of human genetic disease genes. Here we examine the inhibitory effect on the NMD pathway and consequent increase of PTC+ transcripts by the dietary compound curcumin. We have found that several PTC⁺ transcripts including that of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) were specifically increased in cells by curcumin. We also observed a similar curcumin effect on the PTC⁺ mutant transcript from a Tay-Sachs-causing HEXA allele or from a beta-globin reporter gene. The curcumin effect was accompanied by significantly reduced expression of the NMD factors UPF1, 2, 3A and 3B. Consistently, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, curcumin specifically reduced the occupancy of acetyl-histone H3 and RNA polymerase II at the promoter region (-376 to -247nt) of human UPF1, in a time- and dosage-dependent way. Importantly, knocking down UPF1 abolished or substantially reduced the difference of PTC(+) transcript levels between control and curcumin-treated cells. The disrupted curcumin effect was efficiently rescued by expression of exogenous Myc-UPF1 in the knockdown cells. Together, our data demonstrate that a group of PTC⁺ transcripts are stabilized by a dietary compound curcumin through the inhibition of UPF factor expression and the NMD pathway.

  5. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  6. Hypoglycaemic activity of an HMG-containing flavonoid glucoside, chamaemeloside, from Chamaemelum nobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, G M; Wright, A D; Keller, W J; Judd, R L; Bates, S; Day, C

    1998-10-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acid (HMG) containing flavonoid glucoside chamaemeloside, has been determined to have in vivo hypoglycaemic activity comparable to that of free HMG. An improved isolation scheme for obtaining chamaemeloside from Chamaemelum nobile is presented.

  7. A new mode of DNA binding distinguishes Capicua from other HMG-box factors and explains its mutation patterns in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forés, Marta; Samper, Núria; Barbacid, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    HMG-box proteins, including Sox/SRY (Sox) and TCF/LEF1 (TCF) family members, bind DNA via their HMG-box. This binding, however, is relatively weak and both Sox and TCF factors employ distinct mechanisms for enhancing their affinity and specificity for DNA. Here we report that Capicua (CIC), an HMG-box transcriptional repressor involved in Ras/MAPK signaling and cancer progression, employs an additional distinct mode of DNA binding that enables selective recognition of its targets. We find that, contrary to previous assumptions, the HMG-box of CIC does not bind DNA alone but instead requires a distant motif (referred to as C1) present at the C-terminus of all CIC proteins. The HMG-box and C1 domains are both necessary for binding specific TGAATGAA-like sites, do not function via dimerization, and are active in the absence of cofactors, suggesting that they form a bipartite structure for sequence-specific binding to DNA. We demonstrate that this binding mechanism operates throughout Drosophila development and in human cells, ensuring specific regulation of multiple CIC targets. It thus appears that HMG-box proteins generally depend on auxiliary DNA binding mechanisms for regulating their appropriate genomic targets, but that each sub-family has evolved unique strategies for this purpose. Finally, the key role of C1 in DNA binding also explains the fact that this domain is a hotspot for inactivating mutations in oligodendroglioma and other tumors, while being preserved in oncogenic CIC-DUX4 fusion chimeras associated to Ewing-like sarcomas. PMID:28278156

  8. Een vergelijking tussen de HMG-CoA reductaseremmende geneesmiddelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D.J.; Schalekamp, T.; Van der Kuy, A.; Van Loenen, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    There are significant differences between the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors with regards to drug-drug interactions. The most important enzyme involved in these interactions is the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4. The major adverse affect due to drug-drug inter

  9. Transcription-independent function of Polycomb group protein PSC in cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Lagarou, Anna; Doyen, Cecile M; van der Knaap, Jan A; Aslan, Ülkü; Bezstarosti, Karel; Yassin, Yasmin; Brock, Hugh W; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2012-05-11

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins control development and cell proliferation through chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression. We describe a transcription-independent function for PcG protein Posterior sex combs (PSC) in regulating the destruction of cyclin B (CYC-B). A substantial portion of PSC was found outside canonical PcG complexes, instead associated with CYC-B and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). Cell-based experiments and reconstituted reactions established that PSC and Lemming (LMG, also called APC11) associate and ubiquitylate CYC-B cooperatively, marking it for proteosomal degradation. Thus, PSC appears to mediate both developmental gene silencing and posttranslational control of mitosis. Direct regulation of cell cycle progression might be a crucial part of the PcG system's function in development and cancer.

  10. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O.; Baek, Eun J.; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-01-01

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine. PMID:26078220

  11. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  12. Analysis of pea HMG-I/Y expression suggests a role in defence gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Steven J; Choi, Jane J; Hadwiger, Lee A

    2003-07-01

    SUMMARY HMG-I/Y proteins are characterized by the presence of AT-hook motifs, DNA binding domains that recognize AT-rich tracts of DNA. By facilitating protein:protein and protein:DNA interactions in the vicinity of these AT-rich binding sites, HMG-I/Y positively or negatively regulates gene expression. Several pea defence gene promoters have AT-rich tracts of DNA that are potential targets for modulation via HMG-I/Y. In this study, a comparison of the expression of a pea defence gene (DRR206) mRNA relative to the expression of HMG-I/Y mRNA was monitored by Northern analysis following the inoculation of a fungal pathogen, Fusarium solani or treatment with chitosan and a F. solani DNase (Fsph DNase). In pea pod endocarp tissue, HMG-I/Y expression was observed at high levels in untreated tissue and at lower levels 6 h following inoculation or wounding of the tissue. Western blots with an antipea HMG-I/Y polyclonal antibody also revealed that pea HMG-I/Y is expressed at decreased levels 6 h following inoculation or elicitor treatment. HMG-I/Y extracted from pea caused alterations in the gel migration of radio-labelled AT-rich sequences from the pea DRR206 promoter, suggesting that similar interactions could exist in vivo. Agroinfiltration was utilized to express the pea HMG-I/Y gene in tobacco containing a chimeric gene fusion of a promoter from the PR gene, DRR206, and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Transient expression of pea HMG-I/Y led to a decrease in GUS reporter gene activity in the heterologous tobacco system. These data implicate pea HMG-I/Y abundance in the down-regulation of DRR206 gene expression, and possibly HMG-I/Y depletion in the expression of defence genes in pea.

  13. Carbohydrate restriction and dietary cholesterol modulate the expression of HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor in mononuclear cells from adult men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volek Jeff S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The liver is responsible for controlling cholesterol homeostasis in the body. HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor (LDL-r are involved in this regulation and are also ubiquitously expressed in all major tissues. We have previously shown in guinea pigs that there is a correlation in gene expression of HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL-r between liver and mononuclear cells. The present study evaluated human mononuclear cells as a surrogate for hepatic expression of these genes. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate restriction with low and high cholesterol content on HMG-CoA reductase and LDL-r mRNA expression in mononuclear cells. All subjects were counseled to consume a carbohydrate restricted diet with 10–15% energy from carbohydrate, 30–35% energy from protein and 55–60% energy from fat. Subjects were randomly assigned to either EGG (640 mg/d additional dietary cholesterol or SUB groups [equivalent amount of egg substitute (0 dietary cholesterol contributions per day] for 12 weeks. At the end of the intervention, there were no changes in plasma total or LDL cholesterol (LDL-C compared to baseline (P > 0.10 or differences in plasma total or LDL-C between groups. The mRNA abundance for HMG-CoA reductase and LDL-r were measured in mononuclear cells using real time PCR. The EGG group showed a significant decrease in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA (1.98 ± 1.26 to 1.32 ± 0.92 arbitrary units P

  14. Evidence supporting the existence of a NUPR1-like family of helix-loop-helix chromatin proteins related to, yet distinct from, AT hook-containing HMG proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Raul; Velez, Gabriel; Lin, Marisa; Lomberk, Gwen; Neira, Jose Luis; Iovanna, Juan

    2014-08-01

    NUPR1, a small chromatin protein, plays a critical role in cancer development, progression, and resistance to therapy. Here, using a combination of structural bioinformatics and molecular modeling methods, we report several novel findings that enhance our understanding of the biochemical function of this protein. We find that NUPR1 has been conserved throughout evolution, and over time it has undergone duplications and transpositions to form other transcriptional regulators. Using threading, homology-based molecular modeling, molecular mechanics calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations, we generated structural models for four of these proteins: NUPR1a, NUPR1b, NUPR2, and the NUPR-like domain of GTF2-I. Comparative analyses of these models combined with extensive linear motif identification reveal that these four proteins, though similar in their propensities for folding, differ in size, surface changes, and sites amenable for posttranslational modification. Lastly, taking NUPR1a as the paradigm for this family, we built models of a NUPR-DNA complex. Additional structural comparisons revealed that NUPR1 defines a new family of small-groove-binding proteins that share structural features with, yet are distinct from, helix-loop-helix AT-hook-containing HMG proteins. These models and inferences should lead to a better understanding of the function of this group of chromatin proteins, which play a critical role in the development of human malignant diseases.

  15. Controlled Ovarian Stimulation Using Medroxyprogesterone Acetate and hMG in Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Treated for IVF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Chen, Qiuju; Wang, NingLing; Chen, Hong; Lyu, Qifeng; Kuang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) during ovarian stimulation is a current challenge for patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Our previous studies indicated that progestin can prevent premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge or moderate/severe OHSS in the general subfertile population, both in the follicular-phase and luteal-phase ovarian stimulation but it is unclear if this is true for patients with PCOS. The aim of the article was to analyze cycle characteristics and endocrinological profiles using human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) in combination with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) for PCOS patients who are undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatments and investigate the subsequently pregnancy outcomes of frozen embryo transfer (FET). In the randomized prospective controlled study, 120 PCOS patients undergoing IVF/ICSI were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups according to the ovarian stimulation protocols: hMG and MPA (group A, n = 60) or short protocol (group B, n = 60). In the study group, hMG (150–225IU) and MPA (10 mg/d) were administered simultaneously beginning on cycle day 3. Ovulation was cotriggered by a gonadotropinreleasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (0.1 mg) and hCG (1000IU) when dominant follicles matured. A short protocol was used as a control. The primary end-point was the ongoing pregnancy rate per transfer and incidence of OHSS. Doses of hMG administrated in group A are significantly higher than those in the controls. LH suppression persisted during ovarian stimulation and no incidence of premature LH surge was seen in both groups. The fertilization rate and the ongoing pregnant rate in the study group were higher than that in the control. The number of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes, clinical pregnancy rates per transfer, implantation rates, and cumulative pregnancy rates per patient were comparable between the 2 groups. The incidence of OHSS was low between the 2

  16. The impact of HMG-CoA reductase therapy on serum PSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mener, David J; Cambio, Angelo; Stoddard, David G; Martin, Brad A; Palapattu, Ganesh S

    2010-05-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, otherwise known as statins, inhibit the enzyme that controls the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a precursor for cholesterol. Statins may be important to prostate cancer biology by inhibiting cell growth, inflammation, and oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of statin therapy on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. The computerized medical records at the University of Rochester Medical Center were used to identify men who filled statin prescriptions between May 31st, 2008 and September 30th, 2008. Men with at least one PSA assay performed within 2 years before and at least one PSA assay performed within 1 year after starting a statin medication were included. The primary endpoint was the change in PSA concentration computed as the difference between PSA levels before and after starting a statin medication. Paired t-tests were used to analyze the mean differences in PSA values. A total of 962 patients were identified. The mean difference in serum PSA level after statin administration was -0.29 ng/ml (-8.04%). Subgroup analyses for mean PSA concentration change before and after statin administration by age group revealed: 50-59 years old (-0.1609, 95% CI: -0.2444, -0.0775, P 70 years old (-0.351, 95% CI: -0.490, -0.212, P < 0.0001). These observations suggest a statistically significant reduction in serum PSA level that is associated with the onset of statin therapy.

  17. Cloning and analysis of an HMG gene from the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharman, A C; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Holland, P W

    1997-01-01

    Evolution has shaped the organisation of vertebrate genomes, including the human genome. To shed further light on genome history, we have cloned and analysed an HMG gene from lamprey, representing one of the earliest vertebrate lineages. Genes of the HMG1/2 family encode chromosomal proteins...... that bind DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner, and have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes dependent on chromatin structure. They are characterised by two copies of a conserved motif, the HMG box, followed by an acidic C-terminal region. We report here the cloning of a cDNA clone from...

  18. Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein: at the crossroads of transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Cruz, Renier; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a variety of growth and developmental defects, photosensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, hearing loss, skeletal abnormalities, progressive neurological degeneration, and premature aging. CS arises due to mutations in the CSA and CSB genes. Both gene products are required for the transcription-coupled (TC) branch of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, however, the severe phenotype of CS patients is hard to reconcile with a sole defect in TC-NER. Studies using cells from patients and mouse models have shown that the CSB protein is involved in a variety of cellular pathways and plays a major role in the cellular response to stress. CSB has been shown to regulate processes such as the transcriptional recovery after DNA damage, the p53 transcriptional response, the response to hypoxia, the response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transactivation of nuclear receptors, transcription of housekeeping genes and the transcription of rDNA. Some of these processes are also affected in combined XP/CS patients. These new advances in the function(s) of CSB shed light onto the etiology of the clinical features observed in CS patients and could potentially open therapeutic avenues for these patients in the future. Moreover, the study of CS could further our knowledge of the aging process.

  19. The influence of gonadotropins on clinico-biological ICSI outcome: a retrospective comparative study rFsH vs HP-hmg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlifi, Abdeljalil; Kacem, Olfa; Maroueni, Maher; Elgoul, Leila; Hidar, Samir; Fekih, Meriem; Boughizane, Sassi; Essaidi, Habib; Ben Regaya, Lassad; Bibi, Mohamed; Ajina, Mounir; Khairi, Hedi

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate the difference in the outcome of ICSI-ET cycles among respondents patients, taking into account the molecule inducer of controlled ovarian stimulation: HP-hMG ou rFSH. Patients and Methods A comparative retrospective study over 62 months including a total of 1005 infertile couples, divided into two groups: HP-HMG (n=125) and rFSH (n=880). Results - The average numbers of retrieved oocytes and matures oocytes were significantly higher in rFSH group rFSH (7,94 ± 2,49, HP-HMG vs 9,05 ± 3,40, rFSH, p=0.0001and  3±2,68, HP-HMG vs 6,65±3,05 , rFSH, p=0,02 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in the endometrial thickness and estradiol level on hCG injection day, the total amount of administrated gonadotropin and the duration of stimulation. In addition, we did not find a significant difference between the two groups regarding the fertilization, the maturation, the cleavage, top quality embryo, implantation, clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancies, live birth and miscarriage rates. There was no case of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Conclusion - Inspite of a higher number of retrieved and mature oocytes obtained with rFSH, the latter showed no superiority over HP-hMG which seem to be equally efficient and safe for ICSI treatment cycles.

  20. Regulation of HMG-CoA reductase in MCF-7 cells by genistein, EPA, and DHA, alone and in combination with mevastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Robin E; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Archer, Michael C

    2005-06-28

    We investigated the regulation of HMG-CoA reductase in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by genistein, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). All three compounds down-regulated reductase activity, primarily through post-transcriptional effects. In mevastatin-treated cells, only genistein and DHA abrogated the induction of reductase activity caused by this competitive inhibitor. Diets rich in soy isoflavones and fish oils, therefore, may exert anti-cancer effects through the inhibition of mevalonate synthesis in the breast. Genistein and DHA, in particular, may augment the efficacy of statins, increasing the potential for use of these drugs in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer.

  1. Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects. Case presentation We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dos...

  2. The CesA gene family of barley. Quantitative analysis of transcripts reveals two groups of co-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Rachel A; Shirley, Neil J; King, Brendon J; Harvey, Andrew J; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2004-01-01

    Sequence data from cDNA and genomic clones, coupled with analyses of expressed sequence tag databases, indicate that the CesA (cellulose synthase) gene family from barley (Hordeum vulgare) has at least eight members, which are distributed across the genome. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction has been used to determine the relative abundance of mRNA transcripts for individual HvCesA genes in vegetative and floral tissues, at different stages of development. To ensure accurate expression profiling, geometric averaging of multiple internal control gene transcripts has been applied for the normalization of transcript abundance. Total HvCesA mRNA levels are highest in coleoptiles, roots, and stems and much lower in floral tissues, early developing grain, and in the elongation zone of leaves. In most tissues, HvCesA1, HvCesA2, and HvCesA6 predominate, and their relative abundance is very similar; these genes appear to be coordinately transcribed. A second group, comprising HvCesA4, HvCesA7, and HvCesA8, also appears to be coordinately transcribed, most obviously in maturing stem and root tissues. The HvCesA3 expression pattern does not fall into either of these two groups, and HvCesA5 transcript levels are extremely low in all tissues. Thus, the HvCesA genes fall into two general groups of three genes with respect to mRNA abundance, and the co-expression of the groups identifies their products as candidates for the rosettes that are involved in cellulose biosynthesis at the plasma membrane. Phylogenetic analysis allows the two groups of genes to be linked with orthologous Arabidopsis CesA genes that have been implicated in primary and secondary wall synthesis.

  3. Isolation and expression of HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA reductase genes in different development stages, tissues and treatments of the Chinese white pine beetle, Dendroctonus armandi (Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiamin; Dai, Lulu; Zhang, Ranran; Li, Zhumei; Pham, Thanh; Chen, Hui

    2015-09-01

    We isolated two full-length cDNAs encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A synthase (HMG-S) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-R) from the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi), and carried out some bioinformatic analysis on the full-length nucleic acid sequences and deduced amino acid sequences. Differential expression of the DaHMG-S and DaHMG-R genes was observed between sexes (emerged adults), and within these significant differences among development stage, tissue distribution, fed on phloem of Pinus armandi and topically applied juvenile hormone (JH) III. Increase of DaHMG-S and DaHMG-R mRNA levels in males suggested that they may play a role in mevalonate pathway. Information from the present study might contribute to understanding the relationship between D. armandi and its semiochemical production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of Wnt signaling pathway gene SRY-related HMG-box 17 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-yi; HAN Chao; ZHENG Li-li; GUO Ming-zhou

    2012-01-01

    Background SRY-related HMG-box 17 (SOX17) encodes a member of the SOX (SRY-related HMG-box) family of transcription factors involved in the regulation of embryonic development and in the determination of the cell fate.Recently,it was considered as a tumor suppressor gene to inhibit canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in several malignancies.However,the function of SOX17 in thyroid cancer was unknown.Therefore,we investigated the epigenetic changes and the function of SOX17 in thyroid cancer.Methods The methylation status of the promoter region of SOX17 was detected using methylation-specific PCR in 63 papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissue,10 normal thyroid tissue,and two thyroid cancer cell lines.Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess mRNA expression of SOX17 before and after 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment in thyroid cancer cell lines.Expression of SOX17 and β-catenin were detected by immunohistochemistry in PTC and adjacent tissue.Luciferase reporter assay,colony formation,transfection,and Western blotting were employed to analyze the effect of SOX17 on thyroid cancer cell proliferation and the function of SOX17 in the Wnt signal pathway.Results Loss of SOX17 expression was correlated to the promoter region hypermethylation in thyroid cancer cell lines.Re-expression of SOX17 was found in TPC-1 cell line after 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment.In primary thyroid cancer,60.3% (38/63) were methylated and 39.7% (25/63) unmethylated.But no methylation was found in noncancerous thyroid tissues.Methylation of SOX17 was associated reversely with β-catenin expression in the cytoplasm or nucleus significantly in the PTC (P <0.05).Colony formation was inhibited by re-expression of SOX17 in TPC-1 cells.SOX17 suppressed the Wnt signaling pathway and the HMG domain was essential for this effect.Conclusions SOX17 was frequently methylated in human PTC.Loss of SOX17 expression was induced by promoter region hypermethylation.SOX17 inhibited thyroid

  5. The in vitro reconstitution of nucleosome and its binding patterns with HMG1/2 and HMG14/17 proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA HUA HU; JIE JIANG; YING HUA MA; NA YANG; MAO HU ZHANG; MIN WU; JIAN FEI; LI HE GUO

    2003-01-01

    Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the dynamic process of the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution followed by slow dilution from high salt to low salt was visualized. Data showed that the histone octamers were dissociated from DNA at 1M NaCl. When the salt concentration was slowly reduced to 650 mMand 300 mM, the core histones bound to the naked DNA gradually. Once the salt concentration was reduced to 50 mM the classic "beads-on-a-string" structure was clearly visualized. Furthermore, using the technique of the in vitro reconstitution ofnucleosome,the mono- and di- nucleosomes were assembled in vitro with both HS2core (-10681 to -10970 bp) and NCR2 (-372to -194 bp) DNA sequences in the 5'flanking sequence of human b-globin gene. Data revealed that HMG 1/2 and HMG 14/17 proteins binding to both DNA sequences are changeable following the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. We suggest that the changeable binding patterns of HMG 14/17 and HMG1/2 proteins with these regulatory elements may be critical in the process of nucleosome assembly, recruitment of chromatin-modifying activities, and the regulation of human b-globin gene expression.

  6. The transcriptional coactivator SAYP is a trithorax group signature subunit of the PBAP chromatin remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Gillian E; Moshkin, Yuri M; Langenberg, Karin; Bezstarosti, Karel; Blastyak, Andras; Gyurkovics, Henrik; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2008-05-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (remodelers) perform critical functions in eukaryotic gene expression control. BAP and PBAP are the fly representatives of the two evolutionarily conserved major subclasses of SWI/SNF remodelers. Both complexes share seven core subunits, including the Brahma ATPase, but differ in a few signature subunits; POLYBROMO and BAP170 specify PBAP, whereas OSA defines BAP. Here, we show that the transcriptional coactivator and PHD finger protein SAYP is a novel PBAP subunit. Biochemical analysis established that SAYP is tightly associated with PBAP but absent from BAP. SAYP, POLYBROMO, and BAP170 display an intimately overlapping distribution on larval salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that SAYP is critical for PBAP-dependent transcription. SAYP is required for normal development and interacts genetically with core- and PBAP-selective subunits. Genetic analysis suggested that, like BAP, PBAP also counteracts Polycomb silencing. SAYP appears to be a key architectural component required for the integrity and association of the PBAP-specific module. We conclude that SAYP is a signature subunit that plays a major role in the functional specificity of the PBAP holoenzyme.

  7. Genomic identification of WRKY transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota) and analysis of evolution and homologous groups for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tian, Chang; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-03-15

    WRKY transcription factors belong to one of the largest transcription factor families. These factors possess functions in plant growth and development, signal transduction, and stress response. Here, we identified 95 DcWRKY genes in carrot based on the carrot genomic and transcriptomic data, and divided them into three groups. Phylogenetic analysis of WRKY proteins from carrot and Arabidopsis divided these proteins into seven subgroups. To elucidate the evolution and distribution of WRKY transcription factors in different species, we constructed a schematic of the phylogenetic tree and compared the WRKY family factors among 22 species, which including plants, slime mold and protozoan. An in-depth study was performed to clarify the homologous factor groups of nine divergent taxa in lower and higher plants. Based on the orthologous factors between carrot and Arabidopsis, 38 DcWRKY proteins were calculated to interact with other proteins in the carrot genome. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that DcWRKY20 can interact with DcMAPK1 and DcMAPK4. The expression patterns of the selected DcWRKY genes based on transcriptome data and qRT-PCR suggested that those selected DcWRKY genes are involved in root development, biotic and abiotic stress response. This comprehensive analysis provides a basis for investigating the evolution and function of WRKY genes.

  8. DNA binding of a non-sequence-specific HMG-D protein is entropy driven with a substantial non-electrostatic contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Anatoly I; Klass, Janet; Read, Christopher; Churchill, Mair E A; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Privalov, Peter L

    2003-08-22

    The thermal properties of two forms of the Drosophila melanogaster HMG-D protein, with and without its highly basic 26 residue C-terminal tail (D100 and D74) and the thermodynamics of their non-sequence-specific interaction with linear DNA duplexes were studied using scanning and titration microcalorimetry, spectropolarimetry, fluorescence anisotropy and FRET techniques at different temperatures and salt concentrations. It was shown that the C-terminal tail of D100 is unfolded at all temperatures, whilst the state of the globular part depends on temperature in a rather complex way, being completely folded only at temperatures close to 0 degrees C and unfolding with significant heat absorption at temperatures below those of the gross denaturational changes. The association constant and thus Gibbs energy of binding for D100 is much greater than for D74 but the enthalpies of their association are similar and are large and positive, i.e. DNA binding is a completely entropy-driven process. The positive entropy of association is due to release of counterions and dehydration upon forming the protein/DNA complex. Ionic strength variation showed that electrostatic interactions play an important but not exclusive role in the DNA binding of the globular part of this non-sequence-specific protein, whilst binding of the positively charged C-terminal tail of D100 is almost completely electrostatic in origin. This interaction with the negative charges of the DNA phosphate groups significantly enhances the DNA bending. An important feature of the non-sequence-specific association of these HMG boxes with DNA is that the binding enthalpy is significantly more positive than for the sequence-specific association of the HMG box from Sox-5, despite the fact that these proteins bend the DNA duplex to a similar extent. This difference shows that the enthalpy of dehydration of apolar groups at the HMG-D/DNA interface is not fully compensated by the energy of van der Waals interactions

  9. A Quantitative Study on the in-vitro and in-vivo Acetylation of High Mobility Group A1 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Zhang, Kangling; Zou, Yan; Perna, Avi; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) A1 proteins are subject to a number of post-translational modifications, which may regulate their function in gene transcription and other cellular processes. We examined, by using mass spectrometry, the acetylation of HMGA1a and HMGA1b proteins induced by histone acetyltransferases p300 and PCAF in vitro and in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells in vivo. It turned out that five lysine residues in HMGA1a, i.e., Lys-14, Lys-64, Lys-66, Lys-70, and Lys-73, could be acety...

  10. Identifying real differences in live birth rates between HMG and rFSH in IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, Masoud

    2009-01-01

    Fertility treatment strives for the delivery of a healthy live birth. Human menopausal gonadotrophin (HMG) and recombinant FSH (rFSH) are the two types of gonadotrophin currently used for ovarian stimulation in assisted reproduction treatments. Although both HMG and rFSH have been shown to be effective, a number of studies have examined whether a potential difference in clinical benefit or outcome exists between treatments. Unlike rFSH preparations, HMG contains both FSH and LH activity (in the form of LH and human chorionic gonadotrophin, which are short- and long-acting, respectively). The beneficial effect of exogenous LH activity has been investigated in the Menotrophin versus Recombinant FSH in-vitro Fertilisation Trial (MERiT), which revealed differences in embryo quality and endometrial receptivity between rFSH and highly purified HMG. Current evidence suggests that HMG provides significantly higher live birth rates than rFSH in women undergoing ovarian stimulation for in-vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles using long gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist protocol. Further studies will continue to provide data with which to expand these findings and optimize the chances of achieving a live birth following assisted reproduction treatment.

  11. Histone H4 hyperacetylation and rapid turnover of its acetyl groups in transcriptionally inactive rooster testis spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, R; Mezquita, C

    1982-12-20

    In order to study the relationship between acetylation of histones, chromatin structure and gene activity, the distribution and turnover of acetyl groups among nucleosomal core histones and the extent of histone H4 acetylation were examined in rooster testis cell nuclei at different stages of spermatogenesis. Histone H4 was the predominant acetylated histone in mature testes. Hyperacetylation of H4 and rapid turnover of its acetyl groups are not univocally correlated with transcriptional activity since they were detected in both genetically active testicular cells and genetically inactive elongated spermatids. During the transition from nucleohistone to nucleoprotamine in elongated spermatids the chromatin undergoes dramatic structural changes with exposition of binding sites on DNA (1). Hyperacetylation of H4 and rapid turnover of its acetyl groups could be correlated with the particular conformation of chromatin in elongated spermatids and might represent a necessary condition for binding of chromosomal proteins to DNA.

  12. Genomic analysis of NAC transcription factors in banana (Musa acuminata) and definition of NAC orthologous groups for monocots and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Albero; Guignon, Valentin; Roux, Nicolas; Rouard, Mathieu

    2014-05-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance to abiotic stresses is important in crop breeding. A comprehensive understanding of the gene families associated with drought tolerance is therefore highly relevant. NAC transcription factors form a large plant-specific gene family involved in the regulation of tissue development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The main goal of this study was to set up a framework of orthologous groups determined by an expert sequence comparison of NAC genes from both monocots and dicots. In order to clarify the orthologous relationships among NAC genes of different species, we performed an in-depth comparative study of four divergent taxa, in dicots and monocots, whose genomes have already been completely sequenced: Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera, Musa acuminata and Oryza sativa. Due to independent evolution, NAC copy number is highly variable in these plant genomes. Based on an expert NAC sequence comparison, we propose forty orthologous groups of NAC sequences that were probably derived from an ancestor gene present in the most recent common ancestor of dicots and monocots. These orthologous groups provide a curated resource for large-scale protein sequence annotation of NAC transcription factors. The established orthology relationships also provide a useful reference for NAC function studies in newly sequenced genomes such as M. acuminata and other plant species.

  13. Transcription profiling of the Neurospora crassa response to a group of synthetic (thioxanthones and a natural acetophenone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Xanthones are a class of heterocyclic compounds characterized by a dibenzo-γ-pyrone nucleus. Analysis of their mode of action in cells, namely uncovering alterations in gene expression, is important because these compounds have potential therapeutic applications. Thus, we studied the transcriptional response of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to a group of synthetic (thioxanthone derivatives with antitumor activity using high throughput RNA sequencing. The induction of ABC transporters in N. crassa, particularly atrb and cdr4, is a common consequence of the treatment with xanthones. In addition, we found a group of genes repressed by all of the tested (thioxanthone derivatives, that are evocative of genes downregulated during oxidative stress. The transcriptional response of N. crassa treated with an acetophenone isolated from the soil fungus Neosartorya siamensis shares some features with the (thioxanthone-elicited gene expression profiles. Two of the (thioxanthone derivatives and the N. siamensis-derived acetophenone inhibited the growth of N. crassa. Our work also provides framework datasets that may orientate future studies on the mechanisms of action of some groups of xanthones.

  14. Mitochondrial nucleoid and transcription factor A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Tomotake; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Narie; Takio, Koji; Alam, Tanfis Istiaq; Hamasaki, Naotaka; Kang, Dongchon

    2004-04-01

    Nuclear DNA is tightly packed into nucleosomal structure. In contrast, human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) had long been believed to be rather naked because mitochondria lack histone. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a member of a high mobility group (HMG) protein family and a first-identified mitochondrial transcription factor, is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. Abf2, a yeast counterpart of human TFAM, is abundant enough to cover the whole region of mtDNA and to play a histone-like role in mitochondria. Human TFAM is indeed as abundant as Abf2, suggesting that TFAM also has a histone-like architectural role for maintenance of mtDNA. When human mitochondria are solubilized with non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 and then separated into soluble and particulate fractions, most TFAM is recovered from the particulate fraction together with mtDNA, suggesting that human mtDNA forms a nucleoid structure. TFAM is tightly associated with mtDNA as a main component of the nucleoid.

  15. Highly purified HMG versus recombinant FSH for ovarian stimulation in IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platteau, P.; Nyboe, Andersen A.; Loft, A.;

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the live birth rates resulting from ovarian stimulation with highly purified human menopausal gonadotrophin (HP-HMG), which combines FSH and human chorionic gonadotrophin-driven LH activities, or recombinant FSH (rFSH) alone in women undergoing IVF cycles....... An integrated analysis was performed of the raw data from two randomized controlled trials that were highly comparable in terms of eligibility criteria and post-randomization treatment regimens with either HP-HMG or rFSH for ovarian stimulation in IVF, following a long down-regulation protocol. All randomized...... subjects who received at least one dose of gonadotrophin in an IVF cycle (HP-HMG, n = 491; rFSH, n = 495) were included in the analysis. Subjects who underwent intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles were excluded. The superiority of one gonadotrophin preparation over the other was tested using...

  16. Controlled Ovarian Stimulation Using Medroxyprogesterone Acetate and hMG in Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Treated for IVF: A Double-Blind Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Chen, Qiuju; Wang, NingLing; Chen, Hong; Lyu, Qifeng; Kuang, Yanping

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) during ovarian stimulation is a current challenge for patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Our previous studies indicated that progestin can prevent premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge or moderate/severe OHSS in the general subfertile population, both in the follicular-phase and luteal-phase ovarian stimulation but it is unclear if this is true for patients with PCOS. The aim of the article was to analyze cycle characteristics and endocrinological profiles using human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) in combination with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) for PCOS patients who are undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatments and investigate the subsequently pregnancy outcomes of frozen embryo transfer (FET). In the randomized prospective controlled study, 120 PCOS patients undergoing IVF/ICSI were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups according to the ovarian stimulation protocols: hMG and MPA (group A, n = 60) or short protocol (group B, n = 60). In the study group, hMG (150-225IU) and MPA (10 mg/d) were administered simultaneously beginning on cycle day 3. Ovulation was cotriggered by a gonadotropinreleasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (0.1 mg) and hCG (1000IU) when dominant follicles matured. A short protocol was used as a control. The primary end-point was the ongoing pregnancy rate per transfer and incidence of OHSS. Doses of hMG administrated in group A are significantly higher than those in the controls. LH suppression persisted during ovarian stimulation and no incidence of premature LH surge was seen in both groups. The fertilization rate and the ongoing pregnant rate in the study group were higher than that in the control. The number of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes, clinical pregnancy rates per transfer, implantation rates, and cumulative pregnancy rates per patient were comparable between the 2 groups. The incidence of OHSS was low between the 2 groups, with

  17. Members of WRKY Group III transcription factors are important in TYLCV defense signaling pathway in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Li, Meng-Yao; Wu, Peng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Que, Feng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-10-07

    Transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, tomato yellow leaf curly virus (TYLCV) has posed serious threats to plant growth and development. Plant innate immune systems against various threats involve WRKY Group III transcription factors (TFs). This group participates as a major component of biological processes in plants. In this study, 6 WRKY Group III TFs (SolyWRKY41, SolyWRKY42, SolyWRKY53, SolyWRKY54, SolyWRKY80, and SolyWRKY81) were identified, and these TFs responded to TYLCV infection. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that SolyWRKY41 and SolyWRKY54 were nuclear proteins in vivo. Many elements, including W-box, were found in the promoter region of Group III TFs. Interaction network analysis revealed that Group III TFs could interact with other proteins, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase 5 (MAPK) and isochorismate synthase (ICS), to respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. Positive and negative expression patterns showed that WRKY Group III genes could also respond to TYLCV infection in tomato. The DNA content of TYLCV resistant lines after SolyWRKY41 and SolyWRKY54 were subjected to virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) was lower than that of the control lines. In the present study, 6 WRKY Group III TFs in tomato were identified to respond to TYLCV infection. Quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and VIGS analyses demonstrated that Group III genes served as positive and negative regulators in tomato-TYLCV interaction. WRKY Group III TFs could interact with other proteins by binding to cis elements existing in the promoter regions of other genes to regulate pathogen-related gene expression.

  18. The human mitochondrial transcription factor A is a versatile G-quadruplex binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Tarrés-Soler, Aleix; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Cuppari, Anna; Brito, Reicy; Jaumot, Joaquim; Gargallo, Raimundo; Vilaseca, Marta; Silva, Cristina; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Eritja, Ramon; Solà, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the guanine-rich strand of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to form G-quadruplex structures (G4s) has been recently highlighted, suggesting potential functions in mtDNA replication initiation and mtDNA stability. G4 structures in mtDNA raise the question of their recognition by factors associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid. The mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a high-mobility group (HMG)-box protein, is the major binding protein of human mtDNA and plays a critical role in its expression and maintenance. HMG-box proteins are pleiotropic sensors of DNA structural alterations. Thus, we investigated and uncovered a surprising ability of TFAM to bind to DNA or RNA G4 with great versatility, showing an affinity similar than to double-stranded DNA. The recognition of G4s by endogenous TFAM was detected in mitochondrial extracts by pull-down experiments using a G4-DNA from the mtDNA conserved sequence block II (CSBII). Biochemical characterization shows that TFAM binding to G4 depends on both the G-quartets core and flanking single-stranded overhangs. Additionally, it shows a structure-specific binding mode that differs from B-DNA, including G4-dependent TFAM multimerization. These TFAM-G4 interactions suggest functional recognition of G4s in the mitochondria. PMID:28276514

  19. Sequence-specific high mobility group box factors recognize 10-12-base pair minor groove motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, M; Dooijes, D; van De Wetering, M

    2000-01-01

    Sequence-specific high mobility group (HMG) box factors bind and bend DNA via interactions in the minor groove. Three-dimensional NMR analyses have provided the structural basis for this interaction. The cognate HMG domain DNA motif is generally believed to span 6-8 bases. However, alignment...

  20. Tumor specific HMG-CoA reductase expression in primary pre-menopausal breast cancer predicts response to tamoxifen

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2011-01-31

    Abstract Introduction We previously reported an association between tumor-specific 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) expression and a good prognosis in breast cancer. Here, the predictive value of HMG-CoAR expression in relation to tamoxifen response was examined. Methods HMG-CoAR protein and RNA expression was analyzed in a cell line model of tamoxifen resistance using western blotting and PCR. HMG-CoAR mRNA expression was examined in 155 tamoxifen-treated breast tumors obtained from a previously published gene expression study (Cohort I). HMG-CoAR protein expression was examined in 422 stage II premenopausal breast cancer patients, who had previously participated in a randomized control trial comparing 2 years of tamoxifen with no systemic adjuvant treatment (Cohort II). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and the effect of HMG-CoAR expression on tamoxifen response. Results HMG-CoAR protein and RNA expression were decreased in tamoxifen-resistant MCF7-LCC9 cells compared with their tamoxifen-sensitive parental cell line. HMG-CoAR mRNA expression was decreased in tumors that recurred following tamoxifen treatment (P < 0.001) and was an independent predictor of RFS in Cohort I (hazard ratio = 0.63, P = 0.009). In Cohort II, adjuvant tamoxifen increased RFS in HMG-CoAR-positive tumors (P = 0.008). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that HMG-CoAR was an independent predictor of improved RFS in Cohort II (hazard ratio = 0.67, P = 0.010), and subset analysis revealed that this was maintained in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients (hazard ratio = 0.65, P = 0.029). Multivariate interaction analysis demonstrated a difference in tamoxifen efficacy relative to HMG-CoAR expression (P = 0.05). Analysis of tamoxifen response revealed that patients with ER-positive\\/HMG-CoAR tumors had a significant response to tamoxifen (P = 0.010) as well as

  1. Cloning and analysis of the HMG domains of ten Sox genes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... is responsible for the sequence-specific DNA binding. In this paper, we ... the conservative motif (HMG-box) of the human SRY gene. We want to .... their evolutionary relationships among the ten Sox proteins of B. maxima and ...

  2. Transcriptional response of polycomb group genes to status epilepticus in mice is modified by prior exposure to epileptic preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eReynolds

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of the brain to brief, non-harmful seizures can activate protective mechanisms that temporarily generate a damage-refractory state. This process, termed epileptic tolerance, is associated with large-scale down-regulation of gene expression. Polycomb group proteins are master controllers of gene silencing during development that are re-activated by injury to the brain. Here we explored the transcriptional response of genes associated with polycomb repressor complex (PRC 1 (Ring1A and Ring1B and Bmi1 and PRC2 (Ezh1, Ezh2 and Suz12, as well as additional transcriptional regulators Sirt1, Yy1 and Yy2, in a mouse model of status epilepticus. Findings were contrasted to changes after status epilepticus in mice previously given brief seizures to evoke tolerance. Real-time quantitative PCR showed status epilepticus prompted an early (1 h increase in expression of several genes in PRC1 and PRC2 in the hippocampus, followed by down-regulation of many of the same genes at later times points (4 , 8 and 24 h. Spatio-temporal differences were found among PRC2 genes in epileptic tolerance, including increased expression of Ezh2, Suz12 and Yy2 relative to the normal injury response to status epilepticus. In contrast, PRC1 complex genes including Ring 1B and Bmi1 displayed differential down-regulation in epileptic tolerance. The present study characterizes polycomb group gene expression following status epilepticus and shows prior seizure exposure produces select changes to PRC1 and PRC2 composition that may influence differential gene expression in epileptic tolerance.

  3. Sry is a transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, R A; Ostrer, H

    1994-09-01

    The SRY gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The mouse Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORFs) share a conserved DNA-binding domain (the HMG-box) yet exhibit no additional homology outside this region. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and mouse SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The mouse Sry HMG-box domain selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when challenged with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. When put under the control of a heterologous promotor, the mouse Sry gene activated transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was likewise observed for a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, when the mouse Sry gene was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-mouse Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive reporter gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and the mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  4. Interaction of HMG proteins and H1 with hybrid PNA-DNA junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsingan, Filbert; Bell, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of inserting peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequences into the protein-binding surface of an immobilized four-way junction (4WJ). Here we compare the classic immobile DNA junction, J1, with two PNA containing hybrid junctions (4WJ-PNA1 and 4WJ-PNA3 ). The protein interactions of each 4WJ were evaluated using recombinant high mobility group proteins from rat (HMGB1b and HMGB1b/R26A) and human histone H1. In vitro studies show that both HMG and H1 proteins display high binding affinity toward 4WJ's. A 4WJ can access different conformations depending on ionic environment, most simply interpreted by a two-state equilibrium between: (i) an open-x state favored by absence of Mg(2+), low salt, and protein binding, and (ii) a compact stacked-x state favored by Mg(2+). 4WJ-PNA3, like J1, shifts readily from an open to stacked conformation in the presence of Mg(+2), while 4WJ-PNA1 does not. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that HMGB1b recognizes each of the hybrid junctions. H1, however, displays a strong preference for J1 relative to the hybrids. More extensive binding analysis revealed that HMGB1b binds J1 and 4WJ-PNA3 with nearly identical affinity (K(D)s) and 4WJ-PNA1 with two-fold lower affinity. Thus both the sequence/location of the PNA sequence and the protein determine the structural and protein recognition properties of 4WJs.

  5. A 3' --> 5' XPB helicase defect in repair/transcription factor TFIIH of xeroderma pigmentosum group B affects both DNA repair and transcription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Hwang; V. Moncollin; W. Vermeulen (Wim); T. Seroz; H. van Vuuren; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractXPB is a subunit of the basal transcription factor TFIIH, which is also involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and potentially in cell cycle regulation. A frameshift mutation in the 3'-end of the XPB gene is responsible for a concurrence of two disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  6. High Mobility Group Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2008-01-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) proteins, including HMGA, HMGB and HMGN, are abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind to DNA, nucleosome and other multi-protein complexes in a dynamic and reversible fashion to regulate DNA processing in the context of chromatin. All HMG proteins, like histone proteins, are subjected to extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as lysine acetylation, arginine/lysine methylation and serine/threonine phosphorylation, to modulate their inter...

  7. Translocation of Cockayne syndrome group A protein to the nuclear matrix: possible relevance to transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kamiuchi (Shinya); M. Saijo (Masafumi); E. Citterio (Elisabetta); M. de Jager (Martijn); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Tanaka (Kiyoji)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTranscription-coupled repair (TCR) efficiently removes a variety of lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. By allowing rapid resumption of RNA synthesis, the process is of major importance for cellular resistance to transcription-blocking genotoxic damage. Mutations in the

  8. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  9. Single dose testosterone increases total cholesterol levels and induces the expression of HMG CoA Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cholesterol is mainly synthesised in liver and the rate-limiting step is the reduction of 3-hydroxy-3methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) to mevalonate, a reaction catalysed by HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR). There is a comprehensive body of evidence documenting that anabolic-androgenic steroids are associated with deleterious alterations of lipid profile. In this study we investigated whether a single dose of testosterone enanthate affects the cholesterol biosynthesis and the e...

  10. [Molecular characterization of a HMG-CoA reductase gene from a rare and endangered medicinal plant, Dendrobium officinale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Gang; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2014-03-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate in mavalonic acid pathway, which is the first committed step for isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants. However, it still remains unclear whether HGMR gene plays a role in the isoprenoid biosynthesis in Dendrobium officinale, an endangered epiphytic orchid species. In the present study, a HMGR encoding gene, designed as DoHMGR1 (GenBank accession JX272632), was identified from D. officinale using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods, for the first time. The full length cDNA of DoHMGR1 was 2 071 bp in length and encoded a 562-aa protein with a molecular weight of 59.73 kD and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.18. The deduced DoHMGR1 protein, like other HMGR proteins, constituted four conserved domains (63-561, 147-551, 268-383 and 124-541) and two transmembrane motifs (42-64 and 85-107). Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that DoHMGR1 had high identity (67%-89%) to a number of HMGR genes from various plants and was closely related to Vanda hybrid cultivar, rice and maize monocots. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis revealed that DoHMGR1 was expressed in the three included organs. The transcripts were the most abundant in the roots with 2.13 fold over that in the leaves, followed by that in the stems with 1.98 fold. Molecular characterization of DoHMGR1 will be useful for further functional elucidation of the gene involving in isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway in D. officinale.

  11. Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobin Jean

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects. Case presentation We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dose simvastatin. The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease. Conclusion This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

  12. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors from Monascus-Fermented Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven compounds were isolated from Monascus-fermented rice by column chromatography with silica gel and semiprep HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods. All compounds displayed HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory potential, among them compound 7 exhibited strong inhibition with IC50 value comparable with lovastatin. In this study, two compounds (1 and 2 were obtained from natural source for the first time.

  13. Developmental toxicity of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (PPD10558) in rats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faqi, Ali S; Prohaska, David; Lopez, Rocio; McIntyre, Gail

    2012-02-01

    PPD10558 is an orally active, lipid-lowering 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statin) being developed as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia in patients who have not been able to tolerate statins because of statin-associated myalgia. We have studied the potential developmental toxicity effects of PPD10558 in pregnant rats and rabbits given daily oral doses during the period of organogenesis. Rats were dosed with 0, 20, 80, or 320 mg/kg/day from Gestation Day (GD) 6 to 17 and rabbits received dose levels of 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg/day from GD 6 to 18. Additional groups in both studies served as toxicokinetic animals and received the PPD10558 in the same manner as the main study groups at the same dose levels. Blood samples were collected from toxicokinetic animals at designated time points on GD 6 and 17 in rats and GD 6 and 18 in rabbits. Fetal exposure in rats was assessed on GD 20. Maternal and developmental parameters were evaluated in rats and rabbits on GD 20 and GD 29, respectively. No maternal and developmental toxicity was observed at any of the dose levels used in the rat study. Evidence of fetal exposure was determined in fetal plasma with mean fetal concentrations of PPD10558 and the metabolite (PPD11901) found to be between 1 and 6% of the mean maternal concentrations. In rabbits, marked maternal toxicity including mortality (eight deaths; 1 dose at 25 and 7 at 50 mg/kg/day), abortions (2 at 25 mg/kg/day and 6 at 50 mg/kg/day) and reduction in gestation body weight, gestation body weight changes and decreased food consumption were observed. In addition, fetal body weights of the combined sexes were significantly reduced at 50 mg/kg/day in comparison with the controls. Mean peak exposure (Cmax) and total exposure (AUC(0-24)) of PPD11901 in both rats and rabbits were higher than that of PPD10558 on GD 6 and GD 17 at each of the three dose levels.. Based on the results of these studies, the no observed adverse effect

  14. Transcript-based redefinition of grouped oligonucleotide probe sets using AceView: High-resolution annotation for microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cam Margaret C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracting biological information from high-density Affymetrix arrays is a multi-step process that begins with the accurate annotation of microarray probes. Shortfalls in the original Affymetrix probe annotation have been described; however, few studies have provided rigorous solutions for routine data analysis. Results Using AceView, a comprehensive human transcript database, we have reannotated the probes by matching them to RNA transcripts instead of genes. Based on this transcript-level annotation, a new probe set definition was created in which every probe in a probe set maps to a common set of AceView gene transcripts. In addition, using artificial data sets we identified that a minimal probe set size of 4 is necessary for reliable statistical summarization. We further demonstrate that applying the new probe set definition can detect specific transcript variants contributing to differential expression and it also improves cross-platform concordance. Conclusion We conclude that our transcript-level reannotation and redefinition of probe sets complement the original Affymetrix design. Redefinitions introduce probe sets whose sizes may not support reliable statistical summarization; therefore, we advocate using our transcript-level mapping redefinition in a secondary analysis step rather than as a replacement. Knowing which specific transcripts are differentially expressed is important to properly design probe/primer pairs for validation purposes. For convenience, we have created custom chip-description-files (CDFs and annotation files for our new probe set definitions that are compatible with Bioconductor, Affymetrix Expression Console or third party software.

  15. Effect of long-term cholesterol-lowering treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (Simvastatin) of myocardial perfusion evaluated by thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Ryohei; Nohara, Ryuji; Linxue, Li; Sasayama, Shigetake [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Tamaki, Shunichi; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Masahiro; Miki, Shinji

    2000-03-01

    Fifteen patients with either angina pectoris or old myocardial infarction, who had positive {sup 201}Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and coronary sclerosis of more than 50%, were treated with an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (simvastatin) for more than 1 year. They were compared with an untreated control group (n=25). Total cholesterol decreased 22% and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) increased 9% with simvastatin; both changes were significantly different from those in controls. Long-term simvastatin induced improvement of myocardial perfusion on {sup 201}Tl SPECT images both during exercise and at rest, which was also significantly different from controls. In addition, the improvement of myocardial perfusion on {sup 201}Tl SPECT images was clearly related to the improvements in cholesterol values, especially nonHDL cholesterol. Thus, the greater the decrease in nonHDL cholesterol, the greater the improvement in myocardial perfusion at rest or during exercise with long-term treatment using an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. These findings indicate that the improvements in cholesterol values caused by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy are related to improvements of myocardial perfusion seen on {sup 201}Tl SPECT images. (author)

  16. The mating-related loci sexM and sexP of the zygomycetous fungus Mucor mucedo and their transcriptional regulation by trisporoid pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Jana; Burmester, Anke; Kolbe, Melanie; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    The putative mating type locus of mucoralean fungi consists of a single high mobility group (HMG)-domain transcription factor gene, sexM or sexP, flanked by genes for an RNA helicase and a triosephosphate transporter. We used degenerate primers derived from the amino acid sequence of the RNA helicase to sequence a fragment of this gene from Mucor mucedo. This fragment was extended by inverse PCR to obtain the complete sequences of the sex loci from both mating types of M. mucedo. The sex loci in M. mucedo reflect the general picture obtained previously for Phycomyces blakesleeanus, presenting a single HMG-domain transcription factor gene, sexM and sexP in the minus and plus mating types, respectively. These are located next to a gene for RNA helicase. Transcriptional analysis by quantitative real-time PCR showed that only transcription of sexM is considerably stimulated by adding trisporoid pheromones, thus mimicking sexual stimulation, whereas sexP is only slightly affected. These differences in regulation between sexM and sexP are supported by the observation that the promoter sequences controlling these genes show no similarities. The protein structures themselves are considerably different. The SexM, but not the SexP protein harbours a nuclear localization sequence. The SexM protein is indeed transported to nuclei. This was shown by means of a GFP fusion construct that was used to study the localization of SexM in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fusion protein is highly enriched in nuclei.

  17. Regeneration of NADPH Coupled with HMG-CoA Reductase Activity Increases Squalene Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivan, Kalaivani; Mutturi, Sarma

    2017-09-20

    Although overexpression of the tHMG1 gene is a well-known strategy for terpene synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the optimal level for tHMG1p has not been established. In the present study, it was observed that two copies of the tHMG1 gene on a dual gene expression cassette improved squalene synthesis in laboratory strain by 16.8-fold in comparison to single-copy expression. It was also observed that tHMG1p is limited by its cofactor (NADPH), as the overexpression of NADPH regenerating genes', viz., ZWF1 and POS5 (full length and without mitochondrial presequence), has led to its increased enzyme activity. Further, it was demonstrated that overexpression of full-length POS5 has improved squalene synthesis in cytosol. Finally, when tHMG1 and full-length POS5 were co-overexpressed there was a net 27.5-fold increase in squalene when compared to control strain. These results suggest novel strategies to increase squalene accumulation in S. cerevisiae.

  18. RNAi silencing of the HaHMG-CoA reductase gene inhibits oviposition in the Helicoverpa armigera cotton bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijian; Dong, Yongcheng; Desneux, Nicolas; Niu, Changying

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has considerable promise for developing novel pest control techniques, especially because of the threat of the development of resistance against current strategies. For this purpose, the key is to select pest control genes with the greatest potential for developing effective pest control treatments. The present study demonstrated that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase; HMGR) gene is a potential target for insect control using RNAi. HMGR is a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway in insects. A complete cDNA encoding full length HMGR (encoding an 837-aa protein) was cloned from Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The HaHMGR (H. armigera HMGR) knockdown using systemic RNAi in vivo inhibited the fecundity of the females, effectively inhibited ovipostion, and significantly reduced vitellogenin (Vg) mRNA levels. Moreover, the oviposition rate of the female moths was reduced by 98% by silencing HaHMGR compared to the control groups. One-pair experiments showed that both the proportions of valid mating and fecundity were zero. Furthermore, the HaHMGR-silenced females failed to lay eggs (approximate 99% decrease in oviposition) in the semi-field cage performance. The present study demonstrated the potential implications for developing novel pest management strategies using HaHMGR RNAi in the control of H. armigera and other insect pests.

  19. CaWRKY58, encoding a group I WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, negatively regulates resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuna; Dang, Fengfeng; Liu, Zhiqin; Wang, Xu; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Yu, Lu; She, Jianju; Shi, Youliang; Lin, Jinhui; Chen, Chengcong; Guan, Deyi; Qiu, Ailian; He, Shuilin

    2013-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by large gene families across the plant kingdom. So far, their biological and molecular functions in nonmodel plants, including pepper (Capsicum annuum) and other Solanaceae, remain poorly understood. Here, we report on the functional characterization of a new group I WRKY protein from pepper, termed CaWRKY58. Our data indicate that CaWRKY58 can be localized to the nucleus and can activate the transcription of the reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene driven by the 35S core promoter with two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. In pepper plants infected with the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, CaWRKY58 transcript levels showed a biphasic response, manifested in an early/transient down-regulation and late up-regulation. CaWRKY58 transcripts were suppressed by treatment with methyl jasmonate and abscisic acid. Tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY58 did not show any obvious morphological phenotypes, but exhibited disease symptoms of greater severity than did wild-type plants. The enhanced susceptibility of CaWRKY58-overexpressing tobacco plants correlated with the decreased expression of hypersensitive response marker genes, as well as various defence-associated genes. Consistently, CaWRKY58 pepper plants silenced by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) displayed enhanced resistance to the highly virulent R. solanacearum strain FJC100301, and this was correlated with enhanced transcripts of defence-related pepper genes. Our results suggest that CaWRKY58 acts as a transcriptional activator of negative regulators in the resistance of pepper to R. solanacearum infection.

  20. The pregnancy rates with intrauterine insemination (IUI) in superovulated cycles employing different protocols (clomiphen citrate (CC), human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) and HMG+CC) and in natural ovulatory cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahani, I M; Afnan, M

    2004-10-01

    To compare the result of IUI in infertile couples with different protocols of induction ovulation. In a retrospective study, 209 infertile couples with different diagnosis (unexplained, male factor, endometriosis, tubal disease, ovulatory dysfunction and multifactorial infertility) were subjected to different protocol of induction ovulation: 50-100 mg CC in day 2-6, 50 mg CC in day 2-6 + 2 amp HMG in day 5, 7, 9, 11, and 2 amp HMG per day. Natural ovulatory cycle + IUI was used for sperm stored patients. 441 consecutive cycles of IUI was performed 36-40 hours after HCG injection. The data were analysed with student T-test and Mann-Whitney test. The significance was defined as P<0.005. Thirty one pregnancies (7% per cycle, 15% per patient) occurred. One pregnancy occurred (pregnancy per cycle was 2% and per patient was 12%) in 8 patients undergoing 37 cycles of IUI with natural ovulation. The result with CC in 27 patients undergoing 41 cycles IUI was 2 pregnancies (4% per cycle, 7% per patient). In 129 patients receiving 283 cycles of IUI with CC+HMG 21 pregnancies occurred (7% per cycle, 16% per patient). In 35 patients receiving 80 cycles of IUI with HMG 8 pregnancies occurred (9% per cycle, 23% per patient). The method chosen for ovulation induction had a critical bearing on the success of IUI. The result of IUI will be better by using induction ovulation compared to natural ovulatory cycle. In our programme the combined use of HMG+IUI yielded a higher rate of pregnancy rate compared with CC+IUI, CC+HMG+IUI and natural ovulatory cycle+IUI.

  1. Aspects of Antithrombotic Effect of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺石林

    2005-01-01

    @@ Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesteremia and have showed remarkable activity in preventing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies demonstrated that statins have significant antithrombotic effect in addition to cholesterollowering action. Although the efficacy of statins for reducing cardiovascular events has historically been ascribed to their inhibitory activity on cholesterol synthesis, the degree of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction by statins generally does not correlate with the magnitude of coronary risk reduction.

  2. Analysis of BMP4 and BMP7 signaling in breast cancer cells unveils time-dependent transcription patterns and highlights a common synexpression group of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Martinez Alejandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are members of the TGF-beta superfamily of growth factors. They are known for their roles in regulation of osteogenesis and developmental processes and, in recent years, evidence has accumulated of their crucial functions in tumor biology. BMP4 and BMP7, in particular, have been implicated in breast cancer. However, little is known about BMP target genes in the context of tumor. We explored the effects of BMP4 and BMP7 treatment on global gene transcription in seven breast cancer cell lines during a 6-point time series, using a whole-genome oligo microarray. Data analysis included hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes, gene ontology enrichment analyses and model based clustering of temporal data. Results Both ligands had a strong effect on gene expression, although the response to BMP4 treatment was more pronounced. The cellular functions most strongly affected by BMP signaling were regulation of transcription and development. The observed transcriptional response, as well as its functional outcome, followed a temporal sequence, with regulation of gene expression and signal transduction leading to changes in metabolism and cell proliferation. Hierarchical clustering revealed distinct differences in the response of individual cell lines to BMPs, but also highlighted a synexpression group of genes for both ligands. Interestingly, the majority of the genes within these synexpression groups were shared by the two ligands, probably representing the core molecular responses common to BMP4 and BMP7 signaling pathways. Conclusions All in all, we show that BMP signaling has a remarkable effect on gene transcription in breast cancer cells and that the functions affected follow a logical temporal pattern. Our results also uncover components of the common cellular transcriptional response to BMP4 and BMP7. Most importantly, this study provides a list of potential novel BMP target

  3. The Utrogestan and hMG protocol in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation during IVF/ICSI treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuxian; Ye, Hongjuan; Fu, Yonglun

    2016-07-01

    Poor oocyte quality is a main concern for decreased reproductive outcomes in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH). A primary way to improve oocyte quality is to optimize the COH protocol. It was demonstrated that the viable embryo rate per oocyte retrieved in the Utrogestan and hMG protocol, a novel regimen based on frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET), is statistically higher than that in the short protocol. Thus, a retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the endocrine characteristics and clinical outcomes in PCOS patients subjected to the Utrogestan and hMG protocol compared with those subjected to the short protocol.One hundred twenty three PCOS patients enrolled in the study group and were simultaneously administered Utrogestan and human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) from cycle day 3 until the trigger day. When the dominant follicles matured, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) 0.1 mg was used as the trigger. A short protocol was applied in the control group including 77 PCOS women. Viable embryos were cryopreserved for later transfer in both groups. The primary outcome was the viable embryo rate per oocyte retrieved. The secondary outcomes included the number of oocytes retrieved, fertilization rate, and clinical pregnancy outcomes from FET cycles.The pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) level was suppressed in most patients; however, the LH level in 13 women, whose basic LH level was more than 10 IU/L, surpassed 10 IU/L on menstruation cycle day (MC)9-11 and decreased subsequently. No significant between-group differences were observed in the number of oocytes retrieved (13.27 ± 7.46 vs 13.1 ± 7.98), number of viable embryos (5.57 ± 3.27 vs 5 ± 2.79), mature oocyte rate (90.14 ± 11.81% vs 93.02 ± 8.95%), and cleavage rate (97.69 ± 6.22% vs 95.89 ± 9.57%). The fertilization rate (76.11 ± 19.04% vs 69.34 ± 21.81%; P < 0

  4. A Case of Dilated Cardiomyopathy Associated with 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG CoA Lyase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. C. Leung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA lyase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by impairment of ketogenesis and leucine catabolism resulting in an organic acidopathy. In 1994, a case of dilated cardiomyopathy and fatal arrhythmia was reported in a 7-month-old infant. We report a case of dilated cardiomyopathy in association with HMG CoA lyase deficiency in a 23-year-old man with the acute presentation of heart failure. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in an adult.

  5. A randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy and safety of two HMG preparations gaining their LH bioactivity from different HCG sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockwood, Gillian; Cometti, Barbara; Bogstad, Jeanette

    2017-01-01

    In this prospective, controlled, randomized, multicentre, non-inferiority study, efficacy and safety of two HMG preparations (Menopur(®)- Ferring and Meriofert®- IBSA Institut Biochimique SA) for ovarian stimulation were compared (270 women undergoing IVF aged between 18 and 39 years; BMI 30 kg/m(2......) or less; less than three prior completed assisted reproduction technique cycles). A standard long down-regulation with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist protocol, with HCG triggering was used; primary end-point was total number of oocytes retrieved; attention was paid toovarian hyperstimulation...... syndrome (OHSS). No statistically significant differences between the treatment groups were reported for most of the clinically significant end-points, including embryo quality, fertilization rate, implantation rate, ongoing pregnancy rate and live birth rate. Total number of oocytes retrieved was higher...

  6. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Manólio Soares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC, and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect.

  7. Kinetic characterization of an oxidative, cooperative HMG-CoA reductase from Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Benjamin H; Driver, Joseph; Peacock, Riley B; Dembinski, Holly E; Corson, Melissa H; Gordon, Samuel S; Watson, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is a key enzyme in endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in mammals and isoprenoid biosynthesis via the mevalonate pathway in other eukaryotes, archaea and some eubacteria. In most organisms that express this enzyme, it catalyzes the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of HMG-CoA to mevalonate. We have cloned and characterized the 6x-His-tagged HMGR from the opportunistic lung pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Kinetic characterization shows that the enzyme prefers NAD(H) over NADP(H) as a cofactor, suggesting an oxidative physiological role for the enzyme. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the Burkholderia cenocepacia genome lacks the genes for the downstream enzymes of the mevalonate pathway. The enzyme exhibits positive cooperativity toward the substrates of the reductive reaction, but the oxidative reaction exhibits unusual double-saturation kinetics, distinctive among characterized HMG-CoA reductases. The unusual kinetics may arise from the presence of multiple active oligomeric states, each with different Vmax values.

  8. Both HMG boxes in Hmo1 are essential for DNA binding in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Ayako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Kasahara, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Hmo1, a member of the high mobility group B family proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, associates with the promoters of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) to direct accurate transcriptional initiation. Here, to identify factors involved in the binding of Hmo1 to its targets and the mechanism of Hmo1-dependent transcriptional initiation, we developed a novel reporter system using the promoter of the RPG RPS5. A genetic screen did not identify any factors that influence Hmo1 binding, but did identify a number of mutations in Hmo1 that impair its DNA binding activity in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that Hmo1 binds to its target promoters autonomously without any aid of additional factors. Furthermore, characterization of Hmo1 mutants showed that the box A domain plays a pivotal role in DNA binding and may be required for the recognition of structural properties of target promoters that occur in native chromatin.

  9. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, other lipid-lowering medication, antiplatelet therapy, and the risk of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramcharan, A.S.; van Stralen, K.J.; Snoep, J.D.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A.K.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background: Statins [3-hydroxymethyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] and antiplatelet therapy reduce the risk of atherosclerotic disease. Besides a reduction of lipid levels, statins might also have antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties, and anti-platelet

  10. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, other lipid-lowering medication, antiplatelet therapy, and the risk of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramcharan, A.S.; Stralen, van K.J.; Snoep, J.D.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A.K.; Doggen, C.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Statins [3-hydroxymethyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] and antiplatelet therapy reduce the risk of atherosclerotic disease. Besides a reduction of lipid levels, statins might also have antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties, and anti-platelet therap

  11. A SRY-HMG box frame shift mutation inherited from a mosaic father with a mild form of testicular dysgenesis syndrome in Turner syndrome patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batra Swaraj

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex determining factor (SRY located on the short arm of the Y chromosome, plays an important role in initiating male sex determination, resulting in development of testicular tissue. Presence of the SRY gene in females results in XY sex reversal and increased risk of gonadal germ cell tumours if the karyotype also includes the so-called GonadoBlastoma on the Y chromosome (GBY region. The majority of mutations within the SRY gene are de novo affecting only a single individual in the family. The mutations within the high-mobility group (HMG region have the potential to affect its DNA binding activity. Case Presentation We performed G- and R-banding cytogenetic analysis of the patient and her family members including her father. We also performed molecular genetic analysis of SRY gene. Cytogenetic analysis in the patient (Turner Syndrome revealed the mosaic karyotype as 45, X/46, XY (79%/21% respectively while her father (milder features with testicular dysgenesis syndrome has a normal male karyotype (46, XY. Using molecular approach, we screened the patient and her father for mutations in the SRY gene. Both patient and her father showed the same deletion of cytosine within HMG box resulting in frame shift mutation (L94fsX180, the father in a mosaic pattern. Histological examination of the gonads from the patient revealed the presence of gonadoblastoma formation, while the father presented with oligoasthenozoospermia and a testicular seminoma. The frameshift mutation at this codon is novel, and may result in a mutated SRY protein. Conclusion Our results suggest that lack of a second sex chromosome in majority cells of the patient may have triggered the short stature and primary infertility, and the mutated SRY protein may be associated with the development of gonadoblastoma. It is of importance to note that mosaic patients without a SRY mutation also have a risk for malignant germ cell tumors.

  12. Quantification of SLIT-ROBO transcripts in hepatocellular carcinoma reveals two groups of genes with coordinate expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konu Ozlen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SLIT-ROBO families of proteins mediate axon pathfinding and their expression is not solely confined to nervous system. Aberrant expression of SLIT-ROBO genes was repeatedly shown in a wide variety of cancers, yet data about their collective behavior in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is missing. Hence, we quantified SLIT-ROBO transcripts in HCC cell lines, and in normal and tumor tissues from liver. Methods Expression of SLIT-ROBO family members was quantified by real-time qRT-PCR in 14 HCC cell lines, 8 normal and 35 tumor tissues from the liver. ANOVA and Pearson's correlation analyses were performed in R environment, and different clinicopathological subgroups were pairwise compared in Minitab. Gene expression matrices of cell lines and tissues were analyzed by Mantel's association test. Results Genewise hierarchical clustering revealed two subgroups with coordinate expression pattern in both the HCC cell lines and tissues: ROBO1, ROBO2, SLIT1 in one cluster, and ROBO4, SLIT2, SLIT3 in the other, respectively. Moreover, SLIT-ROBO expression predicted AFP-dependent subgrouping of HCC cell lines, but not that of liver tissues. ROBO1 and ROBO2 were significantly up-regulated, whereas SLIT3 was significantly down-regulated in cell lines with high-AFP background. When compared to normal liver tissue, ROBO1 was found to be significantly overexpressed, while ROBO4 was down-regulated in HCC. We also observed that ROBO1 and SLIT2 differentiated histopathological subgroups of liver tissues depending on both tumor staging and differentiation status. However, ROBO4 could discriminate poorly differentiated HCC from other subgroups. Conclusion The present study is the first in comprehensive and quantitative evaluation of SLIT-ROBO family gene expression in HCC, and suggests that the expression of SLIT-ROBO genes is regulated in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our results implicate that SLIT-ROBO transcription profile is bi-modular in nature, and

  13. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-like globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681--10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and the HS2core DNA sequence which exists in different states (the naked DNA or the in vitro reconstituted nucleosomal DNA) are quite different. We speculate that HMG proteins might play a critical role in the regulation of the human β-like globin gene's expression.

  14. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681--10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and the HS2core DNA sequence which exists in different states (the naked DNA or the in vitro reconstituted nucleosomal DNA) are quite different. We speculate that HMG proteins might play a critical role in the regulation of the human b-like globin gene's expression.

  15. HMG-CoA还原酶抑制剂临床应用现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵民象; 于秉新

    1999-01-01

    @@ 3-羟基-3-甲基戊二酰辅酶A(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzymeA,HMG-CoA)还原酶抑制剂是一类新型降血脂药物,为临床防治动脉粥样硬化首选药.目前已用于临床有5种:洛伐他汀(lovastatin,默克公司创制);辛伐他汀(simvastatin,默克公司创制);普伐他汀(pravastatin,日本三共公司创制);氟伐他汀(flulatatin,瑞士sandoz公司创制);atorvastatin(美国Parke-Davis/PFizer Ltd创制).

  16. Potential use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) as radioprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Gerhard; Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia. Apart from their lipid-lowering activity, they have pleiotropic effects that are attributed to the inhibition of regulatory proteins, including Ras-homologous (Rho) GTPases. Here, we discuss the potential usefulness of statins to prevent normal tissue damage provoked by radiotherapy. Statins reduce the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines stimulated by ionizing radiation in vitro and alleviate IR-induced inflammation and fibrosis in vivo. The currently available data indicate that statins accelerate the rapid repair of DNA double-strand breaks and, moreover, mitigate the DNA damage response induced by IR. Furthermore, statins increase the mRNA expression of DNA repair factors in vivo. Thus, although the molecular mechanisms involved are still ambiguous, preclinical data concordantly show a promising radioprotective capacity of statins.

  17. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  18. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  19. Twelve Group I introns in the same pre-rRNA transcript of the myxomycete Fuligo septica: RNA processing and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Eirik W; Einvik, Christer; Rønning, Sissel; Haugli, Kari; Johansen, Steinar

    2004-07-01

    The ribosomal DNA region of the myxomycete Fuligo septica was investigated and found to contain 12 group I introns (four in the small subunit and eight in the large subunit ribosomal RNAs). We have performed molecular and phylogenetic analyses to provide insight into intron structure and function, intron-host biology, and intron origin and evolution. The introns vary in size from 398 to 943 nt, all lacking detectable open reading frames. Secondary structure models revealed considerable structural diversity, but all, except one (subclass IB), represent the common group IC1 intron subclass. In vitro splicing analysis revealed that 10 of the 12 introns were able to self-splice as naked RNA, but all 12 introns were able to splice out from the precursor rRNA in vivo as evaluated by reverse transcription PCR analysis on total F. septica RNA. Furthermore, RNA processing analyses in vitro and in vivo showed that 10 of 12 introns perform hydrolytic cleavage at the 3' splice site, as well as intron circularization. Full-length intron RNA circles were detected in vivo. The order of splicing was analyzed by a reverse transcription PCR approach on cellular RNA, but no strict order of intron excision could be detected. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that most Fuligo introns were distantly related to each other and were independently gained in ribosomal DNA during evolution.

  20. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  1. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors Bind to PPARα to Upregulate Neurotrophin Expression in the Brain and Improve Memory in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Jana, Malabendu; Kundu, Madhuchhanda; Corbett, Grant T; Rangaswamy, Suresh B; Mishra, Rama K; Luan, Chi-Hao; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-08-01

    Neurotrophins are important for neuronal health and function. Here, statins, inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol lowering drugs, were found to stimulate expression of neurotrophins in brain cells independent of the mevalonate pathway. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses, computer-derived simulation, site-directed mutagenesis, thermal shift assay, and de novo binding followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) demonstrates that statins serve as ligands of PPARα and that Leu331 and Tyr 334 residues of PPARα are important for statin binding. Upon binding, statins upregulate neurotrophins via PPARα-mediated transcriptional activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Accordingly, simvastatin increases CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Ppara null mice receiving full-length lentiviral PPARα, but not L331M/Y334D statin-binding domain-mutated lentiviral PPARα. This study identifies statins as ligands of PPARα, describes neurotrophic function of statins via the PPARα-CREB pathway, and analyzes the importance of PPARα in the therapeutic success of simvastatin in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Water-Soluble Compounds from Lentinula edodes Influencing the HMG-CoA Reductase Activity and the Expression of Genes Involved in the Cholesterol Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Caz, Víctor; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Martin-Hernandez, Roberto; Largo, Carlota; Tabernero, María; Marín, Francisco R; Iacomini, Marcello; Reglero, Guillermo; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2016-03-09

    A water extract from Lentinula edodes (LWE) showed HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity but contained no statins. NMR indicated the presence of water-soluble α- and β-glucans and fucomannogalactans. Fractions containing derivatives of these polysaccharides with molecular weight down to approximately 1 kDa still retained their inhibitory activity. Once digested LWE was applied to Caco2 in transport experiments, no significant effect was noticed on the modulation of cholesterol-related gene expression. But, when the lower compartment of the Caco2 monolayer was applied to HepG2, some genes were modulated (after 24 h). LWE was also administrated to normo- and hypercholesterolemic mice, and no significant lowering of serum cholesterol levels was observed; but reduction of triglycerides in liver was observed. However, LWE supplementation modulated the transcriptional profile of some genes involved in the cholesterol metabolism similarly to simvastatin, suggesting that it could hold potential as a hypolipidemic/hypocholesterolemic extract, although further dose-dependent studies should be carried out.

  3. The statin class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors demonstrate differential activation of the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR and FXR, as well as their downstream target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Katharine; Sanat, Faizah; Thumser, Alfred E; Coleman, Tanya; Plant, Nick

    2011-07-01

    The therapeutic class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, the statins are central agents in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and the associated conditions of cardiovascular disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Although statin therapy is generally considered safe, a number of known adverse effects do occur, most commonly treatment-associated muscular pain. In vitro evidence also supports the potential for drug-drug interactions involving this class of agents, and to examine this a ligand-binding assay was used to determine the ability of six clinically used statins for their ability to directly activate the nuclear receptors pregnane X-receptor (PXR), farnesoid X-receptor (FXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), demonstrating a relative activation of PXR>FXR>CAR. Using reporter gene constructs, we demonstrated that this order of activation is mirrored at the transcriptional activation level, with PXR-mediated gene activation being pre-eminent. Finally, we described a novel regulatory loop, whereby activation of FXR by statins increases PXR reporter gene expression, potentially enhancing PXR-mediated responses. Delineating the molecular interactions of statins with nuclear receptors is an important step in understanding the full biological consequences of statin exposure. This demonstration of their ability to directly activate nuclear receptors, leading to nuclear receptor cross-talk, has important potential implications for their use within a polypharmacy paradigm.

  4. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  5. Statins: 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors demonstrate anti-atherosclerotic character due to their antioxidant capacity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Puttananjaiah, M.H.; Dhale, M.A.; Gaonkar, V.; Keni, S.

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of multiple etiologies. It is associated with the accumulation of oxidized lipids in arterial lesions leading to coronary heart disease. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase...

  6. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-Mike globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晖; 张树冰; 蒋俶; 钱若兰

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNasel hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681-10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG 14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG 1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and t

  7. Sry-type HMG box 18 Contributes to the differentiation of Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuagie, Ikhapoh Attairu; Pelham, Christopher J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have shown therapeutic potential to engraft and either differentiate into or support differentiation of vascular endothelial cells (EC), smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes in animal models of ischemic heart disease. Following intracoronary or transendocardial delivery of MSCs, however, only a small fraction of cells engraft and the majority of those persist as an immature cell phenotype. The goal of the current study was to decipher the molecular pathways and mechanisms that control MSC differentiation into ECs. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-165) treatment is known to enhance in vitro differentiation of MSCs into ECs. We tested the possible involvement of the Sry-type HMG box (Sox) family of transcription factors in this process. Method and Results MSCs were isolated from the bone marrow of Yucatan microswine and underwent a 10 day differentiation protocol. VEGF-165 (50 ng/ml) treatment of MSCs in vitro induced a significant increase in the protein expression of VEGFR-2, Sox9 and Sox18, in addition to the EC markers PECAM-1, VE-cadherin and vWF, as determined by Western blot or flow cytometry. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Sox18, as opposed to Sox9, in MSCs prevented VEGF-165-mediated induction of EC markers and capillary tube formation. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 signaling (SC-202850) reduced Sox18 and reduced VEGF-165-induced differentiation of MSCs to ECs. Conclusion Here we demonstrate that VEGF-165 mediates MSC differentiation into ECs via VEGFR-2-dependent induction of Sox18, which ultimately coordinates the transcriptional upregulation of specific markers of the EC phenotype. PMID:25913202

  8. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  10. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamala Salvamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, nitric oxide (NO, and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  11. Involvement of HMG-12 and CAR-1 in the cdc-48.1 expression of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Seiji; Higashitani, Nahoko; Otani, Mieko; Higashitani, Atsushi; Ogura, Teru; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi

    2008-06-15

    Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two p97/VCP/Cdc48p homologues, named CDC-48.1 (C06A1.1) and CDC-48.2 (C41C4.8), and their expression patterns and levels are differently regulated. To clarify the regulatory mechanisms of differential expression of two p97 proteins of C. elegans, we performed detailed deletion analysis of their promoter regions. We found that the promoter of cdc-48.1 contains two regions necessary for embryonic and for post-embryonic expression, while the promoter of cdc-48.2 contains the single region necessary for embryonic expression. In particular, two elements (Element A and Element B) and three conserved boxes (Box a, Box b and Box c) were essential for cdc-48.1 expression in embryos and at post-embryonic stages, respectively. By using South-Western blotting and MALDI-TOF MS analysis, we identified HMG-12 and CAR-1 as proteins that bind to Element A and Element B, respectively, from the embryonic nuclear extract. Importantly, we found the decreased expression of p97 in embryos prepared from hmg-12(RNAi) or car-1(RNAi) worms. These results indicate that both HMG-12 and CAR-1 play important roles in embryonic expression of cdc-48.1.

  12. Lepidopteran HMG-CoA reductase is a potential selective target for pest control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-mei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of the negative impacts on the environment of some insecticides, discovery of eco-friendly insecticides and target has received global attention in recent years. Sequence alignment and structural comparison of the rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR revealed differences between lepidopteran pests and other organisms, which suggested insect HMGR could be a selective insecticide target candidate. Inhibition of JH biosynthesis in vitro confirmed that HMGR inhibitors showed a potent lethal effect on the lepidopteran pest Manduca sexta, whereas there was little effect on JH biosynthesis in Apis mellifera and Diploptera punctata. The pest control application of these inhibitors demonstrated that they can be insecticide candidates with potent ovicidal activity, larvicidal activity and insect growth regulatory effects. The present study has validated that Lepidopteran HMGR can be a potent selective insecticide target, and the HMGR inhibitors (especially type II statins could be selective insecticide candidates and lead compounds. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sequence alignment, homology modeling and structural comparison may be useful for determining potential enzymes or receptors which can be eco-friendly pesticide  targets.

  13. Lepidopteran HMG-CoA reductase is a potential selective target for pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-mei; Huang, Juan; Tobe, Stephen S.

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of the negative impacts on the environment of some insecticides, discovery of eco-friendly insecticides and target has received global attention in recent years. Sequence alignment and structural comparison of the rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) revealed differences between lepidopteran pests and other organisms, which suggested insect HMGR could be a selective insecticide target candidate. Inhibition of JH biosynthesis in vitro confirmed that HMGR inhibitors showed a potent lethal effect on the lepidopteran pest Manduca sexta, whereas there was little effect on JH biosynthesis in Apis mellifera and Diploptera punctata. The pest control application of these inhibitors demonstrated that they can be insecticide candidates with potent ovicidal activity, larvicidal activity and insect growth regulatory effects. The present study has validated that Lepidopteran HMGR can be a potent selective insecticide target, and the HMGR inhibitors (especially type II statins) could be selective insecticide candidates and lead compounds. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sequence alignment, homology modeling and structural comparison may be useful for determining potential enzymes or receptors which can be eco-friendly pesticide  targets. PMID:28133568

  14. Similarities in the structure of the transcriptional repressor AmtR in two different space groups suggest a model for the interaction with GlnK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevvana, Madhumati; Hasselt, Kristin; Grau, Florian C; Burkovski, Andreas; Muller, Yves A

    2017-03-01

    AmtR belongs to the TetR family of transcription regulators and is a global nitrogen regulator that is induced under nitrogen-starvation conditions in Corynebacterium glutamicum. AmtR regulates the expression of transporters and enzymes for the assimilation of ammonium and alternative nitrogen sources, for example urea, amino acids etc. The recognition of operator DNA by homodimeric AmtR is not regulated by small-molecule effectors as in other TetR-family members but by a trimeric adenylylated PII-type signal transduction protein named GlnK. The crystal structure of ligand-free AmtR (AmtRorth) has been solved at a resolution of 2.1 Å in space group P21212. Comparison of its quaternary assembly with the previously solved native AmtR structure (PDB entry 5dy1) in a trigonal crystal system (AmtRtri) not only shows how a solvent-content reduction triggers a space-group switch but also suggests a model for how dimeric AmtR might stoichiometrically interact with trimeric adenylylated GlnK.

  15. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bin [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Department of Urology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Wu, Bin [Department of Urology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Tanimoto, Akihide [Department of Pathology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Science, Kagoshima (Japan); Sasaguri, Yasuyuki [Pathology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Kohno, Kimitoshi, E-mail: k-kohno@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. {yields} mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. {yields} Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). {yields} Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  16. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Hung Lin,1 Kao-Jean Huang,1,2 Ching-Feng Weng,1 David Shiuan1 1Department of Life Science and Institute of Biotechnology, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Development Center of Biotechnology, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR. The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, virtual screening, curcumin, salvianolic acid C

  17. The influence of highly purified HMG on pregnancy outcome in vitro fertilization%高纯度尿促性腺激素对IVF-ET妊娠结局的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李萍

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨体外受精-胚胎移植(IVF-ET)超促排卵周期中应用高纯度尿促性腺激素(HP-HMG,贺美奇)对妊娠结局的影响.方法:回顾性分析117个IVF-ET周期,根据超促排卵周期中是否使用HP-HMG将其分为两组,A组(n=63)应用果纳芬(r-FSH,重组卵泡刺激素),B组(n=54)加用贺美奇,比较两组妊娠率、流产率、着床率、持续妊娠率和持续着床率.结果:两组鲜胚移植周期妊娠率、流产率、着床率、持续妊娠率和持续着床率比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);两组冻胚移植周期妊娠率和着床率比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),而流产率、持续妊娠率和持续着床率比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:长方案超促排卵适时加用HP-HMG可以改善胚胎质量和子宫内膜容受性,提高持续妊娠率和持续着床率,降低流产率.%Objective: To study the influence of highly purified HMG on pregnancy outcome in vitro fertilization. Methods: 117 patients (retrospective study) underwent IVF -ET cycles were divided into two groups. The patients of group A (n =63) were stimulated with r - FSH, the patients of group B ( n = 52 ) were stimulated with r - FSH and HP - HMG. The contrast pregnancy rate, miscarriage rate, implantation rate, ongoing pregnancy rate and ongoing implantation rate between group A and group B were compared. Results: There were statistical significant differences (P <0. 05) between group A and group B in pregnancy rate, miscarriage rate, implantation rate, ongoing pregnancy rate and ongoing implantation rate in fresh embryo transfer cycles, and there were no statistical differences ( P > 0. 05 ) in pregnancy rate and implantation rate while statistical significant differences ( P < 0.05) in miscarriage rate, ongoing pregnancy rate and ongoing implantation rate in frozen embryo transfer cycles. Conclusion: To supplement HP -HMG to r- FSH in COH (controlled ovarian hyperstimulation) is useful to improve

  18. Docking molecular de derivados de 2-fenilindano-1,3-dionas inibidores da enzima HMG-CoA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Q. Pordeus

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As doenças cardiovasculares constituem uma das principais causas de mortes em todo o mundo. Estudos mostram que a enzima HMG-CoA é considerada uma precursora da via metabólica hipolipidêmica no soro sanguíneo. Na busca por uma nova classe de compostos aptos a inibir esta enzima e consequentemente reduzir os níveis de colesterol, as 2-fenilindano-1,3-dionas apresentam resultados promissores. Uma das maneiras de avaliar o poder farmacológico destes compostos e predizer análogos ainda mais potentes consiste na avaliação da interação entre fármaco (2-fenilindano-1,3-diona e enzima (HMG-CoA, em que se utiliza da técnica de modelagem molecular docking. Neste estudo, o procedimento computacional para obtenção dos resultados de docking foi feito através do software AutoDock 1.5.6. Para avaliar a interação no sítio ativo da HMG-CoA, utilizamos, dentre a série de congêneres, o composto 2-(2-clorofenilindano-1,3-diona. De acordo com os resultados obtidos, foi identificada uma interação hidrofílica importante, do tipo ligação de hidrogênio C=O∙∙∙H–N, a qual apresenta uma distância de 1.62 Å entre os grupos carbonila do anel diona e o aminoácido metionina da HMG-CoA. Outra ligação de hidrogênio p∙∙∙H–N com distância de 3.10 Å formada entre o anel aromático do grupo indano-1,3-diona e o aminoácido glicina também foi identificada.

  19. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin improves abnormal brain electrical activity via mechanisms involving eNOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, F B; Kilic, U; Caglayan, B; Ethemoglu, M S; Caglayan, A B; Ekimci, N; Demirci, S; Dogan, A; Oztezcan, S; Sahin, F; Yilmaz, B; Kilic, E

    2015-01-22

    Apart from its repressing effect on plasma lipid levels, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors exert neuroprotective functions in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In view of these promising observations, we were interested in whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibition would affect epileptiform activity in the brain. To elucidate this issue, atorvastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin were administered orally at a dose of 20 mg/kg each for 3 days and their anti-epileptic activities were tested and compared in rats. Epileptiform activity in the brain was induced by an intracortical penicillin G injection. Among HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, simvastatin-treatment was less effective in terms of spike frequency as compared with atorvastatin- and rosuvastatin-treated animals. Atorvastatin treatment reduced spike frequencies and amplitudes significantly throughout the experiment. However, the most pronounced anti-epileptic effect was observed in rosuvastatin-treated animals, which was associated with improved blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and decreased expressions of pro-apoptotic p53, Bax and caspase-3 mRNAs. Inhibition of eNOS activity with L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) reversed the anti-epileptic effect of rosuvastatin significantly. However, L-NAME did not alter the effect of rosuvastatin on the levels of p53, Bax and caspase-3 mRNA expression. Here, we provide evidence that among HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, rosuvastatin was the most effective statin on the reduction of epileptiform activity, which was associated with improved BBB permeability, increased expression of eNOS and decreased expressions of pro-apoptotic p53, Bax and caspase-3. Our observation also revealed that the anti-epileptic effect of rosuvastatin was dependent on the increased expression level of eNOS. The robust anti-epileptic effect encourages proof-of-concept studies with

  20. Statins: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors demonstrate anti-atherosclerotic character due to their antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttananjaiah, Mohan-Kumari H; Dhale, Mohan Appasaheb; Gaonkar, Vaishali; Keni, Shradha

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of multiple etiologies. It is associated with the accumulation of oxidized lipids in arterial lesions leading to coronary heart disease. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (commonly known as statins) are widely used in cardiovascular disease prevention to lower the cholesterol. The antioxidant activity of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors was studied by lipid peroxidation inhibition assay, DPPH, and hydroxyl radical scavenging-activity methods. The lovastatin (93%) and simvastatin (96%) showed significant action of lipid peroxidation inhibition compared to other HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. The DPPH radical and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of simvastatin was 38% and 33%, respectively. The oxidative modification of serum lipid due to reactive oxygen species causes atherosclerosis. This study revealed the importance of lovastatin and simvastatin to prevent oxidative stress-related cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Drug-drug interactions between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and antiviral protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Benoit; Drouot, Sylvain; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Taburet, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are a class of drugs also known as statins. These drugs are effective and widely prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Seven statins are currently available: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin. Although these drugs are generally well tolerated, skeletal muscle abnormalities from myalgia to severe lethal rhabdomyolysis can occur. Factors that increase statin concentrations such as drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of these adverse events. Drug-drug interactions are dependent on statins' pharmacokinetic profile: simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin are metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A, while the metabolism of the other statins is independent of this CYP. All statins are substrate of organic anion transporter polypeptide 1B1, an uptake transporter expressed in hepatocyte membrane that may also explain some drug-drug interactions. Many HIV-infected patients have dyslipidemia and comorbidities that may require statin treatment. HIV-protease inhibitors (HIV PIs) are part of recommended antiretroviral treatment in combination with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors. All HIV PIs except nelfinavir are coadministered with a low dose of ritonavir, a potent CYP3A inhibitor to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Cobicistat is a new potent CYP3A inhibitor that is combined with elvitegravir and will be combined with HIV-PIs in the future. The HCV-PIs boceprevir and telaprevir are both, to different extents, inhibitors of CYP3A. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic properties of statins and PIs with emphasis on their metabolic pathways explaining clinically important drug-drug interactions. Simvastatin and lovastatin metabolized through CYP3A have the highest potency for drug-drug interaction with potent CYP3A inhibitors such as ritonavir- or cobicistat-boosted HIV-PI or the

  2. A randomized assessor-blind trial comparing highly purified hMG and recombinant FSH in a GnRH antagonist cycle with compulsory single-blastocyst transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devroey, Paul; Pellicer, Antonio; Nyboe Andersen, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of highly purified menotropin (hphMG) and recombinant FSH (rFSH) for controlled ovarian stimulation in a GnRH antagonist cycle with compulsory single-blastocyst transfer. DESIGN: Randomized, open-label, assessor-blind, parallel groups, multicenter......, noninferiority trial. SETTING: Twenty-five infertility centers in seven countries. PATIENT(S): Seven hundred forty-nine women. INTERVENTION(S): Controlled ovarian stimulation with hphMG or rFSH in a GnRH antagonist cycle with compulsory single-blastocyst transfer on day 5 in one fresh or subsequent frozen......% and 38% for women treated with hphMG and rFSH, respectively (both PP and ITT). Significant differences in pharmacodynamic end points were found between the two gonadotropin preparations. CONCLUSION(S): Highly purified hMG is at least as effective as rFSH in GnRH antagonist cycles with compulsory single...

  3. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Perna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia.

  4. Statins, HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Improve Neovascularization by Increasing the Expression Density of CXCR4 in Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Cheng, Wan-Li; Shih, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Kao, Yung-Ta; Lin, Chih-Ting; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Huang, Chun-Yao; Lin, Feng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are used to reduce cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Accordingly, statins regulate nitric oxide (NO) and glutamate metabolism, inflammation, angiogenesis, immunity and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) functions. The function of EPCs are regulated by stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), etc. Even though the pharmacologic mechanisms by which statins affect the neovasculogenesis of circulating EPCs, it is still unknown whether statins affect the EPCs function through the regulation of CXCR4, a SDF-1 receptor expression. Therefore, we desired to explore the effects of statins on CXCR4 expression in EPC-mediated neovascularization by in vitro and in vivo analyses. In animal studies, we analyzed the effects of atorvastatin or rosuvastatin treatments in recovery of capillary density and blood flow, the expression of vWF and CXCR4 at ischemia sites in hindlimb ischemia ICR mice. Additionally, we analyzed whether the atorvastatin or rosuvastatin treatments increased the mobilization, homing, and CXCR4 expression of EPCs in hindlimb ischemia ICR mice that underwent bone marrow transplantation. The results indicated that statins treatment led to significantly more CXCR4-positive endothelial progenitor cells incorporated into ischemic sites and in the blood compared with control mice. In vivo, we isolated human EPCs and analyzed the effect of statins treatment on the vasculogenic ability of EPCs and the expression of CXCR4. Compared with the control groups, the neovascularization ability of EPCs was significantly improved in the atorvastatin or rosuvastatin group; this improvement was dependent on CXCR4 up-regulation. The efficacy of statins on improving EPC neovascularization was related to the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis and might be regulated by the NO. In conclusion, atorvastatin and rosuvastatin improved

  5. The male-determining gene SRY is a hybrid of DGCR8 and SOX3, and is regulated by the transcription factor CP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Youichi; Shinka, Toshikatsu; Sakamoto, Kozue; Ewis, Ashraf A; Nakahori, Yutaka

    2010-04-01

    In mammals, sex is determined by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome that bears a male-dominant sex-determining gene SRY, which switches the differentiation of gonads into male testes. The molecular signaling mechanism turning on the switch, however, has remained unclear for 18 years since the identification of the gene. Here, we describe how this gene emerged and started to work. From amino acid homology, we realized that SRY is a hybrid gene between a portion of the first exon of DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) and the high-mobility group (HMG) box of SRY box-3 (SOX3) gene. We identified the regulatory sequence in the SRY promotor region by searching for a common motif shared with DGCR8 mRNA. From the motif search between DGCR8 mRNA and the SRY upstream sequence, we found that the transcription factor CP2 (TFCP2) binding motif is present in both. TFCP2 overexpression did not show a significant increase of SRY mRNA expression, and TFCP2 suppression by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly reduced SRY mRNA expression. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that TFCP2 acts as a regulator by directly binding to the SRY promoter. We conclude that SRY is a hybrid gene composed of two genes, DGCR8 and SOX3; and TFCP2 is an essential transcription factor for SRY expression regulation.

  6. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibition Promotes Neurological Recovery, Peri-Lesional Tissue Remodeling, and Contralesional Pyramidal Tract Plasticity after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ertugrul; Reitmeir, Raluca; Kilic, Ülkan; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Kelestemur, Taha; Ethemoglu, Muhsine Sinem; Ozturk, Gurkan; Hermann, Dirk M.

    2014-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors are widely used for secondary stroke prevention. Besides their lipid-lowering activity, pleiotropic effects on neuronal survival, angiogenesis, and neurogenesis have been described. In view of these observations, we were interested whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibition in the post-acute stroke phase promotes neurological recovery, peri-lesional, and contralesional neuronal plasticity. We examined effects of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin (0.2 or 2.0 mg/kg/day i.c.v.), administered starting 3 days after 30 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion for 30 days. Here, we show that rosuvastatin treatment significantly increased the grip strength and motor coordination of animals, promoted exploration behavior, and reduced anxiety. It was associated with structural remodeling of peri-lesional brain tissue, reflected by increased neuronal survival, enhanced capillary density, and reduced striatal and corpus callosum atrophy. Increased sprouting of contralesional pyramidal tract fibers crossing the midline in order to innervate the ipsilesional red nucleus was noticed in rosuvastatin compared with vehicle-treated mice, as shown by anterograde tract tracing experiments. Western blot analysis revealed that the abundance of HMG-CoA reductase was increased in the contralesional hemisphere at 14 and 28 days post-ischemia. Our data support the idea that HMG-CoA reductase inhibition promotes brain remodeling and plasticity far beyond the acute stroke phase, resulting in neurological recovery. PMID:25565957

  7. Ectopic expression and knockdown of a zebrafish sox21 reveal its role as a transcriptional repressor in early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenton, Francesco; Giudici, Simona; Deflorian, Gianluca; Cimbro, Simona; Cotelli, Franco; Beltrame, Monica

    2004-02-01

    Sox proteins are DNA-binding proteins belonging to the HMG box superfamily and they play key roles in animal embryonic development. Zebrafish Sox21a is part of group B Sox proteins and its chicken and mouse orthologs have been described as transcriptional repressor and activator, respectively, in two different target gene contexts. Zebrafish sox21a is present as a maternal transcript in the oocyte and is mainly expressed at the developing midbrain-hindbrain boundary from the onset of neurulation. In order to understand its role in vivo, we ectopically expressed sox21a by microinjection. Ectopic expression of full length sox21a leads to dorsalization of the embryos. A subset of the dorsalized embryos shows a partial axis splitting, and hence an ectopic neural tube, as an additional phenotype. At gastrulation, injected embryos show expansion of the expression domains of organizer-specific genes, such as chordin and goosecoid. Molecular markers used in somitogenesis highlight that sox21a-injected embryos have shortened AP axis, undulating axial structures, enlarged or even radialized paraxial territory. The developmental abnormalities caused by ectopic expression of sox21a are suggestive of defects in convergence-extension morphogenetic movements. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, designed to functionally knockdown sox21a, cause ventralization of the embryos. Moreover, gain-of-function experiments with chimeric constructs, where Sox21a DNA-binding domain is fused to a transcriptional activator (VP16) or repressor (EnR) domain, suggests that zebrafish Sox21a acts as a repressor in dorso-ventral patterning.

  8. Drug interactions with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins): the importance of CYP enzymes, transporters and pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2010-03-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) can cause skeletal muscle toxicity; the risk of toxicity is elevated by drug interactions and pharmacogenetic factors that increase the concentration of statins in the plasma. Statins are substrates for several membrane transporters that may mediate drug interactions. Inhibitors of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 can decrease the hepatic uptake of many statins, as well as the therapeutic index of these agents. Potent inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 can significantly increase the plasma concentrations of the active forms of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin. Fluvastatin, which is metabolized by CYP2C9, is less prone to pharmacokinetic interactions, while pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin are not susceptible to any CYP inhibition. An understanding of the mechanisms of statin interactions will help to minimize drug interactions and to develop statins that are less prone to adverse interactions.

  9. Single dose testosterone increases total cholesterol levels and induces the expression of HMG CoA Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gårevik Nina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol is mainly synthesised in liver and the rate-limiting step is the reduction of 3-hydroxy-3methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a reaction catalysed by HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR. There is a comprehensive body of evidence documenting that anabolic-androgenic steroids are associated with deleterious alterations of lipid profile. In this study we investigated whether a single dose of testosterone enanthate affects the cholesterol biosynthesis and the expression of HMGCR. Methods 39 healthy male volunteers were given 500 mg testosterone enanthate as single intramuscular dose of Testoviron®--Depot. The total cholesterol levels prior to and two days after testosterone administration were analysed. Protein expression of HMGCR in whole blood was investigated by Western blotting. In order to study whether testosterone regulates the mRNA expression of HMGCR, in vitro studies were performed in a human liver cell-line (HepG2. Results The total cholesterol level was significantly increased 15% two days after the testosterone injection (p = 0.007. This is the first time a perturbation in the lipoprotein profile is observed after only a single dose of testosterone. Moreover, the HMGCR mRNA and protein expression was induced by testosterone in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Conclusion Here we provide a molecular explanation how anabolic androgenic steroids may impact on the cholesterol homeostasis, i.e. via an increase of the HMGCR expression. Increasing knowledge and understanding of AAS induced side-effects is important in order to find measures for treatment and care of these abusers.

  10. Purificación de una actividad HMG-CoA reductasa fosfatasa tipo 1 de la fracción microsomal de hígado de rata

    OpenAIRE

    Asins Muñoz, Guillermina

    1989-01-01

    El enzima hidroxi-3-metil-glutaril coenzima A reductasa (HMG-CoA reductasa) es el principal enzima regulador de la vía de síntesis del colesterol. Al igual que otros muchos enzimas, éste intercambia sus estados inactivo o activo por fosforilación / desfosforilación reversible, dependiendo su nivel de actividad del grado de fosforilación. En estudios "in vitro" se ha demostrado que en el mecanismo de fosforilación reversible intervienen HMG-CoA reductasa quinasas y HMG-CoA reductasa fosfatasas...

  11. Transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  12. Novel synthetic inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity that inhibit tumor cell proliferation and are structurally unrelated to existing statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Crow, Kyle R; Buszek, Keith R; Brown, Neil; Ellappan, Sampathkumar; Gao, Ge; Luo, Diheng; Minatoya, Machiko; Lushington, Gerald H

    2009-11-01

    Pilot-scale libraries of eight-membered medium ring lactams (MRLs) and related tricyclic compounds (either seven-membered lactams, thiolactams or amines) were screened for their ability to inhibit the catalytic activity of human recombinant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in vitro. A dozen of the synthetic compounds mimic the inhibition of purified HMG-CoA reductase activity caused by pravastatin, fluvastatin and sodium salts of lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin in this cell-free assay, suggesting direct interaction with the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis. Moreover, several MRLs inhibit the metabolic activity of L1210 tumor cells in vitro to a greater degree than fluvastatin, lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin, whereas pravastatin is inactive. Although the correlation between the concentration-dependent inhibitions of HMG-CoA reductase activity over 10 min in the cell-free assay and L1210 tumor cell proliferation over 4 days in culture is unclear, some bioactive MRLs elicit interesting combinations of statin-like (IC50: 7.4-8.0 microM) and anti-tumor (IC50: 1.4-2.3 microM) activities. The HMG-CoA reductase-inhibiting activities of pravastatin and an MRL persist in the presence of increasing concentrations of NADPH. But increasing concentrations of HMG-CoA block the HMG-CoA reductase-inhibiting activity of pravastatin without altering that of an MRL, suggesting that MRLs and existing statins may have different mechanisms of enzyme interaction and inhibition. When tested together, suboptimal concentrations of synthetic MRLs and existing statins have additive inhibitory effects on HMG-CoA reductase activity. Preliminary molecular docking studies with MRL-based inhibitors indicate that these ligands fit sterically well into the HMG-CoA reductase statin-binding receptor model and, in contrast to mevastatin, may occupy a narrow channel housing the pyridinium moiety on NADP+.

  13. Retinol-induced changes in the phosphorylation levels of histones and high mobility group proteins from Sertoli cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.F. Moreira

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins play a role in the organization and functions of DNA. Covalent modifications of nuclear proteins modulate their interactions with DNA sequences and are probably one of the multiple factors involved in the process of switch on/off transcriptionally active regions of DNA. Histones and high mobility group proteins (HMG are subject to many covalent modifications that may modulate their capacity to bind to DNA. We investigated the changes induced in the phosphorylation pattern of cultured Wistar rat Sertoli cell histones and high mobility group protein subfamilies exposed to 7 µM retinol for up to 48 h. In each experiment, 6 h before the end of the retinol treatment each culture flask received 370 KBq/ml [32P]-phosphate. The histone and HMGs were isolated as previously described [Moreira et al. Medical Science Research (1994 22: 783-784]. The total protein obtained by either method was quantified and electrophoresed as described by Spiker [Analytical Biochemistry (1980 108: 263-265]. The gels were stained with Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 and the stained bands were cut and dissolved in 0.5 ml 30% H2O2 at 60oC for 12 h. The vials were chilled and 5.0 ml scintillation liquid was added. The radioactivity in each vial was determined with a liquid scintillation counter. Retinol treatment significantly changed the pattern of each subfamily of histone and high mobility group proteins.

  14. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors prevent migration of human coronary smooth muscle cells through suppression of increase in oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Maeda, K; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2001-06-01

    In vitro and in vivo evidence of a decrease in vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration induced by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors has been reported. When added to SMC cultures for 6 hours, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors fluvastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin at 1 micromol/L resulted in a 48%, 50%, and 16% suppression, respectively, of human coronary SMC migration; these reductions mirrored the suppression in oxidative stress induced by 1 micromol/L lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC) of 50%, 53% and 19%, respectively. The hydroxylated metabolites of fluvastatin, M(2) and M(3), at 1 micromol/L also suppressed the enhancement of SMC migration by 58% and 45% and the increase in oxidative stress induced by lyso-PC of 58% and 49%, respectively. Lyso-PC activated phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC), and this activation was also suppressed by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. The inhibition of phospholipase D and PKC was reversed by 100 micromol/L mevalonate, its isoprenoid derivative, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol but not by 10 micromol/L squalene. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides at 5 micromol/L to PKC-alpha, but not those to the PKC-beta isoform, suppressed the lyso-PC-mediated increases in SMC migration and oxidative stress. These findings suggest that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors have direct antimigratory effects on the vascular wall beyond their effects on plasma lipids and that they might exert such antimigratory effects via suppression of the phospholipase D- and PKC (possibly PKC-alpha)-induced increase in oxidative stress, which might in turn prevent significant coronary artery disease.

  15. Functional Insights into Human HMG-CoA Lyase from Structures of Acyl-CoA-containing Ternary Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Zhuji; Runquist, Jennifer A.; Montgomery, Christa; Miziorko, Henry M.; Kim, Jung-Ja P. (MCW); (UMKC)

    2010-08-16

    HMG-CoA lyase (HMGCL) is crucial to ketogenesis, and inherited human mutations are potentially lethal. Detailed understanding of the HMGCL reaction mechanism and the molecular basis for correlating human mutations with enzyme deficiency have been limited by the lack of structural information for enzyme liganded to an acyl-CoA substrate or inhibitor. Crystal structures of ternary complexes of WT HMGCL with the competitive inhibitor 3-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA and of the catalytically deficient HMGCL R41M mutant with substrate HMG-CoA have been determined to 2.4 and 2.2 {angstrom}, respectively. Comparison of these {beta}/{alpha}-barrel structures with those of unliganded HMGCL and R41M reveals substantial differences for Mg{sup 2+} coordination and positioning of the flexible loop containing the conserved HMGCL 'signature' sequence. In the R41M-Mg{sup 2+}-substrate ternary complex, loop residue Cys{sup 266} (implicated in active-site function by mechanistic and mutagenesis observations) is more closely juxtaposed to the catalytic site than in the case of unliganded enzyme or the WT enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-3-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA inhibitor complex. In both ternary complexes, the S-stereoisomer of substrate or inhibitor is specifically bound, in accord with the observed Mg{sup 2+} liganding of both C3 hydroxyl and C5 carboxyl oxygens. In addition to His{sup 233} and His{sup 235} imidazoles, other Mg{sup 2+} ligands are the Asp{sup 42} carboxyl oxygen and an ordered water molecule. This water, positioned between Asp{sup 42} and the C3 hydroxyl of bound substrate/inhibitor, may function as a proton shuttle. The observed interaction of Arg{sup 41} with the acyl-CoA C1 carbonyl oxygen explains the effects of Arg{sup 41} mutation on reaction product enolization and explains why human Arg{sup 41} mutations cause drastic enzyme deficiency.

  16. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik, E-mail: henrik.thorlacius@med.lu.se

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  17. Development, Optimization, and Evaluation of a Duplex Droplet Digital PCR Assay To Quantify the T-nos/hmg Copy Number Ratio in Genetically Modified Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Urquídez, Dalmira; Pérez-Urquiza, Melina; Valdez Torres, José-Benigno; León-Félix, Josefina; García-Estrada, Raymundo; Acatzi-Silva, Abraham

    2016-01-05

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) are required to guarantee the reliability of analytical measurements. The CRMs available in the field of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are characterized using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This technology has limited application, because of its dependence on a calibrant. The objective of this study was to obtain a method with higher metrological quality, to characterize the CRMs for their contents of T-nos/hmg copy number ratio in maize. A duplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay was developed and optimized by a central composite design. The developed method achieved an absolute limit of detection (LOD) of 11 cP T-nos, a relative LOD of 0.034%, a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 23 cP (relative LOQ of 0.08%), and a dynamic range of 0.08%-100% T-nos/hmg ratio. The specificity and applicability of the assay were established for the analysis of low T-nos concentrations (0.9%) in several corn varieties. The convenience of DNA digestion to reduce measurement bias in the case of multiple-copy binding was confirmed through an enzymatic restriction assay. Given its overall performance, this method can be used to characterize CRM candidates for their contents of T-nos/hmg ratio.

  18. Analysis of intron sequence variability of the conservative HMG-box of Sox9 genes in allotetraploids and their original parents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jifang; Liu Shaojun; Tao Min; Li Wei; Liu Yun

    2007-01-01

    The Sox genes of allotetraploids and their original maternal red crucian carp ( Carassius caassius red var. ) and original paternal common carp ( Cyprinus carpio L. ) were detected by PCR with the designed primers based on the conserved HMG-box sequence in different species. Sequencing of Sox genes indicated that two Sox9 genes (Atsox9a and Atsox9b ) existed in allotetraploids, while only one Sox9 gene existed in red crucian carp ( Rcsox9a ) and common carp ( Ccsox9b ). All of the four Sox9 genes contained an intron in the HMG-box, with the sizes of 413 bp, 703 bp, 401 bp and 714 bp, respectively. Moreover, the introns obeyed the rule of "GT-AG". A high similarity was observed between introns of Atsox9a and Rcsox9a (94.4 % ), Atsox9b and Ccsox9b (97.8 % ). Interestingly, the deduced amino acid sequences of their corresponding exons all shared 100 % identity. Thus, introns of the HMG-domain of Sox9s in allotetraploids and their original parents have not only the length polymorphism but also intron variability. Our results provide significant molecular evidence for the origin and evolution of allotetraploids.

  19. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  20. Exploration of virtual candidates for human HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors using pharmacophore modeling and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minky Son

    Full Text Available 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR is a rate-controlling enzyme in the mevalonate pathway which involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol and other isoprenoids. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and is regarded as a drug target to treat hypercholesterolemia. In this study, ten qualitative pharmacophore models were generated based on chemical features in active inhibitors of HMGR. The generated models were validated using a test set. In a validation process, the best hypothesis was selected based on the statistical parameters and used for virtual screening of chemical databases to find novel lead candidates. The screened compounds were sorted by applying drug-like properties. The compounds that satisfied all drug-like properties were used for molecular docking study to identify their binding conformations at active site of HMGR. The final hit compounds were selected based on docking score and binding orientation. The HMGR structures in complex with the hit compounds were subjected to 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations to refine the binding orientation as well as to check the stability of the hits. After simulation, binding modes including hydrogen bonding patterns and molecular interactions with the active site residues were analyzed. In conclusion, four hit compounds with new structural scaffold were suggested as novel and potent HMGR inhibitors.

  1. Inhibition of HMG CoA reductase reveals an unexpected role for cholesterol during PGC migration in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewing Andrew G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primordial germ cells (PGCs are the embryonic precursors of the sperm and eggs. Environmental or genetic defects that alter PGC development can impair fertility or cause formation of germ cell tumors. Results We demonstrate a novel role for cholesterol during germ cell migration in mice. Cholesterol was measured in living tissue dissected from mouse embryos and was found to accumulate within the developing gonads as germ cells migrate to colonize these structures. Cholesterol synthesis was blocked in culture by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR resulting in germ cell survival and migration defects. These defects were rescued by co-addition of isoprenoids and cholesterol, but neither compound alone was sufficient. In contrast, loss of the last or penultimate enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis did not alter PGC numbers or position in vivo. However embryos that lack these enzymes do not exhibit cholesterol defects at the stage at which PGCs are migrating. This demonstrates that during gestation, the cholesterol required for PGC migration can be supplied maternally. Conclusion In the mouse, cholesterol is required for PGC survival and motility. It may act cell-autonomously by regulating clustering of growth factor receptors within PGCs or non cell-autonomously by controlling release of growth factors required for PGC guidance and survival.

  2. Feedback regulation of cholesterol synthesis:sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Russell A DeBose-Boyd

    2008-01-01

    3Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase produces mevalonate,an important intermediate in the synthesis of cholesterol and essential nonsterol isoprenoids.The reductase is subject to an exorbitant amount of feedback control through multiple mechanisms that are mediated by sterol and nonsterol end-products of mevalonate metabolism.Here,Ⅰwill discuss recent advances that shed light on one mechanism for control of reductase,which involves rapid degradation of the enzyme.Accumulation of certain sterols triggers binding of reductase to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2.Reductase-Insig binding results in recruitment of a membrane-associated ubiquitin ligase called gp78,which initiates ubiquitination of reductase.This ubiquitination is an obligatory reaction for recognition and degradation of reductase from ER membranes by cytosolic 26S proteasomes.Thus,sterol-accelerated degradation of reductase represents an example of how a general cellular process (ER-associated degradation) is used to control an important metabolic pathway (cholesterol synthesis).

  3. Short-term effect of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin on erythrocyte nitric oxide synthase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ludolph

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Ludolph1, Wilhelm Bloch2, Malte Kelm1, Rainer Schulz3, Petra Kleinbongard11Department of Medicine, Medical Clinic I, University Hospital RTWH Aachen, Germany; 2Department of Molecular and Cellular Sport Medicine, Sport University Cologne, Germany; 3Institute of Pathophysiology, Medical School, University of Essen, GermanyAbstract: Prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (or statins, beyond their lipid-lowering properties, have been demonstrated including activation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. Beside endothelial cells, red blood cells (RBCs possess NOS and produce nitric oxide (NO, which contributes to RBC deformability. The present study tested the capacity of statins to activate NOS in RBCs and subsequently to modulate RBC deformability in vitro. Blood samples of healthy young volunteers were incubated with or without rosuvastatin. Afterwards RBC-NOS activity and RBC deformability were determined. Rosuvastatin incubation significantly increased NOS phosphorylation, NOS dependent NO-formation, and RBC deformability. The NOS inhibitor NG- monomethyl-L-arginine reversed the stimulatory effect of rosuvastatin on RBC-NOS activity. This NO dependent effect of rosuvastatin might have an important influence on microcirculation and may offer new perspectives for the therapeutic use of statins.Keywords: red blood cell, nitric oxide synthase, red blood cell deformability, statin

  4. The group I-like ribozyme DiGIR1 mediates alternative processing of pre-rRNA transcripts in Didymium iridis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vader, Anna; Johansen, Steinar; Nielsen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    During starvation induced encystment, cells of the myxomycete Didymium iridis accumulate a 7.5-kb RNA that is the result of alternative processing of pre-rRNA. The 5' end corresponds to an internal processing site cleaved by the group I-like ribozyme DiGIR1, located within the twin-ribozyme intron...

  5. Polycomb group proteins Ring1A/B are functionally linked to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry to maintain ES cell identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endoh, M.; Endo, T.A.; Endoh, T.; Fujimura, Y.; Ohara, O.; Toyoda, T.; Otte, A.P.; Okano, M.; Brockdorff, N.; Vidal, M.; Koseki, H.

    2008-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins mediate heritable silencing of developmental regulators in metazoans, participating in one of two distinct multimeric protein complexes, the Polycomb repressive complexes 1 (PRC1) and 2 (PRC2). Although PRC2 has been shown to share target genes with the core transcr

  6. The post-transcriptional operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A post-transcriptional operon is a set of monocistronic mRNAs encoding functionally related proteins that are co-regulated by a group of RNA-binding proteins and/or small non-coding RNAs so that protein expression is coordinated at the post-transcriptional level. The post-transcriptional operon...... model (PTO) is used to describe data from an assortment of methods (e.g. RIP-Chip, CLIP-Chip, miRNA profiling, ribosome profiling) that globally address the functionality of mRNA. Several examples of post-transcriptional operons have been documented in the literature and demonstrate the usefulness...

  7. Transcription elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity. PMID:25764114

  8. Smad transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massagué, Joan; Seoane, Joan; Wotton, David

    2005-12-01

    Smad transcription factors lie at the core of one of the most versatile cytokine signaling pathways in metazoan biology-the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) pathway. Recent progress has shed light into the processes of Smad activation and deactivation, nucleocytoplasmic dynamics, and assembly of transcriptional complexes. A rich repertoire of regulatory devices exerts control over each step of the Smad pathway. This knowledge is enabling work on more complex questions about the organization, integration, and modulation of Smad-dependent transcriptional programs. We are beginning to uncover self-enabled gene response cascades, graded Smad response mechanisms, and Smad-dependent synexpression groups. Our growing understanding of TGFbeta signaling through the Smad pathway provides general principles for how animal cells translate complex inputs into concrete behavior.

  9. The Function of HMG-Box Transcription Factors Sox4a and Sox4b in Zebrafish Bone Development and Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, J.; Motte, P.; Martial, J. A.; Muller, M.

    2008-06-01

    In mammals, the Sox4 gene is involved in development of endocardial crests, the brain, the lung, teeth, gonads and lymphocytes. Recently, Sox4 was shown to control bone mass and mineralization in mice. In zebrafish, two homologs for the mammalian Sox4 are present, sox4a and sox4b. Here we investigate the function of the sox4a and sox4b genes in cartilage and bone development in zebrafish. Therefore, we focus our attention on the first bone structures to be formed, the head skeleton and more precisely the pharyngeal cartilage. We show that both genes are expressed in the pharyngeal region, albeit at different time points during development. Double in situ hybridization experiments are used to exactly define the particular tissues where they are expressed. Furthermore, microinjection experiments of antisense oligonucleotides are used to block translation of these specific genes and to define their precise function during cartilage and bone development.

  10. Effects of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors (Statins On Bone Mineral Density and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Samancı

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxy methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins have been shown to have effects on bone metabolism in laboratory studies. While early clinic studies have showed lower risk for osteoporotic fractures among statin users than nonusers, subsequent studies have found mixed results. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of statins on bone mineral density (BMD and bone metabolism. Thirty-five consecutive postmenopausal hypercholesterolemic women who were treated for at least last 6 months with statins were included in the study. Seventy-five normocholesterolemic age-matched postmenopausal women were in the control group. Subjects with a history of any diseases and used drugs that may affect calcium or bone metabolism were excluded from the study. Age, associated illness, years since menopause, and body mass index (BMI were obtained from all the patients including the control group. Besides, serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphates, parathyroid hormone, 25 hydroxy D3, osteocalcin, and urinary calcium excretion were measured. BMD was measured by using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA at femoral neck and 3rd lomber spine. Mean duration of statin use was 28.17±21.17 months. BMI was found to be statistically higher in statin users than nonusers (27.47±3.67kg/m2 and 25.46±3.91 kg/m2, respectively. The markers of bone metabolism used in the study were found to be similar between the groups. BMD was not different in statin users and nonusers at femoral neck and lomber spine. As conclusion, statin use did not affect BMD and bone metabolism in this study. In our opinion large randomised, controlled, prospective clinical trials are needed to accurately determine the role of statins in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  11. The conserved lymphokine element-0 in the IL5 promoter binds to a high mobility group-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrugo, J; Marsh, D G; Ghosh, B

    1996-10-01

    The conserved lymphokine elements-0 (CLE0) in the IL5 promoter is essential for the expression of IL-5. Here, we report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a novel CLE0-binding protein, CLEBP-1 from a mouse Th2 clone, D10.G4.1. Interestingly, it was found that the CLEBP1 cDNA sequence was almost identical to the sequences of known high mobility group-1 (HMG1) cDNAs. When expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli, CLEBP-1 was shown to bind to the IL5-CLE0 element in electrophoretic mobility-shift assays (EMSA) and southwestern blot analysis. The CLEBP-1 fusion protein cross-reacts with and-HMG-1/2 in Western blot analysis. It also binds to the CLE0 elements of IL4, GMCSF and GCSF genes. CLEBP-1 and closely related HMG-1 and HMG-2 proteins may play key roles in facilitating the expression of the lymphokine genes that contain CLE0 elements.

  12. Camphene, a Plant-Derived Monoterpene, Reduces Plasma Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Hyperlipidemic Rats Independently of HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). Methodology/Principal Findings The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001), 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p<0.001) and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001). Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Conclusions Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent

  13. Camphene, a plant-derived monoterpene, reduces plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperlipidemic rats independently of HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (pcholesterol (ptriglycerides (pcholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent and merits further evaluation.

  14. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors decrease angiotensin II-induced vascular fibrosis: role of RhoA/ROCK and MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, Mónica; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Esteban, Vanesa; Carvajal, Gisselle; Plaza, Juan José; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2007-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) present beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to cardiovascular damage through the production of profibrotic factors, such as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Our aim was to investigate whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors could modulate Ang II responses, evaluating CTGF expression and the mechanisms underlying this process. In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) atorvastatin and simvastatin inhibited Ang II-induced CTGF production. The inhibitory effect of statins on CTGF upregulation was reversed by mevalonate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, suggesting that RhoA inhibition could be involved in this process. In VSMCs, statins inhibited Ang II-induced Rho membrane localization and activation. In these cells Ang II regulated CTGF via RhoA/Rho kinase activation, as shown by inhibition of Rho with C3 exoenzyme, RhoA dominant-negative overexpression, and Rho kinase inhibition. Furthermore, activation of p38MAPK and JNK, and redox process were also involved in Ang II-mediated CTGF upregulation, and were downregulated by statins. In rats infused with Ang II (100 ng/kg per minute) for 2 weeks, treatment with atorvastatin (5 mg/kg per day) diminished aortic CTGF and Rho activation without blood pressure modification. Rho kinase inhibition decreased CTGF upregulation in rat aorta, mimicking statin effect. CTGF is a vascular fibrosis mediator. Statins diminished extracellular matrix (ECM) overexpression caused by Ang II in vivo and in vitro. In summary, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors inhibit several intracellular signaling systems activated by Ang II (RhoA/Rho kinase and MAPK pathways and redox process) involved in the regulation of CTGF. Our results may explain, at least in part, some beneficial effects of statins in cardiovascular diseases.

  15. NMR evaluation of total statin content and HMG-CoA reductase inhibition in red yeast rice (Monascus spp. food supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachenmeier Dirk W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red yeast rice (i.e., rice fermented with Monascus spp., as a food supplement, is claimed to be blood cholesterol-lowering. The red yeast rice constituent monacolin K, also known as lovastatin, is an inhibitor of the hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase. This article aims to develop a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR method to determine the total statin content of red yeast rice products. Methods The total statin content was determined by a 400 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopic method, based on the integration of the multiplet at δ 5.37-5.32 ppm of a hydrogen at the hexahydronaphthalene moiety in comparison to an external calibration with lovastatin. The activity of HMG-CoA reductase was measured by a commercial spectrophotometric assay kit. Results The NMR detection limit for total statins was 6 mg/L (equivalent to 0.3 mg/capsule, if two capsules are dissolved in 50 mL ethanol. The relative standard deviations were consistently lower than 11%. The total statin concentrations of five red yeast rice supplements were between 1.5 and 25.2 mg per specified daily dose. A dose-dependent inhibition of the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme activity by the red yeast rice products was demonstrated. Conclusion A simple and direct NMR assay was developed to determine the total statin content in red yeast rice. The assay can be applied for the determination of statin content for the regulatory control of red yeast rice products.

  16. Ensayos cristalográficos de complejos de ADN con proteínas HMG-box y fármacos

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez Jimenez, Fabiola Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Las HMGB son proteínas nucleares que presentan el motivo “HMG-box”, con el que se unen al surco estrecho del ADN. Producen cambios estructurales en el mismo y están implicadas en diferentes enfermedades por lo que el estudio estructural de dichas proteínas unidas a ADN es de importancia en el desarrollo de estrategias terapéuticas. Por otra parte, los compuestos derivados de difenilo bisimidazolinio también se unen al surco estrecho del ADN, específicamente en zonas ricas en AT...

  17. HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins for people with chronic kidney disease not requiring dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetonia C. Palmer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the most frequent cause of death in people with early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD, for whom the absolute risk of cardiovascular events is similar to people who have existing coronary artery disease. This is an update of a review published in 2009, and includes evidence from 27 new studies (25,068 participants in addition to the 26 studies (20,324 participants assessed previously; and excludes three previously included studies (107 participants. This updated review includes 50 studies (45,285 participants; of these 38 (37,274 participants were meta-analysed. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the benefits (such as reductions in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, MI and stroke; and slow progression of CKD to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD and harms (muscle and liver dysfunction, withdrawal, and cancer of statins compared with placebo, no treatment, standard care or another statin in adults with CKD who were not on dialysis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register to 5 June 2012 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs that compared the effects of statins with placebo, no treatment, standard care, or other statins, on mortality, cardiovascular events, kidney function, toxicity, and lipid levels in adults with CKD not on dialysis were the focus of our literature searches. Data collection and analysis: Two or more authors independently extracted data and assessed study risk of bias. Treatment effects were expressed as mean difference (MD for continuous outcomes (lipids, creatinine clearance and proteinuria and risk ratio (RR for dichotomous outcomes (major cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI, fatal or non-fatal stroke

  18. Lanostane Triterpenes from the Tibetan Medicinal Mushroom Ganoderma leucocontextum and Their Inhibitory Effects on HMG-CoA Reductase and α-Glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Bao, Li; Xiong, Weiping; Ma, Ke; Han, Junjie; Wang, Wenzhao; Yin, Wenbing; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-08-28

    Sixteen new lanostane triterpenes, ganoleucoins A-P (1-16), together with 10 known tripterpenes (17-26), were isolated from the cultivated fruiting bodies of Ganoderma leucocontextum, a new member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis and chemical transformation. The inhibitory effects of 1-26 on HMG-CoA reductase and α-glucosidase were tested in vitro. Compounds 1, 3, 6, 10-14, 17, 18, 23, 25, and 26 showed much stronger inhibitory activity against HMG-CoA reductase than the positive control atorvastatin. Compounds 13, 14, and 16 presented potent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase from yeast with IC₅₀ values of 13.6, 2.5, and 5.9 μM, respectively. In addition, the cytotoxicity of 1-26 was evaluated against the K562 and PC-3 cell lines by the MTT assay. Compounds 1, 2, 6, 7, 10, 12, 16, 18, and 25 exhibited cytotoxicity against K562 cells with IC₅₀ values in the range 10-20 μM. Paclitaxel was used as the positive control with an IC₅₀ value of 0.9 μM. This is the first report of secondary metabolites from this medicinal mushroom.

  19. Carotid intimal-media thickness as a surrogate for cardiovascular disease events in trials of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Timothy

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surrogate measures for cardiovascular disease events have the potential to increase greatly the efficiency of clinical trials. A leading candidate for such a surrogate is the progression of intima-media thickness (IMT of the carotid artery; much experience has been gained with this endpoint in trials of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins. Methods and Results We examine two separate systems of criteria that have been proposed to define surrogate endpoints, based on clinical and statistical arguments. We use published results and a formal meta-analysis to evaluate whether progression of carotid IMT meets these criteria for HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins. IMT meets clinical-based criteria to serve as a surrogate endpoint for cardiovascular events in statin trials, based on relative efficiency, linkage to endpoints, and congruency of effects. Results from a meta-analysis and post-trial follow-up from a single published study suggest that IMT meets established statistical criteria by accounting for intervention effects in regression models. Conclusion Carotid IMT progression meets accepted definitions of a surrogate for cardiovascular disease endpoints in statin trials. This does not, however, establish that it may serve universally as a surrogate marker in trials of other agents.

  20. Phenolics from grapefruit peels inhibit HMG-CoA reductase and angiotensin-I converting enzyme and show antioxidative properties in endothelial EA.Hy 926 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayokunle O. Ademosun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to investigate the possible mechanisms for the use of phenolic extracts from grapefruit peels in the management/prevention of cardiovascular complications. The effects of the phenolic extracts on key enzymes relevant to cardiovascular diseases [3-hydroxy-methyl-3-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase and angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE], cellular antioxidant activity in human endothelial cells (EA.Hy 926 and radicals [1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS] scavenging abilities were investigated. The phenolic contents of the extracts were investigated using HPLC–DAD. There was no significant (P > 0.05 difference in the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory ability of the two extracts, while the bound phenolic extracts had a stronger ACE inhibitory ability than the soluble free phenolics. The extracts also showed intracellular antioxidant activity in human endothelial (EA.Hy 926 cells. Furthermore, the bound phenolics had significantly higher radicals (DPPH* and ABTS* scavenging abilities than the free phenolics. The HPLC analysis revealed the presence of flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol, phenolics acids (resveratrol, gallic acid, ellagic acid and caffeic acid and tannin (catechin. The cellular antioxidative properties and inhibition of enzymes relevant to the management of cardiovascular complications showed that grapefruit peels could be used as nutraceuticals for the management of such conditions.

  1. Histone Acetylation Influences the Activity of Sox9-related Transcriptional Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furumatsu,Takayuki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocyte differentiation is the fundamental process in skeletal development. From the mesenchymal condensation of chondroprogenitors to the hypertrophic maturation of chondrocytes, chondrogenesis is sequentially regulated by cross-talk among transcription factors, growth factors, and chromatin structure. The master transcription factor Sry-type HMG box (Sox 9 has an essential role in the expression of chondrogenic genes through the association with Sox9-binding sites on its target genes. Several transcription factors and coactivators, such as Scleraxis/E47 and p300, cooperatively modulate the Sox9-dependent transcription by interacting with Sox9. The Sox9-related transcriptional apparatus activates its target gene expression through p300-mediated histone acetylation on chromatin. The transforming growth factor (TGF-β superfamily also plays a key role in chondrocyte differentiation. The TGF-β-regulated Smad3/4 complex activates Sox9-dependent transcription on chromatin by associating with Sox9 itself, and by recruiting p300 onto Sox9. These findings suggest that the epigenetic status including histone modification and chromatin structure, directly influences Sox9-regulated chondrocyte differentiation. In this article, we review the regulators of Sox9 expression itself, modulators of posttranslational Sox9 function, and Sox9-associating factors in the Sox9-dependent epigenetic regulation during chondrogenesis.

  2. Camphene, a plant-derived monoterpene, reduces plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperlipidemic rats independently of HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Vallianou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001, 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol (p<0.001 and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001. Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. CONCLUSIONS: Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid

  3. Urinary hMG versus recombinant FSH for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation following an agonist long down-regulation protocol in IVF or ICSI treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomarasamy, Arri; Afnan, Masoud; Cheema, Deepti; van der Veen, Fulco; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; van Wely, Madelon

    2008-02-01

    Since the most recent Cochrane review on hMG versus rFSH for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation following a long down-regulation protocol, several new trials have emerged. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing the effectiveness of hMG versus rFSH following a long down-regulation protocol in IVF-ICSI cycles, on the primary outcome of live birth per woman randomized, as well as several other secondary outcomes. Searches were conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Direct, Cochrane Library and databases of abstracts (last search January 2007). Seven randomized trials, consisting of a total of 2159 randomized women, were identified. A meta-analysis of these trials showed a significant increase in live birth rate with hMG when compared with rFSH (relative risk, RR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38, P = 0.03). The heterogeneity test was non-significant (P = 0.97), suggesting that there was no statistical inconsistency between the seven studies. The pooled risk difference (RD) for the outcome of live birth rate was 4% (95% CI: 1-7%) for these study populations. There was an increase in clinical pregnancy rates with hMG when compared with rFSH (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.03-1.34). No significant differences were noted for gonadotrophin use, spontaneous abortion, multiple pregnancy, cancellation and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome rates. For the populations in the randomized trials, hMG was associated with a pooled 4% increase in live birth rate when compared with rFSH in IVF-ICSI treatment following a long down-regulation protocol.

  4. HBP1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation of DNA Methyltransferase 1 and Its Impact on Cell Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kewu; Chen, Yifan; Roth, Mendel; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Shuya; Yee, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    The activity of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is associated with diverse biological activities, including cell proliferation, senescence, and cancer development. In this study, we demonstrated that the HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) transcription factor is a new repressor of DNMT1 in a complex mechanism during senescence. The DNMT1 gene contains an HBP1-binding site at bp −115 to −134 from the transcriptional start site. HBP1 repressed the endogenous DNMT1 gene through sequence-specific binding, resulting in both gene-specific (e.g., p16INK4) and global DNA hypomethylation changes. The HBP1-mediated repression by DNMT1 contributed to replicative and premature senescence, the latter of which could be induced by Ras and HBP1 itself. A detailed investigation unexpectedly revealed that HBP1 has dual and complex transcriptional functions, both of which contribute to premature senescence. HBP1 both repressed the DNMT1 gene and activated the p16 gene in premature senescence. The opposite transcriptional functions proceeded through different DNA sequences and differential protein acetylation. While intricate, the reciprocal partnership between HBP1 and DNMT1 has exceptional importance, since its abrogation compromises senescence and promotes tumorigenesis. Together, our results suggest that the HBP1 transcription factor orchestrates a complex regulation of key genes during cellular senescence, with an impact on overall DNA methylation state. PMID:23249948

  5. Synthesis and highly potent hypolipidemic activity of alpha-asarone- and fibrate-based 2-acyl and 2-alkyl phenols as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta, Aarón; Jiménez, Fabiola; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Mojica-Villegas, Angélica; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Medina-Franco, José L; Meurice, Nathalie; Gutiérrez, Rsuini U; Montiel, Luisa E; Cruz, María Del Carmen; Tamariz, Joaquín

    2014-11-01

    In the search for new potential hypolipidemic agents, the present study focused on the synthesis of 2-acyl phenols (6a-c and 7a-c) and their saturated side-chain alkyl phenols (4a-c and 5a-c), and on the evaluation of their hypolipidemic activity using a murine Tyloxapol-induced hyperlipidemic protocol. The whole series of compounds 4-7 greatly and significantly reduced elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides, with series 6 and 7 showing the greatest potency ever found in our laboratory. At the minimum dose (25mg/kg/day), the latter compounds lowered cholesterol by 68-81%, LDL by 72-86%, and triglycerides by 59-80%. This represents a comparable performance than that shown by simvastatin. Experimental evidence and docking studies suggest that the activity of these derivatives is associated with the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  6. HMG-CoA reductase inhibition aborts functional differentiation and triggers apoptosis in cultured primary human monocytes: a potential mechanism of statin-mediated vasculoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamvakopoulos Joannis E

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins effectively lower blood cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular death. Immunomodulatory actions, independent of their lipid-lowering effect, have also been ascribed to these compounds. Since macrophages participate in several vascular pathologies, we examined the effect of statin treatment on the survival and differentiation of primary human monocytes. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from healthy individuals were cultured in the presence or absence of mevastatin. Apoptosis was monitored by annexin V / PI staining and flow cytometry. In parallel experiments, cultures were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of mevastatin and the release of IL-1β and IL-1Ra was measured by ELISA. Results Among PBMCs, mevastatin-treated monocytes were particularly susceptible to apoptosis, which occurred at doses >1 microM and was already maximal at 5 microM. However, even at the highest mevastatin dose used (10 microM, apoptosis occurred only after 24 h of culture, possibly reflecting a requirement for cell commitment to differentiation. After 72 h of treatment the vast majority (>50% of monocytes were undergoing apoptosis. Stimulation with LPS revealed that mevastatin-treated monocytes retained the high IL-1β output characteristic of undifferentiated cells; conversely, IL-1Ra release was inhibited. Concurrent treatment with mevalonolactone prevented the induction of apoptosis and suppressed both IL-1β and IL-1Ra release in response to LPS, suggesting a rate-limiting role for HMG-CoA reductase in monocyte differentiation. Conclusions Our findings indicate that statins arrest the functional differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and steer these cells into apoptosis, suggesting a novel mechanism for the vasculoprotective properties of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

  7. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  8. RIT1 GTPase Regulates Sox2 Transcriptional Activity and Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Sajad; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A

    2017-02-10

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from neuronal progenitor cells, makes critical contributions to neural circuitry and brain function in both healthy and disease states. Neurogenesis is a highly regulated process in which diverse environmental and physiological stimuli are relayed to resident neural stem cell populations to control the transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing neurogenesis is necessary for the development of translational strategies to harness this process for neuronal repair. Here we report that the Ras-related GTPase RIT1 serves to control the sequential proliferation and differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitor cells, with in vivo expression of active RIT1 driving robust adult neurogenesis. Gene expression profiling analysis demonstrates increased expression of a specific set of transcription factors known to govern adult neurogenesis in response to active RIT1 expression in the hippocampus, including sex-determining region Y-related HMG box 2 (Sox2), a well established regulator of stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis. In adult hippocampal neuronal precursor cells, RIT1 controls an Akt-dependent signaling cascade, resulting in the stabilization and transcriptional activation of phosphorylated Sox2. This study supports a role for RIT1 in relaying niche-derived signals to neural/stem progenitor cells to control transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation.

  9. 转录调控蛋白PrfA对两组新近发现的单核细胞增生李斯特菌基因的体外转录作用的研究%In vitro Transcription of Two Groups of Newly Identified and Putatively in vivo PrfA-Regulated Genes of Listeria monocytogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗勤; 周青春; 邓灵福; 高强; 刘德立; GOEBEL Werner

    2006-01-01

    目的 研究转录调控蛋白PffA对两组新近发现的单核细胞增生李斯特菌基因的体外转录作用.方法 利用本室近年来建立的体外转录系统,对两组基于转录基因组体内研究发现的5个可能的受PffA不同调节的单核细胞增生李斯特菌基因进行了体外转录活性的研究.结果 第一组中的hpt基因的体外转录活性受PffA正调节,而其它4个基因既不被PffA正调节也不被负调节.结论 除hpt基因外,其它4个基因体外转录结果与体内实验不相一致,说明PrfA在体内可能通过复杂多样的非直接方式、或者还需要一些目前未知的因子来调控这些新近发现的基因的表达.%Objective The aim of study was to investigate PrfA-dependent transcription activities of two groups of newly identified and putatively in vivo PrfA-regulated genes of listeria monocytogenes. Methods Transcription initiation at promoters of five genes selected from the two groups based on the transcriptome analysis was studied by means of in vitro transcription system. Results The data showed that, among these new putative" PrfA-regulated" promoters, only the promoter of hpt gene belonging to group I was significantly activated by PrfA. In addition, this promoter was the only one exhibiting all essential features of a typical PrfA-dependent promoter. Neither positively nor negatively, was in vitro transcription starting at most of other promoters affected by PrfA. Conclusion These in vitro transcription results indicate that the effect of PrfA in vivo on the expression of these new genes might be committed in an indirect manner or via a complex process, and that the PrfA-mediated transcription of these genes, in contrast to the PrfA-dependent transcription of the known virulence genes ( including hpt), probably requires additional factors lacked in the in vitro transcription system.

  10. A high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) gene from Chlamys farreri and the DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity of its recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Zhi; Yi, Qilin; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2014-02-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a highly conserved DNA binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. In the present research, a cDNA of 1268 bp for the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri HMGB1 (designed as CfHMGB1) was cloned via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique and expression sequence tag (EST) analysis. The complete cDNA sequence of CfHMGB1 contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 648 bp, which encoded a protein of 215 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1 shared 53-57% similarity with other identified HMGB1s. There were two HMG domains, two low complexity regions and a conserved acidic tail in the amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1. The mRNA transcripts of CfHMGB1 were constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, including haemocytes, muscle, mantle, gill, hepatopancreas, kidney and gonad, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. The mRNA expression profiles of CfHMGB1 in haemocytes after the stimulation with different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and glucan (Glu), were similar with an up-regulation in the early stage and then recovered to the original level. The recombinant CfHMGB1 protein could bind double-stranded DNA and induce the release of TNF-α activity in mixed primary culture of scallop haemocytes. These results collectively indicated that CfHMGB1, with DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity, could play an important role in the immune response of scallops.

  11. 茶树 HMG-CoA 还原酶基因全长 cDNA 克隆及序列分析%Cloning and sequence analysis of HMG-CoA reductase full-length cDNA from tea (Camellia sinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩兴杰; 徐玲玲; 廖亮; 李同建; 邓辉胜; 樊启水; 徐小青

    2015-01-01

    香气是茶叶的重要品质之一,萜类物质不仅香气好,而且沸点普遍较高,是构成茶叶香气的重要物质基础,决定着茶叶的香气品质,也可作为茶叶香型划分的依据.在植物中,倍半萜、多萜醇等通过胞质中的甲瓦龙酸(MVA)途径合成.HMG-CoA 还原酶(HMGR)催化 HMG-CoA(3-羟基-3-甲基戊二酸单酰辅酶 A)生成甲瓦龙酸,是依赖 MVA 萜类合成途径的关键限速反应.为了有助于理解茶树萜类合成的分子遗传机制,通过 RACE-PCR 方法从茶树中克隆了一个编码 HMG-CoA 还原酶的 cDNA 全长序列(命名为 CsHMGR 1),该序列由1979 bp 组成,包含一个1722 bp 的完整开放阅读框,编码573个氨基酸.其推定的编码蛋白与橡胶树、旱莲木、人参、荔枝、西洋参、丹参、罗汉果及龙眼的同源蛋白具有80%~82%的序列一致性.利用 CsH-MGR1和其它物种 HMGR 同源蛋白的催化区域构建系统发育树,表明其属于真核生物 I 类 HMGR 家族.结构分析表明,CsHMGR1含有两个跨膜区,推测其与其它真核生物同源蛋白类似地定位于内质网上;含有两个HMG-CoA 结合位点、两个 NADPH 结合位点、四个保守的催化活性残基及一个磷酸化位点,说明磷酸化/去磷酸化很可能也是其活性调节的重要方式.表达分析表明,CsHMGR 1在“大叶龙”叶芽、母株叶芽及花芽都有较强的表达.其表达调控及生理活性对茶叶品质可能有重要影响,并在其功能解析的基础上,有可能作为茶叶品质鉴定及育种的一个依据.%Aroma is an important character of tea,and terpenoids,with preferable fragrance and relatively high boiling point,are substantial substances contributing to tea aroma,which not only determine the aroma quality of tea,but also provide a classification basis of scent types.In plants,sesquiterpenes and dolichol and so forth are synthesize via the cytoplasmic mevalonate-dependent pathway.The enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR

  12. Transcription in archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  13. A high-fat diet reduces ceramide synthesis by decreasing adiponectin levels and decreases lipid content by modulating HMG-CoA reductase and CPT-1 mRNA expression in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takumi; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2011-09-01

    Molecules involved in skin function are greatly affected by nutritional conditions. However, the mechanism linking high-fat (HF) diets with these alterations is not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the molecular changes in skin function that result from HF diets. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed HF diets for 28 days. The skin levels of ceramide, lipids and mRNAs involved in lipid metabolism were evaluated using TLC, oil red O staining and quantitative PCR, respectively. The serum adiponectin concentration was determined by ELISA. HF diets led to reduced ceramide levels and lowered skin lipid content. They also decreased mRNA levels of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in the skin and those of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α -PPAR-α), which upregulates SPT and HMG-CoA reductase expression. The HF diets reduced the serum concentration of adiponectin, which acts upstream of PPAR-α. Finally, these diets led to increased mRNA levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, the rate-limiting enzyme that acts in β-oxidation. Our study suggests that HF diets reduce ceramide and lipid synthesis in the skin by reducing levels of SPT and HMG-CoA reductase through lowered adiponectin and PPAR-α activity. Additionally, they decrease lipid content by enhancing β-oxidation. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by MFS, a purified extract from the fermentation of marine fungus Fusarium solani FG319, and optimization of MFS production using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Wu, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Qing-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Bao, Bin

    2015-05-01

    The present study was designed to isolate and characterize a purified extract from Fusarium solani FG319, termed MFS (Metabolite of Fusarium solani FG319) that showed anti-atherosclerosis activity by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to achieve an improved yield from the fermentation medium. The inhibiting effect of the isolate, MFS, on HMG-CoA reductase was greater than that of the positive control, lovastatin. The average recovery of MFS and the relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged between 99.75% to 101.18%, and 0.31% to 0.74%, respectively. The RSDs intra- and inter-assay of the three samples ranged from 0.288% to 2.438%, and from 0.934% to 2.383%, respectively. From the RSM, the concentration of inducer, cultivation time, and culture temperatures had significant effects on the MFS production, with the effect of inducer concentration being more pronounced that other factors. In conclusion, the optimal conditions for the MFS production were achieved using RSM and that MFS could be explored as an anti-atherosclerosis agent based on its ability to inhibit HMG-CoA reductase. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrolyis of whey protein with proteases and the influence of the hydrolyzate on HMG-CoA reductase activity%乳清蛋白复合酶解条件优化及其水解产物对HMG-CoA还原酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高学飞; 王志耕; 陆爱华

    2007-01-01

    采用胰蛋白酶、中性蛋白酶A.S1398组成复合酶联合水解乳清蛋白,建立了三因素(水解温度T℃,初始pH,胰蛋白酶活性占总活性的百分比)与乳清蛋白水解度(DH)之间的回归模型,通过模型优化了胰蛋白酶、中性蛋白酶A.S1398联合水解乳清蛋白的条件参数,并研究了在优化的水解条件下,乳清蛋白不同阶段水解产物在体外对HMG-CoA还原酶活性的影响.

  16. Use of Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes to Predict Biliary Clearance of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Koji; Bridges, Arlene S.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that in vitro biliary clearance (Clbiliary) determined in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes correlates well with in vivo Clbiliary for limited sets of compounds. The purpose of this study was 1) to determine the in vitro Clbiliary in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes of angiotensin II receptor blockers and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that undergo limited metabolism and 2) to compare the predicted Clbiliary values with estimated in vivo hepatic clearance data in humans. The average biliary excretion index and in vitro intrinsic Clbiliary values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes were 35, 23, 31, 25, and 16%, respectively, and 0.943, 1.20, 0.484, 3.39, and 5.48 ml/min/kg, respectively. Clbiliary values predicted from sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes correlated with estimated in vivo hepatic clearance values based on published data (no in vivo data in humans was available for pitavastatin), and the rank order was also consistent. In conclusion, in vitro Clbiliary determined in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes can be used to predict in vivo Clbiliary of compounds in humans. PMID:19074974

  17. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output.

  18. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  19. Computational Analysis of the Transcriptional Regulation of the Actin Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑家顺; 吴加金; 孙之荣

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a very important regulatory step in the regulation of gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role in controlling the temporal special specificity of gene expression. The regulation area of actin genes was analyzed statistically to predict the transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory area. A group of transcription factors located in most of the sequences is believed to play an important role in co-regulating the expression of actin genes.

  20. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  1. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  2. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout (MASTER): Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R.; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M.; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 47 (~16,000) bar-coded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields ("massively systematic transcript end readout," MASTER). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo, we define the TSS-region DNA-sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield, and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching"). PMID:26626484

  3. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout, "MASTER": Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2015-12-17

    We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 4(7) (∼ 16,000) barcoded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields (massively systematic transcript end readout, "MASTER"). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo; we define the TSS-region DNA sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield; and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching").

  4. Comparison of the effect of two HMG CoA reductase inhibitors on LDL susceptibility to oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Portal

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the differences between fluvastatin and pravastatin regarding LDL susceptibility to oxidation, plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC, HDL-C, LDL-C and triglycerides (TG in hypercholesterolemic patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD. METHODS: A double-blind randomized parallel study was conducted that included 41 hypercholesterolemic outpatients with CHD treated at the Instituto de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul. The inclusion criteria were LDL-C above 100 mg/dL and triglycerides below 400 mg/dL based on 2 measures. After 4 weeks on a low cholesterol diet, those patients that fullfilled the inclusion criteria were randomized into 2 groups: the fluvastatin group (fluvastatin 40 mg/day and the pravastatin group (pravastatin 20 mg/day, for 24 weeks of treatment. LDL susceptibility to oxidation was analyzed with copper-induced production of conjugated dienes (Cu2+ and water-soluble free radical initiator azo-bis (2'-2'amidinopropanil HCl (AAPH. Spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance was used for determination of lipids. RESULTS: After 24 weeks of drug therapy, fluvastatin and pravastatin significantly reduced LDL susceptibility to oxidation as demonstrated by the reduced rate of oxidation (azo and Cu and by prolonged azo-induced lag time (azo lag. The TC, LDL-C, and TG reduced significantly and HDL-C increased significantly. No differences between the drugs were observed. CONCLUSION: In hypercholesterolemic patients with CHD, both fluvastatin and pravastatin reduced LDL susceptibility to oxidation.

  5. Optimization, validation and application of an assay for the activity of HMG-CoA reductase in vitro by LC-MS/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Ji-Ye Sun; Chun-Jie Sha; Yu-Feng Shao; Yan-Hong Liu; You-Xin Li; Zhen-Wen Duan; Wan-Hui Liu

    2015-01-01

    A stable HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) reaction in vitro was developed by a sensitive, selective and precise liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) method. The optimized enzyme reac-tion condition contained 1.5μg of HMGR, 20 nM of NADPH with 50 min of reaction time. The method was validated by several intra-and inter-day assays. The production transitions of m/z 147.0/59.1 and m/z 154.0/59.1 were used to detect and quantify mevalonolactone (MVAL) and MVAL-D7, respectively. The accuracy and precision of the method were evaluated over the concentration range of 0.005–1.000μg/mL for MVAL and 0.010–0.500μg/mL for lovastatin acid in three validation batch runs. The lower limit of quantitation was found to be 0.005μg/mL for MVAL and 0.010μg/mL for lovastatin acid. Intra-day and inter-day precision ranged from 0.95%to 2.39%and 2.26%to 3.38%for MVAL, 1.46%to 3.89%and 0.57% to 5.10% for lovastatin acid, respectively. The results showed that the active ingredients in Xuezhikang capsules were 12.2 and 14.5 mg/g, respectively. This assay method could be successfully applied to the quality control study of Xuezhikang capsule for the first time.

  6. Investigation of the rate-determining process in the hepatic elimination of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takao; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Kazuya; Kanamaru, Hiroshi; Saito, Yoshikazu; Hu, Zhuohan; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2010-02-01

    Elucidation of the rate-determining process in the overall hepatic elimination of drugs is critical for predicting their intrinsic hepatic clearance and the impact of variation of sequestration clearance on their systemic concentration. The present study investigated the rate-determining process in the overall hepatic elimination of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors pravastatin, pitavastatin, atorvastatin, and fluvastatin both in rats and humans. The uptake of these statins was saturable in both rat and human hepatocytes. Intrinsic hepatic clearance obtained by in vivo pharmacokinetic analysis in rats was close to the uptake clearance determined by the multiple indicator dilution method but much greater than the intrinsic metabolic clearance extrapolated from an in vitro model using liver microsomes. In vivo uptake clearance of the statins in humans (pravastatin, 1.44; pitavastatin, 30.6; atorvastatin, 12.7; and fluvastatin, 62.9 ml/min/g liver), which was obtained by multiplying in vitro uptake clearance determined in cryopreserved human hepatocytes by rat scaling factors, was within the range of overall in vivo intrinsic hepatic clearance (pravastatin, 0.84-1.2; pitavastatin, 14-35; atorvastatin, 11-19; and fluvastatin, 123-185 ml/min/g liver), whereas the intrinsic metabolic clearance of atorvastatin and fluvastatin was considerably low compared with their intrinsic hepatic clearance. Their uptake is the rate-determining process in the overall hepatic elimination of the statins in rats, and this activity likely holds true for humans. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation of the uptake clearance using a cryopreserved human hepatocytes model and rat scaling factors will be effective for predicting in vivo intrinsic hepatic clearance involving active uptake.

  7. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  8. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  9. Mechanical Properties of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Stuart A.; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical properties of transcription have recently been shown to play a central role in gene expression. However, a full physical characterization of this central biological process is lacking. In this Letter, we introduce a simple description of the basic physical elements of transcription where RNA elongation, RNA polymerase rotation, and DNA supercoiling are coupled. The resulting framework describes the relative amount of RNA polymerase rotation and DNA supercoiling that occurs during RNA elongation. Asymptotic behavior is derived and can be used to experimentally extract unknown mechanical parameters of transcription. Mechanical limits to transcription are incorporated through the addition of a DNA supercoiling-dependent RNA polymerase velocity. This addition can lead to transcriptional stalling and resulting implications for gene expression, chromatin structure and genome organization are discussed.

  10. Comparative evaluation of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in experimentally-induced myocardial necrosis: Biochemical, morphological and histological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variya, Bhavesh C; Patel, Snehal S; Trivedi, Jinal I; Gandhi, Hardik P; Rathod, S P

    2015-10-05

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of different statins on isoproterenol (ISO) induced myocardial necrosis. Atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin (10 mg/kg/day) were administered for 12 weeks. After pretreatment of 12 weeks myocardial necrosis was induced by subsequent injection of ISO (85 mg/kg/day, s.c.) to wistar rats. Serum biochemical parameters like glucose, lipid profile, cardiac markers and transaminases were evaluated. Animals were killed and heart was excised for histopathology and antioxidant study. Statins pretreated rats showed significant protection against ISO induced elevation in serum biochemical parameters and serum level of cardiac marker enzymes and transaminase level as compared to ISO control group. Mild to moderate protection was observed in different statins treated heart in histopathology and TTC stained sections. Result from our study also revealed that statins could efficiently protect against ISO intoxicated myocardial necrosis by impairing membrane bound enzyme integrity and endogenous antioxidant enzyme levels. Amongst all statins used, rosuvastatin and pravastatin were found to have maximum cardio-protective activity against ISO induced myocardial necrosis as compared to other statins.

  11. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  12. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  13. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, statins, induce phosphorylation of Mdm2 and attenuate the p53 response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pääjärvi, Gerd; Roudier, Emilie; Crisby, Milita; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2005-03-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, statins, are widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs and have been shown to have anticancer effects in many models. We have investigated the effect of statins on Mdm2, a p53-specific ubiquitin ligase. It was found that pravastatin induced Mdm2 phosphorylation at Ser166 and at 2A10 antibody-specific epitopes in HepG2 cells, while mRNA levels were unchanged. Furthermore, pravastatin was found to induce phosphorylation of mTOR at Ser2448. Ser166 phosphorylation of Mdm2 was abrogated by an inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin, but not by the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin. Ser166 phosphorylation of Mdm2 has been associated to active Mdm2 and has been shown to increase its ubiquitin ligase activity and lead to increased p53 degradation. Our data show that statins attenuated the p53 response to DNA damage. Thus, in HepG2 cells pravastatin and simvastatin pretreatment attenuated the p53 response to DNA damage induced by 5-fluorouracil and benzo(a)pyrene. Similar attenuation was induced when p53 stabilization was induced by the inhibitor of nuclear export, leptomycin B. Furthermore, in the DNA-damaged cells, half-lives of Mdm2 and p53 were decreased by statins, indicating a more rapid formation of p53/Mdm2 complexes and facilitated p53 degradation. The induction of p53 responsive genes and apoptosis was attenuated. Mdm2 and p53 were also studied in vivo in rat liver employing immunohistochemistry, and it was found that constitutive Mdm2 expression was changed in livers of pravastatin-treated rats. We also show that the p53 response to a challenging dose of diethylnitrosamine was attenuated in hepatocytes in situ and in primary cultures of hepatocytes by pravastatin pretreatment. Taken together, these data indicate that statins induce an mTOR-dependent Ser166 phosphorylation of Mdm2, and this effect may attenuate the duration and intensity of the p53 response to DNA damage in hepatocytes.

  14. Efficacy of hCG and hMG on testicular morphology and function in male patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency%促性腺激素治疗对多种垂体激素缺乏症男性患者睾丸形态和功能影响的时效性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐琳; 李桂梅; 王倩

    2014-01-01

    length of 54 male patients was significantly increased from (2.58 ± 0.69) cm to (4.19 ± 0.77) cm , and penis circumference was also increased from (3.71 ± 1.36) cm to (5.95 ± 1.26) cm;the testicular volume was increased from (1.76 ± 1.49) ml to (5.20±2.30) ml;height was increased from (147.01 ± 12.29) cm to (151.98 ± 11.52) cm and bone age was increased from (11.22 ± 2.71) years to (11.64 ± 2.72) years;the differences before and after treatment were statistically significant (all P<0.01). As the patients' age increased, their testicular volume and testosterone level increased slowly, and significant differences amongst each age group were found (P<0.05). The in-creased value of testicular volume, serum FSH and LH levels, and height growth tended to be negatively correlated to the initial age of therapy (r=-0.517~-0.334, P<0.05). Conclusions Early and proper treatment in male patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency using hCG and hMG improves testicular function and secondary sex characteristics.

  15. Influence of DMBA-induced mammary cancer on the liver CPT I, mit HMG-CoA synthase and PPARalpha mRNA expression in rats fed a low or high corn oil diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Raquel; Solanas, Montserrat; Manzanares, Eva Mónica; Haro, Diego; Escrich, Eduard

    2004-08-01

    Hepatic mitochondrial outer membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMG-CoA synthase) enzymes play a key role in regulation of fatty acid oxidation and in ketogenic pathways, respectively. Their expression are regulated by fatty acids mainly by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). To investigate possible mechanisms through which cancer alters the lipid metabolism, we analyzed by Northern blot, the mRNA relative abundance of these proteins in liver from healthy and DMBA-induced mammary tumor-bearing rats fed a low or high corn oil diet. Serum levels of lipids, body weight and mass were also determined. Whereas mRNA steady-state levels of CPT I and mit HMG-CoA synthase were unaffected by the presence of the extra-hepatic tumor, the cancer state seemed to modify the regulation of the expression of these genes by high fat diet. We hypothesize that putative changes in PPARalpha mRNA levels could have contributed to such alterations. These results, together with changes in serum lipid profiles, body weight and mass, indicate fat mobilization and non-enhanced oxidation rates despite a high-fat feeding. This effect of the cancer state could be related to tumor aggressiveness and suggest a preferential redirection of long-chain fatty acids into energetic and specific pathways of the cancer cells.

  16. Identification of direct regulatory targets of the transcription factor Sox10 based on function and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sanghyuk

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox10, a member of the Sry-related HMG-Box gene family, is a critical transcription factor for several important cell lineages, most notably the neural crest stem cells and the derivative peripheral glial cells and melanocytes. Thus far, only a handful of direct target genes are known for this transcription factor limiting our understanding of the biological network it governs. Results We describe identification of multiple direct regulatory target genes of Sox10 through a procedure based on function and conservation. By combining RNA interference technique and DNA microarray technology, we have identified a set of genes that show significant down-regulation upon introduction of Sox10 specific siRNA into Schwannoma cells. Subsequent comparative genomics analyses led to potential binding sites for Sox10 protein conserved across several mammalian species within the genomic region proximal to these genes. Multiple sites belonging to 4 different genes (proteolipid protein, Sox10, extracellular superoxide dismutase, and pleiotrophin were shown to directly interact with Sox10 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. We further confirmed the direct regulation through the identified cis-element for one of the genes, extracellular superoxide dismutase, using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and reporter assay. Conclusion In sum, the process of combining differential expression profiling and comparative genomics successfully led to further defining the role of Sox10, a critical transcription factor for the development of peripheral glia. Our strategy utilizing relatively accessible techniques and tools should be applicable to studying the function of other transcription factors.

  17. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  18. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  19. Gene-Transformation-Induced Changes in Chemical Functional Group Features and Molecular Structure Conformation in Alfalfa Plants Co-Expressing Lc-bHLH and C1-MYB Transcriptive Flavanoid Regulatory Genes: Effects of Single-Gene and Two-Gene Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra G. Heendeniya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. genotypes transformed with Lc-bHLH and Lc transcription genes were developed with the intention of stimulating proanthocyanidin synthesis in the aerial parts of the plant. To our knowledge, there are no studies on the effect of single-gene and two-gene transformation on chemical functional groups and molecular structure changes in these plants. The objective of this study was to use advanced molecular spectroscopy with multivariate chemometrics to determine chemical functional group intensity and molecular structure changes in alfalfa plants when co-expressing Lc-bHLH and C1-MYB transcriptive flavanoid regulatory genes in comparison with non-transgenic (NT and AC Grazeland (ACGL genotypes. The results showed that compared to NT genotype, the presence of double genes (Lc and C1 increased ratios of both the area and peak height of protein structural Amide I/II and the height ratio of α-helix to β-sheet. In carbohydrate-related spectral analysis, the double gene-transformed alfalfa genotypes exhibited lower peak heights at 1370, 1240, 1153, and 1020 cm−1 compared to the NT genotype. Furthermore, the effect of double gene transformation on carbohydrate molecular structure was clearly revealed in the principal component analysis of the spectra. In conclusion, single or double transformation of Lc and C1 genes resulted in changing functional groups and molecular structure related to proteins and carbohydrates compared to the NT alfalfa genotype. The current study provided molecular structural information on the transgenic alfalfa plants and provided an insight into the impact of transgenes on protein and carbohydrate properties and their molecular structure’s changes.

  20. Swinger RNA self-hybridization and mitochondrial non-canonical swinger transcription, transcription systematically exchanging nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-06-21

    Stem-loop hairpins punctuate mitochondrial post-transcriptional processing. Regulation of mitochondrial swinger transcription, transcription producing RNAs matching the mitogenome only assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (23 bijective transformations along 9 symmetric exchanges XY, e.g. AG, and 14 asymmetric exchanges X>Y>Z>X, e.g. A>G>C>A) remains unknown. Does swinger RNA self-hybridization regulate swinger, as regular, transcription? Groups of 8 swinger transformations share canonical self-hybridization properties within each group, group 0 includes identity (regular) transcription. The human mitogenome has more stem-loop hairpins than randomized sequences for all groups. Group 2 transformations reveal complementarity of the light strand replication origin (OL) loop and a neighboring tRNA gene, detecting the longtime presumed OL/tRNA homology. Non-canonical G=U pairings in hairpins increases with swinger RNA detection. These results confirm biological relevancy of swinger-transformed DNA/RNA, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected swinger DNA/RNA and swinger peptides. Swinger-transformed mitogenomes include unsuspected multilayered information.

  1. Rhythm quantization for transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.; Desain, P.W.M.; Kappen, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Music Transcription is the extraction of an acceptable notation from performed music. One important task in this problem is rhythm quantization which refers to categorization of note durations. Although quantization of a pure mechanical performance is rather straightforward, the task becom

  2. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any a

  3. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  4. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any

  5. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  6. The Comparative Effects of HMG and FSH on Superovulation in Angus Heifers%HMG和FSH用于安格斯牛超数排卵的效果比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华林; 肖遥; 岑桂英; 陈建国; 王晓民; 付树滨; 胡道俊; 李文功; 杨利国

    2012-01-01

    超数排卵在动物胚胎工程技术的体内胚生产中起关键作用,不同品种甚至个体对超数排卵的反应不同。人绝经期促性腺激素(HMG)是从绝经期妇女尿液中提纯得到的具有促卵泡素(FSH)活性的蛋白质激素,在医学上广泛应用于诱导排卵和治疗不育不孕症。本试验以安格斯青年母牛为超排供体,采用分次肌肉注射激素方法进行超排处理,比较了HMG与FSH用于安格斯母牛超数排卵的效果。B超检查发现,HMG和FSH超排处理后牛只两侧卵巢上直径〉1cm的卵泡数分别为10.33±0.52和9.25±0.46个,二者差异不显著(P〉0.05),表明HMG与FSH同样安全有效;总剂量1400IU的HMG或FSH用于安格斯母牛超排后B超检查卵巢没有发现异常变化,说明该剂量是用于安格斯母牛超数排卵的安全有效剂量。%Superovulation plays an important role in iv vivo production of embryos in the embryo engineering techniques, and is affected by animal breeds and even individuals. Human menopausal gonadotrophin(HMG)is a protein hormone refined from urine of menopausal women, which has high follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) activity. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of HMG and FSH in superovulation regimens via multiple intramuscular injections in Angus heifers. B type ultrasonography was performed to evaluate superovulation treatment. The results showed that there was no significant difference between HMG and FSH (10.33±0.52 vs 9.25±0.46, P〉0.05, respectively) in the number of follicles on both ovaries. All animals responded well to the superovulatory stimulus by a total dose of 1400IU HMG or FSH, indicating that this dose is safe and effective for superovulation in Angus Heifers.

  7. Transcription factors Mat2 and Znf2 operate cellular circuits orchestrating opposite- and same-sex mating in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Lin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen that undergoes a dimorphic transition from a unicellular yeast to multicellular hyphae during opposite sex (mating and unisexual reproduction (same-sex mating. Opposite- and same-sex mating are induced by similar environmental conditions and involve many shared components, including the conserved pheromone sensing Cpk1 MAPK signal transduction cascade that governs the dimorphic switch in C. neoformans. However, the homeodomain cell identity proteins Sxi1alpha/Sxi2a encoded by the mating type locus that are essential for completion of sexual reproduction following cell-cell fusion during opposite-sex mating are dispensable for same-sex mating. Therefore, identification of downstream targets of the Cpk1 MAPK pathway holds the key to understanding molecular mechanisms governing the two distinct developmental fates. Thus far, homology-based approaches failed to identify downstream transcription factors which may therefore be species-specific. Here, we applied insertional mutagenesis via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and transcription analysis using whole genome microarrays to identify factors involved in C. neoformans differentiation. Two transcription factors, Mat2 and Znf2, were identified as key regulators of hyphal growth during same- and opposite-sex mating. Mat2 is an HMG domain factor, and Znf2 is a zinc finger protein; neither is encoded by the mating type locus. Genetic, phenotypic, and transcriptional analyses of Mat2 and Znf2 provide evidence that Mat2 is a downstream transcription factor of the Cpk1 MAPK pathway whereas Znf2 functions as a more terminal hyphal morphogenesis determinant. Although the components of the MAPK pathway including Mat2 are not required for virulence in animal models, Znf2, as a hyphal morphology determinant, is a negative regulator of virulence. Further characterization of these elements and their target circuits will reveal genes controlling biological

  8. Similarities in transcription factor IIIC subunits that bind to the posterior regions of internal promoters for RNA polymerase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsutani Sachiko

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase III (RNAP III transcribes the genes for small RNAs like tRNAs, 5S rRNA, and several viral RNAs, and short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs. The genes for these RNAs and SINEs have internal promoters that consist of two regions. These two regions are called the A and B blocks. The multisubunit transcription factor TFIIIC is required for transcription initiation of RNAP III; in transcription of tRNAs, the B-block binding subunit of TFIIIC recognizes a promoter. Although internal promoter sequences are conserved in eukaryotes, no evidence of homology between the B-block binding subunits of vertebrates and yeasts has been reported previously. Results Here, I reported the results of PSI-BLAST searches using the B-block binding subunits of human and Shizosacchromyces pombe as queries, showing that the same Arabidopsis proteins were hit with low E-values in both searches. Comparison of the convergent iterative alignments obtained by these PSI-BLAST searches revealed that the vertebrate, yeast, and Arabidopsis proteins have similarities in their N-terminal one-third regions. In these regions, there were three domains with conserved sequence similarities, one located in the N-terminal end region. The N-terminal end region of the B-block binding subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tentatively identified as a HMG box, which is the DNA binding motif. Although I compared the alignment of the N-terminal end regions of the B-block binding subunits, and their homologs, with that of the HMG boxes, it is not clear whether they are related. Conclusion Molecular phylogenetic analyses using the small subunit rRNA and ubiquitous proteins like actin and α-tubulin, show that fungi are more closely related to animals than either is to plants. Interestingly, the results obtained in this study show that, with respect to the B-block binding subunits of TFIIICs, animals appear to be evolutionarily closer to plants

  9. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J. Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals propagating through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programs in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. In many cases, the dynamical performance of transcriptional re...

  10. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... targeting specific cis-acting elements in genes, and by the significant lack of fixed tertiary structure in their extensive intrinsically disordered regions. Recent research in protein intrinsic disorder (ID) has changed our understanding of transcriptional activation domains from 'negative noodles' to ID...... them to participate in large interactomes, how they use only a few hydrophobic residues, short sequence motifs, prestructured motifs, and coupled folding and binding for their interactions with co-activators, and how their accessibility to post-translational modification affects their interactions...

  11. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  12. SNFing HIV transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukrinsky Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is an essential regulator of transcription of cellular genes. HIV-1 infection induces exit of a core component of SWI/SNF, Ini1, into the cytoplasm and its association with the viral pre-integration complex. Several recent papers published in EMBO Journal, Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Retrovirology provide new information regarding possible functions of Ini1 and SWI/SNF in HIV life cycle. It appears that Ini1 has an inhibitory effect on pre-integration steps of HIV replication, but also contributes to stimulation of Tat-mediated transcription. This stimulation involves displacement of the nucleosome positioned at the HIV promoter.

  13. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  14. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    RNA); and ii) translation, in which the mRNA is translated into a protein. This thesis focus on the ¿rst of these steps, transcription, and speci¿cally the initiation of this. Simpli¿ed, initiation is preceded by the binding of several proteins, known as transcription factors (TFs), to DNA. This takes place......The myriad of cells in the human body are all made from the same blueprint: the human genome. At the heart of this diversity lies the concept of gene regulation, the process in which it is decided which genes are used where and when. Genes do not function as on/off buttons, but more like a volume...... control spanning the range from completely muted to cranked up to maximum. The volume, in this case, is the production rate of proteins. This production is the result of a two step procedure: i) transcription, in which a small part of DNA from the genome (a gene) is transcribed into an RNA molecule (an m...

  15. Interplay of Dynamic Transcription and Chromatin Remodeling: Lessons from Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Klopf

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of transcription involves dynamic rearrangements of chromatin structure. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a variety of highly conserved factors necessary for these reconstructions. Chromatin remodelers, histone modifiers and histone chaperones directly associate to promoters and open reading frames of exposed genes and facilitate activation and repression of transcription. We compare two distinct patterns of induced transcription: Sustained transcribed genes switch to an activated state where they remain as long as the induction signal is present. In contrast, single pulsed transcribed genes show a quick and strong induction pulse resulting in high transcript levels followed by adaptation and repression to basal levels. We discuss intensively studied promoters and coding regions from both groups for their co-factor requirements during transcription. Interplay between chromatin restructuring factors and dynamic transcription is highly variable and locus dependent.

  16. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-10-11

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals that propagate through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programmes in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. Cellular response dynamics are ultimately determined by interactions between transcriptional and non-transcriptional networks, with dramatic implications for physiology and evolution. Here, we provide an overview of non-transcriptional interactions that can affect the performance of natural and synthetic bacterial regulatory networks.

  17. Chromatin-mediated transcriptional regulation by the yeast architectural factors NHP6A and NHP6B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    2000-01-01

    . Micrococcal nuclease and DNase I analysis of the CHA1 gene in this strain showed an open promoter structure, characteristic of the activated state of this promoter, even under non-inducing conditions. To address the possible function of the NHP6A/B proteins in chromatin-mediated gene regulation, we performed......The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NHP6A and NHP6B proteins are chromatin architectural factors, functionally and structurally related to the mammalian high mobility group (HMG)-1 and -2 proteins, a family of non-sequence-specific DNA binding proteins. nhp6a nhp6b mutants have various morphological...... defects and are defective in the induced expression of several RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes. We found that NHP6A/B proteins are also required for full induction of the yeast CHA1 gene. Importantly, CHA1 basal level expression is increased 10-fold in an nhp6a nhp6b double deletion mutant...

  18. Regulated assembly of transcription factors and control of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    2001-11-30

    Proteins that function in regulation of transcription initiation are typically homo or hetero-oligomeric. Results of recent biophysical studies of transcription regulators indicate that the assembly of these proteins is often subject to regulation. This regulation of assembly dictates the frequency of transcription initiation via its influence on the affinity of a transcription regulator for DNA and its affect on target site selection. Factors that modulate transcription factor assembly include binding of small molecules, post-translational modification, DNA binding and interactions with other proteins. Here, the results of recent structural and/or thermodynamic studies of a number of transcription regulators that are subject to regulated assembly are reviewed. The accumulated data indicate that this phenomenon is ubiquitous and that mechanisms utilized in eukaryotes and prokaryotes share common features. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Transcriptional factor HBP1 targets P16(INK4A), upregulating its expression and consequently is involved in Ras-induced premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Wang, W; Liu, X; Paulson, K E; Yee, A S; Zhang, X

    2010-09-09

    Oncogene-mediated premature senescence has emerged as a potential tumor-suppressive mechanism in early cancer transitions. Many studies showed that Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) participate in premature senescence. Our previous work indicated that the HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) transcription factor is involved in Ras- and p38 MAPK-induced premature senescence, but the mechanism of which has not yet been identified. Here, we showed that the p16(INK4A) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor is a novel target of HBP1 participating in Ras-induced premature senescence. The promoter of the p16(INK4A) gene contains an HBP1-binding site at position -426 to -433 bp from the transcriptional start site. HBP1 regulates the expression of the endogenous p16(INK4A) gene through direct sequence-specific binding. With HBP1 expression and the subsequent increase of p16(INK4A) gene expression, Ras induces premature senescence in primary cells. The data suggest a model in which Ras and p38 MAPK signaling engage HBP1 and p16(INK4A) to trigger premature senescence. In addition, we report that HBP1 knockdown is also required for Ras-induced transformation. All the data indicate that the mechanism of HBP1-mediated transcriptional regulation is important for not only premature senescence but also tumorigenesis.

  20. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    . Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t......RNA primer for reverse transcription may have a major influence on transcriptional silencing. Alterations of these elements of the vector backbone as well as the use of internal promoter elements from housekeeping genes may contribute to reduce transcriptional silencing. The use of cell culture and animal...

  1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  2. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...

  3. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  4. DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions.

  5. Mechanisms of suspended animation are revealed by transcript profiling of diapause in the flesh fly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gregory J. Ragland; David L. Denlinger; Daniel A. Hahn

    2010-01-01

    .... We used transcriptional profiling to identify key groups of genes and pathways differentially regulated during pupal diapause, dynamically regulated across diapause development, and differentially...

  6. Promoter-mediated transcriptional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiajun; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-21

    Genes in eukaryotic cells are typically regulated by complex promoters containing multiple binding sites for a variety of transcription factors, but how promoter dynamics affect transcriptional dynamics has remained poorly understood. In this study, we analyze gene models at the transcriptional regulation level, which incorporate the complexity of promoter structure (PS) defined as transcriptional exits (i.e., ON states of the promoter) and the transition pattern (described by a matrix consisting of transition rates among promoter activity states). We show that multiple exits of transcription are the essential origin of generating multimodal distributions of mRNA, but promoters with the same transition pattern can lead to multimodality of different modes, depending on the regulation of transcriptional factors. In turn, for similar mRNA distributions in the models, the mean ON or OFF time distributions may exhibit different characteristics, thus providing the supplemental information on PS. In addition, we demonstrate that the transcriptional noise can be characterized by a nonlinear function of mean ON and OFF times. These results not only reveal essential characteristics of promoter-mediated transcriptional dynamics but also provide signatures useful for inferring PS based on characteristics of transcriptional outputs. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mastering Transcription: Multiplexed Analysis of Transcription Start Site Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochschild, Ann

    2015-12-17

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Vvedenskaya et al. (2015) describe a high-throughput sequencing-based methodology for the massively parallel analysis of transcription from a high-complexity barcoded template library both in vitro and in vivo, providing a powerful new tool for the study of transcription.

  8. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  9. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Muñoz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-regulated genes. An example is illustrative. A rewiring has been reported by Hogues et al. that RAP1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae substitutes for TBF1/CBF1 in Candida albicans for ribosomal RP genes. There one transcription factor substitutes for another on some collection of genes. Such a substitution is referred to as a “rewiring”. We agree with this finding of rewiring as far as it goes but the situation is more complicated. Many transcription factors can regulate a gene and our algorithm finds that in this example a “team” (or collection of three transcription factors including RAP1 substitutes for TBF1 for 19 genes. The switch occurs for a branch of the phylogenetic tree containing 10 species (including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while the remaining 13 species (Candida albicans are regulated by TBF1. Conclusions To gain insight into more general evolutionary mechanisms, we have created a mathematical algorithm that finds such general switching events and we prove that it converges. Of course any such computational discovery should be validated in the biological tests. For each branch of the phylogenetic tree and each gene module, our algorithm finds a sub-group of co-regulated genes and a team of transcription factors that substitutes for another team of transcription factors. In most cases the signal will be small but in some cases we find a strong signal of switching. We report our findings for 23 Ascomycota fungi species.

  10. Analyzing stochastic transcription to elucidate the nucleoid's organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chéron Angélique

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The processes of gene transcription, translation, as well as the reactions taking place between gene products, are subject to stochastic fluctuations. These stochastic events are being increasingly examined as it emerges that they can be crucial in the cell's survival. In a previous study we had examined the transcription patterns of two bacterial species (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis to elucidate the nucleoid's organization. The basic idea is that genes that share transcription patterns, must share some sort of spatial relationship, even if they are not close to each other on the chromosome. We had found that picking any gene at random, its transcription will be correlated with genes at well-defined short – as well as long-range distances, leaving the explanation of the latter an open question. In this paper we study the transcription correlations when the only transcription taking place is stochastic, in other words, no active or "deterministic" transcription takes place. To this purpose we use transcription data of Sinorhizobium meliloti. Results Even when only stochastic transcription takes place, the co-expression of genes varies as a function of the distance between genes: we observe again the short-range as well as the regular, long-range correlation patterns. Conclusion We explain these latter with a model based on the physical constraints acting on the DNA, forcing it into a conformation of groups of a few successive large and transcribed loops, which are evenly spaced along the chromosome and separated by small, non-transcribed loops. We discuss the question about the link between shared transcription patterns and physiological relationship and come to the conclusion that when genes are distantly placed along the chromosome, the transcription correlation does not imply a physiological relationship.

  11. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional profile of human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Sergey I; Deutsch, Samuel; Genolet, Raphael; Borel, Christelle; Parand, Leila; Ucla, Catherine; Schütz, Frederic; Duriaux Sail, Genevieve; Dupré, Yann; Jaquier-Gubler, Pascale; Araud, Tanguy; Conne, Beatrice; Descombes, Patrick; Vassalli, Jean-Dominique; Curran, Joseph; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated extensive transcriptional activity across the human genome, a substantial fraction of which is not associated with any functional annotation. However, very little is known regarding the post-transcriptional processes that operate within the different classes of RNA molecules. To characterize the post-transcriptional properties of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21 (HSA21), we separated RNA molecules from three cell lines (GM06990, HeLa S3, and SK-N-AS) according to their ribosome content by sucrose gradient fractionation. Polyribosomal-associated RNA and total RNA were subsequently hybridized to genomic tiling arrays. We found that approximately 50% of the transcriptional signals were located outside of annotated exons and were considered as TARs (transcriptionally active regions). Although TARs were observed among polysome-associated RNAs, RT-PCR and RACE experiments revealed that approximately 40% were likely to represent nonspecific cross-hybridization artifacts. Bioinformatics discrimination of TARs according to conservation and sequence complexity allowed us to identify a set of high-confidence TARs. This set of TARs was significantly depleted in the polysomes, suggesting that it was not likely to be involved in translation. Analysis of polysome representation of RefSeq exons showed that at least 15% of RefSeq transcripts undergo significant post-transcriptional regulation in at least two of the three cell lines tested. Among the regulated transcripts, enrichment analysis revealed an over-representation of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including APP and the BACE1 protease that cleaves APP to produce the pathogenic beta 42 peptide. We demonstrate that the combination of RNA fractionation and tiling arrays is a powerful method to assess the transcriptional and post-transcriptional properties of genomic regions.

  12. Mechanosensitive mechanisms in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-07-01

    Transcriptional regulation contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic cells and in stem cells. Therefore, control of gene expression at the level of transcription is crucial for embryonic development, as well as for organogenesis, functional adaptation, and regeneration in adult tissues and organs. In the past, most work has focused on how transcriptional regulation results from the complex interplay between chemical cues, adhesion signals, transcription factors and their co-regulators during development. However, chemical signaling alone is not sufficient to explain how three-dimensional (3D) tissues and organs are constructed and maintained through the spatiotemporal control of transcriptional activities. Accumulated evidence indicates that mechanical cues, which include physical forces (e.g. tension, compression or shear stress), alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics and changes in cell shape, are transmitted to the nucleus directly or indirectly to orchestrate transcriptional activities that are crucial for embryogenesis and organogenesis. In this Commentary, we review how the mechanical control of gene transcription contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, determination of cell fate, pattern formation and organogenesis, as well as how it is involved in the control of cell and tissue function throughout embryogenesis and adult life. A deeper understanding of these mechanosensitive transcriptional control mechanisms should lead to new approaches to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  13. Transcriptional networks controlling adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, R; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is regulated by a complex cascade of signals that drive the transcriptional reprogramming of the fibroblastic precursors. Genome-wide analyses of chromatin accessibility and binding of adipogenic transcription factors make it possible to generate "snapshots" of the trans...

  14. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  15. Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase: a control enzyme in ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegardt, F G

    1999-03-15

    Cytosolic and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthases were first recognized as different chemical entities in 1975, when they were purified and characterized by Lane's group. Since then, the two enzymes have been studied extensively, one as a control site of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and the other as an important control site of ketogenesis. This review describes some key developments over the last 25 years that have led to our current understanding of the physiology of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the HMG-CoA pathway and in ketogenesis in the liver and small intestine of suckling animals. The enzyme is regulated by two systems: succinylation and desuccinylation in the short term, and transcriptional regulation in the long term. Both control mechanisms are influenced by nutritional and hormonal factors, which explains the incidence of ketogenesis in diabetes and starvation, during intense lipolysis, and in the foetal-neonatal and suckling-weaning transitions. The DNA-binding properties of the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor and other transcription factors on the nuclear-receptor-responsive element of the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter have revealed how ketogenesis can be regulated by fatty acids. Finally, the expression of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the gonads and the correction of auxotrophy for mevalonate in cells deficient in cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme may play a role in cholesterogenesis in gonadal and other tissues.

  16. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Structural basis of transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rucobo, Fuensanta W; Cramer, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    For transcription elongation, all cellular RNA polymerases form a stable elongation complex (EC) with the DNA template and the RNA transcript. Since the millennium, a wealth of structural information and complementary functional studies provided a detailed three-dimensional picture of the EC and many of its functional states. Here we summarize these studies that elucidated EC structure and maintenance, nucleotide selection and addition, translocation, elongation inhibition, pausing and proofreading, backtracking, arrest and reactivation, processivity, DNA lesion-induced stalling, lesion bypass, and transcriptional mutagenesis. In the future, additional structural and functional studies of elongation factors that control the EC and their possible allosteric modes of action should result in a more complete understanding of the dynamic molecular mechanisms underlying transcription elongation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermodynamic Model of Transcription Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadigotla, Vasisht; O'Maoileidigh, Daibhid; Sengupta, Anirvan; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei

    2006-03-01

    We present a statistical mechanics approach to the prediction of backtracked pauses in prokaryotic transcription elongation derived from structural models of the transcription elongation complex (TEC). Our algorithm is based on the thermodynamic stability of TEC along the DNA template calculated from the sequence dependent free-energy of DNA-DNA, DNA-RNA and RNA-RNA base pairing associated with (a) the translocation and size fluctuations of the transcription bubble; (b) the changes in the DNA-RNA hybrid; and (c) the changes in the RNA folding free-energy. The calculations involve no adjustable parameters apart from a cutoff used to discriminate paused from non-paused complexes. When applied to 100 experimental pauses in transcription elongation by E. coli RNA polymerase on ten DNA templates the approach produces highly statistically significant results. Transcription elongation is an inherently kinetic process and a simplified kinetic model with the same predictive power is presented separately.

  19. Transcription-coupled DNA repair in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Ann; Spivak, Graciela; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) that acts specifically on lesions in the transcribed strand of expressed genes. First reported in mammalian cells, TCR was then documented in Escherichia coli. In this organism, an RNA polymerase arrested at a lesion is displaced by the transcription repair coupling factor, Mfd. This protein recruits the NER lesion-recognition factor UvrA, and then dissociates from the DNA. UvrA binds UvrB, and the assembled UvrAB* complex initiates repair. In mutants lacking active Mfd, TCR is absent. A gene transcribed by the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase in E. coli also requires Mfd for TCR. The CSB protein (missing or defective in cells of patients with Cockayne syndrome, complementation group B) is essential for TCR in humans. CSB and its homologs in higher eukaryotes are likely functional equivalents of Mfd. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibition Activity of the Hydrolyzed Product of Snakehead Fish (Channa striata) Skin Collagen with 50 kDa Collagenase from Bacillus licheniformis F11.4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia, Agnes; Rachmawati, Heni; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive peptides produced from enzymatic hydrolysis fibrous protein have been proven to have several biological activities. Previous study showed that the hydrolysis product of snakehead fish skin collagen with 26 kDa collagenase from Bacillus licheniformis F11.4 showed HMG-CoA (HMGR) inhibition activity. The aim of this research was to determine the ability of the hydrolysis product produced from snakehead fish skin collagen hydrolysed by 50 kDa collagenase from B. licheniformis F11.4 in inhibiting HMGR activity. Snakehead fish skin collagen was extracted using an acid method and collagenase was produced from B. licheniformis F11.4 using half-strength Luria Bertani (LB) medium containing 5% collagen. Crude collagenase was concentrated and fractionated using the DEAE Sephadex A-25 column eluted with increasing gradient concentrations of NaCl. Collagen, collagenase, and fractions were analyzed using SDS-PAGE and collagenolytic activity was analyzed by the zymography method. Collagenase with 50 kDa molecular weight presented in fraction one was used to hydrolyze the collagen. The reaction was done in 18 hours at 50°C. The hydrolysis product using 3.51 μg collagen and 9 ng collagenase showed 25.8% inhibition activity against pravastatin. This work shows for the first time that the hydrolysis product of snakehead fish skin collagen and 50 kDa collagenase from B. licheniformis F11.4 has potential as an anticholesterol agent.

  1. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order manip

  2. Transcriptional response of nitrifying communities to wetting of dry soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placella, Sarah A; Firestone, Mary K

    2013-05-01

    The first rainfall following a severe dry period provides an abrupt water potential change that is both an acute physiological stress and a defined stimulus for the reawakening of soil microbial communities. We followed the responses of indigenous communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to the addition of water to laboratory incubations of soils taken from two California annual grasslands following a typically dry Mediterranean summer. By quantifying transcripts for a subunit of bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenases (amoA) and a bacterial nitrite oxidoreductase (nxrA) in soil from 15 min to 72 h after water addition, we identified transcriptional response patterns for each of these three groups of nitrifiers. An increase in quantity of bacterial amoA transcripts was detectable within 1 h of wet-up and continued until the size of the ammonium pool began to decrease, reflecting a possible role of transcription in upregulation of nitrification after drought-induced stasis. In one soil, the pulse of amoA transcription lasted for less than 24 h, demonstrating the transience of transcriptional pools and the tight coupling of transcription to the local soil environment. Analysis of 16S rRNA using a high-density microarray suggested that nitrite-oxidizing Nitrobacter spp. respond in tandem with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria while nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospina spp. and Nitrospira bacteria may not. Archaeal ammonia oxidizers may respond slightly later than bacterial ammonia oxidizers but may maintain elevated transcription longer. Despite months of desiccation-induced inactivation, we found rapid transcriptional response by all three groups of soil nitrifiers.

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065847 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065847 J013042H05 At1g04880.1 high mobility group (HMG1/2) family protein / ARID/BRIGHT...ein 4 (HMG-4) (High mobility group protein 2a) (HMG-2a) {Homo sapiens}; contains Pfam profiles PF00505: HMG (high mobility group) box, PF01388: ARID/BRIGHT DNA binding domain 7e-74 ...

  4. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  5. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousuke Imamura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation.

  6. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  7. The eukaryotic gene transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberg, R D

    2001-08-01

    Seven purified proteins may be combined to reconstitute regulated, promoter-dependent RNA polymerase II transcription: five general transcription factors, Mediator, and RNA polymerase II. The entire system has been conserved across species from yeast to humans. The structure of RNA polymerase II, consisting of 10 polypeptides with a mass of about 500 kDa, has been determined at atomic resolution. On the basis of this structure, that of an actively transcribing RNA polymerase II complex has been determined as well.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of mononuclear phagocyte development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane eTussiwand

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe mononuclear-phagocyte system (MPS, which comprises dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages and monocytes, is a heterogeneous group of myeloid cells. The complexity of the MPS is equally reflected by the plasticity in function and phenotype that characterizes each subset depending on their location and activation state. Specialized subsets of Mononuclear Phagocytes (MP reside in defined anatomical locations, are critical for the homeostatic maintenance of tissues, and provide the link between innate and adaptive immune responses during infections. The ability of MP to maintain or to induce the correct tolerogenic or inflammatory milieu also resides in their complex subset specialization. Such subset heterogeneity is obtained through lineage diversification and specification, which is controlled by defined transcriptional networks and programs. Understanding the MP biology means to define their transcriptional signature, which is required during lineage commitment, and which characterizes each subset’s features. This review will focus on the transcriptional regulation of the MPS; in particular what determines lineage commitment and functional identity; we will emphasizes recent advances in the field of single cell analysis and highlight unresolved questions in the field.

  9. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Modeling of Transcriptional Pausing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vasisht R. Tadigotla; Dáibhid Ó. Maoiléidigh; Anirvan M. Sengupta; Vitaly Epshtein; Richard H. Ebright; Evgeny Nudler; Andrei E. Ruckenstein

    2006-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanics approach for the prediction of backtracked pauses in bacterial transcription elongation derived from structural models of the transcription elongation complex (EC...

  10. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions taken...

  11. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject...... of algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group......-theorists, and to stimulate contacts between participants. Each of the first four days was dedicated to one area of research that has recently seen decisive progress: \\begin{itemize} \\item structure and classification of wonderful varieties, \\item finite reductive groups and character sheaves, \\item quantum cohomology...

  12. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  13. MUYANG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With its headquarters in the historic city of Yangzhou,Jiangsu Muyang Group Co.,Ltd has since its founding in 1967 grown into a well-known group corporation whose activities cover research&development.project design,manufacturing,installation and services in a multitude of industries including feed machinery and engineering,storage engineering,grain machinery and engineering,environmental protection,conveying equipment and automatic control systems.

  14. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  15. Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most well-know bacterial model about the function of its molecular components. In this review are presented several structural and functional aspects of their transcriptional regulatory network constituted by transcription factors and target genes. The network discussed here represent to 1531 genes and 3421 regulatory interactions. This network shows a power-law distribution with a few global regulators and most of genes poorly connected. 176 of genes in the network correspond to transcription factors, which form a sub-network of seven hierarchical layers where global regulators tend to be set in superior layers while local regulators are located in the lower ones. There is a small set of proteins know as nucleoid-associated proteins, which are in a high cellular concentrations and reshape the nucleoid structure to influence the running of global transcriptional programs, to this mode of regulation is named analog regulation. Specific signal effectors assist the activity of most of transcription factors in E. coli. These effectors switch and tune the activity of transcription factors. To this type of regulation, depending of environmental signals is named the digital-precise-regulation. The integration of regulatory programs have place in the promoter region of transcription units where it is common to observe co-regulation among global and local TFs as well as of TFs sensing exogenous and endogenous conditions. The mechanistic logic to understand the harmonious operation of regulatory programs in the network should consider the globalism of TFs, their signal perceived, coregulation, genome position, and cellular concentration. Finally, duplicated TFs and their horizontal transfer influence the evolvability of members of the network. The most duplicated and transferred TFs are located in the network periphery.

  16. TCF/LEF Transcription Factors: An Update from the Internet Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Hrckulak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (TCF/LEF proteins (TCFs from the High Mobility Group (HMG box family act as the main downstream effectors of the Wnt signaling pathway. The mammalian TCF/LEF family comprises four nuclear factors designated TCF7, LEF1, TCF7L1, and TCF7L2 (also known as TCF1, LEF1, TCF3, and TCF4, respectively. The proteins display common structural features and are often expressed in overlapping patterns implying their redundancy. Such redundancy was indeed observed in gene targeting studies; however, individual family members also exhibit unique features that are not recapitulated by the related proteins. In the present viewpoint, we summarized our current knowledge about the specific features of individual TCFs, namely structural-functional studies, posttranslational modifications, interacting partners, and phenotypes obtained upon gene targeting in the mouse. In addition, we employed several publicly available databases and web tools to evaluate the expression patterns and production of gene-specific isoforms of the TCF/LEF family members in human cells and tissues.

  17. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Gene transcription in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from disparate populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Waters, Shannon C.; Meyerson, Randi; Rode, Karyn D.; Atwood, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Polar bears in the Beaufort (SB) and Chukchi (CS) Seas experience different environments due primarily to a longer history of sea ice loss in the Beaufort Sea. Ecological differences have been identified as a possible reason for the generally poorer body condition and reproduction of Beaufort polar bears compared to those from the Chukchi, but the influence of exposure to other stressors remains unknown. We use molecular technology, quantitative PCR, to identify gene transcription differences among polar bears from the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as well as captive healthy polar bears. We identified significant transcriptional differences among a priori groups (i.e., captive bears, SB 2012, SB 2013, CS 2013) for ten of the 14 genes of interest (i.e., CaM, HSP70, CCR3, TGFβ, COX2, THRα, T-bet, Gata3, CD69, and IL17); transcription levels of DRβ, IL1β, AHR, and Mx1 did not differ among groups. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated separation among the groups of polar bears. Specifically, we detected transcript profiles consistent with immune function impairment in polar bears from the Beaufort Sea, when compared with Chukchi and captive polar bears. Although there is no strong indication of differential exposure to contaminants or pathogens between CS and SB bears, there are clearly differences in important transcriptional responses between populations. Further investigation is warranted to refine interpretation of potential effects of described stress-related conditions for the SB population.

  19. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  20. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  1. Informal groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van den Berg; P. van Houwelingen; J. de Hart

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Informele groepen Going out running with a group of friends, rather than joining an official sports club. Individuals who decide to take action themselves rather than giving money to good causes. Maintaining contact with others not as a member of an association, but through an Inter

  2. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen U; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Burby, Peter E; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA.

  3. Structural basis of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Yu; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Tuske, Steve; Ho, Mary X; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2012-11-23

    During transcription initiation, RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds and unwinds promoter DNA to form an RNAP-promoter open complex. We have determined crystal structures at 2.9 and 3.0 Å resolution of functional transcription initiation complexes comprising Thermus thermophilus RNA polymerase, σ(A), and a promoter DNA fragment corresponding to the transcription bubble and downstream double-stranded DNA of the RNAP-promoter open complex. The structures show that σ recognizes the -10 element and discriminator element through interactions that include the unstacking and insertion into pockets of three DNA bases and that RNAP recognizes the -4/+2 region through interactions that include the unstacking and insertion into a pocket of the +2 base. The structures further show that interactions between σ and template-strand single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preorganize template-strand ssDNA to engage the RNAP active center.

  4. Transcription factors - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A hearty wellcome to prof. Higgins editorial toil: a necessary tool for those colleagues (young and older fighting each day with the transcription factor they are involved with. In fact, the book is a full coverage compendium of state of the art papers dealing with practical thecniques and theoretical concepts about transcription factors. Each of the chapters (twenty-four is written by colleagues already working with one of the many trascription factors we become acquainted with. For the sake of the reader the volume is divided in four parts: Part I is a brief (when compared to the others three ! introductory presentation of the shuttling (i.e., transcription factor nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking achieved by three reviews presentation of this biologically critical phenomenon. Part II (nine chapters is devoted to the necessary techniques to study nuclear translocation ...............

  5. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  6. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.;

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...

  7. Subventricular zone microglia transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starossom, Sarah C; Imitola, Jaime; Wang, Yue; Cao, Li; Khoury, Samia J

    2011-07-01

    Microglia play an important role in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system. There is evidence of microglial diversity with distinct phenotypes exhibiting either neuroprotection and repair or neurotoxicity. However the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this diversity are still unknown. Using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we performed transcriptional profiling of isolated subventricular zone microglia from the acute and chronic disease phases of EAE. We found that microglia exhibit disease phase specific gene expression signatures, that correspond to unique gene ontology functions and genomic networks. Our data demonstrate for the first time, distinct transcriptional networks of microglia activation in vivo, that suggests a role as mediators of injury or repair.

  8. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  9. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...... of the production in high cost countries. Confident with the prospects of the new partnership, the company signed a long-term contract with Flextronics. This decision eventually proved itself to have been too hasty, however. Merely three years after the contracts were signed, LEGO management announced that it would...

  10. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...

  11. 2014 SRP Integration Transcript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    HRP's mission is to reduce the risks to human health and performance during long-duration spaceflight. The HRP Integrated Research Plan (IRP) contains the research plans for the 32 risks that require research to characterize and mitigate. From its inception the "integrate" aspect of the IRP has denoted the integrated nature of risks to human health and performance. Even though each risk in the IRP has its own research plan and is tracked separately, the interrelated nature of health and performance requires that they be addressed in an integrative or holistic fashion so that the connectedness of physiological systems within the human body and the integrated response to spaceflight can be addressed. Common characteristics of the spaceflight environment include altered gravity, atmospheres, and light/dark cycles; space radiation; isolation; noise; and periods of high or low workload. Long-term exposure to this unique environment produces a suite of physiological effects such as stress; vision, neurocognitive, and anthropometric changes; circadian misalignment; fluid shifts; cardiovascular deconditioning; immune dysregulation; and altered nutritional requirements. Expanding cross-disciplinary integrative approaches that synthesize concepts or data from two or more disciplines would improve the identification and characterization risk factors, and enable the development of countermeasures relevant to multiple risks. Cross-disciplinary approaches might also help to illuminate problem areas that may arise when a countermeasure adversely impacts risks other than those which it was developed to mitigate, or to identify groupings of physiological changes that are likely to occur that may impact the overall risk posture. In 2014 HRP embarked on a pilot study that combined four SRPs (and 12 HRP risks) - Behavioral Health, Sensorimotor, Cardiovascular, and Bone/Muscle - specifically to discuss cross-disciplinary integration. The points outlined below were suggested to seed the

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  13. Emerging Functions of Transcription Factors in Malaria Parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Tuteja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription is a process by which the genetic information stored in DNA is converted into mRNA by enzymes known as RNA polymerase. Bacteria use only one RNA polymerase to transcribe all of its genes while eukaryotes contain three RNA polymerases to transcribe the variety of eukaryotic genes. RNA polymerase also requires other factors/proteins to produce the transcript. These factors generally termed as transcription factors (TFs are either associated directly with RNA polymerase or add in building the actual transcription apparatus. TFs are the most common tools that our cells use to control gene expression. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for causing the most lethal form of malaria in humans. It shows most of its characteristics common to eukaryotic transcription but it is assumed that mechanisms of transcriptional control in P. falciparum somehow differ from those of other eukaryotes. In this article we describe the studies on the main TFs such as myb protein, high mobility group protein and ApiA2 family proteins from malaria parasite. These studies show that these TFs are slowly emerging to have defined roles in the regulation of gene expression in the parasite.

  14. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  15. General trends in the evolution of prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan Babu, M; Balaji, S; Aravind, L

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression in organisms is controlled by regulatory proteins termed transcription factors, which recognize and bind to specific nucleotide sequences. Over the years, considerable information has accumulated on the regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their target genes in various model prokaryotes, such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. This has allowed the representation of this information in the form of a directed graph, which is commonly referred to as the transcriptional regulatory network. The network representation provides us with an excellent conceptual framework to understand the structure of the transcriptional regulation, both at local and global levels of organization. Several studies suggest that the transcriptional network inferred from model organisms may be approximated by a scale-free topology, which in turn implies the presence of a relatively small group of highly connected regulators (hubs or global regulators). While the graph theoretical principles have been applied to infer various properties of such networks, there have been few studies that have actually investigated the evolution of the transcriptional regulatory networks across diverse organisms. Using recently developed computational methods that exploit various evolutionary principles, we have attempted to reconstruct and compare these networks across a wide-range of prokaryotes. This has provided several insights on the modification and diversification of network structures of various organisms in course of evolution. Firstly, we observed that target genes show a much higher level of conservation than their transcriptional regulators. This in turn suggested that the same set of functions could be differently controlled across diverse organisms, contributing significantly to their adaptive radiations. In particular, at the local level of network structure, organism-specific optimization of the transcription network has evolved primarily via tinkering

  16. Structural insights into transcription complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Imre; Blanco, Alexandre G; Boelens, Rolf; Cavarelli, Jean; Coll, Miquel; Folkers, Gert E; Nie, Yan; Pogenberg, Vivian; Schultz, Patrick; Wilmanns, Matthias; Moras, Dino; Poterszman, Arnaud

    2011-08-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of structural proteomics on our understanding of the molecular basis of gene expression. While most atomic structures were obtained by X-ray crystallography, the impact of solution NMR and cryo-electron microscopy is far from being negligible. Here, we summarize some highlights and illustrate the importance of specific technologies on the structural biology of protein-protein or protein/DNA transcription complexes: structure/function analysis of components the eukaryotic basal and activated transcription machinery with focus on the TFIID and TFIIH multi-subunit complexes as well as transcription regulators such as members of the nuclear hormone receptor families. We also discuss molecular aspects of promoter recognition and epigenetic control of gene expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural insights into transcription complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, I.; Blanco, A.G.; Boelens, R.; Cavarelli, J.; Coll, M.; Folkers, G.E.; Nie, Y.; Pogenberg, V.; Schultz, P.; Wilmanns, M.; Moras, D.; Poterszman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of

  18. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  19. Regulating transcription traffic around DSBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-05-07

    If a double-strand break (DSB) occurs and either a DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase is coming along, how do we save the train? In this issue of Molecular Cell, Ui et al. (2015) describe a connection between an elongation factor and a repressive complex to prevent transcription in proximity to a DSB.

  20. HDG1 transcription factor targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.; Boutilier, K.A.; Sanchez Perez, Gabino

    2015-01-01

    The AIL transcription factor BABY BOOM (BBM) is required together with the related PLETHORA proteins for embryo and root meristem development and its expression is sufficient to confer pluripotency and totipotency to somatic tissues. We show that BBM and other AIL proteins interact with multiple

  1. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  2. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  3. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  4. Stepwise mechanism for transcription fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorov Savva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription is the first step of gene expression and is characterized by a high fidelity of RNA synthesis. During transcription, the RNA polymerase active centre discriminates against not just non-complementary ribo NTP substrates but also against complementary 2'- and 3'-deoxy NTPs. A flexible domain of the RNA polymerase active centre, the Trigger Loop, was shown to play an important role in this process, but the mechanisms of this participation remained elusive. Results Here we show that transcription fidelity is achieved through a multi-step process. The initial binding in the active centre is the major discrimination step for some non-complementary substrates, although for the rest of misincorporation events discrimination at this step is very poor. During the second step, non-complementary and 2'-deoxy NTPs are discriminated against based on differences in reaction transition state stabilization and partly in general base catalysis, for correct versus non-correct substrates. This step is determined by two residues of the Trigger Loop that participate in catalysis. In the following step, non-complementary and 2'-deoxy NTPs are actively removed from the active centre through a rearrangement of the Trigger Loop. The only step of discrimination against 3'-deoxy substrates, distinct from the ones above, is based on failure to orient the Trigger Loop catalytic residues in the absence of 3'OH. Conclusions We demonstrate that fidelity of transcription by multi-subunit RNA polymerases is achieved through a stepwise process. We show that individual steps contribute differently to discrimination against various erroneous substrates. We define the mechanisms and contributions of each of these steps to the overall fidelity of transcription.

  5. Modeling Writing Development: Contribution of Transcription and Self-Regulation to Portuguese Students' Text Generation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpo, Teresa; Alves, Rui A.

    2013-01-01

    Writing is a complex activity that requires transcription and self-regulation. We used multiple-group structural equation modeling to test the contribution of transcription (handwriting and spelling), planning, revision, and self-efficacy to writing quality at 2 developmental points (Grades 4-6 vs. 7-9). In Grades 4-6, the model explained 76% of…

  6. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  7. Bidirectional Transcription Arises from Two Distinct Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Benjamin S; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C; Adelman, Karen

    2015-06-18

    Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding, and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression.

  8. [Transcription Factors in Developmental Genetics and the Evolution of Higher Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutova, L A; Dodueva, I E; Lebedeva, M A; Tvorogova, V E

    2015-05-01

    Transcription factors play an essential role in controlling various developmental programs in plants, coordinating the action of any genetic network. Among the most important groups of plant transcription factors are the homeodomain-containing transcription factors, in particular, those belonging to the KNOX and WOX families, the functions of which are associated with regulation of the meristem activity, development of the aboveground and underground parts of plants, and control of embryogenesis. This review examines the role of KNOX and WOX transcription factors in various developmental programs, as well as in the evolutionary complication of the body plan in terrestrial plants.

  9. Transcriptional programs controlling perinatal lung maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available The timing of lung maturation is controlled precisely by complex genetic and cellular programs. Lung immaturity following preterm birth frequently results in Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS and Broncho-Pulmonary Dysplasia (BPD, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Mechanisms synchronizing gestational length and lung maturation remain to be elucidated. In this study, we designed a genome-wide mRNA expression time-course study from E15.5 to Postnatal Day 0 (PN0 using lung RNAs from C57BL/6J (B6 and A/J mice that differ in gestational length by ∼30 hr (B6transcriptional networks controlling lung maturation. We identified both temporal and strain dependent gene expression patterns during lung maturation. For time dependent changes, cell adhesion, vasculature development, and lipid metabolism/transport were major bioprocesses induced during the saccular stage of lung development at E16.5-E17.5. CEBPA, PPARG, VEGFA, CAV1 and CDH1 were found to be key signaling and transcriptional regulators of these processes. Innate defense/immune responses were induced at later gestational ages (E18.5-20.5, STAT1, AP1, and EGFR being important regulators of these responses. Expression of RNAs associated with the cell cycle and chromatin assembly was repressed during prenatal lung maturation and was regulated by FOXM1, PLK1, chromobox, and high mobility group families of transcription factors. Strain dependent lung mRNA expression differences peaked at E18.5. At this time, mRNAs regulating surfactant and innate immunity were more abundantly expressed in lungs of B6 (short gestation than in A/J (long gestation mice, while expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and histone modification were expressed at lower levels in B6 than in A/J mice. The present study systemically mapped key regulators

  10. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  11. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  12. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  13. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  14. Transcription Against an Applied Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong; Wang, Michelle D.; Svoboda, Karel; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M.; Gelles, Jeff

    1995-12-01

    The force produced by a single molecule of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase during transcription was measured optically. Polymerase immobilized on a surface was used to transcribe a DNA template attached to a polystyrene bead 0.5 micrometer in diameter. The bead position was measured by interferometry while a force opposing translocation of the polymerase along the DNA was applied with an optical trap. At saturating nucleoside triphosphate concentrations, polymerase molecules stalled reversibly at a mean applied force estimated to be 14 piconewtons. This force is substantially larger than those measured for the cytoskeletal motors kinesin and myosin and exceeds mechanical loads that are estimated to oppose transcriptional elongation in vivo. The data are consistent with efficient conversion of the free energy liberated by RNA synthesis into mechanical work.

  15. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  17. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify “insults” and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The

  18. TET1 and hydroxymethylcytosine in transcription and DNA methylation fidelity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup;

    2011-01-01

    throughout the genome of embryonic stem cells, with the majority of binding sites located at transcription start sites (TSSs) of CpG-rich promoters and within genes. The hmC modification is found in gene bodies and in contrast to mC is also enriched at CpG-rich TSSs. We provide evidence further that TET1 has...... a role in transcriptional repression. TET1 binds a significant proportion of Polycomb group target genes. Furthermore, TET1 associates and colocalizes with the SIN3A co-repressor complex. We propose that TET1 fine-tunes transcription, opposes aberrant DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequences and thereby...... contributes to the regulation of DNA methylation fidelity....

  19. Deconstructing p53 transcriptional networks in tumor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieging, Kathryn T; Attardi, Laura D

    2012-02-01

    p53 is a pivotal tumor suppressor that induces apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress signals. Although p53 transcriptional activation is important for these responses, the mechanisms underlying tumor suppression have been elusive. To date, no single or compound mouse knockout of specific p53 target genes has recapitulated the dramatic tumor predisposition that characterizes p53-null mice. Recently, however, analysis of knock-in mice expressing p53 transactivation domain mutants has revealed a group of primarily novel direct p53 target genes that may mediate tumor suppression in vivo. We present here an overview of well-known p53 target genes and the tumor phenotypes of the cognate knockout mice, and address the recent identification of new p53 transcriptional targets and how they enhance our understanding of p53 transcriptional networks central for tumor suppression.

  20. Characterizing disease states from topological properties of transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluger Harriet M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression experiments yield large amounts of data that can augment our understanding of disease processes, in addition to classifying samples. Here we present new paradigms of data Separation based on construction of transcriptional regulatory networks for normal and abnormal cells using sequence predictions, literature based data and gene expression studies. We analyzed expression datasets from a number of diseased and normal cells, including different types of acute leukemia, and breast cancer with variable clinical outcome. Results We constructed sample-specific regulatory networks to identify links between transcription factors (TFs and regulated genes that differentiate between healthy and diseased states. This approach carries the advantage of identifying key transcription factor-gene pairs with differential activity between healthy and diseased states rather than merely using gene expression profiles, thus alluding to processes that may be involved in gene deregulation. We then generalized this approach by studying simultaneous changes in functionality of multiple regulatory links pointing to a regulated gene or emanating from one TF (or changes in gene centrality defined by its in-degree or out-degree measures, respectively. We found that samples can often be separated based on these measures of gene centrality more robustly than using individual links. We examined distributions of distances (the number of links needed to traverse the path between each pair of genes in the transcriptional networks for gene subsets whose collective expression profiles could best separate each dataset into predefined groups. We found that genes that optimally classify samples are concentrated in neighborhoods in the gene regulatory networks. This suggests that genes that are deregulated in diseased states exhibit a remarkable degree of connectivity. Conclusion Transcription factor-regulated gene links and

  1. Virus-induced opposite effect on Bombyx mori gene transcriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bombyx mori bidensovirus (BmBDV and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV are serious pathogens of Bombyx mori. In this study, we reported the changes of transcription level of several immune genes, including bmi, argo, dicer, cap1, cap3 and car, in Bombyx mori midgut after exposure to BmBDV or BmNPV. Silkworm strains 798 (anti-BmBDV and 306 (susceptible to BmBDV were subjected to BmBDV infection, and NB (anti-BmNPV and HUABA (35 (susceptible to BmNPV were subjected to BmNPV infection. The results showed that the transcription levels differ largely among different silkworm strains, and that the extent to which the gene transcriptions were affected by the viruses was different. However, both BmNPV and BmBDV viruses can reverse the transcription patterns of these genes when the silkworms were administered with the viruses compared with those control groups. The transcript levels of bmi and dicer were decreased in 798 and 306 strains that were inoculated with BmBDV compared with their respective controls, but were increased in NB and HUABA (35 inoculated with BmNPV. The transcript levels of argo and cap3 were risen in 798, 306 and NB strains when inoculated with their respective viruses, but were decreased in HUABA (35 strain. The transcript levels of cap1 were risen in all silkworm strains, while the levels of car were decreased in 798, 306 and HUABA (35 strains, and increased in NB strain when inoculated with their respective viruses. These findings may contribute to more in-depth understanding on functions of these genes in virus infection and proliferation.

  2. Functionality of intergenic transcription: an evolutionary comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Khaitovich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts.

  3. Functionality of Intergenic Transcription: An Evolutionary Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Johann; Giger, Thomas; Joerchel, Sabrina; Petzold, Ekkehard; Green, Richard E; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-01-01

    Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts. PMID:17040132

  4. PBMA Pause and Learn Video Nuggets Transcript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ed

    2006-01-01

    This document is a transcript for a video about a practice practiced at Goddard Space Flight Center called Pause and Learn (PaL). The PaL process is intended to, first of all, help the team learn. So, the team that was involved in the activity, the group that actually did the work, that handled the review, or ran the tests, or developed the piece of equipment, they sit down and actually say, "What did we learn from this exercise?" The idea is to create a learning environment at various key milestones in the execution of a process, rather than wait until the end of the given process, be it a launch or a mission.

  5. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  6. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2016-04-19

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  7. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  8. TAF7: traffic controller in transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegonne, Anne; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-01-01

    TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex, controls the first steps of transcription. It interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of transcription factors that regulate RNA polymerase II progression. Its diverse functions in transcription initiation are consistent with its essential role in cell proliferation.

  9. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  10. A unified model for yeast transcript definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Carl G; van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Li, Joyce; Morris, Quaid D; Nislow, Corey; Greenblatt, Jack F; Hughes, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    Identifying genes in the genomic context is central to a cell's ability to interpret the genome. Yet, in general, the signals used to define eukaryotic genes are poorly described. Here, we derived simple classifiers that identify where transcription will initiate and terminate using nucleic acid sequence features detectable by the yeast cell, which we integrate into a Unified Model (UM) that models transcription as a whole. The cis-elements that denote where transcription initiates function primarily through nucleosome depletion, and, using a synthetic promoter system, we show that most of these elements are sufficient to initiate transcription in vivo. Hrp1 binding sites are the major characteristic of terminators; these binding sites are often clustered in terminator regions and can terminate transcription bidirectionally. The UM predicts global transcript structure by modeling transcription of the genome using a hidden Markov model whose emissions are the outputs of the initiation and termination classifiers. We validated the novel predictions of the UM with available RNA-seq data and tested it further by directly comparing the transcript structure predicted by the model to the transcription generated by the cell for synthetic DNA segments of random design. We show that the UM identifies transcription start sites more accurately than the initiation classifier alone, indicating that the relative arrangement of promoter and terminator elements influences their function. Our model presents a concrete description of how the cell defines transcript units, explains the existence of nongenic transcripts, and provides insight into genome evolution.

  11. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  12. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  13. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, the gene most frequently mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Henson

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70-80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3'-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  15. Contribution of transcription to animal early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Davis, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    In mature gametes and during the oocyte-to-embryo transition, transcription is generally silenced and gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated. However, we recently discovered that major transcription can occur immediately after fertilization, prior to pronuclear fusion, and in the first cell division of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in the nematode Ascaris suum. We postulate that the balance between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the oocyte-to-embryo transition may largely be determined by cell cycle length and thus the time available for the genome to be transcribed.

  16. Transcription factories: genetic programming in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Lucas Brandon; Fraser, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Among the most intensively studied systems in molecular biology is the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus, which expresses genes in a regulated manner across hundreds of different cell types. Several studies over the past few years have added weight to the concept that transcription takes place within discrete 'transcription factories' assembled inside the cell nucleus. These studies apply innovative technical approaches to gain insights into the molecular constituents, dynamical behaviour and organizational regulators of transcription factories, providing exciting insights into the spatial dimension of transcriptional control.

  17. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  18. From mapping class groups to automorphism groups of free groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    We show that the natural map from the mapping class groups of surfaces to the automorphism groups of free groups, induces an infinite loop map on the classifying spaces of the stable groups after plus construction. The proof uses automorphisms of free groups with boundaries which play the role...... of mapping class groups of surfaces with several boundary components....

  19. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    MYBs to activate transcription of GLS biosynthetic genes. A lot is known about transcriptional regulation of these nine GLS regulators. This thesis aimed at identifying regulatory mechanisms at the protein level, allowing rapid and specific regulation of transcription factors using GLS as a model....... The general introduction and the first chapter provide background on protein level regulation and underline the importance of these mechanisms in regulating transcription factors. The remaining chapters report the identification of multiple new regulators of MYB transcription factors, potentially involved...... in their regulation at multiple steps of their activation. Plant signaling in connection with transcription factor regulation is an exciting field, allowing research on multiple regulatory mechanisms. This thesis shed light on the importance of integrating all steps of transcription factor activation in a regulatory...

  20. Transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-10-01

    Plant senescence is a natural phenomenon known for the appearance of beautiful autumn colors and the ripening of cereals in the field. Senescence is a controlled process that plants utilize to remobilize nutrients from source leaves to developing tissues. While during the past decades, molecular components underlying the onset of senescence have been intensively studied, knowledge remains scarce on the age-dependent mechanisms that control the onset of senescence. Recent advances have uncovered transcriptional networks regulating the competence to senesce. Here, gene regulatory networks acting as internal timing mechanisms for the onset of senescence are highlighted, illustrating that early and late leaf developmental phases are highly connected.

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Egg Allergy and Relationship to Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoy, Roman; Agashe, Charuta; Grishin, Alexander; Leung, Donald Y.; Wood, Robert A.; Sicherer, Scott H.; Jones, Stacie M.; Burks, A. Wesley; Davidson, Wendy F.; Lindblad, Robert W.; Dawson, Peter; Merad, Miriam; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies of childhood. There is a lack of information on the immunologic basis of egg allergy beyond the role of IgE. Objective To use transcriptional profiling as a novel approach to uncover immunologic processes associated with different phenotypes of egg allergy. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from egg-allergic children who were defined as reactive (BER) or tolerant (BET) to baked egg, and from food allergic controls (AC) who were egg non-allergic. PBMCs were stimulated with egg white protein. Gene transcription was measured by microarray after 24 h, and cytokine secretion by multiplex assay after 5 days. Results The transcriptional response of PBMCs to egg protein differed between BER and BET versus AC subjects. Compared to the AC group, the BER group displayed increased expression of genes associated with allergic inflammation as well as corresponding increased secretion of IL-5, IL-9 and TNF-α. A similar pattern was observed for the BET group. Further similarities in gene expression patterns between BER and BET groups, as well as some important differences, were revealed using a novel Immune Annotation resource developed for this project. This approach identified several novel processes not previously associated with egg allergy, including positive associations with TLR4-stimulated myeloid cells and activated NK cells, and negative associations with an induced Treg signature. Further pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes comparing BER to BET subjects showed significant enrichment of IFN-α and IFN-γ response genes, as well as genes associated with virally-infected DCs. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling identified several novel pathways and processes that differed when comparing the response to egg allergen in BET, BER, and AC groups. We conclude that this approach is a useful hypothesis-generating mechanism to identify novel immune processes associated

  2. Terapia combinada de colestiramina e inibidores da HMG-CoA redutase na prevenção secundária da doença coronária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novazzi José Paulo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as alterações obtidas no perfil lipídico de coronariopatas dislipidêmicos, após a adição de colestiramina, em pacientes tratados com inibidores da HMG-CoA redutase, e que não atingiram os valores ideais de LDL-colesterol. MÉTODOS: Vinte coronariopatas (12 submetidos à revascularização do miocárdio, 3 à angioplastia coronária e 5 mantidos sob tratamento clínico, com média de idade de 60,78 anos, que já realizavam dieta hipolipemiante e eram medicados com lovastatina 20mg/dia ou sinvastatina 10mg/dia, receberam também colestiramina na dose de 8 a 16g/dia durante 8 semanas, com o objetivo de reduzir LDL-colesterol para valores inferiores a 100mg/dl. RESULTADOS: Houve significante redução do colesterol total (valor médio inicial 239,52mg/dL e ao final 199,00mg/dL, obtendo-se um decréscimo percentual médio de 16,92%. O valor médio de LDL-colesterol também se reduziu, significantemente, de 172,73mg/dL para 118,26mg/dL, com decréscimo percentual médio de 31,53%. A trigliceridemia média aumentou, ainda dentro da faixa de referência normal, de 145,05mg/dL para 162,00mg/dL, (diferença percentual média de 11,69%. Houve significante aumento da fração HDL-colesterol de um valor médio inicial de 38,00mg/dL para um valor médio final de 48,21mg/dL (diferença média percentual 26,87%. Não houve efeitos adversos que impedissem a continuidade do tratamento. CONCLUSÃO: A associação de colestiramina a doses baixas de vastatinas em pacientes com hipercolesterolemia primária e de alto risco coronário é uma boa opção terapêutica, podendo atingir benefícios sobre o perfil lipídico semelhantes àqueles obtidos quando esses fármacos são utilizados, isoladamente, ou em associação, e em doses mais elevadas.

  3. The transcriptional regulation of pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Chi Yeo; Huck-Hui Ng

    2013-01-01

    The defining features of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are their self-renewing and pluripotent capacities.Indeed,the ability to give rise into all cell types within the organism not only allows ESCs to function as an ideal in vitro tool to study embryonic development,but also offers great therapeutic potential within the field of regenerative medicine.However,it is also this same remarkable developmental plasticity that makes the efficient control of ESC differentiation into the desired cell type very difficult.Therefore,in order to harness ESCs for clinical applications,a detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling ESC pluripotency and lineage commitment is necessary.In this respect,through a variety of transcriptomic approaches,ESC pluripotency has been found to be regulated by a system of ESC-associated transcription factors; and the external signalling environment also acts as a key factor in modulating the ESC transcriptome.Here in this review,we summarize our current understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network in ESCs,discuss how the control of various signalling pathways could influence pluripotency,and provide a future outlook of ESC research.

  4. The role of RNA polymerase I transcription and embryonic genome activation in nucleolar development in bovine preimplantation embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, F.; Petrovicova, I.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of RNA polymerase I (RPI) transcription in nucleolar development during major transcriptional activation (MTA) in cattle. Late eight-cell embryos were cultured in the absence (control group) or presence of actinomycin D (AD) (RPI inhibition......, Ad 0.2 µg/ml; total transcriptional inhibition, AD 2.0 µg/ml). Late four-cell embryos were cultured to late eight-cell stage in 0.2 µg/ml AD (MTA prevention, ADLT (long-term total transcriptional inhibition group). Embryos were processed for autoradiography, transmission electron microscopy...

  5. Collaboration of MLLT1/ENL, Polycomb and ATM for transcription and genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Ayako; Yasui, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Polycomb group (PcG) repress, whereas Trithorax group (TrxG) activate transcription for tissue development and cellular proliferation, and misregulation of these factors is often associated with cancer. ENL (MLLT1) and AF9 (MLLT3) are fusion partners of Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL), TrxG proteins, and are factors in Super Elongation Complex (SEC). SEC controls transcriptional elongation to release RNA polymerase II, paused around transcription start site. In MLL rearranged leukemia, several components of SEC have been found as MLL-fusion partners and the control of transcriptional elongation is misregulated leading to tumorigenesis in MLL-SEC fused Leukemia. It has been suggested that unexpected collaboration of ENL/AF9-MLL and PcG are involved in tumorigenesis in leukemia. Recently, we found that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 and PcG led to a novel mechanism of transcriptional switch from elongation to repression under ATM-signaling for genome integrity. Activated ATM phosphorylates ENL/AF9 in SEC, and the phosphorylated ENL/AF9 binds BMI1 and RING1B, a heterodimeric E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex in Polycomb Repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and recruits PRC1 at transcriptional elongation sites to rapidly repress transcription. The ENL/AF9 in SEC- and PcG-mediated transcriptional repression promotes DSB repair near transcription sites. The implication of this is that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 in SEC and PcG ensures a rapid response of transcriptional switching from elongation to repression to neighboring genotoxic stresses for DSB repair. Therefore, these results suggested that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 and PcG in transcriptional control is required to maintain genome integrity and may be link to the MLL-ENL/AF9 leukemia.

  6. Ectopic expression of MYB46 identifies transcriptional regulatory genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2009-11-01

    MYB46 functions as a transcriptional switch that turns on the genes necessary for secondary wall biosynthesis. Elucidating the transcriptional regulatory network immediately downstream of MYB46 is crucial to our understanding of the molecular and biochemical processes involved in the biosynthesis and deposition of secondary walls in plants. To gain insights into MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation, we first established an inducible secondary wall thickening system in Arabidopsis by expressing MYB46 under the control of dexamethasone-inducible promoter. Then, we used an ATH1 GeneChip microarray and Illumina digital gene expression system to obtain a series of transcriptome profiles with regard to the induction of secondary wall development. These analyses allowed us to identify a group of transcription factors whose expression coincided with or preceded the induction of secondary wall biosynthetic genes. A transient transcriptional activation assay was used to confirm the hierarchical relationships among the transcription factors in the network. The in vivo assay showed that MYB46 transcriptionally activates downstream target transcription factors, three of which (AtC3H14, MYB52 and MYB63) were shown to be able to activate secondary wall biosynthesis genes. AtC3H14 activated the transcription of all of the secondary wall biosynthesis genes tested, suggesting that AtC3H14 may be another master regulator of secondary wall biosynthesis. The transcription factors identified here may include direct activators of secondary wall biosynthesis genes. The present study discovered novel hierarchical relationships among the transcription factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, and generated several testable hypotheses.

  7. DBD: a transcription factor prediction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression influences almost all biological processes in an organism; sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors are critical to this control. For most genomes, the repertoire of transcription factors is only partially known. Hitherto transcription factor identification has been largely based on genome annotation pipelines that use pairwise sequence comparisons, which detect only those factors similar to known genes, or on functional classification schemes that amalgamate many types of proteins into the category of 'transcription factor'. Using a novel transcription factor identification method, the DBD transcription factor database fills this void, providing genome-wide transcription factor predictions for organisms from across the tree of life. The prediction method behind DBD identifies sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors through homology using profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) of domains. Thus, it is limited to factors that are homologus to those HMMs. The collection of HMMs is taken from two existing databases (Pfam and SUPERFAMILY), and is limited to models that exclusively detect transcription factors that specifically recognize DNA sequences. It does not include basal transcription factors or chromatin-associated proteins, for instance. Based on comparison with experimentally verified annotation, the prediction procedure is between 95% and 99% accurate. Between one quarter and one-half of our genome-wide predicted transcription factors represent previously uncharacterized proteins. The DBD (www.transcriptionfactor.org) consists of predicted transcription factor repertoires for 150 completely sequenced genomes, their domain assignments and the hand curated list of DNA-binding domain HMMs. Users can browse, search or download the predictions by genome, domain family or sequence identifier, view families of transcription factors based on domain architecture and receive predictions for a protein sequence.

  8. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  9. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer.

  10. Accessorizing the human mitochondrial transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestwick, Megan L; Shadel, Gerald S

    2013-06-01

    The human genome comprises large chromosomes in the nucleus and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) housed in the dynamic mitochondrial network. Human cells contain up to thousands of copies of the double-stranded, circular mtDNA molecule that encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes and the rRNAs and tRNAs needed to translate these in the organelle matrix. Transcription of human mtDNA is directed by a single-subunit RNA polymerase, POLRMT, which requires two primary transcription factors, TFB2M (transcription factor B2, mitochondrial) and TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial), to achieve basal regulation of the system. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the structure and function of the primary human transcription machinery and the other factors that facilitate steps in transcription beyond initiation and provide more intricate control over the system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The molecular basis of eucaryotic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberg, R D

    2007-12-01

    Thanks to the Nobel Foundation for permission to publish this Lecture. We report here the Nobel Lecture delivered by Professor RD Kornberg describing his research in the understanding of transcription in eucaryotes. The amazing work by Professor Kornberg goes from the discovery of the nucleosome to the structural and functional studies of pol II transcription complexes. His research sheds light on fundamental molecular biology problems such as transcription initiation, fidelity of transcription, RNA release at the end of transcription, and many more. This is a beautiful report on how structural and functional studies can be combined to really understand in an accurate and detailed way how proteins combine in huge molecular complexes to regulate one of the most important cellular processes: gene transcription.

  12. Structural basis of eukaryotic gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeger, Hinrich; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Lorch, Yahli; Strattan, J Seth; Westover, Kenneth D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-02-07

    An RNA polymerase II promoter has been isolated in transcriptionally activated and repressed states. Topological and nuclease digestion analyses have revealed a dynamic equilibrium between nucleosome removal and reassembly upon transcriptional activation, and have further shown that nucleosomes are removed by eviction of histone octamers rather than by sliding. The promoter, once exposed, assembles with RNA polymerase II, general transcription factors, and Mediator in a approximately 3 MDa transcription initiation complex. X-ray crystallography has revealed the structure of RNA polymerase II, in the act of transcription, at atomic resolution. Extension of this analysis has shown how nucleotides undergo selection, polymerization, and eventual release from the transcribing complex. X-ray and electron crystallography have led to a picture of the entire transcription initiation complex, elucidating the mechanisms of promoter recognition, DNA unwinding, abortive initiation, and promoter escape.

  13. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  14. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  15. Transcription in Archaea: in vitro transcription assays for mjRNAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollett, Katherine; Blombach, Fabian; Werner, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The fully recombinant Methanocaldococcus jannaschii RNA polymerase allows for a detailed dissection of the different stages of the transcription. In the previous chapter, we discussed how to purify the different components of the M. jannaschii transcription system, the RNA polymerase subunits, and general transcription factors and how to assemble a functional M. jannaschii enzyme. Standard in vitro transcription assays can be used to examine the different stages of transcription. In this chapter, we describe how some of these assays have been optimized for M. jannaschii RNA polymerase, which transcribes at much higher temperatures than many other transcription complexes.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  17. Balanced Branching in Transcription Termination

    CERN Document Server

    Harrington, K J; Liang, S

    2000-01-01

    The theory of stochastic transcription termination based on free-energy competition requires two or more reaction rates to be delicately balanced over a wide range of physical conditions. A large body of work on glasses and large molecules suggests that this should be impossible in such a large system in the absence of a new organizing principle of matter. We review the experimental literature of termination and find no evidence for such a principle but many troubling inconsistencies, most notably anomalous memory effects. These suggest that termination has a deterministic component and may conceivably be not stochastic at all. We find that a key experiment by Wilson and von Hippel allegedly refuting deterministic termination was an incorrectly analyzed regulatory effect of Mg2+ binding.

  18. Harnessing transcription for bioproduction in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensjö, Karin; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Tyystjärvi, Taina

    2017-01-01

    of cyanobacteria. A wide variety of expression systems will be required to adjust both the expression of heterologous enzyme(s) and metabolic routes to the best possible balance, allowing the optimal production of a particular substance. In bacteria, transcription, especially the initiation of transcription, has...... a central role in adjusting gene expression and thus also metabolic fluxes of cells according to environmental cues. Here we summarize the recent progress in developing tools for efficient cyanofactories, focusing especially on transcriptional regulation....

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of transcriptional pausing

    OpenAIRE

    Tadigotla, Vasisht R.; Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid Ó; Sengupta, Anirvan M.; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard H.; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanics approach for the prediction of backtracked pauses in bacterial transcription elongation derived from structural models of the transcription elongation complex (EC). Our algorithm is based on the thermodynamic stability of the EC along the DNA template calculated from the sequence-dependent free energy of DNA–DNA, DNA–RNA, and RNA–RNA base pairing associated with (i) the translocational and size fluctuations of the transcription bubble; (ii) changes in the as...

  20. A New Vaccinia Virus Intermediate Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Patrick; Moss, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the vaccinia virus genome is mediated by a virus-encoded multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in conjunction with early-, intermediate-, and late-stage-specific factors. Previous studies indicated that two virus-encoded proteins (capping enzyme and VITF-1) and one unidentified cellular protein (VITF-2) are required for specific transcription of an intermediate promoter template in vitro. We have now extensively purified an additional virus-induced intermediate transcript...

  1. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  2. Transcriptional networks inferred from molecular signatures of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongbai, Ron; Idelman, Gila; Nordgard, Silje H; Cui, Wenwu; Jacobs, Jonathan L; Haggerty, Cynthia M; Chanock, Stephen J; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Livingston, Gary; Shaunessy, Patrick; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Kristensen, Vessela N; Bilke, Sven; Gardner, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Global genomic approaches in cancer research have provided new and innovative strategies for the identification of signatures that differentiate various types of human cancers. Computational analysis of the promoter composition of the genes within these signatures may provide a powerful method for deducing the regulatory transcriptional networks that mediate their collective function. In this study we have systematically analyzed the promoter composition of gene classes derived from previously established genetic signatures that recently have been shown to reliably and reproducibly distinguish five molecular subtypes of breast cancer associated with distinct clinical outcomes. Inferences made from the trends of transcription factor binding site enrichment in the promoters of these gene groups led to the identification of regulatory pathways that implicate discrete transcriptional networks associated with specific molecular subtypes of breast cancer. One of these inferred pathways predicted a role for nuclear factor-kappaB in a novel feed-forward, self-amplifying, autoregulatory module regulated by the ERBB family of growth factor receptors. The existence of this pathway was verified in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation and shown to be deregulated in breast cancer cells overexpressing ERBB2. This analysis indicates that approaches of this type can provide unique insights into the differential regulatory molecular programs associated with breast cancer and will aid in identifying specific transcriptional networks and pathways as potential targets for tumor subtype-specific therapeutic intervention.

  3. 实时荧光定量PCR检测乙肝病毒DNA方法在绒促性素和尿促性素生产中的应用%Application of Real -time fluorescence PCR detecting HBV DNA during the production flow of HCG and HMG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴利红; 王灿; 邵泓; 陈钢

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To verify the method of Real -time fluorescence PCR to detect HBV DNA during the production flow of HCG and HMG. Methods: HCG or HMG was added into positive blood containing different concentration HBV, and the Real - time fluorescence PCR was used to detect the concentration of HBV DNA. The recovery was calculated, and the linear range, repetition and sensitivity of the method were verified. The positive results detected by Real - time PCR would be detected by ELISA again, and the results of two methods would be compared. Results:The coefficient of linear relation was 0. 9969 (the range of 104 - 107IU · mL-1) ,and the recovery of HBV was 94. 9% - 103. 8%. Besides,the minimum value was 500 IU · mL-1 ,RSD <5%. The positive samples detected by Real - time PCR showed negative HBsAg by ELISA. Conclusion: Real - time PCR can be used to detect HBV DNA during the production flow of HCG and HMG,and also can be used as the complement method of ELISA.%目的:验证实时荧光定量PCR( Real - time PCR)检测绒促性素(HCG)和尿促性素(HMG)生产工艺中尿液、粗品和原料药中乙肝病毒DNA(HBV DNA)的方法,并用该方法对HCG和HMG生产工艺中关键点进行控制.方法:在不同浓度的乙肝阳性血中添加HCG或HMG的尿液、粗品和原料药,用Real - time PCR方法检测添加前后不同浓度乙肝阳性血中HBV DNA的浓度,计算出HBV DNA回收率,同时验证该方法的线性、重复性和灵敏度;用Real - time PCR方法对尿液、粗品和原料药样品进行HBV DNA检测,将检测出阳性的样品用ELISA方法检测,比较2种方法的检测结果差异.结果:Real - time PCR检测HBV DNA在104~ 107IU·mL-1范围内线性关系良好,r2=0.9969;HCG或HMG尿液、粗品和原料药中添加不同浓度乙肝阳性血,HBV DNA回收率为94.9%~103.8%;3次重复实验相对标准偏差(RSD)均小于5%;最低检出限为500 IU·mL-1.Real - time PCR检测出阳性的样品用ELISA方法检测乙肝表面抗

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan Babu, M; Teichmann, Sarah A; Aravind, L

    2006-04-28

    The structure of complex transcriptional regulatory networks has been studied extensively in certain model organisms. However, the evolutionary dynamics of these networks across organisms, which would reveal important principles of adaptive regulatory changes, are poorly understood. We use the known transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli to analyse the conservation patterns of this network across 175 prokaryotic genomes, and predict components of the regulatory networks for these organisms. We observe that transcription factors are typically less conserved than their target genes and evolve independently of them, with different organisms evolving distinct repertoires of transcription factors responding to specific signals. We show that prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks have evolved principally through widespread tinkering of transcriptional interactions at the local level by embedding orthologous genes in different types of regulatory motifs. Different transcription factors have emerged independently as dominant regulatory hubs in various organisms, suggesting that they have convergently acquired similar network structures approximating a scale-free topology. We note that organisms with similar lifestyles across a wide phylogenetic range tend to conserve equivalent interactions and network motifs. Thus, organism-specific optimal network designs appear to have evolved due to selection for specific transcription factors and transcriptional interactions, allowing responses to prevalent environmental stimuli. The methods for biological network analysis introduced here can be applied generally to study other networks, and these predictions can be used to guide specific experiments.

  5. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  6. Swinger RNAs with sharp switches between regular transcription and transcription systematically exchanging ribonucleotides: Case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    During RNA transcription, DNA nucleotides A,C,G, T are usually matched by ribonucleotides A, C, G and U. However occasionally, this rule does not apply: transcript-DNA homologies are detectable only assuming systematic exchanges between ribonucleotides. Nine symmetric (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric (X ↔ Y ↔ Z, e.g. A ↔ C ↔ G) exchanges exist, called swinger transcriptions. Putatively, polymerases occasionally stabilize in unspecified swinger conformations, possibly similar to transient conformations causing punctual misinsertions. This predicts chimeric transcripts, part regular, part swinger-transformed, reflecting polymerases switching to swinger polymerization conformation(s). Four chimeric Genbank transcripts (three from human mitochondrion and one murine cytosolic) are described here: (a) the 5' and 3' extremities reflect regular polymerization, the intervening sequence exchanges systematically between ribonucleotides (swinger rule G ↔ U, transcript (1), with sharp switches between regular and swinger sequences; (b) the 5' half is 'normal', the 3' half systematically exchanges ribonucleotides (swinger rule C ↔ G, transcript (2), with an intercalated sequence lacking homology; (c) the 3' extremity fits A ↔ G exchanges (10% of transcript length), the 5' half follows regular transcription; the intervening region seems a mix of regular and A ↔ G transcriptions (transcript 3); (d) murine cytosolic transcript 4 switches to A ↔ U + C ↔ G, and is fused with A ↔ U + C ↔ G swinger transformed precursor rRNA. In (c), each concomitant transcript 5' and 3' extremities match opposite genome strands. Transcripts 3 and 4 combine transcript fusions with partial swinger transcriptions. Occasional (usually sharp) switches between regular and swinger transcriptions reveal greater coding potential than detected until now, suggest stable polymerase swinger conformations.

  7. Large-scale screening of transcription factor-promoter interactions in spruce reveals a transcriptional network involved in vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Isabelle; Lachance, Denis; Giguère, Isabelle; Bomal, Claude; Morency, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Gervais; Boyle, Brian; MacKay, John J; Séguin, Armand

    2014-06-01

    This research aimed to investigate the role of diverse transcription factors (TFs) and to delineate gene regulatory networks directly in conifers at a relatively high-throughput level. The approach integrated sequence analyses, transcript profiling, and development of a conifer-specific activation assay. Transcript accumulation profiles of 102 TFs and potential target genes were clustered to identify groups of coordinately expressed genes. Several different patterns of transcript accumulation were observed by profiling in nine different organs and tissues: 27 genes were preferential to secondary xylem both in stems and roots, and other genes were preferential to phelloderm and periderm or were more ubiquitous. A robust system has been established as a screening approach to define which TFs have the ability to regulate a given promoter in planta. Trans-activation or repression effects were observed in 30% of TF-candidate gene promoter combinations. As a proof of concept, phylogenetic analysis and expression and trans-activation data were used to demonstrate that two spruce NAC-domain proteins most likely play key roles in secondary vascular growth as observed in other plant species. This study tested many TFs from diverse families in a conifer tree species, which broadens the knowledge of promoter-TF interactions in wood development and enables comparisons of gene regulatory networks found in angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  8. RNA interference against transcription elongation factor SII does not support its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon-Roy, Christine; Stubbert, Lawton J; McKay, Bruce C

    2011-01-10

    RNA polymerase II is unable to bypass bulky DNA lesions induced by agents like ultraviolet light (UV light) and cisplatin that are located in the template strand of active genes. Arrested polymerases form a stable ternary complex at the site of DNA damage that is thought to pose an impediment to the repair of these lesions. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) preferentially repairs these DNA lesions through an incompletely defined mechanism. Based on elegant in vitro experiments, it was hypothesized that the transcription elongation factor IIS (TFIIS) may be required to couple transcription to repair by catalyzing the reverse translocation of the arrested polymerase, allowing access of repair proteins to the site of DNA damage. However the role of TFIIS in this repair process has not been tested in vivo. Here, silencing TFIIS using an RNA interference strategy did not affect the ability of cells to recover nascent RNA synthesis following UV exposure or the ability of cells to repair a UV-damaged reporter gene while a similar strategy to decrease the expression Cockayne syndrome group B protein (CSB) resulted in the expected repair defect. Furthermore, RNA interference against TFIIS did not increase the sensitivity of cells to UV light or cisplatin while decreased expression of CSB did. Taken together, these results indicate that TFIIS is not limiting for the repair of transcription-blocking DNA lesions and thus the present work does not support a role for TFIIS in TC-NER.

  9. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  10. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionas Erb

    Full Text Available The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1 occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  11. Genome-wide transcriptional effects of the anti-cancer agent camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Veloso

    Full Text Available The anti-cancer drug camptothecin inhibits replication and transcription by trapping DNA topoisomerase I (Top1 covalently to DNA in a "cleavable complex". To examine the effects of camptothecin on RNA synthesis genome-wide we used Bru-Seq and show that camptothecin treatment primarily affected transcription elongation. We also observed that camptothecin increased RNA reads past transcription termination sites as well as at enhancer elements. Following removal of camptothecin, transcription spread as a wave from the 5'-end of genes with no recovery of transcription apparent from RNA polymerases stalled in the body of genes. As a result, camptothecin preferentially inhibited the expression of large genes such as proto-oncogenes, and anti-apoptotic genes while smaller ribosomal protein genes, pro-apoptotic genes and p53 target genes showed relative higher expression. Cockayne syndrome group B fibroblasts (CS-B, which are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR, showed an RNA synthesis recovery profile similar to normal fibroblasts suggesting that TCR is not involved in the repair of or RNA synthesis recovery from transcription-blocking Top1 lesions. These findings of the effects of camptothecin on transcription have important implications for its anti-cancer activities and may aid in the design of improved combinatorial treatments involving Top1 poisons.

  12. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  13. Integrated Groups and Smooth Distribution Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro J. MIANA

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove directly that α-times integrated groups define algebra homo-morphisms. We also give a theorem of equivalence between smooth distribution groups and α-times integrated groups.

  14. Biological data warehousing system for identifying transcriptional regulatory sites from gene expressions of microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Ann-Ping; Sun, Yi-Ming; Liu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Hsien-Da; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Liu, Baw-Juine

    2006-07-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory sites plays an important role in the investigation of gene regulation. For this propose, we designed and implemented a data warehouse to integrate multiple heterogeneous biological data sources with data types such as text-file, XML, image, MySQL database model, and Oracle database model. The utility of the biological data warehouse in predicting transcriptional regulatory sites of coregulated genes was explored using a synexpression group derived from a microarray study. Both of the binding sites of known transcription factors and predicted over-represented (OR) oligonucleotides were demonstrated for the gene group. The potential biological roles of both known nucleotides and one OR nucleotide were demonstrated using bioassays. Therefore, the results from the wet-lab experiments reinforce the power and utility of the data warehouse as an approach to the genome-wide search for important transcription regulatory elements that are the key to many complex biological systems.

  15. Transcription of Byzantine Chant - Problems, Possibilities, Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes.......Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes....

  16. Transcription and the aspect ratio of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper Wibeck; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    analysis of transcription. It is shown that under certain reasonable assumptions transcription is only possible if the aspect ratio is in the regime corresponding to further twisting. We find this constraint to be in agreement with long-established crystallographic studies of DNA....

  17. 36 CFR 1150.92 - Official transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official transcript. 1150.92 Section 1150.92 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD PRACTICE AND PROCEDURES FOR COMPLIANCE HEARINGS The Record § 1150.92 Official transcript. The...

  18. Using Virtual Reference Transcripts for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David

    2003-01-01

    Describes a method of library staff training based on chat transcript analysis in which graduate student workers at a university reference desk examined transcripts of actual virtual reference desk transactions to analyze reference interviews. Discusses reference interview standards, reference desk behavior, and reference interview skills in…

  19. Phonetic Transcription of African American Vernacular English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Karen E.; Meredith, Linette Hinton

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes African American Vernacular English (AAVE) phonological features from the perspective of phonetic transcription. Relevant International Phonetic Alphabet symbols and diacritics are discussed, as well as the importance of transcription detail when differentiating dialect variation from phonological delay or disorder. A chart…

  20. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  1. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty.

  2. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...

  3. Transcriptional response to 131I exposure of rat thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudqvist, Nils; Spetz, Johan; Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z; Langen, Britta; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Humans are exposed to 131I in medical diagnostics and treatment but also from nuclear accidents, and better knowledge of the molecular response in thyroid is needed. The aim of the study was to examine the transcriptional response in thyroid tissue 24 h after 131I administration in rats. The exposure levels were chosen to simulate both the clinical situation and the case of nuclear fallout. Thirty-six male rats were i.v. injected with 0-4700 kBq 131I, and killed at 24 h after injection (Dthyroid = 0.0058-3.0 Gy). Total RNA was extracted from individual thyroid tissue samples and mRNA levels were determined using oligonucleotide microarray technique. Differentially expressed transcripts were determined using Nexus Expression 3.0. Hierarchical clustering was performed in the R statistical computing environment. Pathway analysis was performed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool and the Gene Ontology database. T4 and TSH plasma concentrations were measured using ELISA. Totally, 429 differentially regulated transcripts were identified. Downregulation of thyroid hormone biosynthesis associated genes (e.g. thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, the sodium-iodine symporter) was identified in some groups, and an impact on thyroid function was supported by the pathway analysis. Recurring downregulation of Dbp and Slc47a2 was found. Dbp exhibited a pattern with monotonous reduction of downregulation with absorbed dose at 0.0058-0.22 Gy. T4 plasma levels were increased and decreased in rats whose thyroids were exposed to 0.057 and 0.22 Gy, respectively. Different amounts of injected 131I gave distinct transcriptional responses in the rat thyroid. Transcriptional response related to thyroid function and changes in T4 plasma levels were found already at very low absorbed doses to thyroid.

  4. Pleiohomeotic interacts with the core transcription elongation factor Spt5 to regulate gene expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Harvey

    Full Text Available The early elongation checkpoint regulated by Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb is a critical control point for the expression of many genes. Spt5 interacts directly with RNA polymerase II and has an essential role in establishing this checkpoint, and also for further transcript elongation. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Spt5 interacts both physically and genetically with the Polycomb Group (PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho, and the majority of Pho binding sites overlap with Spt5 binding sites across the genome in S2 cells. Our results indicate that Pho can interact with Spt5 to regulate transcription elongation in a gene specific manner.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoja, Nada; Gazel, Alix; Banno, Tomohiro; Yano, Shoichiro; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2006-10-03

    In epidermal differentiation basal keratinocytes detach from the basement membrane, stop proliferating, and express a new set of structural proteins and enzymes, which results in an impermeable protein/lipid barrier that protects us. To define the transcriptional changes essential for this process, we purified large quantities of basal and suprabasal cells from human epidermis, using the expression of beta4 integrin as the discriminating factor. The expected expression differences in cytoskeletal, cell cycle, and adhesion genes confirmed the effective separation of the cell populations. Using DNA microarray chips, we comprehensively identify the differences in genes expressed in basal and differentiating layers of the epidermis, including the ECM components produced by the basal cells, the proteases in both the basal and suprabasal cells, and the lipid and steroid metabolism enzymes in suprabasal cells responsible for the permeability barrier. We identified the signaling pathways specific for the two populations and found two previously unknown paracrine and one juxtacrine signaling pathway operating between the basal and suprabasal cells. Furthermore, using specific expression signatures, we identified a new set of late differentiation markers and mapped their chromosomal loci, as well as a new set of melanocyte-specific markers. The data represent a quantum jump in understanding the mechanisms of epidermal differentiation.

  6. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  7. Spatial organization of transcription in bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiaoli; Xiao, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Prokaryotic transcription has been extensively studied over the past half a century. However, there often exists a gap between the structural, mechanistic description of transcription obtained from in vitro biochemical studies, and the cellular, phenomenological observations from in vivo genetic studies. It is now accepted that a living bacterial cell is a complex entity; the heterogeneous cellular environment is drastically different from the homogenous, well-mixed situation in vitro. Where molecules are inside a cell may be important for their function; hence, the spatial organization of different molecular components may provide a new means of transcription regulation in vivo, possibly bridging this gap. In this review, we survey current evidence for the spatial organization of four major components of transcription [genes, transcription factors, RNA polymerase (RNAP) and RNAs] and critically analyze their biological significance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism...... is regulated to allocate resources to growth and/or defense at different time points. Among plant chemical defenses are the amino acid-derived glucosinolates (GLS). Their absolute and relative accumulation is tightly regulated at basal level, but also in response to e.g. pathogen attack and hormone stimuli...

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  10. Transcriptional factors, Mafs and their biological roles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Tsuchiya; Ryoichi Misaka; Kosaku Nitta; Ken Tsuchiya

    2015-01-01

    The Maf family of transcription factors is characterizedby a typical bZip structure; these transcription factorsact as important regulators of the development anddifferentiation of many organs and tissues, includingthe kidney. The Maf family consists of two subgroupsthat are characterized according to their structure largeMaf transcription factors and small Maf transcriptionfactors. The large Maf subgroup consists of fourproteins, designated as MAFA, MAFB, c-MAF and neuralretina-specific leucine zipper. In particular, MAFA is adistinct molecule that has been attracting the attentionof researchers because it acts as a strong transactivatorof insulin, suggesting that Maf transcription factors arelikely to be involved in systemic energy homeostasis. Inthis review, we focused on the regulation of glucose/energy balance by Maf transcription factors in variousorgans.

  11. Transcription Factor Networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Y. Rhee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific cellular fates and functions depend on differential gene expression, which occurs primarily at the transcriptional level and is controlled by complex regulatory networks of transcription factors (TFs. TFs act through combinatorial interactions with other TFs, cofactors, and chromatin-remodeling proteins. Here, we define protein-protein interactions using a coaffinity purification/mass spectrometry method and study 459 Drosophila melanogaster transcription-related factors, representing approximately half of the established catalog of TFs. We probe this network in vivo, demonstrating functional interactions for many interacting proteins, and test the predictive value of our data set. Building on these analyses, we combine regulatory network inference models with physical interactions to define an integrated network that connects combinatorial TF protein interactions to the transcriptional regulatory network of the cell. We use this integrated network as a tool to connect the functional network of genetic modifiers related to mastermind, a transcriptional cofactor of the Notch pathway.

  12. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  13. Combinatorial Regulation in Yeast Transcription Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao

    2006-03-01

    Yeast has evolved a complex network to regulate its transcriptional program in response to changes in environment. It is quite common that in response to an external stimulus, several transcription factors will be activated and they work in combinations to control different subsets of genes in the genome. We are interested in how the promoters of genes are designed to integrate signals from multiple transcription factors and what are the functional and evolutionary constraints. To answer how, we have developed a number of computational algorithms to systematically map the binding sites and target genes of transcription factors using sequence and gene expression data. To analyze the functional constraints, we have employed mechanistic models to study the dynamic behavior of genes regulated by multiple factors. We have also developed methods to trace the evolution of transcriptional networks via comparative analysis of multiple species.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  15. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J;

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we...

  16. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Bacillus anthracis in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, are attributed to poly- γ-D-glutamate acid (PGA) capsule, lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) [10-12]. These toxins...M, Hellman M, Muhie S, et al. (2013) Transcriptional Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Bacillus anthracis in vitro...author and source are credited. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Bacillus anthracis in vitro Rasha

  17. A membrane-tethered transcription factor ANAC089 negatively regulates floral initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2,and CUC2) transcription factors have a regulatory function in developmental processes and stress responses. Notably a group of NAC members named NTLs (NTM1-Like) are membrane-tethered, ensuring plants rapidly respond to developmental changes and environmental stimuli. Our results indicated that ANAC089 was a membrane-tethered transcription factor and its truncated form was responsible for the physiological function in flowering time control.

  18. Expression of thyroid-specific transcription factors in thyroid carcinoma, contralateral thyroid lobe and healthy thyroid gland in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, P; Castillo, V; Araújo, M; Carriquiry, M; Meikle, A

    2012-08-01

    Thyrotropin receptor (TSH-R), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroperoxidase (TPO), thyroid specific transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), paired box 8 transcription factor (PAX-8), insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) transcripts were determined by real-time PCR in follicular carcinoma and contralateral (CL) lobes, and healthy thyroid canine glands. Concentrations of TSH-R, PAX-8, and ERα mRNA were not different among groups; the carcinoma group had lower Tg and TPO mRNA than healthy and CL groups, while no differences were found between the two latter groups, suggesting that the carcinoma tissue presents an altered capacity to synthesize thyroid hormones. The transcription factor that promotes thyrocytes proliferation, TTF-1 as well as IGF-1, presented a greater mRNA expression in the CL group, suggesting that the CL lobe may function in a compensatory state. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  19. Pathologically Relevant Prelamin A Interactions with Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Arantza; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-linked laminopathies are a group of rare human diseases caused by mutations in LMNA or by disrupted posttranslational processing of its largest encoded isoform, prelamin A. The accumulation of mutated or immature forms of farnesylated prelamin A, named progerin or prelamin A, respectively, dominantly disrupts nuclear lamina structure with toxic effects in cells. One hypothesis is that aberrant lamin filament networks disrupt or "trap" proteins such as transcription factors, thereby interfering with their normal activity. Since laminopathies mainly affect tissues of mesenchymal origin, we tested this hypothesis by generating an experimental model of laminopathy by inducing prelamin A accumulation in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We provide detailed protocols for inducing and detecting prelamin A accumulation in hMSCs, and describe the bioinformatic analysis and in vitro assays of transcription factors potentially affected by prelamin A accumulation.

  20. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  1. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  2. Intermittent Transcription Dynamics for the Rapid Production of Long Transcripts of High Fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Depken

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal cellular function relies on the efficient and accurate readout of the genetic code. Single-molecule experiments show that transcription and replication are highly intermittent processes that are frequently interrupted by polymerases pausing and reversing directions. Although intermittent dynamics in replication are known to result from proofreading, their origin and significance during transcription remain controversial. Here, we theoretically investigate transcriptional fidelity and show that the kinetic scheme provided by the RNA-polymerase backtracking and transcript-cleavage pathway can account for measured error rates. Importantly, we find that intermittent dynamics provide an enormous increase in the rate of producing long transcripts of high fidelity. Our results imply that intermittent dynamics during transcription may have evolved as a way to mitigate the competing demands of speed and fidelity in the transcription of extended sequences.

  3. Hereditary profiles of disorderly transcription?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simons Johannes WIM

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microscopic examination of living cells often reveals that cells from some cell strains appear to be in a permanent state of disarray without obvious reason. In all probability such a disorderly state affects cell functioning. The aim of this study was to establish whether a disorderly state could occur that adversely affects gene expression profiles and whether such a state might have biomedical consequences. To this end, the expression profiles of the 14 genes of the proteasome derived from the GEO SAGE database were utilized as a model system. Results By adopting the overall expression profile as the standard for normal expression, deviation in transcription was frequently observed. Each deviating tissue exhibited its own characteristic profile of over-expressed and under-expressed genes. Moreover such a specific deviating profile appeared to be epigenetic in origin and could be stably transmitted to a clonal derivative e.g. from a precancerous normal tissue to its tumor. A significantly greater degree of deviation was observed in the expression profiles from the tumor tissues. The changes in the expression of different genes display a network of interdependencies. Therefore our hypothesis is that deviating profiles reflect disorder in the localization of genes within the nucleus The underlying cause(s for these disorderly states remain obscure; it could be noise and/or deterministic chaos. Presence of mutational damage does not appear to be predominantly involved. Conclusion As disturbances in expression profiles frequently occur and have biomedical consequences, its determination could prove of value in several fields of biomedical research. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Trey Ideker, Itai Yanai and Stephan Beck

  4. Prunus transcription factors: Breeding perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmor João Bianchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs. In peach, 1,533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome.

  5. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  6. Evolution and diversification of the basal transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttke, Sascha H C

    2015-03-01

    Transcription initiation was once thought to be regulated primarily by sequence-specific transcription factors with the basal transcription machinery being largely invariant. Gradually it became apparent that the basal transcription machinery greatly diversified during evolution and new studies now demonstrate that diversification of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) family yielded specialized and largely independent transcription systems.

  7. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin's roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation.

  8. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Notation systems for transcription: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Catherine; O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine

    2002-11-01

    A 21-syllable question posed by Bernard Shaw in a CNN television interview with Margaret Thatcher was presented to 90 participants, either as an audio recording or as a typed transcript or as both. Participants were asked to speak it, as closely as possible, as Shaw had (or, in conditions without the audio recording, as he might have). The typed version was either an ordinary transcript or a transcript in one of three transcription systems used currently in research on spoken discourse, all of which incorporate notations for prosody. Hence, there were nine conditions in all, with five women and five men in each. Contrary to the experimental hypothesis, approximations to Shaw's original temporal measures of performance were not degraded but were instead improved significantly by the addition of a prosodically notated transcript to the audio recording and significantly more in the absence of the audio recording. Presentation of the ordinary transcript alone produced the worst approximation to Shaw's temporal measures. The usefulness, accuracy, and readability of transcripts prepared according to detailed notation systems are discussed.

  10. Transcriptional Regulation by CHIP/LDB Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, Revital; Levkovitz, Liron; Yosef, Nir; Yanku, Michaela; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded; Westphal, Heiner; Oliver, Brian; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that transcription factors play versatile roles in turning genes “on” or “off” depending on cellular context via the various transcription complexes they form. This poses a major challenge in unraveling combinatorial transcription complex codes. Here we use the powerful genetics of Drosophila combined with microarray and bioinformatics analyses to tackle this challenge. The nuclear adaptor CHIP/LDB is a major developmental regulator capable of forming tissue-specific transcription complexes with various types of transcription factors and cofactors, making it a valuable model to study the intricacies of gene regulation. To date only few CHIP/LDB complexes target genes have been identified, and possible tissue-dependent crosstalk between these complexes has not been rigorously explored. SSDP proteins protect CHIP/LDB complexes from proteasome dependent degradation and are rate-limiting cofactors for these complexes. By using mutations in SSDP, we identified 189 down-stream targets of CHIP/LDB and show that these genes are enriched for the binding sites of APTEROUS (AP) and PANNIER (PNR), two well studied transcription factors associated with CHIP/LDB complexes. We performed extensive genetic screens and identified target genes that genetically interact with components of CHIP/LDB complexes in directing the development of the wings (28 genes) and thoracic bristles (23 genes). Moreover, by in vivo RNAi silencing we uncovered novel roles for two of the target genes, xbp1 and Gs-alpha, in early development of these structures. Taken together, our results suggest that loss of SSDP disrupts the normal balance between the CHIP-AP and the CHIP-PNR transcription complexes, resulting in down-regulation of CHIP-AP target genes and the concomitant up-regulation of CHIP-PNR target genes. Understanding the combinatorial nature of transcription complexes as presented here is crucial to the study of transcription regulation of gene batteries required

  11. Finger Movements in Transcription Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-07

    Dr. Alfred F. Smode Office of Nvel Research Dr. Richard Gibson Training Aalysis & Rvalustion Group Arlington, VA 22217Dr. ~chnd Clson(TANG) Bureau of...Personnel PAD Center 1 Dr. Lloyd Hitchcock San Diego, CA 92152 Human Factors lagineerig 1 Roger W. loinSto, bh.D Division (6022) Code L52 I Technical Dirlctor

  12. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  13. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  14. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  15. Our evolving knowledge of the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2008-01-01

    The development of a genome-scale approach to identification of the 5' ends of capped mRNAs (CAGE) has given new insights into many aspects of mammalian RNApolII transcription control. They include the identification of the minimal initiator motif, the different types of proximal promoter architecture, the promoters of noncoding RNAs, the transcription of retrotransposons, and the extensive impact of alternative promoters on the proteome. CAGE also offers applications as a form of expression profiling that measures promoter use, allowing more precise development of transcriptional network models.

  16. Folding Kinetics of Riboswitch Transcriptional Terminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerwine, Benjamin; Widom, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Riboswitches control the expression of genes in bacteria by halting gene transcription or allowing it to proceed based on the presence of ligands in solution. A key feature of every riboswitch is a transcriptional terminator in which the messenger RNA folds into a secondary structure with the stem-loop structure of a hairpin. Through kinetic Monte Carlo simulation we show that terminators have been naturally selected to fold with high reliability on the time-scale of gene transcription. This efficient folding behavior is preserved among two classes of riboswitch and among two species of bacteria.

  17. Optogenetic control of transcription in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available Light inducible protein-protein interactions are powerful tools to manipulate biological processes. Genetically encoded light-gated proteins for controlling precise cellular behavior are a new and promising technology, called optogenetics. Here we exploited the blue light-induced transcription system in yeast and zebrafish, based on the blue light dependent interaction between two plant proteins, blue light photoreceptor Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2 and the bHLH transcription factor CIB1 (CRY-interacting bHLH 1. We demonstrate the utility of this system by inducing rapid transcription suppression and activation in zebrafish.

  18. Global transcriptional profiling reveals Streptococcus agalactiae genes controlled by the MtaR transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvek Urska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus; GBS is a significant bacterial pathogen of neonates and an emerging pathogen of adults. Though transcriptional regulators are abundantly encoded on the GBS genome, their role in GBS pathogenesis is poorly understood. The mtaR gene encodes a putative LysR-type transcriptional regulator that is critical for the full virulence of GBS. Previous studies have shown that an mtaR- mutant transports methionine at reduced rates and grows poorly in normal human plasma not supplemented with methionine. The decreased virulence of the mtaR mutant was correlated with a methionine transport defect; however, no MtaR-regulated genes were identified. Results Microarray analysis of wild-type GBS and an mtaR mutant revealed differential expression of 12 genes, including 1 upregulated and 11 downregulated genes in the mtaR mutant. Among the downregulated genes, we identified a cluster of cotranscribed genes encoding a putative methionine transporter (metQ1NP and peptidase (pdsM. The expression of four genes potentially involved in arginine transport (artPQ and arginine biosynthesis (argGH was downregulated and these genes localized to two transcriptional units. The virulence factor cspA, which encodes an extracellular protease, was downregulated. Additionally, the SAN_1255 locus, which putatively encodes a protein displaying similarity to plasminogen activators, was downregulated. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe the global influence of MtaR on GBS gene expression. This study implicates the metQ1NP genes as encoding the MtaR-regulated methionine transporter, which may provide a mechanistic explanation for the methionine-dependent growth defect of the mtaR mutant. In addition to modulating the expression of genes involved in metabolism and amino acid transport, inactivation of mtaR affected the expression of other GBS genes implicated in pathogenesis. These findings

  19. Virology Interest Group Seminar | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virology Interest Group Seminar.  September 7th, Building 50, Room 2328 from 3:00 until 4:00.   We will have two presenters. Dr. Vladimir Majerciak: The full transcription map of mouse papillomavirus type 1 (MmuPV1), Tumor Virus RNA Biology Section, RNA Biology Laboratory, NCI Dr. Zhi-Ming Zheng: Viral DNA replication regulates HPV18 transcription and gene expression, Tumor Virus RNA Biology Section, RNA Biology Laboratory, NCI    

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069900 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069900 J023035E20 At5g23420.1 high mobility group (HMG1/2) family protein similar to high... mobility group protein 2 HMG2 [Ipomoea nil] GI:1052956; contains Pfam profile PF00505: HMG (high mobility group) box 8e-32 ...

  1. Magnetic translation groups as group extension

    OpenAIRE

    Florek, Wojciech

    1998-01-01

    Extensions of a direct product T of two cyclic groups Z_n1 and Z_n2 by an Abelian (gauge) group G with the trivial action of T on G are considered. All possible (nonequivalent) factor systems are determined using the Mac Lane method. Some of resulting groups describe magnetic translation groups. As examples extensions with G=U(1) and G=Z_n are considered and discussed.

  2. Divergent transcriptional and translational signals in Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, E; Klenk, H. P.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2005-01-01

    Many Archaea, in contrast to bacteria, produce a high proportion of leaderless transcripts, show a wide variation in their consensus Shine-Dalgarno (S-D) sequences and frequently use GUG and UUG start codons. In order to understand the basis for these differences, 18 complete archaeal genomes were...... examined for sequence signals that are positionally conserved upstream from genes. These functional motifs include box A promoter sequences for leaderless transcripts and S-D sequences for transcripts with leaders. Most of the box A sequences were preceded by a BRE-like motif and followed by a previously...... for the 18 Archaea, reveal that usage of high levels of both S-D motifs, and GUG and UUG start codons occurs exclusively in the shorter branched Archaea. High levels of leaderless transcripts are found in the longer branched Archaea....

  3. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications...

  4. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  5. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transcription machinery. In this review, we discuss: (i) the molecular composition and functions of the Pol I enzyme complex and the two main Pol I transcription factors, SL1 (selectivity factor 1) and UBF (upstream binding factor); (ii) the interplay between these factors during pre-initiation complex formation at the rDNA promoter in mammalian cells; and (iii) the cellular control of the Pol I transcription machinery.

  6. Topologies for perfect adaptation in gene transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation is commonly used in sensory systems and signaling networks to allow the detection of further stimuli. Despite enzymatic network topologies for adaptation have been investigated systematically, the topology of transcriptional network that could perform adaptation still remains unclear, due to the complexity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we systematically investigated all three-node transcriptional networks, and found the topologies of transcriptional networks for adaptation are different from that of enzymatic ones. While both negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed forward loop (IFFL) are capable of performing adaptation analytically, a positive self-regulation on buffer node is necessary for NFBL topology and more flexible structures emerge for IFFL than that of enzymatic networks. Most of the simulation results agree with analytical predictions. This study may explain the mechanism of adapted gene regulation behavior and supply a design table for gene regulatory adaptation.

  7. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  8. Contributions of nuclear architecture to transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, G S; van Wijnen, A J; Stein, J; Lian, J B; Montecino, M

    1995-01-01

    Three parameters of nuclear structure contribute to transcriptional control. The linear representation of promoter elements provides competency for physiological responsiveness within the contexts of development as well as cycle- and phenotype-dependent regulation. Chromatin structure and nucleosome organization reduce distances between independent regulatory elements providing a basis for integrating components of transcriptional control. The nuclear matrix supports gene expression by imposing physical constraints on chromatin related to three-dimensional genomic organization. In addition, the nuclear matrix facilitates gene localization as well as the concentration and targeting of transcription factors. Several lines of evidence are presented that are consistent with involvement of multiple levels of nuclear architecture in cell growth and tissue-specific gene expression during differentiation. Growth factor and steroid hormone responsive modifications in chromatin structure, nucleosome organization, and the nuclear matrix that influence transcription of the cell cycle-regulated histone gene and the bone tissue-specific osteocalcin gene during progressive expression of the osteoblast phenotype are considered.

  9. Dynamics of transcription-translation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, D.; Edwards, R.

    2016-09-01

    A theory for qualitative models of gene regulatory networks has been developed over several decades, generally considering transcription factors to regulate directly the expression of other transcription factors, without any intermediate variables. Here we explore a class of models that explicitly includes both transcription and translation, keeping track of both mRNA and protein concentrations. We mainly deal with transcription regulation functions that are steep sigmoids or step functions, as is often done in protein-only models, though translation is governed by a linear term. We extend many aspects of the protein-only theory to this new context, including properties of fixed points, description of trajectories by mappings between switching points, qualitative analysis via a state-transition diagram, and a result on periodic orbits for negative feedback loops. We find that while singular behaviour in switching domains is largely avoided, non-uniqueness of solutions can still occur in the step-function limit.

  10. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  11. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  12. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  13. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  14. A Discriminative Model for Polyphonic Piano Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliner Graham E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a discriminative model for polyphonic piano transcription. Support vector machines trained on spectral features are used to classify frame-level note instances. The classifier outputs are temporally constrained via hidden Markov models, and the proposed system is used to transcribe both synthesized and real piano recordings. A frame-level transcription accuracy of 68% was achieved on a newly generated test set, and direct comparisons to previous approaches are provided.

  15. Transcriptional inhibition by the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A; Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M......-mediated transcription would be lost by mutation in the retinoblastoma gene in human tumours, by pRB's interaction with DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, or by phosphorylation during the cell cycle....

  16. Co-transcriptional splicing in two yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Herzel, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Cellular function and physiology are largely established through regulated gene expression. The first step in gene expression, transcription of the genomic DNA into RNA, is a process that is highly aligned at the levels of initiation, elongation and termination. In eukaryotes, protein-coding genes are exclusively transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Upon transcription of the first 15-20 nucleotides (nt), the emerging nascent RNA 5’ end is modified with a 7-methylguanosyl cap. This is on...

  17. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  18. A unified architecture of transcriptional regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Danko, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is precisely controlled in time and space through the integration of signals that act at gene promoters and gene-distal enhancers. Classically, promoters and enhancers are considered separate classes of regulatory elements, often distinguished by histone modifications. However...... and enhancers are considered a single class of functional element, with a unified architecture for transcription initiation. The context of interacting regulatory elements and the surrounding sequences determine local transcriptional output as well as the enhancer and promoter activities of individual elements....

  19. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single

  20. Transcript changes in Vibrio cholerae in response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuping; Liang, Weili; Du, Pengcheng; Yan, Meiying; Kan, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, which is a serious human intestinal pathogen, often resides and thrives in estuaries but requires major self-regulation to overcome intestinal hyperosmotic stress or high salt stress in water and food. In the present study, we selected multiple O1 and O139 group V. cholerae strains that were isolated from different regions and during different years to study their salt tolerance. Based on the mechanisms that other bacteria use to respond to high salt stress, we selected salt stress-response related genes to study the mechanisms which V. cholerae responds to high salt stress. V. cholerae strains showed salt-resistance characteristics that varied in salt concentrations from 4% to 6%. However, group O1 and group O139 showed no significant difference in the degree of salt tolerance. The primary responses of bacteria to salt stress, including Na(+) exclusion, K(+) uptake and glutamate biosynthesis, were observed in V. cholerae strains. In addition, some sigma factors were up-regulated in V. cholerae strains, suggesting that V. cholerae may recruit common sigma factors to achieve an active salt stress response. However, some changes in gene transcript levels in response to salt stress in V. cholerae were strain-specific. In particular, hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes indicated that transcript levels of these genes were correlated with the degree of salt tolerance. Therefore, elevated transcript levels of some genes, including sigma factors and genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, may be due to the salt tolerance of strains. In addition, high salt-tolerant strains may recruit common as well as additional sigma factors to activate the salt stress response.

  1. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). Th

  2. Control of transcription by cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yung Wu

    Full Text Available Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. Here we show that ploidy-associated changes in gene expression reflect transcriptional adjustment to a larger cell size, implicating cellular geometry as a key parameter in gene regulation. Using RNA-seq, we identified genes whose expression was altered in a tetraploid as compared with the isogenic haploid. A significant fraction of these genes encode cell surface proteins, suggesting an effect of the enlarged cell size on the differential regulation of these genes. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of these genes in haploid mutants that also produce enlarged size. Surprisingly, many genes differentially regulated in the tetraploid are identically regulated in the enlarged haploids, and the magnitude of change in gene expression correlates with the degree of size enlargement. These results indicate a causal relationship between cell size and transcription, with a size-sensing mechanism that alters transcription in response to size. The genes responding to cell size are enriched for those regulated by two mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and components in those pathways were found to mediate size-dependent gene regulation. Transcriptional adjustment to enlarged cell size could underlie other cellular changes associated with polyploidy. The causal relationship between cell size and transcription suggests that cell size homeostasis serves a regulatory role in transcriptome maintenance.

  3. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site...... RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels.......Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site......, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites...

  4. DMD transcript imbalance determines dystrophin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitali, Pietro; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Verhaart, Ingrid E C; Wokke, Beatrijs; Janson, Anneke A M; van den Eijnde, Rani; den Dunnen, Johan T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2013-12-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by out-of-frame and in-frame mutations, respectively, in the dystrophin encoding DMD gene. Molecular therapies targeting the precursor-mRNA are in clinical trials and show promising results. These approaches will depend on the stability and expression levels of dystrophin mRNA in skeletal muscles and heart. We report that the DMD gene is more highly expressed in heart than in skeletal muscles, in mice and humans. The transcript mutated in the mdx mouse model shows a 5' to 3' imbalance compared with that of its wild-type counterpart and reading frame restoration via antisense-mediated exon skipping does not correct this event. We also report significant transcript instability in 22 patients with Becker dystrophy, clarifying the fact that transcript imbalance is not caused by premature nonsense mutations. Finally, we demonstrate that transcript stability, rather than transcriptional rate, is an important determinant of dystrophin protein levels in patients with Becker dystrophy. We suggest that the availability of the complete transcript is a key factor to determine protein abundance and thus will influence the outcome of mRNA-targeting therapies.

  5. The regulation of transcription in memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberini, Cristina M; Kandel, Eric R

    2014-12-04

    De novo transcription of DNA is a fundamental requirement for the formation of long-term memory. It is required during both consolidation and reconsolidation, the posttraining and postreactivation phases that change the state of the memory from a fragile into a stable and long-lasting form. Transcription generates both mRNAs that are translated into proteins, which are necessary for the growth of new synaptic connections, as well as noncoding RNA transcripts that have regulatory or effector roles in gene expression. The result is a cascade of events that ultimately leads to structural changes in the neurons that mediate long-term memory storage. The de novo transcription, critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation, is orchestrated by chromatin and epigenetic modifications. The complexity of transcription regulation, its temporal progression, and the effectors produced all contribute to the flexibility and persistence of long-term memory formation. In this article, we provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to this transcriptional regulation underlying long-term memory formation.

  6. Mitochondrial transcription: is a pattern emerging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaehning, J A

    1993-04-01

    Despite the striking similarities of RNA polymerases and transcription signals shared by eubacteria, archaebacteria and eukaryotes, there has been little indication that transcription in mitochondria is related to any previously characterized model. Only in yeast has the subunit structure of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase been determined. The yeast enzyme is composed of a core related to polymerases from bacteriophage T7 and T3, and a promoter recognition factor similar to bacterial sigma factors. Soluble systems for studying mitochondrial transcript initiation in vitro have been described from several organisms, and used to determine consensus sequences at or near transcription start sites. Comparison of these sequences from fungi, plants, and amphibians with the T7/T3 promoter suggests some intriguing similarities. Mammalian mitochondrial promoters do not fit this pattern but instead appear to utilize upstream sites, the target of a transcriptional stimulatory factor, to position the RNA polymerase. The recent identification of a possible homologue of the mammalian upstream factor in yeast mitochondria may indicate that a pattern will eventually be revealed relating the transcriptional machineries of all eukaryotic mitochondria.

  7. Transcriptional elongation factor ENL phosphorylated by ATM recruits polycomb and switches off transcription for DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Ayako; Nagaura, Yuko; Yasui, Akira

    2015-05-07

    Transcription is repressed if a DNA double-strand break (DSB) is introduced in close proximity to a transcriptional activation site at least in part by H2A-ubiquitination. While ATM signaling is involved, how it controls H2A-ubiquitination remains unclear. Here, we identify that, in response to DSBs, a transcriptional elongation factor, ENL (MLLT1), is phosphorylated by ATM at conserved SQ sites. This phosphorylation increases the interaction between ENL and the E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) via BMI1. This interaction promotes enrichment of PRC1 at transcription elongation sites near DSBs to ubiquitinate H2A leading to transcriptional repression. ENL SQ sites and BMI1 are necessary for KU70 accumulation at DSBs near active transcription sites and cellular resistance to DSBs. Our data suggest that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of ENL functions as switch from elongation to Polycomb-mediated repression to preserve genome integrity.

  8. Structural, functional, and genetic analyses of the actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Humphrey, Laurence J; Flack, Joshua E; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Gene expression is highly regulated at the step of transcription initiation, and transcription activators play a critical role in this process. RbpA, an actinobacterial transcription activator that is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), binds selectively to group 1 and certain group 2 σ-factors. To delineate the molecular mechanism of RbpA, we show that the Mtb RbpA σ-interacting domain (SID) and basic linker are sufficient for transcription activation. We also present the crystal structure of the Mtb RbpA-SID in complex with domain 2 of the housekeeping σ-factor, σ(A). The structure explains the basis of σ-selectivity by RbpA, showing that RbpA interacts with conserved regions of σ(A) as well as the nonconserved region (NCR), which is present only in housekeeping σ-factors. Thus, the structure is the first, to our knowledge, to show a protein interacting with the NCR of a σ-factor. We confirm the basis of selectivity and the observed interactions using mutagenesis and functional studies. In addition, the structure allows for a model of the RbpA-SID in the context of a transcription initiation complex. Unexpectedly, the structural modeling suggests that RbpA contacts the promoter DNA, and we present in vivo and in vitro studies supporting this finding. Our combined data lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of RbpA function as a transcription activator.

  9. Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus UL140 and UL141 genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanping Ma; Mali Li; Bo Zheng; Ning Wang; Shuang Gao; Lin Wang; Qi Ying; Zhengrong Sun; Qiang Ruan

    2013-03-01

    Transcription of human cytomegalovirus UL/b′ region has been studied extensively for some genes. In this study, transcripts of the UL140 and UL141, two of the UL/b′ genes, were identified in late RNAs of three HCMV isolates using Northern blot hybridization, cDNA library screening and RACE-PCR. At least three transcripts with length of 2800, 2400 and 1700 nt, as well as a group of transcripts of about 1000–1300 nt, were found in this gene region with an accordant 3′ ends. Among the transcripts, two initiated upstream of the start code of the UL140 gene and contained the UL140 and UL141 open reading frame (ORF), one initiated in the middle of the UL140 gene, and could encode short ORFs upstream of the UL141 ORF. A group of transcripts initiated upstream or downstream of the start code of the UL141 gene, and could encode `nested’ ORFs, including the UL141 ORF. These `nested’ ORFs possess different initiation sites but the same termination site as that of the UL141 ORF.

  10. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  11. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin;

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  12. About group digital signatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-01-01

    ...).A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature...

  13. Signatures of DNA target selectivity by ETS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Gregory M K; Kim, Hye Mi

    2017-05-27

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. DNA target specificity derives from combinatorial interactions with other proteins as well as intrinsic heterogeneity among ETS domains. Emerging evidence suggests molecular hydration as a fundamental feature that defines the intrinsic heterogeneity in DNA target selection and susceptibility to epigenetic DNA modification. This perspective invokes novel hypotheses in the regulation of ETS proteins in physiologic osmotic stress, their pioneering potential in heterochromatin, and the effects of passive and pharmacologic DNA demethylation on ETS regulation.

  14. INTEGRATIVE COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF ANTISENSE TRANSCRIPTS AND miRNA TARGETS IN PLANT GENOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Y.L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNA, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are important components of gene expression in eukaryotes, forming a regulatory network. miRNAs are expressed through nucleolytic maturation of hairpin precursors transcribed by RNA Polymerase II or III. Such transcripts are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation in plants, fungi and animals. miRNAs bind to target RNA transcripts and guide their cleavage (mostly for plants or act to prevent translation. siRNAs act via a similar mechanism of cleavage of their target genes, but they also can direct genomic DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling. It is estimated that large fraction, up to 30% of all human genes also may be post-transcriptionally regulated by miRNAs. For plant genomes numbers could be higher depending on quality of sequencing and genome annotation. Due to availability of genome and mRNA sequences genome-wide searches for sense-antisense transcripts have been reported, but few plant sense-antisense transcript pairs have been studied. Integration of these data in specialized databases is challenging problem of computer genomics. We have developed set of computer programs to define antisense transcripts and miRNA genes based on available sequencing data. We have analyzed data from PlantNATsDB (Plant Natural Antisense Transcripts DataBase which is a platform for annotating and discovering Natural Antisense Transcripts (NAT by integrating various data sources [1]. NATs can be grouped into two categories, cis-NATs and trans-NATs. Cis-NAT pairs are transcribed from opposing DNA strands at the same genomic locus and have a variety of orientations and differing lengths of overlap between the perfect sequence complementary regions, whereas trans-NAT pairs are transcribed from different loci and form partial complementarily. The database contains at the moment 69 plant species. The database provides an integrative, interactive and information-rich web graphical interface to

  15. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  16. An activator of transcription regulates phage TP901-1 late gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Lone; Pedersen, Margit; Hammer, Karin

    2001-01-01

    to activate transcription of the promoter. Several lactococcal bacteriophages encode ORF29 homologous proteins, indicating that late transcription may be controlled by a similar mechanism in these phages. With the identification of this novel regulator, our results suggest that within the P335 group...... bp contains both the promoter and the region necessary for activation by ORF29. The transcriptional start site of the promoter was identified by primer extension to position 13073 on the TP901-1 genome, thus located 87 bp downstream of orf29 in a 580-bp intergenic region between orf29 and orf30....... Furthermore, the region located -85 to -61 bp upstream of the start site was shown to be necessary for promoter activity. During infection, the transcript arising from the late promoter is fully induced at 40 min postinfection, and our results suggest that a certain level of ORF29 must he reached in order...

  17. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Zenkin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  18. Genomic context drives transcription of insertion sequences in the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia wVulC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveau, Nicolas; Gilbert, Clément; Liu, Chao; Garrett, Roger A; Grève, Pierre; Bouchon, Didier; Cordaux, Richard

    2015-06-10

    Transposable elements (TEs) are DNA pieces that are present in almost all the living world at variable genomic density. Due to their mobility and density, TEs are involved in a large array of genomic modifications. In eukaryotes, TE expression has been studied in detail in several species. In prokaryotes, studies of IS expression are generally linked to particular copies that induce a modification of neighboring gene expression. Here we investigated global patterns of IS transcription in the Alphaproteobacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia wVulC, using both RT-PCR and bioinformatic analyses. We detected several transcriptional promoters in all IS groups. Nevertheless, only one of the potentially functional IS groups possesses a promoter located upstream of the transposase gene, that could lead up to the production of a functional protein. We found that the majority of IS groups are expressed whatever their functional status. RT-PCR analyses indicate that the transcription of two IS groups lacking internal promoters upstream of the transposase start codon may be driven by the genomic environment. We confirmed this observation with the transcription analysis of individual copies of one IS group. These results suggest that the genomic environment is important for IS expression and it could explain, at least partly, copy number variability of the various IS groups present in the wVulC genome and, more generally, in bacterial genomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Eimeria transcript DB: an integrated resource for annotated transcripts of protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Luiz Thibério; Novaes, Jeniffer; Durham, Alan M; Madeira, Alda Maria B N; Gruber, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Eimeria infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts, including chickens. We have recently reported a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella, integrating ORESTES data produced by our group and publicly available Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). All cDNA reads have been assembled, and the reconstructed transcripts have been submitted to a comprehensive functional annotation pipeline. Additional studies included orthology assignment across apicomplexan parasites and clustering analyses of gene expression profiles among different developmental stages of the parasites. To make all this body of information publicly available, we constructed the Eimeria Transcript Database (EimeriaTDB), a web repository that provides access to sequence data, annotation and comparative analyses. Here, we describe the web interface, available sequence data sets and query tools implemented on the site. The main goal of this work is to offer a public repository of sequence and functional annotation data of reconstructed transcripts of parasites of the genus Eimeria. We believe that EimeriaTDB will represent a valuable and complementary resource for the Eimeria scientific community and for those researchers interested in comparative genomics of apicomplexan parasites. Database URL: http://www.coccidia.icb.usp.br/eimeriatdb/

  20. Functional consequences of splicing of the antisense transcript COOLAIR on FLC transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Sebastian; Raitskin, Oleg; Wu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    perturbs a cotranscriptional feedback mechanism linking COOLAIR processing to FLC gene body histone demethylation and reduced FLC transcription. The importance of COOLAIR splicing in this repression mechanism was confirmed by disrupting COOLAIR production and mutating the COOLAIR proximal splice acceptor...... site. Our findings suggest that altered splicing of a long noncoding transcript can quantitatively modulate gene expression through cotranscriptional coupling mechanisms.......Antisense transcription is widespread in many genomes; however, how much is functional is hotly debated. We are investigating functionality of a set of long noncoding antisense transcripts, collectively called COOLAIR, produced at Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). COOLAIR initiates just...

  1. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination of long noncoding RNA transcripts hosting microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J; Jopling, Catherine L

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major part in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with cotranscriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. Although most miRNAs are located within introns of protein-coding transcripts, a substantial minority of miRNAs originate from long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, for which transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lncRNA transcripts containing miRNAs (lnc-pri-miRNAs) do not use the canonical cleavage-and-polyadenylation pathway but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a new RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells.

  2. When transcription goes on Holliday: Double Holliday junctions block RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipathsouk, Anne; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2017-02-01

    Non-canonical DNA structures can obstruct transcription. This transcription blockage could have various biological consequences, including genomic instability and gratuitous transcription-coupled repair. Among potential structures causing transcription blockage are Holliday junctions (HJs), which can be generated as intermediates in homologous recombination or during processing of stalled replication forks. Of particular interest is the double Holliday junction (DHJ), which contains two HJs. Topological considerations impose the constraint that the total number of helical turns in the DNA duplexes between the junctions cannot be altered as long as the flanking DNA duplexes are intact. Thus, the DHJ structure should strongly resist transient unwinding during transcription; consequently, it is predicted to cause significantly stronger blockage than single HJ structures. The patterns of transcription blockage obtained for RNA polymerase II transcription in HeLa cell nuclear extracts were in accordance with this prediction. However, we did not detect transcription blockage with purified T7 phage RNA polymerase; we discuss a possible explanation for this difference. In general, our findings implicate naturally occurring Holliday junctions in transcription arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic analysis of stochastic transcription cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire V Harper

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In individual mammalian cells the expression of some genes such as prolactin is highly variable over time and has been suggested to occur in stochastic pulses. To investigate the origins of this behavior and to understand its functional relevance, we quantitatively analyzed this variability using new mathematical tools that allowed us to reconstruct dynamic transcription rates of different reporter genes controlled by identical promoters in the same living cell. Quantitative microscopic analysis of two reporter genes, firefly luciferase and destabilized EGFP, was used to analyze the dynamics of prolactin promoter-directed gene expression in living individual clonal and primary pituitary cells over periods of up to 25 h. We quantified the time-dependence and cyclicity of the transcription pulses and estimated the length and variation of active and inactive transcription phases. We showed an average cycle period of approximately 11 h and demonstrated that while the measured time distribution of active phases agreed with commonly accepted models of transcription, the inactive phases were differently distributed and showed strong memory, with a refractory period of transcriptional inactivation close to 3 h. Cycles in transcription occurred at two distinct prolactin-promoter controlled reporter genes in the same individual clonal or primary cells. However, the timing of the cycles was independent and out-of-phase. For the first time, we have analyzed transcription dynamics from two equivalent loci in real-time in single cells. In unstimulated conditions, cells showed independent transcription dynamics at each locus. A key result from these analyses was the evidence for a minimum refractory period in the inactive-phase of transcription. The response to acute signals and the result of manipulation of histone acetylation was consistent with the hypothesis that this refractory period corresponded to a phase of chromatin remodeling which significantly

  4. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  5. A new role for LOX and LOXL2 proteins in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturbide, Ane; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2015-05-01

    The lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of proteins (LOX and LOXL1-LOXL4) oxidize amino groups located in the ε-position in lysines to generate an aldehyde group. In general, they are considered as extracellular proteins and have elastin and collagen as their main substrates. However, recent findings suggest a critical intracellular role for LOX and LOXL2 in transcriptional regulation. In this review, we highlight what is known about the transcriptional role of these two members of the family. Intriguingly, both the intracellular localization of these proteins and the fact that histones have been revealed to be their substrates place this family of proteins within the epigenetic field.

  6. Function-based discovery of significant transcriptional temporal patterns in insulin stimulated muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Camillo, Barbara; Irving, Brian A; Schimke, Jill; Sanavia, Tiziana; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2012-01-01

    Insulin action on protein synthesis (translation of transcripts) and post-translational modifications, especially of those involving the reversible modifications such as phosphorylation of various signaling proteins, are extensively studied but insulin effect on transcription of genes, especially of transcriptional temporal patterns remains to be fully defined. To identify significant transcriptional temporal patterns we utilized primary differentiated rat skeletal muscle myotubes which were treated with insulin and samples were collected every 20 min for 8 hours. Pooled samples at every hour were analyzed by gene array approach to measure transcript levels. The patterns of transcript levels were analyzed based on a novel method that integrates selection, clustering, and functional annotation to find the main temporal patterns associated to functional groups of differentially expressed genes. 326 genes were found to be differentially expressed in response to in vitro insulin administration in skeletal muscle myotubes. Approximately 20% of the genes that were differentially expressed were identified as belonging to the insulin signaling pathway. Characteristic transcriptional temporal patterns include: (a) a slow and gradual decrease in gene expression, (b) a gradual increase in gene expression reaching a peak at about 5 hours and then reaching a plateau or an initial decrease and other different variable pattern of increase in gene expression over time. The new method allows identifying characteristic dynamic responses to insulin stimulus, common to a number of genes and associated to the same functional group. The results demonstrate that insulin treatment elicited different clusters of gene transcript profile supporting a temporal regulation of gene expression by insulin in skeletal muscle cells.

  7. Function-based discovery of significant transcriptional temporal patterns in insulin stimulated muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Di Camillo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin action on protein synthesis (translation of transcripts and post-translational modifications, especially of those involving the reversible modifications such as phosphorylation of various signaling proteins, are extensively studied but insulin effect on transcription of genes, especially of transcriptional temporal patterns remains to be fully defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify significant transcriptional temporal patterns we utilized primary differentiated rat skeletal muscle myotubes which were treated with insulin and samples were collected every 20 min for 8 hours. Pooled samples at every hour were analyzed by gene array approach to measure transcript levels. The patterns of transcript levels were analyzed based on a novel method that integrates selection, clustering, and functional annotation to find the main temporal patterns associated to functional groups of differentially expressed genes. 326 genes were found to be differentially expressed in response to in vitro insulin administration in skeletal muscle myotubes. Approximately 20% of the genes that were differentially expressed were identified as belonging to the insulin signaling pathway. Characteristic transcriptional temporal patterns include: (a a slow and gradual decrease in gene expression, (b a gradual increase in gene expression reaching a peak at about 5 hours and then reaching a plateau or an initial decrease and other different variable pattern of increase in gene expression over time. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The new method allows identifying characteristic dynamic responses to insulin stimulus, common to a number of genes and associated to the same functional group. The results demonstrate that insulin treatment elicited different clusters of gene transcript profile supporting a temporal regulation of gene expression by insulin in skeletal muscle cells.

  8. An overview on transcriptional regulators in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Rodríguez, Alba; Robledo-Casados, Ivonne; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Streptomyces are Gram-positive microorganisms able to adapt and respond to different environmental conditions. It is the largest genus of Actinobacteria comprising over 900 species. During their lifetime, these microorganisms are able to differentiate, produce aerial mycelia and secondary metabolites. All of these processes are controlled by subtle and precise regulatory systems. Regulation at the transcriptional initiation level is probably the most common for metabolic adaptation in bacteria. In this mechanism, the major players are proteins named transcription factors (TFs), capable of binding DNA in order to repress or activate the transcription of specific genes. Some of the TFs exert their action just like activators or repressors, whereas others can function in both manners, depending on the target promoter. Generally, TFs achieve their effects by using one- or two-component systems, linking a specific type of environmental stimulus to a transcriptional response. After DNA sequencing, many streptomycetes have been found to have chromosomes ranging between 6 and 12Mb in size, with high GC content (around 70%). They encode for approximately 7000 to 10,000 genes, 50 to 100 pseudogenes and a large set (around 12% of the total chromosome) of regulatory genes, organized in networks, controlling gene expression in these bacteria. Among the sequenced streptomycetes reported up to now, the number of transcription factors ranges from 471 to 1101. Among these, 315 to 691 correspond to transcriptional regulators and 31 to 76 are sigma factors. The aim of this work is to give a state of the art overview on transcription factors in the genus Streptomyces.

  9. Extraction of transcript diversity from scientific literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parantu K Shah

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcript diversity generated by alternative splicing and associated mechanisms contributes heavily to the functional complexity of biological systems. The numerous examples of the mechanisms and functional implications of these events are scattered throughout the scientific literature. Thus, it is crucial to have a tool that can automatically extract the relevant facts and collect them in a knowledge base that can aid the interpretation of data from high-throughput methods. We have developed and applied a composite text-mining method for extracting information on transcript diversity from the entire MEDLINE database in order to create a database of genes with alternative transcripts. It contains information on tissue specificity, number of isoforms, causative mechanisms, functional implications, and experimental methods used for detection. We have mined this resource to identify 959 instances of tissue-specific splicing. Our results in combination with those from EST-based methods suggest that alternative splicing is the preferred mechanism for generating transcript diversity in the nervous system. We provide new annotations for 1,860 genes with the potential for generating transcript diversity. We assign the MeSH term "alternative splicing" to 1,536 additional abstracts in the MEDLINE database and suggest new MeSH terms for other events. We have successfully extracted information about transcript diversity and semiautomatically generated a database, LSAT, that can provide a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific gene expression. LSAT (Literature Support for Alternative Transcripts is publicly available at http://www.bork.embl.de/LSAT/.

  10. Identification of epididymis-specific transcripts in the mouse and rat by transcriptional profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel S. Johnston; Terry T. Turner; Joshua N. Finger; Tracy L. Owtscharuk; S. Kopf; Scott A. Jelinsky

    2007-01-01

    As part of our efforts to identify novel contraceptive targets in the epididymis we performed transcriptional profiling on each of the 10 and 19 segments of the mouse and rat epididymidis, respectively, using Affymetrix whole genome microarrays. A total of 17 096 and 16 360 probe sets representing transcripts were identified as being expressed in the segmented mouse and rat epididymal transcriptomes, respectively. Comparison of the expressed murine transcripts against a mouse transcriptional profiling database derived from 22 other mouse tissues identified 77transcripts that were expressed uniquely in the epididymis. The expression of these genes was further evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of RNA from 21 mouse tissues. RT-PCR analysis confirmed epididymis-specific expression of Defensin Beta 13 and identified two additional genes with expression restricted only to the epididymis and testis. Comparison of the 16 360 expressed transcripts in the rat epididymis with data of 21 other tissues from a rat transcriptional profiling database identified 110 transcripts specific for the epididymis.Sixty-two of these transcripts were further investigated by qPCR analysis. Only Defensin 22 (E3 epididymal protein)was shown to be completely specific for the epididymis. In addition, 14 transcripts showed more than 100-fold selective expression in the epididymis. The products of these genes might play important roles in epididymal and/or sperm function and further investigation and validation as contraceptive targets are warranted. The results of the studies described in this report are available at the Mammalian Reproductive Genetics (MRG) Database (http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu/).

  11. Programming off and on states in chromatin: mechanisms of Polycomb and trithorax group complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jeffrey A; Tamkun, John W

    2002-04-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin components that maintain stable states of gene expression. Recent studies have identified and characterized several multiprotein complexes containing these transcriptional regulators. Advances in understanding molecular activities of these complexes in vitro, and functional domains present in their subunits, suggest that they control transcription through multistep mechanisms that involve nucleosome modification, chromatin remodeling, and interaction with general transcription factors.

  12. Structural analysis of nucleosomal barrier to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaykalova, Daria A; Kulaeva, Olga I; Volokh, Olesya; Shaytan, Alexey K; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Sokolova, Olga S; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2015-10-27

    Thousands of human and Drosophila genes are regulated at the level of transcript elongation and nucleosomes are likely targets for this regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms of formation of the nucleosomal barrier to transcribing RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and nucleosome survival during/after transcription remain unknown. Here we show that both DNA-histone interactions and Pol II backtracking contribute to formation of the barrier and that nucleosome survival during transcription likely occurs through allosterically stabilized histone-histone interactions. Structural analysis indicates that after Pol II encounters the barrier, the enzyme backtracks and nucleosomal DNA recoils on the octamer, locking Pol II in the arrested state. DNA is displaced from one of the H2A/H2B dimers that remains associated with the octamer. The data reveal the importance of intranucleosomal DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions during conformational changes in the nucleosome structure on transcription. Mechanisms of nucleosomal barrier formation and nucleosome survival during transcription are proposed.

  13. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of transcriptional pausing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadigotla, Vasisht R; O Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Sengupta, Anirvan M; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard H; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei E

    2006-03-21

    We present a statistical mechanics approach for the prediction of backtracked pauses in bacterial transcription elongation derived from structural models of the transcription elongation complex (EC). Our algorithm is based on the thermodynamic stability of the EC along the DNA template calculated from the sequence-dependent free energy of DNA-DNA, DNA-RNA, and RNA-RNA base pairing associated with (i) the translocational and size fluctuations of the transcription bubble; (ii) changes in the associated DNA-RNA hybrid; and (iii) changes in the cotranscriptional RNA secondary structure upstream of the RNA exit channel. The calculations involve no adjustable parameters except for a cutoff used to discriminate paused from nonpaused complexes. When applied to 100 experimental pauses in transcription elongation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase on 10 DNA templates, the approach produces statistically significant results. We also present a kinetic model for the rate of recovery of backtracked paused complexes. A crucial ingredient of our model is the incorporation of kinetic barriers to backtracking resulting from steric clashes of EC with the cotranscriptionally generated RNA secondary structure, an aspect not included explicitly in previous attempts at modeling the transcription elongation process.

  14. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Ungricht, Rosemarie; Kelemen, János Z; Shetty, Chetak; Ratna, Prasuna; Becskei, Attila

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears the hallmarks of competitive inhibition, whereas a downstream activator inhibits gene expression non-competitively. When gene expression is induced weakly, the antagonistic activator can have a positive effect and can even trigger paradoxical activation. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium models of transcription shed light on the mechanism by which interference converts signals, and reveals that self-antagonism of activators imitates the behavior of feed-forward loops. Indeed, a synthetic circuit generates a bell-shaped response, so that the induction of expression is limited to a narrow range of the input signal. The identification of conserved regulatory principles of interference will help to predict the transcriptional response of genes in their genomic context. PMID:19690569

  15. Chromatin insulation by a transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Nathan B; Scalzo, David; Fiering, Steven; Groudine, Mark; Martin, David I K

    2003-02-04

    In eukaryotic genomes, transcriptionally active regions are interspersed with silent chromatin that may repress genes in its vicinity. Chromatin insulators are elements that can shield a locus from repressive effects of flanking chromatin. Few such elements have been characterized in higher eukaryotes, but transcriptional activating elements are an invariant feature of active loci and have been shown to suppress transgene silencing. Hence, we have assessed the ability of a transcriptional activator to cause chromatin insulation, i.e., to relieve position effects at transgene integration sites in cultured cells. The transgene contained a series of binding sites for the metal-inducible transcriptional activator MTF, linked to a GFP reporter. Clones carrying single integrated transgenes were derived without selection for expression, and in most clones the transgene was silent. Induction of MTF resulted in transition of the transgene from the silent to the active state, prolongation of the active state, and a marked narrowing of the range of expression levels at different genomic sites. At one genomic site, prolonged induction of MTF resulted in suppression of transgene silencing that persisted after withdrawal of the induction stimulus. These results are consistent with MTF acting as a chromatin insulator and imply that transcriptional activating elements can insulate active loci against chromatin repression.

  16. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  17. Small Group Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  18. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  19. Study on the Regulation of Bcl-2 Gene on Rat Spermatogenic Cells Apoptosis in Transcription Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董强; 杨宇如; 黄明孔; 李虹; 张卫东; 徐震波

    2000-01-01

    Objective To detect the change of Bcl-2 gene expression in the apopototic process of spermatogenic cells in rat with vasoligation and vasostomy, and to find out the relationship between the transcription of Bcl-2 and the apoptosis of spermatognic cells.Materials & Methods Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in 3 groups were operated with vasoligation and vasostomy. Then hybridization in situ with hypersensitive Bcl-2 RNA probe was used to detect the change of Bcl-2 mRNA.Results The transcription of Bcl-2 gene in spermatogenic cells was obviously inhibited in the vasoligation group compared with that in the control group (P<0. 05), and the transcription in the vasostomy group showed no difference from that of the control group.Conclusion Bcl-2 gene has an anti-apoptotic effect in rats with vasostomy, and there was a transcriptional regulation of Bcl-2 gene in rat spermatogenic cell during the period of pre-vasoligation to post-vasoligation and to post-vasosotomy.

  20. RNA Pol II Dynamics Modulate Co-transcriptional Chromatin Modification, CTD Phosphorylation, and Transcriptional Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Nova; Saldi, Tassa; Sheridan, Ryan M; Cortazar, Michael A; Bentley, David L

    2017-05-18

    Eukaryotic genes are marked by conserved post-translational modifications on the RNA pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) and the chromatin template. How the 5'-3' profiles of these marks are established is poorly understood. Using pol II mutants in human cells, we found that slow transcription repositioned specific co-transcriptionally deposited chromatin modifications; histone H3 lysine 36 trimethyl (H3K36me3) shifted within genes toward 5' ends, and histone H3 lysine 4 dimethyl (H3K4me2) extended farther upstream of start sites. Slow transcription also evoked a hyperphosphorylation of CTD Ser2 residues at 5' ends of genes that is conserved in yeast. We propose a "dwell time in the target zone" model to explain the effects of transcriptional dynamics on the establishment of co-transcriptionally deposited protein modifications. Promoter-proximal Ser2 phosphorylation is associated with a longer pol II dwell time at start sites and reduced transcriptional polarity because of strongly enhanced divergent antisense transcription at promoters. These results demonstrate that pol II dynamics help govern the decision between sense and divergent antisense transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A bacteriophage transcription regulator inhibits bacterial transcription initiation by σ-factor displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Shadrin, Andrey; Sheppard, Carol; Mekler, Vladimir; Xu, Yingqi; Severinov, Konstantin; Matthews, Steve; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) appropriate essential processes of bacterial hosts to benefit their own development. The multisubunit bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAp) enzyme, which catalyses DNA transcription, is targeted by phage-encoded transcription regulators that selectively modulate its activity. Here, we describe the structural and mechanistic basis for the inhibition of bacterial RNAp by the transcription regulator P7 encoded by Xanthomonas oryzae phage Xp10. We reveal that P7 uses a two-step mechanism to simultaneously interact with the catalytic β and β' subunits of the bacterial RNAp and inhibits transcription initiation by inducing the displacement of the σ(70)-factor on initial engagement of RNAp with promoter DNA. The new mode of interaction with and inhibition mechanism of bacterial RNAp by P7 underscore the remarkable variety of mechanisms evolved by phages to interfere with host transcription.

  2. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  3. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen A Leyn

    Full Text Available Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  4. Deciphering the Innate Lymphoid Cell Transcriptional Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Seillet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are enriched at mucosal surfaces, where they provide immune surveillance. All ILC subsets develop from a common progenitor that gives rise to pre-committed progenitors for each of the ILC lineages. Currently, the temporal control of gene expression that guides the emergence of these progenitors is poorly understood. We used global transcriptional mapping to analyze gene expression in different ILC progenitors. We identified PD-1 to be specifically expressed in PLZF+ ILCp and revealed that the timing and order of expression of the transcription factors NFIL3, ID2, and TCF-1 was critical. Importantly, induction of ILC lineage commitment required only transient expression of NFIL3 prior to ID2 and TCF-1 expression. These findings highlight the importance of the temporal program that permits commitment of progenitors to the ILC lineage, and they expand our understanding of the core transcriptional program by identifying potential regulators of ILC development.

  5. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  6. Transcriptional network underlying Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takao; Wang, Minqin; Ririe, Ted O; Fernandes, Jolene S; Sternberg, Paul W

    2005-04-05

    The vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans provides an opportunity to investigate genetic networks that control gene expression during organogenesis. During the fourth larval stage (L4), seven vulval cell types are produced, each of which executes a distinct gene expression program. We analyze how the expression of cell-type-specific genes is regulated. Ras and Wnt signaling pathways play major roles in generating the spatial pattern of cell types and regulate gene expression through a network of transcription factors. One transcription factor (lin-29) primarily controls the temporal expression pattern. Other transcription factors (lin-11, cog-1, and egl-38) act in combination to control cell-type-specific gene expression. The complexity of the network arises in part because of the dynamic nature of gene expression, in part because of the presence of seven cell types, and also because there are multiple regulatory paths for gene expression within each cell type.

  7. Battles and hijacks: noncoding transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Jégu, Teddy; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription.

  8. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  9. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Transcription and the Pitch Angle of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Kasper W

    2013-01-01

    The question of the value of the pitch angle of DNA is visited from the perspective of a geometrical analysis of transcription. It is suggested that for transcription to be possible, the pitch angle of B-DNA must be smaller than the angle of zero-twist. At the zero-twist angle the double helix is maximally rotated and its strain-twist coupling vanishes. A numerical estimate of the pitch angle for B-DNA based on differential geometry is compared with numbers obtained from existing empirical data. The crystallographic studies shows that the pitch angle is approximately 38 deg., less than the corresponding zero-twist angle of 41.8 deg., which is consistent with the suggested principle for transcription.

  11. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Switching on cilia: transcriptional networks regulating ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choksi, Semil P; Lauter, Gilbert; Swoboda, Peter; Roy, Sudipto

    2014-04-01

    Cilia play many essential roles in fluid transport and cellular locomotion, and as sensory hubs for a variety of signal transduction pathways. Despite having a conserved basic morphology, cilia vary extensively in their shapes and sizes, ultrastructural details, numbers per cell, motility patterns and sensory capabilities. Emerging evidence indicates that this diversity, which is intimately linked to the different functions that cilia perform, is in large part programmed at the transcriptional level. Here, we review our understanding of the transcriptional control of ciliary biogenesis, highlighting the activities of FOXJ1 and the RFX family of transcriptional regulators. In addition, we examine how a number of signaling pathways, and lineage and cell fate determinants can induce and modulate ciliogenic programs to bring about the differentiation of distinct cilia types.

  13. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Group The MSUD Family Support Group is a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization for those with MSUD ... Family Support Group is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with no paid staff. Funds are needed ...

  14. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  15. Homomorphisms of quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Ralf; Woronowicz, Stanisław Lech

    2010-01-01

    We introduce some equivalent notions of homomorphisms between quantum groups that behave well with respect to duality of quantum groups. Our equivalent definitions are based on bicharacters, coactions, and universal quantum groups, respectively.

  16. IKAROS: a multifunctional regulator of the polymerase II transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Milot, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Transcription factors are important determinants of lineage specification during hematopoiesis. They favor recruitment of cofactors involved in epigenetic regulation, thereby defining patterns of gene expression in a development- and lineage-specific manner. Additionally, transcription factors can facilitate transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and assembly on chromatin. Interestingly, a few lineage-specific transcription factors, including IKAROS, also regulate transcription elongation. IKAROS is a tumor suppressor frequently inactivated in leukemia and associated with a poor prognosis. It forms a complex with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is required for productive transcription elongation. It has also been reported that IKAROS interacts with factors involved in transcription termination. Here we review these and other recent findings that establish IKAROS as the first transcription factor found to act as a multifunctional regulator of the transcription cycle in hematopoietic cells.

  17. The LIM Homeodomain Transcription Factor LHX6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zichao; Gutierrez, Diana; Li, Xiao; Bidlack, Felicitas; Cao, Huojun; Wang, Jianbo; Andrade, Kelsey; Margolis, Henry C.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    LHX6 is a LIM-homeobox transcription factor expressed during embryogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating LHX6 transcriptional activities are unknown. LHX6 and the PITX2 homeodomain transcription factor have overlapping expression patterns during tooth and craniofacial development, and in this report, we demonstrate new transcriptional mechanisms for these factors. PITX2 and LHX6 are co-expressed in the oral and dental epithelium and epithelial cell lines. Lhx6 expression is increased in Pitx2c transgenic mice and decreased in Pitx2 null mice. PITX2 activates endogenous Lhx6 expression and the Lhx6 promoter, whereas LHX6 represses its promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal endogenous PITX2 binding to the Lhx6 promoter. LHX6 directly interacts with PITX2 to inhibit PITX2 transcriptional activities and activation of multiple promoters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal an LHX6·PITX2 nuclear interaction in living cells. LHX6 has a dominant repressive effect on the PITX2 synergistic activation with LEF-1 and β-catenin co-factors. Thus, LHX6 acts as a transcriptional repressor and represses the expression of several genes involved in odontogenesis. We have identified specific defects in incisor, molar, mandible, bone, and root development and late stage enamel formation in Lhx6 null mice. Amelogenin and ameloblastin expression is reduced and/or delayed in the Lhx6 null mice, potentially resulting from defects in dentin deposition and ameloblast differentiation. Our results demonstrate that LHX6 regulates cell proliferation in the cervical loop and promotes cell differentiation in the anterior region of the incisor. We demonstrate new molecular mechanisms for LHX6 and an interaction with PITX2 for normal craniofacial and tooth development. PMID:23229549

  18. Food Groups Recipes

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    15 pages In 2011, My Plate replaced the Food Pyramid as a visual representation for the USDA Dietary Guidelines. This publication, a group of recipes based on this new division of food groups, reflects the effort of the USDA and other groups to translate science-based research into everyday practice for Americans. Fifteen recipes (3 from each food group) show ways to use foods from each food group. They are complete with basic nutritional analyses and food group amounts.

  19. Locally minimal topological groups

    OpenAIRE

    Außenhofer, Lydia; Chasco, María Jesús; Dikranjan, Dikran; Domínguez, Xabier

    2009-01-01

    A Hausdorff topological group $(G,\\tau)$ is called locally minimal if there exists a neighborhood $U$ of 0 in $\\tau$ such that $U$ fails to be a neighborhood of zero in any Hausdorff group topology on $G$ which is strictly coarser than $\\tau.$ Examples of locally minimal groups are all subgroups of Banach-Lie groups, all locally compact groups and all minimal groups. Motivated by the fact that locally compact NSS groups are Lie groups, we study the connection between local minimality and the ...

  20. GROUP PROFILE Computer Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Sidorenkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article contains a description of the structure, the software and functional capabilities, and the scope and purposes of application of the Group Profile (GP computer technique. This technique rests on a conceptual basis (the microgroup theory, includes 16 new and modified questionnaires, and a unique algorithm, tied to the questionnaires, for identification of informal groups. The GP yields a wide range of data about the group as a whole (47 indices, each informal group (43 indices, and each group member (16 indices. The GP technique can be used to study different types of groups: production (work groups, design teams, military units, etc., academic (school classes, student groups, and sports.