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Sample records for group highly preferred

  1. Preference for High Status Predicts Implicit Outgroup Bias among Children from Low-Status Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newheiser, Anna-Kaisa; Dunham, Yarrow; Merrill, Anna; Hoosain, Leah; Olson, Kristina R.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas members of high-status racial groups show ingroup preference when attitudes are measured implicitly, members of low-status racial groups--both adults and children--typically show no bias, potentially reflecting awareness of the ingroup's low status. We hypothesized that when status differences are especially pronounced, children from…

  2. Description and Comparison of Group Behavior Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    they prefer to behave. The claisification theory started with the work of Carl Gustav Jung (7:18). Jung believed an individual’s behavior was...preference for introversion . These preferences are displayed in the scale percentages and in the group mean scores (see Appendix C). The Navy shows

  3. An Intra-Group Perspective on Leader Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Troels; Laustsen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that followers’ preferences for dominant leadership vary according to two types of exploitation risks from other individuals within the group. Previous work demonstrates that contexts of inter-group war and peace make followers prefer dominant- and non-dominant-looking leaders......, respectively. We add an intra-group perspective to this literature. Four original studies demonstrate that contexts with high risks of free-riding and criminal behavior from other group members (i.e., horizontal exploitation) increase preferences for dominant-looking leaders, whereas contexts with high risks...... of unresponsive, self-interested behavior from leaders themselves (i.e., vertical exploitation) decrease preferences for dominant-looking leaders. Moreover, within this framework of intra-group exploitation risks we show that followers prefer leaders from another vis-à-vis their own ethnic coalition to look less...

  4. Utopian preference mapping and the utopian preference method for group multiobjective optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yuda; HONG Zhenjie; ZHOU Xuanwei

    2003-01-01

    The individual utopian preference and the group utopian preference on a set of alternatives, and the concept of the utopian preference mapping from the individual utopian preferences, to the group utopian preference, based on the utopian points of the corresponding multiobjective optimization models proposed by decision makers are introduced. Through studying the various fundamental properties of the utopian preference mapping, a method for solving group multiobjective optimization problems with multiple multiobjective optimization models is constructed.

  5. Impact of discussion on preferences elicited in a group setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milne Ruairidh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completeness of preferences is assumed as one of the axioms of expected utility theory but has been subject to little empirical study. Methods Fifteen non-health professionals was recruited and familiarised with the standard gamble technique. The group then met five times over six months and preferences were elicited independently on 41 scenarios. After individual valuation, the group discussed the scenarios, following which preferences could be changed. Changes made were described and summary measures (mean and median before and after discussion compared using paired t test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out to explore attitudes to discussing preferences. These were transcribed, read by two investigators and emergent themes described. Results Sixteen changes (3.6% were made to preferences by seven (47% of the fifteen members. The difference between individual preference values before and after discussion ranged from -0.025 to 0.45. The average effect on the group mean was 0.0053. No differences before and after discussion were statistically significant. The group valued discussion highly and suggested it brought four main benefits: reassurance; improved procedural performance; increased group cohesion; satisfying curiosity. Conclusion The hypothesis that preferences are incomplete cannot be rejected for a proportion of respondents. However, brief discussion did not result in substantial number of changes to preferences and these did not have significant impact on summary values for the group, suggesting that incompleteness, if present, may not have an important effect on cost-utility analyses.

  6. An Intra-Group Perspective on Leader Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Troels; Laustsen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    , respectively. We add an intra-group perspective to this literature. Four original studies demonstrate that contexts with high risks of free-riding and criminal behavior from other group members (i.e., horizontal exploitation) increase preferences for dominant-looking leaders, whereas contexts with high risks...... dominant, and that this difference is driven by enhanced concerns for vertical exploitation from ethnically different leaders. The findings add new insights on appearance-based voting and electoral difficulties facing minority candidates....

  7. Ethnic group preferences for multicultural counseling competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Elizabeth D; Atkinson, Donald R; Wampold, Bruce E

    2004-02-01

    Asian American (n = 155), European American (n = 200), and Hispanic (n = 152) undergraduate students were surveyed using a paired-comparison format to determine preferences for the 9 attitudes/beliefs, 11 knowledges, and 11 skills identified by D. W. Sue, P. Arredondo, and R. J. McDavis (1992) as characteristics of the competent multicultural counselor. The Bradley-Terry-Luce model, which uses a weighted least square regression to place the competencies on a continuum from least preferred to most preferred and to test for significant intergroup differences, was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that preferences for 5 of the 9 attitudes/beliefs, 5 of the 11 knowledges, and 7 of the 11 skills competencies varied as a function of race/ethnicity.

  8. Learning Style Preferences of Iranian EFL High School Students

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    Reza Vaseghi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the learning style preferences of 75 Iranian students at Marefat high school in Kuala Lumpur of which, 41 are females and 34 are males. As there are very few researches in which the learning style preferences of Iranian high school students investigated, this study attempts to fulfil this gap. To this end, in order to identify the students’ preferred learning styles (Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic, Tactile, Group, and Individual Reid’s Perceptual Learning Style Preferences Questionnaire was used. Results indicated that the six learning style preferences considered in the questionnaire were positively preferred. Overall, kinesthetic and tactile learning were major learning styles. Auditory, group, visual, and individual were minor. Keywords: Learning Style Preferences, High School Students, EFL

  9. The evolution of altruistic social preferences in human groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joan B; House, Bailey R

    2016-02-05

    In this paper, we consider three hypotheses to account for the evolution of the extraordinary capacity for large-scale cooperation and altruistic social preferences within human societies. One hypothesis is that human cooperation is built on the same evolutionary foundations as cooperation in other animal societies, and that fundamental elements of the social preferences that shape our species' cooperative behaviour are also shared with other closely related primates. Another hypothesis is that selective pressures favouring cooperative breeding have shaped the capacity for cooperation and the development of social preferences, and produced a common set of behavioural dispositions and social preferences in cooperatively breeding primates and humans. The third hypothesis is that humans have evolved derived capacities for collaboration, group-level cooperation and altruistic social preferences that are linked to our capacity for culture. We draw on naturalistic data to assess differences in the form, scope and scale of cooperation between humans and other primates, experimental data to evaluate the nature of social preferences across primate species, and comparative analyses to evaluate the evolutionary origins of cooperative breeding and related forms of behaviour.

  10. US Interest Groups Prefer Emission Trading: A New Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    If there is to be environmental regulation, what kind of regulation would the main interest groups then prefer? This political distortion must be taken into account when designing future environmental regulation such as CO2 regulation. The three main interest groups in the US (private business......, environmentalist groups and the electricity sector) prefer a grandfathered permit market. Business is attracted by this solution because free initial distribution of permits both favors existing sources financially and furthermore creates a barrier to entry for new firms. Environmentalist groups have changed......, it is suggested that a grandfathered permit market is a more effective policy than a tax in relation to organized interests such as industry, electric utilities and environmental organizations. In perspective, the grandfathered permit market may be mixed with the use of taxes. In the case of CO2 regulation...

  11. Grouping by Closure Influences Subjective Regularity and Implicit Preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Makin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A reflection between a pair of contours is more rapidly detected than a translation, but this effect is stronger when the contours are closed to form a single object compared to when they are closed to form 2 objects with a gap between them. That is, grouping changes the relative salience of different regularities. We tested whether this manipulation would also change preference for reflection or translation. We measured preference for these patterns using the Implicit Association Test (IAT. On some trials, participants saw words that were either positive or negative and had to classify them as quickly as possible. On interleaved trials, they saw reflection or translation patterns and again had to classify them. Participants were faster when 1 button was used for reflection and positive words and another button was used for translation and negative words, compared to when the reverse response mapping was used (translation and positive vs. reflection and negative. This reaction time difference indicates an implicit preference for reflection over translation. However, the size of the implicit preference was significantly reduced in the Two-objects condition. We concluded that factors that affect perceptual sensitivity also systematically affect implicit preference formation.

  12. Are interest groups different in the factors determining landscape preferences?

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    Maria Bacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, rural landscape in Europe has evolved from an agricultural by-product to an important public good. This development creates not only new challenges to farming practices, it also makes participation and public involvement an indispensable tool for sustainable landscape planning. This is especially true for many European mountain regions, where tourism represents an important source of income and conflicts between locals’ and tourists’ interests should be avoided. In our study, we analyze whether discrepancies in the perception of the Alpine landscape can be located between locals and tourists and, if these differences exist, in which aspects these two groups are differing. A model employing three general factors able to describe landscape preferences regardless of the personal background is suggested and validated by confirmatory factor analysis. Our major finding shows that an attractive landscape for tourists does not have to be contradictory to a landscape that supports a high living quality for locals. Compromises in landscape planning between locals’ and tourists’ requirements seem often not to be necessary as they, generally, do not differ in the way they experience and assess the landscape.

  13. US Interest Groups Prefer Emission Trading: A New Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    attitudes and promote the idea too as a way of negotiating higher target reduction levels with industry. Finally, electric utilities prefer a grandfathered permit market, and this step towards less planned economy may be explained by the rise of competition in the US electricity sector. Therefore......If there is to be environmental regulation, what kind of regulation would the main interest groups then prefer? This political distortion must be taken into account when designing future environmental regulation such as CO2 regulation. The three main interest groups in the US (private business......, it is suggested that a grandfathered permit market is a more effective policy than a tax in relation to organized interests such as industry, electric utilities and environmental organizations. In perspective, the grandfathered permit market may be mixed with the use of taxes. In the case of CO2 regulation...

  14. Consumers' preferences for fresh yam: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlagne, Carla; Cornet, Denis; Blazy, Jean-Marc; Diman, Jean-Louis; Ozier-Lafontaine, Harry

    2017-01-01

    In West and Central Africa and in the Caribbean, yam is one of the most important sources of carbohydrates and has a great potential to improve food security. The yam production sector is, however, now challenged by the satisfaction of evolving consumers' preferences. Since little is known about consumers' preferences regarding yams' characteristics, product quality, and the drivers of yam purchase, six focus group discussions were conducted (for a total of 31 participants). Among the purchasing criteria, price was considered more important than the others. It was followed by the external damage, the origin, and the size of the tuber. The most frequently cited consumption criteria were the taste, the texture, and color of flesh after cooking. Taste was considered more important than the other criteria. Three consumers' profiles were established reflecting heterogeneity in preferences, especially as concerns the willingness to pay for yam and consumption habits. They were designated as the Hedonistic, the Thrifty and the Flexible. Our results suggest that innovations can be implemented to sustain and stimulate the development of the yam sector in Guadeloupe. Two main development paths were identified. The first path is the valorization of the great existing diversity of yam varieties and the increase in the level of information for consumers about product attributes such as the cooking mode, the origin, and the mode of production. Building a marketing strategy based on the valorization of this diversity can help maintain and preserve yam's agro-biodiversity and the satisfaction of rapidly evolving consumption habits. The second path is the definition of yam ideotypes that suit consumers' needs. We expect that tailoring the production to consumers' needs will have a positive impact on global food security in the Caribbean region.

  15. Veteran satisfaction and treatment preferences in response to a posttraumatic stress disorder specialty clinic orientation group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Jeremiah A; Walter, Kristen H; Bartone, Anne S; Chard, Kathleen M

    2015-06-01

    To maximize accessibility to evidence-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has widely disseminated cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure (PE) therapy to VA clinicians. However, there is a lack of research on veteran preferences when presented with a range of psychotherapy and medication options. This study uses a mixed-method approach to explore veteran satisfaction with a VA PTSD specialty clinic pre-treatment orientation group, which provides education about available PTSD treatment options. This study also tested differences in treatment preference in response to the group. Participants were 183 US veterans. Most were White, male, and referred to the clinic by a VA provider. Results indicated high satisfaction with the group in providing an overview of services and helping to inform treatment choice. Most preferred psychotherapy plus medications (63.4%) or psychotherapy only (30.1%). Participants endorsed a significantly stronger preference for CPT versus other psychotherapies. PE was significantly preferred over nightmare resolution therapy and present-centered therapy, and both PE and cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy were preferred over virtual reality exposure therapy. Results suggest that by informing consumers about evidence-based treatments for PTSD, pre-treatment educational approaches may increase consumer demand for these treatment options.

  16. Fusion of Heterogeneous Incomplete Hesitant Preference Relations in Group Decision Making

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    ...) under group decision making settings. First, some simple formulae are developed to derive a priority weight vector from an incomplete hesitant fuzzy preference relation or an incomplete hesitant multiplicative preference relation based...

  17. Contextual perceived group threat and radical right-wing populist party preferences: Evidence from Switzerland

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    Carl C. Berning

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing studies suggest that perceived group threat is an important influence on radical right-wing populist party preferences. However, most have focused on perceived group threat at the individual level, overlooking the ideological climate. I examine how an ideological climate of group threat perception as a contextual factor can shape individual preferences for radical right-wing populist party preferences. I argue that above and beyond personal perceived group threat, the prevalence of local perceived group threat exerts a normative influence on personal preferences. Using voting preferences for the Swiss People’s Party, I employ multilevel structural equation modeling to examine the theoretical model. I find clear evidence for a contextual effect of perceived group threat on individual-level Swiss People’s Party preferences.

  18. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  19. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  20. Treatment modality preferences and adherence to group treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Michel; Julien, Dominic; White, Noé Djawn; Bélanger, Claude; Marchand, André; Katerelos, Theodora; Milton, Diana

    2014-06-01

    To examine the relationship between preference for group psychotherapy and adherence to group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for clients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA), 109 participants experiencing PDA completed a questionnaire measuring preference for group treatment (PGTQ) before beginning CBT groups. A t test was used to compare preference scores for group treatment to investigate whether participants who completed treatment differed from those who abandoned treatment. Participants who completed group therapy expressed higher preference for group treatment than participants who dropped out of treatment (t[107] = 1.99; p < 0.05). The PGTQ-4 presented adequate psychometric properties. Reliability analyses of the items retained after factorization demonstrated an acceptable level of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of 0.76). Preference for individual or group therapy appears to impact treatment retention for patients with PDA. Matching patients' preferences to the type of treatment modality used appears to be pertinent, especially for the treatment of anxiety disorders. In terms of practical implications, the rationale and benefits of group therapy should be explained to participants reluctant to engage in group therapy. Individual intervention or a combination of group and individual treatment could be considered for clients who are likely to drop out of group therapy.

  1. A Group Decision Framework with Intuitionistic Preference Relations and Its Application to Low Carbon Supplier Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiayu; Wang, Zhou-Jing

    2016-09-19

    This article develops a group decision framework with intuitionistic preference relations. An approach is first devised to rectify an inconsistent intuitionistic preference relation to derive an additive consistent one. A new aggregation operator, the so-called induced intuitionistic ordered weighted averaging (IIOWA) operator, is proposed to aggregate individual intuitionistic fuzzy judgments. By using the mean absolute deviation between the original and rectified intuitionistic preference relations as an order inducing variable, the rectified consistent intuitionistic preference relations are aggregated into a collective preference relation. This treatment is presumably able to assign different weights to different decision-makers' judgments based on the quality of their inputs (in terms of consistency of their original judgments). A solution procedure is then developed for tackling group decision problems with intuitionistic preference relations. A low carbon supplier selection case study is developed to illustrate how to apply the proposed decision model in practice.

  2. A Group Decision Framework with Intuitionistic Preference Relations and Its Application to Low Carbon Supplier Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Tong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a group decision framework with intuitionistic preference relations. An approach is first devised to rectify an inconsistent intuitionistic preference relation to derive an additive consistent one. A new aggregation operator, the so-called induced intuitionistic ordered weighted averaging (IIOWA operator, is proposed to aggregate individual intuitionistic fuzzy judgments. By using the mean absolute deviation between the original and rectified intuitionistic preference relations as an order inducing variable, the rectified consistent intuitionistic preference relations are aggregated into a collective preference relation. This treatment is presumably able to assign different weights to different decision-makers’ judgments based on the quality of their inputs (in terms of consistency of their original judgments. A solution procedure is then developed for tackling group decision problems with intuitionistic preference relations. A low carbon supplier selection case study is developed to illustrate how to apply the proposed decision model in practice.

  3. Exploring the Communication Preferences of MOOC Learners and the Value of Preference-Based Groups: Is Grouping Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Peck, Kyle L.; Hristova, Adelina; Jablokow, Kathryn W.; Hoffman, Vicki; Park, Eunsung; Bayeck, Rebecca Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10% of learners complete Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs); the absence of peer and professor support contributes to retention issues. MOOC leaders often form groups to supplement in-course forums and Q&A sessions, and students participating in groups find them valuable. Instructors want to assist in the formation of groups,…

  4. What do zebrafish want? Impact of social grouping, dominance and gender on preference for enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Paul; Jones, Soffia; Young, Iain S; Sneddon, Lynne U

    2014-10-01

    Although environmental enrichment is known to improve laboratory rodent wellbeing and enhance scientific data collection, relatively little is known with regards to the type of enrichment that might be useful for zebrafish (Danio rerio). Therefore, this study explored if zebrafish displayed preferences for a range of enrichments, including substrates, artificial plants, combinations thereof and airstones. Tanks divided into two compartments containing different enrichment cues were used to determine the preferences of zebrafish housed in pairs and groups of eight. When comparing time spent in enriched versus barren compartments, dominant individuals in a pair displayed a preference for substrate and behaviourally excluded the subordinate (p < 0.05). In groups there was a preference for all substrate (p < 0.01) and plant (p < 0.05) enrichments over barren conditions. The strongest preference was for gravel substrate and images of gravel attached to the bottom of the tank. When preferences were compared for different enrichments, gravel (both sexes, p < 0.01) again emerged as the cue attracting the most significant preferences, with any combination featuring gravel substrate preferred over any combination featuring sand (p < 0.05). The study has demonstrated that zebrafish reared in barren conditions preferred structural enrichment over standard conditions; however, when fish were held in pairs this was influenced by dominance status and in groups this was influenced by gender.

  5. Consistency and consensus models for group decision-making with uncertain 2-tuple linguistic preference relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Chonghui

    2016-08-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the decision environment and the lack of knowledge, decision-makers may use uncertain linguistic preference relations to express their preferences over alternatives and criteria. For group decision-making problems with preference relations, it is important to consider the individual consistency and the group consensus before aggregating the preference information. In this paper, consistency and consensus models for group decision-making with uncertain 2-tuple linguistic preference relations (U2TLPRs) are investigated. First of all, a formula which can construct a consistent U2TLPR from the original preference relation is presented. Based on the consistent preference relation, the individual consistency index for a U2TLPR is defined. An iterative algorithm is then developed to improve the individual consistency of a U2TLPR. To help decision-makers reach consensus in group decision-making under uncertain linguistic environment, the individual consensus and group consensus indices for group decision-making with U2TLPRs are defined. Based on the two indices, an algorithm for consensus reaching in group decision-making with U2TLPRs is also developed. Finally, two examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  6. Taking the easy way out : Preference diversity, decision strategies, and decision refusal in groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Bernard A.; Kaps, Silvia C.

    2008-01-01

    It has often been argued and found that preference diversity is beneficial for the quality of group decisions. However, this literature has neglected the fact that in many situations, it is also possible not to choose. Further, preference diversity can be based on attractions, aversions, or both. Th

  7. AN APPROACH TO GROUP DECISION MAKING BASED ON INTERVAL FUZZY PREFERENCE RELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunliang JIANG

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we investigate group decision making problems where the decision information given by decision makers takes the form of interval fuzzy preference relations.We first give an index to measure the similarity degree of two interval fuzzy preference relations,and utilize the similarity index to check the consistency degree of group opinion.Furthermore,we use the error-propagation principle to determine the priority vector of the aggregated matrix,and then develop an approach to group decision making based on interval fuzzy preference relations.Finally,we give an example to illustrate the developed approach.

  8. Tomorrow's Journalists: In-Groups, Out-Groups, and News Topic Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzley, Sara Baker; Banning, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored whether student journalists believed they shared news topic preferences with the public. Previous research suggests journalists are very different from the audiences they serve, which may influence their perceptions of audience story preferences because of the social identity theory and the social distance corollary. A national…

  9. Group decision making for a manufacturing organization considering intensity of preference

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P S Chakraborty; B Sarkar; G Majumdar

    2013-01-01

    .... This paper deals with a case study of strategic decision making for an organization with the help of Analytic hierarchy process based group decision making model considering preference intensity of individual voters...

  10. Species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five agroforestry classes in Tabasco, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.C.; Peña-Álvarez, B.; Arriaga-Weiss, S.L.; Hernández-Daumás, S.

    2012-01-01

    We studied species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five classes of agroforestry systems: agroforests, animal agroforestry, linear agroforestry, sequential agroforestry, and crops under tree cover in Tabasco, Mexico. Sampling sites were >2 km from natural forest fragments.

  11. Species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five agroforestry classes in Tabasco, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.C.; Peña-Álvarez, B.; Arriaga-Weiss, S.L.; Hernández-Daumás, S.

    2012-01-01

    We studied species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five classes of agroforestry systems: agroforests, animal agroforestry, linear agroforestry, sequential agroforestry, and crops under tree cover in Tabasco, Mexico. Sampling sites were >2 km from natural forest fragments.

  12. Time-Preference Heterogeneity and Multiplicity of Equilibria in Two-Group Bargaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cardona

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider a multilateral bargaining game in which the agents can be classified into two groups according to their instantaneous preferences. In one of these groups there is one agent with a different discount factor. We analyze how this time-preference heterogeneity may generate multiplicity of equilibria. When such an agent is sufficiently more patient than the rest, there is an equilibrium in which her group-mates make the same proposal as the members of the other group. Thus, in heterogeneous groups the presence of more patient members may reduce the utility of its members.

  13. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

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    Kamps Willem A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17, 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents.

  14. The effects of familiarity and group size on mating preferences in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariette, M M; Zajitschek, S R K; Garcia, C M; Brooks, R C

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, it has become evident that frequency dependence in the attractiveness of a particular phenotype to mates can contribute to the maintenance of polymorphism. However, these preferences for rare and unfamiliar male phenotypes have only been demonstrated in small, controlled experiments. Here, we tested the preference for unfamiliar mates in groups of six to 96 individuals over 13 days, in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). We observed individual behaviour in situ to test whether fish discriminate two unfamiliar individuals among many familiar ones. We found that unfamiliar males and females were preferred over the familiar fishes in all groups and that this effect decayed over time. Increasing group sizes and levels of sexual activity did not hamper the preference for unfamiliar mates, providing further support for the role of frequency dependent mate choice in the maintenance of trait polymorphism in natural populations.

  15. Constructing a Measurement Method of Differences in Group Preferences Based on Relative Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the research and data analysis of the differences involved in group preferences, conventional statistical methods cannot reflect the integrity and preferences of human minds; in particular, it is difficult to exclude humans’ irrational factors. This paper introduces a preference amount model based on relative entropy theory. A related expansion is made based on the characteristics of the questionnaire data, and we also construct the parameters to measure differences in the data distribution of different groups on the whole. In this paper, this parameter is called the center distance, and it effectively reflects the preferences of human minds. Using the survey data of securities market participants as an example, this paper analyzes differences in market participants’ attitudes toward the effectiveness of securities regulation. Based on this method, differences between groups that were overlooked by analysis of variance are found, and certain aspects obscured by general data characteristics are also found.

  16. Preference weights for cost-outcome analyses of schizophrenia treatments: comparison of four stakeholder groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, Martha

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified preferences for schizophrenia outcomes in four stakeholder groups, tested the hypotheses that outcomes differ in importance and stakeholder groups have different preferences, and produced preference weights for seven outcomes for cost-outcome analysis. Fifty patients with schizophrenia, 50 clinicians, 41 family members of patients, and 50 members of the general public rated 16 schizophrenia-related health states, yielding preference weights for seven outcomes: positive symptoms, negative symptoms, extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, social function, independent living, and vocational function. Outcomes differed in importance (F = 23.4, p stakeholders rated positive symptoms and social functioning as more important than negative and extrapyramidal symptoms. Stakeholder groups had different preferences (F = 1.9, p = 0.01). Patients rated extrapyramidal symptoms as more important than did other groups (p important than did patients or family members (p important than did patients and the general public (p important and that stakeholder groups value outcomes differently, demonstrating the importance of incorporating stakeholder preferences in cost-outcome analyses and other treatment comparisons.

  17. Food preferences do not influence adolescent high-level athletes' dietary intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; García-Rovés, Pablo M; García, Angela; Patterson, Angeles M

    2008-01-01

    To assess the influence of preferences on food and nutritional intake in a group of adolescent high-level athletes, 22 male soccer players (14-16 years) were recruited. Individuals were asked to fill in a specific questionnaire including 15 food groups that had to be ranked according to their preferences. Three categories were established: "Like" (ranked 1-5), "Indifferent" (6-10), and "Dislike" (11-15). Dietary intake was assessed using the weighed food method (for nutrient intake) and a quantitative open-ended food frequency questionnaire (for the number of standard portions of each food group ingested daily). The main preferences were Meat, poultry and derivates (ranked 1-5 in 83% of individuals) and Pasta (58%), while Vegetables (ranked 11-15 in 82%) and Fish (64%) were the main dislikes. The most frequently consumed food groups were Fruits and fruit juices (3.9 portions/day), Bread (3.0), and Biscuits, confectionery and sweets (3.0). No statistical differences were found in food consumption between preference groups, and no relation was found between preferences and nutritional intake, except for those individuals who especially like Bread, which had statistically higher energy and carbohydrate intake. Food preferences and food and nutritional intake of adolescent high-level soccer players were, effectively, unrelated.

  18. Prejudice, Ethnic Identity, Contact and Ethnic Group Preferences Among Dutch Young Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masson, C.N.; M.J.A.M. Verkuyten (Maykel)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSocial identity theory, the contact hypothesis, and prejudice research are three important perspectives for studying ingroup information and preferences in the context of ethnic groups. This paper studies the utility of the three perspectives in a particular interethnic group context amo

  19. Students’ High Achievement on Learning Style Preferences in Chinese Department, Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yetty Go

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Every student certainly demonstrates different achievement in her/his Chinese language learning process because every student has her/his own individual way to resolve their problems in learning. In learning process, student’s individual differences exist. These differences lead to different learning speed and learning style of the student. The purpose of this study was to investigate the high achievement students’ learning styles. This study was based on Reid’s learning styles theory and also uses Reid’s Perceptual Learning Style Preference Questionnaire (PLSPQ to investigate student’s learning styles. The main finding of this study is that student’s learning style preference is group style. According to student learning style preferences results, students prefer to learn together with others or in group and learn in a more interactive way.

  20. Observations of hand preference in wild groups of white-faced sakis (Pithecia pithecia) in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H M; Thompson, C L

    2011-07-01

    Hand preference is well observed in humans and some primates. Unlike many other primates, however, humans show a consistent hand preference across a variety of tasks, and a distinct right-handed skew at the population level. Although there are a moderate number of published studies, primate hand preference literature is unbalanced by the large number of studies on only a few species. No previous studies have addressed hand preference in white-faced sakis (WFS; Pithecia pithecia). We followed three habituated groups of wild WFS in Suriname and recorded individual hand preference for six different manual behaviors. There was no consistent hand preference across a range of uni-manual behaviors for any individual. Likewise, there were significantly more ambidextrous individuals in the population than expected (χ(2) (df = 2) = 11.2, P = 0.004) and thus, no population level hand preference. Our findings contribute baseline data to the debate of primate hand lateralization, and support the notion that lateralization of hand function does not characterize all species.

  1. How Do High School Students Prefer to Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Leila A.; Angnakoon, Putthachat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine learning preference--the match between learners and learning methods--and students' information behaviour in technology-rich information environments. The major question asked was: How will high school students' information behaviour differ by gender and academic interests? A total of 88 students (37 girls,…

  2. Focus Groups in Elderly Ophthalmologic Patients: Setting the Stage for Quantitative Preference Elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Marion; Vennedey, Vera; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Fauser, Sascha; Stock, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    Patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are rarely actively involved in decision-making, despite facing preference-sensitive treatment decisions. This paper presents a qualitative study to prepare quantitative preference elicitation in AMD patients. The aims of this study were (1) to gain familiarity with and learn about the special requirements of the AMD patient population for quantitative data collection; and (2) to select/refine patient-relevant treatment attributes and levels, and gain insights into preference structures. Semi-structured focus group interviews were performed. An interview guide including preselected categories in the form of seven potentially patient-relevant treatment attributes was followed. To identify the most patient-relevant treatment attributes, a ranking exercise was performed. Deductive content analyses were done by two independent reviewers for each attribute to derive subcategories (potential levels of attributes) and depict preference trends. The focus group interviews included 21 patients. The interviews revealed that quantitative preference surveys in this population will have to be interviewer assisted to make the survey feasible for patients. The five most patient-relevant attributes were the effect on visual function [ranking score (RS): 139], injection frequency (RS: 101), approval status (RS: 83), side effects (RS: 79), and monitoring frequency (RS: 76). Attribute and level refinement was based on patients' statements. Preference trends and dependencies between attributes informed the quantitative instrument design. This study suggests that qualitative research is a very helpful step to prepare the design and administration of quantitative preference elicitation instruments. It especially facilitated familiarization with the target population and its preferences, and it supported attribute/level refinement.

  3. Together we cry: Social motives and preferences for group-based sadness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Roni; Halperin, Eran; Mannheim, Ittay; Tamir, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Group-based emotions play an important role in helping people feel that they belong to their group. People are motivated to belong, but does this mean that they actively try to experience group-based emotions to increase their sense of belonging? In this investigation, we propose that people may be motivated to experience even group-based emotions that are typically considered unpleasant to satisfy their need to belong. To test this hypothesis, we examined people's preferences for group-based sadness in the context of the Israeli National Memorial Day. In two correlational (Studies 1a and 1b) and two experimental (Studies 2 and 3) studies, we demonstrate that people with a stronger need to belong have a stronger preference to experience group-based sadness. This effect was mediated by the expectation that experiencing sadness would be socially beneficial (Studies 1 and 2). We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding motivated emotion regulation and intergroup relations.

  4. From individual preference construction to group decisions: framing effects and group processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milch, K.F.; Weber, E.U.; Appelt, K.C.; Handgraaf, M.J.J.; Krantz, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Two choice tasks known to produce framing effects in individual decisions were used to test group sensitivity to framing, relative to that of individuals, and to examine the effect of prior, individual consideration of a decision on group choice. Written post-decision reasons and pre-decision group

  5. Implicit out-group preference is associated with eating disorders symptoms amongst Emirati females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin; Quadflieg, Susanne; O'Hara, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Studies exploring the relationship between acculturation and eating disorders symptoms have proven equivocal. Socially desirable responding associated with the use of explicit measures may account for these mixed findings. This study explores the relationship between in-group identity, acculturation and eating disorders symptoms using both implicit and explicit assessments. Emirati female college students (N=94) completed an affective priming task (APT) designed to implicitly assess Emirati in-group evaluations. Participants also completed explicit measures, including the Westernization Survey and the Multicomponent In-group Identification Scale. Eating disorders symptoms were assessed using the Eating Attitudes Test. Only implicit in-group evaluations were correlated with eating disorders symptoms. Specifically, increases in in-group preference were associated with lower levels of eating disorders symptomatology. Furthermore, participants with an actual out-group preference had significantly higher levels of eating disorders symptomatology compared with those demonstrating an in-group preference. These findings support the acculturative stress hypothesis, and suggest that the relationship between eating disorders and acculturation may be better understood with reference to implicit rather than explicit in-group evaluations.

  6. How the public perceives the visual effects of timber harvesting: an evaluation of interest group preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Stephen F.; Benson, Robert E.; Ashor, Joseph L.

    1986-05-01

    A total of 25 scenes representing the five visual quality objectives in the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service visual management system were presented to 18 professional and public interest groups in western Montana. The results indicate that nearly all the groups have similar rank orderings of the scenes in terms of visual preference. However, the groups differ according to the absolute values of their ratings. Most groups were unable, in a statistical sense, to differentiate the scenic quality of areas in the preservation and retention visual quality objectives. Landscape architects tended to rate scenes in a way similar to professional forest management groups.

  7. Habitat preference and the evolution of sympatric intersterility groups in the Heterbasidion annosum species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Garbelotto; W.J. Otrosina; F.W. Cobb; T.D. Bruns

    1998-01-01

    Populations of the basidiomycete Heterobasidion annosum display varying degrees, of intersterility and differential host specialization. At least three intersterility groups have been formally described, each characterized by a range of "preferred" hosts. It has been hypothesized that processes of host-pathogen compatibility may have been...

  8. Preferred Tone of Nutrition Text Messages for Young Adults: Focus Group Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Christina Mary; Howat, Peter A.; Pratt, Iain S.; Boushey, Carol J; Delp, Edward J.; Kerr, Deborah Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Young adults are a particularly hard to reach group using conventional health promotion practices as they do not see nutrition messages as personally relevant to them. Text messaging (short message service, SMS) offers an innovative approach to reaching young adults to support and promote dietary behavior change. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and test tonal preferences for nutrition text messages among young adults using focus groups. Methods A total of 39 young ad...

  9. Personal value preferences, group identifications, and cultural practices of Palestinian Israelis working in close contact with Jewish Israelis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Abu Kheit, Ayat

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the connection between personal value preferences, group identifications, and cultural practices among Palestinian Israelis working in close contact with the Jewish population in Israel. One hundred twenty-two Palestinian Israelis participated in the study. The participants were employed in different professional positions in the Tel Aviv Metropolitan area and were recruited to the study using the snowball technique. A stronger national identification was associated with a higher preference for the security and conformity values, and a lower preference for the humility values. A stronger ethnic identification was associated with a lower preference for the security, power, and stimulation values. Group identifications mediated the connection between personal value preferences and cultural practices. A longer time working in close contact with the majority group and less frequent visits home were associated with a greater adherence to the majority group's cultural practices but not with adherence to the ethnic group's practices and not with the group identifications.

  10. Development of Grading Preferences in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansky, Norman; Shaw, Noma

    1973-01-01

    Results revealed significant differences in preferences for marking plans as well as an interaction between marking plans and grade levels. Differences in preferences were attributed to differences in evaluation needs. (Authors/CB)

  11. Consumer Preferences for High Welfare Meat in Germany: Self-service Counter or Service Counter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Weinrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people view animal welfare standards in the agricultural industry as critical and some consumers would prefer to buy high welfare meat. In order to successfully introduce high welfare meat products onto the market, some important marketing decisions must be made. Due to limited shelf space in retail outlets, niche products like high welfare meat cannot be placed both at the self-service counter and at the service counter. In order to analyze where to place it best an online survey of 642 German consumers was conducted. By means of factor and cluster analyses, consumers’ animal welfare attitudes and their preference for a point of purchase were combined. The different target groups were joint using cross tabulation analysis. The results reveal that consumers in the target group show a more positive attitude to the service counter.

  12. Understanding the role of gender in body image research settings: participant gender preferences for researchers and co-participants in interviews, focus groups and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Zali; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Drummond, Murray

    2013-09-01

    Participant gender preferences for body image researchers, interventionists and focus group and intervention co-participants have been largely ignored, despite recognition that such characteristics can influence the nature and quality of data collected and intervention effects. To address this, Australian women (n=505) and men (n=220) completed a questionnaire about their preferences for interviewers and focus group facilitators, for teachers delivering school-based interventions, and for co-participants in these settings. Women predominantly preferred female interviewers and teachers, and mixed-sex co-participants, but most had no preference for focus group facilitators. Body dissatisfied women were more likely to prefer female researchers and single-sex co-participants. Most men did not have specific preferences, however, body dissatisfied men were more likely to report a gender preference for interviewers and teachers. Professional capabilities, personal qualities and appearance were regarded as important researcher characteristics. These findings have important implications for body image research, particularly among high-risk groups.

  13. Anger Management groups for adolescents: a mixed-methods study of efficacy and treatment preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Richard; Willner, Paul; Watts, Louise; Griffiths, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of, and adolescents' preferences for, a Cognitive Behavioural (CBT) and Personal Development (PD) Anger Management (AM) group. The CBT group aimed to help adolescents develop skills to manage predominantly reactive aggression. The PD group aimed to enhance motivation to develop less aggressive identities with less use of proactive aggression. Eighteen adolescents were randomly allocated to a 10-session CBT or PD AM Group; seven additional adolescents formed a control group. They completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires to assess anger expression and control, use of AM coping skills (also completed by carers) and self-image. Participants were also interviewed pre- and post-intervention; transcripts were subjected to Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Both treatment groups demonstrated significant improvements in anger coping and self-esteem, relative to the control group. Participants' age was significantly correlated with self-image and anger control outcomes in the CBT group. Qualitative analysis identified factors associated with improved outcomes, particularly regarding participants' age, motivation and readiness to change, engagement in the therapeutic process, group dynamics and emotional expressiveness. Our ability to interpret data clinically was enhanced by the use of a mixed quantitative-qualitative methodology. The results help us to better match interventions to clients.

  14. Investigation of Brand Name-Country of Origin Preference in Four Different Product Groups with Respect to Conspicuous Consumption Tendency

    OpenAIRE

    Volkan Doğan; Behçet Yalın Özkara

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine different preferences for brand name–country of origin shaped in line with levels of conspicuous consumption tendency and to determine Turkish consumers’ preferences for brand name–country of origin combinations in different product groups. The study was conducted in Eskisehir (Turkey) with a sample of 413 people chosen through convenience sampling. The study data were collected with a questionnaire and face-face-to interviews. The participants’ preferences...

  15. Extended IOWG Operator and its Use in Group Decision Making Based on Multiplicative Linguistic Preference Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshui Xu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In [1], Xu and Da introduced the Induced Ordered Weighted Geometric (IOWG operator, which takes as its argument pairs, called OWG pairs, in which one component is used to induce an ordering over the second components which are exact numerical values and then aggregated. In this study, we develop an extended IOWG (EIOWG operator, in which the second components are linguistic variables. We study some desirable properties of the EIOWG operator, and then apply the EIOWG operator to group decision making based on multiplicative linguistic preference relations.

  16. Preferred Tone of Nutrition Text Messages for Young Adults: Focus Group Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Christina Mary; Howat, Peter A; Pratt, Iain S; Boushey, Carol J; Delp, Edward J; Kerr, Deborah Anne

    2016-01-19

    Young adults are a particularly hard to reach group using conventional health promotion practices as they do not see nutrition messages as personally relevant to them. Text messaging (short message service, SMS) offers an innovative approach to reaching young adults to support and promote dietary behavior change. The aim of this study was to develop and test tonal preferences for nutrition text messages among young adults using focus groups. A total of 39 young adults aged 18-30 years residing in Perth, Western Australia participated in four focus groups. Participants briefly discussed their perception of healthy eating and their responses to messages about increasing fruit and vegetables, and reducing "junk food" and alcohol intake. They ranked their preference for 15 nutrition messages across 3 dietary behaviors (fruit and vegetables, junk food, and alcohol) with 5 different message tones (authoritative, empathetic, generation Y, solutions, and substitutions) and identified the messages most likely to persuade young adults to change their diet. A 5-point ranking of the nutrition messages was from the most likely to least likely to persuade (1-5). The focus groups were conducted by a trained facilitator and observer and were recorded. Data driven content analysis was used to explore themes. Tonal preferences and potential motivators were collated and frequencies presented. Participants ranked offering substitutes (29%, 11/39) and using empathy (22%, 9/39) as the most persuasive message techniques in improving diets of young adults, with low responses for Generation Y (17%, 7/39), solutions (17%, 7/39), and authoritative (15%, 6/39) tones. Females were more likely to consider substitution messages persuasive (35%, 7/20) compared with males (22%, 4/19). A greater proportion of males compared with females considered authoritative messages persuasive: (22%, 4/19) compared with (7%, 1/20). There is a strong preference for a substitution tone for fruit and vegetable

  17. Comparison of high and low preferred topographies of contingent attention during discrete trial training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, R.; Werff, M. van der; Verbeek, K.P.D.; Didden, H.C.M.; Davenport, K.; Moore, M.; Lee, A.; Rispoli, M.; Machalicek, W.A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    We used the paired-stimulus (PS) and multiple-stimulus without replacement (MSWO) preference assessment procedures to identify high and low preferred topographies of attention for two children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Both preference assessment formats identified the same high and low p

  18. Preferences for health outcomes associated with Group A Streptococcal disease and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay Charlene

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A 26-valent Group A Streptococcus (GAS vaccine candidate has been developed that may provide protection against pharyngitis, invasive disease and rheumatic fever. However, recommendations for the use of a new vaccine must be informed by a range of considerations, including parents' preferences for different relevant health outcomes. Our objectives were to: (1 describe parent preferences for GAS disease and vaccination using willingness-to-pay (WTP and time trade-off (TTO methods; and (2 understand how parents' implied WTP for a quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained might vary depending on the particular health outcome considered (e.g. averted GAS disease vs. vaccine adverse events. Methods Telephone interviews were conducted with parents of children diagnosed with GAS pharyngitis at 2 pediatric practice sites in the Boston metropolitan area. WTP and TTO (trading parental longevity for child's health questions for 2 vaccine and 4 disease-associated health states were asked using a randomly selected opening bid, followed by a 2nd bid and a final open-ended question about the amount willing to pay or trade. Descriptive analyses included medians and interquartile ranges for WTP and TTO estimates. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to assess differences in WTP/QALY values for vaccine adverse events vs. disease states. Results Of 119 respondents, 100 (84% and 96 (81% provided a complete set of responses for WTP and TTO questions, respectively. The median WTP and discounted (at 3% per year TTO values to avoid each health state were as follows: local reaction, $30, 0.12 days; systemic reaction, $50, 0.22 days; impetigo, $75, 1.25 days; strep throat, $75, 2.5 days; septic arthritis, $1,000, 6.6 days; and toxic shock syndrome, $3,000, 31.0 days. The median WTP/QALY was significantly higher for vaccine adverse events (~$60,000/QALY compared to disease states ($18,000 to $36,000/QALY. Conclusions Parents strongly prefer to prevent

  19. Facial profile preferences, self-awareness and perception among groups of people in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Taki, Amjad; Guidoum, Amina

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the differences in facial profile preference among different layers of people in the United Arab Emirates. Facial profile self-awareness among the different groups was also evaluated. A total sample of 222 participants (mean [standard deviation] age = 25.71 [8.3] years, almost 80% of the participants were of Arab origin and 55% were males); consisting of 60 laypersons, 60 dental students, 60 general practitioners, 16 oral surgeons, and 26 orthodontists. Facial profile photographs of a male and female adult with straight profiles and a Class I skeletal relationship were used as a baseline template. Computerized photographic image modification was carried out on the templates to obtain seven different facial profile silhouettes for each gender. To assess differences in facial profile perception, participants were asked to rank the profiles of each gender on a scale from most to least attractive (1 [highest score] and 7 [least score]). Awareness and satisfaction with the facial appearance on a profile view was assessed using questionnaires completed by the non-expert groups. The straight facial profile was perceived to be highly attractive by all five groups. The least attractive profiles were the bimaxillary protrusion and the mandibular retrusion for the male and the female profiles, respectively. Lip protrusion was more esthetically acceptable in females. Significant differences in perception existed among groups. The female profile esthetic perception was highly correlated between the expert groups (P > 0.05). Overall agreement between the non-expert group's perceptions of their own profiles and evaluation by the expert orthodontist was 51% (κ = 0.089). Candidates who perceived themselves as having a Class III facial profile were the least satisfied with their profile. Dental professionals, dental students, and laypersons had a similar perception trends in female and male aesthetic preference. Laypersons were more tolerant

  20. University Programme Preferences of High School Science Students in Singapore and Reasons that Matter in their Preferences: A Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Pey-Tee; Subramaniam, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored an under-researched area in science education-the university programmes preferred by high school students who take physical science subjects and the reasons that matter in their preferences. A total of 1,071 upper secondary and pre-university students in Singapore, who take physical science subjects among their range of subjects, participated in this study. A survey method was adopted and the Rasch model was used to analyse the data. Overall, Business Studies was ranked as the predominant choice; nonetheless, scientific programmes such as Science, Engineering, and Mathematics are generally still well liked by the students. When gender differences were examined, we found that students largely followed gender-typical programme preferences, in which males tend to incline towards Engineering while females tend to incline towards Arts and Social Sciences. Students prefer a university programme based on their individual interest and ability, with career aspiration and remuneration coming next. Interestingly, females place greater emphasis on career aspiration than males. Some implications of the study are discussed.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF BRAND NAME-COUNTRY OF ORIGIN PREFERENCE IN FOUR DIFFERENT PRODUCT GROUPS WITH RESPECT TO CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION TENDENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Doğan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine different preferences for brand name–country of origin shaped in line with levels of conspicuous consumption tendency and to determine Turkish consumers’ preferences for brand name–country of origin combinations in different product groups. The study was conducted in Eskisehir (Turkey with a sample of 413 people chosen through convenience sampling. The study data were collected with a questionnaire and face-face-to interviews. The participants’ preferences for brand name-country of origin combinations were determined separately based on four different product groups(hedonic, utilitarian, durable and non-durable. The study showed that, for all the four product groups, the participants preferred the products with a Turkish brand name and Turkey as the country of origin most, followed by the products with a French brand name and France as the country of origin. This finding suggests that, with respect to the four product groups in the study, Turkish consumers preferred domestic products over foreign products. Also, the participants who preferred French brand name-France as the country of origin for the hedonic product, French brand name-Turkey as the country of origin for the utilitarian product, French brand name-Turkey as the country of origin for the durable product and French brand name-France as the country of origin for the non-durable product were found to have highest tendency of conspicuous consumption in the corresponding product groups. In other words, as the level of conspicuous consumption increased, the participants tended to prefer French brand name-France as the country of origin for the hedonic product, French brand name-Turkey as the country of origin for the utilitarian product, French brand name-Turkey as the country of origin for the durable product and French brand name-France as the country of origin for the non-durable product.

  2. Effects of continuous exposure to high gravity on gravity preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoy, D. F.; Jankovich, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Rats were chronically centrifuged in excess of 2.0 g for 6 or 12 mo. They were given four 24-hr gravity-preference tests in a spiral centrifuge in which they could adjust the gravity level imposed by locomoting inward or outward radially along a track. Chronically centrifuged rats (Group CC) spent as much time at 2.0 g as at 1.0 g while normally raised controls (Group NC) selecdonly 1.0 g. Group CC initially selected 2.0 g and a preference for 1.0 g developed over the four test sessions. These results suggest that hypergravity is not necessarily an aversive stimulus and that gravity preference may depend initially upon the reference level involved. The ultimate selection of 1.0 g by chronically centrifuged animals suggests that a preference for a familiar gravity environment is replaced by a preference for low-gravity stimuli.

  3. Adolescent asthmatics' needs and preferences regarding medication counseling: Results from online focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/308480643; Philbert, Daphne; Van Dijk, Liset L.; De Vries, Tjalling W.; Bouvy, Marcel L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/153182210

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adolescents, non-adherence is a major problem and leads to uncontrolled disease. Objectives: To assess adolescents needs and preferences regarding counseling and support with focus on use of new media. Methods: Asthmatic adolescents needs and preferences were examined by means of

  4. Adolescent asthmatics' needs and preferences regarding medication counseling: results from online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.S.; Philbert, D.; Dijk, L. van; Vries, T.W. de; Bouvy, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adolescents, non-adherence is a major problem and leads to uncontrolled disease. Objectives: To assess adolescents needs and preferences regarding counseling and support with focus on use of new media. Methods: Asthmatic adolescents needs and preferences were examined by means of mode

  5. Adolescent asthmatics' needs and preferences regarding medication counseling: Results from online focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; Philbert, Daphne; Van Dijk, Liset L.; De Vries, Tjalling W.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adolescents, non-adherence is a major problem and leads to uncontrolled disease. Objectives: To assess adolescents needs and preferences regarding counseling and support with focus on use of new media. Methods: Asthmatic adolescents needs and preferences were examined by means of mode

  6. Adolescent asthmatics' needs and preferences regarding medication counseling: results from online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.S.; Philbert, D.; Dijk, L. van; Vries, T.W. de; Bouvy, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adolescents, non-adherence is a major problem and leads to uncontrolled disease. Objectives: To assess adolescents needs and preferences regarding counseling and support with focus on use of new media. Methods: Asthmatic adolescents needs and preferences were examined by means of

  7. Group Delay of High Q Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahramzy, Pevand; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2013-01-01

    become an issue, when working with high Q antennas, because of the steep phase shift over the frequency. In this paper, it is measured how large group delay variations can become, when going from a low Q antenna to a high Q antenna. The group delay of a low Q antenna is shown to be around 1.3 ns, whereas...... a high Q antenna has group delay of around 22 ns. It is due to this huge group delay variation characteristics of high Q antennas, that signal distortion might occur in the radio system with high Q antennas....

  8. Radiologists' preferences for digital mammographic display. The International Digital Mammography Development Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, E D; Cole, E B; Major, S; Zong, S; Hemminger, B M; Muller, K E; Johnston, R E; Walsh, R; Conant, E; Fajardo, L L; Feig, S A; Nishikawa, R M; Yaffe, M J; Williams, M B; Aylward, S R

    2000-09-01

    To determine the preferences of radiologists among eight different image processing algorithms applied to digital mammograms obtained for screening and diagnostic imaging tasks. Twenty-eight images representing histologically proved masses or calcifications were obtained by using three clinically available digital mammographic units. Images were processed and printed on film by using manual intensity windowing, histogram-based intensity windowing, mixture model intensity windowing, peripheral equalization, multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA), contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization, Trex processing, and unsharp masking. Twelve radiologists compared the processed digital images with screen-film mammograms obtained in the same patient for breast cancer screening and breast lesion diagnosis. For the screening task, screen-film mammograms were preferred to all digital presentations, but the acceptability of images processed with Trex and MUSICA algorithms were not significantly different. All printed digital images were preferred to screen-film radiographs in the diagnosis of masses; mammograms processed with unsharp masking were significantly preferred. For the diagnosis of calcifications, no processed digital mammogram was preferred to screen-film mammograms. When digital mammograms were preferred to screen-film mammograms, radiologists selected different digital processing algorithms for each of three mammographic reading tasks and for different lesion types. Soft-copy display will eventually allow radiologists to select among these options more easily.

  9. Focus group findings about the influence of culture on communication preferences in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrank, William H; Kutner, Jean S; Richardson, Terri; Mularski, Richard A; Fischer, Stacy; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2005-08-01

    Little guidance is available for health care providers who try to communicate with patients and their families in a culturally sensitive way about end-of-life care. To explore the content and structure of end-of-life discussions that would optimize decision making by conducting focus groups with two diverse groups of patients that vary in ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Six focus groups were conducted; 3 included non-Hispanic white patients recruited from a University hospital (non-Hispanic white groups) and 3 included African-American patients recruited from a municipal hospital (African-American groups). A hypothetical scenario of a dying relative was used to explore preferences for the content and structure of communication. Thirty-six non-Hispanic white participants and 34 African-American participants. Content analysis of focus group transcripts. Non-Hispanic white participants were more exclusive when recommending family participants in end-of-life discussions while African-American participants preferred to include more family, friends and spiritual leaders. Requested content varied as non-Hispanic white participants desired more information about medical options and cost implications while African-American participants requested spiritually focused information. Underlying values also differed as non-Hispanic white participants expressed more concern with quality of life while African-American participants tended to value the protection of life at all costs. The groups differed broadly in their preferences for both the content and structure of end-of-life discussions and on the values that influence those preferences. Further research is necessary to help practitioners engage in culturally sensitive end-of-life discussions with patients and their families by considering varying preferences for the goals of end-of-life care communication.

  10. A Direct Approach Based on C2-IULOWA Operator for Group Decision Making with Uncertain Additive Linguistic Preference Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Hong Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With respect to group decision making (GDM problem with uncertain additive linguistic preference relations (UALPRs, we investigate the efficient aggregation of the uncertain additive linguistic preference information. First, we introduce two measures to assess the consistency level and the consensus level of uncertain additive linguistic preference information, respectively, and study some of their desirable properties. Then, based on both the two measures, we propose a coinduced uncertain linguistic ordered weighted averaging (IULOWA operator, called the consistency and consensus coinduced uncertain linguistic ordered weighted averaging (C2-IULOWA operator, to aggregate individual uncertain additive linguistic preference information, in which the consistency level and the consensus level synergistically serve as inducing variables and then guide the determination of the associated weights. We have proved the collective uncertain linguistic preference information aggregated by the C2-IULOWA operator that can maintain the fundamental properties of preference relation, such as indifference, reciprocity, and transitivity. By using the C2-IULOWA operator, we develop a direct GDM approach with UALPRs. Finally, an illustrative example on the selection of chief quality officer is used to demonstrate the effectiveness and rationalitly of the developed approach.

  11. Preferences for very low and very high voice pitch in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Re

    Full Text Available Manipulations of voice pitch have been shown to alter attractiveness ratings, but whether preferences extend to very low or very high voice pitch is unknown. Here, we manipulated voice pitch in averaged men's and women's voices by 2 Hz intervals to create a range of male and female voices speaking monopthong vowel sounds and spanning a range of frequencies from normal to very low and very high pitch. With these voices, we used the method of constant stimuli to measure preferences for voice. Nineteen university students (ages: 20-25 participated in three experiments. On average, men preferred high-pitched women's voices to low-pitched women's voices across all frequencies tested. On average, women preferred men's voices lowered in pitch, but did not prefer very low men's voices. The results of this study may reflect selection pressures for men's and women's voices, and shed light on a perceptual link between voice pitch and vocal attractiveness.

  12. Senior High School Students' Preference and Reasoning Modes about Nuclear Energy Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Anderson, O. Roger

    2003-01-01

    Examines senior high school students' cognitive orientation toward scientific or social information, designated as information preference, and associated preferential reasoning modes when presented with an environmental issue concerning nuclear energy usage. Investigates the association of information preference variable with academic and personal…

  13. Senior High School Students' Preference and Reasoning Modes about Nuclear Energy Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Anderson, O. Roger

    2003-01-01

    Examines senior high school students' cognitive orientation toward scientific or social information, designated as information preference, and associated preferential reasoning modes when presented with an environmental issue concerning nuclear energy usage. Investigates the association of information preference variable with academic and personal…

  14. An Exploratory Study of the Language-Learning Style Preferences of Iranian EFL High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Afsaneh Effatdokht; Dehgahi, Meysam; Hashemi, Hanie

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the learning style preferences of 40 Iranian students at Marefat Iranian high school in Kuala Lumpur of which, 20 are females and 20 are males. To this end, this study used structured interview to elicit in-depth information from the students. The results of the study showed that learning style preferences of Iranian students…

  15. Who directs group movement? Leader effort versus follower preference in stickleback fish of different personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shinnosuke; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Johnstone, Rufus A; Manica, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    During collective movement, bolder individuals often emerge as leaders. Here, we investigate whether this reflects a greater propensity of bold individuals to initiate movement, or a preference for shy individuals to follow a bolder leader. We set up trios of stickleback fish comprising a focal individual who was either bold or shy, and one other individual of each personality. We then recorded the movements of all individuals in and out of cover in a foraging context to determine how assiduously the focal fish followed the movements of each other partner. We found that a shy focal fish preferred to follow a leader whose personality matched its own, but we did not detect such a difference in bold fish. Despite this preference, however, the greater propensity of bold individuals to initiate movements out of cover meant that they successfully led more joint trips. Thus, when offered a choice of leaders, sticklebacks prefer to follow individuals whose personality matches their own, but bolder individuals may, nevertheless, be able to impose their leadership, even among shy followers, simply through greater effort.

  16. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: using online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Tates, K.; Dulmen, S. van; Hoogerbrugge, M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated

  17. Preparation of highly preferred orientation TiB2 coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the preparation of titanium diboride (TiB2) coatings on the graphite substrate by continuous current plating (CCP) and pulse current plating (PIC) electrochemical techniques in fluoride electrolytes (LiF-NaF-KF)containing K2TiF6 and KBF4 as the electrochemically-active components at 700℃. Thick leveled and uniform coatings were obtained and were composed of relatively pure TiB2. The effect of the experimental parameters on the microstructure of the coatings was studied. The results showed the electrodeposition with PIC produced coatings with better quality, when compared with those obtained by CCP, under the conditions of the current density i = 0.6 A/cm2, frequency = 100 Hz, and ton/toff = 4/1. XRD analysis indicated that the preferred orientation of coatings is (110) plane, which is in accordance with the prediction of the two-dimensional crystal nuclei theory. The effect of a ratio of ton/toff and frequency on the crystal size, texture coefficient and microstress was also investigated.

  18. 327 Gender and Occupational Preferences among Senior High ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... values and social class' one's sex, place of birth, religious .... secondary schools to serve as an enlightening agent for students' knowledge ... that adequate and proper interaction between them and the group members.

  19. The effects of varied versus constant high-, medium-, and low-preference stimuli on performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wine, Byron; Wilder, David A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to compare the delivery of varied versus constant high-, medium-, and low-preference stimuli on performance of 2 adults on a computer-based task in an analogue employment setting...

  20. The influence of neighbors' family size preference on progression to high parity births in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elyse A; Barber, Jennifer S

    2013-03-01

    Large families can have a negative impact on the health and well-being of women, children, and their communities. Seventy-three percent of the individuals in our rural Nepalese sample report that two children is their ideal number, yet about half of the married women continue childbearing after their second child. Using longitudinal data from the Chitwan Valley Family Study, we explore the influence of women's and neighbors' family size preferences on women's progression to high parity births, comparing this influence across two cohorts. We find that neighbors' family size preferences influence women's fertility, that older cohorts of women are more influenced by their neighbors' preferences than are younger cohorts of women, and that the influence of neighbors' preferences is independent of women's own preferences. © 2013 The Population Council, Inc.

  1. Absolute risk representation in cardiovascular disease prevention: comprehension and preferences of health care consumers and general practitioners involved in a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Rebecca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communicating risk is part of primary prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke, collectively referred to as cardiovascular disease (CVD. In Australia, health organisations have promoted an absolute risk approach, thereby raising the question of suitable standardised formats for risk communication. Methods Sixteen formats of risk representation were prepared including statements, icons, graphical formats, alone or in combination, and with variable use of colours. All presented the same risk, i.e., the absolute risk for a 55 year old woman, 16% risk of CVD in five years. Preferences for a five or ten-year timeframe were explored. Australian GPs and consumers were recruited for participation in focus groups, with the data analysed thematically and preferred formats tallied. Results Three focus groups with health consumers and three with GPs were held, involving 19 consumers and 18 GPs. Consumers and GPs had similar views on which formats were more easily comprehended and which conveyed 16% risk as a high risk. A simple summation of preferences resulted in three graphical formats (thermometers, vertical bar chart and one statement format as the top choices. The use of colour to distinguish risk (red, yellow, green and comparative information (age, sex, smoking status were important ingredients. Consumers found formats which combined information helpful, such as colour, effect of changing behaviour on risk, or comparison with a healthy older person. GPs preferred formats that helped them relate the information about risk of CVD to their patients, and could be used to motivate patients to change behaviour. Several formats were reported as confusing, such as a percentage risk with no contextual information, line graphs, and icons, particularly those with larger numbers. Whilst consumers and GPs shared preferences, the use of one format for all situations was not recommended. Overall, people across groups felt that risk

  2. High frequency group pulse electrochemical machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gaoyang; ZHANG Zhijing; ZHANG Weimin; TANG Xinglun

    2007-01-01

    In the process of machining ultrathin metal structure parts,the signal composition of high frequency group pulse,the influence of frequency to reverse current,and the design of the cathode in high frequency group pulse electrochemical machining (HGPECM) are discussed.The experiments on process were carried out.Results indicate that HGPECM can greatly improve the characteristics of the inter-electrode gap flow field,reduce electrode passivation,and obtain high machining quality.The machining quality is obviously improved by increasing the main pulse frequency.The dimensional accuracy reaches 30-40 pro and the roughness attained is at 0.30-0.35 μm.High frequency group pulse electrochemical machining can be successfully used in machining micro-parts.

  3. Primary care physicians' educational needs and learning preferences in end of life care: A focus group study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Lucy Ellen; Brighton, Lisa Jane; Robinson, Vicky; George, Rob; Khan, Shaheen A; Burman, Rachel; Koffman, Jonathan

    2017-03-09

    Primary care physicians (General Practitioners (GPs)) play a pivotal role in providing end of life care (EoLC). However, many lack confidence in this area, and the quality of EoLC by GPs can be problematic. Evidence regarding educational needs, learning preferences and the acceptability of evaluation methods is needed to inform the development and testing of EoLC education. This study therefore aimed to explore GPs' EoLC educational needs and preferences for learning and evaluation. A qualitative focus group study was conducted with qualified GPs and GP trainees in the UK. Audio recordings were transcribed and analysed thematically. Expert review of the coding frame and dual coding of transcripts maximised rigour. Twenty-eight GPs (10 fully qualified, 18 trainees) participated in five focus groups. Four major themes emerged: (1) why education is needed, (2) perceived educational needs, (3) learning preferences, and (4) evaluation preferences. EoLC was perceived as emotionally and clinically challenging. Educational needs included: identifying patients for palliative care; responsibilities and teamwork; out-of-hours care; having difficult conversations; symptom management; non-malignant conditions; and paediatric palliative care. Participants preferred learning through experience, working alongside specialist palliative care staff, and discussion of real cases, to didactic methods and e-learning. 360° appraisals and behavioural assessment using videoing or simulated interactions were considered problematic. Self-assessment questionnaires and patient and family outcome measures were acceptable, if used and interpreted correctly. GPs require education and support in EoLC, particularly the management of complex clinical care and counselling. GPs value mentoring, peer-support, and experiential learning alongside EoLC specialists over formal training.

  4. Patients' preferences for video cassette recorded information: effect of age, sex and ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Deary, A; Kaminski, E; Stockton, D; De Zueew, N

    1999-06-01

    The emotional turmoil patients endure following a diagnosis of cancer can impair their ability to retain complex treatment-related information. Manoeuvres which increase the intensity of information have been shown to increase the amount retained. Providing details of treatment in a video format is one method of intensifying information provision, but the attitudes of patients to this format have not previously been evaluated. In this pilot study, the attitudes of 300 patients to video directed information were evaluated via questionnaires, of which 210 (70%) were returned. Eighty-nine per cent had easy access to a video cassette player. A highly significant number felt that the video would be very helpful or helpful (78%) compared to not helpful, worrying or equivocal 21% (P < 0.0001). This trend was particularly strong in patients < 60 years (83% versus 17%) (P < 0.0001) and those from ethnic groups (95% versus 5%) (P < 0.0001). As a result of this trial, a 20-min film (HEP) has been commissioned. It describes details of the two main treatments for cancer after surgery, namely chemotherapy and radiotherapy, shows patients actually having treatment, and explains the common side-effects and ways to alleviate them. Patients satisfaction with the film and its effect on anxiety and depression are currently being evaluated in an international prospective randomized trial. If it proves advantageous for patients--in view of the ethnic group bias in this study--it will be translated into the ethnic languages of the UK.

  5. Linguistic Multi-Attribute Group Decision Making with Risk Preferences and Its Use in Low-Carbon Tourism Destination Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Zhou-Jing

    2017-09-17

    Low-carbon tourism plays an important role in carbon emission reduction and environmental protection. Low-carbon tourism destination selection often involves multiple conflicting and incommensurate attributes or criteria and can be modelled as a multi-attribute decision-making problem. This paper develops a framework to solve multi-attribute group decision-making problems, where attribute evaluation values are provided as linguistic terms and the attribute weight information is incomplete. In order to obtain a group risk preference captured by a linguistic term set with triangular fuzzy semantic information, a nonlinear programming model is established on the basis of individual risk preferences. We first convert individual linguistic-term-based decision matrices to their respective triangular fuzzy decision matrices, which are then aggregated into a group triangular fuzzy decision matrix. Based on this group decision matrix and the incomplete attribute weight information, a linear program is developed to find an optimal attribute weight vector. A detailed procedure is devised for tackling linguistic multi-attribute group decision making problems. A low-carbon tourism destination selection case study is offered to illustrate how to use the developed group decision-making model in practice.

  6. The effect of body coloration and group size on social partner preferences in female fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, C; McRobert, S P; Brown, A C; Clotfelter, E D

    2009-02-01

    Females of the fighting fish Betta splendens have been shown to associate with other B. splendens females in a manner reminiscent of shoaling behavior. Since body coloration varies dramatically in this species, and since body coloration has been shown to affect shoalmate choice in other species of fish, we examined the influence of body coloration on association preferences in female B. splendens. In dichotomous choice tests, B. splendens females spent more time swimming near groups of females (regardless of coloration) than swimming near an empty chamber, and chose to swim near fish of similar coloration to their own when choosing between two distinctly colored groups of females. When examining the interplay between body coloration and group size, focal fish spent more time swimming near larger groups (N=5) of similarly colored fish than swimming near an individual female of similar coloration. However, focal fish showed no preference when presented with an individual female of similar coloration and a larger group of females of dissimilar coloration. These results suggest that association choices in B. splendens females are strongly affected by both body coloration and by group size.

  7. Crossing ethnic lines? The impact of in-group favouritism and acculturation preferences on inter-ethnic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Brüb

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the notion that making individuals in-teract across ethnic lines seems to be a major difficulty (Amir,1976, this comparative field study offers two explanations for the differences in inter-ethnic contacts among German, Turkish and Aussiedler (Resettler adolescents. One assumption is based on Social Identity Theory research with its central proposition that in group affiliation is likely to trigger out-group rejection. Thus in group favouritism is expected to decrease the frequency of inter-ethnic encounters. The other assumption is built on acculturation research and argues that certain dispositions towards acculturation facilitate or inhibit inter-ethnic contacts considerably. A preference for interaction is supposed to function as a facilitating factor where as assimilation is likely to prevent inter-ethnic encounters.On the whole the findings of this field study corroborate the assumptionsfor in-group favouritism and acculturation preferences.Further, young men tend more often to approve of in-group favouritism which prohibits inter-ethnic contact, while in contrast, young women more often agree with notions of dissimilation orinteraction which facilitate encounters with out-group members.Finally, subgroup analyses point to the importance of religious affiliation sand their consequences for inter-ethnic contacts under certain conditions.

  8. Investigation on Habitat Preferences and Group Sizes of Chinkara (Gazella bennettii in Dareh-Anjeer Wildlife Refuge, Yazd province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Akbari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chinkara is classified as a vulnerable species (IUCN, 2009. Yet, there is a little information on its biological characteristics and habitat in Iran. This study focuses on the habitat preference and social pattern of this species in Dareh-Anjeer wildlife refuge in 2010-2011. We first determined habitat boundaries of Chinkara in the area. During the survey, 15 transects were located within different habitat types and each transect was observed ~10 times annually. We used landform parameters and plant structure for the habitat type layers in Arc GIS software. Then, we mapped the habitat preference of Chinkara using Jacob’s selectivity index. The group size and sex ratio was obtained by the analysis of field notes. Results of the study showed that Chinkara preferred foothills and hilly plains (Jacob’s selectivity index for foothills was estimated 0.31 and for flat plains 0.03. The foothill habitat type covering 25 percent of the Chinkara habitats in the area provides better resources such as cover and water than the other habitat types. Our results suggest that the Chinkara’s activity in summer and autumn is greatest in the early morning. The mean group size of Chinkara in the area is 2.07±0.32 (n=53, SE=1.17, sex ratio (male/female is 0.52±0.179, and there is no significant difference between the numbers of males and females in the population.

  9. The effect of gender and leisure preference on transformational leadership behaviour of high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekinci Nurullah Emir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate transformational leadership behaviors of high school students according to their leisure preference and gender. Randomly chosen 391 high school students from Kutahya voluntarily took part in the study. In the study Transformational Leadership Scale was used as data gathering tool and after evaluation of dispersion of the data Two-way Analysis of Variance was used as a hypothesis test. As a result, this study showed that transformational leadership behavior differs according to gender and also both leisure preference and gender have an effect on transformational leadership behavior of high school students.

  10. Assessment of Materialism and Reference Group Influence on Preference for Western Branded Fabrics in Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how materialism and reference group influence may affect consumers’ preference for western branded fabrics. Data for the study was collected through questionnaire administered on a sample of 26 respondents. The respondents were selected using convenient sampling through snowball from a population of male and female professional workers aged 18 and above. Data collected from the primary source (questionnaire was analyzed using simple percentage. Findings revealed that materialism had no significant influence on their preferences for western branded fabrics. Reference groups, however, significantly influenced respondents’ decision to purchase Western branded fabrics. It was concluded that although some of the behaviors of the sampled group were quite materialistic, they were not enhanced by associations with Western branded fabrics and their related cultural values. Based on the findings, it was recommended that marketers of western brands in Borno state, particularly in the state capital can do well if they adopt a strategy of deliberately targeting and nurturing of their consumers’ reference groups, rather than attempt to position their products on the basis of inherent materialistic values.

  11. Setting Preferences of High and Low Use River Recreationists: How Different are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainzinger, Silvia; Arnberger, Arne; Burns, Robert C.

    2016-11-01

    Whitewater boaters often choose a river based on their preferences for attributes important for their trip experience. This study explored whether preferences and tradeoffs of whitewater boaters for social, resource, and managerial attributes of riverscapes differ among a high and a low use river in the United States by employing a stated choice approach. River trip scenarios were displayed using verbal descriptions and computer-generated photographs. Results indicate that use levels were more important for boaters on the low use river, whereas river difficulty and river access fee was of higher importance for the high use river boaters, who are more involved in this whitewater activity. Preferences for waiting times and trip length did not differ between the samples. Findings suggest that whitewater boaters of high and low use rivers have a different tradeoff behavior among river setting attributes, which has implications for river recreation management.

  12. Determinants of negative preference for female fetuses amongst women of reproductive age group at rural medical college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Shrivastava

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is experiencing lowest child sex ratio of the world. The deficit of girl children has been progressively increasing, in spite of so many laws to favour them like Sharda act, act against dowry and law against female feticide, i.e. PC & PNDT. The present study attempted to explore the determinants of negative preference of female fetuses at rural setup and preferences for prevention of female foeticide. Methods: In a prospective, multicentric, cohort study, 2203 married women of reproductive age group were interviewed by pretested piloted structured questionnaire. SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Results: Common causes for not preferring daughters were related to their marriages expenses, dowry along with exogamy and practices regarding death ceremonies of parents. Self deprived image of today’s woman by herself is mainly responsible for not allowing her to welcome another girl child in a family. Conclusions: Female foeticide is still in practice inspite of awareness programmes and existing law. Main reason for it is societal need due to marriage related customs and cultures along with unethical practices by service providers. To increase in self-esteem of women can only reduce the volume of service receiver along with upliftment of moral and ethical values of service providers from the beginning of their medical training can prevent it to happen. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(1.000: 67-73

  13. TOWARDS LEARNER-CENTRED MEDICAL CURRICULUM: QUALITATIVE FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCES DEPENDING ON VERBAL ENVIRONMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukeyeva, A; Riklefs, V; Riklefs, I; Tashkenbayeva, V; Kassatova, A

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong evidence in medical education literature that the learner-centred curriculum favouring the use of metacognition and self-learning is very proficient. However, ethnocultural and verbal environment may undermine learners' ability to utilise the learning strategies, leading to inefficient learning. This study aimed to investigate the personal preferences of learners in multilingual educational environment prompting the most efficient learning. The study uses qualitative focus group methodology to understand students' opinion on how educational environment influences the efficiency of medical school curriculum.

  14. Preference for high-fat diet is developed by young Swiss CD1 mice after short-term feeding and is prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttigieg, Angie; Flores, Osvaldo; Hernández, Alejandro; Sáez-Briones, Patricio; Burgos, Héctor; Morgan, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic that is increasing at an alarming rate. One of its causes is the increased availability and consumption of diets rich in fat. In the present study, we investigated the effects of short-term consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) on dietary preferences in Swiss CD1 mice and its relation in time to specific metabolic effects. Mice that were weaned 21days postpartum and fed a chow diet for one week were afterward subjected to a diet preference test for 5days, exposed to both a regular diet (RD) and HFD. We found that mice did not show any preferences. In a second experiment, two groups of mice that were weaned 21days postpartum and subjected to a chow diet for one week were fed either RD or HFD for 18days, and a diet preference test was performed for 5days. After this short-term consumption of HFD, mice preferred HFD, while mice subjected to RD did not show any preference. Importantly, no differences in blood glucose levels were found between the groups prior to and after the experiments. The results support our hypothesis that the preference for HFD is not a spontaneous behavior in CD1 mice, but it can be observed after short-term consumption; additionally, this preference develops before metabolic effects appear. Finally, this preference for HFD could not be observed when the mice were i.p. injected daily with low doses of the NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine, ifenprodil or MK-801 during the HFD feeding period. These data suggest that acquisition of dietary preference for HFD is a NMDA receptor-dependent learning process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Male rats with same sex preference show high experimental anxiety and lack of anxiogenic-like effect of fluoxetine in the plus maze test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cárdenas, Nallely; Olvera-Hernández, Sandra; Gómez-Quintanar, Blanca Nelly; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso

    2015-08-01

    Homosexual men show a 2-4 higher risk to suffer anxiety in comparison with heterosexuals. It is unknown if biological factors collaborate to increase such incidence. Fluoxetine produces differential brain activation in homosexuals as compared with heterosexuals, suggesting that it may produce a divergent behavioral effect dependant on sex-preference. The first aim was to evaluate experimental anxiety in male rats that show same-sex preference in the elevated plus maze (EPM). The second goal explored the putative differential effect of fluoxetine (10mg/kg) in male rats with female and same-sex preference in the EPM. To induce same-sex preference males were prenatally treated with letrozole (0.56μg/kg, 10-20 gestation days), while controls were males prenatally treated with letrozole that retain female-preference or which mothers received oil. In both groups we found animals with male preference, but the proportion was higher in males that prenatally received letrozole (10 vs. 27%). Males with same-sex preference spent less time and showed lower number of entries to the open arms of the EPM than males that prefer females, regardless of the prenatal treatment. In males with female preference, fluoxetine reduced the time spent and number of entries to the open arms that was absent in males with same-sex preference. These data suggest that biological factors contribute to the high levels of anxiety in subjects with same-sex preference and that fluoxetine in men may produce a divergent action depending on sexual orientation.

  16. Rats' preferences for high fructose corn syrup vs. sucrose and sugar mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2011-03-28

    High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has replaced sucrose in many food products, which has prompted research comparing these two sweeteners in rodents. The present study examined the relative palatability of HFCS and sucrose for rats, offering 11% carbohydrate solutions to match the content of common beverages for human consumption. The animals initially preferred HFCS to sucrose but after separate experience with each solution they switched to sucrose preference. Approximating the composition of HFCS with a mixture of fructose and glucose (55:45) yielded a solution that was less attractive than sucrose or HFCS. However, HFCS contains a small amount of glucose polymers, which are very attractive to rats. A 55:42:3 mixture of fructose, glucose and glucose polymers (Polycose) was equally preferred to HFCS and was treated similarly to HFCS in comparisons vs. sucrose. Post-oral effects of sucrose, which is 50% fructose and 50% glucose, may be responsible for the shift in preference with experience. This shift, and the relatively small magnitude of differences in preference for HFCS and sucrose, suggest that palatability factors probably do not contribute to any possible difference in weight gain responses to these sweeteners.

  17. Oral fat perception is related with body mass index, preference and consumption of high-fat foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ruiz, Nina R; López-Díaz, José A; Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Jiménez-Castro, Jorge A; Angulo, Ofelia

    2014-04-22

    Oral sensory perception may play an important role in food preferences, driving food intake and energy balance. Fat perceived in oral cavity has been associated with satiety and homeostatic signals. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that fat oral-intensity perception may be associated with BMI, food preferences and consumption of fat-rich foods. The ability to perceive linoleic acid at different concentrations by intensity scaling was measured in young adults (n=121), characterized by anthropometric measurements such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and total body fat (TBF) percentage. Additionally, dietary habits were recorded online during 35days using a questionnaire designed according to the 24-hour recall and the food diary methods. Finally, food preferences were evaluated online using a nine-point hedonic scale. Taste sensitivity (intensity scaling with suprathreshold concentrations) was estimated with different linoleic acid concentrations using a linear scale of 150mm labeled at the ends. Four groups were established after the ratings for oral-intensity perception of linoleic acid: quartile high ratings (QH), quartile medium-high ratings (QMH), quartile medium-low ratings (QML) and quartile low ratings (QL). Participants with high-intensity ratings for linoleic acid (QH) had lower BMI (p=0.04) and waist circumference (WC) (p=0.03) values than participants in the QL group. High-fat foods (foods with more than 20% of energy from lipids such as fast foods and Mexican street foods) were less preferred by participants with high-intensity ratings for linoleic acid (QH) than by participants with medium- (QMH, QML) and low-(QL) intensity ratings (pfoods like fast foods (p=0.04) and Mexican street foods (p=0.03) than subjects with medium- (QMH, QML) and low-(QL) intensity ratings. Overall, these data suggest that the participant's intensity ratings for oral perception of linoleic acid were inversely correlated with BMI, WC

  18. Sustainable forest management preferences of interest groups in three regions with different levels of industrial forestry: an exploratory attribute-based choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berninger, Kati; Adamowicz, Wiktor; Kneeshaw, Daniel; Messier, Christian

    2010-07-01

    The challenge of sustainable forest management is to integrate diverse and sometimes conflicting management objectives. In order to achieve this goal, we need a better understanding of the aspects influencing the preferences of diverse groups and how these groups make trade-offs between different attributes of SFM. We compare the SFM preferences of interest groups in regions with different forest use histories based on the reasoning that the condition of the forest reflects the forest use history of the area. The condition of the forest also shapes an individual's forest values and attitudes. These held values and attitudes are thought to influence SFM preferences. We tested whether the SFM preferences vary amongst the different interest groups within and across regions. We collected data from 252 persons using a choice experiment approach, where participants chose multiple times among different options described by a combination of attributes that are assigned different levels. The novelty of our approach was the use of choice experiments in the assessment of regional preference differences. Given the complexity of inter-regional comparison and the small sample size, this was an exploratory study based on a purposive rather than random sample. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the aggregation of preferences of all individuals within a region does not reveal all information necessary for forest management planning since opposing viewpoints could cancel each other out and lead to an interpretation that does not reflect possibly polarised views. Although based on a small sample size, the preferences of interest groups within a region are generally statistically significantly different from each other; however preferences of interest groups across regions are also significantly different. This illustrates the potential importance of assessing heterogeneity by region and by group.

  19. Intermediate-term emotional bookkeeping is necessary for long-term reciprocal grooming partner preferences in an agent-based model of macaque groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Evers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether and how primates are able to maintain long-term affiliative relationships is still under debate. Emotional bookkeeping (EB, the partner-specific accumulation of emotional responses to earlier interactions, is a candidate mechanism that does not require high cognitive abilities. EB is difficult to study in real animals, due to the complexity of primate social life. Therefore, we developed an agent-based model based on macaque behavior, the EMO-model, that implements arousal and two emotional dimensions, anxiety-FEAR and satisfaction-LIKE, which regulate social behavior. To implement EB, model individuals assign dynamic LIKE attitudes towards their group members, integrating partner-specific emotional responses to earlier received grooming episodes. Two key parameters in the model were varied to explore their effects on long-term affiliative relationships: (1 the timeframe over which earlier affiliation is accumulated into the LIKE attitudes; and (2 the degree of partner selectivity. EB over short and long timeframes gave rise to low variation in LIKE attitudes, and grooming partner preferences were only maintained over one to two months. Only EB over intermediate-term timeframes resulted in enough variation in LIKE attitudes, which, in combination with high partner selectivity, enables individuals to differentiate between regular and incidental grooming partners. These specific settings resulted in a strong feedback between differentiated LIKE attitudes and the distribution of grooming, giving rise to strongly reciprocated partner preferences that could be maintained for longer periods, occasionally up to one or two years. Moreover, at these settings the individual’s internal, socio-emotional memory of earlier affiliative episodes (LIKE attitudes corresponded best to observable behavior (grooming partner preferences. In sum, our model suggests that intermediate-term LIKE dynamics and high partner selectivity seem most plausible for

  20. Preferences for behavioural, analytic and gestalt psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, H J

    1979-09-01

    This study investigated preferences for behavioural, analytic and gestalt psychotherapy among a sample of 40 SES class III and IV adult females and 67 college freshmen who had never been actual therapy patients. A scaled survey assessed general preference, preference given an imagined long-standing depressive disorder, preference given an imagined specific phobia, and preference for the therapist-patient relationship. Three audio tapes were designed, each describing one of the modalities. High inter-rater reliability and agreement were determined by three independent judges. Results showed that young females had a general preference for gestalt therapy. Young and old females, but not young males, significantly preferred behavioural therapy for a specific phobia. Under forced-choice conditions the group as a whole significantly preferred gestalt therapy. No differences were found for the relationship or preference given a depressive disorder. Preference was hypothesized as a cognitive structure with potential use in therapist-client matching.

  1. HEDONIC PREFERENCES AND UTILITARIAN JUSTIFICATIONS AT THE INTRODUCTION OF HIGH TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Jose Montero Arruda Filho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast technological upgrading attracts the development of new products in the market, converging into multiples uses and accesses, which has been presentedin the literature of new product development and systems integration. Due to their confront, this research places its study focus on the determinants of consumer preference for high technology product launch. The hedonic / social utility of the all-in-one products has a priority in utilitarian factors. The main objective of this work is to evaluate which factors influence the consumer preference of high technology users, using the Apple´s tablet (iPad as a research object to identify how its use decision is made. In this article, anetnographic study was carried out about the iPad consumer behavior, interpreting their needs through their experiences described in American websites for the discussion of the product. These sites present comments about the process of choice, preference and use of the iPad. The websites have also been used to collect the textual database which is coded, interpreted and presented through the description of how current and potential consumers use the analyzed product.

  2. The effect of preferred music on mood and performance in a high-cognitive demand occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiuk, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Mild positive affect has been shown in the psychological literature to improve cognitive skills of creative problem-solving and systematic thinking. Individual preferred music listening offers opportunity for improved positive affect. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of preferred music listening on state-mood and cognitive performance in a high-cognitive demand occupation. Twenty-four professional computer information systems developers (CISD) from a North American IT company participated in a 3-week study with a music/no music/music weekly design. During the music weeks, participants listened to their preferred music "when they wanted, as they wanted." Self-reports of State Positive Affect, State Negative Affect, and Cognitive Performance were measured throughout the 3 weeks. Results indicate a statistically significant improvement in both state-mood and cognitive performance scores. "High-cognitive demand" is a relative term given that challenges presented to individuals may occur on a cognitive continuum from need for focus and selective attention to systematic analysis and creative problem-solving. The findings and recommendations have important implications for music therapists in their knowledge of the effect of music on emotion and cognition, and, as well, have important implications for music therapy consultation to organizations.

  3. Stability and Change in In-Group Mate Preferences among Young People in Ethiopia Are Predicted by Food Security and Gender Attitudes, but Not by Expected Pathogen Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Craig; Hruschka, Daniel

    2017-09-04

    There is broad anthropological interest in understanding how people define "insiders" and "outsiders" and how this shapes their attitudes and behaviors toward others. As such, a suite of hypotheses has been proposed to account for the varying degrees of in-group preference between individuals and societies. We test three hypotheses related to material insecurity, pathogen stress, and views of gender equality among cross-sectional (n = 1896) and longitudinal (n = 1002) samples of young people in Ethiopia (aged 13-17 years at baseline) to explore stability and change in their preferences for coethnic spouses. We show that food insecurity is associated with a greater likelihood of intolerant mate preferences. We also find that young people who hold more gender equitable attitudes tended to hold more tolerant mate preferences. Finally, we find no support for the hypothesis that expected pathogen exposure is associated with intolerant mate preferences. Our results most strongly support a material insecurity hypothesis of in-group bias, which assumes that uncertainty over meeting basic needs leads people to favor those in their in-group. As such, our findings join a small but growing group of studies that highlight the importance of material insecurity for understanding tolerance, xenophobia, in-group bias, and favoritism.

  4. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  5. Sunspot Group Development in High Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Muraközy, J; Ludmány, A

    2014-01-01

    The Solar and Heliospheric Obseratory/Michelson Doppler Imager--Debrecen Data (SDD) sunspot catalogue provides an opportunity to study the details and development of sunspot groups on a large statistical sample. The SDD data allow, in particular, the differential study of the leading and following parts with a temporal resolution of 1.5 hours. In this study, we analyse the equilibrium distance of sunspot groups as well as the evolution of this distance over the lifetime of the groups and the shifts in longitude associated with these groups. We also study the asymmetry between the compactness of the leading and following parts, as well as the time-profiles for the development of the area of sunspot groups. A logarithmic relationship has been found between the total area and the distance of leading-following parts of active regions (ARs) at the time of their maximum area. In the developing phase the leading part moves forward; this is more noticeable in larger ARs. The leading part has a higher growth rate than...

  6. Low diversity and high host preference of ectomycorrhizal fungi in western Amazonia, a neotropical biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedersoo, Leho; Sadam, Ave; Zambrano, Milton; Valencia, Renato; Bahram, Mohammad

    2010-04-01

    Information about the diversity of tropical microbes, including fungi is relatively scarce. This study addresses the diversity, spatial distribution and host preference of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcMF) in a neotropical rainforest site in North East Ecuador. DNA sequence analysis of both symbionts revealed relatively low richness of EcMF as compared with the richness of temperate regions that contrasts with high plant (including host) diversity. EcMF community was positively autocorrelated up to 8.5+/-1.0-m distance-roughly corresponding to the canopy and potentially rooting area of host individuals. Coccoloba (Polygonaceae), Guapira and Neea (Nyctaginaceae) differed by their most frequent EcMF. Two-thirds of these EcMF preferred one of the host genera, a feature uncommon in boreal forests. Scattered distribution of hosts probably accounts for the low EcMF richness. This study demonstrates that the diversity of plants and their mycorrhizal fungi is not always related and host preference among EcMF can be substantial outside the temperate zone.

  7. Effects of excitation around jet preferred mode Strouhal number in high-speed jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2017-04-01

    It has been widely reported in the literature that the jet preferred mode Strouhal number varies over a large range of 0.2-0.6, depending upon the facility where the measurement is made as well as the measurement techniques and the location in the jet plume where the measurement is taken. This study investigates this wide variation and potential explanations for it. Active flow control is used to show that the jet is receptive to excitation over a large range of Strouhal numbers and azimuthal modes. The wide variation in the preferred mode Strouhal number is shown to be tightly linked to the evolution, spacing, and scale of the coherent flow structures, which dominate the jet shear layer's development. The low-end of the range is determined by the minimum Strouhal number at which structures begin to interact with one another in the jet plume. Below this range, structures have no significant effect on the plume's statistical properties. For Strouhal numbers at the high-end of the range, the development of coherent flow structures shifts upstream toward the nozzle exit and the structures disintegrate earlier in the jet plume. The earlier development and disintegration prevent these structures from strongly impacting the entire flowfield. The results imply that upstream perturbations in the flow present in various facilities could be responsible for the variations in the measured jet preferred mode Strouhal number. Experimental results from schlieren imaging and near- and far-field microphone measurements are used to investigate the preferred mode Strouhal number across this range.

  8. Preference and intake frequency of high sodium foods and dishes and their correlations with anthropometric measurements among Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Stella Sinn-Yee; Balan, Sumitha Nair; Chua, Leong-Siong; Say, Yee-How

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the preference and intake frequency of a list of 15 commonly available high sodium Malaysian foods/dishes, discretionary salt use, and their possible association with demographics, blood pressures and anthropometric measurements among 300 Malaysian university students (114 males, 186 females; 259 ethnic Chinese, 41 Indians; 220 lean, 80 overweight). French fries and instant soup noodle were found to be the most preferred and most frequently consumed salty food, respectively, while salted fish was least preferred and least frequently consumed. Males had a significantly higher intake frequency of at least 6 of the salty foods, but the preference of most salty foods was not significantly different between genders. Ethnic Chinese significantly preferred more and took more frequently traditional and conventional Malaysian foods like asam laksa (a Malaysian salty-sour-spicy noodle in fish stock), salted biscuits and salted vegetable, while Indians have more affinity and frequency towards eating salty Western foods. Body Mass Index was significantly negatively correlated with the intake frequency of canned/packet soup and salted fish while waist circumference was significantly positively correlated with the preference of instant noodle. Also, an increased preference of potato chips and intake frequency of salted biscuits seemed to lead to a decreased WHR. Other than these, all the other overweight/obesity indicators did not seem to fully correlate with the salty food preference and intake frequency. Nevertheless, the preference and intake frequency of asam laksa seemed to be significant negative predictors for blood pressures. Finally, increased preference and intake frequency of high sodium shrimp paste (belacan)-based foods like asam laksa and belacan fried rice seemed to discourage discretionary salt use. In conclusion, the preference and intake frequency of the high sodium belacan-based dish asam laksa seems to be a good predictor for ethnic

  9. High Power Distance Enhances Employees' Preference for Likable Managers: A Resource Dependency Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cong; Sun, Xiaomin; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Chunfang; Xue, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Is a manager's likability important from an employee's perspective? Research results in this field are scant and inconsistent. The current study explored employees' response to managers' likability and the moderating effect of power distance at both the cultural and individual levels. In study 1, following the countercultural priming experimental paradigm proposed by Van den Bos et al. (2013), 121 college students from China (a high power distance culture) and 99 college students from Denmark (a low power distance culture) were randomly assigned to either a countercultural (experimental) condition or a control condition. All participants were required to complete a manager selection task using the zero-acquaintance paradigm to measure their preference for likable managers. The results confirmed the moderating role of power distance at the cultural level. Study 2 further explored the moderating effect of power distance orientation at the individual level, as well as the boundary condition of the degree of resource dependence from the employee's perspective. One hundred and three Chinese participants with work experience were randomly assigned to either the subordinate perspective (high resource dependence) or the HR department perspective (low resource dependence) condition and completed the same task as in study 1. The results suggested that high power distance-oriented participants demonstrate stronger preference for likable manager candidates than do low power distance-oriented participants. In addition, these findings hold only when employees expect a high resource dependence relation with the manager. Theoretical and practical implications of the research findings and future research directions were discussed. PMID:28119654

  10. Mapa de preferência de sorvetes ricos em fibras Preference map of high-fiber ice cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane Lopes de Sales

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Quatro amostras de sorvete foram preparadas adicionando-se diferentes concentrações de granola e Frutooligossacarídeo (FOS. Foi avaliado o teor de fibras segundo método AOAC. A avaliação da aceitabilidade sensorial foi realizada por 78 consumidores, com idade entre 15 e 25 anos. Estes avaliaram a aceitação global das formulações, utilizando a escala hedônica de nove pontos, em uma única seção, de forma monádica. O experimento foi estruturado segundo delineamento em blocos inteiramente casualizados. Os resultados foram submetidos à análise de variância, ao teste de médias de Tuckey e à metodologia do Mapa de Preferência interno para análise dos componentes principais. As amostras controle e as adicionadas de FOS tiveram melhor aceitação. A amostra contendo somente FOS foi a que mais se aproximou do produto tradicional, não diferindo significativamente quanto à aceitação global. A granola distinguiu-se estatisticamente do produto tradicional. O teor de fibras analisado foi superior ao fornecido pelo fabricante da granola. As concentrações de fibras nos sorvetes variaram de 0,9 a 5,45 g.100 g-1 de sorvete, com a maior concentração de fibras provenientes do FOS. Esse resultado permite concluir que o FOS é um ingrediente promissor no desenvolvimento de produtos ricos em fibras.Four samples of ice cream were prepared with four different concentrations of granola and fructooligosaccharide (FOS. The concentration of fiber was evaluated using the AOAC method. The acceptance evaluation was conducted by 78 consumers between 15 and 25 years of age. The consumers evaluated the global acceptance of the formulations through the structured 9-point hedonic scale, in a single section, in a monadic form. The experiment was structured by a Randomized Complete Block Design. The results were submitted to the analysis of variance, Tukey test, and to the preference mapping technique for principal component analysis. The control samples

  11. Assessing public aesthetic preferences towards some urban landscape patterns: the case study of two different geographic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziyue; Xu, Bing; Devereux, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Landscape aesthetics is closely linked to people's daily life, and a large body of studies has been conducted to understand the public's landscape preferences. These studies commonly focused on comprehensive landscape configuration, yet limited emphasis was placed on the patterns of individual landscape features. This research explored people's preferences towards the composition and patterns of some specific urban features. Questionnaire-based survey was conducted in two cities: Cambridge, UK and Nanjing, China and more than 180 responses were collected, respectively. Respondents from both sites showed similar preferences towards freely growing trees, individual houses, gable roofs and mixed design of green spaces. On the other hand, respondents from Cambridge and Nanjing have different preferences towards the height of trees, the size of green spaces, and the height diversity of buildings. This survey also proved that the factors of age, education, status and length of living have larger influences on landscape preferences than the factors of gender, and major. Furthermore, strong correlations were found between people's aesthetic preferences towards comparative landscape patterns, building types, tree shapes and roof structures. The existence of generally shared landscape preferences makes it feasible to conduct international and standardized projects for acquiring comparable and transferable criteria. The methodology and findings of this research provides landscape planners and decision makers with useful reference to compare, evaluate and improve urban landscape configurations to meet people's needs.

  12. Ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion in Warsaw Alcohol High-Preferring (WHP) and Warsaw Alcohol Low-Preferring (WLP) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyr, Wanda; Wyszogrodzka, Edyta; Paterak, Justyna; Siwińska-Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Małkowska, Anna; Polak, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    The aversive action of the pharmacological properties of ethanol was studied in selectively bred Warsaw Alcohol High-Preferring (WHP) and Warsaw Alcohol Low-Preferring (WLP) rats. For this study, a conditioned-taste aversion test was used. Male WHP and WLP rats were submitted to daily 20-min sessions for 5 days, in which a saccharin solution (1.0 g/L) was available (pre-conditioning phase). Next, this drinking was paired with the injection of ethanol (0, 0.5, 1.0 g/kg), intraperitoneally [i.p.] immediately after removal of the saccharin bottle (conditioning phase). Afterward, the choice between the saccharin solution and water was extended for 18 subsequent days for 20-min daily sessions (post-conditioning phase). Both doses of ethanol did not produce an aversion to saccharin in WLP and WHP rats in the conditioning phase. However, injection of the 1.0 g/kg dose of ethanol produced an aversion in WLP rats that was detected by a decrease in saccharin intake at days 1, 3, 7, and 10 of the post-conditioning phase, with a decrease in saccharin preference for 16 days of the post-conditioning phase. Conditioned taste aversion, measured as a decrease in saccharin intake and saccharin preference, was only visible in WHP rats at day 1 and day 3 of the post-conditioning phase. This difference between WLP and WHP rats was apparent despite similar blood ethanol levels in both rat lines following injection of 0.5 and 1.0 g/kg of ethanol. These results may suggest differing levels of aversion to the post-ingestional effects of ethanol between WLP and WHP rats. These differing levels of aversion may contribute to the selected line difference in ethanol preference in WHP and WLP rats.

  13. Naltrexone and amperozide modify chocolate and saccharin drinking in high alcohol-preferring P rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, T A; Myers, R D

    1998-06-01

    Previous studies showed that the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, amperozide, is somewhat more potent than the opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in reducing alcohol drinking in high alcohol-preferring (P) rats. The purpose of this study was to determine in the P rat whether the effect of either drug could be due, in part, to an alteration in gustatory function. In an unlimited, 24-h free choice paradigm, P rats were offered water simultaneously with either a highly palatable 0.1% saccharin solution or a 1:4 dilution of Nestlé Sweet Success chocolate drink. Throughout all phases of the study, the P rats always consumed significantly greater volumes of the chocolate drink than of the saccharin solution, i.e., 526 ml/kg vs. 181 ml/kg, respectively. Successive 12-day experimental periods consisted of three phases: a 4-day predrug control interval; 4 days of administration of saline control vehicle or either drug; and a final 4 day postdrug interval. In a counterbalance design, saline, amperozide (1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg) or naltrexone (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously twice daily at 1600 and 2200 h for 4 days. Amperozide and naltrexone significantly reduced the drinking of chocolate in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, only the two higher doses of amperozide and naltrexone decreased the intake of saccharin significantly. Thus, these findings suggest that different populations of central serotonin and opioid receptors concurrently underpin, in part, the preferences for both palatable and/or nutrient fluids. Finally, because both the opiate and 5-HT2A antagonists reduce the ingestion of saccharin and chocolate solutions differentially, it is apparent that preferences for alternative palatable fluids should be examined when candidate drugs are screened for suppressing alcohol drinking and ultimately the treatment of alcohol abuse.

  14. High School Transfer Students: A Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.; Amos, Louise Cleary

    1973-01-01

    A counselor's awareness of many incidents of adjustment problems among new students in a large and impersonal high school prompted an effort to make changes in the situation; the resulting program, designed to help new students is described in this article. (Author)

  15. Early high-sodium solid diet does not affect sodium intake, sodium preference, blood volume and blood pressure in adult Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnal, Marcin; Drapala, Adrian; Sikora, Mariusz; Zera, Tymoteusz

    2011-07-01

    A high-Na diet may lead to the development of hypertension in both humans and rats; however, the causes of Na intake in amounts greater than physiologically needed as well as the mechanisms whereby high-Na food elevates blood pressure are not clear. Therefore, we decided to test the hypothesis that a high-Na diet introduced after suckling affects Na intake, food preference, resting blood pressure and blood volume in adult rats. Male Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, 4 weeks old, were divided into three groups and placed on either a high-Na (3.28%), a medium-Na (0.82%) or a regular diet (0.22%) with the same energy content for 8 weeks. Subsequently, food preference, resting arterial blood pressure, blood volume, plasma osmolality and Na blood level were evaluated. When offered a choice of diets, all the groups preferred the regular chow, and there was no significant difference in total Na intake between the groups. When the rats experienced the change from their initial chow to a new one with different Na content, they continued to eat the same amount of food. Body weight, resting arterial blood pressure, blood volume, plasma osmolality and Na blood level were comparable between the groups. In conclusion, the results show that a high-Na diet introduced immediately after suckling does not affect Na preference and Na intake in adult WKY rats. Furthermore, the findings provide evidence that both blood volume and arterial blood pressure are highly protected in normotensive rats on a high-Na diet.

  16. Transitivity of Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to "z". Any claim of empirical violations of transitivity by…

  17. High Resolution Spatial Analysis of Habitat Preference of Aedes Albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in an Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Daniela; Hartemink, Nienke; Zeimes, Caroline B; Vanwambeke, Sophie O; Ienco, Annamaria; Caputo, Beniamino

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decades, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895)) has emerged in many countries, and it has colonized new environments, including urban areas. The species is a nuisance and a potential vector of several human pathogens, and a better understanding of the habitat preferences of the species is needed for help in successful prevention and control. So far, the habitat preference in urban environments has not been studied in Southern European cities. In this paper, spatial statistical models were used to evaluate the relationship between egg abundances and land cover types on the campus of Sapienza University in Rome, which is taken as an example of a European urban habitat. Predictor variables included land cover types, classified in detail on a high resolution image, as well as solar radiation and month of capture. The models account for repeated measures in the same trap and are adjusted for meteorological circumstances. Vegetation and solar radiation were found to be positively related to the number of eggs. More specifically, trees were positively related to the number of eggs and the relationship with grass was negative. These findings are consistent with the species' known preference for shaded areas. The unexpected positive relationship with solar radiation is amply discussed in the paper. This study represents a first step toward a better understanding of the spatial distribution of Ae. albopictus in urban environments. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. High energy flare physics group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  19. Smoking Rates Still High in Some Racial Groups, CDC Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160256.html Smoking Rates Still High in Some Racial Groups, CDC ... lot of progress in getting Americans to stop smoking, some groups still have high smoking rates, a ...

  20. Highly effective recognition of carbohydrates by phenanthroline-based receptors: alpha- versus beta-anomer binding preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazik, Monika; Hartmann, Andrè; Jones, Peter G

    2009-09-14

    (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations in competitive and non-competitive media, as well as binding studies in two-phase systems, such as phase transfer of sugars from aqueous into organic solvents and dissolution of solid carbohydrates in apolar media revealed both highly effective recognition of neutral carbohydrates and interesting binding preferences of an acyclic phenanthroline-based receptor 1. Compared to the previously described acyclic receptors, compound 1 displays significantly higher binding affinities, the rare capability to extract sugars from water into non-polar organic solutions and alpha- versus beta-anomer binding preference in the recognition of glycosides, which differs from those observed for other receptor systems. X-ray crystallographic investigations revealed the presence of water molecules in the binding pocket of 1 that are engaged in the formation of hydrogen-bonding motifs similar to those suggested by molecular modelling for the sugar OH groups in the receptor-sugar complexes. The molecular modelling calculations, synthesis, crystal structure and binding properties of 1 are described and compared with those of the previously described receptors.

  1. Preferable removal of phosphate from water using hydrous zirconium oxide-based nanocomposite of high stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weixian; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming

    2015-03-02

    In this study, we employed a new nanocomposite adsorbent HZO-201, which featured high stability under varying solution chemistry, for preferable removal of phosphate from synthetic solution and a real effluent. An anion exchange resin (D-201) was employed as the host of HZO-201, where nano-hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) was encapsulated as the active species. D-201 binds phosphate through nonspecific electrostatic affinity, whereas the loaded HZO nanoparticles capture phosphate through formation of the inner-sphere complexes. Quantitative contribution of both species to phosphate adsorption was predicted based on the double-Langmuir model. Preferable removal of phosphate by HZO-201 was observed in the presence of the competing anions at higher levels (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), HCO3(-)). Fixed-bed adsorption indicated that the effective volume capacity of a synthetic water (2.0 mg P-PO4(3-)/L) by using HZO-201 was ∼1600 BV in the first run (<0.5mg P-PO4(3-)/L), comparable to Fe(III)-based nanocomposite HFO-201 (∼1500 BV) and much larger than D-201 (<250 BV). The exhausted HZO-201 can be in situ regenerated by using a binary NaOH-NaCl solution for cyclic runs, whether fed with the synthetic solution or real effluent. In general, HZO-201 is a promising alternative to Fe(III)-based adsorbents for trace phosphate removal from effluent particularly at acidic pH.

  2. Should high-dose interleukin-2 still be the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Robert O; Barth, Neil M; VanderMolen, Louis A; Mahdavi, Khosrow; McClure, Stephanie E

    2012-08-01

    For more than 20 years interleukin-2 (IL2) was the preferred treatment for medically fit metastatic melanoma patients, but recently two new agents, ipilimumab and vemurafenib, were approved for stage IV disease. Single-institution data were used to determine the long-term survival rate for IL2-treated melanoma patients, and whether use of inpatient IL2 had declined recently. Between May 1987 and April 2010, 150 patients were hospitalized for high-dose, intravenous (i.v.) IL2. The average number of IL2 patients increased from 5.4 per year during 1987-1991 to 5.8 during 1992-1997 after regulatory approval of IL2, to 8.3 during 1998-2006 after a marketing indication in metastatic melanoma was granted, but dropped to 3.0 during 2007-2010. At the time of treatment, median age was 52 years; 27% were 60 years of age or older. At the time of analysis 122 patients were deceased. Median survival from the start date of IL2 treatment was 15.6 months, with a 20% 5-year survival. Among patients enrolled in clinical trials, there were as many nonresponders who survived 5 years as responders, which is consistent with a delayed immunotherapy benefit. In the absence of long-term survival data for these newer agents, IL2 probably should still be the preferred initial treatment for most patients with metastatic melanoma who are medically fit.

  3. Attenuation of high sweet solution preference by mood stabilizers: a possible mouse model for the increased reward-seeking domain of mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaisher-Grinberg, Shlomit; Overgaard, Shauna; Einat, Haim

    2009-02-15

    The lack of appropriate animal models for bipolar disorder (BPD) is a major factor hindering the research of its pathophysiology and the development of new drug treatments. In line with the notion that BPD might represent a heterogeneous group of disorders, it was suggested that models for specific domains of BPD should be developed and then integrated. The present study tested sweet solution preference as a rodent model for increased reward seeking, a central component of manic behavior and a possible endophenotype of the disorder. The study identified that Black Swiss mice show high baseline saccharin preference compared with C57bl/6, CBA/J and A/J strains. Sweet solution preference in Black Swiss mice was therefore evaluated across a number of saccharin concentrations, with or without treatment with the mood stabilizers lithium and valproate and the antidepressant imipramine. Results indicated that the structurally dissimilar mood stabilizers lithium and valproate, but not the antidepressant imipramine, reduce sweet solution preference. However, different dosing schedules were needed for the two drugs to induce this effect. These findings support the face and the predictive validity of the sweet solution preference test as an animal model for the elevated reward-seeking domain of mania. As such, this test might be well integrated into a battery of models for different domains of BPD. Such a battery can be effectively utilized to screen new treatments, to distinguish between specific effects of different drugs, and to explore the mechanisms underlying BPD.

  4. Consistent group selection in high-dimensional linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Fengrong; 10.3150/10-BEJ252

    2010-01-01

    In regression problems where covariates can be naturally grouped, the group Lasso is an attractive method for variable selection since it respects the grouping structure in the data. We study the selection and estimation properties of the group Lasso in high-dimensional settings when the number of groups exceeds the sample size. We provide sufficient conditions under which the group Lasso selects a model whose dimension is comparable with the underlying model with high probability and is estimation consistent. However, the group Lasso is, in general, not selection consistent and also tends to select groups that are not important in the model. To improve the selection results, we propose an adaptive group Lasso method which is a generalization of the adaptive Lasso and requires an initial estimator. We show that the adaptive group Lasso is consistent in group selection under certain conditions if the group Lasso is used as the initial estimator.

  5. Dealing with incomplete agents' preferences and an uncertain agenda in group decision making via sequential majority voting

    CERN Document Server

    Pini, Maria; Venable, Brent; Walsh, Toby

    2009-01-01

    We consider multi-agent systems where agents' preferences are aggregated via sequential majority voting: each decision is taken by performing a sequence of pairwise comparisons where each comparison is a weighted majority vote among the agents. Incompleteness in the agents' preferences is common in many real-life settings due to privacy issues or an ongoing elicitation process. In addition, there may be uncertainty about how the preferences are aggregated. For example, the agenda (a tree whose leaves are labelled with the decisions being compared) may not yet be known or fixed. We therefore study how to determine collectively optimal decisions (also called winners) when preferences may be incomplete, and when the agenda may be uncertain. We show that it is computationally easy to determine if a candidate decision always wins, or may win, whatever the agenda. On the other hand, it is computationally hard to know wheth er a candidate decision wins in at least one agenda for at least one completion of the agents...

  6. Teaching Style Preferences of Trainees at Police In-Service Training Sessions and Differences among Demographic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Studies in adult learning have increased and better developed in the past century. From them adult learning theory emerged, comprised of andragogy, self-directed learning, and transformational learning. The main purpose of this study is to measure the teaching style preferences of trainees at a mid-size police department. The second purpose is to…

  7. Teaching Style Preferences of Trainees at Police In-Service Training Sessions and Differences among Demographic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Studies in adult learning have increased and better developed in the past century. From them adult learning theory emerged, comprised of andragogy, self-directed learning, and transformational learning. The main purpose of this study is to measure the teaching style preferences of trainees at a mid-size police department. The second purpose is to…

  8. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galak, Jeff; Gray, Kurt; Elbert, Igor; Strohminger, Nina

    2016-01-01

    How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women's shoes (16,236 transactions) across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size) when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context.

  9. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Galak

    Full Text Available How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women's shoes (16,236 transactions across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context.

  10. Twenty Hirsch index variants and other indicators giving more or less preference to highly cited papers

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Hirsch index or h-index is widely used to quantify the impact of an individual's scientific research output, determining the highest number h of a scientist's papers that received at least h citations. Several variants of the index have been proposed in order to give more or less preference to highly cited papers. I analyse the citation records of 26 physicists discussing various suggestions, in particular A, e, f, g, h(2), h_w, h_T, \\hbar, m, {\\pi}, R, s, t, w, and maxprod. The total number of all and of all cited publications as well as the highest and the average number of citations are also compared. Advantages and disadvantages of these indices and indicators are discussed. Correlation coefficients are determined quantifying which indices and indicators yield similar and which yield more deviating rankings of the 26 datasets. For 6 datasets the determination of the indices and indicators is visualized.

  11. Automated recording of individual performance and hand preference during joystick-task acquisition in group-living bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M W; Rosenblum, L A

    1994-12-01

    A microchip that provided a unique identification number was injected into each forearm of all 8 members of a bonnet macaque (Macaca radiata) social group. The group was then given computer-controlled joystick tasks of increasing difficulty. The identification number of the arm used on each trial was input into the computer and used to determine individual performance and hand preference in more than 23,000 trials. Three subjects reversed hand preference as task difficulty was increased over time. All subjects exhibited nearly exclusive use of a single hand on the most difficult task; 6 used the right hand, and 2 used the left. Daily patterns of joystick activity for the group members differed somewhat from that of our individually housed monkeys.

  12. Perception of the thermal environment in high school and university classrooms: Subjective preferences and thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corgnati, Stefano Paolo; Filippi, Marco; Viazzo, Sara [Department of Energy (DENER), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    This work shows some of the results of a field study about environmental comfort investigations in classrooms. In this project thermal, acoustic, visual and air quality aspects were analysed in a number of classrooms-13 classrooms at four different high schools of the Provincia di Torino and four typical medium-sized university classrooms of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. The investigations were carried out during the heating period. Both field measurements and subjective surveys were performed at the same time during the regular lesson periods. This paper focuses on thermal comfort, which may have a significant effect on the students' performance, in terms of attention, comprehension and learning levels. The measurement campaign consisted in measuring the thermal environment parameters-air temperature, mean radiant temperatures, air relative humidity and air velocity. Through these data, the thermal comfort Fanger's indices (predicted mean vote (PMV), and predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD)people) were calculated, the actual people clothing and metabolic rate being known. The subjective survey involved questions on the thermal environmental perception. They basically investigated the thermal environment acceptability and preference. Moreover, a judgement based on the typical seven point thermal sensation scale (Fanger 7-points scale) was also asked. Through the elaboration of the questionnaire data, the actual percentage of dissatisfied (PD) people of the felt thermal environment was evaluated. The judgements about the thermal environment were compared with the results of the field measurements. Moreover, the subjective mean votes were compared with the thermal environment perceptions in terms of acceptability and preference. (author)

  13. Interest in, concerns about, and preferences for potential video-group delivery of an effective behavioral intervention among women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhefka, Stephanie L; Fuhrmann, Hollie J; Gilliam, Patricia; Lopez, Bernice; Baldwin, Julie

    2012-10-01

    Novel strategies are needed to expand access to effective behavioral interventions for HIV prevention. Delivering effective group-based interventions to people living with HIV using video-conferencing technology is an innovative approach that may address this need, but has not been explored. Twenty-seven women living with HIV (WLH) who had just completed Healthy Relationships, a group-based behavioral program for WLH, participated in focus groups to share their thoughts about potentially participating in Healthy Relationships via a video-conferencing group. Overall, WLH supported the idea of video-group delivery of the program. They had numerous questions about logistics, expressed concerns about safety and confidentiality, and indicated a preference for accessing video-groups via special video-phones versus computers. Findings warrant further research into the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of video-group delivery of HIV prevention interventions and suggest important considerations for researchers and practitioners who may employ video-conferencing for intervention delivery.

  14. [Study of the dietary preferences and the social-psychological factors that affect the dietary behaviors of high school and university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamaki, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate the correlation among dietary intake, dietary preferences, and social-psychological factors in the youth and to examine the factors that affect such dietary behaviors as snacking, skipping breakfast, and taking a biased nutrition. A survey was carried out using a questionnaire with closed questions on multiple items such as dietary behaviors, psychosocial stress, dietary externalization, information and consciousness about health. The survey was conducted on 1,056 high school students and 1,323 university students in Japan. As a result of the factor analysis among the groups of male/female and high school/university students, relationships were found between the items of "preferences for snacking" and "snack food intakes" among all these groups. Those who like sweets and snacks tended to snack between lunch and dinner or after dinner by themselves more often than those who do not. In contrast to men, intermediate correlations were found between the item of "a meal as a diversion" and each of the items of "snack food intake," "preferences for fried foods/sautéed foods/meat dishes," and "preferences for snacking," among women who do not live alone, regardless of their being high school or university students. The item of "stress over human relationships/academic performance" was shown to have similarly weak correlations with the items of "reasons for skipping breakfast" and "nutrition intake" in the groups of male and female high school students. The less they value nutrition intake, the more they tend to be conscious of stress over human relationships/academic performance.

  15. Relationship between Holland High-Point Code and Client Preferences for Selected Vocational Counseling Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Cynthia J.; Cramer, Stanley H.

    1995-01-01

    Undergraduates (n=208) with at least an eight-point difference between the first and second letters of their Holland type code completed the Self-Directed Search and Vocational Counseling Preference Inventory. Significant preference differences appeared among personality types in terms of counseling framework, career aspirations, and decision…

  16. Some Rational Conditions of Group Utopian Preference Mapping%群体理想偏爱映射的若干理性条件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪振杰; 徐贤胜; 叶帆

    2007-01-01

    本文研究求解群体多目标最优化问题的理想偏爱法的性质,证明了对应的理想偏爱映射满足基数型群体决策规则的匿名性,中立性,正响应性,非负响应性,强Pareto原则以及局部非独裁性等理性条件.%Some cardinal rational conditions as anonymity, neutrality, positive responsiveness, nonnegative responsiveness, Pareto rule and local nondictatorship are defined and the group utopian preference mapping relative to group utopian preference method is proved to satisfy all these rational conditions.

  17. Emotional reactivity to incentive downshift as a correlated response to selection of high and low alcohol preferring mice and an influencing factor on ethanol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Liana M; Grahame, Nicholas J

    2015-11-01

    Losing a job or significant other are examples of incentive loss that result in negative emotional reactions. The occurrence of negative life events is associated with increased drinking (Keyes, Hatzenbuehler, & Hasin, 2011). Further, certain genotypes are more likely to drink alcohol in response to stressful negative life events (Blomeyer et al., 2008; Covault et al., 2007). Shared genetic factors may contribute to alcohol drinking and emotional reactivity, but this relationship is not currently well understood. We used an incentive downshift paradigm to address whether emotional reactivity is elevated in mice predisposed to drink alcohol. We also investigated if ethanol drinking is influenced in High Alcohol Preferring mice that had been exposed to an incentive downshift. Incentive downshift procedures have been widely utilized to model emotional reactivity, and involve shifting a high reward group to a low reward and comparing the shifted group to a consistently rewarded control group. Here, we show that replicate lines of selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring mice exhibited larger successive negative contrast effects than their corresponding replicate Low Alcohol Preferring lines, providing strong evidence for a genetic association between alcohol drinking and susceptibility to the emotional effects of negative contrast. These mice can be used to study the shared neurological and genetic underpinnings of emotional reactivity and alcohol preference. Unexpectedly, an incentive downshift suppressed ethanol drinking immediately following an incentive downshift. This could be due to a specific effect of negative contrast on ethanol consumption or a suppressive effect on consummatory behavior in general. These data suggest that either alcohol intake does not provide the anticipated negative reinforcement, or that a single test was insufficient for animals to learn to drink following incentive downshift. However, the emotional intensity following incentive

  18. Development of an Instrument for Assessing Senior High School Students' Preferred and Perceived Laboratory Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Wu, Ying-Tien; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wong, Terrence William; Fu, Hsieh-Hai; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chung-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an instrument, named the inquiry-based laboratory classroom environment instrument (ILEI), for assessing senior high-school science students' preferred and perceived laboratory environment. A total of 262 second-year students, from a senior-high school in Taiwan, were recruited for this study. Four stages were…

  19. Preference structure of personal and social goals of the high-schoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Bora

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is establishing structure of acceptance (of preferences 18 personal and 18 social goals. Sample has been consisted of 243 final year high school students. There are seven extracted factors in domain of the personal goals that were named: selfishness fulfillment of duties, strive for power and popularity, competence and independence, affiliation and love, material achievement, hedonistic orientation and conscientious and healthy life. There are another seven factor in domain of the social goals: normal state, tradition and territorial integrity, transition, and also sociodemocratic, traditional socialist, democratic and ethatistic orientation. There are significant but not so high linear correlations between two lists. It justifies idea to examine those two lists separately. The most acceptable, among personal goals, are friends, love and independence, and the least are popularity, obedience and social power. The biggest importance among social goals was given to employment and living standard, and the least to one-party state and finishing of privatization.

  20. Intraperitoneal injection of d-serine inhibits high-fat diet intake and preference in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Yasoshima, Yasunobu; Matsui, Sho; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2017-11-01

    d-serine is a co-agonist of the N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, an important modulator of glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission. We previously reported that oral d-serine ingestion inhibited the intake of highly preferred food and promoted the intake of less preferred food in mice. Here, we analyzed the effects of intraperitoneal (IP) d-serine injections on feeding behavior in mice. We assessed the effects of d-serine during both the acquisition and maintenance of a preference for high-fat diets (HFDs). Aversiveness of IP d-serine was analyzed in the conditioned taste aversion paradigm. The effects on food intake were assessed by providing liquid meals with different fat contents. Finally, we measured brain d-serine and l-serine levels after d-serine administration. We found that IP-injected d-serine effectively inhibited the acquisition of a HFD preference, but failed to prevent expression of a previously learned HFD preference. IP-injected d-serine was not sufficient to condition taste aversion. The effect on HFD preference acquisition was associated with increases in d-serine levels in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. IP-injected d-serine most effectively inhibited the intake of liquid meals with high fat content. This effect was dose-dependent, but the responses varied significantly among male C57BL/6J mice. The differential responses to d-serine were consistent among multiple trials in each mouse. In summary, IP-injected d-serine inhibited HFD intake and the acquisition of an HFD preference. Individual mice with the same genetic background showed different sensitivities to d-serine; thus, d-serine sensitivity may be associated with unidentified traits. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The orientational preferences of backbones of proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; WANG Jun; XUE Bin; WANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The orientation between the backboneresidues of proteins is defined based on the local configurations and the corresponding preferences are analyzed by statistics. It is found that all the residue pairs have some specific preferences of orientations. The statistical analysis is mainly concentrated in the orientational distributions for two kinds of groupings of residues based on the hydrophobicity and secondary structural features. The statistics for such two types of groupings shows different orientational preferences. It is found that for the former grouping the orientational preference is rather weak,while for the later a kind of strong orientational preferences. This suggests that the formation of local structures and of secondary structures are highly related to the orientational preferences.

  2. The effect of prior alcohol consumption on the ataxic response to alcohol in high-alcohol preferring mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Brandon M; Boehm, Stephen L

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that ethanol-naïve high-alcohol preferring (HAP) mice, genetically predisposed to consume large quantities of alcohol, exhibited heightened sensitivity and more rapid acute functional tolerance (AFT) to alcohol-induced ataxia compared to low-alcohol preferring mice. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of prior alcohol self-administration on these responses in HAP mice. Naïve male and female adult HAP mice from the second replicate of selection (HAP2) underwent 18 days of 24-h, 2-bottle choice drinking for 10% ethanol vs. water, or water only. After 18 days of fluid access, mice were tested for ataxic sensitivity and rapid AFT following a 1.75 g/kg injection of ethanol on a static dowel apparatus in Experiment 1. In Experiment 2, a separate group of mice was tested for more protracted AFT development using a dual-injection approach where a second, larger (2.0 g/kg) injection of ethanol was given following the initial recovery of performance on the task. HAP2 mice that had prior access to alcohol exhibited a blunted ataxic response to the acute alcohol challenge, but this pre-exposure did not alter rapid within-session AFT capacity in Experiment 1 or more protracted AFT capacity in Experiment 2. These findings suggest that the typically observed increase in alcohol consumption in these mice may be influenced by ataxic functional tolerance development, but is not mediated by a greater capacity for ethanol exposure to positively influence within-session ataxic tolerance.

  3. Knowledge, attitudes, and preferences of healthy young adults regarding advance care planning: a focus group study of university students in Pittsburgh, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavalieratos, Dio; Ernecoff, Natalie C; Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Degenholtz, Howard B

    2015-02-27

    To date, research and promotion regarding advance care planning (ACP) has targeted those with serious illness or the elderly, thereby ignoring healthy young adults. The purpose of this study was to explore young adults' knowledge, attitudes, and preferences regarding advance care planning (ACP) and medical decision-making. Further, we aimed to understand the potential role of public health to encourage population-based promotion of ACP. Between February 2007 and April 2007, we conducted six focus groups comprising 56 young adults ages 18-30. Topics explored included (1) baseline knowledge regarding ACP, (2) preferences for ACP, (3) characteristics of preferred surrogates, and (4) barriers and facilitators to completing ACP specific to age and individuation. We used a qualitative thematic approach to analyze transcripts. All participants desired more information regarding ACP. In addition, participants expressed (1) heterogeneous attitudes regarding triggers to perform ACP, (2) the opinion that ACP is a marker of individuation, (3) the belief that prior exposure to illness plays a role in prompting ACP, and (4) an appreciation that ACP is flexible to changes in preferences and circumstances throughout the life-course. Young adults perceive ACP as a worthwhile health behavior and view a lack of information as a major barrier to discussion and adoption. Our data emphasize the need for strategies to increase ACP knowledge, while encouraging population-level, patient-centered, healthcare decision-making.

  4. Overlay Share Mesh for Interactive Group Communication with High Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-hua; CAI Yun-ze; XU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    An overlay share mesh infrastructure is presented for high dynamic group communication systems, such as distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and distributed virtual environments (DVE). Overlay share mesh infrastructure can own better adapting ability for high dynamic group than tradition multi-tree multicast infrastructure by sharing links among different groups. The mechanism of overlay share mesh based on area of interest (AOI) was discussed in detail in this paper. A large number of simulation experiments were done and the permance of mesh infrastructure was studied. Experiments results proved that overlay mesh infrastructure owns better adaptability than traditional multi-tree infrastructure for high dynamic group communication systems.

  5. Preference for Hiring Highly-Qualified STEM Women Faculty Does Not Extend to Less Qualified Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Ceci

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Audits of tenure-track hiring reveal faculty prefer to hire female applicants over males. However, audit data do not control for applicant quality, allowing some to argue women are hired at higher rates because they are more qualified. To test this, Williams and Ceci (2015 conducted an experiment demonstrating a preference for hiring women over identically-qualified men. While their findings are consistent with audits, they raise the specter that faculty may prefer women over even more-qualified men, a claim made recently. We evaluated this question in the present study: 158 faculty ranked two men and one woman for a tenure-track-assistant professorship, and 94 faculty ranked two women and one man. In the former condition, the female applicant was slightly weaker than her two male competitors, although still strong; in the other condition the male applicant was slightly weaker than his two female competitors, although still strong. Faculty of both genders and in all fields preferred the more-qualified men over the slightly-less-qualified women, and they also preferred the stronger women over the slightly-less-qualified man. This suggests that preference for women among identically-qualified applicants found in experimental studies and in audits does not extend to women whose credentials are weaker than male counterparts.

  6. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Ling Lo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP. This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS, were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50% of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284 and intronic regions (169 with the least in exon's (4, suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a, excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1, neurotransmitters (Pomc, and synapses (Snap29. This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  7. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  8. Lateral Preference Behaviors in Preschool Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coren, Stanley; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The behavioral manifestations of hand, eye, foot, and ear preference were studied in a sample of 384 children of 3, 4, and 5 years of age, and were compared to the preferences of a group of 171 high school students. Results indicate that some aspects of lateral preference behavior are influenced by age-related variables. (Author/RH)

  9. Examining High-School Students' Preferences toward Learning Environments, Personal Beliefs and Concept Learning in Web-Based Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore three kinds of personal affective traits among high-school students and their effects on web-based concept learning. The affective traits include personal preferences about web-based learning environments, personal epistemological beliefs, and beliefs about web-based learning. One hundred 11th graders…

  10. A Study of High School Music Participants' Stylistic Preferences and Identification Abilities in Music and the Visual Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Research investigated how high school students conceptualize the basic Classical-Romantic values dichotomy as exemplified by various aesthetic eras, styles, and objects, and how students operate within such aesthetic-conceptual frameworks in terms of their preferences and identification-categorization abilities. (Author/AM)

  11. Examining High-School Students' Preferences toward Learning Environments, Personal Beliefs and Concept Learning in Web-Based Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore three kinds of personal affective traits among high-school students and their effects on web-based concept learning. The affective traits include personal preferences about web-based learning environments, personal epistemological beliefs, and beliefs about web-based learning. One hundred 11th graders…

  12. Specialty Preferences of Physicians and Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Harrison G.

    1975-01-01

    Family and internal medicine were rated high by the groups studied. Neurological and colon-rectal surgery were rated low. Males gave higher ratings to surgical specialities, whereas females express stronger preferences for obstetrics and gynecology. (Author/KE)

  13. Preferences over Social Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten; Rutström, E. Elisabet;

    2013-01-01

    the methodological issues extend to larger groups that form endogenously (e.g., families, committees, communities). Preferences over social risk can be closely approximated by individual risk attitudes when subjects have no information about the risk preferences of other group members. We find no evidence......We elicit individual preferences over social risk. We identify the extent to which these preferences are correlated with preferences over individual risk and the well-being of others. We examine these preferences in the context of laboratory experiments over small, anonymous groups, although...... that subjects systematically reveal different risk attitudes in a social setting with no prior knowledge about the risk preferences of others compared to when they solely bear the consequences of the decision. However, we also find that subjects are significantly more risk averse when they know the risk...

  14. The Genetic Relatedness in Groups of Joint-Nesting Taiwan Yuhinas: Low Genetic Relatedness with Preferences for Male Kin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Liu

    Full Text Available The relative importance of direct and indirect fitness and, thus, the role of kinship in the evolution of social behavior is much debated. Studying the genetic relatedness of interacting individuals is crucial to improving our understanding of these issues. Here, we used a seven-year data set to study the genetic structure of the Taiwan yuhina (Yuhina brunneciceps, a joint-nesting passerine. Ten microsatellite loci were used to investigate the pair-wised relatedness among yuhina breeding group members. We found that the average genetic relatedness between same-sex group members was very low (0.069 for male dyads and 0.016 for female dyads. There was also a low ratio of closely-related kin (r>0.25 in the cooperative breeding groups of yuhinas (21.59% and 9.68% for male and female dyads, respectively. However, the relatedness of male dyads within breeding groups was significantly higher than female dyads. Our results suggest that yuhina cooperation is maintained primarily by direct fitness benefits to individuals; however, kin selection might play a role in partner choice for male yuhinas. Our study also highlights an important, but often neglected, question: Why do animals form non-kin groups, if kin are available? We use biological market theory to propose an explanation for group formation of unrelated Taiwan yuhinas.

  15. High Resolution Spatial Analysis of Habitat Preference of Aedes Albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in an Urban Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cianci, D.; Hartemink, N.; Zeimes, C.B.; Vanwambeke, S.O.; Ienco, A.; Caputo, B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895)) has emerged in many countries, and it has colonized new environments, including urban areas. The species is a nuisance and a potential vector of several human pathogens, and a better understanding of the habitat prefere

  16. High Resolution Spatial Analysis of Habitat Preference of Aedes Albopictus (Diptera Culicidae) in an Urban Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cianci, Daniela; Hartemink, Nienke; Zeimes, Caroline B; Vanwambeke, Sophie O; Ienco, Annamaria; Caputo, Beniamino

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895)) has emerged in many countries, and it has colonized new environments, including urban areas. The species is a nuisance and a potential vector of several human pathogens, and a better understanding of the habitat prefere

  17. High Resolution Spatial Analysis of Habitat Preference of Aedes Albopictus (Diptera Culicidae) in an Urban Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cianci, Daniela; Hartemink, Nienke; Zeimes, Caroline B; Vanwambeke, Sophie O; Ienco, Annamaria; Caputo, Beniamino

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895)) has emerged in many countries, and it has colonized new environments, including urban areas. The species is a nuisance and a potential vector of several human pathogens, and a better understanding of the habitat prefere

  18. High Resolution Spatial Analysis of Habitat Preference of Aedes Albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in an Urban Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cianci, D.; Hartemink, N.; Zeimes, C.B.; Vanwambeke, S.O.; Ienco, A.; Caputo, B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895)) has emerged in many countries, and it has colonized new environments, including urban areas. The species is a nuisance and a potential vector of several human pathogens, and a better understanding of the habitat prefere

  19. High Profile Football Players' Reading at a Research University: ACT Scores, Interview Responses, and Personal Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines the reading acumen of a cohort of twenty-six senior football players at a Midwestern public research university. Data related to three indices--ACT scores, interview responses, and personal preferences--were collected as part of a larger IRB-approved study aimed at determining the factors that led to the entire…

  20. Group Lasso for high dimensional sparse quantile regression models

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the statistical properties of the group Lasso estimator for high dimensional sparse quantile regression models where the number of explanatory variables (or the number of groups of explanatory variables) is possibly much larger than the sample size while the number of variables in "active" groups is sufficiently small. We establish a non-asymptotic bound on the $\\ell_{2}$-estimation error of the estimator. This bound explains situations under which the group Lasso estimator is potentially superior/inferior to the $\\ell_{1}$-penalized quantile regression estimator in terms of the estimation error. We also propose a data-dependent choice of the tuning parameter to make the method more practical, by extending the original proposal of Belloni and Chernozhukov (2011) for the $\\ell_{1}$-penalized quantile regression estimator. As an application, we analyze high dimensional additive quantile regression models. We show that under a set of primitive regularity conditions, the group Lasso estimator c...

  1. Are amino groups advantageous to insensitive high explosives (IHEs)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xia; Wen, Yushi; Xiang, Bin; Long, Xinping; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2012-10-01

    There is usually a contradiction between increasing energy densities and reducing sensitivities of explosives. The explosives with both high energy densities and low sensitivities, or the so-called insensitive high explosives (IHEs), are desirable in most cases. It seems from applied explosives that amino groups are advantageous to IHE but the amount of amino groups contained IHEs is very limited. To make this clear, we present systemic examinations of the effects on the two properties stressed in IHEs after introducing amino groups to different molecular skeletons. As a result, the amino groups on resonant sites to nitro groups in conjugated systems can improve distinctly sensitivities and change energy densities in terms of oxygen balance; while the amino groups in unconjugated systems can hardly increase energy densities and usually cause increased sensitivities. It agrees well with a fact that almost all the molecules of applied amino group contained explosives possess conjugated skeletons. We therefore confirm that if amino groups are introduced resonantly to a nitro group in a conjugated system and the introduction improves OB, they are advantageous to IHEs.

  2. Reciprocal altruism and group formation : The degree of segmentation of reciprocal altruists who prefer 'old-helping-partners'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeggelink, E.P.H.; de Vos, H.; Elsas, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    To what degree does reciprocal altruism add to the explanation of the human way of group living? That is the main question of this paper. In order to find an answer to this question, we use the Social Evolution Model (SEM) that has been developed earlier. It allows us to investigate both the conditi

  3. Choosing a Group Representative : The Impact of Perceived Organizational Support on the Preferences for Deviant Representatives in Work Negotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demoulin, Stephanie; Teixeira, Catia Pinto; Gillis, Celine; Goldoni, Edwine; Stinglhamber, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Group representative selection in negotiation is a topic that has only recently attracted researchers' attention. This article focuses on workplace negotiations and examines how employees' selection of representatives depends on their level of perceived organizational support (POS). We predict and s

  4. Choosing a Group Representative : The Impact of Perceived Organizational Support on the Preferences for Deviant Representatives in Work Negotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demoulin, Stephanie; Teixeira, Catia Pinto; Gillis, Celine; Goldoni, Edwine; Stinglhamber, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Group representative selection in negotiation is a topic that has only recently attracted researchers' attention. This article focuses on workplace negotiations and examines how employees' selection of representatives depends on their level of perceived organizational support (POS). We predict and s

  5. The difluoromethylene (CF2) group in aliphatic chains: Synthesis and conformational preference of palmitic acids and nonadecane containing CF2 groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Callejo, Ricardo; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; O'Hagan, David

    2014-01-06

    The syntheses of palmitic acids and a nonadecane are reported with CF2 groups located 1,3 or 1,4 to each other along the aliphatic chain. Specifically 8,8,10,10- and 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorohexadecanoic acids (6b and 6c) are prepared as well as the singly modified analogue 8,8-difluorohexadecanoic acid (6a). Also 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorononadecane (27) is prepared as a pure hydrocarbon containing a 1,4-di-CF2 motif. The modified palmitic acids are characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine melting points and phase behaviour relative to palmitic acid (62.5 °C). It emerges that 6c, with the CF2 groups placed 1,4- to each other, has a significantly higher melting point (89.9 °C) when compared to the other analogues and palmitic acid itself. It is a crystalline compound and the structure reveals an extended anti-zig-zag chain. Similarly 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorononadecane (27) adopts an extended anti-zig-zag structure. This is rationalized by dipolar relaxation between the two CF2 groups placed 1,4 to each other in the extended anti-zig-zag chain and suggests a design modification for long chain aliphatics which can introduce conformational stability.

  6. Comparative effectiveness of low- and high-fidelity bronchoscopy simulation for training in conventional transbronchial needle aspiration and user preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Mohsen; Wahidi, Momen M; Zamanian Rohani, Nazanin; Colt, Henri G

    2010-01-01

    Conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) can be learned using high-fidelity virtual-reality platforms and low-fidelity models comprised of molded silicone or excised animal airways. The purpose of this study was to determine perceptions and preferences of learners and instructors regarding the comparative effectiveness of low-fidelity and high-fidelity bronchoscopy simulation for training in TBNA. During the 2008 annual CHEST conference, a prospective randomized crossover design was used to train study participants in three methods of conventional TBNA using low- and high-fidelity models. Likert style questions were administered to learners and instructors in order to elicit preferences and opinions regarding educational effectiveness of the models. Results were tabulated and depicted in graphic format, with medians calculated. Learners felt that the models were equally enjoyable (13-13) and enthusiasm generating (low 17-high 15). There was preference for low-fidelity in terms of realism (23-17), ease of learning (20-6), and learning all three TBNA methods (31-7 for hub-against-wall, 31-6 for jabbing, 29-6 for piggyback). Low-fidelity was preferred as an ideal model overall (19-11). Instructors thought that low-fidelity was more useful in teaching TBNA (9-0 for all three methods). Instructors perceived the low-fidelity model overall as an ideal tool for learning TBNA (8-0) and a more effective teaching instrument (8-0). Based on learner and instructor perceptions, a low-fidelity model is superior to a high-fidelity platform for training in three methods of conventional TBNA. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. 模糊偏好下群决策结构的研究%Research on the Structure of Group Decision Making under Fuzzy Preferences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文坤; 刘家诚; 李宗平

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies fuzzy preferences in group decision making. An impossibility theorem is proved under a series of fuzzy rational conditions. The concept of influencing set is introduced. And it discusses the structure of influencing set, which influences group decision making. Finally, a practical example is given.%研究了群决策问题的模糊偏好关系,在模糊理性条件下证明了一个不可能定理,提出了影响集的概念,讨论了对群决策产生影响的影响集的结构,并给出了一个实例.

  8. Effects of dopamine antagonists on methamphetamine-induced dopamine release in high and low alcohol preference rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Minori; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kasuda, Shogo; Takahashi, Montonori; Yamamura, Takehiko; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Ouchi, Harumi; Minami, Takako; Hishida, Shigeru; Nishio, Hajime

    2010-03-01

    The authors have previously shown that high alcohol preference rats (HAP) have a significantly higher sensitivity than low alcohol preference rats (LAP) for methamphetamine (MAP). In this study, changes in dopamine and serotonin release induced by MAP (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) after pre-treatment with D1 and D2 receptor antagonists were examined in the striatum of rats with different alcohol preferences to elucidate differences in receptor levels between the two rat strains. D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 or D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol were administrated intracerebroventricularly 10 min before MAP stimulation. This study investigated the effect of methamphetamine-induced dopamine and serotonin release in striatum using microdialysis of freely moving rats coupled to ECD-HPLC. With haloperidol treatment both strains of rats showed a significantly greater maximum increase on MAP-induced dopamine release compared with respective control rats. However, after SCH23390 treatment only HAP rats showed a significantly greater increase in dopamine release compared with controls. SCH23390 blocks mainly D1 receptors only in the post-synaptic membrane, whereas haloperidol blocks D2 receptors in both the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic membranes. The MAP-induced increase in dopamine release following haloperidol pre-treatment was greater than SCH23390 pre-treatment in both strains. This result indicates that D2 receptors (autoreceptors) in the pre-synaptic membrane were blocked, leading to the elimination of the feedback function that regulates dopamine release. These data suggested that alcohol preference is associated with the action of MAP, and the dopaminergic mechanism, specifically the D1 system in the striatum, might have a different pathway dependent on alcohol preference.

  9. Evidence for a compulsive-like behavior in rats exposed to alternate access to highly preferred palatable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Clara; Spena, Giuseppe; Halfon, Olivier; Boutrel, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Converging evidence suggests that recurrent excessive calorie restriction causes binge eating by promoting behavioral disinhibition and overeating. This interpretation suggests that cognitive adaptations may surpass physiological regulations of metabolic needs after recurrent cycles of dieting and binging. Intermittent access to palatable food has long been studied in rats, but the consequences of such diet cycling procedures on the cognitive control of food seeking remain unclear. Female Wistar rats were divided in two groups matched for food intake and body weight. One group received standard chow pellets 7 days/week, whereas the second group was given chow pellets for 5 days and palatable food for 2 days over seven consecutive weeks. Rats were also trained for operant conditioning. Intermittent access to palatable food elicited binging behavior and reduced intake of normal food. Rats with intermittent access to palatable food failed to exhibit anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze, but displayed reduced locomotor activity in the open field and developed a blunted corticosterone response following an acute stress across the diet procedure. Trained under a progressive ratio schedule, both groups exhibited the same motivation for sweetened food pellets. However, in contrast to controls, rats with a history of dieting and binging exhibited a persistent compulsive-like behavior when access to preferred pellets was paired with mild electrical foot shock punishments. These results highlight the intricate development of anxiety-like disorders and cognitive deficits leading to a loss of control over preferred food intake after repetitive cycles of intermittent access to palatable food.

  10. High vitamin A intake during pregnancy modifies dopaminergic reward system and decreases preference for sucrose in Wistar rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Diana; Poon, Abraham N; Kubant, Ruslan; Kim, Hwanki; Huot, Pedro S P; Cho, Clara E; Pannia, Emanuela; Reza-López, Sandra A; Pausova, Zdenka; Bazinet, Richard P; Anderson, G Harvey

    2016-01-01

    High multivitamin (HV) content in gestational diets has long-term metabolic effects in rat offspring. These changes are associated with in utero modifications of gene expression in hypothalamic food intake regulation. However, the role of fat-soluble vitamins in mediating these effects has not been explored. Vitamin A is a plausible candidate due to its role in gene methylation. Vitamin A intake above requirements during pregnancy affects the development of neurocircuitries involved in food intake and reward regulation. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed AIN-93G diets with the following content: recommended multivitamins (1-fold multivitamins: RV), high vitamin A (10-fold vitamin A: HA) or HV with only recommended vitamin A (10-fold multivitamins, 1-fold vitamin A: HVRA). Body weight, food intake and preference, mRNA expression and DNA methylation of hippocampal dopamine-related genes were assessed in male offspring brains at different developmental windows: birth, weaning and 14weeks postweaning. HA offspring had changes in dopamine-related gene expression at all developmental windows and DNA hypermethylation in the dopamine receptor 2 promoter region compared to RV offspring. Furthermore, HA diet lowered sucrose preference but had no effect on body weight and expression of hypothalamic genes. In contrast, HVRA offspring showed only at adulthood changes in expression of hippocampal genes and a modest effect on hypothalamic genes. High vitamin A intake alone in gestational diets has long-lasting programming effects on the dopaminergic system that are further translated into decreased sucrose preference but not food intake.

  11. HIV Sentinel Surveillance Among High Risk Groups: Scenario In Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L B Chavan, Prakash Patel, Vaibhav Gharat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surveillance is the ongoing systematic collection, collation, analysis and interpretation of data so that appropriate action can be taken within time. Aims and Objective: The present annual HIV sentinel surveillance (HSS was carried out for monitoring trends of HIV epidemic in high risk group populations in selected sites of Gujarat state.. Methodology: The HSS was carried out in representative populations from High Risk Group (HRG like Female Sex Workers (FSW, Man having Sex with Man (MSM and Single Male Migrant. Target sample size was 250 at each HRG site (Female Sex Worker, Male Sex Male & SMM. Consecutive sampling was done at designated sentinel site for selecting the survey participants. Results: Overall 3726 samples (1494 FSWs, 1732 MSMs & 500 SMM were tested in the High risk group of HSS 2008. The overall sero-positivity in samples from FSWs, MSMs sites was 4.5%. Sero-positivity was more or less high (? 5% among FSWs as well as MSMs irrespective of age, place of residence, literacy level, occupation; and migration status. Conclusion: The overall trend of sero-positivity in High risk groups shows decreasing trend of HIV in the state from 2004 to 2008.

  12. Which Type of Inquiry Project Do High School Biology Students Prefer: Open or Guided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2012-10-01

    In teaching inquiry to high school students, educators differ on which method of teaching inquiry is more effective: Guided or open inquiry? This paper examines the influence of these two different inquiry learning approaches on the attitudes of Israeli high school biology students toward their inquiry project. The results showed significant differences between the two groups: Open inquiry students were more satisfied and felt they gained benefits from implementing the project to a greater extent than guided inquiry students. On the other hand, regarding documentation throughout the project, guided inquiry students believed that they conducted more documentation, as compared to their open inquiry peers. No significant differences were found regarding `the investment of time', but significant differences were found in the time invested and difficulties which arose concerning the different stages of the inquiry process: Open inquiry students believed they spent more time in the first stages of the project, while guided inquiry students believed they spent more time in writing the final paper. In addition, other differences were found: Open inquiry students felt more involved in their project, and felt a greater sense of cooperation with others, in comparison to guided inquiry students. These findings may help teachers who hesitate to teach open inquiry to implement this method of inquiry; or at least provide their students with the opportunity to be more involved in inquiry projects, and ultimately provide their students with more autonomy, high-order thinking, and a deeper understanding in performing science.

  13. Beijing Encourages High-Risk Groups to Undertake AIDS Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    High-risk groups in Beijing, China's capital city, such as sex workers, drug-takers who share needles and gay communities are being encouraged to take voluntary counseling and tests (VCT) as part of an effort to stem the spread of AIDS. Tens of thousands of flyers have been distributed to disease control centers at district levels, and they will be handed to high-risk individuals by AIDS workers and volunteers over the next few weeks.

  14. Inhibition of the reinstatement of morphine-induced place preference in rats by high-frequency stimulation of the bilateral nucleus accumbens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu; CHEN Ning; WANG Hui-min; Meng Fan-gang; ZHANG Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Background Opiate addiction remains intractable in a large percentage of patients,and relapse is the biggest hurdle to recovery.Many studies have identified a central role of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in addiction.Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has the advantages of being reversible,adjustable,and minimally invasive,and it has become a potential neurobiological intervention for addiction.The purpose of our study was to investigate whether high-frequency DBS in the NAc effectively attenuates the reinstatement of morphine seeking in morphine-primed rats.Methods A morphine-dependent group of rats was given increasing doses of morphine during conditioned place preference training.A control group of rats was given equal volumes of saline.After the establishment of this model,withdrawal syndromes were precipitated in these two groups by administering naloxone,and the differences in withdrawal symptoms between the groups were analyzed.Electrodes for DBS were implanted in the bilateral shell of the NAc in the experimental group.The rats were stimulated daily in the NAc for 5 hours per day over 30 days.Changes in the conditioned place preference test and withdrawal symptoms in the rats were investigated and place navigation studies were performed using the Morris water maze.The data were assessed statistically with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's tests for multiple post hoc comparisons.Results High-frequency stimulation of the bilateral NAc prevented the morphine-induced reinstatement of morphine seeking in the conditioned place preference test.The time spent in the white compartment by rats following 30 days of DBS ((268.25±25.07) seconds) was not significantly different compared with the time spent in the white compartment after relapse was induced by morphine administration ((303.29±34.22) seconds).High-frequency stimulation of the bilateral NAc accelerated the innate decay of drug craving in morphine-dependent rats without significantly

  15. Perception, Attitude and Instructional Preferences on Physics in High School Students: An Exploration in an International Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Mini; Gafoor, Abdul

    Questionnaire survey explored perception, attitude and instructional preferences with respect to gender and nationality in high school students of India and USA, a sample of 1101 Indian and 458 US students. Descriptive Statistics techniques were adopted for analysis. Male and female students in USA were at the high and low ends of the spectrum, respectively, in perception and attitude. Preference on instructional strategies was found to be independent of nationality, exposed strategies, opting science, class size and facilities. Responses from both countries indicate preference for an integrated instructional strategy that has strong teacher involvement in a student-centered framework. A thoughtful and properly designed instructional strategy could provide sufficient elements in modifying students' epistemological beliefs. Understanding the nature and process of physics along with a better learning outcome is usually not possible by administering student-centered or teacher-centered strategies alone in their purest form. This study provides adequate support in obtaining two equally significant but contrasting goals in Physics Education Research, to gain conceptual development with increased interest and attainment in learners, through integration.

  16. Highly conducting and preferred oriented boron doped nc-Si films for window layers in nc-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Praloy; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-05-01

    Growth and optimization of the boron dopednanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) films have been studied by varyingthe gaspressure applied to the hydrogendiluted silane plasma in RF (13.56 MHz) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system, using diborane (B2H6) as the dopant gas. High magnitudeof electrical conductivity (~102 S cm-1) andorientedcrystallographic lattice planes have been obtained with high crystalline volume fraction (~86 %) at an optimum pressure of 2.5 Torr. XRD and Raman studies reveal good crystallinity with preferred orientation, suitable for applications in stacked layer devices, particularly in nc-Si solar cells.

  17. Highly Scalable Trip Grouping for Large Scale Collective Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Risch, Tore

    2008-01-01

    Transportation-related problems, like road congestion, parking, and pollution, are increasing in most cities. In order to reduce traffic, recent work has proposed methods for vehicle sharing, for example for sharing cabs by grouping "closeby" cab requests and thus minimizing transportation cost...... and utilizing cab space. However, the methods published so far do not scale to large data volumes, which is necessary to facilitate large-scale collective transportation systems, e.g., ride-sharing systems for large cities. This paper presents highly scalable trip grouping algorithms, which generalize previous...

  18. Independent preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Karl

    1991-01-01

    A simple mathematical result characterizing a subset of a product set is proved and used to obtain additive representations of preferences. The additivity consequences of independence assumptions are obtained for preferences which are not total or transitive. This means that most of the economic...... theory based on additive preferences - expected utility, discounted utility - has been generalized to preferences which are not total or transitive. Other economic applications of the theorem are given...

  19. Views and Preferences for Nicotine Products as an Alternative to Smoking: A Focus Group Study of People Living with Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurk, Carla; Ford, Pauline; Sharma, Ratika; Fitzgerald, Lisa; Gartner, Coral

    2016-11-23

    Aims and Background: People living with mental disorders experience a disproportionately higher burden of tobacco-related disease than the general population. Long-term substitution with less harmful nicotine products could reduce the tobacco-related harm among this population. This study investigated the views and preferences of people with mental health disorders about different nicotine products and their use as long-term substitutes for cigarettes. Methods: Semi-structured focus group discussion followed by a brief questionnaire. The discussion transcripts were analysed for content and themes and quantitative data summarised with descriptive statistics. Results: Twenty-nine participants took part in four focus groups. Vaping devices were the most acceptable nicotine products discussed; however preferences for nicotine products were individual and varied along aesthetic, pragmatic, sensory and symbolic dimensions. The concept of tobacco harm reduction was unfamiliar to participants, however they generally agreed with the logic of replacing cigarettes with less harmful nicotine products. Barriers to activating tobacco harm reduction included the symbolism of smoking and quitting; the importance placed on health; the consumer appeal of alternatives; and cost implications. Discussion and Conclusions: Engaging this population in tobacco harm reduction options will require communication that challenges black and white thinking (a conceptual framework in which smoking cigarettes or quitting all nicotine are the only legitimate options) as in practice this serves to support the continuance of smoking. Consumers should be encouraged to trial a range of nicotine products to find the most acceptable alternative to smoking that reduces health harms. Providing incentives to switch to nicotine products could help overcome barriers to using less harmful nicotine products among mental health consumers.

  20. Views and Preferences for Nicotine Products as an Alternative to Smoking: A Focus Group Study of People Living with Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Meurk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Background: People living with mental disorders experience a disproportionately higher burden of tobacco-related disease than the general population. Long-term substitution with less harmful nicotine products could reduce the tobacco-related harm among this population. This study investigated the views and preferences of people with mental health disorders about different nicotine products and their use as long-term substitutes for cigarettes. Methods: Semi-structured focus group discussion followed by a brief questionnaire. The discussion transcripts were analysed for content and themes and quantitative data summarised with descriptive statistics. Results: Twenty-nine participants took part in four focus groups. Vaping devices were the most acceptable nicotine products discussed; however preferences for nicotine products were individual and varied along aesthetic, pragmatic, sensory and symbolic dimensions. The concept of tobacco harm reduction was unfamiliar to participants, however they generally agreed with the logic of replacing cigarettes with less harmful nicotine products. Barriers to activating tobacco harm reduction included the symbolism of smoking and quitting; the importance placed on health; the consumer appeal of alternatives; and cost implications. Discussion and Conclusions: Engaging this population in tobacco harm reduction options will require communication that challenges black and white thinking (a conceptual framework in which smoking cigarettes or quitting all nicotine are the only legitimate options as in practice this serves to support the continuance of smoking. Consumers should be encouraged to trial a range of nicotine products to find the most acceptable alternative to smoking that reduces health harms. Providing incentives to switch to nicotine products could help overcome barriers to using less harmful nicotine products among mental health consumers.

  1. 具有偏好关系网络结构稳定的群决策协商控制模型%Group decision-making controllable model with preference relations network structure stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭亚军; 侯宏波; 侯芳

    2011-01-01

    挖掘群决策偏好关系结构信息,提出决策者个体偏好与群体偏好关系以及网络结构稳定的群决策协商控制模型.根据模型提供个体偏好参考基准,计算决策者及群体的偏好相容性测度.通过决策者建立、取消(断开)或加强与其他决策者的链接以及对偏好信息进行调整的策略建议,促使决策者个体偏好、群决策偏好关系网络结构正向演化,在模型框架下保证群体偏好网络结构稳定,达到群体偏好信息相容性极人的目的,为进一步信息集结提供依据.%This paper introduces a model for group decision-making problem based on both the preferences of decisionmakers and the group and the stability of network structure. References of the individual preferences are provided according to the model, and the measurement of preferences consistency about both decision-makers and the group is calculated. The decision-makers establish, cancel(disconnect) or strength the links between others, and regulate their preferences in the model. Both decision-makers preferences and the group preferences network structure can develop to the positive evolution in the model. Structural stability of the group preference s network structure can be guaranteed, and the group preferences consistency maximization is achieved, which provide more convenient solutions for information aggregation.

  2. Group Lasso estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bigot, Jérémie; Loubes, Jean-Michel; Alvarez, Lilian Muniz

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Group Lasso estimator of the covariance matrix of a stochastic process corrupted by an additive noise. We propose to estimate the covariance matrix in a high-dimensional setting under the assumption that the process has a sparse representation in a large dictionary of basis functions. Using a matrix regression model, we propose a new methodology for high-dimensional covariance matrix estimation based on empirical contrast regularization by a group Lasso penalty. Using such a penalty, the method selects a sparse set of basis functions in the dictionary used to approximate the process, leading to an approximation of the covariance matrix into a low dimensional space. Consistency of the estimator is studied in Frobenius and operator norms and an application to sparse PCA is proposed.

  3. Information needs and preferences of low and high literacy consumers for decisions about colorectal cancer screening: utilizing a linguistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sian K; Trevena, Lyndal; Nutbeam, Don; Barratt, Alexandra; McCaffery, Kirsten J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Context  The use of written decision aids (DAs) in clinical practice has proliferated. However, few DAs have been developed for low literacy users, despite this group having low knowledge about healthcare and lacking involvement in health decisions. Objective  To explore the information needs and understanding of adults with varying literacy in relation to colorectal cancer screening, and to consider their responses to two versions of a decision aid. Participants  Thirty‐three men and women aged 45–74 years were recruited from Adult Basic Education classes (n = 17) and University Continuing Education programs (n = 16). Methods  We used qualitative methods (in‐depth, semi‐structured interviews) to compare and contrast the views of adults with lower and higher literacy levels, to gain a better understanding of how people with lower literacy value and interpret specific DA content and components; and determine whether needs and preferences are specific to lower literacy groups or generic across the broad literacy spectrum. Results  Regardless of literacy perspective, participants’ interpretations of the DA were shaped by their prior knowledge and expectations, as well as their values and preferences. This influenced perceptions of the DAs role in supporting informed decision making. A linguistic theoretical model was applied to interpret the findings. This facilitated considerations beyond the traditional focus on the readability of materials. Conclusion  Decision aids developers may find it useful to apply alternative approaches (linguistic) when creating DAs for consumers of varying literacy. PMID:18494957

  4. High Mobility Group Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2008-01-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) proteins, including HMGA, HMGB and HMGN, are abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind to DNA, nucleosome and other multi-protein complexes in a dynamic and reversible fashion to regulate DNA processing in the context of chromatin. All HMG proteins, like histone proteins, are subjected to extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as lysine acetylation, arginine/lysine methylation and serine/threonine phosphorylation, to modulate their inter...

  5. Differences in evolutionary pressure acting within highly conserved ortholog groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In highly conserved widely distributed ortholog groups, the main evolutionary force is assumed to be purifying selection that enforces sequence conservation, with most divergence occurring by accumulation of neutral substitutions. Using a set of ortholog groups from prokaryotes, with a single representative in each studied organism, we asked the question if this evolutionary pressure is acting similarly on different subgroups of orthologs defined as major lineages (e.g. Proteobacteria or Firmicutes. Results Using correlations in entropy measures as a proxy for evolutionary pressure, we observed two distinct behaviors within our ortholog collection. The first subset of ortholog groups, called here informational, consisted mostly of proteins associated with information processing (i.e. translation, transcription, DNA replication and the second, the non-informational ortholog groups, mostly comprised of proteins involved in metabolic pathways. The evolutionary pressure acting on non-informational proteins is more uniform relative to their informational counterparts. The non-informational proteins show higher level of correlation between entropy profiles and more uniformity across subgroups. Conclusion The low correlation of entropy profiles in the informational ortholog groups suggest that the evolutionary pressure acting on the informational ortholog groups is not uniform across different clades considered this study. This might suggest "fine-tuning" of informational proteins in each lineage leading to lineage-specific differences in selection. This, in turn, could make these proteins less exchangeable between lineages. In contrast, the uniformity of the selective pressure acting on the non-informational groups might allow the exchange of the genetic material via lateral gene transfer.

  6. Exploring the relationship between preferences for high fat foods and efficacy of the ketogenic and modified Atkins diets among children with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Adrianna; Turner, Zahava; Rubenstein, James E; Miller, Jonathan R; Kossoff, Eric H

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has indicated that children with seizures may prefer high fat foods - a preference compatible with ketogenic and modified Atkins dietary therapies. The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the relationship between fat preference and efficacy of therapeutic diets in treating intractable seizures among a pediatric population. Preference for high fat foods was directly assessed in a sample of 30 children prior to commencing either the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet. Seizure control was assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months following diet initiation. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, correlations between fat preference and diet efficacy were examined at each follow-up and across the follow-up period. At individual follow-ups, correlations between fat preference and diet efficacy varied in terms of both strength and significance; however, modest, positive correlations with fat preference were significant when examining high levels of efficacy (100% seizure reduction, ≥90% seizure reduction) across a 1-year follow-up period. These findings provide preliminary evidence that fat preference, when directly assessed, may be a useful predictor of treatment efficacy for the ketogenic and modified Atkins diets; however, further research is necessary. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase transitions in Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. C.; Liu, C. Y.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    The structures and transition pressures of Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors and of a pseudobinary system (Ga/x/In/1-x/Sb) have been investigated. Results indicate that GaP, InSb, GaSb, GaAs and possible AlP assume Metallic structures at high pressures; a tetragonal, beta-Sn-like structure is adopted by only InSb and GaSb. The rocksalt phase is preferred in InP, InAs, AlSb, ZnO and ZnS. The model of Van Vechten (1973) gives transition pressures which are in good agreement with measured values, but must be refined to account for the occurrence of the ionic rocksalt structure in some compounds. In addition, discrepancies between the theoretical scaling values for volume changes at the semiconductor-to-metal transitions are observed.

  8. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one

  9. Auditor Preference

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We analyze theoretically and empirically the effect of preference policies, which favor some auditors over others for reasons unrelated to the audit. For example, an auditee may prefer minority-owned auditors, all else equal. We construct an analytical model of the competitive bidding process for audit services. We show that preference policies can sometimes improve the audit procurement process by encouraging price concessions from non-preferenced auditors. We test model predictions in a set...

  10. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Patrone

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a member of highly conserved non-histone DNA binding protein family, has been studied as transcription factor and growth factor. Secreted extracellularly by activated monocytes and macrophages or passively released by necrotic or damaged cells, extracellular HMGB1 is a potent mediator of inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 has apparently contrasting biological actions: it sustains inflammation (with the possible establishment of autoimmunity or of self-maintaining tissue damage, but it also activates and recruits stem cells, boosting tissue repair. Here, we focus on the role of HMGB1 in physiological and pathological responses, the mechanisms by which it contributes to tissue repair and therapeutic strategies base on targeting HMGB1.

  11. Electroweak renormalization group corrections in high energy processes

    CERN Document Server

    Melles, M

    2001-01-01

    At energies ($\\sqrt{s}$) much higher than the electroweak gauge boson masses ($M$) large logarithmic corrections of the scale ratio $\\sqrt{s}/M$ occur. While the electroweak Sudakov type double (DL) and universal single (SL) logarithms have recently been resummed, at higher orders the electroweak renormalization group (RG) corrections are folded with the DL Sudakov contributions and must be included for a consistent subleading treatment to all orders. In this paper we derive first all relevant formulae for massless as well as massive gauge theories including all such terms up to order ${\\cal O} (\\alpha^n \\beta_0 \\log^{2n-1} \\frac{s}{M^2})$ by integrating over the corresponding running couplings. The results for broken gauge theories in the high energy regime are then given in the framework of the infrared evolution equation (IREE) method. The analogous QED-corrections below the weak scale $M$ are included by appropriately matching the low energy solution to the renormalization group improved high energy resul...

  12. Female BRCA mutation carriers with a preference for prophylactic mastectomy are more likely to participate an educational-support group and to proceed with the preferred intervention within 2 years.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Prins, J.B.; Kamm, Y.J.L.; Brunner, H.G.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2010-01-01

    Women with a BRCA mutation face a complex choice between breast cancer surveillance and prophylactic mastectomy. We determined risk management preferences shortly after genetic test disclosure and mastectomy status after a median observation period of 2 years. The effect of an educational-support

  13. Female BRCA mutation carriers with a preference for prophylactic mastectomy are more likely to participate an educational-support group and to proceed with the preferred intervention within 2 years.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Prins, J.B.; Kamm, Y.J.L.; Brunner, H.G.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2010-01-01

    Women with a BRCA mutation face a complex choice between breast cancer surveillance and prophylactic mastectomy. We determined risk management preferences shortly after genetic test disclosure and mastectomy status after a median observation period of 2 years. The effect of an educational-support gr

  14. High solid and high stability waterborne polyurethanes via ionic groups in soft segments and chain termini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S K; Kim, B K

    2009-08-01

    High solid and high stability waterborne polyurethanes were molecularly designed and synthesized. The positions and concentrations of the anionic groups were varied, along with the molecular weights of the polyol. It was found that the dispersions containing ionic groups at the chain termini (called terminal ions) gave the smallest dispersion size, and the highest dispersion stability and viscosity, whereas the hard ions, containing ionic groups in the hard segments, resulted in the greatest swelling in water. However, the mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of the dispersion cast films were similar. It was demonstrated that highly stable dispersions with a high solid content (45%) can be obtained at a low ionic content (2%) by simply incorporating the ionic groups at the flexible chain ends. The results were interpreted in terms of the high mobility and low free energy of the chain ends.

  15. Cost/efficacy analysis of preferred Spanish AIDS study group regimens and the dual therapy with lopinavir/ritonavir plus lamivudine for initial ART in HIV infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatell Artigas, Josep María; Arribas López, José Ramón; Lázaro Y de Mercado, Pablo; Blasco Bravo, Antonio Javier

    2016-01-01

    The National AIDS Plan and the Spanish AIDS study group (GESIDA) proposes "preferred regimens" (PR) of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV-infected patients. In 2013, the recommended regimens were all triple therapy regimens. The Gardel Study assessed the efficacy of a dual therapy (DT) combination of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus lamivudine (3TC). Our objective is to evaluate the GESIDA PR and the DT regimen LPV/r+3TC cost/efficacy ratios. Decision tree models were built. probability of having viral load <50 copies/mL at week 48. ART regime cost: costs of ART, adverse effects, and drug resistance tests during the first 48 weeks. Cost/efficacy ratios varied between 5,817 and 13,930 euros per responder at 48 weeks, for the DT of LPV/r+3TC and tenofovir DF/emtricitabine+raltegravir, respectively. Taking into account the official Spanish prices of ART, the most efficient regimen was DT of LPV/r+3TC, followed by the triple therapy with non-nucleoside containing regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Un problema de consenso para problemas de toma de decisiones multicriterio en grupo mediante relaciones de preferencia intervalares difusas lingüísticas || A Consensus Model for Group Multicriteria Decision Making Problems with Interval Fuzzy Preference Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amor Pulido, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En el contexto de toma de decisiones multicriterio y bajo ciertas circunstancias, puede ocurrir que no se pueda expresar una cierta valoración mediante una única etiqueta lingüística, ya que puede haber duda en esa valoración. En este trabajo, presentamos un modelo de consenso para problemas de toma de decisiones en grupo con relaciones de preferencia intervalares lingüísticas. Este modelo está basado en dos criterios de consenso, una medida de consenso y una de proximidad, y en el concepto de coincidencia entre preferencias. Calcularemos ambos criterios en los tres niveles de representación de una relación de preferencia y diseñaremos un mecanismo de realimentación automático para guiar a los expertos en el proceso para alcanzar el consenso. || In some circumstances a decision maker, expert, in a group decision making problem cannot express his/her preferences with a unique linguistic fuzzy preference because he/she is dubious into some preferences. In this paper, we present a consensus model for group decision making problems with interval fuzzy preference relations. This model is based on two consensus criteria, a consensus measure and a proximity measure, and on the concept of co- incidence among preferences. We compute both consensus criteria in the three representation levels of a preference relation and design an automatic feedback mechanism to guide experts in the consensus reaching process.

  17. Technological preferences for teaching-learning a second language in Huichol communities and private high-schools in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Raúl César Romero

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research enquires about the Information and Communication Technologies preferences of students, teachers, and school principals in the teaching-learning process of a second language in 9th grade in two settings: Spanish for the Huichol people in a remote rural area and English for a private school in the city. The first case is situated in a rural Huichol community in the high mountain area of Jalisco, Mexico. The second one is located in a wealthy neighborhood in the Western Metropolitan area of Mexico City. A qualitative methodology with a heuristic and ethnographic design to investigate the reality of the daily use of technologies in both contexts for learning a second language. The instruments were the participant observation and in-depth interviews. Among the key findings are: (a the participants tend to favor the use of technology for second language learning, (b the bandwidth and the speed of the Internet is crucial to strengthen the immersion into the culture of a second language, (c Educational communities support electronic enquiring, (d there are similarities in the preferred search engines between the two populations, (e the equity of education is hindered by school desertions, and (f educational innovation requires that similar investigations take place to foster a full performance in the society of knowledge.

  18. [HTLV-I infection in a high-risk group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, E; Ollero, M; Gimeno, A; Colchero, J; Alcoucer, R; Márquez, P

    1990-07-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the presence of HTLV-1 in a high-risk population in west Andalusia. We studied 267 samples of serum from 255 patients: 179 of these patients being intravenous drug-users, 14 had ADVP sexual partners, 16 were inhalation drug-users, 4 were hemophiliacs, 9 had other high-risk habits and 25 hematological patients afflicted with leukemia or lymphoma. All of them were tested for antibodies against HTLV-1 by means of an in vitro qualitative ELISA technique (ELISA Du Pont HTLV-1). The positive results were confirmed by the Western blot technique. Additionally, the p24 antigen and the antibodies against VIH-1 and VIH-2 (ENV/CORE) were analysed, except in the 25 hematological patients. We found 20 serum samples positive to HTLV-1 by ELISA (7.4%), but only 1 (0.3%) was confirmed by the Western blot technique. The prevalence of VIH-1 was 46%; 9% had p24 VIH antigen and 26% had false positive ELISA to VIH-2. We found a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.0005) between positive ELISA to HTLV-1 and antibodies against VIH. We conclude that HTLV-1 has penetrated into the high-risk population of west Andalusia , although not yet to a great degree, and point out the need for seric epidemiological surveillance to prevent the spread of the retrovirus in these groups.

  19. Cost/efficacy analysis of preferred Spanish AIDS study group regimens and the dual therapy with LPV/r+3TC for initial ART in HIV infected adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josép M Gatell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The National AIDS Plan and the Spanish AIDS study group (GESIDA panel of experts propose “preferred regimens” of antiretroviral treatment (ART as initial therapy in HIV-infected patients for 2013 [1]. All these regimens are triple therapy regimens. The Gardel Study assessed the efficacy and safety of a dual therapy (DT combination of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r 400/100 mg BID+ lamivudine (3TC 150 mg BID [2]. The objective of this study is to evaluate the costs and efficiency of initiating treatment with the GESIDA “preferred regimens” and DT. Materials and Methods: Economic assessment of costs and efficiency (cost/efficacy through decision tree analysis models. Efficacy was defined as the probability of having viral load <50 copies/mL at week 48, in an intention-to-treat analysis. Cost of initiating treatment with an ART regime was defined as the costs of ART and its consequences (adverse effects, changes of ART regime and drug resistance tests during the first 48 weeks. The payer perspective (Spanish National Health System was applied considering only differential direct costs: ART (official prizes, management of adverse effects, resistance tests, and determination of HLA B*5701. The setting is Spain and the costs are those of 2013. A sensitivity deterministic analysis was conducted, building three scenarios for each regime: base, most favourable and most unfavourable cases. Results: In the base case scenario, the cost of initiating treatment ranges from 5138 euros for DT, to 12,059 euros for tenofovir DF/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC+raltegravir (RAL. The efficacy ranges between 0.66 for abacavir (ABC/3TC+LPV/r and ABC/3TC+atazanavir (ATV/r, and 0.88 for DT. Efficiency, in terms of cost/efficacy, varies between 5817 and 13,930 euros per responder at 48 weeks, for DT and TDF/FTC+RAL respectively. DT is the most efficient regimen in the most favourable (5503 euros per responder and most unfavourable (6169 euros per responder

  20. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor coagonist d-serine suppresses intake of high-preference food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Sho; Kakuta, Shigeru; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kinoshita, Kuni; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kinoshita, Toshio; Yada, Toshihiko; Amano, Naoji; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2015-09-01

    d-Serine is abundant in the forebrain and physiologically important for modulating excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission as a coagonist of synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. NMDA signaling has been implicated in the control of food intake. However, the role of d-serine on appetite regulation is unknown. To clarify the effects of d-serine on appetite, we investigated the effect of oral d-serine ingestion on food intake in three different feeding paradigms (one-food access, two-food choice, and refeeding after 24-h fasting) using three different strains of male mice (C57Bl/6J, BKS, and ICR). The effect of d-serine was also tested in leptin signaling-deficient db/db mice and sensory-deafferented (capsaicin-treated) mice. The expression of orexigenic neuropeptides [neuropeptide Y (Npy) and agouti-related protein (Agrp)] in the hypothalamus was compared in fast/refed experiments. Conditioned taste aversion for high-fat diet (HFD) was tested in the d-serine-treated mice. Under the one-food-access paradigm, some of the d-serine-treated mice showed starvation, but not when fed normal chow. HFD feeding with d-serine ingestion did not cause aversion. Under the two-food-choice paradigm, d-serine suppressed the intake of high-preference food but not normal chow. d-Serine also effectively suppressed HFD intake but not normal chow in db/db mice and sensory-deafferented mice. In addition, d-serine suppressed normal chow intake after 24-h fasting despite higher orexigenic gene expression in the hypothalamus. d-Serine failed to suppress HFD intake in the presence of L-701,324, the selective and full antagonist at the glycine-binding site of the NMDA receptor. Therefore, d-serine suppresses the intake of high-preference food through coagonism toward NMDA receptors. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. A Selective Review of Group Selection in High Dimensional Models

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Jian; Ma, Shuangge

    2012-01-01

    Grouping structures arise naturally in many statistical modeling problems. Several methods have been proposed for variable selection that respect grouping structure in variables. Examples include the group LASSO and several concave group selection methods. In this article, we give a selective review of group selection concerning methodological developments, theoretical properties, and computational algorithms. We pay particular attention to group selection methods involving concave penalties. We address both group selection and bi-level selection methods. We describe several applications of these methods in nonparametric additive models, semiparametric regression, seemingly unrelated regressions, genomic data analysis and genome wide association studies. We also highlight some issues that require further study.

  2. Classroom Assessment Preference of Indonesian Junior High School Teachers in English as Foreign Language Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saefurrohman

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted using a mix method design with 24 Indonesian junior high school English teachers as respondents who completed the questionnaire on classroom assessment practices. Six respondents participated in an interview and observation to further clarify their practices on classroom assessment. The study found that an Indonesian…

  3. Improving Socialization for High School Students with ASD by Using Their Preferred Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegel, Robert; Kim, Sunny; Koegel, Lynn; Schwartzman, Ben

    2013-01-01

    There has been a paucity of research on effective social interventions for adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in inclusive high school settings. The literature, however, suggests that incorporating the student with ASD's special interests into activities may help improve their socialization with typical peers. Within the context…

  4. Level of arterial ligation in rectal cancer surgery: Low tie preferred over high tie. A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Lange (Marilyne); M. Buunen (Mark); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractConsensus does not exist on the level of arterial ligation in rectal cancer surgery. From oncologic considerations, many surgeons apply high tie arterial ligation (level of inferior mesenteric artery). Other strategies include ligation at the level of the superior rectal artery, just cau

  5. Preference Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Furnkranz, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    The topic of preferences is a new branch of machine learning and data mining, and it has attracted considerable attention in artificial intelligence research in previous years. It involves learning from observations that reveal information about the preferences of an individual or a class of individuals. Representing and processing knowledge in terms of preferences is appealing as it allows one to specify desires in a declarative way, to combine qualitative and quantitative modes of reasoning, and to deal with inconsistencies and exceptions in a flexible manner. And, generalizing beyond traini

  6. Silicon-based bulky group-induced remote control and conformational preference in the synthesis and application of isolable atropisomeric amides with secondary alcohol or amine moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xing-Feng; Deng, Wen-Hui; Xu, Zheng; Li, Fu-Wei; Deng, Yuan; Xia, Chun-Gu; Xu, Li-Wen

    2014-04-01

    Remote stereocontrol through conformational transmission along a carbon chain is highly important in synthetic systems and molecular architectures. In this work, the interactional reactivity between a remote silicon-based bulky group and an O-/N-containing functional group has been revealed and determined by lateral lithiation-substitution, desilylation, as well as desilylation-olefination with benzaldehyde. The results suggest considerable information transmission and steric hindrance that can be exploited for the controllable synthesis of atropisomeric molecules. Based on the remote steric effect of a functional group across the aromatic ring of an amide, the construction of isolable atropisomeric amides with functional groups, such as alcohol, amine, and olefin was successfully achieved. All these new atropisomers were obtained in reasonable yield in pure diastereomeric form, and the specific configuration of representative products was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. When do high and low status group members support confrontation? The role of perceived pervasiveness of prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Kimberly Barsamian; Barreto, Manuela; Kaiser, Cheryl R; Rego, Marco Silva

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines how perceived pervasiveness of prejudice differentially affects high and low status group members' support for a low status group member who confronts. In Experiment 1 (N = 228), men and women read a text describing sexism as rare or as pervasive and subsequently indicated their support for a woman who confronted or did not confront a sexist remark. Experiment 2 (N = 324) specified the underlying process using a self-affirmation manipulation. Results show that men were more supportive of confrontation when sexism was perceived to be rare than when it was pervasive. By contrast, women tended to prefer confrontation when sexism was pervasive relative to when it was rare. Personal self-affirmation decreased men's and increased women's support for confrontation when prejudice was rare, suggesting that men's and women's support for confrontation when prejudice is rare is driven by personal impression management considerations. Implications for understanding how members of low and high status groups respond to prejudice are discussed.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide reduces incentive motivation while boosting preference for high reward in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Hunt, Sarah C; Dantzer, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in the development of various psychiatric disorders, including depression. However, the neurobehavioral mechanism involved in this relationship remains elusive. This gap in knowledge may best be filled by evaluating elementary neurobehavioral units affected by inflammation rather than behavioral changes in conventional animal tests of depression. To this end, the current study used a concurrent choice paradigm to evaluate inflammation-induced motivational changes. Male C57BL/6J mice (n=27) were food restricted to between 85 and 90% of their free-feeding weight and were trained to perform a concurrent choice task where they nose-poked for grain rewards on a fixed ratio (FR) 1 schedule (low effort/low reward) and chocolate-flavored rewards on a FR-10 schedule (high effort/high reward). A counterbalanced-within subjects design was used. A single intraperitoneal injection of 0.33 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used to induce peripheral inflammation. Twenty-four hours after LPS administration, mice showed a reduction in the total number of nose pokes. A proportionally greater reduction in nose pokes was observed for grain, resulting in an increase in percent chocolate pellets earned. These behavioral changes cannot be explained by reduced appetite as feeding before the test led to a similar increase in percent chocolate pellets earned but without any decrease in responding. These results indicate that inflammation modulates incentive motivation by affecting willingness to exert effort for reward and not by reducing sensitivity to reward.

  9. Sparse group lasso and high dimensional multinomial classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Hansen, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    group lasso classifier. On three different real data examples the multinomial group lasso clearly outperforms multinomial lasso in terms of achieved classification error rate and in terms of including fewer features for the classification. An implementation of the multinomial sparse group lasso...

  10. Do High Ability Learners Enjoy Learning Alone "or" in Groups? It Depends....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevsky, Lannie

    2015-01-01

    Pedagogical shifts favouring collaborative learning and findings of recent studies have raised concerns regarding the claim that gifted students prefer to learn alone. The purpose of this study was to further investigate if, when and how high ability learners want to work with or without others. The distributions of 416 high ability students (n =…

  11. High-mobility group box-1 in sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, A; Tohme, S; Billiar, T R

    2014-11-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was originally defined as a ubiquitous nuclear protein, but it was later determined that the protein has different roles both inside and outside of cells. Nuclear HMGB1 regulates chromatin structure and gene transcription, whereas cytosolic HMGB1 is involved in inflammasome activation and autophagy. Extracellular HMGB1 has drawn attention because it can bind to related cell signalling transduction receptors, such as the receptor for advanced glycation end products, Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4 and TLR9. It also participates in the development and progression of a variety of diseases. HMGB1 is actively secreted by stimulation of the innate immune system, and it is passively released by ischaemia or cell injury. This review focuses on the important role of HMGB1 in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic sterile inflammatory conditions. Strategies that target HMGB1 have been shown to significantly decrease inflammation in several disease models of sterile inflammation, and this may represent a promising clinical approach for treatment of certain conditions associated with sterile inflammation. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-11

    The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

  13. An investigation of the use of high- and low-preference food as a reinforcer for increased activity of individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, M L; Taylor, R L; Bloom, S R

    1986-12-01

    The results of this study provide information that might be used to develop an approach to weight loss management for individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome that emphasizes the increase of output. Specifically, our finding that they do have a definite food preference and, subsequently, that they prefer a lesser amount of the high-preference food than a greater amount of low-preference food is contradictory to several non-empirical reports (Holm, 1981; Pipes & Holm, 1981). Further, the use of food as a reinforcer has been considered taboo by those who use more conventional and restrictive management approaches with Prader-Willi syndrome individuals. Our data, however, strongly suggest that a low volume of food can be used as an effective reinforcer for increased activity and exercise.

  14. Measuring Acceptability and Preferences for Implementation of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Using Conjoint Analysis: An Application to Primary HIV Prevention Among High Risk Drug Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Roman; Karki, Pramila; Altice, Frederick L; Dubov, Oleksandr; Fraenkel, Liana; Huedo-Medina, Tania; Copenhaver, Michael

    2017-07-10

    Although people who use drugs (PWUD) are one of the key risk populations who could benefit from the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), to date, little attention has been given to incorporating PrEP into HIV prevention approaches targeting this underserved group. This study investigated the acceptability of PrEP based on a number of known PrEP attributes among high-risk PWUD in a drug treatment setting. A total of 400 HIV-negative PWUD, who reported drug- and/or sex-related risk behaviors were recruited from a methadone clinic to complete a stated preference (full-profile conjoint) survey. Participants ranked the eight hypothetical PrEP program scenarios with varied combinations of six attributes related to PrEP (cost, dosing, efficacy, side-effects, treatment setting, and frequency of HIV testing). SPSS conjoint procedure was used to estimate the relative importance of each attribute and preferences across eight possible PrEP delivery programs. PrEP acceptability ranged from 30.6 to 86.3% with a mean acceptability of 56.2% across the eight hypothetical PrEP program scenarios. The PrEP program scenario with the highest acceptability had the following attribute levels: insurance covered, daily dosing, 95% effective, no side-effects, treatment at HIV clinic, and HIV testing needed every 6 months. The cost associated with PrEP was the most important attribute (relative importance score: RIS = 38.8), followed by efficacy (RIS = 20.5) and side effects (RIS = 11.9); other attributes had no significant effect. Our findings reported a high acceptability of PrEP in response to different PrEP program scenarios with different attribute profiles. As the result of having this information, researchers and policymakers will be better equipped for evidence informed targeting and dissemination efforts to optimize PrEP uptake among this underserved population.

  15. DETERMINANTS OF SMALLHOLDERS’ PREFERENCE TO HYBRIDS – PROSPECT FOR UPGRADING TO HIGH-VALUE FOOD CHAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe Ejigu Alemu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid coordination systems (marketing cooperatives and contracts are in place in agriculture to link smallholder farmers to the global agri-food value chains. With the framework of transaction cost economics, this study, however, is particularly designed to investigate the key determinants pushing dairy farmers to hybrids (marketing cooperatives and contracts, viz. spot market channels in the local food chains. A household survey of 415 smallholder dairy farmers was designed. Data collection was administered using trained enumerators. A multinomial logistic regression model was employed to analyze data and to identify the signifi cant determinants. The results indicate that high transaction costs and resource constraints were found driving farmers to cooperative engagement and contracts, implying that hybrids were found to be a solution to farmers’ constraints of access to information and institutional absence, as well as resource constraints. Policy makers and development partners are advised to strengthen cooperative societies and contract enforcement mechanisms. Providing information and resources to increase smallholders’ capacity with resources appear to be interventions which will enable the agricultural marketing system to properly function by serving smallholders in linking to the global food chains.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of p-Type SnO Thin Film with High c-Axis Preferred Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yanli; Liu, Wuguang; Shi, Jingtao; Chen, Zimin; Wang, Gang

    2016-11-01

    p-Type tin monoxide (SnO) thin films with high c-axis preferred orientation have been fabricated on quartz substrate via electron-beam evaporation at 280°C. Subsequently, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was performed in N2 atmosphere at 400°C to 800°C. Their structural, chemical, optical, and electrical properties were investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Hall-effect measurements. The c-axis-oriented films of Sn-rich SnO presented excellent thermal stability up to RTA at 700°C. Both the crystallization and the hole Hall mobility were enhanced with increasing RTA temperature, with Hall mobility of 16 cm2 V-1 s-1 being obtained after RTA at 700°C. It was considered that the presence of defects and low scattering from grain boundaries contributed to this high Hall mobility. RTA annealing temperature above 700°C induced chemical reaction between SnO and the quartz substrate, with a change of the film to amorphous state with Sn4+ formation.

  17. Social preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this article is social divisions among preschool children in daycare centers. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in three daycare centers in Denmark, the analysis concerns young children’s social preferences. The ethnographic material shows that despite an explicit political ambition...... of daycares as means for social and cultural integration, lines of division do exist amongst the children. Such divisions are established in the daily interactions of the daycare, but they also reflect those of the broader society. With a focus on children’s interactions and social preferences, the material...

  18. Strategies used by parents to influence their children's food preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Catherine G; Worsley, Anthony; Campbell, Karen J

    2015-07-01

    Food preferences are important determinants of children's food intakes. Parental feeding behaviours have a significant influence on the development of children's food preferences. The aim of the present study was to describe the ways in which parents attempt to influence their children's food preferences. Parents of 2-5 year old children participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews, which were transcribed and content analysed using a thematic coding manual. The parents described the ways in which they tried to influence the foods their child liked and disliked. Participants (N = 57) were separated into three separate groups based on an a priori study measuring food preferences and food neophobia: those who either had children with healthy food preferences (i.e. closely aligned with dietary guidelines) (N = 20), or unhealthy food preferences (i.e. not closely aligned with dietary guidelines) (N = 18), or high levels of food neophobia (N = 19). The parents used many, diverse behaviours to influence their child's food preferences. Some of these behaviours were likely to be effective in promoting healthy food preferences in children (e.g. parental modelling, food exposure), whilst others were likely to be ineffective (e.g. forcing consumption, restricting food access). Parents of children with healthy food preferences appeared to use more of the feeding behaviours predicted to promote healthy preferences than parents in the other two groups. Parents of children with unhealthy food preferences and those of food neophobic children appeared to rely more on ineffective behaviours. Parents used a mixture of effective and ineffective behaviours, with parents of children with unhealthy food preferences or high food neophobia using fewer behaviours known to be effective. Interventions aimed at influencing parental feeding behaviours should include those behaviours targeted at children's food preferences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Sparse group lasso and high dimensional multinomial classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Hansen, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    algorithm is available in the R package msgl. Its performance scales well with the problem size as illustrated by one of the examples considered - a 50 class classification problem with 10 k features, which amounts to estimating 500 k parameters. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.......The sparse group lasso optimization problem is solved using a coordinate gradient descent algorithm. The algorithm is applicable to a broad class of convex loss functions. Convergence of the algorithm is established, and the algorithm is used to investigate the performance of the multinomial sparse...... group lasso classifier. On three different real data examples the multinomial group lasso clearly outperforms multinomial lasso in terms of achieved classification error rate and in terms of including fewer features for the classification. An implementation of the multinomial sparse group lasso...

  20. CONSUMER PREFERENCES FOR TABLE OLIVES IN TIRANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvina Merkaj

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Table olive production sector is undergoing rapid changes, as the government is undertaking an ambitious program supporting the expansion of olive grove plantations. Despite the increase in domestic production, import of table olive is still high, due to constraints in quantity and quality of domestically supplied olives. In the context of import substitution strategy, embraced by producers and policy-makers, it is important to analyze the consumer preferences for table olives. The objective of this paper is to segment the table olive market according to preferences for table olives attributes applying Conjoint Choice Experiment (CCE and Latent Class Analysis to collect and analyze the data. The research results show a strong consumer preference for domestic table olives whereas preferences for other attributes vary between consumer groups.

  1. Women's antenatal preferences for delivery route in a setting with high cesarean section rates and a medically dominated maternity system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweik, Diána; Girasek, Edmond; Töreki, Annamária; Mészáros, Gyula; Pál, Attila

    2014-04-01

    To assess birth preferences in a sample of Hungarian pregnant women and identify determinants of ambivalence or clear choices for cesarean section throughout pregnancy. Follow-up two-point questionnaire survey. University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Hungary. A total of 413 women with singleton pregnancies where there was no awareness of medical contradictions to vaginal delivery, attending for routine ultrasound examination in mid-pregnancy from November 2011 to March 2012. Questionnaires completed in mid- and late pregnancy (gestational weeks 18-22 and 35-37) including the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire A. Prevalence of women preferring cesarean section or being uncertain about what delivery route to choose, in case they had the choice; their demographic characteristics, attitudes toward birth issues and their Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire A scores, compared with women consistent in their preference for vaginal delivery. Of the 413 respondents, 365 (88.4%) were consistent in their preference for vaginal delivery. In logistic regression models the important contributors to describing preferences for cesarean section or uncertain preferences were previous cesarean section and maternal belief that cesarean section is more beneficial than vaginal delivery. The majority of pregnant women preferred vaginal delivery to cesarean section. Neither a higher Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire A score nor sociodemographic differences were important determinants of a preference for cesarean section or for an uncertain preference. On the other hand, previous cesarean section and certain preconceived maternal attitudes towards delivery were characteristic for these women. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. A qualitative study of the relationship of personality type with career management and career choice preference in a group of bioscience postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Blackford, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the career management and career choice preferences of a sample of bioscience postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers according to their personality type as determined using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Correlations can be found but other decision-making processes come into play and are more influential regarding career choices

  3. A qualitative study of the relationship of personality type with career management and career choice preference in a group of bioscience postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Blackford, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the career management and career choice preferences of a sample of bioscience postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers according to their personality type as determined using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Correlations can be found but other decision-making processes come into play and are more influential regarding career choices

  4. Average Exceptional Lie Group Hierarchy and High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    El Naschie, M S

    2008-01-01

    Starting from an invariant total dimension for an exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy, we drive all the essential characteristic and coupling constants of the fundamental interactions of physics. It is shown in a most simplistic fashion that all physical fields are various transfinite scaling transformation and topological deformation of each other. An extended standard model on the other hand turned out to be a compact sub group H of a version of E7 exceptional Lie group E7(−5) with dimH =69. Thus particle physics, electromagnetism as well as gravity and the bulk are all representable via modular spaces akin to the famous compactified version of F. Klein’s modular curve.

  5. The Highly Perturbed X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    The NGC 5044 group is the X-ray brightest group in the sky and hosts many small X-ray cavities that were inflated by weak AGN outbursts. The cumulative effect of many weak AGN outbursts may be the dominant reheating mechanism in cooling flows. While AGN feedback probably prevents the bulk of gas from cooling in NGC 5044, the presence of molecular structures, Halpha filaments, [CII] emission and star formation indicates that at least some gas is able to condense out of the hot phase. The near by 5044 group is the best target for detecting small X-ray cavities with Chandra and investigating the cumulative effect of repeated weak AGN outbursts. The wealth of multi-frequency data also makes NGC 5044 an ideal target for studying gas over a broad range of temperatures in a cooling flow.

  6. Oral noribogaine shows high brain uptake and anti-withdrawal effects not associated with place preference in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Deborah C; Ameer, Barbara; Prou, Delphine; Howes, John F; Maillet, Emeline L

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of noribogaine, the principal metabolite of the drug ibogaine, on substance-related disorders. In the first experiment, mice chronically treated with morphine were subjected to naloxone-precipitated withdrawal two hours after oral administration of noribogaine. Oral noribogaine dose dependently decreased the global opiate withdrawal score by up to 88% of vehicle control with an ED50 of 13 mg/kg. In the second experiment, blood and brain levels of noribogaine showed a high brain penetration and a brain/blood ratio of 7±1 across all doses tested. In a third experiment, rats given oral noribogaine up to 100 mg/kg were tested for abuse liability using a standard biased conditioned place paradigm. Noribogaine-treated rats did not display place preference, suggesting that noribogaine is not perceived as a hedonic stimulus in rodents. Retrospective review of published studies assessing the efficacy of ibogaine on morphine withdrawal shows that the most likely cause of the discrepancies in the literature is the different routes of administration and time of testing following ibogaine administration. These results suggest that the metabolite noribogaine rather than the parent compound mediates the effects of ibogaine on blocking naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Noribogaine may hold promise as a non-addicting alternative to standard opiate replacement therapies to transition patients to opiate abstinence.

  7. Improving nutritional management within high-risk groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Berg, van den M.G.A.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Staveren, van W.A.; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.; Weel, van C.

    2009-01-01

    The current pitfalls and future possibilities of nutritional management are discussed by two patients with tongue cancer who have suffered from substantial weight loss. Their nutritional problems are illustrative of those among other (cancer) patient groups. The main concerns are the lack of early c

  8. Highly Scalable Trip Grouping for Large Scale Collective Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Risch, Tore

    2008-01-01

    Transportation-related problems, like road congestion, parking, and pollution, are increasing in most cities. In order to reduce traffic, recent work has proposed methods for vehicle sharing, for example for sharing cabs by grouping "closeby" cab requests and thus minimizing transportation cost...

  9. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghi Kim

    2015-01-01

    The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data.

  10. Mutations to Less-Preferred Synonymous Codons in a Highly Expressed Gene of Escherichia coli: Fitness and Epistatic Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hauber

    Full Text Available Codon-tRNA coevolution to maximize protein production has been, until recently, the dominant hypothesis to explain codon-usage bias in highly expressed bacterial genes. Two predictions of this hypothesis are 1 selection is weak; and 2 similar silent replacements at different codons should have similar fitness consequence. We used an allele-replacement strategy to change five specific 3rd-codon-position (silent sites in the highly expressed Escherichia coli ribosomal protein gene rplQ from the wild type to a less-preferred alternative. We introduced the five mutations within a 10-codon region. Four of the silent sites were chosen to test the second prediction, with a CTG to CTA mutation being introduced at two closely linked leucine codons and an AAA to AAG mutation being introduced at two closely linked lysine codons. We also introduced a fifth silent mutation, a GTG to GTA mutation at a valine codon in the same genic region. We measured the fitness effect of the individual mutations by competing each single-mutant strain against the parental wild-type strain, using a disrupted form of the araA gene as a selectively neutral phenotypic marker to distinguish between strains in direct competition experiments. Three of the silent mutations had a fitness effect of |s| > 0.02, which is contradictory to the prediction that selection will be weak. The two leucine mutations had significantly different fitness effects, as did the two lysine mutations, contradictory to the prediction that similar mutations at different codons should have similar fitness effects. We also constructed a strain carrying all five silent mutations in combination. Its fitness effect was greater than that predicted from the individual fitness values, suggesting that negative synergistic epistasis acts on the combination allele.

  11. Drug Preferences of Multiple Drug Abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Examined drug preferences of a group of active multiple drug abusers referred for treatment. Nearly half the respondents preferred drugs other than type they most frequently used. Preferences were related to method of administration. Results suggest preference is one among several determinants of drug use. (Author/BEF)

  12. Social preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2014-01-01

    indicates that children’s choices of playmates run along lines of ethnic and class divisions. The article will address this pattern and analyze its causes in order to understand why such lines of divisions are to be found in an institutional context designed to overcome social inequality and prevent social......The focus of this article is social divisions among preschool children in daycare centers. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in three daycare centers in Denmark, the analysis concerns young children’s social preferences. The ethnographic material shows that despite an explicit political ambition...... of daycares as means for social and cultural integration, lines of division do exist amongst the children. Such divisions are established in the daily interactions of the daycare, but they also reflect those of the broader society. With a focus on children’s interactions and social preferences, the material...

  13. Sequential effects in preference decision: Prior preference assimilates current preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seah; Kim, Chai-Youn; Cho, Yang Seok

    2017-01-01

    An important factor affecting preference formation is the context in which that preference decision takes place. The current research examined whether one's preference formed for a previously presented stimulus influences the processing of a subsequent preference decision, henceforth referred to as the preference sequence effect. Using a novel sequential rating/judgment paradigm, the present study demonstrated the presence of a preference sequence effect using artistic photographs and face stimuli: A neutral stimulus was preferred more following a preferable stimulus than a less preferable stimulus. Furthermore, a similar trend was found even when the potential influence of response bias was controlled. These results suggest that an assimilative sequential effect exists even when sequential judgments are made solely based on one's subjective feeling; preference formed for a preceding stimulus modulates preference for a subsequent stimulus. This implies the need for a consideration of trial sequence as a factor creating a psychological context affecting the subsequent preference decisions.

  14. A gestational diet high in fat-soluble vitamins alters expression of genes in brain pathways and reduces sucrose preference, but not food intake, in Wistar male rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Diana; Poon, Abraham N; Kubant, Ruslan; Kim, Hwanki; Huot, Pedro S P; Cho, Clara E; Pannia, Emanuela; Pausova, Zdenka; Anderson, G Harvey

    2015-04-01

    High intakes of multivitamins (HV) during pregnancy by Wistar rats increase food intake, body weight, and characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in male offspring. In this study, high-fat soluble vitamins were fed in combination during gestation to test the hypothesis that they partially account for the effects of the HV diet. Pregnant Wistar rats (14-16/group) were fed a recommended multivitamin diet (1-fold all vitamins) or high-fat soluble vitamin diet (HFS; 10-fold vitamins A, D, E, and K) during pregnancy. Offspring body weight, food intake, and preference as well as expression of selected genes in the hypothalamus and hippocampus were evaluated at birth, weaning, and 14 weeks postweaning. Body weight and food intake were not affected but sucrose preference decreased by 4% in those born to dams fed the HFS gestational diet. Gene expressions of the hypothalamic anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) and orexogenic neuropeptide Y (Npy) (∼30% p = 0.008, ∼40% p = 0.007) were increased in weaning and adult rats, respectively. Hippocampal dopaminergic genes (35%-50% p food intake but may affect the development of higher hedonic regulatory pathways associated with food preference.

  15. Distribution of influenza vaccine to high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ompad, Danielle C; Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

    2006-01-01

    Vaccine distribution programs have historically targeted individuals at high risk of complications due to influenza. Despite recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, vaccination coverage among high-risk populations has been generally low. This review systematically summarizes the recent literature evaluating programs in different settings, from within medical settings to venue-based and community-based approaches, in an effort to identify successful program components. The published literature was identified by using the MEDLINE database from 1990 to 2006 covering studies that reported on interventions or programs aimed at vaccinating high-risk populations. The authors reviewed 56 studies. In the United States, the Healthy People 2010 goals included 90% vaccination coverage for adults aged > or = 65 years and 60% for high-risk adults aged 18-64 years. Only a handful of the studies reviewed managed to meet those goals. Interventions that increased vaccination coverage to Healthy People 2010 goals included advertising, provider and patient mailings, registry-based telephone calls, patient and staff education, standing orders coupled with standardized forms, targeting of syringe exchange customers, and visiting nurses. Few studies evaluated the impact of vaccination programs by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Few studies targeted individuals outside of the health-care and social services sectors. Given the growing disparities in health and health-care access, understanding the way in which interventions can remedy disparities is crucial.

  16. Determining Preferences Related to HIV Counselling and Testing Services Among High School Learners in KwaZulu-Natal: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Michael; George, Gavin L; Rhodes, Bruce D

    2016-11-16

    A key strategy of the South African national response to HIV is the scale-up of HIV counselling and testing (HCT) in the 15-49 years age group. The integrated school health policy aims to guide the roll out of youth-friendly health services including the provision of HCT in schools. Using a discrete choice experiment to examine preferences regarding the attributes of HCT service packages, this study identifies barriers to and facilitators of HCT among high school learners. Monetary considerations were found to have the strongest effect of any attribute on choice, whilst confidentiality was found to be a primary concern for learners considering HCT. Policy makers and service providers must ensure that confidentiality is maintained, and could consider using monetary incentives as a way of increasing uptake of HCT. Programmes designed to reduce social stigma and improve education and knowledge dissemination around HCT and HIV, are vital in creating demand for HCT and changing attitudes among young people.

  17. Collection Preferences of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Richard T.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Eighty nursery school and upper elementary school children selected picture cards from varying stimulus arrays in order to indicate their preference for unorganized mixed collections, groups of identical cards, or sets of different cards that together formed a whole figure. (CW)

  18. Sunshine Group Builds High-End Aluminum Product Industrial Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    In order to propel development of the aluminum industry to move toward featured,specialized,and ecological directions,Sunlight Sanyuan Aluminum Company plans to expropriate 300 mu of land in Hanjiang District of Putian City,Fujian province,where it plans to construct high-end aluminum product industrial park,introduce the world’s most advanced fully automatic production equipment and technologies for aluminum profile and

  19. Cultural legacies and political preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hechter, Michael Norman; Siroky, David; Mueller, Sean

    2015-01-01

    , ecological constraints such as geography and topography affect social interaction with like-minded individuals. On the basis of both these political preferences and ecological constraints, individuals then make rational choices about the desirability of secession. Instrumental considerations are therefore...... that cultural identities matter for explaining secessionism, but not because of primordial attachments. Rather, religious and linguistic groups matter because their members are imbued with cultural legacies that lead to distinct political preferences – in this case preferences over welfare statism. Further...

  20. High-performance functional Renormalization Group calculations for interacting fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, J.; Sánchez de la Peña, D.; Rohe, D.; Di Napoli, E.; Honerkamp, C.; Maier, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    We derive a novel computational scheme for functional Renormalization Group (fRG) calculations for interacting fermions on 2D lattices. The scheme is based on the exchange parametrization fRG for the two-fermion interaction, with additional insertions of truncated partitions of unity. These insertions decouple the fermionic propagators from the exchange propagators and lead to a separation of the underlying equations. We demonstrate that this separation is numerically advantageous and may pave the way for refined, large-scale computational investigations even in the case of complex multiband systems. Furthermore, on the basis of speedup data gained from our implementation, it is shown that this new variant facilitates efficient calculations on a large number of multi-core CPUs. We apply the scheme to the t ,t‧ Hubbard model on a square lattice to analyze the convergence of the results with the bond length of the truncation of the partition of unity. In most parameter areas, a fast convergence can be observed. Finally, we compare to previous results in order to relate our approach to other fRG studies.

  1. Acute ghrelin changes food preference from a high-fat diet to chow during binge-like eating in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bake, T; Hellgren, K T; Dickson, S L

    2017-04-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone released from the empty stomach, provides a gut-brain signal that promotes many appetitive behaviours, including anticipatory and goal-directed behaviours for palatable treats high in sugar and/or fat. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether ghrelin is able to influence and/or may even have a role in binge-like eating behaviour in rodents. Accordingly, we used a palatable scheduled feeding (PSF) paradigm in which ad lib. chow-fed rodents are trained to 'binge' on a high-fat diet (HFD) offered each day for a limited period of 2 hours. After 2 weeks of habituation to this paradigm, on the test day and immediately prior to the 2-hour PSF, rats were administered ghrelin or vehicle solution by the i.c.v. route. Remarkably and unexpectedly, during the palatable scheduled feed, when rats normally only binge on the HFD, those injected with i.c.v. ghrelin started to eat more chow and chow intake remained above baseline for the rest of the 24-hour day. We identify the ventral tegmental area (VTA) (a key brain area involved in food reward) as a substrate involved because these effects could be reproduced, in part, by intra-VTA delivery of ghrelin. Fasting, which increases endogenous ghrelin, immediately prior to a palatable schedule feed also increased chow intake during/after the schedule feed but, in contrast to ghrelin injection, did not reduce HFD intake. Chronic continuous central ghrelin infusion over several weeks enhanced binge-like behaviour in palatable schedule fed rats. Over a 4-week period, GHS-R1A-KO mice were able to adapt and maintain large meals of HFD in a manner similar to wild-type mice, suggesting that ghrelin signalling may not have a critical role in the acquisition or maintenance in this kind of feeding behaviour. In conclusion, ghrelin appears to act as a modulating factor for binge-like eating behaviour by shifting food preference towards a more nutritious choice (from HFD to chow), with these effects

  2. Differences between Mobile Learning Environmental Preferences of High School Teachers and Students in Taiwan: A Structural Equation Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chiu-Lin; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology has been increasingly applied to educational settings in the past decade. Although researchers have attempted to investigate both students' and teachers' preferences regarding mobile learning, few studies have investigated the differences between the two, an understanding of which is important for developing effective mobile…

  3. The Influence of Emotions and Learning Preferences on Learning Strategy Use before Transition into High-Achiever Track Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obergriesser, Stefanie; Stoeger, Heidrun

    2016-01-01

    Research on the relationships between students' achievement emotions and their (self-regulated) learning behavior is growing. However, little is known about the relationships between students' learning preferences and achievement emotions and the extent to which these influence learning strategies. In this study we, first, looked at the…

  4. Predicting High School Student Use of Learning Strategies: The Role of Preferred Learning Styles and Classroom Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Jehanzeb; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the predictiveness of preferred learning styles (competitive and cooperative) and classroom climate (teacher support and disciplinary climate) on learning strategy use in mathematics. The student survey part of the Programme for International Student Assessment 2003 comprising of 4633 US observations was used in a weighted…

  5. Predicting High School Student Use of Learning Strategies: The Role of Preferred Learning Styles and Classroom Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Jehanzeb; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the predictiveness of preferred learning styles (competitive and cooperative) and classroom climate (teacher support and disciplinary climate) on learning strategy use in mathematics. The student survey part of the Programme for International Student Assessment 2003 comprising of 4633 US observations was used in a weighted…

  6. The 2-(Triphenylsilylethoxycarbonyl-(“Tpseoc”- Group: A New Silicon-Based, Fluoride Cleavable Oxycarbonyl Protecting Group Highly Orthogonal to the Boc-, Fmoc- and Cbz-Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Golkowski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from 2-(triphenylsilylethanol a new oxycarbonyl protecting group cleavable by fluoride ion induced Peterson-elimination has been developed. Known 2-(triphenylsilylethanol has been prepared from commercially available triphenylvinyl-silane by a hydroboration-oxidation sequence using the sterically hindered borane reagent 9-BBN. The silyl alcohol was subsequently transformed into its chloroformate, imidazolylcarboxylic acid ester and p-nitrophenyl carbonate and used in standard protocols for the formation of carbamates and carbonates. The Tpseoc group proved to be highly resistant against acidic conditions applied in removal of tert-butyl esters and the t-Boc-group. It also withstood catalytic hydrogenation, treatment with morpholine, methylhydrazine and Pd-reagents/allyl-scavanger combinations, conditions required to cleave Cbz-, Fmoc-, phthalimide- and Alloc-groups. The Tpseoc-group is cleaved upon treatment with TBAF/CsF at 0 °C or r.t. with cleavage times reaching from

  7. Short Circuits or Superconductors? Effects of Group Composition on High-Achieving Students' Science Assessment Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.; Nemer, Kariane Mari; Zuniga, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effects of group ability composition (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) on group processes and outcomes for high-ability students completing science assessments. Results for 83 high ability students show the quality of group functioning serves as the strongest predictor of high-ability students' performance and explained much of the…

  8. 二元语义处理不同偏好评价信息的群决策方法%Group decision making method based on two-tuple linguistic with different forms of preference evaluation information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩二东; 郭鹏; 赵静

    2015-01-01

    The group decision making problem with six forms of preference evaluation information is proposed, the pref-erence evaluation information are preference ordering of the alternatives, utility values, fuzzy judgement matrix, multiplicative judgement matrix, interval fuzzy numbers and triangular fuzzy numbers, from the definition of preference information, transforming different forms of preference information to two-tuple linguistic judgement matrices with transformation functions, effectiveness and rationality of the transformation are demonstrated, the Two-tuple linguistic Weighting Arithmetic Average(T-WAA) operator is utilized to aggregate the transformed two-tuple linguistic judgement matrices, then the group two-tuple linguistic judgement matrix is obtained, based on the Two-tuple Ordered Weighting Average(T-OWA) operator, the entirety preference level of one alternative superior to all the other alternatives is calculated, the rank list of alternatives is the final conclusion. An illustrative example analysis shows the effectiveness and feasibility of this approach.%针对具有序关系值、效用值、互反判断矩阵、互补判断矩阵、区间模糊数、三角模糊数六种不同偏好评价信息的群决策问题,根据偏好信息的实际意义,通过转换函数将不同偏好信息一致化为二元语义判断矩阵形式,阐明转化方法的合理性与有效性,采用二元语义加权算术平均(T-WAA)算子集结转化后的二元语义判断矩阵,得到群体二元语义判断矩阵,基于二元语义有序加权平均(T-OWA)算子计算某方案优于其他所有方案的整体偏好程度,从而对方案排序择优。算例分析表明该群决策方法的有效性与合理性。

  9. A group decision making method based on double hesitant linguistic preference relations%基于双重犹豫语言偏好关系的群决策方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵娜; 徐泽水

    2016-01-01

    针对决策小组权重未知、方案的偏好信息以双重犹豫语言偏好关系形式给出的群决策问题,提出了一种简单决策方法。首先,为准确、全面地描述群决策过程中的不确定评估信息,定义双重犹豫语言数,并根据定义的运算法则,提出双重犹豫语言加权平均算子。其次,定义双重犹豫语言偏好关系,并利用单个决策小组对方案偏好信息得分值的标准差和其偏好信息得分值与其他决策小组偏好信息得分值的相关系数,提出一种客观确定决策小组权重的方法,进而提出一种基于双重犹豫语言偏好关系的群决策方法。同时,通过九甸峡水库运行方案选择实例说明该方法的可行性和有效性。最后,将该方法与现有方法进行比较,结果表明,所提出的方法能够直接处理双重犹豫语言偏好信息,不需要进行信息转化,从而可以减少原始决策信息的丢失。%A simple decision method is proposed to solve the group decision making problems in which the weights of decision organizations are unknown and the preferences for alternatives are provided by double hesitant linguistic preference relations. First, double hesitant linguistic elements are defined as representing the uncertain assessment information in the process of group decision making accurately and comprehensively, and the double hesitant linguistic weighted averaging operator is developed based on the defined operational laws for double hesitant linguistic elements. Then, double hesitant linguistic preference relations are defined and a means to objectively determine the weights of decision organizations is put forward using the standard deviation of scores of preferences provided by the individual decision organization for alternatives. Finally the correlation coefficient between the scores of preferences and the scores of preferences are provided by the other decision organizations

  10. Basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area with reference to high level radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Ryul; Park, J. K.; Hwang, D. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, H. S.; Kim, D. Y.; Park, H. S.; Koo, S. B.; Cho, J. D.; Kim, K. E. [Korea Inst. of Geology, Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area to develope underground disposal technique of high level radioactive waste in future. The study has been done for the crystalline rocks(especially granitic rocks) with emphasis of abandoned metallic mines and uranium ore deposits, and for the geological structure study by using gravity and aeromagnetic data. 138 refs., 54 tabs., 130 figs. (author)

  11. Resident’s Floor Level Preference in High-Rise Residential Buildings in China:A Case Study of Shijiazhuang City,Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun; Pingjun; Wang; Ying; Pang; Ruiqiu; Song; Xinyan

    2016-01-01

    With the constant advance of global urbanization and aggravation of urban construction land scarcity,high-rise residential buildings have become one of the main carriers of urban residential function on account of both land saving and large housing requirement.However,relevant studies on consumers’ floor selection preference in high-rise residential buildings,regarding what inherent and regular features and causes it has,are still insufficient,despite that related issues have important practical significance for real estate developers and designers’ decision making in terms of dwelling size ratio,floor area,indoor layout,and so on.This study,based on systematic examination of existing domestic and international researches,seeks to make empirical tests and generalization on the above issues from the aspect of "utility function"(safety,comfortableness,accessibility and economic efficiency) of the living environment that impacted by different floor levels,and floor selection features regarding consumers’ social and family structure attributes,as well as the intrinsic correlation between them.The results show the existence of floor level preference in high-rise residential buildings.Its essence is a personalized characterization of consumers’ social and family structures’ attributes in selecting the "utility function" of the living environment,as the preference value differs under various attributes including gender,age,income,family members and others.

  12. High and Low Consensus Groups: A Content and Relational Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStephen, Rolayne S.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed the complete interaction of high and low consensus groups in a basic small group course. Interaction analysis indicated that both the relational and content levels of communication are significantly different for high versus low consensus groups. The conclusion that increased feedback leads to decision satisfaction was confirmed. (JAC)

  13. Measuring customer preferences in the German statutory health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendzialek, Jonas B; Simic, Dusan; Stock, Stephanie

    2017-09-01

    This paper investigates consumer preferences in the German statutory health insurance market. It further aims to test whether preferences differ by age and health status. Evidence is provided by a discrete choice experiment conducted in 2014 using the six most important attributes in sickness fund competition and ten random generated choice sets per participant. Price is found to be the most important attribute followed by additional benefits, managed care programmes, and distance to nearest branch. Other positive attributes of sickness funds are found to balance out a higher price, which would allow a sickness fund to position itself as high quality. However, significant differences in preferences were found between age and health status group. In particular, compromised health is associated with higher preference for illness-related additional benefits and less distance to the lowest branch, but lower preference for a lower price. Based on these differences, a distinct sickness fund offer could be constructed that would allow passive risk selection.

  14. 考虑专家偏好关联的群决策方法及其应用%Group decision making method and application with interactions among experts' preferences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石福丽; 许永平; 杨峰

    2013-01-01

    By analyzing group decision making processes, it is proposed that there may be some interactions among experts' preferences which can be described by fuzzy measures, and a group decision making method with interactions among experts' preferences is proposed. The method is based on the resemblance degree between the experts' knowledge and between the experts' comparison matrices, and the 2-additive fuzzy measures are calculated to represent the importance of experts. Choquet integral is used as the aggregation operators to obtain group's preference. Finally, an example of naval submarine demonstration is given to show the feasibility and rationality of the proposed method.%通过分析群决策过程,提出使用模糊测度描述专家偏好之间可能存在的关联关系,并给出了一种考虑专家偏好关联的群决策方法.该方法从参评专家知识结构的相似性及判断结果的相似性出发,通过计算得到相应的2-可加模糊测度来描述专家的重要程度,并使用Choquet积分将多个专家的偏好信息聚合为群体的判断结果.最后,通过一个潜艇装备论证的例子验证了所提出方法的可行性和合理性.

  15. Taste preference changes throughout different life stages in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Ueda, Katsura; Nakatsuka, Michiko; Kumabe, Shunji; Inui, Tadashi; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2017-01-01

    Taste preference, a key component of food choice, changes with aging. However, it remains unclear how this occurs. To determine differences in taste preference between rats in different life stages, we examined the consumption of taste solutions and water using a two-bottle test. Male Sprague-Dawley rats of different ages were used: juvenile (3–6 weeks), young adult (8–11 weeks), adult (17–20 weeks), middle-aged (34–37 weeks), and old-aged (69–72 weeks). The intakes of the high and low concentration solutions presented simultaneously were measured. We observed that the old-aged group had lower preference ratios for 0.3 M sucrose and 0.1 M MSG in comparison with other groups. The preference ratio for 0.03 mM QHCl was higher in the middle-aged group than in the three younger groups and higher in the old-aged group than the juvenile group. The taste preferences for HCl and NaCl did not significantly differ among the age groups. The old-aged group tended to prefer high concentrations of sucrose, QHCl, NaCl, and MSG to low concentrations, indicating age-related decline in taste sensitivity. We also aimed to investigate differences between life stages in the electrophysiological responses of the chorda tympani nerve, one of the peripheral gustatory nerves, to taste stimuli. The electrophysiological recordings showed that aging did not alter the function of the chorda tympani nerve. This study showed that aging induced alterations in taste preference. It is likely that these alterations are a result of functional changes in other peripheral taste nerves, the gastrointestinal system, or the central nervous system. PMID:28742813

  16. ICE CRAWLERS (GRYLLOBLATTODEA – THE HISTORY OF THE INVESTIGATION OF A HIGHLY UNUSUAL GROUP OF INSECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Wipfler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Grylloblattodea are one of the most unusual groups of insects and the second smallest order. All known extant species are wingless and exhibit a remarkable preference for cold temperatures. Although their morphology was intensively investigated shortly after their discovery, the systematic position has been disputed for a long time. The placement of Grylloblattodea as sister-group to the recently described Mantophasamtodea is supported by morphological and molecular evidence. However, the relationships of this clade, Xenonomia, among the polyneopteran lineages is not clear. Transcriptome analyses, in addition to the study of winged grylloblattodean fossils, may help to clarify the position of Xenonomia and aid in the reconstruction of the “phylogenetic backbone” of Polyneoptera.

  17. SOCIAL PARTICIPATION OF DIABETES AND EX-LEPROSY PATIENTS IN THE NETHERLANDS AND PATIENT PREFERENCE FOR COMBINED SELF-CARE GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry John Christiaan De Vries

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier we showed that neuropathic complications limit social participation of ex-leprosy patients, even in a non-endemic leprosy setting like the Netherlands. Self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients can strengthen self-worth of participants, prevent further handicap, and enable the exchange of coping strategies. For non-endemic leprosy settings with a very low rate of leprosy patients a self-care group exclusively for (exleprosy patients is not likely to be feasible. A combined group with patients facing comparable morbidity would be more efficient than disease specific self-care groups. Here, we studied the comparability in social constraints of diabetic patients and ex-leprosy patients. Moreover, we investigated if combined self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients and diabetic patients would be desirable and acceptable for possible participants.Methods: Social participation was studied based on in-depth interviews and Participation Scale information collected from 41 diabetic patients and compared with the data of 31 ex-leprosy patients from a prior study. Moreover, we made an inventory of potential strengths and limitations and attitudes towards combined self-care groups for diabetic patients with neuropathy.Results: The following themes emerged among diabetic patients: disease confrontation, dependency, conflict with partner or relatives, feelings of inferiority, stigma, abandoning social activities, fear of the future, lack of information and hiding the disease. These themes were very similar to those voiced by the previously interviewed ex-leprosy patients. The latter more often mentioned stigma and disease ignorance among Dutch health care workers. Whereas ex-leprosy patients perceived stigma on multiple fronts, diabetic patients only mentioned feeling inferior. Diabetic patients experienced some form of participation restriction in 39% of the cases as opposed to 71% of the ex-leprosy patients. Diabetic patients did

  18. Novel Method To Identify Source-Associated Phylogenetic Clustering Shows that Listeria monocytogenes Includes Niche-Adapted Clonal Groups with Distinct Ecological Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nightingale, K. K.; Lyles, K.; Ayodele, M.

    2006-01-01

    While phylogenetic and cluster analyses are often used to define clonal groups within bacterial species, the identification of clonal groups that are associated with specific ecological niches or host species remains a challenge. We used Listeria monocytogenes, which causes invasive disease...... in humans and different animal species and which can be isolated from a number of environments including food, as a model organism to develop and implement a two-step statistical approach to the identification of phylogenetic clades that are significantly associated with different source populations...

  19. Developing the Stroke Exercise Preference Inventory (SEPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Nicholas S.; O’Halloran, Paul D.; Bernhardt, Julie; Cumming, Toby B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is highly prevalent after stroke, increasing the risk of poor health outcomes including recurrent stroke. Tailoring of exercise programs to individual preferences can improve adherence, but no tools exist for this purpose in stroke. Methods We identified potential questionnaire items for establishing exercise preferences via: (i) our preliminary Exercise Preference Questionnaire in stroke, (ii) similar tools used in other conditions, and (iii) expert panel consultations. The resulting 35-item questionnaire (SEPI-35) was administered to stroke survivors, along with measures of disability, depression, anxiety, fatigue and self-reported physical activity. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify a factor structure in exercise preferences, providing a framework for item reduction. Associations between exercise preferences and personal characteristics were analysed using multivariable regression. Results A group of 134 community-dwelling stroke survivors (mean age 64.0, SD 13.3) participated. Analysis of the SEPI-35 identified 7 exercise preference factors (Supervision-support, Confidence-challenge, Health-wellbeing, Exercise context, Home-alone, Similar others, Music-TV). Item reduction processes yielded a 13-item version (SEPI-13); in analysis of this version, the original factor structure was maintained. Lower scores on Confidence-challenge were significantly associated with disability (p = 0.002), depression (p = 0.001) and fatigue (p = 0.001). Self-reported barriers to exercise were particularly prevalent in those experiencing fatigue and anxiety. Conclusions The SEPI-13 is a brief instrument that allows assessment of exercise preferences and barriers in the stroke population. This new tool can be employed by health professionals to inform the development of individually tailored exercise interventions. PMID:27711242

  20. Voter-Weighted Environmental Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jason; Huber, Joel; Viscusi, W. Kip

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the political economy of preferences with respect to the environment using a new stated preference survey that presents the first benefit values for national water quality levels. The mean valuation greatly exceeds the median value, as the distribution of valuations is highly skewed. The study couples the survey valuations…

  1. Expressing Preferences using Preference Set Constraint Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Brik, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces an extension of Answer Set Programming called Preference Set Constraint Programming which is a convenient and general formalism to reason with preferences. PSC programming extends Set Constraint Programming introduced by Marek and Remmel (Marek and Remmel 2004) by introducing two types of preference set constraint atoms, measure preference set constraint atoms and pre-ordered preference set constraint atoms, which are extensions of set constraint atoms. We show that the question of whether a PSC program has a preferred stable model is CoNP-complete. We give examples of the uses of the preference set constraint atoms and show that Answer Set Optimization (Brewka, Niemel\\"a, and Truszczynski 2003) and General Preference (Son and Pontelli 2006) can be expressed using preference set constraint atoms.

  2. A Review on the Preference-Aggregation-based Group Recommendation Algorithms%基于用户偏好融合的组推荐算法综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王理; 张淑莲

    2014-01-01

    传统的推荐系统是面向单个用户的推荐。作为个性化推荐的一个新的延伸,目前有越来越多的推荐系统正试图面向一组成员进行推荐。将推荐对象从单个用户扩展到一组用户的转变带来了许多新的课题,该文将主要介绍目前已有的几种组推荐算法,并总结一般组推荐系统的偏好融合过程。%The traditional recommender systems focus on recommend items for individual users. As an extension of personalized recommendation, more and more recent recommender systems try to make recommendations for a group of members. The al-tered target(i.e., from an individual user to a group of users)has brought many new issues. This paper focuses on the reviewing of existing group recommendation algorithmsapp:addword:algorithms, and discusses the directions of the group recommendation systems research.

  3. Exploring the Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Communication Preferences of the General Public regarding HPV: Findings from CDC Focus Group Research and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allison L.; Shepeard, Hilda

    2007-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, causing genital warts, cervical cell abnormalities, and cervical cancer in women. To inform HPV education efforts, 35 focus groups were conducted with members of the general public, stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural…

  4. A Study of the Relationship between Selected Non-music Major Eastern Kentucky University Students' High School Musical-Athletic Backgrounds and their Knowledge, Preferences, and Opinions of the Eastern Kentucky University Marching Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas C.

    This study measures the knowledge, preferences, and opinions of Eastern Kentucky University football fans about their marching band and relates high school musical and/or athletic experience to those preferences. Data was obtained from a questionnaire distributed to a sample of the student body. The results indicate that people with musical…

  5. The Unusually High Halo Concentration of the Fossil Group NGC 6482: Evidence for Weak Adiabatic Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buote, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Although fossil galaxy systems are thought to be very old, and thus should possess above-average halo concentrations, typically fossils have unexceptional concentrations of their masses. We revisit the massive isolated elliptical galaxy/fossil group NGC 6482 for which previous X-ray studies of a modest Chandra observation obtained a very uncertain, but also possibly very high, halo concentration. We present new measurements of the hot gas surface brightness, temperature, and iron abundance using the modest Chandra observation and a previously unpublished Suzaku observation, the latter of which allows the measurements of the gas properties to be extended out to ∼ {r}2500. By constructing hydrostatic equilibrium models of the gas with separate components for the gas, the stellar mass of the large central galaxy (BCG), and the dark matter (DM), we measure {c}200=32.2+/- 7.1 and {M}200=(4.5+/- 0.6)× {10}12 {M}ȯ using a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) DM profile. For a halo of this mass, the measured concentration c200 exceeds the mean value (7.1) expected for relaxed ΛCDM halos by 3.5σ in terms of the observational error, and by 6σ considering the intrinsic scatter in the ΛCDM c–M relation, which situates NGC 6482 as the most extreme outlier known for a fossil system. We explored several variants of adiabatic contraction (AC) models and, while the AC models provide fits of the same quality as the uncontracted models, they do have the following advantages: (1) lower c200 that is less of an outlier in the ΛCDM c–M relation, and (2) baryon fractions ({f}{{b},200}) that agree better with the mean cosmic value. While the standard AC prescriptions yield a BCG stellar mass that is uncomfortably low compared to results from stellar population synthesis (SPS) models, a weaker AC variant that artificially shuts off cooling and star formation at z = 2 yields the same stellar mass as the uncontracted models. These are probably the reasons why our X-ray analysis prefers this

  6. Grouping of Persistent Scatterers in high-resolution SAR data of urban scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunert, Alexander; Soergel, Uwe

    2012-09-01

    Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) is a technique to simultaneously estimate surface deformation and 3D structure from stacks of SAR images. It was proposed first about one decade ago to monitor preferably urban areas, where in general the highest numbers of PS are found. At that time no high-resolution satellite SAR data were available. Instead, for example, stacks of ERS imagery were used providing ground range resolution of about 25 m. In data of such kind only the strongest PS can be detected, which are usually caused by corner reflectors built by orthogonal building and road planes of considerable size, whereas smaller structures causing weaker ones signal are averaged by clutter or mutually interfere with others in the same resolution cell. Thus, if any, only a few or even just one single PS are found per building. The advent of a new senor generation of systems like TerraSAR-X and COSMO-Skymed in 2007 led to a significant improvement of spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude. This comes along with a dramatic rise of PS density: In some cases tens to hundreds are detected at large buildings, which offers the possibility to monitor even individual urban objects. In addition, especially at building façades the distribution of those PS is often quite regular. A reason for that is the usually rectilinear arrangement of façade structures inducing PS like windows or balconies. Those patterns contain a lot of information about the objects under investigation, which is mostly ignored in current PSI processing schemes. For example, consider a regular structure of windows on a certain façade of a multi-story building. Assuming the same kind of structure generates one single PS at each window, the phase centers of all scatterers caused by windows of each floor share the same height. This means, we may benefit from such kind of redundancy, for instance, to improve the height estimate by averaging over PS having the same elevation. In this work, we

  7. Intuitionistic preference modeling and interactive decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zeshui

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the priority methods of intuitionistic preference relations, the consistency and consensus improving procedures for intuitionistic preference relations, the approaches to group decision making based on intuitionistic preference relations, the approaches and models for interactive decision making with intuitionistic fuzzy information, and the extended results in interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy environments.

  8. Preferred and optimal stride frequency, stiffness and economy: changes with fatigue during a 1-h high-intensity run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Iain; Smith, Gerald A

    2007-08-01

    Metabolic cost of submaximal running at constant speed is influenced by various factors including fatigue and kinematic characteristics. Metabolic costs typically drift upwards during extended running while stride characteristics often shift away from initial. When non-fatigued, experienced runners naturally optimize stride frequency in a manner that minimizes oxygen uptake. An initial objective was to determine whether runners demonstrate a similar self-optimizing capability when fatigued where stride characteristics have perhaps shifted away from the initial state. A secondary objective involved measurement of vertical and leg stiffness characteristics as a potential explanation for frequency changes with fatigue. We hypothesized that runners decrease stride frequency and stiffness with fatigue while optimizing these characteristics to minimize metabolic cost. Sixteen experienced runners completed a near maximal effort 1-h treadmill run at a constant speed. Preferred and optimal stride frequencies (PSF and OSF) were measured near the beginning and end of the hour run using frequencies +/-4 and +/-8% around PSF. From vertical force data recorded throughout the run, leg and vertical stiffness were determined. As expected, oxygen uptake significantly increased during the run from 45.9 to 47.4 ml kg(-1) min(-1) (P = 0.004). There was no difference between preferred and optimal stride frequencies at the beginning or the end of running (P = 0.978), however both PSF and OSF significantly decreased from 1.45 to 1.43 Hz (P = 0.026). All runners self-optimized stride frequency at the beginning and end of one-hour of running despite changes of optimal stride frequency. Stiffness and stride frequency changes were subject specific with some runners exhibiting little to no change. No clear relationship of frequency or stiffness changes to economy was found.

  9. Dancing bees communicate a foraging preference for rural lands in high-level agri-environment schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvillon, Margaret J; Schürch, Roger; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2014-06-02

    Since 1994, more than €41 billion has been spent in the European Union on agri-environment schemes (AESs), which aim to mitigate the effects of anthropomorphic landscape changes via financial incentives for land managers to encourage environmentally friendly practices [1-6]. Surprisingly, given the substantial price tag and mandatory EU member participation [2], there is either a lack of [1] or mixed [1, 2, 7] evidence-based support for the schemes. One novel source of data to evaluate AESs may be provided by an organism that itself may benefit from them. Honeybees (Apis mellifera), important pollinators for crops and wildflowers [8, 9], are declining in parts of the world from many factors, including loss of available forage from agricultural intensification [10-13]. We analyzed landscape-level honeybee foraging ecology patterns over two years by decoding 5,484 waggle dances from bees located in the center of a mixed, urban-rural 94 km(2) area, including lands under government-funded AESs. The waggle dance, a unique behavior performed by successful foragers, communicates to nestmates the most profitable foraging locations [14-16]. After correcting for distance, dances demonstrate that honeybees possess a significant preference for rural land managed under UK Higher Level AESs and a significant preference against rural land under UK Organic Entry Level AESs. Additionally, the two most visited areas contained a National and Local Nature Reserve, respectively. Our study demonstrates that honeybees, with their great foraging range and sensitive response to forage quality, can be used as bioindicators to monitor large areas and provide information relevant to better environmental management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Student Counseling Groups in Senior High School Settings: An Evaluation of Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Susan E.; Kilmann, Peter R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviewed the studies which evaluated counseling groups in senior high school settings. A methodological evaluation was conducted within four areas: subjects, counselors, treatment, and outcome criteria. Overall, behavioral and directive groups achieved greater success than nondirective or client-centered groups. (Author)

  11. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  12. Victimization of high performers: the roles of envy and work group identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Glomb, Theresa M

    2014-07-01

    Drawing from victim precipitation, social comparison, and identity theories, this study develops and tests an integrative model of the victimization of high-performing employees. We examine envy as an explanatory mechanism of the victimization of high performers from fellow group members and propose work group identification as a moderator of this envy mechanism. Study 1, in a sample of 4,874 university staff employees in 339 work groups, supports the proposition that high performers are more likely to be targets of victimization. In Study 2, multisource data collected at 2 time points (217 employees in 67 work groups in 3 organizations), supports the proposition that high performers are more likely to be targets of victimization because of fellow group members' envy, and work group identification mitigates the mediated relationship.

  13. The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Junior High School Students during Small Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2004-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of cooperative learning on junior high school students who worked in structured or unstructured cooperative groups. Two hundred and twenty-three junior high school students participated in the study and worked in three or four-person, mixed gender and achievement groups. The results show that the children in the…

  14. Structural Changes in Chinese Food Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Gould, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    The article tests for structural food preference change in urban China using province-level panel data from 2002 to 2010. We employ the Generalized Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System to represent consumer preferences and estimate demand for seven food groups in a dynamic setting. This relaxes many of the restrictions on the demand models used in the literature on structural preference change. Our findings suggest that Chinese food preferences are continuing to evolve.

  15. Clinical efficacy of preferred use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in treatment of neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage%首选使用高频振荡通气治疗新生儿肺出血的临床效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 杜立中; 唐军; 伍金林; 母得志

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical efifcacy and safety of preferred use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) in the treatment of neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage.MethodsThe clinical efifcacy of preferred use of HFOV (preferred use group) and rescue use of HFOV after conventional mechanical ventilation proved ineffective (rescue use group) in the treatment of 26 cases of neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage was retrospectively analyzed. The oxygenation index (OI), pulmonary hemorrhage time, hospitalization time, ventilation time, oxygen therapy time, complications, and outcome of the two groups were compared.ResultsCompared with the rescue use group, the preferred use group had signiifcantly lower IO values at 1, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatment (P0.05). Compared with those in the rescue use group, children who survived in the preferred use group had signiifcantly shorter pulmonary hemorrhage time, hospitalization time, ventilation time, and oxygen therapy time (P0.05)。存活患儿中,首选组在肺出血时间、住院时间、上机时间、氧疗时间上较解救组明显缩短(P<0.05)。结论与解救组相比,首选HFOV较解救性使用HFOV能更好地改善肺出血患儿氧合功能,降低VAP的发生率,缩短病程,提高治愈率,且未增加不良反应的发生率。

  16. 初中生对理化课程不同教学方法喜好程度的调查研究%Science Teaching Methods Preferred by Junior High School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宏佳; 李媛; 金惠文

    2012-01-01

    教师使用学生喜好的教学方法有利于培养学生对科学课程和科学积极的情感,本研究调查了l334名(男生679名,女生655名)初中学生,在目前物理、化学课堂中23种教学活动使用的频数,以及他们希望其使用的频数。调查数据用描述性统计和非参数检验分析,结果显示:现代教学方法和传统教学法均受到学生的肯定;学生强烈希望开展参观工厂、博物馆等教学活动;学生个体差异影响其对教学方法的喜好;女学生更喜欢听教师讲解和看教师演示实验;成绩好的学生更喜欢小组课题研究、小组讨论等。调查结果对教师理解学生和选择教学方法有启示作用。%Teachers using the methods that students preferred would most likely help develop their positive attitudes toward school science. This study analyzed Chinese junior high school students'actual experiences in physics and chemistry classrooms and their preferred teaching methods. A total of 1334 students (679 males and 655 females) completed the survey. Descriptive statistics (median and percentages) and nonparametric tests were used to analyze the data. It appears that the students liked both reform-based and traditional teaching methods. They also showed a great desire to visit factories, museums and other activities and their individual differences affect their preferences for teaching methods. The females prefer lectures and demonstrations by teachers. The higher achieving students prefer to do project work and group discussion. The findings have implications for teachers to choose teaching methods in consideration of both students' desires and reform-based instructional practices.

  17. Controlling self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides at high pH using heterocyclic capping groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam D.; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Heu, Celine; Garvey, Christopher J.; Ratcliffe, Julian; Waddington, Lynne J.; Gardiner, James; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-03-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), it is shown that the existence of pre-assembled structures at high pH for a capped diphenylalanine hydrogel is controlled by the selection of N-terminal heterocyclic capping group, namely indole or carbazole. At high pH, changing from a somewhat hydrophilic indole capping group to a more hydrophobic carbazole capping group results in a shift from a high proportion of monomers to self-assembled fibers or wormlike micelles. The presence of these different self-assembled structures at high pH is confirmed through NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Controlling self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides at high pH using heterocyclic capping groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam D.; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Heu, Celine; Garvey, Christopher J.; Ratcliffe, Julian; Waddington, Lynne J.; Gardiner, James; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), it is shown that the existence of pre-assembled structures at high pH for a capped diphenylalanine hydrogel is controlled by the selection of N-terminal heterocyclic capping group, namely indole or carbazole. At high pH, changing from a somewhat hydrophilic indole capping group to a more hydrophobic carbazole capping group results in a shift from a high proportion of monomers to self-assembled fibers or wormlike micelles. The presence of these different self-assembled structures at high pH is confirmed through NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. PMID:28272523

  19. Hoverfly preference for high honeydew amounts creates enemy-free space for aphids colonizing novel host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosteen, Ilka; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunert, Grit

    2016-09-01

    The existence of an enemy-free space can play an important role in aphid host race formation processes, but little is known about the mechanisms that create an area of low predation pressure on particular host plants. In this paper, we identify a mechanism generating lower predation pressure that promotes the maintenance of the different host races of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) complex, a well-studied model for ecological speciation. The pea aphid consists of at least 15 genetically distinct host races which are native to specific host plants of the legume family, but can all develop on the universal host plant Vicia faba. Previous work showed that hoverfly (Episyrphus balteatus) oviposition preferences contribute to the enemy-free space that helps to maintain the different pea aphid host races, and that higher amounts of honeydew are more attractive to ovipositing hoverflies. Here we demonstrated that aphid honeydew is produced in large amounts when aphid reproduction rate was highest, and is an important oviposition cue for hoverflies under field conditions. However, on less suitable host plants, where honeydew production is reduced, pea aphids enjoy lower predation rates. A reduction in enemy pressure can mitigate the performance disadvantages of aphids colonizing a novel host and probably plays an important role in pea aphid host race formation.

  20. Nursing students at a university - a study about learning style preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Karin

    2014-12-01

    In most adult education, teachers use methods that assume all students learn in the same way. But knowledge of students' learning style preferences highlights the importance of adequate teaching and learning adaptation. The aim of the study was to describe and compare final year nursing students' learning style preferences in two campuses during three semesters. A further aim was to identify differences between learning style preferences and personal characteristics. A descriptive cross-sectional study using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS) questionnaire was conducted at a Swedish rural university. Three semester groups with 263 nursing students participated in 2012-2013. The majority of the students were 'flexible' in their learning style preferences and had none or few strong preferences. Students with strong preferences preferred high structure (75%) and an authority figure present (40%). About a third were highly auditory, tactile and/or kinesthetic while 8% were highly visual. Few significant differences were revealed between the groups of campuses and the groups of semesters or between learning style preferences and upper secondary school and care experience. There were no significant differences between learning style preferences and age and assistant nurse graduation. More women than men were highly motivated, auditory, tactile and kinesthetic and preferred structure and mobility. The PEPS questionnaire provides nursing students with self-awareness regarding their strengths and shortcomings in learning and teachers with a valuable and practical basis for their selection of adapted individual and group teaching methods. The findings suggest the need for wide variation and interactive teaching approaches, conscious didactic actions between cooperating teachers and conscious learning strategies for nursing students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Perspectives on Preference Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenwetter, Michel

    2009-07-01

    For centuries, the mathematical aggregation of preferences by groups, organizations, or society itself has received keen interdisciplinary attention. Extensive theoretical work in economics and political science throughout the second half of the 20th century has highlighted the idea that competing notions of rational social choice intrinsically contradict each other. This has led some researchers to consider coherent democratic decision making to be a mathematical impossibility. Recent empirical work in psychology qualifies that view. This nontechnical review sketches a quantitative research paradigm for the behavioral investigation of mathematical social choice rules on real ballots, experimental choices, or attitudinal survey data. The article poses a series of open questions. Some classical work sometimes makes assumptions about voter preferences that are descriptively invalid. Do such technical assumptions lead the theory astray? How can empirical work inform the formulation of meaningful theoretical primitives? Classical "impossibility results" leverage the fact that certain desirable mathematical properties logically cannot hold in all conceivable electorates. Do these properties nonetheless hold true in empirical distributions of preferences? Will future behavioral analyses continue to contradict the expectations of established theory? Under what conditions do competing consensus methods yield identical outcomes and why do they do so?

  2. Low level of extra-pair paternity between nearest neighbors results from female preference for high-quality males in the yellow-rumped flycatcher (Ficedula zanthopygia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Mingju; Gong, Ye; Yu, Jiangping; Zhang, Siyu; Fan, Qianxi; Jiang, Yunlei

    2017-01-01

    Extra-pair copulation is considered to be a means by which females can modify their initial mate choice, and females might obtain indirect benefits to offspring fitness by engaging in this behavior. Here, we examined the patterns of extra-pair paternity and female preferences in the yellow-rumped flycatcher (Ficedula zanthopygia). We found that female yellow-rumped flycatchers are more likely to choose larger and relatively highly heterozygous males than their social mates as extra-pair mates, that the genetic similarity of pairs that produced mixed-paternity offspring did not differ from the similarity of pairs producing only within-pair offspring, and that extra-pair offspring were more heterozygous than their half-siblings. These findings support the good genes hypothesis but do not exclude the compatibility hypothesis. Most female yellow-rumped flycatchers attained extra-pair paternity with distant males rather than their nearest accessible neighboring males, and no differences in genetic and phenotypic characteristics were detected between cuckolded males and their nearest neighbors. There was no evidence that extra-pair mating by female flycatchers reduced inbreeding. Moreover, breeding density, breeding synchrony and their interaction did not affect the occurrence of extra-pair paternity in this species. Our results suggest that the variation in extra-pair paternity distribution between nearest neighbors in some passerine species might result from female preference for highly heterozygous males. PMID:28257431

  3. In-Group Ostracism Increases High-Fidelity Imitation in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Whitehouse, Harvey; Legare, Cristine H

    2016-01-01

    The Cyberball paradigm was used to examine the hypothesis that children use high-fidelity imitation as a reinclusion behavior in response to being ostracized by in-group members. Children (N = 176; 5- to 6-year-olds) were either included or excluded by in- or out-group members and then shown a video of an in-group or an out-group member enacting a social convention. Participants who were excluded by their in-group engaged in higher-fidelity imitation than those who were included by their in-group. Children who were included by an out-group and those who were excluded by an out-group showed no difference in imitative fidelity. Children ostracized by in-group members also displayed increased anxiety relative to children ostracized by out-group members. The data are consistent with the proposal that high-fidelity imitation functions as reinclusion behavior in the context of in-group ostracism.

  4. When high achievers and low achievers work in the same group: the roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi; Lam, Shui-fong; Chan, Joanne Chung-yan

    2008-06-01

    There has been an ongoing debate about the inconsistent effects of heterogeneous ability grouping on students in small group work such as project-based learning. The present research investigated the roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning. At the student level, we examined the interaction effect between students' within-group achievement and group processes on their self- and collective efficacy. At the group level, we examined how group heterogeneity was associated with the average self- and collective efficacy reported by the groups. The participants were 1,921 Hong Kong secondary students in 367 project-based learning groups. Student achievement was determined by school examination marks. Group processes, self-efficacy and collective efficacy were measured by a student-report questionnaire. Hierarchical linear modelling was used to analyse the nested data. When individual students in each group were taken as the unit of analysis, results indicated an interaction effect of group processes and students' within-group achievement on the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy. When compared with low achievers, high achievers reported lower collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of low quality. However, both low and high achievers reported higher collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of high quality. With 367 groups taken as the unit of analysis, the results showed that group heterogeneity, group gender composition and group size were not related to the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy reported by the students. Group heterogeneity was not a determinant factor in students' learning efficacy. Instead, the quality of group processes played a pivotal role because both high and low achievers were able to benefit when group processes were of high quality.

  5. 77 FR 1778 - U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth AGENCY: Office of the United... Working Group on Jobs and Growth, led by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and EU Trade Commissioner... and investment to support mutually beneficial job creation, economic growth, and...

  6. A Content Literacy Collaborative Study Group: High School Teachers Take Charge of Their Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Gail M.

    2008-01-01

    The progress and effects of a collaborative study group as a method of job-embedded professional development were studied. Eight high school teachers representing a variety of disciplines and the author (a literacy specialist) met monthly as a collaborative group for one school year to investigate materials and methods for literacy strategy…

  7. Flexible Grouping and Student Learning in a High-Needs School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Sharon; Deniz, Carla Baker; Tortora, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The study focused on the impact of flexible grouping on student learning during a period of time in a high-needs school. The study tracked non transient, below-goal elementary students on multiple literacy assessments during a 5-year flexible grouping implementation. Results showed that the percentage of students attaining mastery increased in 16…

  8. IUDS AS COFACTORS FOR HIV/PID IN HIGH RISK GROUPS AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZengH.Q.; EsquleAriasandESEHafez

    1989-01-01

    IUD cofactors which enhance HIV heterosexual/ bisexual transmission are high risk groups and in Third World Countries include; a) menstrual irregularities; b) abnormal inflammatory responses, increased blood flow/cellularity of endometnum; c) massive

  9. High-Resolution Crystal Structures Elucidate the Molecular Basis of Cholera Blood Group Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggelund, Julie Elisabeth; Burschowsky, Daniel; Bjørnestad, Victoria Ariel; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Krengel, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Cholera is the prime example of blood-group-dependent diseases, with individuals of blood group O experiencing the most severe symptoms. The cholera toxin is the main suspect to cause this relationship. We report the high-resolution crystal structures (1.1-1.6 Å) of the native cholera toxin B-pentamer for both classical and El Tor biotypes, in complexes with relevant blood group determinants and a fragment of its primary receptor, the GM1 ganglioside. The blood group A determinant binds in the opposite orientation compared to previously published structures of the cholera toxin, whereas the blood group H determinant, characteristic of blood group O, binds in both orientations. H-determinants bind with higher affinity than A-determinants, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. Together, these findings suggest why blood group O is a risk factor for severe cholera.

  10. An Epidemiological Profile Of Diabetes Mellitus Amongst High Risk Age Group - A Community Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Ahmad; Suresh Chandra; R P Sharma; J P Srivastava; S C Saxena

    2004-01-01

    Research Question : What is the epidemiological profile of Diabetes mellitus amongst high-risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives : To study the prevalence, magnitude, possible associates and socio demographic variables related to Diabetes mellitus amongst the high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Study Design : Cross-sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on five thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur...

  11. Group Differences in Test-Taking Behaviour: An Example from a High-Stakes Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Eklöf, Hanna; Lyrén, Per-Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether different groups of test-takers vary in their reported test-taking behaviour in a high-stakes test situation. A between-group design (N = 1129) was used to examine whether high and low achievers, as well as females and males, differ in their use of test-taking strategies, and in level of reported test anxiety and…

  12. Group Differences in Test-Taking Behaviour: An Example from a High-Stakes Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Eklöf, Hanna; Lyrén, Per-Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether different groups of test-takers vary in their reported test-taking behaviour in a high-stakes test situation. A between-group design (N = 1129) was used to examine whether high and low achievers, as well as females and males, differ in their use of test-taking strategies, and in level of reported test anxiety and…

  13. Highly porous organic polymers bearing tertiary amine group and their exceptionally high CO2 uptake capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-02-01

    We report a very simple and unique strategy for synthesis of a tertiary amine functionalized high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) PDVTA-1 through the co-polymerization of monomers divinylbenzene (DVB) and triallylamine (TAA) under solvothermal reaction conditions. Two different PDVTA-1 samples have been synthesized by varying the molar ratio of the monomers. The porous polymeric materials have been thoroughly characterized by solid state 13C CP MAS-NMR, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR TEM and FE SEM to understand its chemical environment, nanostructure, bonding, morphology and related surface properties. PDVTA-1 with higher amine content (DVB/TAA=4.0) showed exceptionally high CO2 uptake capacity of 85.8 wt% (19.5 mmol g-1) at 273 K and 43.69 wt% (9.93 mmol g-1) at 298 K under 3 bar pressure, whereas relatively low amine loaded material (DVB/TAA=7.0) shows uptake capacity of 59.2 wt% (13.45 mmol g-1) at 273 K and 34.36 wt% (7.81 mmol g-1) at 298 K. Highly porous nanostructure together with very high surface area and basicity at the surface due to the presence of abundant basic tertiary amine N-sites in the framework of PDVTA-1 could be responsible for very high CO2 adsorption.

  14. Reflective visualization and verbalization of unconscious preference

    CERN Document Server

    Maeno, Yoshiharu

    2008-01-01

    Unconscious preference is the preference which can be observed as an action resulted from one's decision making, but whose origin and background one can not describe with verbal explanation. It is an important problem to develop a method to help one become conscious of the one's unconscious preference, and convey it to the others in the form of verbal explanation. This paper develops a method which combines the concepts of reflection, visualization, and verbalization, applied to group discussion, with a tool which implements an algorithm to process information on the subjects' stated preference. The method is applied to the experiments where the unconscious preference on the art works is investigated.

  15. Influence of gender preference and sex composition of surviving children on childbearing intention among high fertility married women in stable union in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebowale, Stephen Ayo; Palamuleni, Martin Enoch

    2015-03-01

    Child's gender preference (GP) frequently leads to high fertility which has adverse effect on family health. The link between women's fertility intention, GP and Living Children's Sex Composition (LCSC) as found in this study is less explored in Malawi. We examined the relationship between GP, LCSC and fertility intention. This study utilized 2010 MDHS dataset and focused on married women aged 15-49 years (n=1739) in stable unions who currently have at least 5 living children. Data was analyzed at bivariate and multivariate levels (α=0.05). About 39.7% of the women have GP and higher proportion (23.3%) has preference for females. Age, region, wealth-quintile, religion, residence and family planning programmes were significantly associated with fertility intention. Women who have GP and same LCSC were 1.35 and 2.4 times significantly more likely to have intention to bear more children than those who have no GP and different sexes composition respectively. These odd ratios changed to 1.38 for GP and 2.44 for LCSC after adjusting for other socio-demographic variables. We find that GP and LCSC significantly influence women's intention to bear more children. Women should stop childbearing after attaining their desired number irrespective of the LCSC.

  16. Preference direction study of Job’s-tears ice cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwat Wangcharoen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Job's-tears (Coix lachryma-jobi L. is a kind of cereal commonly used in Asia as food and medicine, but it is still not widely consumed in Thailand. Four prototype products of Job’s-tears ice cream were developed by varying 2 levels of glucose syrup (16 and 32% of Job's-tears used and coconut milk (50 and 100 % of Job's-tears used. Their sensory attribute profiles were evaluated by 3 groups of 10 selected panelists using Ratio profile test (RPT, and their acceptances, hedonic scores, were evaluated by 100 consumers. Results showed that there were significant effects of coconut milk quantity on several attributes, such as appearance (whiteness, texture (hardness, smoothness, and flavour (coconut milk aroma, sweetness, saltiness, but the effect of glucose syrup quantity was significant on hardness only. Acceptance data were analyzed by cluster analysis to find out the difference of preference directions and 3 clusters (n1 = 39, n2 = 25, n3 = 36 were found. The first cluster preferred Job's tears ice cream containing high glucose syrup and low coconut milk, whilst the second preferred high level of only one of these two ingredients, and the third preferred high level of both ingredients. External preference maps were created from RPT and acceptance data to express the preference direction of each cluster.

  17. Focus Group Effects on Field Practicum Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandel, Mark H.; Cohen, Harriet L.; Thomas, Cecilia L.; Barton, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    During the coming years the need for professionals to work with the nation's elders will increase several fold. This will place a great responsibility on university educational programs to prepare enough qualified future professionals to work in the greatly expanding field of gerontology. Prior research has identified several nonacademic and…

  18. The relationship of value orientations in older adolescents with high status position in a student group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D. Kuteynikova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present study results of social and psychological characteristics of group and individual value orientations in older adolescents. We considered the main criteria to be content and orientation of values, and level of value-oriented student group unity. The study involved 86 high school students of IX-XI grades of Moscow schools. We used a set of socio-psychological methods and instructional techniques: sociometry, referentometry, a technique of defining the informal intragroup power structure in a contact community, "Values and orientation of the individual" method by L.N.Silantieva, a method of determining the degree of value-orientation of group unity. The results obtained show that in high school there is a relationship between the student's status in the group and his system of individual and group value orientations. The most significant differences among students with different status position were detected in the content and direction of value orientations.

  19. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Group Therapy on Decreasing Depression among High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad nazariy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depending on its etiology, many methods have been established for the treatment of depression among adolescents; cognitive therapy is one of them. The purpose of the present research was to investigate the effect of cognitive group therapy on decreasing depression among high school students. Methods: From the male students of a boarding high school in Tarom district of Gazvin province, a sample of 16 students were randomly selected and assigned into experimental and control groups. The measurement tool was Beck depression inventory. The experimental group participated in 8 sessions of cognitive therapy, while the control group did not receive any treatment. The mean scores of the two groups were compared through independent t-test. Results: The results of the study showed significant differences between the mean scores of the pre-tests and post-tests of the experimental and control groups, so that cognitive group therapy had reduced the depression mean score in the experimental group (-2.1 vs. -0.25. Conclusion: The findings of the study indicate that cognitive group therapy can reduce the depression among students. These findings can be used for therapeutic planning within the cognitive paradigm to reduce or prevent depression among student

  20. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  1. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  2. Working group report on advanced high-voltage high-power and energy-storage space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, H. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Evans, R. W.; Hastings, D.; Jongeward, G.; Laframboise, J. G.; Mahaffey, D.; Mcintyre, B.; Pfizer, K. A.; Purvis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Space systems in the future will probably include high-voltage, high-power energy-storage and -production systems. Two such technologies are high-voltage ac and dc systems and high-power electrodynamic tethers. The working group identified several plasma interaction phenomena that will occur in the operation of these power systems. The working group felt that building an understanding of these critical interaction issues meant that several gaps in our knowledge had to be filled, and that certain aspects of dc power systems have become fairly well understood. Examples of these current collection are in quiescent plasmas and snap over effects. However, high-voltage dc and almost all ac phenomena are, at best, inadequately understood. In addition, there is major uncertainty in the knowledge of coupling between plasmas and large scale current flows in space plasmas. These gaps in the knowledge are addressed.

  3. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOU,W.; WEI,J.

    2001-08-14

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade.

  4. Fund allocation strategy under condition of investment multi-projects portfolio based on group evaluation preference%多投资项目组合条件下的资金分配策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 冯涛

    2009-01-01

    针对多投资项目组合、资金分批拨付条件下的最优资金分配问题进行了研究.首先,建立了资金分配的目标模型.基于多属性的群体决策方法,并考虑了群体评价偏好的聚集问题,构建了项目对资金需求的紧迫性状态评价方法,并基于遗传算法对目标函数进行了求解,最后给出了一个算例.%For multi-portfolio investment projects under the condition of the status of funds allocated in batches,an allocation strategy is studied.Based on multi-attributes group decision-making methods,and considering the preference aggregation of group evaluation, an evaluation method for the project funding needs of the urgency of the state is established.Furthermore, a dynamic genetic algorithm for solving the objective function is proposed.At last,an example is presented.

  5. Immigrants' location preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    This paper exploits a spatial dispersal policy for refugee immigrants to estimate the importance of local and regional factors for refugees' location preferences. The main results of a mixed proportional hazard competing risks model are that placed refugees react to high regional unemployment...... and lack of a local immigrant population by migrating to large municipalities. Lack of local fellow countrymen, however, increases the exit rate to medium-sized as well as large municipalities. This finding is likely to be a result of the dispersal policy. Finally, refugees react strongly to assignment...

  6. High versus low fat/sugar food affects the behavioral, but not the cortisol response of marmoset monkeys in a conditioned-place-preference task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, R B M; Patrono, E; Borges, A C; Tomaz, C; Ventura, R; Gasbarri, A; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Barros, M

    2015-02-01

    The effect of a high (chocolate) versus low fat/sugar (chow) food on a conditioned-place-preference (CPP) task was evaluated in marmoset monkeys. Anxiety-related behaviors and cortisol levels before and after the CPP task were also measured. Subjects were habituated to a two-compartment CPP box and then, on alternate days, had access to only one compartment during daily 15-min conditionings, for a total of 14 trials. Marmosets were provisioned with chocolate chips in the CC-paired compartment on odd-numbered trials and standard chow in the CW-paired compartment on even-numbered trials. They were then tested for preferring the CC-paired context after a 24-h interval. During the conditioning, a significantly greater amount (in kcal/trial) of chocolate was consumed than chow, yet the foraging pattern of both food types was similar. On the test trial, the time spent in the CC-paired context increased significantly compared to pre-CPP levels, yet this response was not readily predicted by baseline behavioral or cortisol levels. Also, the chocolate CPP response was positively correlated with foraging time, rather than the amount of calories consumed. The sudden absence of the food increased exploration, while the chocolate CPP effect was associated with vigilance - both anxiety-related behaviors in marmosets. This behavioral profile occurred regardless of any concomitant change or correlation with cortisol. Therefore, the high fat/sugar food was more prone to be overly consumed by the marmosets, to induce a CPP response and to lead to anxiety-related behavior in its absence. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Acceleration of high resolution temperature based optimization for hyperthermia treatment planning using element grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, H P; de Greef, M; Bel, A; Crezee, J

    2009-08-01

    In regional hyperthermia, optimization is useful to obtain adequate applicator settings. A speed-up of the previously published method for high resolution temperature based optimization is proposed. Element grouping as described in literature uses selected voxel sets instead of single voxels to reduce computation time. Elements which achieve their maximum heating potential for approximately the same phase/amplitude setting are grouped. To form groups, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of precomputed temperature matrices are used. At high resolution temperature matrices are unknown and temperatures are estimated using low resolution (1 cm) computations and the high resolution (2 mm) temperature distribution computed for low resolution optimized settings using zooming. This technique can be applied to estimate an upper bound for high resolution eigenvalues. The heating potential of elements was estimated using these upper bounds. Correlations between elements were estimated with low resolution eigenvalues and eigenvectors, since high resolution eigenvectors remain unknown. Four different grouping criteria were applied. Constraints were set to the average group temperatures. Element grouping was applied for five patients and optimal settings for the AMC-8 system were determined. Without element grouping the average computation times for five and ten runs were 7.1 and 14.4 h, respectively. Strict grouping criteria were necessary to prevent an unacceptable exceeding of the normal tissue constraints (up to approximately 2 degrees C), caused by constraining average instead of maximum temperatures. When strict criteria were applied, speed-up factors of 1.8-2.1 and 2.6-3.5 were achieved for five and ten runs, respectively, depending on the grouping criteria. When many runs are performed, the speed-up factor will converge to 4.3-8.5, which is the average reduction factor of the constraints and depends on the grouping criteria. Tumor temperatures were comparable. Maximum exceeding

  8. Preferred retinal locus of eccentric fixation in eyes with high myopia%高度近视偏心注视优势位置的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾亚丁; 栗改云; 张棉花

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨高度近视眼因黄斑病理损害形成中心暗点以及丧失中心视力后偏心固视的形成规律,确定偏心注视点的优势位置.方法 应用微视野计(MP-1)对因黄斑病变形成偏心固视的40例高度近视患者的54只眼作固视检查.利用正常成人中心固视的90%置信椭圆,确定偏心固视相对于中心凹的位置.根据观察到的偏心固视的位置,将所有患眼分为preferred retinal locucs(PRL)优势组和PRL非优势组;并将两组视力作统计学比较.结果 54只高度近视眼中,中心视力丧失后偏心固视点形成在暗点下方视野者24只眼,占本组患眼的44.44%;左侧19只眼,占35.19%;上方6只眼,占11.11%;右侧5只眼,占9.26%.双眼均形成偏心固视者14例,其中13例双眼偏心固视模式一致,均为下方者7例,占双眼偏心固视者的50.00%;均为左侧者5例,占35.71%;均为上方者1例,占7.14%.偏心固视位于下方、左侧视野组与偏心位置位于右侧和上方的非优势组之间比较.其视力差异无统计学意义(F=0.144,P>0.05).结论高度近视患者偏心固视会形成在尽量靠近中心凹有功能的视网膜.下方视野是形成偏心固视的优势位置.%Objective To investigate the distribution of the preferred retinal locus (PRL) of eccentric fixation in eyes with high myopia. Methods A total of 40 highly myopic patients (54 eyes) with eccentric fixation were examined by MP-1 microperimeter to identify the PRL. The position of PRL relative to the fovea was estimated using the 90% confidence ellipse of normal adult foveal fixation. The differences of visual acuity between "desirable" and "undesirable" PRL were tested by analysis of variance. Results In 54 eyes with high myopia, 24 eyes (44.44%) had PRL of eccentric fixation below the scotoma after loss of central vision; 19 eyes (35.19%) had a left-field PRL; 6 eyes (11.11%) had an upper-field PRL; and 5 eyes (9.26%) had right-field PRL. In 14 patients who had

  9. Landscape genetics informs mesohabitat preference and conservation priorities for a surrogate indicator species in a highly fragmented river system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, J; Hammer, M P; Unmack, P J; Adams, M; Beheregaray, L B

    2017-04-01

    Poor dispersal species represent conservative benchmarks for biodiversity management because they provide insights into ecological processes influenced by habitat fragmentation that are less evident in more dispersive organisms. Here we used the poorly dispersive and threatened river blackfish (Gadopsis marmoratus) as a surrogate indicator system for assessing the effects of fragmentation in highly modified river basins and for prioritizing basin-wide management strategies. We combined individual, population and landscape-based approaches to analyze genetic variation in samples spanning the distribution of the species in Australia's Murray-Darling Basin, one of the world's most degraded freshwater systems. Our results indicate that G. marmoratus displays the hallmark of severe habitat fragmentation with notably scattered, small and demographically isolated populations with very low genetic diversity-a pattern found not only between regions and catchments but also between streams within catchments. By using hierarchically nested population sampling and assessing relationships between genetic uniqueness and genetic diversity across populations, we developed a spatial management framework that includes the selection of populations in need of genetic rescue. Landscape genetics provided an environmental criterion to identify associations between landscape features and ecological processes. Our results further our understanding of the impact that habitat quality and quantity has on habitat specialists with similarly low dispersal. They should also have practical applications for prioritizing both large- and small-scale conservation management actions for organisms inhabiting highly fragmented ecosystems.

  10. 一种基于用户偏好自动分类的社会媒体共享和推荐方法%A User Preference Based Automatic Potential Group Generation Method for Social Media Sharing and Recommendation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾大文; 曾承; 彭智勇; 成鹏; 阳志敏; 卢舟

    2012-01-01

    Social media applications have become the mainstream of Web application. User-oriented and content generated by users are pivotal characteristics of social media sites. Data sharing and recommendation approaches play an important role in dealing with the problem of information overload in social media environment. In this paper, we analyze the flaws of current group-based information sharing mechanism and the common problem of traditional recommender approaches, and then we propose a novel approach of group automatic generating for social media sharing and recommendation. Intuitively, the essential idea of our approach is that we switch user's preference from the media objects to the interest elements which media objects imply. Then we gather the users who have common preference, namely users have the same interestingness in a set of interest elements, together as Common Preference Group (CPG). We also propose a new social media data sharing and recommendation system architecture based on CPG and design a CPG automatic mining algorithm. By compare our CPG mining algorithm with other algorithm which has similar functionality, it is shown that our algorithm could be applicable to real social media application with massive users.%社会媒体应用已成为Web应用的主流,以用户为中心并且海量媒体数据由用户自生成是社会媒体Web应用的重要特征.应对目前社会媒体环境中信息过载的问题,信息的共享和推荐机制发挥着重要的作用.文中分析了目前主流社会媒体网站基于用户自建组的信息共享机制所存在的问题以及传统推荐技术在效率上的问题,提出了一种新的基于用户偏好自动分类的社会媒体数据共享和推荐方法.直观上讲,该方法的本质是把用户对具体媒体对象的偏好转化成用户对媒体对象所蕴含兴趣元素的偏好,然后把具有相同偏好的用户,即对若干兴趣元素上的兴趣度都相同,自动聚

  11. Implementing high-fidelity simulations with large groups of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara; Shaw, Luanne; Zamzam, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators are increasing the use of simulation as a teaching strategy. Simulations are conducted typically with a small group of students. This article describes the process for implementing 6 high-fidelity simulations with a large group of undergraduate nursing students. The goal was to evaluate if student knowledge increased on postsimulation quiz scores when only a few individuals actively participated in the simulation while the other students observed.

  12. The Effectivenss of a Group Guidance Program on The Realistic Field Choice Amondst First Year High

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davut AYDIN

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effectiveness of a group guidance program in terms of assisting first year high school students to choose realistically their study field was examined.The research was carried out with 40 pupils who were randomly selected among the first year Özel Ferda Lisesi pupils, in Ankara, during the academic year 2001-2002.The subjects were separated to two groups: the experimental group which attended the group guidance program and the control group which did not. Both groups were tested before the guidance program was implemented and after.The program developed by the researcher, was mainly based on cognitive-behavioural approach with a substantial emphasis on informational and interactional techniques.The independent variable of the research was the group guidance program that was applied to the experimental group. The dependent variable of the study was students’ aptitude points.The program consisted of 12 sessions and it was administered every five days. Each session lasted for about 90 minutes. After the last session of the program, the student evaluation scale, which was developed by Kuzgun, was given to both the experimental and the control group members. In order to test this hypothesis thedependent-samples t-test was used.The results indicated that the experimental group members’ score both in the aptitude test become closer to their teachers rating after the group guidance program while the control group members score did not change from the first to the second application of the test.

  13. High rhesus (Rh(D)) negative frequency and ethnic-group based ABO blood group distribution in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golassa, Lemu; Tsegaye, Arega; Erko, Berhanu; Mamo, Hassen

    2017-07-26

    Knowledge of the distribution of ABO-Rh(D) blood groups in a locality is vital for safe blood services. However, the distribution of these blood systems among Ethiopians in general is little explored. This study was, therefore, designed to determine the ABO-Rh(D) blood group distribution among patients attending Gambella hospital, southwestern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted between November and December 2013 (N = 449). The patients were grouped into two broad categories. Those who originally moved from different parts of Ethiopia and currently residing in Gambella are named 'highlanders' (n = 211). The other group consisted of natives (Nilotics) to the locality (n = 238). ABO-Rh(D) blood groups were typed by agglutination, open-slide test method, using commercial antisera (Biotech laboratories Ltd, Ipswich, Suffolk, UK). Overall, majority of the participants (41.20%) had blood type 'O' followed by types 'A' (34.96%), 'B' (20.48%) and 'AB' (3.34%). However, blood type 'A' was the most frequent (44.07%) blood group among the 'highlanders' and 50.42% of Nilotic natives had type 'O'. The proportion of participants devoid of the Rh factor was 19.37%. While the ABO blood group distribution is similar to previous reports, the Rh(D) frequency is much higher than what was reported so far for Ethiopia and continental Africa.

  14. Calculation Method to Determine the Group Composition of Vacuum Distillate with High Content of Saturated Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarova Galina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculation method to determine the group composition of the heavy fraction of vacuum distillate with high content of saturated hydrocarbons, obtained by vacuum distillation of the residue from the West Siberian oil with subsequent hydrotreating, are given in this research. The method is built on the basis of calculation the physico-chemical characteristics and the group composition of vacuum distillate according to the fractional composition and density considering with high content of saturated hydrocarbons in the fraction. Calculation method allows to determine the content of paraffinic, naphthenic, aromatic hydrocarbons and the resins in vacuum distillate with high accuracy and can be used in refineries for rapid determination of the group composition of vacuum distillate.

  15. Relations between high and low power groups: the importance of legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Spears, Russell; Cremers, Iris; Hogg, Michael A

    2003-02-01

    Using a social identity perspective, two experiments examined the effects of power and the legitimacy of power differentials on intergroup bias. In Experiment 1, 125 math-science students were led to believe that they had high or low representation in a university decision-making body relative to social-science students and that this power position was either legitimate or illegitimate. Power did not have an independent effect on bias; rather, members of both high and low power groups showed more bias when the power hierarchy was illegitimate than when it was legitimate. This effect was replicated in Experiment 2 (N = 105). In addition, Experiment 2 showed that groups located within an unfair power hierarchy expected the superordinate power body to be more discriminatory than did those who had legitimately high or low power. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for group relations.

  16. An Epidemiological Profile Of Diabetes Mellitus Amongst High Risk Age Group - A Community Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : What is the epidemiological profile of Diabetes mellitus amongst high-risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives : To study the prevalence, magnitude, possible associates and socio demographic variables related to Diabetes mellitus amongst the high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Study Design : Cross-sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on five thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur. Participants : High risk age group population i.e. 45 years and above.Study variables: Age, sex, education, working status, social class. Impaired glucose tolerance. Body mass index, Hypertension, family history of diabetes mellitus.Statistical analysis : Chi-square test. Percentages.Results : The overall prevalence of Diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population was found to be 7.6% with 11.3% in urban areas and 3.6% in rural areas. The overall maximum prevalence was in the 56-60 years age group. Higher prevalence was observed amongst the graduates and onwards (30.1%, social class-1 (32.1%, sedentary lifestyle (62.5%, obese (19.7%. hypertensives (39.5%, family history of diabetes mellitus (31.5%. It was observed that 77.7% cases in rural areas and 26.9% cases in urban areas were newly diagnosed.

  17. Summary report of working group 3: Laser and high-gradient structure-based acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonian, Gerard; Simakov, Evgenya

    2017-03-01

    High-gradient particle acceleration with reduced power demands is essential for miniaturization and cost reduction of future accelerators. Applications for compact accelerators span collider research for High Energy Physics, light source development for Basic Energy Sciences and National Security, and industrial accelerators for Energy and Environmental Applications. Working Group 3 discussed and surveyed the recent advances in achieving higher gradients and better acceleration efficiency in externally powered, structure-based accelerators. The topics covered in Working Group 3 included dielectric laser acceleration, millimeter-wave accelerators, breakdown phenomena, exotic topologies such as photonic band-gap structures, artificial materials, and nanostructures, and novel rf technology.

  18. Generation of High-order Group-velocity-locked Vector Solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, X X; Zhang, Q; Li, L; Tang, D Y; Shen, D Y; Fu, S N; Liu, D M; Zhao, L M

    2015-01-01

    We report numerical simulations on the high-order group-velocity-locked vector soliton (GVLVS) generation based on the fundamental GVLVS. The high-order GVLVS generated is characterized with a two-humped pulse along one polarization while a single-humped pulse along the orthogonal polarization. The phase difference between the two humps could be 180 degree. It is found that by appropriate setting the time separation between the two components of the fundamental GVLVS, the high-order GVLVS with different pulse width and pulse intensity could be obtained. 1+2 and 2+2 type high-order GVLVS could be either obtained.

  19. Impact of a patient-centered pharmacy program and intervention in a high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Janice M; Shartle, Deborah; Faudskar, Larry; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A

    2013-04-01

    The medication therapy management (MTM) program identified high-risk members in a large employer group and invited them to participate in an MTM program. The intervention consisted of at least 3 consultations with a clinical pharmacist to review and discuss drug therapy. The goal was to improve drug therapy adherence and clinical outcomes. To assess the impact of MTM on plan-paid health care costs, utilization of medical services, overall days supply of targeted medications, and medication possession ratios (MPRs). The MTM and control group comprised eligible members of a large employer prescription benefit plan who were identified between October 1, 2007, and November 12, 2008, and invited to participate. Control group members were selected from targeted members who declined. After propensity score matching to ensure similarity of groups at baseline, each group had 2,250 members. Baseline comparisons and post-period impact analyses between groups were conducted using bivariate analysis. Post-period analyses used tests for paired comparisons. The MTM and control group members were studied for the year before and after their individual program invitations. We measured pre-post differences between the MTM members and controls in total heath care costs, inpatient visits, emergency room (ER) visits, total days supply, and MPRs for 5 conditions: diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, depression, and asthma. MTM members significantly reduced their plan-paid health care costs by 10.3% or $977, compared with an increase of 0.7% or $62 in the control group (P = 0.048). Inpatient visits in the MTM group decreased by 18.6%, while the control group experienced an increase of 24.2% (P  less than  0.001). While both groups had decreases in ER visits, the groups were not significantly different (P = 0.399). Average days supply for the MTM group increased by 72.7 days over baseline; for the control group, it decreased by 111.1 days (P  less than  0.001). MTM members

  20. A preference for migration

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Oded

    2007-01-01

    At least to some extent migration behavior is the outcome of a preference for migration. The pattern of migration as an outcome of a preference for migration depends on two key factors: imitation technology and migration feasibility. We show that these factors jointly determine the outcome of a preference for migration and we provide examples that illustrate how the prevalence and transmission of a migration-forming preference yield distinct migration patterns. In particular, the imitation of...

  1. A preference for migration

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Oded

    2007-01-01

    At least to some extent migration behavior is the outcome of a preference for migration. The pattern of migration as an outcome of a preference for migration depends on two key factors: imitation technology and migration feasibility. We show that these factors jointly determine the outcome of a preference for migration and we provide examples that illustrate how the prevalence and transmission of a migration-forming preference yield distinct migration patterns. In particular, the imitation of...

  2. Multiple Group Testing Procedures for Analysis of High-Dimensional Genomic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyoseok; Kim, Kipoong

    2016-01-01

    In genetic association studies with high-dimensional genomic data, multiple group testing procedures are often required in order to identify disease/trait-related genes or genetic regions, where multiple genetic sites or variants are located within the same gene or genetic region. However, statistical testing procedures based on an individual test suffer from multiple testing issues such as the control of family-wise error rate and dependent tests. Moreover, detecting only a few of genes associated with a phenotype outcome among tens of thousands of genes is of main interest in genetic association studies. In this reason regularization procedures, where a phenotype outcome regresses on all genomic markers and then regression coefficients are estimated based on a penalized likelihood, have been considered as a good alternative approach to analysis of high-dimensional genomic data. But, selection performance of regularization procedures has been rarely compared with that of statistical group testing procedures. In this article, we performed extensive simulation studies where commonly used group testing procedures such as principal component analysis, Hotelling's T2 test, and permutation test are compared with group lasso (least absolute selection and shrinkage operator) in terms of true positive selection. Also, we applied all methods considered in simulation studies to identify genes associated with ovarian cancer from over 20,000 genetic sites generated from Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27K Beadchip. We found a big discrepancy of selected genes between multiple group testing procedures and group lasso.

  3. Function of the triceps surae muscle group in low and high arched feet: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branthwaite, Helen; Pandyan, Anand; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2012-06-01

    The Achilles tendon has been shown to be comprised of segmental components of tendon arising from the tricpes surae muscle group. Motion of the foot joints in low and high arched feet may induce a change in behaviour of the triceps surae muscle group due to altered strain on the tendon. Surface electromyogram of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius and the soleus muscle from 12 subjects (with 6 low arched and 6 high arched feet) (1:1) was recorded whilst walking at a self selected speed along a 10m walkway. The results showed a high variability in muscle activity between groups with patterns emerging within groups. Soleus was more active in 50% of the low arch feet at forefoot loading and there was a crescendo of activity towards heel lift in 58% of all subjects. This observed variability between groups and foot types emphasises the need for further work on individual anatomical variation and foot function to help in the understanding and management of Achilles tendon pathologies and triceps surae dysfunction.

  4. The Effect of High Versus Low Teacher Affect and Passive Versus Active Student Activity During Music Listening on Preschool Children's Attention, Piece Preference, Time Spent Listening, and Piece Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Wendy L.

    1986-01-01

    Small-group listening lessons and subsequent individual posttests were used to judge 94 three- through five-year-old subjects' attention, paired-comparison piece preference, time spent listening, and piece recognition. Research procedures included a modified multiple baseline design and split-screen video taping of instructional sessions.…

  5. Myrmecochores can target high-quality disperser ants: variation in elaiosome traits and ant preferences for myrmecochorous Euphorbiaceae in Brazilian Caatinga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Laura Carolina; Lima Neto, Mário Correia; de Oliveira, Antônio Fernando Morais; Andersen, Alan N; Leal, Inara R

    2014-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the traditional view of myrmecochory as a highly diffuse interaction between diaspores and a wide range of ant species attracted to their elaiosomes may not be correct. The effectiveness of dispersal varies markedly among ant species, and combined with differential attractiveness of diaspores due to elaiosome size and composition, this raises the potential for myrmecochorous plants to target ant species that offer the highest quality dispersal services. We ask the question: Do particular physical and chemical traits of elaiosomes result in disproportionate removal of Euphorbiaceae diaspores by high-quality disperser ants in Caatinga vegetation of north-eastern Brazil? We offered seeds of five euphorb species that varied in morphological and chemical traits of elaiosomes to seed-dispersing ants. High-quality seed-disperser ants (species of Dinoponera, Ectatomma and Camponotus) were identified as those that rapidly collected and transported diaspores to their nests, often over substantial distances, whereas low-quality disperser ants (primarily species of Pheidole and Solenopsis) typically fed on elaiosomes in situ, and only ever transported diaspores very short distances. Low-quality disperser ants were equally attracted to the elaiosomes of all study species. However, high-quality dispersers showed a strong preference for diaspores with the highest elaiosome mass (and especially proportional mass). As far as we are aware, this is the first study to identify a mechanism of diaspore selection by high-quality ant dispersers based on elaiosome traits under field conditions. Our findings suggest that myrmecochorous plants can preferentially target high-quality seed-disperser ants through the evolution of particular elaiosome traits.

  6. Alcohol drinking increases the dopamine-stimulating effects of ethanol and reduces D2 auto-receptor and group II metabotropic glutamate receptor function within the posterior ventral tegmental area of alcohol preferring (P) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Ingraham, Cynthia M; Rodd, Zachary A; McBride, William J

    2016-10-01

    Repeated local administration of ethanol (EtOH) sensitized the posterior ventral tegmental area (pVTA) to the local dopamine (DA)-stimulating effects of EtOH. Chronic alcohol drinking increased nucleus accumbens (NAC) DA transmission and pVTA glutamate transmission in alcohol-preferring (P) rats. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effects of chronic alcohol drinking by P rats on the (a) sensitivity and response of the pVTA DA neurons to the DA-stimulating actions of EtOH, and (b) negative feedback control of DA (via D2 auto-receptors) and glutamate (via group II mGlu auto-receptors) release in the pVTA. EtOH (50 or 150 mg%) or the D2/3 receptor antagonist sulpiride (100 or 200 μM) was microinjected into the pVTA while DA was sampled with microdialysis in the NAC shell (NACsh). The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 (1 or 10 μM) was perfused through the pVTA via reverse microdialysis and local extracellular glutamate and DA levels were measured. EtOH produced a more robust increase of NACsh DA in the 'EtOH' than 'Water' groups (e.g., 150 mg% EtOH: to ∼ 210 vs 150% of baseline). In contrast, sulpiride increased DA release in the NACsh more in the 'Water' than 'EtOH' groups (e.g., 200 μM sulpiride: to ∼ 190-240 vs 150-160% of baseline). LY341495 (at 10 μM) increased extracellular glutamate and DA levels in the 'Water' (to ∼ 150-180% and 180-230% of baseline, respectively) but not the 'EtOH' groups. These results indicate that alcohol drinking enhanced the DA-stimulating effects of EtOH, and attenuated the functional activities of D2 auto-receptors and group II mGluRs within the pVTA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High Power test of a low group velocity X-band Accelerator Structure for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, S; Riddone, G; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W; Zennaro, R; Fukuda, S; Higashi, Y; Higo, T; Matsumoto, S; Ueno, K; Yokoyama, K; Adolphsen, C; Dolgashev, V; Laurent, L; Lewandowski, J; Tantawi, S; Wang, F; Wang, JW

    2008-01-01

    In recent years evidence has been found that the maximum sustainable gradient in an accelerating structure depends on the rf power flow through the structure. The CLIC study group has consequently designed a new prototype structure for CLIC with a very low group velocity, input power and average aperture ( = 0.13). The 18 cell structure has a group velocity of 2.6 % at the entrance and 1 % at the last cell. Several of these structures have been made in a collaboration between KEK, SLAC and CERN. A total of five brazed-disk structures and two quadrant structures have been made. The high power results of the first KEK/SLAC built structure is presented which reached an unloaded gradient in excess of 100 MV/m at a pulse length of 230 ns with a breakdown rate below 10-6 per meter active length. The high-power testing was done using the NLCTA facility at SLAC.

  8. Tropolone as a High-Performance Robust Anchoring Group for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Fujimori, Yamato; Sugiura, Kenichi; Tsuji, Yukihiro; Ito, Seigo; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-07-27

    A tropolone group has been employed for the first time as an anchoring group for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The DSSC based on a porphyrin, YD2-o-C8T, with a tropolone moiety exhibited a power-conversion efficiency of 7.7 %, which is only slightly lower than that observed for a reference porphyrin, YD2-o-C8, with a conventional carboxylic group. More importantly, YD2-o-C8T was found to be superior to YD2-o-C8 with respect to DSSC durability and binding ability to TiO2 . These results unambiguously demonstrate that tropolone is a highly promising dye-anchoring group for DSSCs in terms of device durability as well as photovoltaic performance.

  9. Evolving Cross-Group Relationships: The Story of Miller High, 1950-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines students' evolving cross-group relationships in a comprehensive high school in Baltimore County, Maryland, USA, between 1950 and 2000. The findings of this research, situated at the intersections of two lenses of inquiry: oral historical analysis and critical studies, uncover both the power of students accustomed to integrated…

  10. High Y-chromosomal Differentiation Among Ethnic Groups of Dir and Swat Districts, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Inam; Olofsson, Jill K; Margaryan, Ashot

    2017-01-01

    , these five ethnic groups fall mostly outside the previously characterized Y-chromosomal gene pools of the Indo-Pakistani subcontinent. Male founder effects, coupled with culturally and topographically based constraints upon marriage and movement, are likely responsible for the high degree of genetic...

  11. Influenza vaccination coverage among high-risk groups in 11 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerbroks, A.; Stock, C.; Bosch, J.A.; Litaker, D.G.; Apfelbacher, C.J.

    BACKGROUND: National vaccination coverage rates for individuals at increased risk of influenza-related complications represent a useful public health indicator of preparedness. We compared European countries regarding (i) vaccination coverage among high-risk groups and (ii) the likelihood that

  12. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  13. Group Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan W.; Koenig, Kathleen; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased recognition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the chronic and pervasive nature of associated deficits, there is a pressing need for effective treatments. The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a structured, group social skills training program for high-functioning youth with ASD was examined in this study. Fifteen…

  14. Group Mentoring: a Way to Retain ´High-Risk´Teachers on the Job

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Lisbeth Angela Lunde

    2015-01-01

    The present article concerns group mentoring combined with action learning as a way to counteract work related sickness and early retirement for´ high risk´ teachers. Focus has been on reflection and vitalization. The data shows that this way of working has many possibilities in supporting...

  15. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  16. High mobility group A1 enhances tumorigenicity of human cholangiocarcinoma and confers resistance to therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Piscuoglio, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein has been described to play an important role in numerous types of human carcinoma. By the modulation of several target genes HMGA1 promotes proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells. However, its role in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has ...

  17. Internet-based Group Relations: A High School Peace Educational Project in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Yaacov B.; Katz, Yaacov J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Internet-based group communication was used as the major strategy to promote the societal values of understanding, equality, tolerance, and peace between Jewish and Bedouin Arab high school students in Israel. Discusses changes in student attitudes and considers the prognosis for long-term change and cooperation between the two…

  18. Product Recommendation System Based on Personal Preference Model Using CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoko; Yoshioka, Nobukazu; Orihara, Ryohei; Furukawa, Koichi

    Product recommendation system is realized by applying business rules acquired by data maining techniques. Business rules such as demographical patterns of purchase, are able to cover the groups of users that have a tendency to purchase products, but it is difficult to recommend products adaptive to various personal preferences only by utilizing them. In addition to that, it is very costly to gather the large volume of high quality survey data, which is necessary for good recommendation based on personal preference model. A method collecting kansei information automatically without questionnaire survey is required. The constructing personal preference model from less favor data is also necessary, since it is costly for the user to input favor data. In this paper, we propose product recommendation system based on kansei information extracted by text mining and user's preference model constructed by Category-guided Adaptive Modeling, CAM for short. CAM is a feature construction method that can generate new features constructing the space where same labeled examples are close and different labeled examples are far away from some labeled examples. It is possible to construct personal preference model by CAM despite less information of likes and dislikes categories. In the system, retrieval agent gathers the products' specification and user agent manages preference model, user's likes and dislikes. Kansei information of the products is gained by applying text mining technique to the reputation documents about the products on the web site. We carry out some experimental studies to make sure that prefrence model obtained by our method performs effectively.

  19. High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability Linked to Affiliation with a New Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder K Sahdra

    Full Text Available This study tests the hypothesis that high levels of high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV predisposes individuals to affiliate with new groups. Resting cardiac physiological recordings were taken before and after experimental sessions to measure trait high-frequency heart rate variability as an index of dispositional autonomic influence on heart rate. Following an experimental manipulation of priming of caring-related words, participants engaged in a minimal group paradigm, in which they imagined being a member of one of two arbitrary groups, allocated money to members of the two groups, and rated their affiliation with the groups. High levels of HF-HRV were associated with ingroup favouritism while allocating money, an effect largely attributable to a positive relationship between HF-HRV and allocation of money to the ingroup, and less due to a negative relationship between HF-HRV and money allocation to the outgroup. HF-HRV was also associated with increased self-reported affiliation feelings for the ingroup but was unrelated to feelings towards the outgroup. These effects remained substantial even after controlling for age, gender, BMI, mood, caffeine consumption, time of day of data collection, smoking and alcohol behaviour, and respiration rate. Further, the effects were observed regardless of whether participants were primed with caring-related words or not. This study is the first to bridge a long history of research on ingroup favouritism to the relatively recent body of research on cardiac vagal tone by uncovering a positive association between HF-HRV and affiliation with a novel group.

  20. 模糊多维偏好群决策的BOT项目风险管理研究%Research on Fuzzy Multiple Preference Group Decisional Build Operation Transfer Project Risk Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李香花; 王孟钧; 张彦春

    2011-01-01

    运用模糊的语言变量进行多属性事物的群体评价决策,即模糊信息多维偏好群决策.由于BOT项目的风险结构十分复杂,如何对BOT项目风险进行有效的分级管理显得十分重要.系统地分析了BOT全生命周期风险的内容与属性,运用模糊决策理论和多维线性规划模型,结合改进的Borda分值法,构建了BOT项目生命周期的模糊信息多维偏好线性规划风险评价模型.模型中既考虑了决策者意见的一致性,又兼顾了决策意见的差异性,为BOT项目风险管理和评价提供了新的思路.%Fuzzy information and multidimensional preference group decision means group multiple attribute decision making by using the fuzzy linguistic variables. Because of the complicated structure of project risk, it is very important that how to level and manage BOT project risk effectively. This paper analyzes the whole BOT life cycle risks and their property systematically, combined with improved Borda score method and fuzzy multi attribute decision making and linear programming techniques, constructed a BOT whole life cycle fuzzy information multidimensional linear programming decision model. This model takes into account not only the decision makers' consistency views but also their inconsistency views, it gives us a innovative idea of BOT project risk management.

  1. Incidence of high blood pressure in a group of tannery workers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cordeiro

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of high blood pressure (HBP in a medium-size tannery in Botucatu, São Paulo State, southeast Brazil. A previous study at this tannery showed a high prevalence of arterial hypertension. A positive correlation was found between cumulated work time and arterial pressure. We followed a cohort of workers for seven years. At the end of this period, HBP incidence rate was calculated as 0.0964.year-1. This was considered high compared to other occupational groups.

  2. A comparison of the therapeutic effectiveness of and preference for postural drainage and percussion, intrapulmonary percussive ventilation, and high-frequency chest wall compression in hospitalized cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekojis, Sarah M; Douce, F Herbert; Flucke, Robert L; Filbrun, David A; Tice, Jill S; McCoy, Karen S; Castile, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have abnormally viscid bronchial secretions that cause airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection that leads to lung damage. To enhance airway clearance and reduce airway obstruction, daily bronchopulmonary hygiene therapy is considered essential. Compare the effectiveness of and patient preferences regarding 3 airway clearance methods: postural drainage and percussion (PD&P), intrapulmonary percussive ventilation (IPV), and high-frequency chest wall compression (HFCWC). The participants were hospitalized CF patients >or= 12 years old. Effectiveness was evaluated by measuring the wet and dry weights of sputum obtained with each method. In random order, each patient received 2 consecutive days of each therapy, delivered 3 times daily for 30 minutes. Sputum was collected during and for 15 minutes after each treatment, weighed wet, then dried and weighed again. Participants rated their preferences using a Likert-type scale. Mean weights and preferences were compared using analysis of variance with repeated measures. Patient preferences were compared using Freidman's test. Twenty-four patients were studied. The mean +/- SD wet sputum weights were 5.53 +/- 5.69 g with PD&P, 6.84 +/- 5.41 g with IPV, and 4.77 +/- 3.29 g with HFCWC. The mean wet sputum weights differed significantly (p = 0.035). Wet sputum weights from IPV were significantly greater than those from HFCWC (p < 0.05). The mean dry sputum weights were not significantly different. With regard to overall preference and to the subcomponents of preference, none of the 3 methods was preferred over the others. HFCWC and IPV are at least as effective as vigorous, professionally administered PD&P for hospitalized CF patients, and the 3 modalities were equally acceptable to them. A hospitalized CF patient should try each therapy and choose his or her preferred modality.

  3. Reader preference for report typefaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M B; Daglish, H N; Adams, J A

    1979-06-01

    A postal survey of typeface preference is described. The survey was designed to help in the choice of typeface to be used for the internal technical Reports produced by the Post Office Research Department. Type setting for these Reports is carried out using an IBM Selectric Composer for which seven typefaces suitable for reports are available. One hundred and twenty-five people who regularly receive copies of these Reports and 57 Trainee Technicians (Apprentices) were asked to arrange these seven typefaces in order of preference and record this ranking on a response sheet. About 85% of both groups returned response sheets for statistical analysis. The results showed a significant preference for three of the typefaces: Press Roman, Theme and Univers. Of these, Press Roman is used for the text of Research Department Reports and Univers is used on diagrams and tables.

  4. Vaccination rates among the general adult population and high-risk groups in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Annunziata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to adequately assess the effectiveness of vaccination in helping to control vaccine-preventable infectious disease, it is important to identify the adherence and uptake of risk-based recommendations. METHODS: The current project includes data from five consecutive datasets of the National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS: 2007 through 2011. The NHWS is an annual, Internet-based health questionnaire, administered to a nationwide sample of adults (aged 18 or older which included items on vaccination history as well as high-risk group status. Vaccination rates and characteristics of vaccinees were reported descriptively. Logistic regressions were conducted to predict vaccination behavior from sociodemographics and risk-related variables. RESULTS: The influenza vaccination rate for all adults 18 years and older has increased significantly from 28.0% to 36.2% from 2007 to 2011 (ps<.05. Compared with those not at high risk (25.1%, all high-risk groups were vaccinated at a higher rate, from 36.8% (pregnant women to 69.7% (those with renal/kidney disease; however, considerable variability among high-risk groups was observed. Vaccination rates among high-risk groups for other vaccines varied considerably though all were below 50%, with the exception of immunocompromised respondents (57.5% for the hepatitis B vaccine and 52.5% for the pneumococcal vaccine and the elderly (50.4% for the pneumococcal. Multiple risk factors were associated with increased rate of vaccination for most vaccines. Significant racial/ethnic differences with influenza, hepatitis, and herpes zoster vaccination rates were also observed (ps<.05. CONCLUSIONS: Rates of influenza vaccination have increased over time. Rates varied by high-risk status, demographics, and vaccine. There was a pattern of modest vaccination rate increases for individuals with multiple risk factors. However, there were relatively low rates of vaccination for most risk-based recommendations

  5. Sulfonic Groups Originated Dual-Functional Interlayer for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Gu, Sui; Guo, Jing; Rui, Kun; Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Sanpei; Jin, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2017-05-03

    The lithium-sulfur battery is one of the most prospective chemistries in secondary energy storage field due to its high energy density and high theoretical capacity. However, the dissolution of polysulfides in liquid electrolytes causes the shuttle effect, and the rapid decay of lithium sulfur battery has greatly hindered its practical application. Herein, combination of sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) interlayer on the separator is adopted to suppress the shuttle effect. We speculate that this SRGO layer plays two roles: physically blocking the migration of polysulfide as ion selective layer and anchoring lithium polysulfide by the electronegative sulfonic group. Lewis acid-base theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that sulfonic groups have a strong tendency to interact with lithium ions in the lithium polysulfide. Hence, the synergic effect involved by the sulfonic group contributes to the enhancement of the battery performance. Furthermore, the uniformly distributed sulfonic groups working as active sites which could induce the uniform distribution of sulfur, alleviating the excessive growth of sulfur and enhancing the utilization of active sulfur. With this interlayer, the prototype battery exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of more than 1300 mAh g(-1) and good capacity retention of 802 mAh g(-1) after 250 cycles at 0.5 C rate. After 60 cycles at different rates from 0.2 to 4 C, the cell with this functional separator still recovered a high specific capacity of 1100 mAh g(-1) at 0.2 C. The results demonstrate a promising interlayer design toward high performance lithium-sulfur battery with longer cycling life, high specific capacity, and rate capability.

  6. Advocacy and political convergence under preference uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Reuben; C. Traxler; F. van Winden

    2015-01-01

    We study the formation of advocacy groups and how they can impact policy outcomes by revealing information about voters׳ preferences to uninformed political candidates. We conduct a laboratory experiment based on a two-candidate spatial electoral competition setting where the policy preferences of v

  7. Learning Style Preferences of Gifted Minority Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Norma J.; Yong, Fung Lan

    1993-01-01

    This study compared learning style preferences among gifted African-American (n=54), Mexican-American (n=61), and American-born Chinese (n=40) middle grade students attending Chicago, Illinois, public schools. Significant ethnic, gender, and grade differences were found. All three groups preferred studying in the afternoon and bright light and did…

  8. Synthesis of modified polyacrylamide with high content of hydroxamate groups and settling performance of red mud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锦伟; 胡慧萍; 王梦; 陈湘攀; 陈启元; 丁治英

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxamated polyacrylamide (HPAM) was synthesized from polyacrylamide (PAM) with high relative molecular mass under the optimum reaction conditions (pH 12 and a molar ratio of hydroxylamine to amide groups of 1.5 at 50 °C for 12 h). The hydroxamate groups of HPAM were verified by Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR). 46% (molar fration) hydroxamate groups and 23% (molar fraction) carbonyl groups on HPAM were determined by conductometric titration combined with Kjeldahl’s microanalysis method. The settling performance achieved at different flocculant dosages was investigated with high goethite-containing red mud slurry of simulated Bayer process synthesized in laboratory. It turns out that the settling performance of high goethite-containing red mud was better with HPAM. The average settling rate of red mud in the first 5 min and the turbidity of supernatant after settling for 30 min are 2.36 m/h and 507 NTU, respectively, at a flocculant dosage of 120 g/t, which is similar to that achieved with Hx-600.

  9. The allometry of prey preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Kalinkat

    Full Text Available The distribution of weak and strong non-linear feeding interactions (i.e., functional responses across the links of complex food webs is critically important for their stability. While empirical advances have unravelled constraints on single-prey functional responses, their validity in the context of complex food webs where most predators have multiple prey remain uncertain. In this study, we present conceptual evidence for the invalidity of strictly density-dependent consumption as the null model in multi-prey experiments. Instead, we employ two-prey functional responses parameterised with allometric scaling relationships of the functional response parameters that were derived from a previous single-prey functional response study as novel null models. Our experiments included predators of different sizes from two taxonomical groups (wolf spiders and ground beetles simultaneously preying on one small and one large prey species. We define compliance with the null model predictions (based on two independent single-prey functional responses as passive preferences or passive switching, and deviations from the null model as active preferences or active switching. Our results indicate active and passive preferences for the larger prey by predators that are at least twice the size of the larger prey. Moreover, our approach revealed that active preferences increased significantly with the predator-prey body-mass ratio. Together with prior allometric scaling relationships of functional response parameters, this preference allometry may allow estimating the distribution of functional response parameters across the myriads of interactions in natural ecosystems.

  10. Microstructuring of thermo-mechanically highly stressed surfaces final report of the DFG research group 576

    CERN Document Server

    Rienäcker, Adrian; Knoll, Gunter; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans; Reithmeier, Eduard; Dinkelacker, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume presents the final research results of the DFG Research Group 576, which is a joint initiative of five different institutes of the Leibniz Universität Hannover and the Universität Kassel, Germany. The research of the DFG Research Group 576 focuses on improving the tribological behavior of thermomechanically highly stressed surfaces, particularly on cylinder liner for combustion engines. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students who want to specialize in the field.

  11. University of Virginia High Energy Physics Group. Final performance report, June 1, 1989--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy Contracts for 1989 covered the initial year of the University of Virginia High Energy Physics Group. The first proposal was submitted in the fall of 1988 and the first allocation of funding was received in June 1989. This first contract which covered the time period June 1, 1989--January 31, 1990 was in the amount of $186,000 and covered UVa HEP group operations and equipment during that period. At that point, a regular contract year was established and two subsequent contracts were issued for February 1, 1990--January 31, 1991 and February 1, 1991--January 31, 992 with awards of $280,000 and $580,000, respectively. The funding between June, 1989 and January, 1992 covered the activities of both the UVa Theory Group (Task A) and the UVa HEP Experimental Group (Task B). Expenditures of all above funds was completed by January 31, 1994. In this time period, certain initial things were accomplished using the operating funds provided by DOE and the seed funds ($2.2 million over the period). There were three main areas of activities, the building of the University of Virginia HEP infrastructure (construction of lab space, computer facilities, electronic shop, machine shop and office space), the hiring of personnel (faculty, post docs, and students) and the physics activities of the group. Much of the physics program of the experimental group revolved around the study of production and decay of heavy flavor. A list of technical papers generated by their work is provided.

  12. High mobility group B1 levels in sepsis and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskici, Zeynep M; Açıkgöz, Şerefden; Pişkin, Nihal; Mungan, Görkem; Can, Murat; Güven, Berrak; Köktürk, Fürüzan

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines trigger coagulant and fibrinolytic systems in sepsis to result in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) that is an important complication and leads to disseminated hemorrhages and multi-organ failure. High Mobility Group B1 DNA Binding (HMGB1) protein is a cytokine taking part in systemic inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to investigate HMGB1 levels in groups of septic patients with and without DIC.Twenty-one septic patients without DIC and 12 septic patients with DIC from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) were included in the study. In addition, 20 patients admitted to the ICU without sepsis or DIC and 20 healthy volunteers served as controls. Levels of HMGB1, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, D-dimer, protein C, protein S, anti-thrombin III (ATIII), platelet (thrombocyte) and leukocyte count were determined. Levels of fibrinogen, protein C, ATIII and platelet count were significantly lower and D-dimer was significantly higher in the group with sepsis plus DIC compared to the group with sepsis without DIC. Levels of HMGB1 were higher in the group with sepsis and DIC compared to the group with sepsis; however, the difference was not statistically significant and the levels of HGMB1 of both groups were significantly higher compared to ICU and healthy control groups. HMGB1 levels were not significantly different in survivor and non survivor patients. HMGB1 levels did not differ in lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and urinary tract infection (UTI) in regard to the etiology of sepsis.

  13. Group velocity locked vector dissipative solitons in a high repetition rate fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yiyang; Li, Lei; Sun, Qizhen; Wu, Zhichao; Xu, Zhilin; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Luming

    2016-01-01

    Vectorial nature of dissipative solitons (DSs) with high repetition rates is studied for the first time in a normal-dispersion fiber laser. Despite the fact that the formed DSs are strongly chirped and the repetition rate is greater than 100 MHz, polarization locked and polarization rotating group velocity locked vector DSs can be formed under 129.3 MHz fundamental mode-locking and 258.6 MHz harmonic mode-locking of the fiber laser, respectively. The two orthogonally polarized components of these vector DSs possess distinctly different central wavelengths and travel together at the same group velocity in the laser cavity, resulting in a gradual spectral edge and small steps on the optical spectra, which can be considered as an auxiliary indicator of the group velocity locked vector DSs.

  14. Chimpanzees’ socially maintained food preferences indicate both conservatism and conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Lydia M.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Lambeth, Susan P.; Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees remain fixed on a single strategy, even if a novel, more efficient, strategy is introduced. Previous studies reporting such findings have incorporated paradigms in which chimpanzees learn one behavioural method and then are shown a new one that the chimpanzees invariably do not adopt. This study provides the first evidence that chimpanzees show such conservatism even when the new method employs the identical required behaviour as the first, but for a different reward. Groups of chimpanzees could choose to exchange one of two types of inedible tokens, with each token type being associated with a different food reward: one type was rewarded with a highly preferred food (grape) and the other type was rewarded with a less preferred food (carrot). Individuals first observed a model chimpanzee from their social group trained to choose one of the two types of tokens. In one group, this token earned a carrot, while in the other, control, group the token earned a grape. In both groups, chimpanzees conformed to the trained model’s choice. This was especially striking for those gaining the pieces of carrot, the less favoured reward. This resulted in a population-level trend of food choices, even when counter to their original, individual, preferences. Moreover, the chimpanzees’ food preferences did not change over time, demonstrating that these results were not due to a simple shift in preferences. We discuss social factors apparent in the interactions and suggest that, despite seeming to be inefficient, in chimpanzees, conformity may benefit them, possibly by assisting with the maintenance of group relations. PMID:27011390

  15. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-08

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  16. Promoting Physical Activity With Group Pictures. Affiliation-Based Visual Communication for High-Risk Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifegerste, Doreen; Rossmann, Constanze

    2017-02-01

    Past research in social and health psychology has shown that affiliation motivation is associated with health behavior, especially for high-risk populations, suggesting that targeting this motivation could be a promising strategy to promote physical activity. However, the effects that affiliation appeals (e.g., pictures depicting companionship during physical activities) and accompanying slogans have on motivating physical activity have been largely unexplored. Hence, our two studies experimentally tested the effects of exposure to affiliation-based pictures for overweight or less active people, as well as the moderating effect of affiliation motivation. The results of these two studies give some indication that group pictures (with or without an accompanying slogan) can be an effective strategy to improve high-risk populations' attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to engage in physical activity. Affiliation motivation as a personality trait did not interact with these effects, but was positively associated with attitudes, independent of the group picture effect.

  17. Polybenzimidazole Membranes Containing Benzimidazole Side Groups for High Temprature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Xueyuan; Xu, Yizin

    2013-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI) with a high molecular weight of 69,000 was first synthesized. It was afterwards grafted with benzimidazole pendant groups on the backbones. The acid doped benzimidaozle grafted PBI membranes were investigated and characterized including fuel cell tests at elevated temperat......Polybenzimidazole (PBI) with a high molecular weight of 69,000 was first synthesized. It was afterwards grafted with benzimidazole pendant groups on the backbones. The acid doped benzimidaozle grafted PBI membranes were investigated and characterized including fuel cell tests at elevated...... temperatures without humidification. At an acid doping level of 13.1 mol H3PO4 per average molar repeat unit, the PBI membranes with a benzimidazole grafting degree of 10.6% demonstrated a conductivity of 0.15 S cm-1 and a H2-air fuel cell peak power density of 378 mW cm-2 at 180 oC at ambient pressure without...

  18. High CO2-capture ability of a porous organic polymer bifunctionalized with carboxy and triazole groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lin-Hua; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2013-08-26

    A new porous organic polymer, SNU-C1, incorporating two different CO2 -attracting groups, namely, carboxy and triazole groups, has been synthesized. By activating SNU-C1 with two different methods, vacuum drying and supercritical-CO2 treatment, the guest-free phases, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, respectively, were obtained. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca are 595 and 830 m(2) g(-1), respectively, as estimated by the N2-adsorption isotherms at 77 K. At 298 K and 1 atm, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca show high CO2 uptakes, 2.31 mmol  g(-1) and 3.14 mmol  g(-1), respectively, the high level being due to the presence of abundant polar groups (carboxy and triazole) exposed on the pore surfaces. Five separation parameters for flue gas and landfill gas in vacuum-swing adsorption were calculated from single-component gas-sorption isotherms by using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). The data reveal excellent CO2-separation abilities of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, namely high CO2-uptake capacity, high selectivity, and high regenerability. The gas-cycling experiments for the materials and the water-treated samples, experiments that involved treating the samples with a CO2-N2 gas mixture (15:85, v/v) followed by a pure N2 purge, further verified the high regenerability and water stability. The results suggest that these materials have great potential applications in CO2 separation.

  19. CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Title: CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY Objectives: Orthognathic surgery involves surgical manipulation of jaw and face skeletal structure. A subgroup of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery suffers from excessive ...... to their bleeding risk. This valuable knowledge will be useful with regard to optimization of patient safety, staff composition and transfusion preparations. This pilot study included only 41 patients, and further studies are needed to consolidate the observations done....

  20. High Mobility Group Protein HMGB2 Is a Critical Regulator of Plasmodium Oocyst Development*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Gissot, Mathieu; Ting, Li-Min; Daly, Thomas M.; Bergman, Lawrence W.; Sinnis, Photini; Kim, Kami

    2008-01-01

    The sexual cycle of Plasmodium is required for transmission of malaria from mosquitoes to mammals, but how parasites induce the expression of genes required for the sexual stages is not known. We disrupted the Plasmodium yoelii gene encoding high mobility group nuclear factor hmgb2, which encodes a DNA-binding protein potentially implicated in transcriptional regulation of malaria gene expression. We investigated its function in vivo in the vertebrate and invertebrate ...

  1. Generation of pseudo-high-order group velocity locked vector solitons in fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Xinxin; Li, Lei; Ge, Yanqi; Luo, Jiaolin; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming; Zhao, Luming

    2015-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the generation of pseudo-high-order group velocity locked vector solitons (GVLVS) in a fiber laser using a SESAM as the mode locker. With the help of an external all-fiber polarization resolved system, a GVLVS with a two-humped pulse along one polarization while a single-humped pulse along the orthogonal polarization could be obtained. The phase difference between the two humps is 180 degree.

  2. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 Correlates with Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    OpenAIRE

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to...

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Title: CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY Objectives: Orthognathic surgery involves surgical manipulation of jaw and face skeletal structure. A subgroup of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery suffers from excessive...... intraoperative blood loss. Classification of patients according to their bleeding risk will improve the surgical procedure with regard to staff composition, blood transfusion and patient safety. Thrombelastography is a global coagulation assay measuring the viscoelastic properties of whole blood samples, taking...

  4. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David M; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stillwell, David J; Kosinski, Michal; Rentfrow, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S) theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891) indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320) indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz). Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353) replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., 'brain types'). Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing) preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres) compared to type S (bias towards systemizing) who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock). Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes), negative valence (depressing and sad), and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful), while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling), and aspects of positive valence (animated) and cerebral depth (complexity). The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S) are discussed.

  5. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stillwell, David J.; Kosinski, Michal; Rentfrow, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S) theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891) indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320) indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz). Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353) replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., ‘brain types’). Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing) preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres) compared to type S (bias towards systemizing) who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock). Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes), negative valence (depressing and sad), and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful), while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling), and aspects of positive valence (animated) and cerebral depth (complexity). The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S) are discussed. PMID:26200656

  6. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Greenberg

    Full Text Available Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891 indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320 indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz. Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353 replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., 'brain types'. Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres compared to type S (bias towards systemizing who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock. Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes, negative valence (depressing and sad, and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful, while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling, and aspects of positive valence (animated and cerebral depth (complexity. The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S are discussed.

  7. Effects of a Group of High-Rise Structures on Ground Motions under Seismic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-jun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional simulation was created to determine the seismic performance of coupled systems with a group of up to 100 pile-high-rise structures resting on soil layers using system modal, harmonic, and time domain analysis. The results demonstrated that the existence of a structural group mitigates the structural responses with respect to the single-structure-soil interaction (SSI and results in significantly nonuniform ground seismic motions. Due to the influence of a structural group, adjacent structures can exhibit fully alternating mechanical behavior, and buildings in the urban fringe are subjected to stronger shaking than downtown buildings. The overall trend of the influence of structural groups is that ground motions are lessened inside an urban area, and ground motions at the locations between structures differ from those at the locations of the structures. Moreover, the effective distance of a structural group on ground motions is associated with the urban width. Less distance between structures enhances the interaction effect. In addition, the soil properties can greatly influence the system’s seismic responses and can even completely change the effect trends. The results in our paper are consistent with the phenomena observed in the Mexico City earthquake and the 1976 earthquake in Friuli, Italy.

  8. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of a Type 2 Blood Group A Tetrasaccharide and Development of High-throughput Assays Enables a Platform for Screening Blood Group Antigen-cleaving Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, David H; Ernst, Sabrina; Kötzler, Miriam P; Withers, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    A facile enzymatic synthesis of the methylumbelliferyl β-glycoside of the type 2 A blood group tetrasaccharide in good yields is reported. Using this compound, we developed highly sensitive fluorescence-based high-throughput assays for both endo-β-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity specific for the oligosaccharide structure of the blood group A antigen. We further demonstrate the potential to use this assay to screen the expressed gene products of metagenomic libraries in the search for efficient blood group antigen-cleaving enzymes.

  9. Circadian Phase Preference in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri L. Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric bipolar disorder (BD rates have notably increased over the past three decades. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with BD, efforts are needed to identify factors useful in earlier detection to help address this serious public health concern. Sleep is particularly important to consider given the sequelae of disrupted sleep on normative functioning and that sleep is included in diagnostic criteria for both Major Depressive and Manic Episodes. Here, we examine one component of sleep—i.e., circadian phase preference with the behavioral construct of morningness/eveningness (M/E. In comparing 30 BD and 45 typically developing control (TDC participants, ages 7–17 years, on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children (MESC, no between-group differences emerged. Similar results were found when comparing three groups (BD−ADHD; BD+ADHD; TDC. Consistent with data available on circadian phase preference in adults with BD, however, we found that BD adolescents, ages 13 years and older, endorsed significantly greater eveningness compared to their TDC peers. While the current findings are limited by reliance on subjective report and the high-rate of comorbid ADHD among the BD group, this finding that BD teens demonstrate an exaggerated shift towards eveningness than would be developmentally expected is important. Future studies should compare the circadian rhythms across the lifespan for individuals diagnosed with BD, as well as identify the point at which BD youth part ways with their healthy peers in terms of phase preference. In addition, given our BD sample was overall euthymic, it may be that M/E is more state vs. trait specific in latency age youth. Further work would benefit from assessing circadian functioning using a combination of rating forms and laboratory-based measures. Improved understanding of sleep in BD may identify behavioral targets for inclusion in prevention and intervention protocols.

  10. Differential activation of the frontal pole to high vs low calorie foods: The neural basis of food preference in Anorexia Nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Jessica C; Godier, Lauren R; Reinecke, Andrea; Harmer, Catherine J; Park, Rebecca J

    2016-12-30

    Neuroimaging studies in anorexia nervosa (AN) suggest that altered food reward processing may result from dysfunction in both limbic reward and cortical control centers of the brain. This fMRI study aimed to index the neural correlates of food reward in a subsample of individuals with restrictive AN: twelve currently ill, fourteen recovered individuals and sixteen healthy controls. Participants were shown pictures of high and low-calorie foods and asked to evaluate how much they wanted to eat each one following a four hour fast. Whole-brain task-activated analysis was followed by psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI) of the amygdala and caudate. In the AN group, we observed a differential pattern of activation in the lateral frontal pole: increasing following presentation of high-calorie stimuli and decreasing in during presentation of low-calorie food pictures, the opposite of which was seen in the healthy control (HC) group. In addition, decreased activation to food pictures was observed in somatosensory regions in the AN group. PPI analyses suggested hypo-connectivity in reward pathways, and between the caudate and both somatosensory and visual processing regions in the AN group. No significant between-group differences were observed between the recovered group and the currently ill and healthy controls in the PPI analysis. Taken together, these findings further our understanding of the neural processes which may underpin the avoidance of high-calorie foods in those with AN and might exacerbate the development of compulsive weight-loss behavior, despite emaciation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Report of the Snowmass M6 Working Group on high intensity proton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou and J. Wei

    2002-08-20

    The U.S. high-energy physics program needs an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver (PD), by the end of this decade. This machine will serve as a stand-alone facility that will provide neutrino superbeams and other high intensity secondary beams such as kaons, muons, neutrons, and anti-protons (cf. E1 and E5 group reports) and also serve as the first stage of a neutrino factory (cf. M1 group report). It can also be a high brightness source for a VLHC. Based on present accelerator technology and project construction experience, it is both feasible and cost-effective to construct a 1-4 MW Proton Driver. Two recent PD design studies have been made, one at FNAL and the other at the BNL. Both designed PD's for 1 MW proton beams at a cost of about U.S. $200M (excluding contingency and overhead) and both designs were upgradeable to 4 MW. An international collaboration between FNAL, BNL and KEK on high intensity proton facilities is addressing a number of key design issues. The superconducting (sc) RF cavities, cryogenics, and RF controls developed for the SNS can be directly adopted to save R&D efforts, cost, and schedule. PD studies are also actively being pursued at Europe and Japan.

  12. Evaluation of anger management groups in a high-security hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Claire; Gandolfi, Stacy; Dudley, Alison; Thomas, Brian; Tapp, James; Moore, Estelle

    2013-12-01

    Anger management programmes for offenders typically aim to improve the management of emotion associated with aggressive and antisocial behaviour. Such programmes have been quite extensively evaluated in prison and probation settings, but there is less published research in forensic mental health settings. This study aimed to evaluate anger management groups in a high-security hospital. Eighty-six patients were referred for a 20-session anger management intervention. Outcomes were self-reported experiences of anger and changes in institutionally documented incidents of aggression. Incident rates were retrospectively reviewed for all group graduates, where data were available, including a comparison group of graduates who acted as their own controls. Group graduates reported sustained reductions in feelings of anger and positive changes in their use of aggression in reaction to provocation. Some reduction in incidents of physical aggression was noted when group completers were compared with non-completers. Incidents of verbal aggression were observed to increase for graduates. There was also a trend towards improvement when treated men were compared with men on the waiting list. Our findings contribute to the growing evidence for anger management groups for aggressive men, although the low-base rate of incidents, typical of such a containing and therapeutic hospital setting, rendered the analysis of behavioural outcomes difficult. Anger management sessions for male forensic psychiatric patients can be effective in reducing incidents of physical aggression in response to provocation. Evaluation of treatments for anger is particularly difficult in secure and protective settings, where the aim is to keep incidents of actual physical aggression to a minimum. Further research of this kind is needed to test the value of self-reported reduction in angry feelings as an indicator of clinically useful progress. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. NEWBORNS OF HIGH RISK GROUPS AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CARDIAC ACTIVITY DURING THE PERIOD OF EARLY ADAPTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Tumaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study characteristics of electrophysiological cardiac activity in children of risk groups and to assess possibilities of Holter-electrocardiography (H-ECG in revealing of cardiac dysfunction during the period of early adaptation. Patients and methods: 250 newborns were examined. The main group consisted of 200 children with cerebral ischemia (CI. This group was divided into 2 subgroups: 100 full-term and 100 premature (at various gestation age infants. Control group contained 50 children born at 38–40th weeks of gestation with physiological course of pregnancy and delivery, APGAR score of 8–9 points. Complex examination included H-ECG according the standard technic with evaluation of the hearth rate (HR during sleep and wakefulness; HRmin, HRmax; arrhythmias, conductivity disorders, duration of the intervals; rhythm variability. Results: according to the ECG children with CI, especially premature ones, and children delivered via Cesarean section more often had ST-T disturbances, arrhythmias (sinus tachycardia, less often — sinus bradycardia and conductivity disorders, Q-Tc prolongation. H-EGC revealed decrease of sleep HR, HRmin and HRmax in children with CI especially in delivered via Cesarean section. The most common arrhythmia was supraventricular extrasystole.  Pauses in rhythms and variability were the highest in premature children delivered via Cesarean section. Conclusions: hypoxia/ischemia is a trigger for development of cardiovascular dysfuncion in newborns. Premature and children delivered via Cesarean section form a group of high risk. H-ECG widens possibilities of revealing of symptoms of cardiac dysfunction (disturbances at the basal level of functioning, of adaptation resources of the sinus node, electric instability of the myocardium and heart rate variability in children of risk group for development of cardiovascular disorders. 

  14. A typical wave wake from high-speed vessels: its group structure and run-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Didenkulova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High-amplitude water waves induced by high-speed vessels are regularly observed in Tallinn Bay, the Baltic Sea, causing intense beach erosion and disturbing marine habitants in the coastal zone. Such a strong impact on the coast may be a result of a certain group structure of the wave wake. In order to understand it, here we present an experimental study of the group structure of these wakes at Pikakari beach, Tallinn Bay. The most energetic vessel waves at this location (100 m from the coast at the water depth 2.7 m have amplitudes of about 1 m and periods of 8–10 s and cause maximum run-up heights on a beach up to 1.4 m. These waves represent frequency modulated packets where the largest and longest waves propagate ahead of other smaller amplitude and period waves. Sometimes the groups of different heights and periods can be separated even within one wave wake event. The wave heights within a wake are well described by the Weibull distribution, which has different parameters for wakes from different vessels. Wave run-up heights can also be described by Weibull distribution and its parameters can be connected to the parameters of the distribution of wave heights 100 m from the coast. Finally, the run-up of individual waves within a packet is studied. It is shown that the specific structure of frequency modulated wave packets, induced by high-speed vessels, leads to a sequence of high wave run-ups at the coast, even when the original wave heights are rather moderate. This feature can be a key to understanding the significant impact on coasts caused by fast vessels.

  15. Report of the Snowmass T7 working group on high performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ko; R. Ryne; P. Spentzouris

    2002-12-05

    The T7 Working Group on High Performance Computing (HPC) had more than 30 participants. During the three weeks at Snowmass there were about 30 presentations. This working group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), M1 (Muon Based Systems), M6 (High Intensity Proton Sources), T4 (Particle sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), and T8 (Advanced Accelerators). The topics that were discussed fall naturally into three areas: (1) HPC requirements for next-generation accelerator design, (2) state-of-the-art in HPC simulation of accelerator systems, and (3) applied mathematics and computer science activities related to the development of HPC tools that will be of use to the accelerator community (as well as other communities). This document summarizes the material mentioned above and includes recommendations for future HPC activities in the accelerator community. The relationship of those activities to the HENP/SciDAC project on 21st century accelerator simulation is also discussed.

  16. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS T7 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwok

    2002-08-30

    The T7 Working Group on High Performance Computing (HPC) had more than 30 participants (listed in Section 6). During the three weeks at Snowmass there were about 30 presentations (listed in Section 7). This working group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), M1 (Muon Based Systems), M6 (High Intensity Proton Sources), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), and T8 (Advanced Accelerators). The topics that were discussed fall naturally into three areas: (1) HPC requirements for next-generation accelerator design, (2) state-of-the-art in HPC simulation of accelerator systems, and (3) applied mathematics and computer science activities related to the development of HPC tools that will be of use to the accelerator community (as well as other communities). This document summarizes the material mentioned above and includes recommendations for future HPC activities in the accelerator community. The relationship of those activities to the HENP/SciDAC project on 21st century accelerator simulation is also discussed.

  17. Closeout Report: Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of South Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Charles M; Godang, Romulus

    2013-06-25

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of South Alabama has been supported by this research grant (DE-FG02-96ER40970) since 1996. One researcher, Dr. Merrill Jenkins, has been supported on this grant during this time worked on fixed target experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, west of Chicago, Illinois. These experiments have been E-705, E-771, E-871 (HyperCP) and E-921 (CKM) before it was canceled for budgetary reasons. After the cancellation of CKM, Dr. Jenkins joined the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment as an associate member via the High Energy Physics Group at the Florida State University. A second, recently tenured faculty member, Dr. Romulus Godang joined the group in 2009 and has been supported by this grant since then. Dr. Godang is working on the BaBaR experiment at SLAC and has joined the Belle-II experiment located in Japan at KEK. According to the instructions sent to us by our grant monitor, we are to concentrate on the activities over the last three years in this closeout report.

  18. High-precision thermodynamic and critical properties from tensor renormalization-group flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A Nihat

    2008-01-01

    The recently developed tensor renormalization-group (TRG) method provides a highly precise technique for deriving thermodynamic and critical properties of lattice Hamiltonians. The TRG is a local coarse-graining transformation, with the elements of the tensor at each lattice site playing the part of the interactions that undergo the renormalization-group flows. These tensor flows are directly related to the phase diagram structure of the infinite system, with each phase flowing to a distinct surface of fixed points. Fixed-point analysis and summation along the flows give the critical exponents, as well as thermodynamic functions along the entire temperature range. Thus, for the ferromagnetic triangular lattice Ising model, the free energy is calculated to better than 10(-5) along the entire temperature range. Unlike previous position-space renormalization-group methods, the truncation (of the tensor index range D) in this general method converges under straightforward and systematic improvements. Our best results are easily obtained with D=24, corresponding to 4624-dimensional renormalization-group flows.

  19. High-Precision Thermodynamic and Critical Properties from Tensor Renormalization-Group Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A. Nihat

    2008-03-01

    The recently developed tensor renormalization-group (TRG) method [1] provides a highly precise technique for deriving thermodynamic and critical properties of lattice Hamiltonians. The TRG is a local coarse-graining transformation, with the elements of the tensor at each lattice site playing the part of the interactions that undergo the renormalization-group flows. These tensor flows are directly related [2] to the phase diagram structure of the infinite system, with each phase flowing to a distinct surface of fixed points. Fixed-point analysis and summation along the flows give the critical exponents, as well as thermodynamic functions along the entire temperature range. Thus, for the ferromagnetic triangular lattice Ising model, the free energy is calculated to better than 10-5 along the entire temperature range. Unlike previous position-space renormalization-group methods, the truncation (of the tensor index range D) in this general method converges under straightforward and systematic improvements. Our best results are easily obtained with D=24, corresponding to 4624-dimensional renormalization-group flows. [1] M. Levin and C.P. Nave, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 120601 (2007). [2] M. Hinczewski and A.N. Berker, arXiv:0709.2803v1 [cond-mat.stat-mech], Phys. Rev. E, in press.

  20. Protein adsorption of dialdehyde cellulose-crosslinked chitosan with high amino group contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ung-Jin; Lee, Yeong Ro; Kang, Tong Ho; Choi, Joon Weon; Kimura, Satoshi; Wada, Masahisa

    2017-05-01

    Crosslinked chitosan was prepared by Schiff base formation between the aldehyde groups of dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) and the amino groups of chitosan and a subsequent reduction. DAC was obtained through periodate oxidation of cellulose and solubilization in hot water at 100°C for 1h. Three grades of DAC-crosslinked chitosan were prepared by adding various amounts DAC. The degrees of crosslinking as determined by amino group content were 3.8, 8.3, and 12.1%, respectively. DAC-crosslinked chitosan showed higher stability in the pH 2-9 range and no cytotoxicity was identified over the course of a 21-day long-term stability test. Also, DAC-crosslinked chitosan showed remarkably high bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption capacity at pH 5.5 as a result of the increased amino group content, due to the reaction between DAC and chitosan molecular chains occurring at multiple points even though DAC-crosslinked chitosan showed a lower degree of crosslinking.

  1. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Johnson, Benjamin D; Bullock, James S; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times ($z \\sim 2$ and $z \\sim 7$) by combining stellar population synthesis modeling with star formation histories derived from deep color-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-$z$ galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-$z$ Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe $z \\sim 7$ progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field lum...

  2. Chimpanzees' socially maintained food preferences indicate both conservatism and conformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopper, LM; Schapiro, Steve; Lambeth, SP

    2011-01-01

    Chimpanzees remain fixed on a single strategy, even if a novel, more efficient, strategy is introduced. Previous studies reporting such findings have incorporated paradigms in which chimpanzees learn one behavioural method and then are shown a new one that the chimpanzees invariably do not adopt....... This study provides the first evidence that chimpanzees show such conservatism even when the new method employs the identical required behaviour as the first, but for a different reward. Groups of chimpanzees could choose to exchange one of two types of inedible tokens, with each token type being associated...... with a different food reward: one type was rewarded with a highly preferred food (grape) and the other type was rewarded with a less preferred food (carrot). Individuals first observed a model chimpanzee from their social group trained to choose one of the two types of tokens. In one group, this token earned...

  3. Change in food cravings, food preferences, and appetite during a low-carbohydrate and low-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Corby K; Rosenbaum, Diane; Han, Hongmei; Geiselman, Paula J; Wyatt, Holly R; Hill, James O; Brill, Carrie; Bailer, Brooke; Miller, Bernard V; Stein, Rick; Klein, Sam; Foster, Gary D

    2011-10-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the effect of prescribing a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) and a low-fat diet (LFD) on food cravings, food preferences, and appetite. Obese adults were randomly assigned to a LCD (n = 134) or a LFD (n = 136) for 2 years. Cravings for specific types of foods (sweets, high-fats, fast-food fats, and carbohydrates/starches); preferences for high-sugar, high-carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate/high-protein foods; and appetite were measured during the trial and evaluated during this secondary analysis of trial data. Differences between the LCD and LFD on change in outcome variables were examined with mixed linear models. Compared to the LFD, the LCD had significantly larger decreases in cravings for carbohydrates/starches and preferences for high-carbohydrate and high-sugar foods. The LCD group reported being less bothered by hunger compared to the LFD group. Compared to the LCD group, the LFD group had significantly larger decreases in cravings for high-fat foods and preference for low-carbohydrate/high-protein foods. Men had larger decreases in appetite ratings compared to women. Prescription of diets that promoted restriction of specific types of foods resulted in decreased cravings and preferences for the foods that were targeted for restriction. The results also indicate that the LCD group was less bothered by hunger compared to the LFD group and that men had larger reductions in appetite compared to women.

  4. Identification and characterization of the lamprey high-mobility group box 1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Pang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. We identified a homolog of HMGB1 in the Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica. The Lampetra japonica HMGB1 gene (Lj-HMGB1 has over 70% sequence identity with its homologs in jawed vertebrates. Despite the reasonably high sequence identity with other HMGB1 proteins, Lj-HMGB1 did not group together with these proteins in a phylogenetic analysis. We examined Lj-HMGB1 expression in lymphocyte-like cells, and the kidneys, heart, gills, and intestines of lampreys before and after the animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and concanavalin A (ConA. Lj-HMGB1 was initially expressed at a higher level in the heart, but after treatment with LPS and ConA only the gills demonstrated a significant up-regulation of expression. The recombinant Lj-HMGB1 (rLj-HMGB1 protein bound double-stranded DNA and induced the proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells to a similar extent as human HMGB1. We further revealed that Lj-HMGB1 was able to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory mediator, in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. These results suggest that lampreys use HMGB1 to activate their innate immunity for the purpose of pathogen defense.

  5. Preference, priorities and belief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, D.; Liu, F.; Grüne-Yanoff, T.; Hansson, S.O.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider preference over objects. We show how this preference can be derived from priorities, properties of these objects, a concept which is initially from optimality theory. We do this both in the case when an agent has complete information and in the case when an agent only has b

  6. von Neumann Morgenstern Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Karl

    von Neumann Morgenstern utility is generalized to von Neumann Morgenstern preferences. The proof is an application of simple hyperplane theorems......von Neumann Morgenstern utility is generalized to von Neumann Morgenstern preferences. The proof is an application of simple hyperplane theorems...

  7. von Neumann Morgenstern Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Karl

    2000-01-01

    von Neumann Morgenstern utility is generalized to von Neumann Morgenstern preferences. The proof is an application of simple hyperplane theorems......von Neumann Morgenstern utility is generalized to von Neumann Morgenstern preferences. The proof is an application of simple hyperplane theorems...

  8. Eye tracking social preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Ting; Potters, Jan; Funaki, Yukihiko

    We hypothesize that if people are motivated by a particular social preference, then choosing in accordance with this preference will lead to an identifiable pattern of eye movements. We track eye movements while subjects make choices in simple three-person distribution experiments. We characterize

  9. Scheduled access alcohol drinking by alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats: modeling adolescent and adult binge-like drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard L.; Rodd, Zachary A.; Engleman, Eric A.; Toalston, Jamie E.; McBride, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Binge alcohol drinking continues to be a public health concern among today’s youth and young adults. Moreover, an early onset of alcohol use, which usually takes the form of binge drinking, is associated with a greater risk for developing alcohol use disorders. Given this, it is important to examine this behavior in rat models of alcohol abuse and dependence. Toward that end, the objective of this article is to review findings on binge-like drinking by selectively bred alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) lines of rats. As reviewed elsewhere in this special issue, the P line meets all, and the HAD line meets most, of the proposed criteria for an animal model of alcoholism. One model of binge drinking is scheduled ethanol access during the dark cycle, which has been used by our laboratory for over 20 years. Our laboratory has also adopted a protocol involving the concurrent presentation of multiple ethanol concentrations. When this protocol is combined with limited access, ethanol intake is maximized yielding blood ethanol levels (BELs) in excess, sometimes greatly in excess, of 80 mg%. By extending these procedures to include multiple scheduled ethanol access sessions during the dark cycle for 5 consecutive days/week, P and HAD rats consume in 3 or 4 h as much as, if not more than, the amount usually consumed in a 24-h period. Under certain conditions, using the multiple scheduled access procedure, BELs exceeding 200 mg% can be achieved on a daily basis. An overview of findings from studies with other selectively bred, inbred, and outbred rats places these findings in the context of the existing literature. Overall, the findings support the use of P and HAD rats as animal models to study binge-like alcohol drinking and reveal that scheduled access procedures will significantly increase ethanol intake by other rat lines and strains as well. PMID:24290311

  10. Scheduled access alcohol drinking by alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats: modeling adolescent and adult binge-like drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard L; Rodd, Zachary A; Engleman, Eric A; Toalston, Jamie E; McBride, William J

    2014-05-01

    Binge alcohol drinking continues to be a public health concern among today's youth and young adults. Moreover, an early onset of alcohol use, which usually takes the form of binge drinking, is associated with a greater risk for developing alcohol use disorders. Given this, it is important to examine this behavior in rat models of alcohol abuse and dependence. Toward that end, the objective of this article is to review findings on binge-like drinking by selectively bred alcohol-preferring (P) and high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) lines of rats. As reviewed elsewhere in this special issue, the P line meets all, and the HAD line meets most, of the proposed criteria for an animal model of alcoholism. One model of binge drinking is scheduled ethanol access during the dark cycle, which has been used by our laboratory for over 20 years. Our laboratory has also adopted a protocol involving the concurrent presentation of multiple ethanol concentrations. When this protocol is combined with limited access, ethanol intake is maximized yielding blood ethanol levels (BELs) in excess, sometimes greatly in excess, of 80 mg%. By extending these procedures to include multiple scheduled ethanol access sessions during the dark cycle for 5 consecutive days/week, P and HAD rats consume in 3 or 4 h as much as, if not more than, the amount usually consumed in a 24 h period. Under certain conditions, using the multiple scheduled access procedure, BELs exceeding 200 mg% can be achieved on a daily basis. An overview of findings from studies with other selectively bred, inbred, and outbred rats places these findings in the context of the existing literature. Overall, the findings support the use of P and HAD rats as animal models to study binge-like alcohol drinking and reveal that scheduled access procedures will significantly increase ethanol intake by other rat lines and strains as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Colorectal cancer screening in high-risk groups is increasing, although current smokers fall behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluyemi, Aminat O; Welch, Amy R; Yoo, Lisa J; Lehman, Erik B; McGarrity, Thomas J; Chuang, Cynthia H

    2014-07-15

    There is limited information about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening trends in high-risk groups, including the black, obese, diabetic, and smoking populations. For this study, the authors evaluated national CRC screening trends in these high-risk groups to provide insights into whether screening resources are being appropriately used. This was a nationally representative, population-based study using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System from the Centers for Disease Control. Data analysis was performed using bivariate analyses with weighted logistic regression. In the general population, CRC screening increased significantly from 59% to 65% during the years 2006 to 2010. The screening prevalence in non-Hispanic blacks was 58% in 2006 and 65% in 2010. Among obese individuals, the prevalence of up-to-date CRC screening increased significantly from 59% in 2006 to 66% in 2010. Screening prevalence in individuals with diabetes was 63% in 2006 and 69% in 2010. The CRC screening prevalence in current smokers was 45% in 2006 and 50% in 2010. The odds of CRC screening in the non-Hispanic black population, the obese population, and the diabetic population were higher than in non-Hispanic whites, normal weight individuals, and the population without diabetes, respectively. Current smokers had significantly lower odds of CRC screening than never-smokers in the years studied (2006: odds ratio [OR], 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.76; 2008: OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.63-0.71; 2010: OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66-0.73). The prevalence of CRC screening in high-risk groups is trending upward. Despite this, current smokers have significantly lower odds of CRC screening compared with the general population. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  12. Increase of the effectiveness of school PE classes through sport preferences survey: Contextual prediction of demanded sport activities

    OpenAIRE

    Michal Kudláček

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An effort to promote participation in any type of PA is more effective when it is aimed at needs, interests and preferences of particular target group. Current evidence emphasizes the insufficiency of PA in all age groups. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to analyze and describe the structure of sport activity preferences of high school students and to contribute to prospective improvement of sports and physical activity programs. METHODS: Two standardized questionnaires we...

  13. High-end Manufacture of Yulian Energy Group Focused Efforts on Aluminum Deep Processing Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum deep processing products recorded brisk production and sales,Q1 sales completed29%of the whole year plan,budget profit completed 67%of the annual plan,first 3months of the year fulfilled consecutive profitearning,customer orders have been scheduled for production till June.Such splendid score sheet indicated that the high-end manufacture of Henan Yulian Energy Group Co.,Ltd,a pilot enterprise for transition and upgrading in Henan aluminum industry,has flexed its

  14. Parallel adaptive integration in high-performance functional Renormalization Group computations

    CERN Document Server

    Lichtenstein, Julian; de la Peña, David Sánchez; Vidović, Toni; Di Napoli, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual framework provided by the functional Renormalization Group (fRG) has become a formidable tool to study correlated electron systems on lattices which, in turn, provided great insights to our understanding of complex many-body phenomena, such as high- temperature superconductivity or topological states of matter. In this work we present one of the latest realizations of fRG which makes use of an adaptive numerical quadrature scheme specifically tailored to the described fRG scheme. The final result is an increase in performance thanks to improved parallelism and scalability.

  15. Report of the working group on production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, R.L. [MS H851I, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bisognano, J.; Brau, C.; Hogan, M.; Kim, K.; Milton, S.; Nuhn, H.; Pagani, C.; Pierini, P.; Reiser, M.; Schmerge, J.; Serafini, L.; Teng, L.; Winick, H.; Cornacchia, M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the main discussions of the Working Group on the Production and Dynamics of High Brightness Beams. The following topics are covered in this paper: proposed new electron sources and needed research on existing sources, discussions on issues relating to the description of phase space on non-thermalized electron beam distributions and the theoretical modeling on non-thermalized electron beam distributions, and the present status of the theoretical modeling of beam transport in bends. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Consumers’ preferences for bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edenbrandt, Anna Kristina; Gamborg, Christian; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2017-01-01

    Consumers are apprehensive about transgenic technologies, so cisgenics, which limit gene transfers to sexually compatible organisms, have been suggested to address consumer concerns. We study consumer preferences for rye bread alternatives based on transgenic or cisgenic rye, grown conventionally...... pesticide-free production methods, and that while cisgenics is preferred over transgenics, the majority of respondents favour traditional breeding methods. The distribution in preferences suggests that some respondents prefer bread from cisgenic crops produced without pesticides over traditional crops...... produced using pesticides. Preferences for organic bread are stronger than for pesticide-free products. From a policy perspective results suggest that excluding cisgenics from mandatory labeling in the EU, or including it in the voluntary non-GM labelling in the US, would cause welfare losses for consumers....

  17. Documentation for The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) data archived at NODC (NODC Accession 0123222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) is an international open group for SST data producers, users, and scientists. It brings together...

  18. Spatial features of preference difference and conflict potential among multi-groups in tourism community: A case of Tangyu town in Xi'an%旅游社区多群体态度差异和冲突倾向的空间特征——以西安汤峪镇为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚玉杰; 赵振斌; 张铖; 陈诚; 陈幺

    2016-01-01

    ,which totally generated 5518 geo-spatial points.Based on Brown's land use conflict model,this study combined preference differences and landscape values with geo-spatial analysis to explore the spatial features of differences of different preferences and potential conflicts held by multi-groups.Results indicated that:(1) Preferences toward tourism development and their difference were characterized by obvious location differentiation,and were related to different groups' spatial perception of landscape values.The spatial distribution of conflicts potential associated with tourism development in Tangyu was uneven,but presented a patch structure.The areas with high values of conflict potential were mainly distributed across core areas of tourism development,and the values decreased gradually from the core areas to the peripheral areas.(2) The formation of potential conflict sites was not only impacted by the traditional factors,but also by the spatial factors.The tourism development stages of local community,the involvement degree of those related groups,the spatial structure of tourism development elements and the spatial perception of landscape values,jointly contributed to the formation of conflict sites.(3) The combination of participatory mapping and in-depth interview provided a new method to better understand the spatial features of preferences and conflicts potential associated with tourism development.

  19. The Effects of Preference for Information on Consumers’ Online Health Information Search Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Preference for information is a personality trait that affects people’s tendency to seek information in health-related situations. Prior studies have focused primarily on investigating its impact on patient-provider communication and on the implications for designing information interventions that prepare patients for medical procedures. Few studies have examined its impact on general consumers’ interactions with Web-based search engines for health information or the implications for designing more effective health information search systems. Objective This study intends to fill this gap by investigating the impact of preference for information on the search behavior of general consumers seeking health information, their perceptions of search tasks (representing information needs), and user experience with search systems. Methods Forty general consumers who had previously searched for health information online participated in the study in our usability lab. Preference for information was measured using Miller’s Monitor-Blunter Style Scale (MBSS) and the Krantz Health Opinion Survey-Information Scale (KHOS-I). Each participant completed four simulated health information search tasks: two look-up (fact-finding) and two exploratory. Their behaviors while interacting with the search systems were automatically logged and ratings of their perceptions of tasks and user experience with the systems were collected using Likert-scale questionnaires. Results The MBSS showed low reliability with the participants (Monitoring subscale: Cronbach alpha=.53; Blunting subscale: Cronbach alpha=.35). Thus, no further analyses were performed based on the scale. KHOS-I had sufficient reliability (Cronbach alpha=.77). Participants were classified into low- and high-preference groups based on their KHOS-I scores. The high-preference group submitted significantly shorter queries when completing the look-up tasks (P=.02). The high-preference group made a significantly higher

  20. The high resolution vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectra of the group VI dihydrides and deuterides Rydberg series

    CERN Document Server

    Mayhew, C A

    1984-01-01

    The high resolution absorption spectra of the important group VI dihydrides and deuterides in the vacuum ultraviolet below, and up to, their first ionisation potentials are presented. These spectra were recorded using synchrotron radiation as the background light source in conjunction with a 3m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph, equipped with holographic gratings. Due to the nature of the originating orbital for the majority of optical transitions in the VUV well developed Rydberg series are observed. One particular series can be followed up to fairly high n, so that accurate values of the first ionisation potential are determined. The identifications of the Rydberg series are made from arguments relating to their oscillator strengths, quantum defects, symmetries and from comparisons with the spectra of the corresponding united atoms i.e. the inert gases. Examples of the symmetry assignments for Rydberg series from rotational band contour analyses of the lower Rydberg members for the H sub 2 S, H sub 2 Se ...

  1. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, A.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Lappi, T.; Schenke, B.; Venugopalan, R.

    2011-12-01

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large Nc approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  2. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Schenke, Bjoern; Venugopalan, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large N_c approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  3. High-field electron transport in nanoscale group-III nitride devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komirenko, S.M.; Kim, K.W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Kochelap, V.A. [Inst. of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev-28 (Ukraine); Stroscio, M.A. [Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Mathematical Sciences Div.

    2001-11-08

    Focusing on the short-size group-III nitride heterostructures, we have developed a model which takes into account main features of transport of electrons injected into a polar semiconductor under high electric fields. The model is based on an exact analytical solution of Boltzmann transport equation. The electron velocity distribution over the device is analyzed at different fields and the basic characteristics of the high-field electron transport are obtained. The critical field for the runaway regime, when electron energies and velocities increase with distance which results in the average velocities higher than the peak velocity in bulk-like samples, is determined. We have found that the runaway electrons are characterized by a distribution function with population inversion. Different nitride-based small-size devices where this effect can have an impact on the device performance are considered. (orig.)

  4. High temperature fuel cell membranes based on poly(arylene ether)s containing benzimidazole groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Sik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Kwan - Soo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuiper, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guiver, Michael D [CANADA

    2009-01-01

    Development of new high-performance polymer membranes that retain their proton conductivity under low humidity conditions is one of the most critical requirements to commercialize PEMFC systems. Current sulfonated proton exchange membranes acquire proton conductivity by water that solvates ion and carries proton. Consequently, a loss of water under low RH conditions immediately results in a loss of proton conductivity. One approach to maintain proton conductivity under low RH conditions is to replace water with a less volatile proton solvent. Kreuer has pointed out the possibility to develop fully polymeric proton-conducting membranes based on nitrogen-containing heterocycles such as imidazole, benzimidazole, and pyrazole. We have attempted to blend those less volatile proton solvent with sulfonated copolymers such as polystyrene sulfonic acid, Nafion, poly(arylene ether sulfone, BPSH-xx). [Ref. DOE review meeting 2007 and 2008] However, we observed that imidazole was slowly sublimated out as temperature and humidity increases which could cause poisoning of electro-catalyst, corrosion and losing conductivity. In this presentation, we report the synthesis of novel poly(arylene ether sulfone)s containing benzimidazole groups These benzimidazole containing polymer was blended with sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone). In the blend system, benzimidazole group attached to the polysulfone acts as a medium through the basic nitrogen for transfer of protons between the sulfonic acid groups. Proton conductivity of the blend membranes was investigated as a function of water content at 80 C and compared the performance with water based proton conduction system.

  5. High prevalence of hypertension among an ethnic group in Sudan: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sufian K; Elsugud, Nada A; Bushara, Sarra O; Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is an emerging non-communicable disease in developing countries. Due to its silent nature and serious complications, active screening is essential in order to prevent complications. For instance, premature mortality from cardiovascular diseases could be prevented by the effective control of hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension among Nuba ethnic group living in Atbara city, north Sudan and to identify the associated risk factors. All consenting 500 adults from Nuba tribe who live in El Wihda District, Atbara were included. Blood pressure (BP) and body mass index were measured. Standard interviewing procedures were used to record medical history, socio-demographic data, and lifestyle characteristics. Among the 500 participants, females were 364 (72.8%) and males were 136 (27.2%). The overall prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was 49.4% (30.8% stage 1 hypertension and 18.6% stage 2 hypertension). In addition, 41% of the population was having prehypertension. The significant risk factors for high BP were: male sex, age above 45 years, overweight, illiteracy, and alcohol consumption. Undiagnosed high BP is very common among Nuba ethnic group; therefore, active screening and early management are recommended to prevent complications.

  6. High-temperature mass spectrometry - Vaporization of group 4-B metal carbides. [using Knudsen effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    The high temperature vaporization of the metal-carbon systems TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC was studied by the Knudsen effusion - mass spectrometric method. For each system the metal dicarbide and tetracarbide molecular species were identified in the gas phase. Relative ion currents of the carbides and metals were measured as a function of temperature. Second- and third-law methods were used to determine enthalpies. Maximum values were established for the dissociation energies of the metal monocarbide molecules TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC. Thermodynamic functions used in the calculations are discussed in terms of assumed molecular structures and electronic contributions to the partition functions. The trends shown by the dissociation energies of the carbides of Group 4B are compared with those of neighboring groups and discussed in relation to the corresponding oxides and chemical bonding. The high temperature molecular beam inlet system and double focusing mass spectrometer are described.

  7. NEW APPROACHES TO REHABILITATION AMONG CHILDREN FROM HIGH RISK GROUPS OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Aksenova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The research studied the impact of the mixture of bacteria lysates (IRS 19 on the recurrence of the acute respiratory infections among the weakened and sickly children from TB high risk group, who underwent rehabilitation at the anti TB health center. The researcher studied the tolerance to the physical loads (Shalkov test, secretory Iga concentration in the saliva, recurrence of the acute respiratory infections under supervision in catamnesis within a year. To prevent and treat bacterial nasal and respiratory infections, the authors used the mixture of bacteria lysates (Solvay pharma along the specific chemical tuberculosis prevention. Performed complex rehabilitation increased the resistance of the children's body infected with TB mycobacteria and conduced to the increase of the normergic reactions to tuber culine. They revealed that the recurrence of the acute respiratory infections among the children, who received the mixture of bacteria lysates, made up 0,9 ± 0,2 among the children infected and 1,1 ± 0,2 non=infected with tb mycobacteria within the first 6 months of observation. In the test group, these indices came to 2,2 ± 0,3 and 2,3 ± 0,2, respectively. After they carried on the immunocorrection course, the saliva witnessed the increase of the secretory Iga concentration (among the children both infected and non infected with TB mycobacteria. performed research proves that it is clinically efficient, safe and expedient to introduce the seasonal course of the local immuno corrector — the mixture of bacteria lysates to the set of the rehabilitation actions among the children from TB high risk groups, which allows them to recommend wider application of this medication in children.Key words: mixture of bacteria lysates, tuberculosis, prevention, children.

  8. Infant preferences for attractive faces: a cognitive explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, A J; Kalakanis, L; Langlois, J H

    1999-05-01

    Research on infant face perception has shown that infants' preferences for attractive faces exist well before socialization from parents, peers, and the media can affect these preferences. Four studies assessed a cognitive explanation for the development of attractiveness preferences: cognitive averaging and infant preferences for mathematically averaged faces, or prototypes. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that both adults and 6-month-old infants prefer prototypical, mathematically averaged faces. Studies 3 and 4 demonstrated that 6-month-olds can abstract the central tendency from a group of naturalistic faces. Taken together, the studies suggest that infants' preferences for attractive faces can be explained by general information-processing mechanisms.

  9. Amide group anchored glucose oxidase based anodic catalysts for high performance enzymatic biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yongjin; Ahn, Yeonjoo; Kim, Do-Heyoung; Kwon, Yongchai

    2017-01-01

    A new enzyme catalyst is formed by fabricating gold nano particle (GNP)-glucose oxidase (GOx) clusters that are then attached to polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) with cross-linkable terephthalaldehyde (TPA) (TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP]). Especially, amide bonds belonging to TPA play an anchor role for incorporating rigid bonding among GNP, GOx and CNT/PEI, while middle size GNP is well bonded with thiol group of GOx to form strong GNP-GOx cluster. Those bonds are identified by chemical and electrochemical characterizations like XPS and cyclic voltammogram. The anchording effect of amide bonds induces fast electron transfer and strong chemical bonding, resulting in enhancements in (i) catalytic activity, (ii) amount of immobilized GOx and (ii) performance of enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) including the catalyst. Regarding the catalytic activity, the TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP] produces high electron transfer rate constant (6 s-1), high glucose sensitivity (68 μA mM-1 cm-2), high maximum current density (113 μA cm-2), low charge transfer resistance (17.0 Ω cm2) and long-lasting durability while its chemical structure is characterized by XPS confirming large portion of amide bond. In EBC measurement, it has high maximum power density (0.94 mW cm-2) compatible with catalytic acitivity measurements.

  10. Explaining preferences for home surroundings and locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Skifter Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a survey carried out in Denmark that asked a random sample of the population about their preferences for home surroundings and locations. It shows that the characteristics of social surroundings are very important and can be divided into three independent dimensions: avoiding social nuisances, preferring social homogeneity and living close to one’s social network and place of origin. The study shows that most people have many detailed preferences, whereas some have very few. This confirms an earlier theory that some people are very connected to certain places with given characteristics and thus do not have priorities regarding home surroundings and locations. For others, mostly young people and singles, home is just a place to sleep and relax, whereas life is lived elsewhere. For this group, there are only preferences for location and there are few specific preferences for surroundings.

  11. 中国高中和大学学生英语语音变体偏好研究%An examination of Chinese high school and university students’ preferences on native speaker varieties in English language learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈潇潇

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the Chinese students’ attitude and preference for the native speaker varieties. Forty students from a high school and a university in central China were chosen as the participants of the research. The main results and findings of the research showed that more high school students preferred the British English, and the university students displayed the same in preferring the two varieties. Most of the students who preferred British English are because their English teacher’s effects, while the participants chose American English were influenced by the American pop culture.%本文旨在探讨中国学生对于英语母语变体的态度和偏好,研究者用问卷调查和采访的方式对来自高中和大学的四十名学生进行了数据收集。结果发现,高中生更加偏好英式英语;大学生对于英式和美式两种母语变体的偏好基本持平。在偏好英式英语的学生当中,教师影响因素占有较大比重;而偏好美式英语的学生多受到美国文化的影响。

  12. Trends in birth across high-parity groups by race/ethnicity and maternal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Muktar H; Salihu, Hamisu M; Keith, Louis G; Ehiri, John E; Islam, M Aminul; Jolly, Pauline E

    2005-06-01

    The changing racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. population along with delayed childbearing suggest that shifts in the demographic composition of gravidas are likely. It is unclear whether trends in the proportion of births to parous women in the United States have changed over the decades by race and ethnicity, reflecting parallel changes in population demographics. Singleton deliveries > or = 20 weeks of gestation in the United States from 1989 through 2000 were analyzed using data from the "Natality data files" assembled by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). We classified maternal age into three categories; younger mothers (aged or = 40 years) and maternal race/ethnicity into three groups: blacks (non-Hispanic), Hispanics and whites (non-Hispanic). We computed birth rates by period of delivery across the entire population and repeated the analysis stratified by age and maternal race. Chi-squared statistics for linear trend were utilized to assess linear trend across three four-year phases: 1989-1992, 1993-1996 and 1997-2000. In estimating the association between race/ethnicity and parity status, the direct method of standardization was employed to adjust for maternal age. Over the study period, the total number of births to blacks and whites diminished consistently (p for trend fashion among the high (5-9 previous live births), very high (10-14 previous live births) and extremely high (> or = 15 previous live births) parity groups (p for trend < 0.001). After maternal age standardization, black and Hispanic women were more likely to have higher parity as compared to whites. Our findings demonstrate substantial variation in parity patterns among the main racial and ethnic populations in the United States. These results may help in formulating strategies that will serve as templates for optimizing resource allocation across the different racial/ethnic subpopulations in the United States.

  13. Teaching high-school Geoscience through a group-based activity: the Geotrivia experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athanasia

    2015-04-01

    Geotrivia is an educational game which aims at the enhancement of geoscience teaching in secondary education, through an interactive group-based activity. As behavioural teaching methods no longer excite students in a multitask society, new approaches should be implemented to keep up with novel learning methodologies and team-based techniques. Thus, the main aim of the experiment was to come up with an alternative learning process on geology and geography in order to upgrade and attract more students to Geosciences. Geotrivia is based on the techniques of motivation (competition to be the winner) and enjoyable educational time (it is funny to play a game) in terms of team-based student collaboration. Pedagogical aims of Geotrivia consist of team-based work, independency, autonomy and initiative, active participation, student self-evaluation and metacognition. Geotrivia is a card game, consisting of about 150 playing cards, a whistle and an hourglass. Each playing card contains a geology- or geography-related question and the answer to the question is given in the lower part of the card. Class students are divided in about 4 groups of about 5 students each. The aim of each group is to collect as many cards as possible. The hourglass is flipped and a member of the team takes the pack of cards and uses it to ask questions to his team; the other members have to answer as many questions. The team wins a card when they give a correct answer. The game is played at the end of each curriculum unit; a comprehensive version of the game is held at end of the school year. Most -but not all- questions are based on the course syllabus, which deals with the geology and geography of Europe at junior high school level (e.g. what is the cause of high seismicity in Greece?). Accordingly, Geotrivia questions can be adjusted to each country school book of geology - geography at any grade. To evaluate the results of Geotrivia, we used the methodology of pretest and posttest, an

  14. Cortisol shifts financial risk preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Narayanan; Hardy, Ben; Page, Lionel; Schaffner, Markus; Graggaber, Johann; Powlson, Andrew S.; Fletcher, Paul C.; Gurnell, Mark; Coates, John

    2014-01-01

    Risk taking is central to human activity. Consequently, it lies at the focal point of behavioral sciences such as neuroscience, economics, and finance. Many influential models from these sciences assume that financial risk preferences form a stable trait. Is this assumption justified and, if not, what causes the appetite for risk to fluctuate? We have previously found that traders experience a sustained increase in the stress hormone cortisol when the amount of uncertainty, in the form of market volatility, increases. Here we ask whether these elevated cortisol levels shift risk preferences. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over protocol we raised cortisol levels in volunteers over 8 d to the same extent previously observed in traders. We then tested for the utility and probability weighting functions underlying their risk taking and found that participants became more risk-averse. We also observed that the weighting of probabilities became more distorted among men relative to women. These results suggest that risk preferences are highly dynamic. Specifically, the stress response calibrates risk taking to our circumstances, reducing it in times of prolonged uncertainty, such as a financial crisis. Physiology-induced shifts in risk preferences may thus be an underappreciated cause of market instability. PMID:24550472

  15. The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Craig; Casey, Kenneth; Minnett, Peter; Corlett, Gary

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, satellite Agencies, science, operational user/producer and Sea Surface Temperature practitioner communities have come together within the Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) to create a new framework for generation, delivery and application of improved common format high-resolution (~1-10 km) satellite SST datasets for the benefit of society. The GHRSST data system is a mature, robust, and highly reliable near real time and delayed mode data system known as the GHRSST Regional/Global Task Sharing framework (R/GTS) and has operated in NRT since 2006. It consists of distributed Regional Data Assembly Centers (RDACs) around the world that submit their data to a Global Data Assembly Center (GDAC) maintained at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC), where all the data are available for 30 days. After that they are transferred to the GHRSST Long Term Stewardship and Reanalysis Facility (LTSRF) at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) for long-term preservation and distribution. The extensive user base includes many operational meteorological services, the scientific community, industry and Government. Since the R/GTS has operated, statistics show over 72,000 users have accessed the R/GTS in NRT, accessing over 100 million files amounting to more than 232 Tb of information. GHRSST has an organisation structure that has both fixed and flexible components allowing it to respond effectively and efficiently to new and emerging challenges. GHRSST has often been cited as a model for other Virtual Communities/Constellations. GHRSST is underpinned by an international Science Team and International Project Office together. Long-standing GHRSST Technical Advisory Groups (TAG) and ad hoc Working Groups (WG) are typically at the "cutting edge" of international SST activities delivering real coordination in space-based Earth observations for societal benefit through the prioritized

  16. Preference assessments in the zoo: Keeper and staff predictions of enrichment preferences across species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrkam, Lindsay R; Dorey, Nicole R

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment is widely used in the management of zoo animals, and is an essential strategy for increasing the behavioral welfare of these populations. It may be difficult, however, to identify potentially effective enrichment strategies that are also cost-effective and readily available. An animal's preference for a potential enrichment item may be a reliable predictor of whether that individual will reliably interact with that item, and subsequently enable staff to evaluate the effects of that enrichment strategy. The aim of the present study was to assess the utility of preference assessments for identifying potential enrichment items across six different species--each representing a different taxonomic group. In addition, we evaluated the agreement between zoo personnel's predictions of animals' enrichment preferences and stimuli selected via a preference assessment. Five out of six species (nine out of 11 individuals) exhibited clear, systematic preferences for specific stimuli. Similarities in enrichment preferences were observed among all individuals of primates, whereas individuals within ungulate and avian species displayed individual differences in enrichment preferences. Overall, zoo personnel, regardless of experience level, were significantly more accurate at predicting least-preferred stimuli than most-preferred stimuli across species, and tended to make the same predictions for all individuals within a species. Preference assessments may therefore be a useful, efficient husbandry strategy for identifying viable enrichment items at both the individual and species levels. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Continuous glucose monitoring system and new era of early diagnosis of diabetes in high risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Soliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM systems are an emerging technology that allows frequent glucose measurements to monitor glucose trends in real time. Their use as a diagnostic tool is still developing and appears to be promising. Combining intermittent glucose self-monitoring (SGM and CGM combines the benefits of both. Significant improvement in the treatment modalities that may prevent the progress of prediabetes to diabetes have been achieved recently and dictates screening of high risk patients for early diagnosis and management of glycemic abnormalities. The use of CGMS in the diagnosis of early dysglycemia (prediabetes especially in high risk patients appears to be an attractive approach. In this review we searched the literature to investigate the value of using CGMS as a diagnostic tool compared to other known tools, namely oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C in high risk groups. Those categories of patients include adolescents and adults with obesity especially those with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO, gestational diabetes, cystic fibrosis, thalassemia major, acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and after renal transplantation. It appears that the ability of the CGMS for frequently monitoring (every 5 min glucose changes during real-life settings for 3 to 5 days stretches the chance to detect more glycemic abnormalities during basal and postprandial conditions compared to other short-timed methods.

  18. High burden of invasive group A streptococcal disease in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R; Patel, M; Currie, B J; Holt, D C; Harris, T; Krause, V

    2016-04-01

    Although the incidence of invasive group A streptococcal disease in northern Australia is very high, little is known of the regional epidemiology and molecular characteristics. We conducted a case series of Northern Territory residents reported between 2011 and 2013 with Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from a normally sterile site. Of the 128 reported episodes, the incidence was disproportionately high in the Indigenous population at 69·7/100 000 compared to 8·8/100 000 in the non-Indigenous population. Novel to the Northern Territory is the extremely high incidence in haemodialysis patients of 2205·9/100 000 population; and for whom targeted infection control measures could prevent transmission. The incidences in the tropical north and semi-arid Central Australian regions were similar. Case fatality was 8% (10/128) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurred in 14 (11%) episodes. Molecular typing of 82 isolates identified 28 emm types, of which 63 (77%) were represented by four emm clusters. Typing confirmed transmission between infant twins. While the diverse range of emm types presents a challenge for effective coverage by vaccine formulations, the limited number of emm clusters raises optimism should cluster-specific cross-protection prove efficacious. Further studies are required to determine effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for contacts and to inform public health response.

  19. The relation between star formation, morphology and local density in high redshift clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Poggianti, Bianca M; Finn, Rose; Bamford, Steven; De Lucia, Gabriella; Varela, Jesus; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Halliday, Claire; Noll, Stefan; Saglia, Roberto; Zaritsky, Dennis; Best, Philip; Clowe, Douglas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Jablonka, Pascale; Pello, Roser; Rudnick, Gregory; Simard, Luc; von der Linden, Anja; White, Simon

    2008-01-01

    We investigate how the [OII] properties and the morphologies of galaxies in clusters and groups at z=0.4-0.8 depend on projected local galaxy density, and compare with the field at similar redshifts and clusters at low-z. In both nearby and distant clusters, higher-density regions contain proportionally fewer star-forming galaxies, and the average [OII] equivalent width of star-forming galaxies is independent of local density. However, in distant clusters the average current star formation rate (SFR) in star-forming galaxies seems to peak at densities ~15-40 galaxies Mpc^{-2}. At odds with low-z results, at high-z the relation between star-forming fraction and local density varies from high- to low-mass clusters. Overall, our results suggest that at high-z the current star formation (SF) activity in star-forming galaxies does not depend strongly on global or local environment, though the possible SFR peak seems at odds with this conclusion. We find that the cluster SFR normalized by cluster mass anticorrelate...

  20. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  1. Deadly Attraction - Attentional Bias toward Preferred Cigarette Brand in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaradzka, Ewa; Bielecki, Maksymilian

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that biases in visual attention might be evoked by affective and personally relevant stimuli, for example addiction-related objects. Despite the fact that addiction is often linked to specific products and systematic purchase behaviors, no studies focused directly on the existence of bias evoked by brands. Smokers are characterized by high levels of brand loyalty and everyday contact with cigarette packaging. Using the incentive-salience mechanism as a theoretical framework, we hypothesized that this group might exhibit a bias toward the preferred cigarette brand. In our study, a group of smokers (N = 40) performed a dot probe task while their eye movements were recorded. In every trial a pair of pictures was presented - each of them showed a single cigarette pack. The visual properties of stimuli were carefully controlled, so branding information was the key factor affecting subjects' reactions. For each participant, we compared gaze behavior related to the preferred vs. other brands. The analyses revealed no attentional bias in the early, orienting phase of the stimulus processing and strong differences in maintenance and disengagement. Participants spent more time looking at the preferred cigarettes and saccades starting at the preferred brand location had longer latencies. In sum, our data shows that attentional bias toward brands might be found in situations not involving choice or decision making. These results provide important insights into the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of attentional biases to stimuli of personal relevance and might serve as a first step toward developing new attitude measurement techniques.

  2. Keypress-Based Musical Preference Is Both Individual and Lawful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Sherri L.; Sheppard, John P.; Kim, Byoung W.; Malthouse, Edward C.; Bourne, Janet E.; Barlow, Anne E.; Lee, Myung J.; Marin, Veronica; O'Connor, Kailyn P.; Csernansky, John G.; Block, Martin P.; Blood, Anne J.; Breiter, Hans C.

    2017-01-01

    Musical preference is highly individualized and is an area of active study to develop methods for its quantification. Recently, preference-based behavior, associated with activity in brain reward circuitry, has been shown to follow lawful, quantifiable patterns, despite broad variation across individuals. These patterns, observed using a keypress paradigm with visual stimuli, form the basis for relative preference theory (RPT). Here, we sought to determine if such patterns extend to non-visual domains (i.e., audition) and dynamic stimuli, potentially providing a method to supplement psychometric, physiological, and neuroimaging approaches to preference quantification. For this study, we adapted our keypress paradigm to two sets of stimuli consisting of seventeenth to twenty-first century western art music (Classical) and twentieth to twenty-first century jazz and popular music (Popular). We studied a pilot sample and then a separate primary experimental sample with this paradigm, and used iterative mathematical modeling to determine if RPT relationships were observed with high R2 fits. We further assessed the extent of heterogeneity in the rank ordering of keypress-based responses across subjects. As expected, individual rank orderings of preferences were quite heterogeneous, yet we observed mathematical patterns fitting these data similar to those observed previously with visual stimuli. These patterns in music preference were recurrent across two cohorts and two stimulus sets, and scaled between individual and group data, adhering to the requirements for lawfulness. Our findings suggest a general neuroscience framework that predicts human approach/avoidance behavior, while also allowing for individual differences and the broad diversity of human choices; the resulting framework may offer novel approaches to advancing music neuroscience, or its applications to medicine and recommendation systems. PMID:28512395

  3. Keypress-Based Musical Preference Is Both Individual and Lawful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri L. Livengood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Musical preference is highly individualized and is an area of active study to develop methods for its quantification. Recently, preference-based behavior, associated with activity in brain reward circuitry, has been shown to follow lawful, quantifiable patterns, despite broad variation across individuals. These patterns, observed using a keypress paradigm with visual stimuli, form the basis for relative preference theory (RPT. Here, we sought to determine if such patterns extend to non-visual domains (i.e., audition and dynamic stimuli, potentially providing a method to supplement psychometric, physiological, and neuroimaging approaches to preference quantification. For this study, we adapted our keypress paradigm to two sets of stimuli consisting of seventeenth to twenty-first century western art music (Classical and twentieth to twenty-first century jazz and popular music (Popular. We studied a pilot sample and then a separate primary experimental sample with this paradigm, and used iterative mathematical modeling to determine if RPT relationships were observed with high R2 fits. We further assessed the extent of heterogeneity in the rank ordering of keypress-based responses across subjects. As expected, individual rank orderings of preferences were quite heterogeneous, yet we observed mathematical patterns fitting these data similar to those observed previously with visual stimuli. These patterns in music preference were recurrent across two cohorts and two stimulus sets, and scaled between individual and group data, adhering to the requirements for lawfulness. Our findings suggest a general neuroscience framework that predicts human approach/avoidance behavior, while also allowing for individual differences and the broad diversity of human choices; the resulting framework may offer novel approaches to advancing music neuroscience, or its applications to medicine and recommendation systems.

  4. Keypress-Based Musical Preference Is Both Individual and Lawful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Sherri L; Sheppard, John P; Kim, Byoung W; Malthouse, Edward C; Bourne, Janet E; Barlow, Anne E; Lee, Myung J; Marin, Veronica; O'Connor, Kailyn P; Csernansky, John G; Block, Martin P; Blood, Anne J; Breiter, Hans C

    2017-01-01

    Musical preference is highly individualized and is an area of active study to develop methods for its quantification. Recently, preference-based behavior, associated with activity in brain reward circuitry, has been shown to follow lawful, quantifiable patterns, despite broad variation across individuals. These patterns, observed using a keypress paradigm with visual stimuli, form the basis for relative preference theory (RPT). Here, we sought to determine if such patterns extend to non-visual domains (i.e., audition) and dynamic stimuli, potentially providing a method to supplement psychometric, physiological, and neuroimaging approaches to preference quantification. For this study, we adapted our keypress paradigm to two sets of stimuli consisting of seventeenth to twenty-first century western art music (Classical) and twentieth to twenty-first century jazz and popular music (Popular). We studied a pilot sample and then a separate primary experimental sample with this paradigm, and used iterative mathematical modeling to determine if RPT relationships were observed with high R(2) fits. We further assessed the extent of heterogeneity in the rank ordering of keypress-based responses across subjects. As expected, individual rank orderings of preferences were quite heterogeneous, yet we observed mathematical patterns fitting these data similar to those observed previously with visual stimuli. These patterns in music preference were recurrent across two cohorts and two stimulus sets, and scaled between individual and group data, adhering to the requirements for lawfulness. Our findings suggest a general neuroscience framework that predicts human approach/avoidance behavior, while also allowing for individual differences and the broad diversity of human choices; the resulting framework may offer novel approaches to advancing music neuroscience, or its applications to medicine and recommendation systems.

  5. A critical test of the assumption that men prefer conformist women and women prefer nonconformist men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Wellauer, Richard; McIntyre, Jason C; Barlow, Fiona Kate

    2015-06-01

    Five studies tested the common assumption that women prefer nonconformist men as romantic partners, whereas men prefer conformist women. Studies 1 and 2 showed that both men and women preferred nonconformist romantic partners, but women overestimated the extent to which men prefer conformist partners. In Study 3, participants ostensibly in a small-group interaction showed preferences for nonconformist opposite-sex targets, a pattern that was particularly evident when men evaluated women. Dating success was greater the more nonconformist the sample was (Study 4), and perceptions of nonconformity in an ex-partner were associated with greater love and attraction toward that partner (Study 5). On the minority of occasions in which effects were moderated by gender, it was in the reverse direction to the traditional wisdom: Conformity was more associated with dating success among men. The studies contradict the notion that men disproportionately prefer conformist women. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  6. Isolation of a very high molecular weight polylactosamine from an ovarian cyst mucin of blood group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A.S.S.; Bush, C.A.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of a blood group A active ovarian cyst mucin glycoprotein with alkaline borohydride under conditions expected to cleave-O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains releases a polysaccharide of average molecular weight 25,000 daltons. It contains no peptide or mannose at the 1% level and carbohydrate analysis gives fuc:galNAc:gal:glcNAc in the ratio of 1:1:2.5:2.5. The /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR spectra show that the polysaccharide has non-reducing terminal side chains of the structure galNAc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 3)(fuc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 2)) gal(..beta..-1 ..-->.. 3) glcNAc (i.e. a type 1 chain). Periodate oxidation removes all the fucose and galNAc from the non-reducing terminal but leaves intact the backbone composed of ..beta..-linked gal and glcNAc as would be expected for a polylactosamine. They conclude that this is a high molecular weight polylactosamine which is related to the asparagine linked polylactosamine chains of cell surface glycoproteins which have been implicated in cell differentiation. However, the blood group A polysaccharide from the ovarian cyst mucin is unique in several respects. It has a much larger molecular weight than even the erythroglycan of the red cell membrane protein, band 3, and is linked to the protein by an -O-glycosidic bond rather than the -N-asparagine linkage of the previously known polylactosamines which have a trimannosyl core. Its blood group A side chains are on a type one core rather than type 2 which is found on other polylactosamines.

  7. Nosocomial infections in brazilian pediatric patients: using a decision tree to identify high mortality groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M.M. Lopes

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections (NI are frequent events with potentially lethal outcomes. We identified predictive factors for mortality related to NI and developed an algorithm for predicting that risk in order to improve hospital epidemiology and healthcare quality programs. We made a prospective cohort NI surveillance of all acute-care patients according to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System guidelines since 1992, applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1988 definitions adapted to a Brazilian pediatric hospital. Thirty-eight deaths considered to be related to NI were analyzed as the outcome variable for 754 patients with NI, whose survival time was taken into consideration. The predictive factors for mortality related to NI (p < 0.05 in the Cox regression model were: invasive procedures and use of two or more antibiotics. The mean survival time was significantly shorter (p < 0.05 with the Kaplan-Meier method for patients who suffered invasive procedures and for those who received two or more antibiotics. Applying a tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA, two groups with high mortality rates were identified: one group with time from admission to the first NI less than 11 days, received two or more antibiotics and suffered invasive procedures; the other group had the first NI between 12 and 22 days after admission and was subjected to invasive procedures. The possible modifiable factors to prevent mortality involve invasive devices and antibiotics. The TSSA approach is helpful to identify combinations of predictors and to guide protective actions to be taken in continuous-quality-improvement programs.

  8. Nosocomial infections in brazilian pediatric patients: using a decision tree to identify high mortality groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M.M. Lopes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections (NI are frequent events with potentially lethal outcomes. We identified predictive factors for mortality related to NI and developed an algorithm for predicting that risk in order to improve hospital epidemiology and healthcare quality programs. We made a prospective cohort NI surveillance of all acute-care patients according to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System guidelines since 1992, applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1988 definitions adapted to a Brazilian pediatric hospital. Thirty-eight deaths considered to be related to NI were analyzed as the outcome variable for 754 patients with NI, whose survival time was taken into consideration. The predictive factors for mortality related to NI (p < 0.05 in the Cox regression model were: invasive procedures and use of two or more antibiotics. The mean survival time was significantly shorter (p < 0.05 with the Kaplan-Meier method for patients who suffered invasive procedures and for those who received two or more antibiotics. Applying a tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA, two groups with high mortality rates were identified: one group with time from admission to the first NI less than 11 days, received two or more antibiotics and suffered invasive procedures; the other group had the first NI between 12 and 22 days after admission and was subjected to invasive procedures. The possible modifiable factors to prevent mortality involve invasive devices and antibiotics. The TSSA approach is helpful to identify combinations of predictors and to guide protective actions to be taken in continuous-quality-improvement programs.

  9. High affinity group III mGluRs regulate mossy fiber input to CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Meriney, Stephen D; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2011-12-01

    Stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons (L-Mi) in hippocampal area CA3 target the apical dendrite of pyramidal cells providing feedforward inhibition. Here we report that selective activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4/8 with L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphnobytyric acid (L-AP4; 10 μM) decreased the probability of glutamate release from the mossy fiber (MF) terminals synapsing onto L-Mi. Consistent with this interpretation, application of L-AP4 in the presence of 3 mM strontium decreased the frequency of asynchronous MF EPSCs in L-Mi. Furthermore, the dose response curve showed that L-AP4 at 400 μM produced no further decrease in MF EPSC amplitude compared with 20 μM L-AP4, indicating the lack of mGluRs 7 at these MF terminals. We also found that one mechanism of mGluRs 4/8-mediated inhibition of release is linked to N-type voltage gated calcium channels at MF terminals. Application of the group III mGluR antagonist MSOP (100 μM) demonstrated that mGluRs 4/8 are neither tonically active nor activated by low and moderate frequencies of activity. However, trains of stimuli to the MF at 20 and 40 Hz delivered during the application of MSOP revealed a relief of inhibition of transmitter release and an increase in the overall probability of action potential firing in the postsynaptic L-Mi. Interestingly, the time to first action potential was significantly shorter in the presence of MSOP, indicating that mGluR 4/8 activation delays L-Mi firing in response to MF activity. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the timing and probability of action potentials in L-Mi evoked by MF synaptic input is regulated by the activation of presynaptic high affinity group III mGluRs.

  10. Estimating exponential scheduling preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Katrine; Börjesson, Maria; Engelson, Leonid

    time by maximising expected total utility over the day, their departure times are conditional on rates of utility derived at these locations. For forecasting and economic evaluation of planning alternatives, it is desirable to have simple forms of utility rates with few parameters. Several forms...... the travel time is random, Noland and Small (1995) suggested using expected utility theory to derive the reduced form of expected travel time cost that includes the cost of TTV. For the α-β-γ formulation of scheduling preferences and exponential or uniform distribution of travel time, Noland and Small (1995....... The purpose of this paper is to explore how well these scheduling preferences explain behaviour, compared to other possible scheduling models, and whether empirical estimation of the more complex exponential scheduling preferences is feasible. We use data from a stated preference survey conducted among car...

  11. Estimating exponential scheduling preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Katrine; Börjesson, Maria; Engelson, Leonid

    time by maximising expected total utility over the day, their departure times are conditional on rates of utility derived at these locations. For forecasting and economic evaluation of planning alternatives, it is desirable to have simple forms of utility rates with few parameters. Several forms...... the travel time is random, Noland and Small (1995) suggested using expected utility theory to derive the reduced form of expected travel time cost that includes the cost of TTV. For the α-β-γ formulation of scheduling preferences and exponential or uniform distribution of travel time, Noland and Small (1995....... The purpose of this paper is to explore how well these scheduling preferences explain behaviour, compared to other possible scheduling models, and whether empirical estimation of the more complex exponential scheduling preferences is feasible. We use data from a stated preference survey conducted among car...

  12. Preferred axis in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The foundation of modern cosmology relies on the so-called cosmological principle which states an homogeneous and isotropic distribution of matter in the universe on large scales. However, recent observations, such as the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, the motion of galaxies in the universe, the polarization of quasars and the acceleration of the cosmic expansion, indicate preferred directions in the sky. If these directions have a cosmological origin, the cosmological principle would be violated, and modern cosmology should be reconsidered. In this paper, by considering the preferred axis in the CMB parity violation, we find that it coincides with the preferred axes in CMB quadrupole and CMB octopole, and they all align with the direction of the CMB kinematic dipole. In addition, the preferred directions in the velocity flows, quasar alignment, anisotropy of the cosmic acceleration, the handedness of spiral galaxies, and the angular distribution of the fine-structu...

  13. Student Preferences in Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard C.; Sullivan, James L. F.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a study in which 245 university students ranked their preferences among typographical variants of typeface, size, emphasis, and interline space in 16 paragraphs. Six references are listed. (CHC)

  14. OBJECTS GROUPING FOR SEGMENTATION OF ROADS NETWORK IN HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES OF URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maboudi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Updated road databases are required for many purposes such as urban planning, disaster management, car navigation, route planning, traffic management and emergency handling. In the last decade, the improvement in spatial resolution of VHR civilian satellite sensors – as the main source of large scale mapping applications – was so considerable that GSD has become finer than size of common urban objects of interest such as building, trees and road parts. This technological advancement pushed the development of “Object-based Image Analysis (OBIA” as an alternative to pixel-based image analysis methods. Segmentation as one of the main stages of OBIA provides the image objects on which most of the following processes will be applied. Therefore, the success of an OBIA approach is strongly affected by the segmentation quality. In this paper, we propose a purpose-dependent refinement strategy in order to group road segments in urban areas using maximal similarity based region merging. For investigations with the proposed method, we use high resolution images of some urban sites. The promising results suggest that the proposed approach is applicable in grouping of road segments in urban areas.

  15. Simple and high yield access to octafunctional azido, amine and urea group bearing cubic spherosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sandra; Kickelbick, Guido

    2016-12-20

    Spherosilicates and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes represent unique well-defined rigid building blocks for molecular and hybrid materials. Drawbacks in their synthesis are often low yields and the restricted presence of functional groups either based on incomplete transformation of all corners or the reactivity of the functional groups. Particularly amine-functionalization reveals some synthetic challenges. In this study we report the synthesis of a new class of octafunctionalized hydrogen bond forming spherosilicates via a facile route based on octabromo alkyl functionalized cubic spherosilicates. Four different alkyl chain lengths, namely C4, C5, C6 and C11, were realized starting from ω-alkenylbromides via hydrosilylation of Q8M8(H). Using sodium azide in a mixture of acetonitrile : DMF = 10 : 1, the octaazide was obtained quantitatively and could be rapidly transformed in an octaamine cube via catalytic hydrogenation over Pd/C in absolute ethanol. The following reaction to hydrogen bond forming spherosilicates was performed in situ by adding propyl isocyanate. All transformations proceed quantitatively at the eight corners of the cube, which was evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS measurements. The Q8-target compound can be separated after each reaction step over simple chemical workup while no cage rearrangement was observed. The structures were confirmed using (1)H, (13)C, (29)Si-NMR, FT-IR, elemental analysis and ESI-MS. The method opens a high yield route (overall isolated yield 83-88%) for structural building blocks in hybrid materials.

  16. Objects Grouping for Segmentation of Roads Network in High Resolution Images of Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maboudi, M.; Amini, J.; Hahn, M.

    2016-06-01

    Updated road databases are required for many purposes such as urban planning, disaster management, car navigation, route planning, traffic management and emergency handling. In the last decade, the improvement in spatial resolution of VHR civilian satellite sensors - as the main source of large scale mapping applications - was so considerable that GSD has become finer than size of common urban objects of interest such as building, trees and road parts. This technological advancement pushed the development of "Object-based Image Analysis (OBIA)" as an alternative to pixel-based image analysis methods. Segmentation as one of the main stages of OBIA provides the image objects on which most of the following processes will be applied. Therefore, the success of an OBIA approach is strongly affected by the segmentation quality. In this paper, we propose a purpose-dependent refinement strategy in order to group road segments in urban areas using maximal similarity based region merging. For investigations with the proposed method, we use high resolution images of some urban sites. The promising results suggest that the proposed approach is applicable in grouping of road segments in urban areas.

  17. Chronic bronchitis is an independently associated factor for more symptom and high-risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi JY

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Joon Young Choi,1 Hyoung Kyu Yoon,2 Seoung Ju Park,3 Yong Bum Park,4 Kyeong-Cheol Shin,5 Ju Ock Na,6 Kwang Ha Yoo,7 Ki-Suck Jung,8 Young Kyoon Kim,1 Chin Kook Rhee1 1Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yeouido St Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 3Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, 4Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, 5Regional Center for Respiratory Disease, Yeungnam University Medical Center, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, 6Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, 7Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, 8Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea Background: The chronic bronchitis (CB phenotype has been associated with poor quality of life and an increased risk of disease in patients with COPD. However, little information exists regarding the relationship between the CB phenotype and the COPD assessment test (CAT score. The goal of this study was to reveal the different pattern of CAT scores between CB and non-CB patients. Moreover, we aimed to investigate whether the CB phenotype is an independently associated factor for more symptom and high-risk groups.Methods: Data were obtained from the Korea COPD Subgroup Study cohort recruited from 46 centers in South

  18. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  19. Screening for TB by sputum culture in high-risk groups in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sidse Graff; Wrona Olsen, Nete; Seersholm, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence on screening high-risk groups for TB by mobile X-ray in low-incidence countries is building, but knowledge on other possible screening methods is limited. In this retrospective study we report results from a community based programme screening for TB by spot sputum culture....... METHODS: On seven occasions, from September 2012 through June 2014, we offered TB screening to all persons present at 11 locations where socially marginalised people gather in Copenhagen. Spot sputum samples from participants were examined by smear microscopy and culture. Genotype, nucleic acid......-positive and seven (19.4%) were smear-positive. Twelve out of 21 (57.1%) cases tested were nucleic acid amplification test positive. Twenty-eight (77.8%) had chest X-ray suggestive of TB. All patients with TB started treatment, 30 (83.3%) had a successful outcome. DISCUSSION: Screening for TB by spot sputum culture...

  20. Potential role of high mobility group box 1 in viral infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haichao; Ward, Mary F; Fan, Xue-Gong; Sama, Andrew E; Li, Wei

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear protein, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is released passively by necrotic cells and actively by macrophages/monocytes in response to exogenous and endogenous inflammatory stimuli. After binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), HMGB1 activates macrophages/monocytes to express proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Pharmacological suppression of its activities or release is protective against lethal endotoxemia and sepsis, establishing HMGB1 as a critical mediator of lethal systemic inflammation. In light of observations that many viruses (e.g., West Nile virus, Salmon anemia virus) can induce passive HMGB1 release, we propose a potential pathogenic role of HMGB1 in viral infectious diseases.

  1. Thiacalix[4]arene derivatives containing multiple aromatic groups: High efficient extractants for organic dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chuang Yang; Zusheng Wang; Hongyu Guo; Ziyu Jiao; Fafu Yang

    2015-08-01

    Click reaction of alkynylthiacalix[4]arene with ethyl 2-azidoacetate, followed by ammonolysis with hydrazine hydrate and Schiff-base condensation with benzaldehyde or salicyic aldehyde, afforded two novel thiacalix[4]arene derivatives containing multiple aromatic groups in yields of 86% and 90%. Their complexation properties for four organic dyes were investigated by liquid-liquid extraction experiments, complexation UV-Vis spectra and mass spectrum. The highest extraction percentage was 97% for Neutral red. The UV- Vis spectra and ESI-MS spectrum indicated the 1:1 complexes in DMSO solution. The association constants were as high as 1∼ 8 × 104 M−1. These complexation experiments showed that thiacalix[4]arene receptors possess excellent complexation capabilities for dyes.

  2. Hierarchy of kissing numbers for exceptional Lie symmetry groups in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, M.S. [Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Department of Physics University of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt)], E-mail: Chaossf@aol.com

    2008-01-15

    We are constructing a hierarchy of kissing numbers representing singular contact points of hyper-spheres in exceptional Lie symmetry groups lattice arrangement embedded in the 26 dimensional bosonic strings spacetime. That way we find a total number of points and dimensions equal to 548. This is 52 more than the order of E{sub 8}E{sub 8} of heterotic string theory and leads to the prediction of 69 elementary particles at an energy scale under 1 T. In other words, our mathematical model predicts nine more particles than what is currently experimentally known to exist in the standard model of high energy physics namely only 60. The result is thus in full agreement with all our previous theoretical findings.

  3. Effect of Solution Focused Group Counseling for High School Students in Order to Struggle with School Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of solution focused group counseling upon high school students struggling with school burnout was analyzed. The research was an experimental study in which a pre-test post-test control group random design was used, depending upon the real experimental model. The study group included 30 students that volunteered from…

  4. Large Group Exposure Treatment: a Feasibility Study in Highly Spider Fearful Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Wannemueller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A large group one-session exposure treatment (LG-OST based on indirect modeled exposure strategies was carried out to investigate its feasibility and effectiveness in a sample of highly spider fearful individuals (N = 78. The stability of LG-OST-effects was assessed at 8-month follow-up (FU. Furthermore, a second sample (N = 30 of highly spider fearful individuals was treated in a standard, single-person one-session treatment (SP-OST design to compare LG-OST-effects to a standard spider fear treatment. Participants’ fear of spider was assessed by multiple questionnaires and by a behavioral approach test (BAT. The fear assessment took place before and after the respective intervention, and at 8-month follow-up in LG-OST. Regarding subjective spider fear measures, LG-OST mainly showed medium to large effect sizes, ranging from Cohen’s d = .69 to d = 1.21, except for one small effect of d = .25. After LG-OST, participants approached the spider closer at post-treatment measures (d = 1.18. LG-OST-effects remained stable during the 8-month FU-interval. However, SP-OST-effects proved superior in most measures. An LG-OST-protocol provided evidence for feasibility and efficiency. The effects of LG-OST were equal to those of indirect modeled exposure strategies, carried out in single-settings. LG-OST may represent a useful tool in future phobia-treatment, especially if it can match the effects of single-setting OST, e.g., by including more direct exposure elements in future large group attempts.

  5. Explaining preferences for home surroundings and locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter

    2011-01-01

    : avoiding social nuisances, preferring social homogeneity and living close to one’s social network and place of origin. The study shows that most people have many detailed preferences, whereas some have very few. This confirms an earlier theory that some people are very connected to certain places...... with given characteristics and thus do not have priorities regarding home surroundings and locations. For others, mostly young people and singles, home is just a place to sleep and relax, whereas life is lived elsewhere. For this group, there are only preferences for location and there are few specific...

  6. Holography as a highly efficient renormalization group flow. I. Rephrasing gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Nicolas; Kuperstein, Stanislav; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate how the holographic correspondence can be reformulated as a generalization of Wilsonian renormalization group (RG) flow in a strongly interacting large-N quantum field theory. We first define a highly efficient RG flow as one in which the Ward identities related to local conservation of energy, momentum and charges preserve the same form at each scale. To achieve this, it is necessary to redefine the background metric and external sources at each scale as functionals of the effective single-trace operators. These redefinitions also absorb the contributions of the multitrace operators to these effective Ward identities. Thus, the background metric and external sources become effectively dynamical, reproducing the dual classical gravity equations in one higher dimension. Here, we focus on reconstructing the pure gravity sector as a highly efficient RG flow of the energy-momentum tensor operator, leaving the explicit constructive field theory approach for generating such RG flows to the second part of the work. We show that special symmetries of the highly efficient RG flows carry information through which we can decode the gauge fixing of bulk diffeomorphisms in the corresponding gravity equations. We also show that the highly efficient RG flow which reproduces a given classical gravity theory in a given gauge is unique provided the endpoint can be transformed to a nonrelativistic fixed point with a finite number of parameters under a universal rescaling. The results obtained here are used in the second part of this work, where we do an explicit field-theoretic construction of the RG flow and obtain the dual classical gravity theory.

  7. Late gestation undernutrtion can predispose for visceral adiposity by altering fat distribution patterns and increasing the preference for a high-fat diet in early postnatal life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette O; Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft; Thygesen, M P

    2013-01-01

    and three females) were slaughtered for further examination and the other half (females only) were transferred to a moderate sheep diet until slaughtered at 24 months of age (adulthood). Maternal undernutrition during late gestation reduced the birth weight of LOW offspring (P ... (LOW). From day 3 postpartum to 6 months (around puberty) of age, one twin lamb was fed a conventional (CONV) diet and the other a high-carbohydrate–high-fat (HCHF) diet, resulting in four groups of offspring: NORM-CONV; NORM-HCHF; LOW-CONV; LOW-HCHF. At 6 months of age, half of the lambs (all males......-term effects were increased adrenal size in male lambs and adult females (P LOW-HCHF female lambs had markedly higher...

  8. Preference for newspaper size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Steve N H; Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S

    2014-05-01

    The past few years has seen a change in the size of newspapers, with publishers moving to a smaller size format. Five 'standard' newspaper sizes are used in different countries: Broadsheet, Rhensch, Tabloid, Tall Tabloid and Berliner. These papers vary in both width and height of pages and hence there are implications for human reading comfort, which may be dependent on reading location such as on a lounge chair or on a train. Experiments were carried out to determine preferences for the different sizes and to relate these preferences to the geometric characteristics of the newspapers. For both comfortable and cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, the rank order of preference for paper types was, from least to most-preferred, Broadsheet, Rhensch, Berliner, Tall Tabloid and Tabloid. Preferences were much stronger when determined in cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, where most comparisons were significantly different. There was good correlation between participant ratings on several scales and preference, where most factors were related to comfort of holding and controlling the paper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  10. High-fidelity simulation among bachelor students in simulation groups and use of different roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thidemann, Inger-Johanne; Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-12-01

    Cost limitations might challenge the use of high-fidelity simulation as a teaching-learning method. This article presents the results of a Norwegian project including two simulation studies in which simulation teaching and learning were studied among students in the second year of a three-year bachelor nursing programme. The students were organised into small simulation groups with different roles; nurse, physician, family member and observer. Based on experiences in different roles, the students evaluated the simulation design characteristics and educational practices used in the simulation. In addition, three simulation outcomes were measured; knowledge (learning), Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning. The simulation was evaluated to be a valuable teaching-learning method to develop professional understanding and insight independent of roles. Overall, the students rated the Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning as high. Knowledge about the specific patient focus increased after the simulation activity. Students can develop practical, communication and collaboration skills, through experiencing the nurse's role. Assuming the observer role, students have the potential for vicarious learning, which could increase the learning value. Both methods of learning (practical experience or vicarious learning) may bridge the gap between theory and practice and contribute to the development of skills in reflective and critical thinking.

  11. ''High intensity per bunch'' working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Third Generation Light Sources are supposed to store high intensity beams not only in many tightly spaced bunches (multibunch operation), but also in few bunch or even single lunch modes of operation, required for example for time structure experiments. Single bunch instabilities, driven by short-range wake fields, however spoil the beam quality, both longitudinally and transversely. Straightforward ways of handling them, by pushing up the chromaticity ({zeta} = {delta}Q/({delta}p/p)) for example, enabled to raise the charge per bunch, but to the detriment of beam lifetime. In addition, since the impedance of the vacuum chamber deteriorates with the installation of new insertion devices, the current thresholds tend to dope down continuously. The goal of this Working Group was then to review these limitations in the existing storage rings, where a large number of beam measurements have been performed to characterise them, and to discuss different strategies which are used against them. About 15 different laboratories reported on the present performance of storage rings, experiences gained in high charge per bunch, and on simulation results and theoretical studies. More than 25 presentations addressed the critical issues and stimulated the discussion. Four main topics came out: - Observation and experimental data; - Impedance studies and tracking codes; - Theoretical investigations; - Cures and feedback. (author)

  12. Expression and Effects of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoao Pang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the significance of high- mobility group box1 (HMGB1 and T-cell-mediated immunity and prognostic value in cervical cancer. HMGB1, forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3, IL-2, and IL-10 protein expression was analyzed in 100 cervical tissue samples including cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, and healthy control samples using immunohistochemistry. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag was immunoradiometrically measured in 32 serum samples from 37 cases of squamous cervical cancer. HMGB1 and SCC-Ag were then correlated to clinicopathological characteristics. HMGB1 expression tends to increase as cervical cancer progresses and it was found to be significantly correlated to FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis. These findings suggest that HMGB1 may be a useful prognostic indicator of cervical carcinoma. In addition, there were significant positive relationships between HMGB1 and FOXP3 or IL-10 expression (both p < 0.05. In contrast, HMGB1 and IL-2 expression was negatively correlated (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression may activate Tregs or facilitate Th2 polarization to promote immune evasion of cervical cancer. Elevated HMGB1 protein in cervical carcinoma samples was associated with a high recurrence of HPV infection in univariate analysis (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression and levels of SCC-Ag were directly correlated in SCC (p < 0.05. Thus, HMGB1 may be a useful biomarker for patient prognosis and cervical cancer prediction and treatment.

  13. The relationship between personality types and reward preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nienaber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Research has shown that total rewards models structured according to individual preferences, positively influence efforts to attract, retain and motivate key employees. Yet, this is seldom done. Structuring total rewards models according to the preferences of employee segments is a viable alternative to accommodate individual preferences. Research purpose: The primary aim of the study was to determine the relationship between personality types and reward preferences. The secondary aim was to determine the reward preferences for different demographic groups. Motivation for the study: An enhanced understanding of reward preferences for different employee segments will enable employers to offer more competitive reward options to their employees. This may, in turn, have a positive impact on retention. Research design, approach and method: Two measuring instruments, the MBTI® Form GRV and the Rewards Preferences Questionnaire, were distributed electronically to 5 000 potential respondents. The results from 589 sets of questionnaires were used in the data analyses. Primary and secondary factor analyses were done on the items in the Rewards Preferences Questionnaire. Main findings/results: The study confirmed that individuals with certain personality types and personality preferences, have different preferences for certain reward categories. There was a stronger relationship between reward preferences and personality preferences than for reward preferences and personality types. Preferences for reward categories by different demographic groups were confirmed. The significant difference in reward preferences between Black and White respondents in particular was noteworthy, with Black respondents indicating significantly higher mean scores for all reward categories than White respondents. Finally, a total rewards framework influenced by the most prominent preferences for reward categories, was designed. Practical/Managerial implications

  14. Traditional nets interfere with the uptake of long-lasting insecticidal nets in the Peruvian Amazon: the relevance of net preference for achieving high coverage and use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Peeters Grietens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN has steadily increased, a growing number of studies report gaps between net ownership and use. We conducted a mixed-methods social science study assessing the importance of net preference and use after Olyset® LLINs were distributed through a mass campaign in rural communities surrounding Iquitos, the capital city of the Amazonian region of Peru. METHODS: The study was conducted in the catchment area of the Paujil and Cahuide Health Centres (San Juan district between July 2007 and November 2008. During a first qualitative phase, participant observation and in-depth interviews collected information on key determinants for net preference and use. In a second quantitative phase, a survey among recently confirmed malaria patients evaluated the acceptability and use of both LLINs and traditional nets, and a case control study assessed the association between net preference/use and housing structure (open vs. closed houses. RESULTS: A total of 10 communities were selected for the anthropological fieldwork and 228 households participated in the quantitative studies. In the study area, bed nets are considered part of the housing structure and are therefore required to fulfil specific architectural and social functions, such as providing privacy and shelter, which the newly distributed Olyset® LLINs ultimately did not. The LLINs' failure to meet these criteria could mainly be attributed to their large mesh size, transparency and perceived ineffectiveness to protect against mosquitoes and other insects, resulting in 63.3% of households not using any of the distributed LLINs. Notably, LLIN usage was significantly lower in houses with no interior or exterior walls (35.2% than in those with walls (73.8% (OR = 5.2, 95CI [2.2; 12.3], p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Net preference can interfere with optimal LLIN use. In order to improve the number of effective days of LLIN protection per dollar

  15. Traditional Nets Interfere with the Uptake of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets in the Peruvian Amazon: The Relevance of Net Preference for Achieving High Coverage and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grietens, Koen Peeters; Muela Ribera, Joan; Soto, Veronica; Tenorio, Alex; Hoibak, Sarah; Aguirre, Angel Rosas; Toomer, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Hugo; Llanos Cuentas, Alejandro; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Gamboa, Dionicia; Erhart, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Background While coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN) has steadily increased, a growing number of studies report gaps between net ownership and use. We conducted a mixed-methods social science study assessing the importance of net preference and use after Olyset® LLINs were distributed through a mass campaign in rural communities surrounding Iquitos, the capital city of the Amazonian region of Peru. Methods The study was conducted in the catchment area of the Paujil and Cahuide Health Centres (San Juan district) between July 2007 and November 2008. During a first qualitative phase, participant observation and in-depth interviews collected information on key determinants for net preference and use. In a second quantitative phase, a survey among recently confirmed malaria patients evaluated the acceptability and use of both LLINs and traditional nets, and a case control study assessed the association between net preference/use and housing structure (open vs. closed houses). Results A total of 10 communities were selected for the anthropological fieldwork and 228 households participated in the quantitative studies. In the study area, bed nets are considered part of the housing structure and are therefore required to fulfil specific architectural and social functions, such as providing privacy and shelter, which the newly distributed Olyset® LLINs ultimately did not. The LLINs' failure to meet these criteria could mainly be attributed to their large mesh size, transparency and perceived ineffectiveness to protect against mosquitoes and other insects, resulting in 63.3% of households not using any of the distributed LLINs. Notably, LLIN usage was significantly lower in houses with no interior or exterior walls (35.2%) than in those with walls (73.8%) (OR = 5.2, 95CI [2.2; 12.3], p<0.001). Conclusion Net preference can interfere with optimal LLIN use. In order to improve the number of effective days of LLIN protection per dollar spent

  16. High pressure stability of the monosilicides of cobalt and the platinum group elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, J.A., E-mail: jeanalexis.hernandez@ens-lyon.fr [Laboratoire de géologie de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5276, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 46 Allée d’Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Vočadlo, L.; Wood, I.G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • We model the high-pressure phases of cobalt- and platinum-group-monosilicides. • CoSi, RuSi, OsSi transform with pressure from the ε-FeSi to the CsCl structure. • RhSi and IrSi transform with pressure from the MnP structure to the ε-FeSi structure. • PdSi and PtSi transform with pressure from the MnP structure to the CuTi structure. - Abstract: The high pressure stability of CoSi, RuSi, RhSi, PdSi, OsSi, IrSi and PtSi was investigated by static first-principles calculations up to 300 GPa at 0 K. As found experimentally, at atmospheric pressure, CoSi, RuSi and OsSi were found to adopt the cubic ε-FeSi structure (P2{sub 1}3) whereas RhSi, PdSi, IrSi and PtSi were found to adopt the orthorhombic MnP (Pnma) structure. At high pressure, CoSi, RuSi and OsSi show a phase transition to the CsCl structure (Pm3{sup ¯}m) structure at 270 GPa, 7 GPa and 6 GPa respectively. RhSi and IrSi were found to transform to an ε-FeSi structure at 10 GPa and 25 GPa. For PdSi and PtSi, a transformation from the MnP structure to the tetragonal CuTi structure (P4/nmm) occurs at 13 GPa and 20 GPa. The pressure dependence of the electronic density of states reveals that RuSi and OsSi are semiconductors in the ε-FeSi structure and become metallic in the CsCl structure. RhSi and IrSi are metals in the MnP structure and become semimetals in their high pressure ε-FeSi form. CoSi in the ε-FeSi configuration is a semimetal. PdSi and PtSi remain metallic throughout up to 300 GPa.

  17. Social Skills Group Training in High-Functioning Autism: A Qualitative Responder Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choque Olsson, Nora; Rautio, Daniel; Asztalos, Jenny; Stoetzer, Ulrich; Bölte, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews show some evidence for the efficacy of group-based social skills group training in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, but more rigorous research is needed to endorse generalizability. In addition, little is known about the perspectives of autistic individuals participating in social skills group training.…

  18. Social Skills Group Training in High-Functioning Autism: A Qualitative Responder Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choque Olsson, Nora; Rautio, Daniel; Asztalos, Jenny; Stoetzer, Ulrich; Bölte, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews show some evidence for the efficacy of group-based social skills group training in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, but more rigorous research is needed to endorse generalizability. In addition, little is known about the perspectives of autistic individuals participating in social skills group training.…

  19. Blood group genotyping: from patient to high-throughput donor screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Veldhuisen; C.E. van der Schoot; M. de Haas

    2009-01-01

    Blood group antigens, present on the cell membrane of red blood cells and platelets, can be defined either serologically or predicted based on the genotypes of genes encoding for blood group antigens. At present, the molecular basis of many antigens of the 30 blood group systems and 17 human platele

  20. Danish Consumer Preferences for Wine and the Impact of Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros; Brunbjerg Jørgensen, Jacob

    in wine production and wine is imported. In addition, our study explores the impact of involvement on wine preferences. Design/methodology/approach: Based on a web-based survey, we applied the Best-Worst Scaling (BWS) method to measure the importance of attributes that Danish consumers assign when...... choosing wine. We further measured consumer level of purchase involvement and we compared their preferences between high and low involvement groups. Findings: Our results show that Danish wine consumers mainly rely on previous experience with wine. Conversely, alcohol content and marketing actions (e.......g. promotions) are not factors that Danish wine consumers rely much on when choosing wine. Wine characteristics are important, but are more prominent among the high involved consumers....

  1. Screening in high-risk group of gestational diabetes mellitus with its maternal and fetal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angadi Rajasab Nilofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a metabolic disorder defined as glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The complications associated with GDM can be prevented by early recognition, intense monitoring and proper treatment. Aims: The present study was done to screen the high-risk pregnancy group for GDM, to find the incidence of abnormal results on screening and to correlate the abnormal results with the maternal and fetal outcomes. The study was done in a tertiary care hospital and teaching institute. It was a prospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: Selective screening for GDM was done in 150 pregnant women with high-risk factors. Screening was done with 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT after 18 weeks, and if GCT was negative then the test was repeated after 28 weeks of pregnancy. The patients who were having an abnormal GCT were subjected to 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. All GDM patients were followed up and treated with diet and/or insulin therapy till delivery to know maternal and fetal outcomes. The period of study was from April 2008 to March 2009. Results: 7.3% of study population was OGCT positive. 6% of the study population was OGTT positive. Age >25 years, obesity, family history of DM, and past history of GDM were the risk factors significantly associated with GDM. One newborn had hypoglycemia and one had hyperbilirubinemia. The fetal and maternal outcome in GDM patients was good in our study due to early diagnosis and intervention. Conclusion: Women with GDM are at an increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The increased morbidity in GDM is preventable by meticulous antenatal care.

  2. Holography as a highly efficient renormalization group flow. II. An explicit construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Nicolas; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2016-07-01

    We complete the reformulation of the holographic correspondence as a highly efficient renormalization group (RG) flow that can also determine the UV data in the field theory in the strong-coupling and large-N limit. We introduce a special way to define operators at any given scale in terms of appropriate coarse-grained collective variables, without requiring the use of the elementary fields. The Wilsonian construction is generalized by promoting the cutoff to a functional of these collective variables. We impose three criteria to determine the coarse-graining. The first criterion is that the effective Ward identities for local conservation of energy, momentum, etc. should preserve their standard forms, but in new scale-dependent background metric and sources which are functionals of the effective single-trace operators. The second criterion is that the scale-evolution equations of the operators in the actual background metric should be state-independent, implying that the collective variables should not explicitly appear in them. The final required criterion is that the end point of the scale-evolution of the RG flow can be transformed to a fixed point corresponding to familiar nonrelativistic equations with a finite number of parameters, such as incompressible nonrelativistic Navier-Stokes, under a certain universal rescaling of the scale and of the time coordinate. Using previous work, we explicitly show that in the hydrodynamic limit each such highly efficient RG flow reproduces a unique classical gravity theory with precise UV data that satisfy our IR criterion and also lead to regular horizons in the dual geometries. We obtain the explicit coarse-graining which reproduces Einstein's equations. In a simple example, we are also able to construct a low-energy effective action and compute the beta function. Finally, we show how our construction can be interpolated with the traditional Wilsonian RG flow at a suitable scale and can be used to develop new

  3. Effects of stress on human mating preferences: stressed individuals prefer dissimilar mates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Deuter, Christian E.; Kuehl, Linn K.; Schulz, André; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Although humans usually prefer mates that resemble themselves, mating preferences can vary with context. Stress has been shown to alter mating preferences in animals, but the effects of stress on human mating preferences are unknown. Here, we investigated whether stress alters men's preference for self-resembling mates. Participants first underwent a cold-pressor test (stress induction) or a control procedure. Then, participants viewed either neutral pictures or pictures of erotic female nudes whose facial characteristics were computer-modified to resemble either the participant or another participant, or were not modified, while startle eyeblink responses were elicited by noise probes. Erotic pictures were rated as being pleasant, and reduced startle magnitude compared with neutral pictures. In the control group, startle magnitude was smaller during foreground presentation of photographs of self-resembling female nudes compared with other-resembling female nudes and non-manipulated female nudes, indicating a higher approach motivation to self-resembling mates. In the stress group, startle magnitude was larger during foreground presentation of self-resembling female nudes compared with other-resembling female nudes and non-manipulated female nudes, indicating a higher approach motivation to dissimilar mates. Our findings show that stress affects human mating preferences: unstressed individuals showed the expected preference for similar mates, but stressed individuals seem to prefer dissimilar mates. PMID:20219732

  4. The effect of a group approach on the performance of high school mathematics learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Dhlamini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of a group approach versus a non-group approach on the mathematics performance of learners. A group approach refers to an arrangement in which learners sit together to discuss and solve mathematics tasks. We studied a convenience sample of low-performing Grade 10 mathematics learners using a quasi-experimental design with a non-equivalent control group. The experimental group was taught using a group approach and the control group using non-group approach instruction. To measure the effects of teaching approaches, we administered a Financial Mathematics Achievement Test (FMAT before and after the experiment. Using a one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA the study found that learners in a group approach learning environment performed significantly better than learners taught through a non-group teaching mode (p < 0.05. The theory of cognitive load was used to interpret the results. The results suggest that a group approach may be effective when teaching certain mathematics topics in Grade 10 classrooms.

  5. The Unusually High Halo Concentration of the Fossil Group NGC 6482: Evidence for Weak Adiabatic Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Buote, David A

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the massive isolated elliptical galaxy / fossil group NGC 6482 for which previous X-ray studies of a modest Chandra observation obtained a very uncertain, but also possibly very high, halo concentration. We present new measurements of the hot gas surface brightness, temperature, and iron abundance using the modest Chandra observation and a previously unpublished Suzaku observation, the latter of which allows measurements of the gas properties to be extended out to ~r_2500. By constructing hydrostatic equilibrium models of the gas with separate components for the gas, BCG stellar mass, and the dark matter (DM), we measure c_200 = 32.2 +/- 7.1 and M_200 = (4.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^12 M_sun using an NFW DM profile. For a halo of this mass, c_200 exceeds the mean value (7.1) expected for relaxed LCDM halos by $3.5 \\sigma$ in terms of the observational error, and by $6 \\sigma$ considering the intrinsic scatter in the LCDM c-M relation, which situates NGC 6482 as the most extreme outlier known for a fossil syste...

  6. Anabolic Properties of High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1 is mainly recognized as a chemoattractant for macrophages in the initial phase of host response to pathogenic stimuli. However, recent findings provide evidence for anabolic properties in terms of enhanced proliferation, migration, and support of wound healing capacity of mesenchymal cells suggesting a dual role of the cytokine in the regulation of immune response and subsequent regenerative processes. Here, we examined potential anabolic effects of HMGB1 on human periodontal ligament (PDL cells in the regulation of periodontal remodelling, for example, during orthodontic tooth movement. Preconfluent human PDL cells (hPDL were exposed to HMGB1 protein and the influence on proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and biomineralization was determined by MTS assay, real time PCR, immunofluorescence cytochemistry, ELISA, and von Kossa staining. HMGB1 protein increased hPDL cell proliferation, migration, osteoblastic marker gene expression, and protein production as well as mineralized nodule formation significantly. The present findings support the dual character of HMGB1 with anabolic therapeutic potential that might support the reestablishment of the structural and functional integrity of the periodontium following periodontal trauma such as orthodontic tooth movement.

  7. Population groups at high risk for poor oral self care: the basis for oral health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artnik, Barbara; Premik, Marjan; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana

    2008-01-01

    Identification of population groups at high risk for poor oral self-care in adults was needed in order to enable more focused planning of oral health promotion actions in Slovenia. The study was based on the national health behaviour database in adults aged 25-64. Data collected in 2001 were used. The sample size was 15,379. The overall response rate was 64%, and 8,392 questionnaires were eligible for oral self-care assessment. A complex indicator based on oral hygiene, frequency of visiting a dentist, and nutritional habits was derived. The outcome of interest was poor oral self-care. Logistic regression was used to test multivariate associations between several factors (gender, age, educational level, social class, etc.) and poor oral self-care. The overall prevalence of poor oral self-care was 6.9%. The odds for this outcome were higher for men (OR(males vs. females) = 7.49, p social classes (OR(lower vs. upper-middle) = 6.20, p social classes.

  8. PREVALENCE OF INTERNET ADDICTION: A PILOT STUDY IN A GROUP OF ITALIAN HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Campanella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed at exploring the prevalence of Internet Addiction (IA amongst a group of high-school students living in Southern Italy. Method: 560 hundred students of both sexes of a “Liceo Classico” who volenteered for the study were included. They completed a smaller version of a specific questionnaire for IA developed by us. Results: 500, out of the total of 560 questionnaires that were returned, were correctly completed and could be analyzed. The main findings were that almost all students used the smartphone to access Internet. About 16% of them used it for a time ranging between 90 and 120 minutes a day, and the remaining less than one hour. The most used applications were Facebook and Whatsup. Fifty percent of the students owned a videogame console, and dedicated less than two hours a day on videogames. The ensuing data were presented to the students and a debate was promoted amongst them. Conclusions: Internet and related technology are now part of the everyday life especially of adolescents. The benefits and limits of them should be underlined. On the same time, an incresead awareness on the possibility of developing an excessive use until a real addiction should be promoted amongst younger generations.

  9. Blockade of high mobility group box-1 protein attenuates experimental severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidehiro Sawa; Takashi Ueda; Yoshifumi Takeyama; Takeo Yasuda; Makoto Shinzeki; Takahiro Nakajima; Yoshikazu Kuroda

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of anti-high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) neutralizing antibody in experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: SAP was induced by creating closed duodenal loop in C3H/HeN mice. SAP was induced immediately after intraperitoneal injection of anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody (200 μg). Severity of pancreatitis, organ injury (liver, kidney and lung), and bacterial translocation to pancreas was examined 12 h after induction of SAP.RESULTS: Anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody significantly improved the elevation of the serum amylase level and the histological alterations of pancreas and lung in SAP.Anti-HMGB1 antibody also significantly ameliorated the elevations of serum alanine aminotransferase and creatinine in SAP. However, anti-HMGB1 antibody worsened the bacterial translocation to pancreas.CONCLUSION: Blockade of HMGB1 attenuated the development of SAP and associated organ dysfunction,suggesting that HMGB1 may act as a key mediator for inflammatory response and organ injury in SAP.

  10. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Barreiro-Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised.

  11. High mobility group box 1 protein as a late-acting mediator of acute lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Waldemar; Stetkiewicz, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Acute inflammatory lung injury is often a delayed complication of critical illness and is associated with increased mortality. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, in addition to its role as a transcriptional regulator factor, has been identified as a late mediator of endotoxin lethality and might be also involved in the development and progression of acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein itself can cause an acute inflammatory response manifested by increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil accumulation. The delayed kinetics of HMGB1 protein release indicate that this protein is a distal mediator of acute inflamatory lung injury. Anti-HMGB1 protein antibodies attenuated endotoxin-induced lung injury, but not the early release of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, indicating that HMGB1 protein is a late mediator of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein is not released by apoptotic cells but is passively released by necrotic or damaged somatic and immune cells and it functions as a major stimulus of necrosis-induced inflammation. HMGB1 protein is also released by activated monocytes/macrophages and induces delayed and biphasic release of proinflammatory mediators from these cells. HMGB1 protein failed to stimulate cytokines release in lymphocytes, indicating that cellular stimulation is specific. We would like to suggest that HMGB1 protein may be also a primary mediator of the inflammatory responses to lung cells injury caused by toxic environmental chemicals.

  12. Superconductivity in Group III-V Semiconductor AlN Under High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Selva Dancy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of cubic zinc blende type group III-V semiconductor AlN under pressure is studied using full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO method. At normal pressure, AlN is an indirect bandgap semiconductor with band gap value 4.56 eV. When the pressure is increased, there is enhanced overlapping between the wave functions of the neighboring atoms. As a result the widths of the valence and empty conduction bands increase. These changes lead to the narrowing and indirect closing of the band gaps in AlN (metallization. On further increase of pressure, AlN becomes a superconductor and AlN comes under the class of electron-phonon-mediated high pressure superconductors. The superconducting transition temperatures (Tc of AlN are obtained as a function of pressure for the CsCl structure. It is also confirmed that the metallization, structural phase transition and onset of superconductivity do not occur simultaneously in this compound. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.628

  13. Regnase-1 in microglia negatively regulates high mobility group box 1-mediated inflammation and neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Chen; Huang, Shao-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Hu, Ya-Fang; Zhou, Liang; Gu, Yong

    2016-04-05

    Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been demonstrated to function as a proinflammatory cytokine and induces neuronal injury in response to various pathological stimuli in central nervous system (CNS). However, the regulatory factor involved in HMGB1-mediated inflammatory signaling is largely unclear. Regulatory RNase 1 (Regnase-1) is a potent anti-inflammation enzyme that can degrade a set of mRNAs encoding proinflammatory cytokines. The present study aims to determine the role of Regnase-1 in the regulation of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory injury in CNS. Cultured microglia and rat brain were treated with recombinant HMGB1 to examine the induction of Regnase-1 expression. Moreover, the role of Regnase-1 in modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neuronal injury was then investigated in microglia by specific siRNA knockdown upon HMGB1 treatment. Results showed that HMGB1 could significantly induce the de novo synthesis of Regnase-1 in cultured microglia. Consistently, Regnase-1 was elevated and found to be co-localized with microglia marker in the brain of rat treated with HMGB1. Silencing Regnase-1 in microglia enhanced HMGB1-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and exacerbated neuronal toxicity. Collectively, these results suggest that Regnase-1 can be induced by HMGB1 in microglia and negatively regulates HMGB1-mediated neuroinflammation and neuronal toxicity.

  14. The High Velocity Galaxy Problem of $\\Lambda$CDM in the Local Group $-$ Including External Perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    We recently used an axisymmetric model of the Local Group (LG) to show that the observed positions and velocities of galaxies inside it are difficult to reconcile with the standard cosmological model, $\\Lambda$CDM (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We now extend this investigation using a 3D model of the LG. This makes it feasible to directly include several other mass concentrations within and just outside the LG e.g. M33 and IC 342, respectively. As before, LG dwarf galaxies are treated as test particles. Although our best-fitting 3D model yields different velocity predictions for individual galaxies, the overall picture remains unchanged. In particular, observed radial velocities (RVs) tend to exceed $\\Lambda$CDM model predictions. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our earlier axisymmetric analysis, with a root mean square value of $\\sim$50 km/s. \\emph{Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy prob...

  15. The Proinflammatory Cytokine High-Mobility Group Box-1 Mediates Retinal Neuropathy Induced by Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Abu El-Asrar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in epiretinal membranes and vitreous fluid from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and in retinas of diabetic rats plays a pathogenetic role in mediating diabetes-induced retinal neuropathy. Retinas of 1-month diabetic rats and HMGB1 intravitreally injected normal rats were studied using Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and glutamate assay. In addition, we studied the effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced biochemical changes in the retina. Diabetes and intravitreal injection of HMGB1 in normal rats induced significant upregulation of HMGB1 protein and mRNA, activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3 and glutamate; and significant downregulation of synaptophysin, tyrosine hydroxylase, glutamine synthetase, and glyoxalase 1. Constant glycyrrhizin intake from the onset of diabetes did not affect the metabolic status of the diabetic rats, but it significantly attenuated diabetes-induced upregulation of HMGB1 protein and mRNA, activated ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, and glutamate. In the glycyrrhizin-fed diabetic rats, the decrease in synaptophysin, tyrosine hydroxylase, and glyoxalase 1 caused by diabetes was significantly attenuated. These findings suggest that early retinal neuropathy of diabetes involves upregulated expression of HMGB1 and can be ameliorated by inhibition of HMGB1.

  16. Vast planes of satellites in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group: comparison to Andromeda

    CERN Document Server

    Gillet, N; Knebe, A; Libeskind, N; Yepes, G; Gottlober, S; Hoffman, Y

    2014-01-01

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of former similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modelling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al.. However the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we fin...

  17. High-Quality Ultra-Compact Grid Layout of Grouped Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoghourdjian, Vahan; Dwyer, Tim; Gange, Graeme; Kieffer, Steve; Klein, Karsten; Marriott, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Prior research into network layout has focused on fast heuristic techniques for layout of large networks, or complex multi-stage pipelines for higher quality layout of small graphs. Improvements to these pipeline techniques, especially for orthogonal-style layout, are difficult and practical results have been slight in recent years. Yet, as discussed in this paper, there remain significant issues in the quality of the layouts produced by these techniques, even for quite small networks. This is especially true when layout with additional grouping constraints is required. The first contribution of this paper is to investigate an ultra-compact, grid-like network layout aesthetic that is motivated by the grid arrangements that are used almost universally by designers in typographical layout. Since the time when these heuristic and pipeline-based graph-layout methods were conceived, generic technologies (MIP, CP and SAT) for solving combinatorial and mixed-integer optimization problems have improved massively. The second contribution of this paper is to reassess whether these techniques can be used for high-quality layout of small graphs. While they are fast enough for graphs of up to 50 nodes we found these methods do not scale up. Our third contribution is a large-neighborhood search meta-heuristic approach that is scalable to larger networks.

  18. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William M Scovell

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1(HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome(N) in a nonenzymatic,adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor(ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes(N’ and N’’) remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed(1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and(2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siR NA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome.

  19. Generation and characterization of a polyclonal antibody against human high mobility group box 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fen; Li, Runsheng; Hong, Aizhen; Duan, Fei; Li, Yuhua

    2013-11-01

    A human high mobility group box 4 (hHMGB4) expression construct (pET‑28a/hHMGB4) was generated by cloning the hHMGB4 full‑length cDNA in the expression vector pET‑28a(+). The hHMGB4 fusion protein with His6‑Tag was prepared using E.coli BL21 (DE3) transformed with pET‑28a/hHMGB4 and purified via preparative SDS‑PAGE plus electroelution. Immunization of rabbits with the purified hHMGB4 generated polyclonal antibodies. The titer of the antiserum was determined to be 1:102,400 by ELISA analysis. Western blotting analysis showed that the antibody specifically recognized the recombinant hHMGB4 protein and also the endogenous hHMGB4 protein in prostate cancer cells. In addition, immunohistochemical staining analysis using the prepared antibody revealed marked hHMGB4 staining in the nuclei of the human prostate tissue. These data demonstrate that the anti‑hHMGB4 polyclonal antibody may be a useful reagent for the functional study of hHMGB4.

  20. Internet design preferences of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernecky, Cynthia; Macklin, Denise; Walter, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    To describe computer experience and preferences for multimedia design. Prospective, descriptive. Physician office and outpatient cancer centers in an urban area in the southeastern United States. Convenience sample of 22 volunteer patients with cancer from four racial groups. A questionnaire on computer experiences was followed by a hands-on computer session with questions regarding preferences for seven interface items. Data termination occurred when sample size was obtained. Design of Internet education site for patients. Variables include preferences, computer, cancer, multimedia, and education. Eighty-two percent had personal computers, 41% used a computer daily, and 95% believed that computers would be a good avenue for learning about cancer care. Preferences included display colors in blue and green hues; colored buttons; easy-to-read text; graphics with a simple design and large, clear pictures; serif font in dark type; light-colored background; and larger photo size in a rectangle shape. Most popular graphic icons as metaphors were 911 for emergency, picture of skull and crossbones for danger, and a picture of a string on an index finger representing reminder. The simple layout most preferred for appearances was one that included text and pictures, read from left to right, and was symmetrical in its placement of pictures and text on the page. Preferences are necessary to maintain interest and support navigation through computer designs to enhance the translation of knowledge to patients. Development of multimedia based on patient preferences will enhance education, learning, and, ultimately, quality patient care.

  1. Measuring children's food preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Annemarie; Kildegaard, Heidi; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate if children’s food preferences can be reliable measured by using pictures of foods presented on a computer screen in a conjoint layout.We investigate reproducibility (test–retest) and infer validity by comparison with traditional hedonic evaluations...... juices (tangible products), chosen to span the preference spectrum, were hedonically evaluated for appearance and taste. Finally, an actual product choice was performed by having the children choose between two buns and two juices.Results showed that the computer evaluationswith pictures of foods...... provided reproducible information about the children’s visual food preferences, which were in concordance with both hedonic measures and products choices, and can thus be considered valid....

  2. The High Velocity Galaxy Challenge to ΛCDM in the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Indranil

    2017-06-01

    In the Local Group (LG), Andromeda (M31) is approaching the Milky Way (MW) at ˜110 km/s despite the large scale cosmic expansion. To turn it around locally to this extent, their combined mass must lie in a narrow range of values. This constrains the gravitational field in the LG as there are no other objects of similar masses. We have conducted calculations solving test particle trajectories in this gravitational field using a 2D dynamical model including Cen A and the LMC (MNRAS, 459, 2237). Although few objects have radial velocities (RVs) much below the predictions of the best-fitting model, some have RVs much above them, sometimes by as much as 100 km/s. This situation persists even when we used a 3D model including perturbers and satellites (MNRAS, 467, 2180).The observations may be explained by a past close flyby of the MW and M31, which arises in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) but not ΛCDM. In this context, a simplified calculation suggests that the recently discovered plane of satellites around the MW and a similar plane around M31 could be explained by a past MW-M31 flyby, but only if they orbit within a particular plane. We used this information in a more detailed MOND simulation of the flyby and its effect on the rest of the LG, treating it as a cloud of ˜3×105 test particles. The high speeds of the MW and M31 at pericentre allow for efficient gravitational slingshots of these particles. Those flung out to the greatest distance tend to lie very close to the MW-M31 orbital plane, probably because the greatest impulses occur for objects flung out almost parallel to the motion of the perturber.I will describe this simulation and recent work (Arxiv: 1701.06559) showing that LG dwarfs with the most anomalously high RVs (relative to our 3D model) indeed lie close to a plane oriented similarly to our expected MW-M31 orbital plane based on considering their satellite systems. This plane of distant LG dwarfs passes within 140 kpc of the MW and M31 and

  3. Seroprevalence of Brucellosis and Risk Factors Related to High Risk Occupational Groups in Kazeroon, South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Taheri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brucellosis is a major zoonosis worldwide. Many people for their professions are at higher risk of contracting the disease.Objective: To determine the seroprevalence of brucellosis and its risk factors in a group of high risk professions.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all personnel or students of veterinary schools, slaughters and butchers working in the city were invited to participate (n=141. A comparison group (n=44 randomly selected from patients who were selected at random from people attended our healthcare center for reasons other than the infectious diseases.Results: 4 veterinarians, 15 veterinary assistants, 42 veterinarian students, 52 butchers, 17 slaughters, 8 slaughterhouse workers and 3 chefs made the first group and 14 storekeepers, 5 students of engineering, 11 clerks, 13 freelance workers, and 1 high school student made the comparison group. While the rate of consumption of most of the studied dairy products was almost similar in both groups, comparison group patients consumed more often milk (p<0.001 and cream (p<0.001 than the high risk group. 11 (7.8%; 95% CI: 3.4%–12.2% cases from high risk group and none of the comparison group were found seropositive for Brucella.Conclusion: Profession is the main factor in seropositivity. Consumption of dairy products and raw milk is not associated with a higher risk of seropositivity.

  4. Using a Random Dependent Group Contingency to Increase On-Task Behaviors of High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Brenda D.; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2009-01-01

    Group contingencies have the advantages of encouraging individual students to collectively feel responsible for appropriate and inappropriate classroom behaviors and have shown effectiveness in improving students' behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a random dependent group contingency on the on-task behaviors of…

  5. Estimating exponential scheduling preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Katrine; Börjesson, Maria; Engelson, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Different assumptions about travelers' scheduling preferences yield different measures of the cost of travel time variability. Only few forms of scheduling preferences provide non-trivial measures which are additive over links in transport networks where link travel times are arbitrarily...... of car drivers' route and mode choice under uncertain travel times. Our analysis exposes some important methodological issues related to complex non-linear scheduling models: One issue is identifying the point in time where the marginal utility of being at the destination becomes larger than the marginal...

  6. Revealed smooth nontransitive preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Tvede, Mich

    2013-01-01

    consumption bundle, all strictly preferred bundles are more expensive than the observed bundle. Our main result is that data sets can be rationalized by a smooth nontransitive preference relation if and only if prices can normalized such that the law of demand is satisfied. Market data sets consist of finitely...... many observations of price vectors, lists of individual incomes and aggregate demands. We apply our main result to characterize market data sets consistent with equilibrium behaviour of pure-exchange economies with smooth nontransitive consumers....

  7. Cultural preferences for visual and verbal communication styles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultural preferences for visual and verbal communication styles in sport ... prefer more symbolic communication like complex visuals and high-context verbal ... the effects of context on attitude-to-the-advertisement and attitude-to-the-brand. ... Americans did not exhibit a strong preference for any specific advertisement type.

  8. Nutritional state influences shoaling preference for familiars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommen, Joachim G; Luz, Corinna; Bakker, Theo C M

    2007-01-01

    Preferences for grouping with familiar individuals are shown in many animal species, including the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Shoaling with familiars is advantageous because of more precise anti-predator behaviours or more stable dominance hierarchies. Additionally, associations with familiar individuals facilitate the evolution of altruistic behaviour. Thus, in situations of increased competition one might expect an increased preference for familiar fish. We gave single juvenile sticklebacks of different nutritional state the choice between shoals composed either of familiar or unfamiliar individuals. Satiated fish preferred to shoal with familiar individuals. A comparative analysis of 8 stickleback studies with 15 different tests using familiars showed that all tests gave similar results, i.e. sticklebacks of all age classes preferred to shoal with familiars in a non-sexual context. In contrast, hungry test fish did not prefer to shoal with familiar fish, but even showed a preference for the unfamiliar group. Because sticklebacks use early-life familiarity to recognize kin, the results suggest the avoidance of competition with relatives. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing an impact of nutritional state on social interactions with familiar individuals.

  9. Uncertain Fuzzy Preference Relations and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Zaiwu; Yao, Tianxiang

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of fuzzy sets and some of their relevant generalizations, this book systematically presents the fundamental principles and applications of group decision making under different scenarios of preference relations. By using intuitionistic knowledge as the field of discourse, this work investigates by utilizing innovative research means the fundamental principles and methods of group decision making with various different intuitionistic preferences: Mathematical reasoning is employed to study the consistency of group decision making; Methods of fusing information are applied to look at the aggregation of multiple preferences; Techniques of soft computing and optimization are utilized to search for satisfactory decision alternatives.             Each chapter follows the following structurally clear format of presentation: literature review, development of basic theory, verification and reasoning of principles , construction of models and computational schemes, and numerical examples, which ...

  10. Socio-cultural factors of formation of musical preferences of Ukrainian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Nesterenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of social and cultural factors on the musical preferences of students in Ukraine has been analysed in the article. The following factors have been selected: the type of society and social change in the polical fields of economy, culture, technology, students, musical paradigm. The urgency of the analysis of the genesis, development and change of musical preferences of students has been proven, the necessity to study the influence of sociocultural factors on the formation of musical preferences in modern society has been grounded. This allowed characterising the musical preferences as a socio-cultural phenomenon that present signs and society, and culture of the society. It has been found that the development of technology, such as the invention and use of the gramophone, phonograph, cinema, radio, television, and later a tape recorder, computer, Internet, mobile communications and the latest gadgets, has enhanced the formation of musical preferences.It has contributed meeting the needs and inquiries of students, which are studying musical art, the use of individual trajectories of formation of formal and informal musical preferences. Formal preferences are associated with the activities of social institutions and social organizations. In this context, the musical preferences and those recommended “from above” have been considered to be two different ways of formation of musical preferences in a totalitarian society. The variety of musical preferences has been determined. State-formed musical preferences have been identified and characterized by a second method of forming a musical preferences, which is based on the perception of diversity and is not approved by the musical culture of the individually selected samples, “from below” groups, which are defined as individual and personal, or informal, musical preferences. The musical preferences of students, related to situations of social changes that have occurred in the spheres

  11. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  12. Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy for High risk group of Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyun Suk; Kang, Seung Hee; Kim, Ju Ree; Lee, Eung Soo; Kim, Yong Bong; Park, Sung Kwan [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Locally advanced cervical carcinoma has shown high rate of local failure and poor survival rate despite the advances in modern radiation therapy techniques. Combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy demonstrated benefit in improving local control and possibly the overall survival. Twelve patients with advanced stages(Figo stage III, IV) or 11b with bulky tumors(>5 cm in diameter) were treated with combination of radiation therapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin between May of 1988 and September of 1991 at Inje University Paik Hospital. Cisplatin was administered in bolus injections of 50mg at weekly intervals during the courses of radiation therapy. Median follow-up period was 34 months with ranges from 3 to 53 months. Eleven patients were evaluable for the estimation of response. Response was noted in all the 11 patients: complete response(CR) in 7(64%), partial response (PR) in 4(36%). Of the 7 patients with CR, all maintained local control, whereas only 1 of 4 with PR showed local control. Six of 7 with CR are alive disease free on the completion of follow-up. Eight of 11 patients (73%) maintained local control in the pelvis. The Median survival for CR patient is 27 months and 9 months for the PR patients. Analysis of survival by stage shows 11 b 4/5, III 2/e and IV 1/3. Overall survival rate was 61%. Three patients recurred : 1 at local, 1 in distant site and 1 with local and distant site. Toxicity for the combination therapy was not excessive. These results are preliminary, but definitely encouraging in view of markedly improved response rate compared with the results of historical control group.

  13. High mobility group B1 impairs hepatocyte regeneration in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Runkuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetaminophen (APAP overdose induces massive hepatocyte necrosis. Necrotic tissue releases high mobility group B1 (HMGB1, and HMGB1 contributes to liver injury. Even though blockade of HMGB1 does not protect against APAP-induced acute liver injury (ALI at 9 h time point, the later time points are not studied and the role of HMGB1 in APAP overdose is unknown, it is possible that neutralization of HMGB1 might improve hepatocyte regeneration. This study aims to test whether blockade of HMGB1 improves hepatocyte regeneration after APAP overdose. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a single dose of APAP (350 mg/kg. 2 hrs after APAP administration, the APAP challenged mice were randomized to receive treatment with either anti-HMGB1 antibody (400 μg per dose or non-immune (sham IgG every 24 hours for a total of 2 doses. Results 24 hrs after APAP injection, anti-HMGB1 therapy instead of sham IgG therapy significantly improved hepatocyte regeneration microscopically; 48 hrs after APAP challenge, the sham IgG treated mice showed 14.6% hepatic necrosis; in contrast, blockade of HMGB1 significantly decreased serum transaminases (ALT and AST, markedly reduced the number of hepatic inflammatory cells infiltration and restored liver structure to nearly normal; this beneficial effect was associated with enhanced hepatic NF-κB DNA binding and increased the expression of cyclin D1, two important factors related to hepatocyte regeneration. Conclusion HMGB1 impairs hepatocyte regeneration after APAP overdose; Blockade of HMGB1 enhances liver recovery and may present a novel therapy to treat APAP overdose.

  14. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  15. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  16. Seroprevalence and risk factors for brucellosis in a high-risk group of individuals in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A K M Anisur; Dirk, Berkvens; Fretin, David; Saegerman, Claude; Ahmed, Muzahed Uddin; Muhammad, Noor; Hossain, Akram; Abatih, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Brucellosis is an occupational hazard of livestock farmers, dairy workers, veterinarians, slaughterhouse workers, and laboratory personnel, all of whom are considered to belong to the high-risk occupational group (HROG). A study was undertaken to determine the seroprevalence of brucellosis, identify risk factors associated with brucellosis seropositivity, and detect Brucella at genus level using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) among people in the HROG in the Dhaka division of Bangladesh. A sample of 500 individuals from the HROG was collected from three districts of Dhaka division of Bangladesh. A multiple random effects logistic regression model was used to identify potential risk factors. Two types of real-time PCR methods were applied to detect Brucella genus-specific DNA using serum from seropositive patients. The prevalence of brucellosis based on the three tests was observed to be 4.4% based on a parallel interpretation. The results of the multiple random effects logistic regression analysis with random intercept for district revealed that the odds of brucellosis seropositivity among individuals who had been in contact with livestock for more than 26 years was about 14 times higher as compared to those who had less than 5 years of contact with livestock. In addition, when the contact was with goats, the odds of brucellosis seropositivity were about 60 times higher as compared to when contact was with cattle only. Noticeable variation in brucellosis seropositivity among humans within the three districts was noted. All of the 13 individuals who tested positive for the serological tests were also positive in two types of real-time PCR using the same serum samples. Livestock farmers of brucellosis positive herds had a significantly higher probability to be seropositive for brucellosis. The study emphasized that contact with livestock, especially goats, is a significant risk factor for the transmission of brucellosis among individuals in the HROG.

  17. High mobility group box 1 protein: possible pathogenic link to atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-rong; WANG Xiao-hong; LIU Hue-fen; ZHOU Wen-jie; JIANG Hong

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained dysrhythmia in clinical practice.The bulk of evidence suggests that inflammatory processes,oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinase are associated with development of AF.However,these agents may be involved in high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1).We hypothesized that HMGB1 may be a possible pathogenic link to AF.A growing body of evidence supports these hypotheses.First,the level of serum HMGB1 is significantly increased in patients with AF including paroxysmal and persistent AF.Second,HMGB1 has been identified as a new pro-inflammatory cytokine in cardiovascular diseases,along with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α,interleukin (IL)-6,and C-reactive protein,and there is cross-talk between HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines.Third,oxidative stress is involved in the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine,HMGB1,indicating there is cross-talk between oxidative stress and inflammation,and oxidative stress may reinforce the effect of inflammation on the pathogenesis of AF and inflammation may play a more important role in the pathogenesis of AF.Fourth,HMGB1 can promote matrix metalloproteinase-9 upregulation and activation.Fifth,HMGB1 receptors (receptor for advanced glycation end products,Toll-like receptor-2,4) may mediate the atrial structural remodeling or be up-regulated in patients with non-valvular AF.These results suggest that HMGB1 may participate in the pathogenesis of AF and provide a potential target for pharmacological interruption of AF.

  18. Cardiac nuclear high mobility group box 1 prevents the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Akira; Shishido, Tetsuro; Netsu, Shunsuke; Narumi, Taro; Kadowaki, Shinpei; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Abe, Jun-ichi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakao, Kazuwa; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2013-09-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an abundant and ubiquitous nuclear DNA-binding protein that has multiple functions dependent on its cellular location. HMGB1 binds to DNA, facilitating numerous nuclear functions including maintenance of genome stability, transcription, and repair. However, little is known about the effects of nuclear HMGB1 on cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. The aim of this study was to examine whether nuclear HMGB1 plays a role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload. Analysis of human biopsy samples by immunohistochemistry showed decreased nuclear HMGB1 expression in failing hearts compared with normal hearts. Nuclear HMGB1 decreased in response to both endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulation in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, where nuclear HMGB1 was acetylated and translocated to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of nuclear HMGB1 attenuated ET-1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thoracic transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was performed in transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of HMGB1 (HMGB1-Tg) and wild-type (WT) mice. Cardiac hypertrophy after TAC was attenuated in HMGB1-Tg mice and the survival rate after TAC was higher in HMGB1-Tg mice than in WT mice. Induction of foetal cardiac genes was decreased in HMGB1-Tg mice compared with WT mice. Nuclear HMGB1 expression was preserved in HMGB1-Tg mice compared with WT mice and significantly attenuated DNA damage after TAC was attenuated in HMGB1-TG mice. These results suggest that the maintenance of stable nuclear HMGB1 levels prevents hypertrophy and heart failure by inhibiting DNA damage.

  19. Socialization of Physical and Social Aggression in Early Adolescents' Peer Groups: High-Status Peers, Individual Status, and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing; Xie, Hongling

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high-status peers on a target individual's physical and manipulative social aggression in peer groups was examined in a diverse sample of seventh-grade students. A total of 245 individual members belonging to 65 groups were included in analyses. Aggression was assessed by peer and victim nominations in the fall and spring…

  20. The Effects of Individual or Group Guidelines on the Calibration Accuracy and Achievement of High School Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Linda; Hacker, Douglas J.; Walck, Camilla C.; Nunnery, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial design was employed in a quasi-experiment to investigate the effects of guidelines in group or individual settings on the calibration accuracy and achievement of 82 high school biology students. Significant main effects indicated that calibration practice with guidelines and practice in group settings increased prediction and…