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Sample records for group follow-up videotapes

  1. Follow Up Study of Group Counseling with Underachieving College Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.

    The purpose of this study was to report long-range effects of group counseling and the college growth experience of students who were identified as underachievers and were enrolled as freshmen during the fall of 1969. Five variables were selected for this study as having possible influence on self-concept: (1) group, (2) education, (3) status, (4)…

  2. Buzz Groups and Videotape Speed Training at Ernst & Ernst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larick, Donald

    1971-01-01

    Using videotape for short lectures at the end of buzz group problems takes the burden off staff when training 360 auditors in computer techniques. Money conscious Ernst & Ernst puts the cost at $1.90 per lecture, per man. (Journal/EB)

  3. Characteristic sonographic and follow up features of thyroid nodules according to children age groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Bo Da; Chang, Yun Woo; Hong, Seong Sook; Hwang, Ji Young; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Dong Hwan [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We analyzed the spectrum and the significance of pediatric thyroid nodules depicted on sonography and evaluated the follow-up change according to the age group. We retrospectively reviewed the sonographic features of 82 nodules in 69 patients (6.6%) among 1282 children less than 13 years of age without a palpable lesion, from January 2006 to January 2013. Patients were divided into three age groups; infants, preschoolers, and schoolers. Thyroid nodules were evaluated according to their sonographic characteristics (simple cyst, colloid cyst, solid mass, or intrathyroid thymus) and the changes detected at follow-up (disappearance, decrease in size, no change or increase in size) were reported. There was a significant difference in the nodule patterns among the age groups (p < 0.001). The nodules in infants included a simple cyst (n = 12), a solid mass (n = 12), or an intra-thyroid thymus (n = 9). The preschoolers had a simple cyst (n = 11), a colloid cyst (n = 5), a solid mass (n = 3) or an intra-thyroid thymus (n = 5). However, the schoolers had a simple cyst (n = 2), a colloid cyst (n = 18), and a solid mass (n = 5), but there was no case of intra-thyroid thymus. Follow-up of 38 cases revealed significant differences among the age groups (p = 0.018). The nodules in infants showed findings such as disappearance of nodules (n = 9) and no change (n = 10) on follow-up sonography. In preschoolers, the nodules had disappeared (n = 2), decreased in size (n = 1), and showed no change (n = 11). However, the nodules in schoolers were found to be decreased in size (n = 1), show no change (n = 2), and increased in size (n = 2). The proven pathologic finding was benign in four patients. There were significant differences in the prevalence and the interval change of thyroid nodules among infants, preschoolers, and schoolers. A large series of intrathyroid thymus was seen in infants and preschoolers, and masses did not increase in size in these age groups. The frequency of a

  4. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazeen H Jafar

    Full Text Available Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE and trained general practitioner (GP intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up.A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes.After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1-0.1] mm Hg compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04. Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl.The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still evident at 7- year follow-up. These

  5. The effects of teachers' homework follow-up practices on students' EFL performance: a randomized-group design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Pedro; Núñez, José C; Vallejo, Guillermo; Cunha, Jennifer; Nunes, Tânia; Suárez, Natalia; Fuentes, Sonia; Moreira, Tânia

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the effects of five types of homework follow-up practices (i.e., checking homework completion; answering questions about homework; checking homework orally; checking homework on the board; and collecting and grading homework) used in class by 26 teachers of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) using a randomized-group design. Once a week, for 6 weeks, the EFL teachers used a particular type of homework follow-up practice they had previously been assigned to. At the end of the 6 weeks students completed an EFL exam as an outcome measure. The results showed that three types of homework follow-up practices (i.e., checking homework orally; checking homework on the board; and collecting and grading homework) had a positive impact on students' performance, thus highlighting the role of EFL teachers in the homework process. The effect of EFL teachers' homework follow-up practices on students' performance was affected by students' prior knowledge, but not by the number of homework follow-up sessions.

  6. Group Parent Training Combined with Follow-Up Coaching for Parents of Children with Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Erin E.; Lissman, Dana Cohen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between group training using an abbreviated version of the Incredible Years parent training with family coaching and positive parenting practices. Two at-­risk mothers and their young children with disabilities participated in the study. Both mothers were enrolled in a group parent training…

  7. Operating group as a follow-up strategy of a Nursing Course’s Pedagogical Project

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    Gabriella Cristine Guerra de Carvalho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to monitor and describe the implementation process of the Pedagogical Project of the Nursing Undergraduate Course, at the Catalão Campus of the Federal University of Goiás, from the perspective of professors and students. Qualitative and descriptive study, conducted with thirteen participants, of April, 2010 and June, 2011, in Catalão, GO, Brazil. It was possible to use the operative group as a technology for monitoring and data collection. At the end of each meeting, it was possible to set up a chronicle that was subjected to the thematic content analysis. Two categories emerged and showed as potentiality: the curricular matrix interdisciplinarity, and the students’ immaturity, the conflictive interpersonal relationship between students and professors as their constraints. Working in small groups and the operative group proved to be assertive in the teaching management and conducting research.

  8. [Daily life of schizofrenia patients after the use of clozapine and group follow up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durão, Ana Maria Sertori; Mello e Souza, Maria Conceição Bernardo; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2007-06-01

    This study was carried out with a sample of 11 patients who are part of the atypical medication group at the Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto's School of Medicine. For data collection semi-structured interviews guided by a script were held in April 2003. The interviews were first taped and fully transcribed afterwards. Results indicated an improvement in patients' symptoms, demonstrated by decreased social isolation, resumption of home/work activities and studies, as well as by participation in social events. They also point out to the need for a new vision regarding patients who suffer from mental disorders and their family members in the sense of searching for adequate therapeutic attitudes that have an impact on the production of life, aimed at giving a new existential meaning in the different forms of social contact and sociability.

  9. Alcohol-related hospital admissions: Missed opportunities for follow up? A focus group study about general practitioners' experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lid, Torgeir Gilje; Oppedal, Kristian; Pedersen, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    in the hospital had been recognised by the GP and how this knowledge affected their follow up of the patient's alcohol problem. Systematic text condensation was applied for analysis. Findings: A majority of the GPs had experienced patients with already recognised alcohol problems being rediscovered......Aims: To explore general practitioners' (GPs') follow-up experiences with patients discharged from hospital after admittance for alcohol-related somatic conditions. Design and participants: Two focus groups with GPs (four women and 10 men), calling for stories about whether the intervention given...... by the hospital staff. Still, they presented examples of how seeing the patient in a different context might present new opportunities. Few participants had received adequate information from the hospital about their patient's alcohol status, and they emphasised that a report about what had happened and what...

  10. A randomized comparison of home visits and hospital-based group follow-up visits after early postpartum discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, G J; Braveman, P A; Ackerson, L; Odouli, R; Coleman-Phox, K; Capra, A M; Wong, C; Lieu, T A

    2001-09-01

    Short postpartum stays are common. Current guidelines provide scant guidance on how routine follow-up of newly discharged mother-infant pairs should be performed. We aimed to compare 2 short-term (within 72 hours of discharge) follow-up strategies for low-risk mother-infant pairs with postpartum length of stay (LOS) of costs were studied using computerized databases and chart review. Breastfeeding continuation, maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal satisfaction were assessed by means of telephone interviews at 2 weeks postpartum. During a 17-month period in 1998 to 1999, we enrolled and randomized 1014 mother-infant pairs (506 to the control group and 508 to the intervention group). There were no significant differences between the study groups with respect to maternal age, race, education, household income, parity, previous breastfeeding experience, early initiation of prenatal care, or postpartum LOS. There were no differences with respect to neonatal LOS or Apgar scores. In the control group, 264 mother-infant pairs had an individual visit only, 157 had a group visit only, 64 had both a group and an individual visit, 4 had a home health and a hospital-based follow-up, 13 had no follow-up within 72 hours, and 4 were lost to follow-up. With respect to outcomes within 2 weeks after discharge, there were no significant differences in newborn or maternal hospitalizations or urgent care visits, breastfeeding discontinuation, maternal depressive symptoms, or a combined clinical outcome measure indicating whether a mother-infant pair had any of the above outcomes. However, mothers in the home visit group were more likely than those in the control group to rate multiple aspects of their care as excellent or very good. These included the preventive advice delivered (76% vs 59%) and the skills and abilities of the provider (84% vs 73%). Mothers in the home visit group also gave higher ratings on overall satisfaction with the newborn's posthospital care (71% vs 59

  11. Defense mechanisms after brief cognitive-behavior group therapy for panic disorder: one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Elizeth; Blaya, Carolina; Kipper, Leticia; Salum, Giovanni A; Otto, Michael W; Manfro, Gisele G

    2007-06-01

    Changes in defense mechanisms have been shown in long-term psychodynamic treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the changes that occurred after brief cognitive-behavior group therapy in the defense style of panic disorder patients that had failed to respond to pharmacotherapy. Forty-seven patients participated in the study and severity of panic disorder was evaluated by Clinical Global Impression. Defense mechanisms were evaluated by the Defense Style Questionnaire. Patients decreased the use of maladaptive defenses after cognitive-behavior group therapy, and the change in immature defenses was maintained at 1-year follow-up evaluation (p = 0.022). These modifications were associated with reduction of symptoms (F = 0.359; p = 0.047). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that defense styles are malleable in short-term treatment and are, at least partially, symptom-state dependent.

  12. Is modified brief assertiveness training for nurses effective? A single-group study with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Naoki; Nakamura, Yohei; Tanoue, Hiroki; MacLiam, Fionnula; Aoishi, Keiko; Shiraishi, Yuko

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of modified brief assertiveness training (with cognitive techniques) for nurses. Most assertiveness training takes a long time to conduct; thus, briefer training is required for universal on-the-job training in the workplace. In this single-group study, nurses received two 90-min training sessions with a 1-month interval between sessions. The degree of assertiveness was assessed by using the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule as the primary outcome, at four time points: pre- and post-training, 3-month follow-up and 6-month follow-up. A total of 33 nurses received the training, and the mean Rathus Assertiveness Schedule score improved from -14.2 (SD = 16.5) pre-training to -10.5 (SD = 18.0) post-training (p assertiveness training seems feasible and may achieve long-term favourable outcomes in improving assertiveness among nurses. The ease of implementation of assertiveness training is important because creating an open environment for communication leads to improved job satisfaction, improved nursing care and increased patient safety. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Comparison of results derived from follow-up examination of respiratory systems in chosen groups of metallurgists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarzyk, E; Gałuszka, Z; Pach, J; Szczeklik, J; Targosz, D

    1992-01-01

    In a 16.5-year follow-up study of the steel industry we investigated the relation of chronic occupational exposure to the changes of ventilatory efficiency and to the frequency of chronic bronchitis (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease--COPD) in a group of 65 men working in the harmful environment of a Coking Plant (CP). The reference group comprised 34 employees of Cold Rolling Mill (CRM) working in favorable hygienic conditions. The faster decline of VC and FEV1 were noted in the group of CP in comparison to the control group. Also the frequency of pathologic values of RT was significantly higher (p < or = 0.001) in the exposed group. The incidence of COPD increased more in the group of CP than in the group of rollers. No differences in the annual decline of FEV1 and VC between smokers and nonsmokers from CP were noted, while in the group of men working in favorable environmental conditions the differences between smoking categories were significant. It suggests that the impact of occupational exposure is so powerful that it can mask the unfavorable influence of cigarette smoking on the ventilatory function of men working in a Coking Plant.

  14. Group medical visits in the follow-up of women with a BRCA mutation: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogerbrugge Nicoline

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRCA mutation carriers have a 40-80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer. They may opt for yearly breast cancer surveillance or for prophylactic mastectomy. Both options show increased survival rates. It is a complex choice to be made between these two options. As a result most women experience high levels of distress and high needs for information. To fulfill the needs for psychosocial support and information we have introduced group medical consultations (GMCs. A GMC provides individual medical visits conducted within a group. This 90 minute group-visit with 8-12 patients gives patients the opportunity to spend more time with their clinician and a behavioral health professional and learn from other patients experiencing similar topics. However, it should be noted that group sessions may increase fear in some patients or influence their decision making. Methods/design In this randomized controlled trial, 160 BRCA mutation carriers diagnosed maximally 2 years ago are recruited from the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. Participants are randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either the GMC intervention group (onetime participation in a GMC instead of a standard individual visit or to a usual care control group. Primary outcome measures are empowerment and psychological distress (SCL 90. Secondary outcome measures are fear of cancer, information needs before the consultation and the received information, self-examination of the breasts, patient satisfaction, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Data are collected via self-reported questionnaires 1 week before the visit, and at 1 week and at 3 months follow-up. A pilot study was conducted to test all procedures and questionnaires. Discussion The possibility for interaction with other BRCA mutation carriers within a medical visit is unique. This study will assess the effectiveness of GMCs for BRCA mutation carriers to improve empowerment and decrease distress compared

  15. Group education and nurse-telephone follow-up effects on blood glucose control and adherence to treatment in type 2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh M Aliha

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: According to the results of the current study self-care group education and 12 weeks follow-up by a nurse using telephone causes significant improvement in metabolic parameters and adherence to treatment recommendations in diabetic patients.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and scintigraphy of the finger joints: one year follow up of patients with early arthritis. The TIRA Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, K E;

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and erosion development of the 2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints by magnetic resonance imaging in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or suspected RA followed up for one...

  17. The Irish DAFNE study protocol: a cluster randomised trial of group versus individual follow-up after structured education for type 1 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinneen, Seán F

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structured education programmes for individuals with Type 1 diabetes have become a recognised means of delivering the knowledge and skills necessary for optimal self-management of the condition. The Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme has been shown to improve biomedical (HbA(1c) and rates of severe hypoglycaemia) and psychosocial outcomes for up to 12 months following course delivery. The optimal way to support DAFNE graduates and maintain the benefits of the programme has not been established. We aimed to compare 2 different methods of follow-up of DAFNE graduates in a pragmatic clinical trial delivered in busy diabetes clinics on the island of Ireland. METHODS: Six participating centres were cluster randomised to deliver either group follow-up or a return to traditional one-to-one clinic visits. In the intervention arm group follow-up was delivered at 6 and 12 months post DAFNE training according to a curriculum developed for the study. In the control arm patients were seen individually in diabetes clinics as part of routine care. Study outcomes included HbA(1c) levels, self-reported rates of severe hypoglycaemia, body weight and measures of diabetes wellbeing and quality of life. These were measured at 6, 12 and 18 months after recruitment. Generalisability (external validity) was maximised by recruiting study participants from existing DAFNE waiting lists in each centre, by using broad inclusion criteria (including HbA(1c) values less than 13 percent with no lower limit) and by using existing clinic staff to deliver the training and follow-up. Internal validity and treatment fidelity were maximised by quality assuring the training of all DAFNE educators, by external peer review of the group follow-up sessions and by striving for full attendance at follow-up visits. Assays of HbA(1c) were undertaken in a central laboratory. DISCUSSION: This pragmatic clinical trial evaluating group follow-up after a structured education programme has

  18. The Irish DAFNE Study Protocol: A cluster randomised trial of group versus individual follow-up after structured education for Type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newell John

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structured education programmes for individuals with Type 1 diabetes have become a recognised means of delivering the knowledge and skills necessary for optimal self-management of the condition. The Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE programme has been shown to improve biomedical (HbA1c and rates of severe hypoglycaemia and psychosocial outcomes for up to 12 months following course delivery. The optimal way to support DAFNE graduates and maintain the benefits of the programme has not been established. We aimed to compare 2 different methods of follow-up of DAFNE graduates in a pragmatic clinical trial delivered in busy diabetes clinics on the island of Ireland. Methods Six participating centres were cluster randomised to deliver either group follow-up or a return to traditional one-to-one clinic visits. In the intervention arm group follow-up was delivered at 6 and 12 months post DAFNE training according to a curriculum developed for the study. In the control arm patients were seen individually in diabetes clinics as part of routine care. Study outcomes included HbA1c levels, self-reported rates of severe hypoglycaemia, body weight and measures of diabetes wellbeing and quality of life. These were measured at 6, 12 and 18 months after recruitment. Generalisability (external validity was maximised by recruiting study participants from existing DAFNE waiting lists in each centre, by using broad inclusion criteria (including HbA1c values less than 13 percent with no lower limit and by using existing clinic staff to deliver the training and follow-up. Internal validity and treatment fidelity were maximised by quality assuring the training of all DAFNE educators, by external peer review of the group follow-up sessions and by striving for full attendance at follow-up visits. Assays of HbA1c were undertaken in a central laboratory. Discussion This pragmatic clinical trial evaluating group follow-up after a structured education

  19. The career paths of a group of Romanian nurses in Italy: a 3-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, A; Barba, M; Mesaglio, M

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to describe for how long a homogeneous group of 17 Romanian nurses who first arrived at the 'Teaching Hospital' in Italy in 2003, stayed in the same hospital/ward of the host country, why and when they decided to move from one hospital to another, and their levels of competence in core skills, after either 6 months or 3 years. A longitudinal study design was adopted. The first phase was carried out in 2004, the second in 2006. We used an anonymous questionnaire. Only ten of the 17 nurses, who had started working in Italy 3 years before, remained in the same Hospital where they first started working. In spite of being given the opportunity to stay, some decided to move to hospitals where it is possible to earn more money or where they could save more by living in less expensive towns. The first nurse left the hospital in the first year, five in the second and one in the third year. Levels of perceived professional independence after 3 years are very good: the permanent group had improved their skills in all areas even though they felt a lack of confidence during the first 6 months. This study, within the limits of the sample and the methods, shows that foreign nurses are highly mobile in the host country and this revolves around the opportunity to earn more. With increasing recruitment of nurses from within the European continent, it is necessary to continue studying the factors that sustain foreign nurses, to find out how they can be helped, how to value their imported professional skills, how to reduce the initial lack of faith in their own abilities and to discover which strategies would encourage them to stay in the hospital where they arrived.

  20. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients’ Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study

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    Kai-Jo Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD. The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ. Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks, posttest (after 12 therapy sessions, and short- (3 months, medium- (6 months, and long-term (12 months follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P<0.001. Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P<0.001. We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  1. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients' Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Jo; Chen, Tsai-Hui; Hsieh, Hsiu-Tsu; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year) effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT) on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT) or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group) and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ). Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks), posttest (after 12 therapy sessions), and short- (3 months), medium- (6 months), and long-term (12 months) follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P < 0.001). We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  2. Primary Prevention Programme for Burnout-Endangered Teachers: Follow-Up Effectiveness of a Combined Group and Individual Intervention of AFA Breathing Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Goetz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early retirement of teachers due to burnout is frequent in Germany. In this study short- and medium-term effects of AFA breathing therapy were evaluated. Methods. This study was designed as a longitudinal controlled intervention design with four points of measurements: before assessment (T1, after intervention (T2, three months (follow up 1 (T3 after intervention, and six months (follow up 2 after intervention (T4. The intervention lasted a total of 11 weeks (weekly group therapy for eight weeks and three weeks of individual breathing session. The effects of intervention were measured with the questionnaire “work-related behaviour and experience Patterns” (AVEM at four times. Results. In the intervention group 64 teachers and in the self-selected control group 27 teachers were included. The AVEM scales “subjective significance of work” and “professional ambition” changed over time and within both groups (interaction effect. Significant improvements over the four measurements were observed in the intervention group in two AVEM scales: “emotional distancing” (F=6.3; P<0.01 and “balance and mental stability” (F=4.4; P<0.02. Conclusions. AFA breathing therapy showed short- and medium-term effects in the intervention group over four points of measurements. It may be assumed that breath therapy supports teachers in resisting occupational demand.

  3. A 9-year follow-up of a self-management group intervention for persistent neck pain in primary health care: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavsson C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Catharina Gustavsson,1,2 Lena von Koch1,3,4 1Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, 2School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, 3Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, 4Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Background and objective: In previous short-term and 2-year follow-ups, a pain and stress self-management group intervention (PASS had better effect on pain-related disability, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and perceived pain control than individually administered physiotherapy (IAPT for patients with persistent tension-type neck pain. Studies that have evaluated long-term effects of self-management approaches toward persistent neck pain are sparse. The objective of this study was to compare pain-related disability, self-efficacy for activities of daily living (ADL, catastrophizing, pain, pain control, use of analgesics, and health care utilization in people with persistent tension-type neck pain 9 years after they received the PASS or IAPT. Materials and methods: Of 156 people (PASS, n = 77; IAPT, n = 79 originally included in a randomized controlled trial, 129 people (PASS, n = 63; IAPT, n = 66 were eligible and were approached for the 9-year follow-up. They were sent a self-assessment questionnaire, comprising the Neck Disability Index, the Self-Efficacy Scale, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and questions regarding pain, analgesics, and health care utilization. Mixed linear models for repeated measures analysis or generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the differences between groups and within groups over time (baseline, previous follow-ups, and 9-year follow-up and the interaction effect of “time by group”. Results: Ninety-four participants (73% responded (PASS, n = 48; IAPT, n = 46. At 9 years, PASS participants reported less

  4. CONTRACT FOLLOW UP TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    SPL is organizing Training Sessions on the Contract Follow Up application. CFU is a Web based tool, developped and supported by the Administrative Information Services. It allows the creation of Divisional Requests and the follow up of their processing, from the Market Survey to the Invitation to Tender or Price Enquiry, approval by the Finance Committee, up to the actual signature of a Contract, acccording to the CERN Purchasing procedures. It includes a document management component. It also provides link with other AIS applications such as BHT and EDH. The course is primarily intended for DPOs, Contract Technical responsibles in the division and their assistants, but is beneficial to anybody involved in the follow up of such Purchasing Procedures. This course is free of charge, but application is necessary. The details of the course may be found at http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P2001/Bureautique/cfu4_f.htm General information of CFU may be found at http://ais.cern.ch/apps/cfu/ The dates of t...

  5. Independent validation of the prognostic capacity of the ISUP prostate cancer grade grouping system for radiation treated patients with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, D E; Jackson, W C; Abugharib, A; Tomlins, S A; Dess, R T; Soni, P D; Lee, J Y; Zhao, S G; Cole, A I; Zumsteg, Z S; Sandler, H; Hamstra, D; Hearn, J W; Palapattu, G; Mehra, R; Morgan, T M; Feng, F Y

    2016-09-01

    There has been a recent proposal to change the grading system of prostate cancer into a five-tier grade grouping system. The prognostic impact of this has been demonstrated in regards only to biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) with short follow-up (3 years). Between 1990 and 2013, 847 consecutive men were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy at a single academic center. To validate the new grade grouping system, bRFS, distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) were calculated. Adjusted Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the independent impact of the new grade grouping system. Discriminatory analyses were performed to compare the commonly used three-tier Gleason score system (6, 7 and 8-10) to the new system. The median follow-up of our cohort was 88 months. The 5-grade groups independently validated differing risks of bRFS (group 1 as reference; adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.35, 2.16, 1.79 and 3.84 for groups 2-5, respectively). Furthermore, a clear stratification was demonstrated for DMFS (aHR 2.03, 3.18, 3.62 and 13.77 for groups 2-5, respectively) and PCSS (aHR 3.00, 5.32, 6.02 and 39.02 for groups 2-5, respectively). The 5-grade group system had improved prognostic discrimination for all end points compared with the commonly used three-tiered system (that is, Gleason score 6, 7 and 8-10). In a large independent radiotherapy cohort with long-term follow-up, we have validated the bRFS benefit of the proposed five-tier grade grouping system. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the system is highly prognostic for DMFS and PCSS. Grade group 5 had markedly worse outcomes for all end points, and future work is necessary to improve outcomes in these patients.

  6. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Internet- vs. group-based cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: 4-year follow-up of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Erik; El Alaoui, Samir; Lindefors, Nils; Andersson, Erik; Rück, Christian; Ghaderi, Ata; Kaldo, Viktor; Lekander, Mats; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljótsson, Brjánn

    2014-08-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is common, debilitating and associated with high societal costs. The disorder can be effectively treated with Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT), but no previous study has investigated the long-term clinical or health economic effects of ICBT for SAD in comparison to an evidence-based control treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ICBT compared to cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) four years post-treatment. We conducted a 4-year follow-up study of participants who had received ICBT or CBGT for SAD within the context of a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial. The cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted taking a societal perspective. Participants in both treatment groups made large improvements from baseline to 4-year follow-up on the primary outcome measure (d = 1.34-1.48) and the 95% CI of the mean difference on the primary outcome was well within the non-inferiority margin. ICBT and CBGT were similarly cost-effective and both groups reduced their indirect costs. We conclude that ICBT for SAD yields large sustainable effects and is at least as long-term effective as CBGT. Intervention costs of both treatments are offset by net societal cost reductions in a short time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effective Group Training for Patients with Unexplained Physical Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a Non-Randomized One-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Lyonne N. L.; van Rood, Yanda R.; Timman, Reinier; Kooiman, Cornelis G.; van't Spijker, Adriaan; Busschbach, Jan J. V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS) is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailored to primary care patients and provided by a secondary community mental-health service reaching out into primary care. Methodology/Principal Findings The effectiveness of this training was explored in a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, 162 patients with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or as chronic pain disorder were randomized either to the training or a waiting list. Both lasted 13 weeks. The preservation of the training's effect was analyzed in non-randomized follow-ups, for which the waiting group started the training after the waiting period. All patients attended the training were followed-up after three months and again after one year. The primary outcomes were the physical and the mental summary scales of the SF-36. Secondary outcomes were the other SF-36-scales and the SCL-90-R. The courses of the training's effects in the randomized controlled trial and the follow-ups were analyzed with linear mixed modeling. In the randomized controlled trial, the training had a significantly positive effect on the quality of life in the physical domain (Cohen's d = 0.38;p = .002), but this overall effect was not found in the mental domain. Regarding the secondary outcomes, the training resulted in reporting an improved physical (Cohen's d = 0.43;p = 0.01), emotional (Cohen's d = 0.44;p = .0.01), and social (Cohen's d = 0.36;p = 0.01) functioning, less pain and better functioning despite pain (Cohen's d = 0.51;p =  PMID:22880056

  8. Effective group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: a randomized controlled trial with a non-randomized one-year follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyonne N L Zonneveld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailored to primary care patients and provided by a secondary community mental-health service reaching out into primary care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effectiveness of this training was explored in a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, 162 patients with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or as chronic pain disorder were randomized either to the training or a waiting list. Both lasted 13 weeks. The preservation of the training's effect was analyzed in non-randomized follow-ups, for which the waiting group started the training after the waiting period. All patients attended the training were followed-up after three months and again after one year. The primary outcomes were the physical and the mental summary scales of the SF-36. Secondary outcomes were the other SF-36-scales and the SCL-90-R. The courses of the training's effects in the randomized controlled trial and the follow-ups were analyzed with linear mixed modeling. In the randomized controlled trial, the training had a significantly positive effect on the quality of life in the physical domain (Cohen's d = 0.38;p = .002, but this overall effect was not found in the mental domain. Regarding the secondary outcomes, the training resulted in reporting an improved physical (Cohen's d = 0.43;p = 0.01, emotional (Cohen's d = 0.44;p = 0.01, and social (Cohen's d = 0.36;p = 0.01 functioning, less pain and better functioning despite pain (Cohen's d = 0.51;p =

  9. A 7-year follow-up of multidisciplinary rehabilitation among chronic neck and back pain patients. Is sick leave outcome dependent on psychologically derived patient groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Gunnar; Bergström, Cecilia; Hagberg, Jan; Bodin, Lennart; Jensen, Irene

    2010-04-01

    A valid method for classifying chronic pain patients into more homogenous groups could be useful for treatment planning, that is, which treatment is effective for which patient, and as a marker when evaluating treatment outcome. One instrument that has been used to derive subgroups of patients is the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate a classification method based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, to predict sick leave among chronic neck and back pain patients for a period of 7 years after vocational rehabilitation. As hypothesized, dysfunctional patients (DYS), according to the MPI-S, showed a higher amount of sickness absence and disability pension expressed in days than adaptive copers (AC) during the 7-years follow-up period, even when adjusting for sickness absence prior to rehabilitation (355.8days, 95% confidence interval, 71.7; 639.9). Forty percent of DYS patients and 26.7% of AC patients received disability pension during the follow-up period. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Further analyses showed that the difference between patient groups was most pronounced among patients with more than 60days of sickness absence prior to rehabilitation. Cost-effectiveness calculations indicated that the DYS patients showed an increase in production loss compared to AC patients. The present study yields support for the prognostic value of this subgroup classification method concerning long-term outcome on sick leave following this type of vocational rehabilitation.

  10. A randomized, controlled trial of group cognitive-behavioral therapy for compulsive buying disorder: posttreatment and 6-month follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Astrid; Mueller, Ulrike; Silbermann, Andrea; Reinecker, Hans; Bleich, Stefan; Mitchell, James E; de Zwaan, Martina

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial comparing the efficacy of a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention designed for the treatment of compulsive buying disorder to a waiting list control (WLC) group. Thirty-one patients with compulsive buying problems according to the criteria developed by McElroy et al. were assigned to receive active treatment (12 weekly sessions and 6-month follow-up) and 29 to the WLC group. The treatment was specifically aimed at interrupting and controlling the problematic buying behavior, establishing healthy purchasing patterns, restructuring maladaptive thoughts and negative feelings associated with shopping and buying, and developing healthy coping skills. Primary outcome measures were the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS), the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Shopping Version (YBOCS-SV), and the German Compulsive Buying Scale (G-CBS). Secondary outcome measures were the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), and the Saving Inventory-Revised (SI-R). The study was completed between November 2003 and May 2007 at the University Hospital of Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences between the CBT and the WLC groups on the primary outcome variables (outcome-by-time-by-group effect, Pillai's trace, F = 6.960, df = 1, p = .002). The improvement was maintained during the 6-month follow-up. The treatment did not affect other psychopathology, e.g., compulsive hoarding, impulsivity, or SCL-90-R scores. We found that lower numbers of visited group therapy sessions and higher pretreatment hoarding traits as measured with the SI-R total score were significant predictors for nonresponse. The results suggest that a disorder-specific cognitive-behavioral intervention can significantly impact compulsive buying behavior.

  11. First on-line survey of an international multidisciplinary working group (MightyMedic) on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, C; D'Alessandri, G; Petta, A; Harada-Shiba, M; Julius, U; Soran, H; Moriarty, P M; Romeo, S; Drogari, E; Jaeger, B R

    2015-05-01

    The MightyMedic (Multidisciplinary International Group for Hemapheresis TherapY and MEtabolic DIsturbances Contrast) Working Group has been founded in 2013. The leading idea was to establish an international network of interdisciplinary nature aimed at working to cross national borders research projects, clinical trials, educational initiatives (meetings, workshops, summer schools) in the field of metabolic diseases, namely hyperlipidemias, and diabetes, preventive cardiology, and atherosclerosis. Therapeutic apheresis, its indications and techniques, is a parallel field of investigation. The first on-line survey of the Group has been completed in the first half of 2014. The survey included # 24 Centers in Italy, Germany, Greece, UK, Sweden, Japan and USA. Relevant data have been collected on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias. 240 subjects with hyperlipidemia and treated with lipoprotein apheresis have been reported in the survey, but a large percentage of patients (35%) who could benefit from this therapeutic option are still treated by conventional drug approach. Genetic molecular diagnosis is performed in only 33% of patients while Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is included in cardiovascular disease risk assessment in 71% of participating Centers. New detailed investigations and prospective multicenter studies are needed to evaluate changes induced by the impact of updated indications and strategies, as well as new treatment options, targeting standardization of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches.

  12. Resource-enhancing group intervention against depression at workplace: who benefits? A randomised controlled study with a 7-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, Kirsi; Vuori, Jukka; Toppinen-Tanner, Salla; Mutanen, Pertti; Honkonen, Teija

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether participation in a structured resource-enhancing group intervention at work would act as primary prevention against depression. The authors analysed whether the intervention resulted in universal, selected or indicated prevention. A total of 566 persons participated in a prospective, within-organisation, randomly assigned field experimental study, which consisted of 34 workshops in 17 organisations. The participants filled in a questionnaire, were randomly assigned to either intervention (n=296) or comparison (n=324) groups and returned another questionnaire 7 months later. The intervention, lasting four half-day sessions, was delivered by trainers from occupational health services and human resources. The aim of the structured programme was to enhance participants' career management preparedness by strengthening self-efficacy and inoculation against setbacks. The comparison group received a literature package. The authors measured depressive symptoms using the short version of the Beck Depression Inventory. A high number of depressive symptoms (over 9 points) were used as a proxy for depression. At follow-up, the odds of depression were lower in the intervention group (OR=0.40, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.85) than in the comparison group when adjusted for baseline depressive symptoms, job strain and socio-demographics. In addition, the odds of depression among those with job strain (OR=0.15, 95% CI 0.03-0.81) at baseline were lower after the intervention. The intervention had no statistically significant effect on those with depressive symptoms (over 4 points) at baseline. The resource-enhancing group intervention appeared to be successful as universal and selective prevention of potential depression.

  13. Predicting the outcome of a cognitive-behavioral group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: a one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonneveld Lyonne NL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT is effective for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS, some therapists in clinical practice seem to believe that CBT outcome will diminish if psychiatric comorbidity is present. The result is that patients with a psychiatric comorbidity are redirected from treatment for UPS into treatment for mental health problems. To explore whether this selection and allocation are appropriate, we explored whether CBT outcomes in UPS could be predicted by variables assessed at baseline and used in routine-practice assessments. Methods Patients (n=162 with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or chronic pain disorder were followed up until one year after they had attended a CBT group training. The time-points of the follow-up were at the end of CBT (immediate outcome, three months after CBT (short-term outcome, and one year after CBT (long-term outcome. CBT outcome was measured using the Physical Component Summary of the SF-36, which was the primary outcome measure in the randomized controlled trial that studied effectiveness of the CBT group training. Predictors were: 1. psychological symptoms (global severity score of SCL-90, 2. personality-disorder characteristics (sum of DSM-IV axis II criteria confirmed, 3. psychiatric history (past presence of DSM-IV axis I disorders, and 4. health-related quality of life in the mental domain (mental component summary of SF-36. The effect of this predictor set was explored using hierarchical multiple regression analyses into which these predictors had been entered simultaneously, after control for: a. pretreatment primary outcome scores, b. age, c. gender, d. marital status, and e. employment. Results The predictor set was significant only for short-term CBT outcome, where it explained 15% of the variance. A better outcome was predicted by more psychological symptoms, fewer personality-disorder characteristics, the presence of a psychiatric

  14. Using Videotapes to Study the Construction of Mathematical Knowledge by Individual Children Working in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes research project utilizing video cameras to record behavior while students worked on a combinatorics task in second grade and five months later when they were in third grade. Results describe student development of new mathematical ideas over an extended period of time. Authors argue that videotaping can play an important role in making…

  15. Randomized-controlled trial of mindfulness-based cancer recovery versus supportive expressive group therapy among distressed breast cancer survivors (MINDSET): long-term follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Linda E; Tamagawa, Rie; Stephen, Joanne; Drysdale, Elaine; Zhong, Lihong; Speca, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Mindfulness-based cancer recovery (MBCR) and supportive expressive group therapy (SET) are two well-validated psychosocial interventions, but they have not been directly compared, and little is known about long-term outcomes. This comparative effectiveness study measured the effects of these two interventions immediately following the groups and for 1 year thereafter in distressed breast cancer survivors. Two hundred fifty-two distressed Stage I-III breast cancer survivors were randomized into either MBCR or SET. Women completed questionnaires addressing mood, stress symptoms, quality of life, social support, spirituality and post-traumatic growth before and after the interventions, and 6 and 12 months later. Immediately following the intervention, women in MBCR reported greater reduction in mood disturbance (primarily fatigue, anxiety and confusion) and stress symptoms including tension, sympathetic arousal and cognitive symptoms than those in SET. They also reported increased emotional and functional quality of life, emotional, affective and positive social support, spirituality (feelings of peace and meaning in life) and post-traumatic growth (appreciation for life and ability to see new possibilities) relative to those in SET, who also improved to a lesser degree on many outcomes. Effect sizes of the time × group interactions were small to medium, and most benefits were maintained over 12 months of follow-up. This study is the first and largest to demonstrate sustained benefits of MBCR in distressed breast cancer survivors relative to an active control. MBCR was superior to SET for improving psychological well-being with lasting benefits over 1 year, suggesting these women gained long-lasting and efficacious tools to cope with cancer. Registered on clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00390169, October 2006. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Results of the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group XIV protocol for classical osteosarcoma: 63 patients with a minimum follow-up of 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeland, Sigbjørn; Bruland, Oyvind S; Hjorth, Lars; Brosjö, Otte; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Osterlundh, Gustaf; Jakobson, Ake; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Monge, Odd R; Björk, Olle; Alvegaard, Thor A

    2011-04-01

    The Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) XIV protocol is based on experience from previous SSG trials and other osteosarcoma intergroup trials, and has been considered the best standard of care for patients with extremity localized, non-metastatic osteosarcoma. We analyzed the outcome in 63 consecutive patients. Patients and methods From 2001 through 2005, 63 patients recruited from centers in Sweden, Norway, and Finland were included. They received preoperative chemotherapy consisting of 2 cycles of paired methotrexate (12 g/m²), cisplatin (90 mg/m²), and doxorubicin (75 mg/m²). 3 cycles were administered postoperatively, and poor histological responders were given 3 additional cycles of ifosfamide (10-12 g/m²) as a salvage strategy. With a median follow-up of 77 months for survivors, the estimated metastasis-free and sarcoma-related survival at 5 years was 70% and 76%, respectively. 53 patients were treated with limb salvage surgery or rotationplasty and 2 patients experienced a local recurrence. 3 toxic deaths were recorded, all related to acute toxicity from chemotherapy. The 5-year metastasis-free survival of poor histological responders receiving add-on treatment with ifosfamide was 47%, as compared to 89% for good histological responders. Outcome from the SSG XIV protocol compares favorably with the results of previous SSG trials and other published osteosarcoma trials. However, salvage therapy given to poor responders did not improve outcome to a similar degree as for good responders. In a multi-institutional setting, more than four-fifths of the patients were operated with limb salvage surgery or rotationplasty, with few local recurrences.

  17. Scars. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This 40-minute videotape tackles the issue of childhood bullying and unwanted teasing and torment. This videotape features real school children handling dramatic roles, and "doing the right thing" (aka "positive modeling.") The film is divided into two distinct parts: first act themes include bullying, girl bullies, children without one or both…

  18. Continued benefit of coronary stenting versus balloon angioplasty: one-year clinical follow-up of Benestent trial. Benestent Study Group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Miguel (Carlos); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.N. Ruygrok (Peter); H. Suryapranata (Harry); S. Klugmann (Silvio); P. Urban (Philip); P. den Heijer (Peter); K. Koch (Karel); R. Simon (Rudiger); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); P.A. Crean (Peter); J.J.R.M. Bonnier (Hans); W. Wijns (William); N. Danchin (Nicolas); C. Bourdonnec (Claude); M-A.M. Morel (Marie-Angèle); E.G. Mast (Gijs)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. This study sought to determine the 1-year clinical follow-up of patients included in the Benestent trial. Background. The Benestent trial is a randomized study comparing elective Palmaz-Schatz stent implantation with balloon angioplasty in patients with stable angina and a de

  19. Follow-up in Childhood Functional Constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Line; Walsted, Anne-Mette; Rittig, Charlotte Siggaard;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Guidelines recommend close follow-up during treatment of childhood functional constipation. Only sparse evidence exists on how follow-up is best implemented. Our aim was to evaluate if follow-up by phone or self-management through web-based information improved treatment outcomes....... METHODS: In this randomized, controlled trial, conducted in secondary care, 235 children, aged 2-16 years, who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of childhood constipation, were assigned to one of three follow-up regimens: (I) control group (no scheduled contact), (II) phone group (2 scheduled phone contacts......: Improved self-management behavior caused by access to self-motivated web-based information induced faster short-term recovery during treatment of functional constipation. Patient empowerment rather than health care promoted follow-up might be a step towards more effective treatment for childhood...

  20. Seven-year follow-up on 334 patients treated by breast conserving surgery and short course radical postoperative radiotherapy: a report of the Yorkshsire Breast Cancer Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ash, D.V. [Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Benson, E.A. [Leeds General Infirmary (United Kingdom); Sainsbury, J.R. [Royal Infirmary, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Round, C.; Head, C. [Yorkshire Clinical Trials and Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    A total of 334 patients have been entered into a prospective protocol of breast conserving treatment, which consisted of clinically complete excision, axillary dissection, and radical post-operative radiotherapy given in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. After 7 years` follow-up, 22 patients (6.6%) have had an isolated local recurrence and 24 (7.2%) a local recurrence associated with metastatic disease. Cosmetic assessment shows that patients are more satisfied with the result than their treating consultants, and that 81% have scored themselves as having an excellent or very good result more than 5 years after treatment. (author).

  1. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients’ Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kai-Jo Chiang; Tsai-Hui Chen; Hsiu-Tsu Hsieh; Jui-Chen Tsai; Keng-Liang Ou; Kuei-Ru Chou

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year) effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT) on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT) or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group) and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression In...

  2. A randomized, controlled clinical trial of standard, group and brief cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia: a two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, André; Roberge, Pasquale; Primiano, Sandra; Germain, Vanessa

    2009-12-01

    A randomized controlled clinical trial with a wait-list control group was conducted to examine the effectiveness of three modalities (brief, group, and standard) of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants meeting DSM-IV criteria were randomly assigned to each treatment condition: a 14-session standard CBT (n=33), a 14-session group CBT (n=35) and a 7-session brief CBT (n=32). Participants received a self-study manual and were assigned weekly readings and exercises. The results indicate that regardless of the treatment condition, CBT for moderate to severe PDA is beneficial in medium and long term. To this effect, all three-treatment conditions significantly reduced the intensity of symptoms, increased participants' quality of life, offered high effect sizes, superior maintenance of gains over time, and lower rates of relapse, compared to the wait-list control.

  3. Game-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (GB-CBT) Group Program for Children Who Have Experienced Sexual Abuse: A Three-Month Follow-Up Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Craig; Misurell, Justin R.; Hiller, Atara

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a game-based cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for addressing problems typically found among elementary school-aged victims of child sexual abuse immediately after treatment and at three months following treatment. It was hypothesized that positive gains would be observed among the following domains:…

  4. Effective group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: A randomized controlled trial with a non-randomized one-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.N.L. Zonneveld (Lyonne); Y.R. van Rood (Yanda); R. Timman (Reinier); C.G. Kooiman (Cornelis); A. van 't Spijker (Adriaan); J.J. van Busschbach (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS) is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailore

  5. Game-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (GB-CBT) Group Program for Children Who Have Experienced Sexual Abuse: A Three-Month Follow-Up Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Craig; Misurell, Justin R.; Hiller, Atara

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a game-based cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for addressing problems typically found among elementary school-aged victims of child sexual abuse immediately after treatment and at three months following treatment. It was hypothesized that positive gains would be observed among the following domains:…

  6. Seven-Year Follow-Up Study of Symptoms in Asylum Seekers and Refugees With PTSD Treated With Trauma-Focused Groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drožđek, B; Kamperman, A.M.; Tol, W.A.; Knipscheer, Jeroen; Kleber, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine sustainability of symptom outcomes of a 1-year phase-based trauma-focused, multimodal, and multicomponent group therapy in a day treatment program for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) over an average period of 7 years. METHOD: Iranian and Afghan patients (N = 69) were asses

  7. Outcome of Home-Based Early Intervention for Autism in Sri Lanka: Follow-Up of a Cohort and Comparison with a Nonintervention Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemamali Perera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the outcome of a home-based autism intervention program (HBAIP in 18- to 40-month-old children newly diagnosed and treatment naïve. Intervention was exclusively implemented at home. Outcome was measured at 3 months and 6 months after intervention and compared with a group of newly diagnosed children with autism who were >40 months at intake but had not received any autism specific clinical management. Aim was also to estimate whether natural development would contribute to gain in skills and compare with the effect of intervention. Five selected parameters of behavior representing social interaction and social communication were used to assess outcome. Results showed a statistically significant improvement between preintervention and postintervention in all the measured parameters. The effect size was large when compared to preintervention and gains were indicated by changes in mean scores and p values within a narrow confidence interval. Highest gains were in first 3 months of postintervention which continued up to 6 months. Although the comparison group was more advanced in the measured skills at intake, they were significantly below the level reached by experimental group at 3 months and 6 months after intervention. This study was registered in the Sri Lanka Clinical Trials Registry (SLCTR/2009/011.

  8. Benefits of extensive recruitment effort persist during follow-ups and are consistent across age group and survey method. The TRAILS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nederhof Esther

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive recruitment effort at baseline increases representativeness of study populations by decreasing non-response and associated bias. First, it is not known to what extent increased attrition occurs during subsequent measurement waves among subjects who were hard-to-recruit at baseline and what characteristics the hard-to-recruit dropouts have compared to the hard-to-recruit retainers. Second, it is unknown whether characteristics of hard-to-recruit responders in a prospective population based cohort study are similar across age group and survey method. Methods First, we compared first wave (T1 easy-to-recruit with hard-to-recruit responders of the TRacking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS, a prospective population based cohort study of Dutch (preadolescents (at first wave: n = 2230, mean age = 11.09 (SD 0.56, 50.8% girls, with regard to response rates at subsequent measurement waves. Second, easy-to-recruit and hard-to-recruit participants at the fourth TRAILS measurement wave (n = 1881, mean age = 19.1 (SD 0.60, 52.3% girls were compared with fourth wave non-responders and earlier stage drop-outs on family composition, socioeconomic position (SEP, intelligence (IQ, education, sociometric status, substance use, and psychopathology. Results First, over 60% of the hard-to-recruit responders at the first wave were retained in the sample eight years later at the fourth measurement wave. Hard-to-recruit dropouts did not differ from hard-to-recruit retainers. Second, extensive recruitment efforts for the web based survey convinced a population of nineteen year olds with similar characteristics as the hard-to-recruit eleven year olds that were persuaded to participate in a school-based survey. Some characteristics associated with being hard-to-recruit (as compared to being easy-to-recruit were more pronounced among non-responders, resembling the baseline situation (De Winter et al.2005

  9. Effect of enzyme replacement therapy on isokinetic strength for all major muscle groups in four patients with Pompe disease-a long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Christer Swan; Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Vissing, John; Andersen, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Pompe disease is a rare, inherited metabolic myopathy characterized by progressive weakness of the proximal limb and respiratory muscles. We report the findings from four patients with late-onset Pompe disease treated with α-glucosidase (Myozyme) for 2 (n=2) and 6 (n=2) years, and monitored with isokinetic dynamometry, 6-minute walking test (6MWT), and vital capacity. Patients were evaluated after 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72months. In two patients, muscle size estimated by MRI and DXA scanning was also performed prior to and following 6months of treatment. After 2years of α-glucosidase treatment, maximal isokinetic muscle strength increased by 11% (0%-50%) [median (range)] and 6MWT improved by 18% (2%-40%). In the two patients treated for 6years, the increase in muscle strength stabilized at 40% and 6MWT stabilized at 32%. The improvements primarily occurred during the first 6months of treatment. Interestingly, the weakest muscle groups seemed to benefit more than those less affected, and greater improvements occurred for flexor muscles compared to extensor muscles. Vital capacity did not improve on treatment.

  10. One-year follow-up on the safety and efficacy of isoprinosine for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Scandinavian Isoprinosine Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, S; Pedersen, C; Sandström, E;

    1992-01-01

    The safety and clinical impact of isoprinosine in HIV-infected individuals were assessed in a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, 24-week study phase, followed by an optional 24-week open treatment phase. The results of the double-blind phase have been reported. Of 866 HIV-seropositive patient...... receiving zidovudine or PCP prophylaxis in the latter group. No severe adverse reactions or toxicities were observed. We conclude that HIV-seropositive patients without AIDS may be safely and effectively treated with isoprinosine.......The safety and clinical impact of isoprinosine in HIV-infected individuals were assessed in a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, 24-week study phase, followed by an optional 24-week open treatment phase. The results of the double-blind phase have been reported. Of 866 HIV-seropositive patients...... assigned placebo progressed to AIDS (P = 0.005). Intention-to-treat analysis showed identical results. Viewing the open treatment phase in isolation revealed no difference in progression rates between those treated and those not receiving the drug, perhaps reflecting the higher proportion of patients...

  11. Predictors of engagement in the Alcoholics Anonymous group or to psychotherapy among Brazilian alcoholics : a six-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Mauro Barbosa; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Figueira, Ivan; Athayde, Luciana Dias; Palermo, Luiz Henrique; Tergolina, Letícia Piccoli; Rovani, Joana Stela; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2007-06-01

    To ascertain factors associated with engagement of patients with alcohol dependence in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) groups and psychotherapy. About 300 hospitalized alcoholics were interviewed at hospitalization and again 3 and 6 months thereafter. Assessment included the administration of standardized instruments. Determinants of engagement in both interventions were assessed through logistic regression analysis. Higher educational level was predictive of engagement in AA after 6 months (OR = 2.19; CI 1.08-4.41). Engagement in psychotherapy after 6 months was related to having a university degree (OR = 3.60; CI 1.6-7.9), to a co-morbid depressive disorder (OR = 3.47; CI 1.8-6.5), to the use of other drugs together with alcohol (OR = 3.08; CI 1.5-6.19), to previous treatment (OR = 2.87; CI 1.29-6.40), and to having a high school degree (OR = 2.44; CI 1.24-4.80). The presence of substance-induced anxiety disorder was associated with non-engagement in psychotherapy (OR = 0.27; CI 0.63-0.003). The identification of predictors of engagement is important to guide clinicians in the choice of the treatment strategies that are more likely to be successful.

  12. Grupo terapêutico para tabagistas: resultados após seguimento de dois anos Therapeutic group for smokers: results after two-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cruz Soares de Azevedo

    2009-01-01

    service. METHODS: One hundred and seventy one smokers were evaluated for treatment in the Therapeutic Group (TG of the Service of Psychoactive Substances. We evaluated sociodemographic variables, history of smoking, presence of medical comorbidity and psychiatric symptoms, initial and late outcomes (median 25 months, by telephone contact. Frequency analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis were used, with a significance level of 5% for associated factors. RESULTS: Most patients were female (73.4%, married (48%, had basic education (74.6%, were working (57%; 65.2% started to smoke before the age of 15, 63.8% smoked for more than thirty years, 76% already had tried to stop smoking, 46.2% had severe dependence, 72.1% had medical comorbidity and 36% presented psychiatric symptoms. The service was sought by 51%, mainly concerned with health. During treatment, 79.1% stopped smoking. After 25 months, 62% remained abstinent. The variable associated with failure of smoking cessation was the presence of psychiatric symptoms. Variables related to relapse were psychiatric symptoms and lesser attendance at Motivation Group sessions. There was an association between clinical comorbidity and years of smoking and years of inactivity CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the importance of understanding the profile of the subjects to evaluate strategies employed and adequacy of treatment proposed for smokers to improve the rates of smoking cessation and reduce rates of relapse.

  13. Effectiveness of Multidisciplinary Group-Based Intervention versus Individual Physiotherapy for Improving Chronic Low Back Pain in Nursing Staff: A Clinical Trial with 3- and 6-Month Follow-Up Visits from Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyani, Leila; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Wagner, Joan

    2017-06-01

    Clinical trial. To evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group-based intervention on improving pain and disability among Iranian nurses with chronic low back pain in Tehran, Iran. Although low back pain (LBP) is one of the most important health problems, the challenge remains on how to find an effective intervention to reduce pain and related disabilities. Overall, 136 eligible nurses with chronic mechanical LBP were classified into two groups. The intervention group (n=66 participants) participated in a physiotherapy educational program (for 120 minutes) plus a health educational program based on predictive constructs of the social cognitive theory (for 120 minutes). These interventions were delivered by a physiotherapist and a health education specialist. The control group (n=70 participants) participated in a physiotherapy educational program (for 120 minutes). Disability rate, pain severity, and back pain prevention behavior were measured initially and at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits using the visual analogue scale, Roland-Morris Disability, and Nursing Low Back Pain Preventive Behaviors Questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver. 16. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the main outcome measures immediately after the educational program and at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Preventive behaviors of participants in the intervention group were improved at 3- and 6- month follow-up visits (ppreventive behaviors in the intervention group were improved after 3 and 6 months (p<0.001). Finally, in the intervention group, pain severity and disability were decreased significantly. This study showed that a multidisciplinary educational program intervention can be an effective approach for reducing LBP and related disabilities among nurses.

  14. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  15. The impact of a clinic-based educational videotape on knowledge and treatment behavior of men with gonorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, M Z; DeJong, W

    1988-01-01

    The impact of a ten-minute, soap opera-style videotape on knowledge and treatment behavior of black men with gonorrhea was tested in randomized clinical trials. The videotape, shown to individual patients after diagnosis, produced a sizeable increase in the percentage of patients who returned for their test-of-cure examination: while only 43.3% of control group patients returned, 53.5% of those in the videotape group did so; chi 2(1) = 9.0; P less than 0.003. In a follow-up study, similar results were found: videotape group (59.0%), control group (39.1%); chi 2(1) = 6.2; P less than 0.015. The videotape also produced large, significant increases in patient knowledge, as measured by a test administered during patients' clinic visit (P less than 0.0001). No measureable effect of the videotape was detected on patients' willingness to refer sexual contacts for treatment. The findings suggest that clinic-based educational materials, particularly soap opera-style videotapes that engender audience identification, create emotional significance for the viewer, and model requisite communication skills, may have a significant role to play in control of sexually transmitted diseases.

  16. A FOLLOW UP STUDY OF HYSTERIA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, N.N.; Mangalwedhe, K.; Bedi, Harminder; Murthy, R. Srinivas

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study undertook to examine the outcome of a group of cases who were diagnosed as hysteria, six or more years ago in a general hospital psychiatric unit and correlate various clinical factors with good or bad outcome. Of the 81 cases selected for the study, 57 (67%) could be located and followed up after a gap of 6-8 years. Majority of the cases (74%) had either no symptoms or symptoms less than before at the time of the follow up. In only 3 cases, there was evidence of an underlying organic illness which seemed to have been missed at the initial assessment. A new sub-classification of hysteria with glossary of terms used for this study is presented for future research work. PMID:21965899

  17. A single group follow-up study of non-surgical patients seen by physiotherapists working in expanded roles in orthopaedic departments: recall of recommendations, change in exercise and self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKay Crystal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specially trained physiotherapists (advanced practice physiotherapists (APP are working in orthopaedic clinics to improve access to orthopaedic services and support chronic disease management. Little attention has been paid to the impact APPs may have on non-surgical patients. In non-surgical patients with hip or knee arthritis consulting an APP in an orthopaedic clinic, the objectives were to: 1 describe patients’ recall of APP recommendations, use of self-management strategies, and barriers to management six weeks following consultation; and, 2 compare exercise behaviour and self-efficacy at baseline and six weeks. Findings This was a single group pre-and post-intervention study of patients who saw an APP when consulting the orthopaedic departments of two hospitals. At baseline and six weeks participants completed the adapted Stanford Exercise Behaviour Scale (response options: none,  3 hours/week, and the Chronic Disease Self-efficacy Scale (range 1–10; higher scores indicate higher self-efficacy. At follow-up participants completed questions on recall of APP recommendations, use of self-management strategies and barriers to management. Seventy three non-surgical patients with hip or knee arthritis participated, a response rate of 89% at follow-up. Seventy one percent of patients reported that the APP recommended exercise, of whom 83% reported exercising to manage their arthritis since the visit. Almost 50% reported an increase in time spent stretching; over 40% reported an increase in time spent walking or doing strengthening exercises at follow-up. Common barriers to arthritis management were time, cost and other health problems. Mean chronic disease self-efficacy scores significantly improved from 6.3 to 7.2 (p  Conclusions This pilot study of an APP intervention for non-surgical patients referred for orthopaedic consultation showed promising results, particularly for enhancing use of conservative management

  18. Indium-111-monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies after the first year of heart transplantation. Identification of risk groups for developing rejection during long-term follow-up and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, M.; Obrador, D.; Carrio, I.; Auge, J.M.; Moya, C.; Pons-Llado, G.; Caralps-Riera, J.M. (Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain))

    1990-12-01

    The long-term clinical course and results of biopsies in 21 patients studied with monoclonal antimyosin antibodies more than 12 months after heart transplantation according to the presence and degree of antimyosin-antibody uptake is described. Eighteen men and three women aged 20-52 years (39 +/- 9 years) were studied with antimyosin antibodies 12-40 months (mean, 22 +/- 9 months) after heart transplantation, and followed for a mean of 18 months (10-28 months). The number of biopsies performed during follow-up was 102. Results showed normal antimyosin-antibody studies in nine patients and abnormal studies in 12 patients. Myocyte damage was identified in 18 of the 102 biopsies (17.6%), one in the normal antimyosin-antibody group of patients and 17 in those patients with myocardial antimyosin-antibody uptake. Patients who developed rejection comprised 11% and 67% of each respective group; the mean number of rejection episodes per patient was 0.11 +/- 0.33 and 1.41 +/- 1.41, respectively (p less than 0.01). A trend was noted by which higher heart-to-lung ratios were associated with greater probability of rejection. Conclusively, (1) antimyosin-antibody studies performed after more than 1 year after heart transplantation indicate the presence and level of rejection activity, (2) groups of patients at risk for developing rejection at biopsy during long-term follow-up may be detected by antimyosin-antibody study, and (3) surveillance for rejection and the degree of immunosuppression should be tailored to meet individual patient needs.

  19. Congenital and acquired neutropenias consensus guidelines on therapy and follow-up in childhood from the Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group of the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioredda, Francesca; Calvillo, Michaela; Bonanomi, Sonia; Coliva, Tiziana; Tucci, Fabio; Farruggia, Piero; Pillon, Marta; Martire, Baldassarre; Ghilardi, Roberta; Ramenghi, Ugo; Renga, Daniela; Menna, Giuseppe; Pusiol, Anna; Barone, Angelica; Gambineri, Eleonora; Palazzi, Giovanni; Casazza, Gabriella; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo

    2012-02-01

    The management of congenital and acquired neutropenias presents some differences according to the type of the disease. Treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is not standardized and scanty data are available on the best schedule to apply. The frequency and the type of longitudinal controls in patients affected with neutropenias are not usually discussed in the literature. The Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group (MFSG) of the Associazione Italiana di Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) elaborated this document following design and methodology formerly approved by the AIEOP board. The panel of experts reviewed the literature on the topic and participated in a conference producing a document that includes recommendations on neutropenia treatment and timing of follow-up.

  20. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    NASA ADAP funds, which are not allowed to fund a major observational follow-up campaign. So here we propose a campaign of follow-up observations that will turn the unique, growing catalog of Disk Detective disk candidates into a reliable, publically-available treasure trove of new data on nearby disks in time to complement the upcoming new catalogs of planet hosts and stellar moving groups. We will use automated adaptive optics (AO) instruments to image disk candidates and check them for contamination from background objects. We will correlate our discoveries with the vast Gaia and LAMOST surveys to study disks in associations with other young stars. We will follow up disk candidates spectroscopically to remove more false positives. We will search for cold dust around our disk candidates with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) and analyze data from the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) to image young, nearby disk candidates. This follow up work will realize the full potential of the WISE mission as a roadmap to future exoplanet discoveries. It will yield contamination rates that will be crucial for interpreting all disk searches done with WISE. Our search will yield 2000 well-vetted nearby disks, including 60 that the Gaia mission will likely find to contain giant planets. This crucial follow-up work should be done now to take full advantage of Gaia during JWST's planned lifetime.

  1. Shelf acetabuloplasty for Perthes' disease: 12-year follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, I.C.M. van der; Kooijman, H.M.; Spruit, M.; Anderson, P.G.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2001-01-01

    The goal of all therapies for Perthes' disease is to achieve an optimal shape of the acetabulum and an optimal coverage of the femoral head. Thirty patients who were included in this follow-up study (mean follow-up 12 years) underwent a shelf acetabuloplasty for Catterall group III or IV. The mean I

  2. The Kepler follow-up observation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier...[], T.N.; Batalha, N.M.; Borucki, W. J.;

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both...... that have been selected for follow-up. A preliminary estimate indicates that between 24% and 62% of planetary candidates selected for follow-up will turn out to be true planets....

  3. Prognosis in glomerulonephritis. A follow-up study of 395 consecutive, biopsy-verified cases. I. Classification, renal histology and outcome. Report from a Copenhagen study group of renal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, M; Balsløv, J T; Brun, C; Gerstoft, J; Jørgensen, F; Jørgensen, H E; Larsen, M; Larsen, S; Lorenzen, I; Løber, M

    1985-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1977, 395 consecutive cases of glomerulonephritis (GN) were collected by a Copenhagen study group. The diagnosis was established by histological and biochemical criteria. Light microscopy investigations of thin silver-stained sections were applied. In a follow-up in 1980 all cases were categorized by one of the following end points: death without uremia, uremia, recovery, or censored cases. The course is presented in figures showing the cumulated distribution of outcomes in relation to observation time. Each histological subgroup of GN had its own characteristic course with respect to initial rates of changes in the renal state, as well as to frequency of recovery, uremia and death. The prognosis was good in minimal changes GN and proliferative GN, bad in unclassified GN and worst in extracapillary GN. When part of a connective tissue disease, GN carried a poor prognosis. We conclude that histological classification of GN based on light microscopy offers a reliable means of predicting the long-term prognosis.

  4. Paradoxes of follow-up - health professionals' views on follow-up after surgical treatment in gynecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Lotte; Wittrup, Inge; Petersen, Lone Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    : A qualitative approach was undertaken with semi-structured focus group interviews. Three focus group interviews were conducted at neutral ground. One group with onco-gynecologists, one group with specialist nurses, and one mixed group. The main themes of the interviewguide were: Existing follow-up program, life...... and appraisal from the patients. A disadvantage was the inadequate use of the nurses' main competencies. Some dilemmas were described by the nurses as well as doctors: First, both groups were aware of the existing evidence that attendance of follow-up programs may not improve survival and yet, health...... that the existing follow-up regime contains several dilemmas. According to the health professionals, future follow-up must be more individualized, and a shift in focus is needed from relapse to quality of life after cancer....

  5. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [Murdoch University (Australia); North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [North-West University (South Africa); Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University (Australia); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [North-West University (South Africa); University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [North-West University (South Africa)

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  6. Follow-up utterances in QA dialogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schooten, van Boris; Akker, op den Rieks

    2006-01-01

    The processing of user follow-up utterances by a QA system is a topic which is still in its infant stages, but enjoys growing interest in the QA community. In this paper, we discuss the broader issues related to handling follow-up utterances in a real-life "information kiosk" setting. With help of a

  7. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  8. Seguimiento de los estudiantes que participaron en un programa de orientación vocacional en grupo Follow-up of individual students that participated in a group guidance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Aisenson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available En el marco de la Investigación "Educación para la Orientación: Proyectos y construcción identitaria de jóvenes escolarizados" (UBACyT 2008-2010 se realizó el seguimiento de los jóvenes que participaron en un programa de orientación vocacional en grupos, transcurrido un año. El programa tuvo lugar en la Dirección de Orientación al Estudiante de la Secretaría de Asuntos Académicos en la Universidad de Buenos Aires. El objetivo fue indagar, mediante una encuesta telefónica, qué pensaban los jóvenes acerca de su situación actual y el desarrollo de sus proyectos de estudio y trabajo, y la posible incidencia que ellos consideraban que había tenido en su orientación el trabajo realizado en los grupos. Los resultados muestran que la mayoría de los jóvenes expresaron su satisfacción con la actividad de orientación. Especialmente, valoraron positivamente haber intercambiado con pares cuestiones comunes acerca de su transición, y haber ampliado la información sobre los estudios superiores y el trabajo.In the framework of research on "Education for Guidance: projects and identity construction of secondary school students" (UBACyT 2008-2010, a follow-up of young people who participated in the guidance groups was carried out one year later. The program took place in the Department of Student Orientation (DOE in the University of Buenos Aires. Specifically, it analyzed the way young people felt about their current situation and the development of their study and work projects, with the aim of exploring the possible influence they think the participation in the groups has in their guidance. For this purpose, a telephone survey have been made. The results show that most of young people express their satisfaction with the guidance activity. Specially, they appreciate to discuss about the aspects in common of the transition with others in group, and to broaden the information in order to build their trajectories.

  9. Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS) is used to track, monitor, and report on audits and open recommendations of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM)...

  10. Internet of things and bariatric surgery follow-up: Comparative study of standard and IoT follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Fort, José Manuel; Boleko, Maria Angeles; Hidalgo, Marta; Armengol, Manel

    2013-09-01

    Follow-up of obese patient is difficult. There is no literature related to patient follow-up that incorporates the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), use of WiFi, Internet, or portable devices for this purpose. This prospective observational study commenced in June 2011. Patients were prospectively offered to participate in the IoT study group, in which they received a WiFi scale (Withing®, Paris) that provides instant WiFi data to the patient and surgeon. Other patients were admitted to the standard follow-up group at the outpatient clinic. A total of 33 patients were included in our study (ten in the IoT group). Twelve patients did not have WiFi at home, ten lacked of computer knowledge, and seven preferred standard for follow-up. All patients underwent different surgical procedures. There were no complications. Excess weight loss (EWL) was similar in both groups. More than 90% of patients were satisfied. In the IoT group, patients considered it valuable in saving time, and considered seeing their evolution graphics extremely motivating. IoT technology can monitor medical parameters remotely and collect data. A WiFi scale can facilitate preoperative and follow-up. Standard follow-up in a classical outpatient clinic setting with the surgeon was preferred globally.

  11. Ethnic differences in mortality of male and female patients surviving acute myocardial infarction: long-term follow-up of 5,700 patients. The Secondary Prevention Reinfarction Israeli Nifedipine Trial (SPRINT) Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, D

    1997-10-01

    In migrant countries, ethnic origin may represent a complex of cultural, behavioral and possibly genetic differences. These have been shown to influence acute myocardial infarction (AMI) incidence. How ethnic origin may affect survival after AMI is unknown. Data from 5,692 patients included in the Secondary Prevention Reinfarction Israeli Nifedipine Trial (SPRINT) registry were analyzed. Patients were divided into eight different ethnic groups, according to birthplaces from five continents, representing major socio-economic and possibly some genetic variation. Mortality was analyzed after adjustment for baseline characteristics known to predict death from coronary artery disease (CAD) using Jews born in Israel as a reference. The odds ratio for in-hospital mortality was higher in women than in men, but unrelated to ethnic origin. The odds ratio for men ranged between 1.08 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67-1.73) for Jews born in Eastern Europe and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.07-3.15) for counterparts born in the Middle East. The odds ratio for women ranged between 0.73 in Jews born in Central Europe (95% CI: 0.35-1.50) and 1.45 (95% CI: 0.76-3.15) for Jewish women born in the Balkan countries. Among 4,686 patients surviving the hospital phase, long-term mortality rates (mean follow-up 7.1 +/- 3.5 years) were 43.3% in men and 57.6% in women. Among 3,586 surviving men, the adjusted risk ratios for 10-year mortality varied between 0.92 (95% CI: 0.72-1.18) for men born in Romania and 1.49 (95% CI: 1.07-2.09) for Israeli born Arabs. The variation among men is within the limits of statistical error. However, among 1,100 surviving women, the risk ratio for 10-year mortality differed significantly, from as low as 1.43 (95% CI: 0.84-2.41) in Jewish women born in Central Europe to as high as 2.83 (95% CI: 1.67-4.79) in counterparts born in the Middle East. The latter observations were consistent with the mortality after 3 years. Thus, ethnic origin of Israelis marginally influenced the

  12. The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherina, M S; Azhar, M Z; Mohd Yunus, A; Azlan Hamzah, S A

    2005-08-01

    The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP) is a project where medical students choose a hospital in-ward patient during their clinical ward-based attachments and follow-up this patient's progress after discharge from the hospital. The students do a series of home visits and also accompany their patients for some of their follow-ups at the hospital, government clinics, general practitioners' clinics and even to the palliative care or social welfare centres. The students assess the physical, psychological and social impact of the illness on the patient, family and community. By following their patients from the time their patients were in the hospital and back to their homes and community, the students are able to understand in depth the problems faced by patients, the importance of communication skills in educating patients on their illness and the importance of good communication between primary, secondary and tertiary care.

  13. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Gautier, Thomas N; Borucki, William J; Cochran, William D; Dunham, Edward W; Howell, Steve B; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geo? W; Buchhave, Lars A; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Furesz, Gabor; Isaacson, Howard; MacQueen, Phillip; Mandushev, Georgi; Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both for identification of astrophysical phenomena that mimic planetary transits and for characterization of the true planets and planetary systems found by Kepler. We have developed techniques and protocols for detection of false planetary transits and are currently conducting observations on 177 Kepler targets that have been selected for follow-up. A preliminary estimate indicates that between 24% and 62% of planetary candidates selected for follow-up will turn out to be true planets.

  14. Follow-up of erlotinib related uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Indu; Ali, Kashif; Usman-Saeed, Muniba; Saeed, Muhammad Usman

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the follow-up of a 68-year-old lady with bilateral anterior uveitis secondary to erlotinib. Erlotinib was started and stopped after symptoms and signs suggestive of severe bilateral anterior uveitis were noted. The patient developed signs of a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, 12 days after stopping the erlotinib, and recovered without major problems. The patient also reported intermittent low-grade fever since starting erlotinib which resolved after stopping this drug. No further symptoms of uveitis were noted up to 6 month follow-up. The patient reported improved well being, resolution of ocular symptoms and intermittent low-grade fever at last follow-up (6 months after stopping erlotinib). PMID:22892235

  15. Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn › Stages › In Treatment Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation Originally published on November 10, 2009 Most recently ... will need to be monitored when treatment stops. Rehabilitation Therapist Either the tumor itself or the effects ...

  16. Giant Cholesteatoma : Recommendations for Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geven, Leontien I.; Mulder, Jef J. S.; Graamans, Kees

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the management of five patients who presented with giant recurrent or residual cholesteatoma after periods of 2 to 50 years. Their case histories are highly diverse, but all provide evidence of the need for long-term follow-up.

  17. Nimh Treatment Study of ADHD Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in medication use between 14 and 24 months follow-up on effectiveness (symptom ratings and growth (height and weight measures were analyzed, comparing 4 groups of patients, in the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA reported by the MTA Cooperative Group.

  18. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 3,500 targets and reported more than 16,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center (MPC).The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet is planned for 2017-2018.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA ARM list. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCOGT Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have recently extended the NEOexchange software to include automated data reduction to re-compute the astrometric solution, determine the photometric zeropoint and find moving objects and present these results to the user via

  19. Radiological follow-up of inverted papilloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, P.; Vivarrat-Perrin, L.; Champsaur, P.; Juhan, V.; Chagnaud, C.; Vidal, V.; Gaubert, J.Y.; Bartoli, J.M.; Moulin, G. [Department of Radiology, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Dessi, P.; Zanaret, M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cross-sectional imaging features of recurrent papilloma of the nasal fossa and paranasal sinuses and to evaluate the role of MR and CT in the postoperative follow-up of this lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT of ten patients who presented recurrence of inverted papilloma were reviewed and correlated to initial imaging, endoscopy, and surgical reports. Imaging patterns of recurrent inverted papilloma are identical to those of initial tumors and recurrence location is closely related to the site of the former lesion. Magnetic resonance is more efficient than CT for the diagnosis and evaluation of extensions. Magnetic resonance supplies the deficiencies of endoscopy in case of extensions to the frontal sinus or the lateral recess of the antrum, especially if mucosal hyperplasia or sinusitis is associated. Magnetic resonance imaging is the first imaging modality to perform in the follow-up after removal of inverted papilloma. (orig.)

  20. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...... high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations...

  1. Radiologic findings and follow-up evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Cheol Hyun; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    In esophageal perforation, fistulous tracts commonly occur between the esophagus and mediastinal or pleural spaces, but rarely between the esophagus and bronchi. The clinical manifestations and radiologic findings of esophageal perforation are nonspecfic, and diagnosis is the often delayed; esophagography is the standard technique for evaluation of its location and degree. CT is useful in demonstrating the extraluminal manifestations of esophageal perforation and for follow-up after medical treatment, and may depict the various manifestations of perforation, according to the causes.

  2. 新生儿B族链球菌脑膜炎13例临床分析和随访%Clinical analysis and follow-up of neonatal purulent meningitis caused by group B streptococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱敏丽; 朱将虎; 李海静; 留佩宁; 林振浪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics,antibiotics sensitivity and outcome of group B streptococcus (GBS) meningitis in neonates in order to provide the guide for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.Method A retrospective review was performed and a total of 13 cases of neonatal purulent meningitis caused by GBS were identified in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Yuying Children's Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from January 1,2005 to May 31,2013.The clinical characteristics,antibiotics sensitivity test results and outcome were analyzed.Result Fever,poor feeding,seizure and lethargy were common clinical signs of neonatal purulent meningitis caused by GBS.Three cases of early onset GBS meningitis received prepartum antibiotics.All 13 cases had abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) level,and 11 cases had increased CRP within hours after admission.Of the 13 patients,7 were cured,4 discharged with improvement,2 patients died during hospitalization after being given up because of serious complication.The average length of stay for recovered patients was (47 ±21)d.Acute complications mainly included hyponatremia (5 cases),intracranial hemorrhage (3 cases),ventriculomegaly (3 cases),subdural collection (2 cases),hydrocephalus (2 cases),septic shock (2 cases),cerebral hernia (1 case),encephalomalacia (1 case).One preterm patient with early onset GBS meningitis died 1 month after hospital discharge.Among 7 survivors with 10-24 months follow-up,3 were early onset GBS meningitis,2 with normal results of neurologic examination,1 with delayed motor development,4 were late onset GBS meningitis,1 with normal results of neurologic examination,3 were neurologically impaired with manifestations including delayed motor development (2 cases) and seizures (1 case).All the GBS strains were sensitive to penicillin and linezolid (13/13,10/10),the susceptibility to levofloxacin,ampicillin and vancomycin were 11/12,9/10,8/13 respectively.Conclusion The clinical

  3. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  4. [Telemedicine in pacemaker therapy and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchert, A

    2009-12-01

    Present-day remote systems for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide, in contrast to previous solutions, a broad range of data about the patient and the implanted device ("remote control"). Telemedicine includes remote monitoring as well as remote follow-up: Remote monitoring is the continual interrogation of the device to detect patient- or device-related adverse events earlier than with standard follow-up visits. Remote follow-up aims to replace scheduled and unscheduled face-to-face follow-up visits due to the interrogation of the automatic pacemaker functions. Currently available remote systems, such as Home Monitoring, CareLink, Merlin.net, and Latitude, have in common that they interrogate the device, send these data to a server, and provide the data to the physician on a secured web site. Automatic wireless interrogation of the device is the preferred solution; however, the devices must have been equipped with a micro-antenna, which is usually restricted to more recent pacemaker models. Knowledge about remote control in pacemaker patients is limited, because most remote applications were evaluated in ICD and CRT patients. While the most frequently reported clinical event in pacemaker patients is atrial fibrillation, the impact in routine clinical follow-up still has to be evaluated in detail. Device-related adverse events are rare. Large, long-term, randomized trials are comparing remote and conventional approaches with the aim of demonstrating the benefits of telemedicine in this patient group.

  5. Counselee participation in follow-up breast cancer genetic counselling visits and associations with achievement of the preferred role, cognitive outcomes, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albada, Akke; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the counselee participation in the follow-up visits, compared to the first visits, for breast cancer genetic counselling and to explore associations with counselees' achievement of their preferred role in decision making, information recall, knowledge, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control. First and follow-up visits for breast cancer genetic counselling of 96 counselees of a Dutch genetics center were videotaped (2008-2010). Counselees completed questionnaires before counselling (T1), after the follow-up visit (T2) and one year after the follow-up visit (T3). Consultations were rated with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Counselee participation was measured as the percentage of counselee utterances, the percentage of counselee questions and the interactivity (number of turns per minute). Follow-up visits had higher levels of counselee participation than first visits as assessed by the percentage of counselee talk, the interactivity and counselee questions. More counselee talk in the follow-up visit was related to higher achievement of the preferred role (T2) and higher perceived personal control (T3). Higher interactivity in the follow-up visit was related to lower achievement of the preferred role in decision making and lower information recall (T2). There were no significant associations with the percentage of questions asked and none of the participation measures was related to knowledge, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control (T2). In line with the interviewing admonishment 'talk less and listen more', the only assessment of counselee participation associated to better outcomes is the percentage of counselee talk. High interactivity might be associated with lower recall in breast cancer genetic counselees who are generally highly educated. However, this study was limited by a small sample size and a heterogeneous group of counselees. Research is needed on the interactions

  6. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  7. A follow up study on interstitial alveolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamat S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To study the benefits of steroid therapy in interstitial alveolitis. Method and Materials : One hundred five adult clinic patients were studied with clinical evaluation, chest radiography, CT scan, bronchoscopic lavage, pulmonary function studies and a regular follow up. They were put on daily prednisolone (in 19 on intravenous methyl prednisolone, for several months. Results: Only a few had no cough or dypnoea; 91 cases had atleast gr. III exertional breathlessness; 61(58% had been given steroids earlier and 32(31% were on a prior antitubercular treatment. Only 16% had GERD symptoms. On radiography, interstitial deposits were seen in 102 cases. While 53 cases belonged to idiopathic variety, 41 were sarcoidosis. A majority had poor lung function with a restrictive disability; but 50% showed a significant response (10%+ to bronchodilators. On follow up in 92 cases, 14 died, 8 went in remission; 32 had a fluctuating course. At some stage 66 had showed improvement. Conclusion : A large majority of our interstitial alveolitis cases are very disabled. They show clinical, functional, and radiographic improvement to long term oral prednisolone. In nonresponsive cases, intravenous steroids show an objective response.

  8. Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. A clinical and follow-up study of 62 cases. The Groupe d'Etudes et de Recherche sur les Maladies "Orphelines" Pulmonaires (GERM"O"P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, E; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Lauque, D; Durieu, J; Tonnel, A B; Cordier, J F

    1998-09-01

    patient initially treated for less than 6 months did not relapse, longer oral corticosteroid therapy in no way provided protection from further relapses. We thus propose to try to wean oral corticosteroid therapy after 6 months in patients without severe asthma, because recurrences remain responsive to oral steroids. However, prolonged oral corticosteroid therapy was necessary in the majority of patients, with 68.9% of those followed for more than 1 year still on oral corticosteroid therapy at the last follow-up, either because of relapse or because of severe asthma.

  9. Follow-up Observations of WASP-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutra, Taylor; Boley, Aaron; Hughes, Anna; Hickson, Paul

    2017-06-01

    This ongoing work aims to provide follow-up observations of known transiting extrasolar planets using the 35-cm robotic telescope at The University of British Columbia's Southern Observatory (USO), located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The observations are part of a long-term effort to search for changes in transit signatures, such as transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs), which could indicate, for example, the presence of additional planets. To help characterize the USO for transit searches, we acquired I-band observations of WASP-36 spanning from 17 January 2017 to 27 February 2017. Three complete transits and one partial transit are included in the data. We present the analysis of these new observations and discuss potential future targets.

  10. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: recommendations for management and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (PubMed), using the terms normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism, for articles in English published before 22 November 2012. Literature was reviewed by 2 members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, and after development of recommendations, the manuscript was reviewed by all other members of the Group, and their suggestions were incorporated. The document provides practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. There is however little evidence available about different aspects of this disease, mainly progression rate and clinical impact. More data are therefore needed before definite recommendations may be made. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochemical Engineering Education through Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G. D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The implementation and results of the use of videotapes in introductory biochemical engineering classes are discussed. The topics of the videotapes and the results of a questionnaire about this instructional method are presented. (CW)

  12. Group versus individual cognitive treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: changes in non-OCD symptoms and cognitions at post-treatment and one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloch, Amparo; Cabedo, Elena; Carrió, Carmen; Fernández-Alvarez, Héctor; García, Fernando; Larsson, Christina

    2011-05-15

    Current cognitive approaches postulate that obsessions and compulsions are caused and/or maintained by misinterpretations about their meaning. This assumption has led to the development of cognitive therapeutic (CT) procedures designed to challenge the dysfunctional appraisals and beliefs patients have about their obsessions. Nonetheless, few studies have compared the efficacy of individual and group CT in changing the dysfunctional cognitions that hypothetically underlie Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). In this study, 44 OCD patients were assigned to individual (n=18) or group (n=24) CT. Sixteen completed the individual CT, and 22 completed the group CT. The effects of the two CT conditions on depression and worry tendencies were comparable. Individual treatment was more effective than group treatment in decreasing scores on dysfunctional beliefs (responsibility, overestimation of threat, and intolerance to uncertainty) and the use of suppression as a thought control strategy. The post-treatment changes were maintained one year later. The correlations between symptom improvement (OCD severity change) and belief changes were moderate: in the individual treatment the greatest associations were with beliefs about thoughts (importance and control), whereas in the group treatment the greatest associations were with beliefs related to anxiety in general (threat overestimation and intolerance to uncertainty). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Therapeutic abortion follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, A J; Davison, L A; Hanson, K H; Loos, S A; Mikkelsen, C M

    1971-05-15

    To determine the long-range psychological effects of therapeutic abortion, 50 women (aged from 13-44 years), who were granted abortions between 1967 and 1968 Because of possible impairment of mental and/or physical health, were analyzed by use of demographic questionnaires, psychological tests, and interviews. Testing revealed that 44 women had psychiatric problems at time of abortion. 43 patients were followed for 3-6 months. The follow-up interviews revealed that 29 patients reacted positively after abortion, 10 reported no significant change and 4 reacted negatively. 37 would definitely repeat the abortion. Women under 21 years of age felt substantially more ambivalent and guilty than older patients. A study of 36 paired pre- and post-abortion profiles showed that 15 initially abnormal tests had become normal. There was a significant increase in contraceptive use among the patients after the abortion, but 4 again became pregnant and 8 were apparently without consistent contraception. It is concluded that the abortions were therapeutic, but physicians are encouraged to be aware of psychological problems in abortion cases. Strong psychological and contraceptive counselling should be exercised.

  14. [Renal lithiasis. Biochemical changes in the follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivacow, Francisco R; del Valle, Elisa E; Zancheta, José R

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of assessing if biochemical changes occur in the follow up of patients with renal lithiasis, 237 patients were studied (115 women and 122 men, mean age 39 +/- 8 and 42 +/- 7 years, respectively) and controlled during 27.3 +/- 19.3 months. All of them had previously undergone metabolic evaluations at baseline and one or more than one control studies afterwards. Patients with a diagnosis of sponge kidney, renal tubular acidosis, primary hyperparathyroidism, anatomical malformations of the urinary tract, or urinary infections were not included. Two populations were identified: those who presented changes in the baseline diagnosis (139 patients, Group I) and those who presented no changes (98 patients, Group II). In these groups, no differences were observed in baseline metabolic diagnoses or in the follow-up period. Hypocitraturia was the additional diagnosis most frequently observed (43.1%), followed by Idiopatic hypercalciuria (20.8%) and abnormalities of uric acid (16.5%). In the group of 110 patients followed up for more than 3 years, 37 patients recurred (33%). Among the latter, 25 (23%) changed the baseline metabolic diagnosis vs. 12 (11%) that maintained the same diagnosis (p < 0.002). Changes in metabolic disorders were frequently observed in the follow up of patients with nephrolithiasis. These changes are not necessarily associated with the diet indicated or drug treatment. Hypocitraturia was the additional metabolic disorder most frequently found. In general, there is a higher recurrence rate in those patients who present changes in their biochemical parameters and undergo no treatment.

  15. Earthquake and Schools. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC.

    Designing schools to make them more earthquake resistant and protect children from the catastrophic collapse of the school building is discussed in this videotape. It reveals that 44 of the 50 U.S. states are vulnerable to earthquake, but most schools are structurally unprepared to take on the stresses that earthquakes exert. The cost to the…

  16. Parent's Journal. [Videotape Series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    Parent's Journal is a set of 16 videotapes for parents of prenatal, infant, and toddler-age children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on the life stories and experiences of capable mothers and…

  17. Family Feathers. [Videotape Series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    Family Feathers is a set of 18 videotapes for parents of preschool children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on practical advice from Tlingit and Haida parents, wisdom from elders, and some of…

  18. Videotaping Students' Booktalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Provides a detailed description of a class project in which each student is videotaped while presenting a booktalk. Included are a list of appropriate books, a checklist for students to use in identifying the important characteristics of a booktalk, and an evaluation form for presentations. (CLB)

  19. A study at 10 medical centers of the safety and efficacy of 48 flexible sigmoidoscopies and 8 colonoscopies during pregnancy with follow-up of fetal outcome and with comparison to control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappell, M S; Colon, V J; Sidhom, O A

    1996-12-01

    To analyze the risks versus benefits of flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy to the pregnant female and fetus, we conducted a multiyear, retrospective study at 10 hospitals of 46 patients undergoing 48 sigmoidoscopies and 8 patients undergoing 8 colonoscopies during pregnancy. Sigmoidoscopy controls included two study control groups and the average American pregnancy outcomes. Sigmoidoscopy indications included hematochezia in 28, diarrhea in 10, abdominal pain in 4, and other in 3. Thirteen patients were in the first trimester of pregnancy, 18 were in the second trimester, and 15 were in the third trimester. Twenty-seven patients had a lesion diagnosed by sigmoidoscopy, including reactivated or newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease, bleeding internal hemorrhoids, and other colitidies. Twenty-two of 29 patients with rectal bleeding had a significant lesion identified by sigmoidoscopy. Sigmoidoscopy was significantly more frequently diagnostic for hematochezia than for other indications (p born infant Apgar scores were 8.2+/-1.5 (SD) at 1 min and 9.0+/-0.2 at 5 min (control mean Apgar scores: 8.1+/-1.7 at 1 min and 8.8+/-1.0 at 5 min; NS, Student's t test). Three high-risk pregnancies ended with fetal demise at 8, 9, or 12 weeks after sigmoidoscopy, from causes unrelated to sigmoidoscopy. No fetal cardiac abnormalities were detected by fetal cardiac monitoring during two sigmoidoscopies. Eight pregnant females underwent colonoscopy, without complications. Pregnancy outcomes included six healthy babies delivered at full term, one voluntary abortion, and one fetal demise in a high-risk pregnancy 4 months after colonoscopy from causes unrelated to colonoscopy. This study suggests that sigmoidoscopy does not induce labor or result in congenital malformations, that sigmoidoscopy is not contraindicated during pregnancy, and that sigmoidoscopy may be beneficial in pregnant patients with significant lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Colonoscopy during pregnancy should

  20. The prevalence rate of schizophrenia in Jinuo ethnic group-a 30 year follow up study%云南基诺族精神分裂症患病率的30年随访研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓斌; 康传媛; 李秋媛; 杨建中; 刘小彦; 李培凯

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and incidence of schizophrenia in 2009 and to study trends in prevalence over a 30 year period in Jinuo ethnic group. Methods Simple cluster random sampling was used to selected subjects from total 10, 610 population of 44 Jinuo villages in 2009. The selected 1984 people were screened using 12-item general health questionnaire ( GHQ-12) and were further selected proportionally according to the scores of GHQ-12 to be interviewed by structured clinical interview for DSM-IV-TR axis I disorders-patient edition ( SCID-I/P) . People with suspected schizophrenia from previous datas were interviewed, including 33 patients who were diagnosed as schizophrenia in the epidemiological investigation in 1999. The prevalence rates calculated from the above two investigation methods were comp- ared and Chi-square trend test was used to analyze the prevalence trend during past 30 years. Results The lifetime prevalence rate and the point prevalence rate of schizophrenia in clue investigation are higher hut the difference did not reach statistical signif'icance compared with cluster sampling investigation. Clue investigation indicated the lif'etime prevalence rate and the point prevalence rate were 0.37% (39/10610) and 0.27% (29/10 610) , respectively. Lifetime prevalence rate and point prevalence rate were higher in men than in women (χ2 = 10.27 ,ρ< 0.01 ; χ 2 = 8.02 ,ρ< 0.01 ). There were 12 new cases during past ten years including a new case in last year. The annual incidence of schizophrenia was 9.43/100 000 ( 1/10610). Neither the lifetime prevalence rate nor the point prevalence rate was significantly changed during past 30 years (χ2 = 10.27 ,ρ< 0.01 ; χ2 = 8.02 ,ρ< 0.01). Conclusion Both of the lifetime prevalence rate and the point prevalence rate of shcizophrenia in Jinuo ethnic group remain constant during past 30 years.%目的 了解2009年基诺族精神分裂症的患病率和发病率,并了解其近30年

  1. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  2. Comparison of remote and in-clinic follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Sheila; Panjwani, Dilzayn; Gupta, Melini; Meaney, Christopher; Morgan, Rebecca; Feuerstein, Erika

    2015-09-01

    This study compared adherence to follow-up and clinical outcomes between standard in-clinic and remote follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion. This nonrandomized trial recruited women requesting medical abortion at two sexual health clinics in Toronto, Canada. Women received methotrexate 50 mg/m(2) followed 3-7 days later by 800 mcg of misoprostol self-administered vaginally. For Day 15, follow-up participants could choose standard in-clinic follow-up with ultrasound and assessment or remote telephone follow-up with serum β-hCG performed at a community laboratory and symptom checklist. Standard and remote follow-up groups were compared for adherence, defined as completing follow-up within 7 days of the scheduled time, and clinical outcomes. Characteristics associated with adherence were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Of 129 women, 86 (67%) chose remote follow-up. Nonadherence rates for remote (28%) and standard (23%) follow-up groups did not differ in univariate (p=.57) or multivariable analysis (odds ratio: 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.39-3.01). Rates of emergency/hospital visits were 3% and 9% for remote and standard groups, respectively (p=.22), and complete loss to follow was 6% and 14% in remote and standard groups (p=.18). Nonadherent women were more likely to be undecided about their contraception (65% vs. 28%; p=.002), and this difference persisted in the multivariable analysis. Given a choice of remote or in-clinic follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion, most women chose remote follow-up. Rates of adherence to follow-up, adverse outcomes and complete loss to follow-up were similar for women choosing remote and standard follow-up. Since standard and remote follow-up after methotrexate/misoprostol abortion are associated with similar adherence to follow-up and similar safety profiles, women should be offered their choice of follow-up method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Videotaped Lectures in a Graduate Cytogenetics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. L.; Jellen, E. N.

    1994-01-01

    Graduate students evaluated the use of videotape recordings of lectures on chromosome configurations in a cytogenetics course. Ninety-two percent of the students indicated that videotaping was worthwhile. Advantages for using the videotaped cytogenetics lectures are presented. (MDH)

  4. Loss to follow up within an HIV cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Wood

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BHIVA guidelines recommend that all ARV-naïve and stable on-treatment patients are monitored at least 6 monthly [1]. Studies have shown that loss to follow up (LFU not only worsens outcomes [2] but has increased potential for onward transmission. Case notes of 1275 HIV patients registered under our care up to January 2011 were examined for attendance within the previous 6 months. 788 (61% patients had not been seen within the previous 6 months. Reasons for non attendance were identified. These are outlined below: 76% of the 130 LFU whose demographics were further examined were of Black African ethnicity, 54% female, 51% of single marital status and 48% of patients had been taking ARVs at the time of LFU. Interestingly, 53% of patients were lost to follow up within 1 year of diagnosis. The LFU patients (88 that had a local GP and a registered current address were sent recall letters. A small number of patients reengaged with care as a result of this action, some having not attended for over 5 years. Partner notification led to a number of new diagnoses in these cases. Failure to respond led to subsequent letters inviting them to clinic and finally a letter to their GP informing them of non attendance. In September 2011, a new recall system using Lillie Electronic Patient Records (EPR was introduced to promptly recognise if a patient had not attended for care as planned. Prior to this, recall was a manual process carried out by the Health Advising Team. We conclude that within our cohort we had a particularly mobile group of patients; 455 (36% transferring care to another clinic within the UK, 54 (4% moving out of UK. 76% of the LFU group being of Black African ethnicity highlights the ongoing problem of retention of care in this group. Further exploration is needed to identify additional issues besides housing and immigration that lead to LFU. Furthermore, the disportionate number of patients (53% disengaging with services within 1 year of

  5. Lost to follow-up: reasons and outcomes following tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Martin F; Sietsema, Debra L; Jones, Clifford B

    2016-12-01

    Different reasons for lost to follow-up are assumed. Besides "objective" reasons, "subjective" reasons and satisfaction contribute to treatment adherence. Retrospective studies usually lack the possibility of acquisition of additional outcome information. Purpose of this study was to determine outcome and factors for patients not returning for follow-up. Between 2002 and 2009, 380 patients underwent internal fixation for tibial plateau fractures. Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) was collected at 6, 12, and 24 months as long as patients returned for follow-up. Pain and range of motion were measured. Records were studied for reasons of termination of follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed comparing lost to follow-up versus continued office visits regarding demographics, contributing factors, and SMFA. Two hundred fifty-nine patients were followed until treatment was completed (PRN), while 120 patients (32 %) terminated further follow-up. Patients in the 12- and 24-month follow-up groups were older (p = 0.02; p leaving treatment untimely and those being released from office visits. Follow-up remains important to obtain as much up-to-date information as possible. The current study does not support the assumption that patients lost to follow-up have a different SMFA outcome than patients returning until PRN. III.

  6. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, M.J.; Kinsella, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion. DESIGN: Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 ...

  8. Consolidated Incineration Facility model videotape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolewski, J F; Augsburger, S T

    1988-01-01

    A Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is in final design for construction at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. The CIF will detoxify and volume reduce combustible radioactive, hazardous and mixed waste. A study model was constructed during scope development for project authorization to assist with equipment layout and insure sufficient maintenance access. To facilitate the Department of Energy Validation process, a videotape of the model was developed. This ten minute videotape includes general information about the incineration process and a tour of the study model with a discussion of activities in each area. The videotape will be shown and the current status and schedule for the CIF presented.

  9. Detailed Follow-up Study of Pediatric Orofacial Granulomatosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaramo, Anu; Alapulli, Heikki; Aine, Liisa; Saarnisto, Ulla; Tuokkola, Jetta; Ruuska, Tarja; Sipponen, Taina; Pitkäranta, Anne; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2017-10-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the orofacial area. Its connection to Crohn disease (CD) is debated. Our aim was to describe a cohort of pediatric patients with OFG in detail, study the long-term behavior of OFG, and evaluate factors predicting CD in patients with OFG. We invited patients diagnosed with OFG at 2 university hospitals, Finland for a follow-up appointment. Patients (n = 29) were examined by a dentist and an otorhinolaryngologist using a structural schema. Orofacial findings were also recorded using digital photographing. Patients filled in questionnaires about general health and special diets. Patients' nutrition was evaluated from food records. The findings were compared between patients with OFG only and OFG with CD. Patients with CD had more findings in the orofacial area (total score for orofacial findings median 11) compared to patients with OFG only (total score median 7.5). There was no statistically significant difference in the type of lesions between these groups, except the upper lip was more often affected in patients with CD (n = 11) than in patients with OFG only (n = 0). Most of the patients had normal otorhinolaryngological findings. All patients with elevated anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody A levels had CD (n = 6) and they presented with more orofacial findings (total score) than patients with normal levels of anti-S cerevisiae antibody A (P = 0.0311). Long-term follow-up of pediatric-onset patients with OFG shows good prognosis. Patients with OFG do not seem to have otorhinolaryngological comorbidity. Anti-S cerevisiae antibody A may serve as a factor to indicate the possible presence of underlying CD in patients with OFG, but further studies are requested.

  10. Leisure of Opiate Addicts at Posttreatment Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. Dwayne; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of self-reported leisure showed an overall shift toward more positive, socially accepted leisure activities at follow-up. More free time was spent with family and friends who did not use drugs. Positive leisure at follow-up was related to favorable outcomes on drug use, criminality, and productive activities. (Author)

  11. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Follow-up. 1022.17 Section 1022.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in...

  12. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... action plan to address each audit finding included in the current year auditor's reports. The corrective... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... reference numbers the auditor assigns to audit findings under § 41.510(c). Since the summary schedule may...

  13. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B.; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    . The conception of follow-up among physicians, patients, and their relatives therefore needs revision. Follow-up after treatment should have a clearly defined and evidence-based purpose. Based on the existing literature, this purpose should presently focus on other end points rather than early detection...

  14. Follow-up schedules after treatment for malignant melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francken, A. B.; Accortt, N. A.; Shaw, H. M.; Colman, M. H.; Wiener, M.; Soong, S. -J.; Hoekstra, H. J.; Thompson, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Existing follow-up guidelines after treatment for melanoma are based largely on dated literature and historical precedent. This study aimed to calculate recurrence rates and establish prognostic factors for recurrence to help redesign a follow-up schedule. Methods: Data were retrieved

  15. The Effects of Drug Education at Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presents a one-year follow-up of a drug education course for 500 junior high school students. Analyses of variance and covariance were performed on class-level data collected at follow-up. None of the short-term effects of the course sustained. (JAC)

  16. The clinical value and the cost-effectiveness of follow-up in endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjalma, W A A; van Dam, P A; Makar, A P; Cruickshank, D J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present article was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of follow-up in endometrial cancer patients. A literature review was performed regarding the studies that addressed routine follow-up of endometrial cancer. For each published study, the costs of the follow-up program were calculated according to Belgium standards. A mean total of 13% relapsed. Symptomatology and clinical examination detected over 83% of the recurrences. The follow-up cost in euro after 5 and 10 years ranged between 127.68 and 2,028.78 and between 207.48 and 2,353.48, respectively. Based on the available data, there is little evidence of routine follow-up improving survival rates. Multiple protocols are used in practice without an evidence base. There is an urgent need for prospective randomized studies to evaluate the value of the current so-called 'standard medical practice of follow-up.' It is to be expected that the cost of follow-up could be reduced considerably, for instance, by tailoring to low- and high-risk groups, or by abandoning routine follow-up. Symptomatic patients, however, should be evaluated immediately. A reduction in the number of visits and examinations would mean an enormous reduction in costs. This economic benefit would be warmly welcomed in the times of increased health costs and decreased budgets.

  17. Urological outcome after myelomeningocele: 20 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Cortes, Dina

    2011-01-01

    Study Type - Therapy (case series)¿Level of Evidence 4 OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the urological outcome in a long-term follow-up of individuals with myelomeningocele and relate the findings obtained to urodynamic variables in childhood. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Individuals with myelomeningocele born....... In childhood and at follow-up, kidney function was estimated with renography and isotope-glomerular filtration rate examinations. RESULTS: In total, 52 individuals (28 boys and 24 girls) aged 19-41 years (median, 29 years) had follow-up. Of these, 37 (71%) individuals had bilateral normal kidney function...

  18. Multicenter follow-up study of ankle fracture surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai-lin; WANG Gang; WANG Guang-lin; WU Xin-bao; LIU Li-min; LI Xuan; ZHANG Dian-ying; FU Zhong-guo; WANG Tian-bing; ZHANG Pei-xun; JIANG Bao-guo; SHEN Hui-liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Few data on ankle fractures in China from large multicenter epidemiological and clinical studies are available.The aim of this research was to evaluate the epidemiological features and surgical outcomes of ankle fractures by reviewing 235 patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five hospitals in China.Methods This study included patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five Chinese hospitals from January 2000 to July 2009.Age,gender,mechanism of injury,Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) fracture type,fracture pattern,length of hospital stay and treatment outcome were recorded.Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS software.The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale,visual analogue scale (VAS),and arthritis scale were used to evaluate outcome.Results Of 235 patients with ankle fractures,105 were male with an average age of 37.8 years and 130 were female with an average age of 47.3 years.The average follow-up period was 55.7 months.There were significant differences in the ratios of patients in different age groups between males and females,and in mechanisms of injury among different age groups.There were also significant differences in the length of hospital stay among different fracture types and mechanisms of injury.In healed fractures,the average AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 95.5,with an excellence rate of 99.6%,the average VAS score was 0.17,and the average arthritis score was 0.18.Movement of the injured ankle was significantly different to that of the uninjured ankle.There were no significant differences between AO fracture types,fracture patterns or follow-up periods and AOFAS score,but there were some significant differences between these parameters and ankle joint movements,pain VAS score and arthritis score.Conclusions Ankle fractures occur most commonly in middle-aged and young males aged 20-39 years and in elderly females aged 50-69 years.The most common mechanisms of

  19. Association between subjective memory complaints and nursing home placement: a four-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of potentially vulnerable patients who need close follow-up, we investigated the risk of nursing home placement during a 4-year follow-up period. METHODS: Prospective cohort survey...... with 4-year follow-up in general practice. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the influence of risk factors on nursing home placement. RESULTS: A total 758 non-nursing home residents aged 65 years and older consulted the General Practitioners in October and November 2002 of whom 50...

  20. Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Analysis reported in Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization by Medicare Patients, 2007-2010, published in Volume 4, Issue 2 of Medicare and...

  1. A CLINICAL AND FOLLOW UP STUDY OF ATYPICAL PSYCHOSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Sachdev, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Twenty-two cases who fulfilled the criteria of having atypical manifestation at any stage of illness and had minimum follow up of three years were studied in detail. Their family history and follow up was analysed. The findings of the present study suggest that the cases showing admixture of schizophrenic and affective symptoms are probably a variant of affective disorders although a possibility of their being a third independent psychosis cannot be ruled out. PMID:22065727

  2. Banked cadaveric fascia lata: 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S H M; Gregório, E P; Rodrigues, M A F; Grando, J P S; Moreira, H A; Fraga, F C

    2004-05-01

    Autologous fascial and synthetic materials have been widely used to repair the stress form of urinary incontinence (SUI) as well as pelvic floor prolapse. The safety and long-term durability of cadaveric fascia lata in orthopedic and ophthalmologic surgery have encouraged urogynecologists to use this material for a sling material. The rationale of placement of a sling from cadaveric fascia lata is based upon decreasing the complication rates caused by autologous and synthetic materials. However, the high costs of the commercially available tissues in Brazil have limited its use in public health. In our institution we developed a cadaveric fascia lata bank, harvesting the material according to the Brazilian Transplantation Legislation and storing it at -70 degrees C. The safety of the tissue is achieved by 25-kGy irradiation. Since 1999, 30 patients have undergone surgery using material from five donors in repairs for stress urinary incontinence and pelvic floor prolapse at a mean of 34 months' follow-up (ranging from 30 to 40 months), there was no evidence of rejection. Therefore, we have shown the safety of cadaveric fascia lata harvested and treated as described above in our group of patients.

  3. What Happens Next? Follow-Up from the Children's Toddler School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Corsello, Christina; Mahrer, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    This study was a follow-up of a group of 29 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at age 2 who attended an inclusive toddler program until age 3. Children ranged in age from 4 to 12 years at the time of the parent survey and follow-up testing. The majority of children were placed in a special education (noninclusive) preschool class,…

  4. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  5. A Facebook Follow-Up Strategy for Rural Drug-Using Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Megan F; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Smith, Kirsten E; Leukefeld, Carl; Webster, J Matthew; Oser, Carrie B

    2017-06-01

    Facebook (FB) use has grown exponentially over the past decade, including in rural areas. Despite its popularity, FB has been underutilized as a research follow-up approach to maintain contact with research participants and may have advantages in less densely populated areas and among more hard-to-reach, at-risk groups. The overall goal of this study was to examine FB as a supplemental follow-up approach to other follow-up strategies with rural drug-using women. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with randomly selected women who completed baseline interviews in 3 rural jails in 1 state. Analyses focus on participants who were released from jail and were eligible for 3-month follow-up (n = 284). Bivariate analyses were used to examine differences between FB users and nonusers, and multivariate logistic regression models examined predictors of 3-month follow-up participation and being located for follow-up using FB. About two-thirds (64.4%) of participants were regular FB users. Bivariate analyses indicated that FB users were younger, more educated, and more likely to have used alcohol in the 30 days before incarceration but less likely to have a chronic health problem. Regression analyses indicated that rural FB users had more than 5 times the odds of being located for the 3-month follow-up interview, even after controlling for other variables. There were no significant predictors of being followed up using FB. Findings suggest that FB is widely used and well accepted among rural drug-using women. Among hard-to-reach populations, including those in rural, geographically isolated regions, FB serves as a method to improve participant follow-up. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Agenda Setting During Follow-Up Encounters in a University Primary Care Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Bellet, Sarah; Dubois, Julie; Vannotti, Marco; Zuercher, Marili; Faouzi, Mohamed; Devaud, Karen; Rodondi, Nicolas; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2016-07-13

    At the beginning of the medical encounter, clinicians should elicit patients' agendas several times using open-ended questions. Little is known, however, about how many times physicians really solicit a patient's agenda during follow-up encounters. The objective was to analyze the number of agenda solicitations by physicians, of agendas initiated by physicians, and of patients' spontaneous agendas during the beginning and the entire encounter. We analyzed 68 videotaped follow-up encounters at a university primary care outpatient clinic. The number of different types of agenda setting was searched for and analyzed using negative binomial regression or logistic regression models. Physicians solicited agendas a mean ± SD of 0.8 ± 0.7 times/patient during the first 5 minutes and 1.7 ± 1.2 times/patient during the entire encounter. Physicians in 32.4% of encounters did not solicit the patient agenda, and there were never more than two physician's solicitations during the first 5 minutes. The mean number of physician's solicitations of the patients' agenda was 42% lower among female physicians during the first 5 minutes and 34% lower during the entire encounter. The number of agendas initiated by physicians was 1.2 ± 1.2/patient during the beginning and 3.2 ± 2.3/patient during the entire encounter. In 58.8% of the encounters, patients communicated their agendas spontaneously. There were twice as many patient spontaneous agendas (IRR = 2.12, p = .002) with female physicians than with males. This study showed that agenda solicitation with open-ended questions in follow-up encounters does not occur as often as recommended. There is thus a risk of missing new agendas or agendas that are important to the patient.

  7. Final results of a long-term, clinical follow-up in fatty liver patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Larsen, Sanne; Becker, Ulrik; Franzmann, Maria-Benedicte

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is increasing focus on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aim of the present study was to conduct a long-term clinical follow-up of patients with biopsy-confirmed fatty liver without inflammation or significant fibrosis (pure fatty liver), to analyse for potential risk....... All admissions, discharge diagnoses and causes of death during follow-up were collected. All surviving patients were invited to a clinical follow-up. RESULTS: The follow-up period was 20.4 and 21.0 years, respectively, for the NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) groups. Two NAFLD patients...... of death. Patients with AFLD died primarily from cirrhosis and other alcohol-related disorders, whereas in patients with NAFLD the main causes of death were cardiovascular disease and cancer. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with pure non-alcoholic fatty liver, survival was good and independent...

  8. Follow-up care of children suffered from burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Константин Александрович Афоничев

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of III-VI AB degree burns in children,regardless of the nature of treatment in the acute andrecovery period, are the development of scar contractures and deformities of the joints. However, thecorrect organization of follow-up care and rehabilitation treatment can significantly reduce the severity and facilitates the full recovery of the affected segment. Based on the analysis of their own material, the author defines the early stage of rehabilitation in these patients before full maturation of scar tissue or before the formation of functionally significant joint contractures, and later period, when there are indications for surgical rehabilitation. In the early period, follow-up care is recommended in 1 month after discharge and then on a quarterly basis, and with the appearance of deformities - at least once in 2 months. At the2nd stage of rehabilitation, older children and children of secondary school age are subject to follow-up care at least 1 time per year of primary school age - atleast once in 6 months, preschool children - every3 months. The proposed assessment of scar tissuehelps to determine the terms of follow-up care. Usingthis scheme of follow-up care and appropriate treatment allowed the author to obtain excellent and goodresults in 87-90 % of cases at the stages of rehabilitaion.

  9. Cohort follow-up: the 21st century procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Debra E; Hughes, Therese; Aldrich, Timothy E; Silver, Kenneth Z; Brion, Gall M

    2009-01-01

    The basic logic of designing an occupational cohort study has changed little since William R. Gaffey outlined the issues of follow-up, measurement of exposure, and analysis of data. However, many new avenues of tracking workers for epidemiological studies have been developed since Gaffey wrote his paper in 1973. Many disease registries also perform follow-up of subjects for vital status determination, so the procedures used with this process are common to the two applications. This article speaks to cohort construction for this occupational research as well as describes the 2007 methods for vital status follow-up. Rises in concern about work-related disease risks and the scientific resources for performing these studies coincided with the computer revolution. Government and private sources of data on vital status have changed in several ways over the 35 years since Gaffey's seminal paper. Some systems make the process of follow-up more rapid and productive, and some barriers have been imposed as societal concerns for privacy have risen. We describe the process of linking 5 sources of data to compile a roster of 6,820 workers employed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from 1953 to 2003. The record linkage processes achieved a final death cohort of 1672 deaths--the ascertainment of these deaths (by time period) was 1379 (1979-2003) and 293 (1953-1978); follow-up then was 100% for this cohort.

  10. Establishment of an inferior vena cava filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up - retrieval rates and patients lost to follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinken, Sven; Humphries, Charlotte; Ferguson, John

    2017-04-17

    To evaluate the rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval and the number of patient's lost to follow-up, before and after the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology (inserting physician) led follow-up. On the 1st of June 2012, an electronic interventional radiology database was established at our Institution. In addition, the interventional radiology team took responsibility for follow-up of IVC filters. Data were prospectively collected from the database for all patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st June 2012 and the 31st May 2014. Data on patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st of June 2009 to the 31st of May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, insertion indications, filter types, retrieval status, documented retrieval decisions, time in situ, trackable events and complications were obtained in the pre-database (n = 136) and post-database (n = 118) cohorts. Attempted IVC filter retrieval rates were improved from 52.9% to 72.9% (P = 0.001) following the establishment of the database. The number of patients with no documented decision (lost to follow-up) regarding their IVC filter reduced from 31 of 136 (23%) to 0 of 118 patients (P = database group (113 as compared to 137 days, P = 0.129). Following the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the attempted retrieval rates of IVC filters and the number of patient's lost to follow-up. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Efficacy and utility of phone call follow-up after pediatric general surgery versus traditional clinic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kevin; Hogan, Virginia; Jager, Alesha; von Allmen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Typical follow-up for surgical procedures consists of an interim history and brief focused physical examination. These appointments occupy clinic resources, require a time investment by the family, and rarely identify problems. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of a postoperative phone call. Compare a traditional in-person clinic postoperative visit with postoperative phone call follow-up regarding patient satisfaction, rate of successful follow-up, and clinic resource utilization in a large academic practice. A retrospective review of charts of patients who underwent select surgical procedures, along with a review of the clinic schedule for the same time period. Efficacy, patient/family satisfaction, and impact on the clinic. Families were contacted by telephone two weeks after select surgical procedures to assess for complications and questions. Cohorts of patients six months before and six months after implementation were assessed for main outcome measures. Before implementation, 55.5% of patients (427/769) who had one of the select surgical procedures were seen in the clinic postoperatively, and 62.6% (435/695) had a successful postoperative phone call follow-up. There were also 1090 overall scheduled postoperative appointments. Six months after implementation, overall postoperative appointments decreased 35.5% to 703. Overall, postoperative-scheduled visits decreased by 6% compared with new visits and other general follow-up visits, which each increased by 3%. A satisfaction survey revealed that 93% of patients (n = 231) were highly satisfied with the process. A hospital cost analysis suggested an 89% cost savings ($101.75 per patient for clinic visit vs $12.50 per patient for phone call follow-up). Postoperative phone call follow-up is an effective tool that improves patient and physician efficiency and satisfaction.

  12. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  13. Clinical follow up of uniparental disomy 16: First data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworniczak, B.; Koppers, B.; Bogdanova, N. [Univ. of Muenster (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Following the introduction of the concept of uniparental disomy (UPD) in 1980 by Engel this segregational anomaly is reported in an ever increasing number of patients. So far, several groups of individuals with an increased risk for UPD have been identified including abnormal carriers of familial balanced translocations or centric fusions, carriers of mosaic trisomies, and fetuses after prenatal diagnosis of confined placental mosaicism. A major pathogenetic mechanism appears to be post-meiotic chromosome loss in trisomic conceptuses. UPD was repeatedly observed in the fetus after diagnosis of mosaic or non-mosaic trisomies in the placenta which are usually considered {open_quotes}lethal{close_quotes} (i.e. trisomies 15 and 16). In an ongoing study to determine the incidence and clinical consequences of UPD we investigated the parental origin of chromosomes in the disomic cell line after prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism for various trisomies (e.g. 2, 7, 14, 15, and 16). At present, two maternal disomies 16 and one maternal disomy 15 were identified. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was a common symptome which, however, was also present in some but not all mosaics with a biparental origin of the chromosomes in question. While prognosis is clear in some instances (i.e. UPD 15) counseling can be extremely difficult in others, when imprinting effects and homozygosity for unknown recessive traits present in a parent have to be considered. To assess the clinical significance, detailed follow-up studies of proven cases of uniparental disomies are essential. First data of two cases with UPD 16 are presented.

  14. Feasibility of telephone follow-up after medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perriera, Lisa K; Reeves, Matthew F; Chen, Beatrice A; Hohmann, Heather L; Hayes, Jennifer; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using telephone calls combined with high-sensitivity urine pregnancy testing as a primary method of follow-up after medical abortion. We enrolled 139 women up to 63 days of gestation to receive mifepristone 200 mg orally and misoprostol 800 mcg vaginally or buccally, per their choice. Participants were contacted by phone one week after mifepristone administration and interviewed using standardized questions. If the subject or clinician thought the pregnancy was not expelled, the subject returned for an ultrasound examination. Otherwise, subjects performed high-sensitivity home urine pregnancy testing 30 days after the mifepristone and were called within 3 days of the test. Those with positive pregnancy tests returned for an ultrasound examination. Those with negative tests required no further follow-up. Six of the 139 (4.3%, 95% CI 1.6-9.1%) subjects presented prior to Phone Call 1 for an in-person visit. All 133 (100%, 95% CI 97.8-100%) subjects eligible for their first telephone follow-up were contacted. Eight of the 133 (6.1%, 95% CI 2.6-11.5%) women were asked to return for evaluation and all did so (100%, 95% CI 63.1-100%). Eight of the 133 women eligible for the 30 day phone call presented for an interim visit prior to the call. After 30 days, 116 of the 117 (99.1%, 95% CI 97.5-100%) eligible subjects were contacted. One subject was not reached for the day 30 phone call. Twenty-seven of the 116 (23.3%, 95% CI 15.6-31.0%) subjects had a positive pregnancy test and required follow-up. Two of these subjects (7.4%, 95% CI 1.0-24.2%) did not return for in-person follow-up. Two of the 116 (1.7%, 95% CI 0.2-6.1%) subjects had inconclusive pregnancy tests and were asked to return for follow-up. One of these subjects (50%, 95% CI 1.2-98.7%) did not return. Complete follow-up was achieved in 135 of the 139 subjects (97.1%, 95% CI 94.3-99.9%). None of the 26 women evaluated for a positive or inconclusive pregnancy

  15. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy - two years follow-up by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Ebner, F.; Flueckiger, F.; Justich, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Millner, M.M. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Paediatrische Klinik)

    1991-04-01

    A case of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MEM) followed-up by MRI for 2 1/2 y is presented. MRI showed gross, diffusely distributed white matter lesions in both hemispheres predominantly in frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital locations a marked ventriculomegaly indicative of cerebral atrophy. Except a slight increase of the cerebral atrophy there were no changes in the follow-up examinations. There are no specific MRI findings in MEM, the diagnosis is established by the synopsis of MRI, laboratory data and muscle biopsy. (orig.).

  16. Barrett's esophagus. Diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Lasse; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Eriksen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's Esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition in the esophagus. Esophageal adenocarcinomas have the fastest increase of incidence of all solid tumors in the western world. BE is defined as areas with macroscopic visible columnar epithelium and intestinal metaplasia oral of the anatomical...... and it is not recommended outside controlled studies. Treatment of high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is handled in departments treating esophageal cancer. Follow-up with endoscopy and biopsy can be offered. Follow-up endoscopy with biopsy can only be recommended after thorough information to the patients...

  17. Exercise-Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Seven Years Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökmen Gemici

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a 7-year follow-up of a 55-year-old male who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recovery period of exercise testing and refused implantation of an ICD. Normal left ventricular systolic function was found on echocardiographic examination, and coronary angiography revealed only a side branch disease with a vessel diameter of less than 2 millimeters. The patient was discharged on metoprolol and ASA in addition to his previous treatment with lisinopril and simvastatin. Outpatient cardiac evaluation by repeated 24-hour ECG monitorizations (Holter revealed normal findings. On follow up visits every six months for the past seven years, the patient was found to be asymptomatic.

  18. Three-year follow-up of bibliotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N M; Floyd, M R; Scogin, F; Jamison, C S

    1997-04-01

    This study examined the durability of cognitive bibliotherapy for mild to moderately depressed adults by conducting a 3-year follow-up of participants from a previous study (C. Jamison & F. Scogin, 1995). The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Beck Depression Inventory, and questions relating to participants' perceptions of the program were administered. Results indicated that treatment gains were maintained over the 3-year follow-up period and support the usefulness of cognitive bibliotherapy as an adjunct to traditional treatment modalities in a general adult population.

  19. Danish offshore wind. Key environmental issues - a follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    This follow-up to the Danish environmental monitoring programme on large-scale offshore wind power builds on the result of the former programme of 2006 and focuses on updated knowledge on harbour porpoises, water birds and fish communities, and on the cumulative effects of wind farms. The scientific quality of the projects in this follow-up has been assessed by experts from the International Advisory Panel of Experts on Marine Ecology (IAPEME), who have commented on the results in an independent evaluation which is reproduced in this publication. (LN)

  20. Four years follow-up of 101 children with melamine-related urinary stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wen, Jian Guo; Wen, Jian Jun; Su, Zhi Qiang; Zhu, Wen; Huang, Chen Xu; Yu, Si Long; Guo, Zhan

    2013-06-01

    The melamine-contaminated milk powder incidence occurred in China in 2008. Many studies have been published regarding the epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of melamine-related urinary stones. The objective of this study is to follow-up the effects of melamine-contaminated milk powder consumption on kidney and body growth in children with melamine-related urinary stones 4 years ago. One hundred and one children with melamine-related urinary stones were followed up by urinalysis, renal function tests and urinary ultrasonography. The data of body weight and height, clinical signs and complications were collected. Eighty normal children without the history of consuming melamine-contaminated milk powder were collected as controls. Eighty-one children with melamine-related urinary stones were successfully followed up. Of 45 cases with melamine-related urinary stones treated conservatively after discharge, 34 disappeared completely, 6 dissolved partially, 1 increased in size and 4 did not change at 4 years follow-up. The percentages of under-height and under-weight infants were significantly higher in melamine-related urinary stones group compared to the controls, respectively (p urinary stones on kidney and bladder was found at 4 years follow-up. However, whether or not melamine-related urinary stones had effect on body growth needs follow-up in future.

  1. Reimbursement for Living Kidney Donor Follow-Up Care: How Often Does Donor Insurance Pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher, Ajay; Rodrigue, James; Ajaimy, Maria; Wasilewski, Marcy; Ladin, Keren; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, many transplantation centers do not follow former living kidney donors on a long-term basis. Several potential barriers have been identified to provide this follow-up of former living kidney donors, including concerns that donor insurance will not reimburse transplantation centers or primary care physicians for this care. Here, we report the rates at which different insurance companies reimbursed our transplantation center for follow-up visits of living donors. Methods We collected data on all yearly follow-up visits of living donors billed from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010, representing 82 different donors. Concurrent visits of their recipients were available for 47 recipients and were used as a control group. Results We find that most bills for follow-up visits of living kidney donors were paid by insurance companies, at a rate similar to the reimbursement for recipient follow-up care. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, for former donors with insurance, inadequate reimbursement should not be a barrier in providing follow-up care. PMID:23060280

  2. Reimbursement for living kidney donor follow-up care: how often does donor insurance pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher, Ajay; Rodrigue, James; Ajaimy, Maria; Wasilewski, Marcy; Ladin, Keren; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2012-11-27

    Currently, many transplantation centers do not follow former living kidney donors on a long-term basis. Several potential barriers have been identified to provide this follow-up of former living kidney donors, including concerns that donor insurance will not reimburse transplantation centers or primary care physicians for this care. Here, we report the rates at which different insurance companies reimbursed our transplantation center for follow-up visits of living donors. We collected data on all yearly follow-up visits of living donors billed from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010, representing 82 different donors. Concurrent visits of their recipients were available for 47 recipients and were used as a control group. We find that most bills for follow-up visits of living kidney donors were paid by insurance companies, at a rate similar to the reimbursement for recipient follow-up care. Our findings suggest that, for former donors with insurance, inadequate reimbursement should not be a barrier in providing follow-up care.

  3. The Minnesota Couple Communication Program: A Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Karen Smith; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1980-01-01

    The Minnesota Couple Communication Program had a positive effect on the couple's use of open-style communication and on perceived quality of the couple's relationship immediately after training. Only the positive changes in perceived quality of relationship persisted at the follow-up. (Author)

  4. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual r...

  5. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  6. A Follow-Up Study of Former Student Health Advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streng, Nancy J.

    2007-01-01

    Student health advocates (SHAs) are high school students who, under the supervision of the school nurse, provide health education and health promotion activities to other students via a peer education model. This 3-year follow-up study explored how the SHA experience influences career choice and attitudes of the participants. It also examined what…

  7. MRI of penile fracture: diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uder, Michael; Gohl, Dietrich; Takahashi, Masahide; Kramann, Bernhard; Schneider, Guenther [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Derouet, Harry [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Defreyne, Luc [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University Hospital of Gent (Belgium)

    2002-01-01

    A rupture of corpus cavernosum (CC) is a rare injury of the erect penis. The present study describes the role of MRI for diagnosis and follow-up of this injury. Four patients with clinically suspected acute penile fractures underwent MRI. Imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. In three patients, follow-up MRI was also available at 1, 6 and 16 weeks after surgical repair. In all patients pre-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) clearly disclosed ruptures of CC, which depicted as discontinuity of low signal intensity of the tunica albuginea (TA). Concomitant subcutaneous haematoma were well visualised both on T1-weighted (T1WI) and T2-weighted images, whereas haematoma in CC were optimally demonstrated on contrast-enhanced T1WI. On follow-up MRI all fractures presented similar healing process. Shortly after the repair, the tunical suture showed an increase in signal intensity on pre-contrast T1WI and was strongly enhanced with the administration of contrast material. Then the tear site gradually recovered low signal intensity on all spin-echo sequences by 4 months after surgery. These serial findings may suggest the formation of vascularised granulation tissue during cicatrisation. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with penile fracture. (orig.)

  8. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  9. A Follow-Up Study of Dyslexic Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucci, Joan M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Over 500 men who attended an independent school for children with developmental dyslexia were followed up from one to 38 years after they left the school. Socioeconomic status and IQ were not predictive of adult outcome. Severity of reading problem upon entrance and academic and remedial progress while at school were predictive of adult…

  10. Immunological follow-up of hydatid cyst cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulut Vedat

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the benefit of monitoring cases with hydatid cyst by means of immune components in patients in a long-term follow-up after surgery. Eighty-four preoperative and postoperative serum samples from 14 cases undergoing surgery for hydatid disease were evaluated in terms of immune parameters, such as total and specific IgE, IgG, IgM, IgA and complement. Total and specific IgE were determined by ELISA. Specific IgG levels were measured by indirect hemaglutination.Total IgG, IgM, IgA and complement (C3 and C4 were detected by nephelometry. Imaging studies were also carried out during the follow-up. In none of the patients hydatid cysts were detected during the follow-up. Total IgE levels in the sera of the patients decreased to normal six months after surgery. Although specific IgE against echinococcal antigens decreased one year after operation, levels were still significantly high. There were no changes in the levels of anti-Echinococcus IgG and total IgG in follow-up period. Additionally, other parameters, such as IgA, IgM, C3 and C4, were not affected.

  11. Transient Alert Follow-up Planned for CCAT

    CERN Document Server

    Jenness, Tim

    2014-01-01

    CCAT is a sub-millimeter telescope to be built on Cerro Chajnantor in Chile near the ALMA site. The remote location means that all observing will be done by remote observers with the future goal of fully autonomous observing using a dynamic scheduler. The fully autonomous observing mode provides a natural means for accepting transient alert notifications for immediate follow up.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Follow-up Assessment of Sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A. M.; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama A.; Van der Kallen, Bas F.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Koes, Bart W.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. METHODS We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial

  13. Treatment, follow-up and microbiota in acute diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, L.

    2015-01-01

    Er bestaat veel controverse rondom diverticulitis. Er is tegenstrijdigheid omtrent de beste behandeling van de verschillende stadia. Voor acute ongecompliceerde diverticulitis is het onzeker of antibiotica nodig zijn. De waarde van routine follow-up colonoscopie wordt betwijfeld. Er bestaat onduidel

  14. A Follow-up Study of Secretarial Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    To determine how effectively the Secretarial Studies Department's program was meeting the needs of its students, a follow-up study was conducted of former Montgomery Community College Secretarial Studies students. The survey sought to determine, in particular, if the students had secured employment that was related to their course work at the…

  15. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  16. Morning Star Cycle Two: Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, L. V.

    Semi-structured telephone interviews were used to gather follow-up data on students who completed the 1977-1979 Morning Star cycle two program, a community-based Native teacher education program at the Blue Quills Native Education Centre leading to a Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Alberta. Of the 24 students who completed…

  17. Challenges of loss to follow-up in tuberculosis research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas N; Rose, Michala V; Kimaro, Godfather

    2012-01-01

    In studies evaluating methods for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), follow-up to verify the presence or absence of active TB is crucial and high dropout rates may significantly affect the validity of the results. In a study assessing the diagnostic performance of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test...

  18. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-accident toxicological testing under this subpart are reported to the railroad's Medical Review Officer and... Medical Review Officer may not disclose to FRA the underlying physical condition for which any medication... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211...

  19. Evaluación de un programa de educación de tratamiento intensivo en adolescentes con diabetes tipo 1: Seguimiento por dos años Evaluation of an intensive treatment education program for type 1 diabetes in a group of adolescents. A two year follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G. Krochik

    2004-04-01

    .03 descendiendo a valores no significativamente diferentes del basal a los dos años. No encontramos diferencias significativas en la frecuencia de hipoglucemias u otras variables metabólicas. Nuestros resultados muestran que el tratamiento intensivo de la diabetes tipo 1 en niños y adolescentes puede llevarse a cabo logrando una reduccción significativa de la HbA1C sin aumentar el riesgo de hipoglucemias ni otros efectos adversos.During the past decade several reports were published showing that intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes can prevent and delay disease-related microvascular complications. However, several problems were reported in children and adolescents such as frequent hypoglycemic episodes and weight gain. The aim of this study was to describe the results of intensified treatment for type 1 diabetes in a group of argentinean adolescents after a follow-up of two years. Twenty five adolescents with type 1 diabetes older than 10 years with at least one year from diagnosis were selected. All patients received a one-week teaching program during admission to our center. All patients were followed-up monthly during two years. Treatment schedule included 4-5 controls in fasting conditions, two doses of NPH insulin and four doses of regular insulin according to glycemia and the amount of calculated carbohydrate intake. Median age was 13.5 years (range 10 to 19 years. Mean time from diagnosis to inclusion in the study was 3.8 years (range 1.25 to 9 years. Mean total dose of NPH insulin decreased significantly when measured at the inclusion in the study (0.9 IU/kg and after a year of follow-up 0.8 IU/kg (p 0.04. However, there were no changes in NPH insulin dose after two years follow-up (0.85 IU/kg. On the contrary, the dose of regular insulin administered on fasting conditions with normal glycemia increased from 0 to 0.21/kg after a year (p 0.0001 and to 0.69 after two years (non significant. Median HbA1C showed a significant reduction from 10± 1.62% to 8.53 ± 1

  20. Randomized Trial of Treatment for Children with Sexual Behavior Problems: Ten-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Melissa Y.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This study prospectively follows 135 children 5-12 years of age with sexual behavior problems from a randomized trial comparing a 12-session group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with group play therapy and follows 156 general clinic children with nonsexual behavior problems. Ten-year follow-up data on future juvenile and adult arrests and…

  1. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that rates of ambulatory follow-up after traumatic injury are not optimal, but the association with insurance status has not been studied. Aims: To describe trauma patient characteristics associated with completed follow-up after hospitalization and to compare relative rates of healthcare utilization across payor types. Setting and Design: Single institution retrospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: We compared patient demographics and healthcare utilization behavior after discharge among trauma patients between April 1, 2005 and April 1, 2010. Our primary outcome of interest was outpatient provider contact within 2 months of discharge. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between characteristics including insurance status and subsequent ambulatory and acute care. Results: We reviewed the records of 2906 sequential trauma patients. Patients with Medicaid and those without insurance were significantly less likely to complete scheduled outpatient follow-up within 2 months, compared to those with private insurance (Medicaid, OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88; uninsured, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.23-0.36. Uninsured and Medicaid patients were twice as likely as privately insured patients to visit the Emergency Department (ED for any reason after discharge (uninsured patients (Medicaid, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.50-4.53; uninsured, OR 2.10, 94% CI 1.31-3.36. Conclusion: We found marked differences between patients in scheduled outpatient follow-up and ED utilization after injury associated with insurance status; however, Medicaid seemed to obviate some of this disparity. Medicaid expansion may improve outpatient follow-up and affect patient outcome disparities after injury.

  2. Full remission and relapse of obsessive-compulsive symptoms after cognitive-behavioral group therapy: a two-year follow-up Remissão completa e recaídas dos sintomas obsessivo-compulsivos depois da terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo: dois anos de acompanhamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Tusi Braga

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess whether the results obtained with 12 sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy with obsessive-compulsive patients were maintained after two years, and whether the degree of symptom remission was associated with relapse. METHOD: Forty-two patients were followed. The severity of symptoms was measured at the end of cognitive-behavioral group therapy and at 18 and 24 months of follow-up. The assessment scales used were the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Clinical Global Impression, Beck Depression Inventory, and Beck Anxiety Inventory. RESULTS: The reduction in symptom severity observed at the end of treatment was maintained during the two-year follow-up period (F = 57.881; p OBJETIVO: Avaliar se os resultados obtidos com 12 sessões de terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo para pacientes com transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo foram mantidos depois de dois anos do final do tratamento e se o grau de remissão dos sintomas esteve associado às recaídas. MÉTODO: Quarenta e dois pacientes foram acompanhados. A gravidade dos sintomas foi avaliada no final da terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo, 18 e 24 meses após o término do tratamento. As escalas utilizadas para avaliação foram Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Clinical Global Impression, Beck Depression Inventory e Beck Anxiety Inventory. RESULTADOS: A redução da gravidade dos sintomas observada no final do tratamento foi mantida durante o período de dois anos de acompanhamento (F = 57,881; p < 0,001. Ao final do tratamento, 9 (21,4% pacientes apresentaram remissão completa, 22 (52,4% remissão parcial e 11 (26,2% não apresentaram mudança na Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. Dois anos depois, 13 pacientes (31,0% apresentaram remissão completa dos sintomas, 20 (47,6% apresentaram remissão parcial, e 9 (21,4% não apresentaram mudança na Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. A remissão completa dos sintomas ao

  3. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  4. Long-term follow-up of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, Laura E; Harting, Matthew T; Lally, Kevin P

    2017-06-01

    Increased survival of patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia has created a unique cohort of children, adolescent, and adult survivors with complex medical and surgical needs. Disease-specific morbidities offer the opportunity for multiple disciplines to unite together to provide long-term comprehensive follow-up, as well as an opportunity for research regarding late outcomes. These children can exhibit impaired pulmonary function, altered neurodevelopmental outcomes, nutritional insufficiency, musculoskeletal changes, and specialized surgical needs that benefit from regular monitoring and intervention, particularly in patients with increased disease severity. Below we aim to characterize the specific challenges that these survivors face as well as present an algorithm for a multidisciplinary long-term follow-up program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. From themes to hypotheses: following up with quantitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David L

    2015-06-01

    One important category of mixed-methods research designs consists of quantitative studies that follow up on qualitative research. In this case, the themes that serve as the results from the qualitative methods generate hypotheses for testing through the quantitative methods. That process requires operationalization to translate the concepts from the qualitative themes into quantitative variables. This article illustrates these procedures with examples that range from simple operationalization to the evaluation of complex models. It concludes with an argument for not only following up qualitative work with quantitative studies but also the reverse, and doing so by going beyond integrating methods within single projects to include broader mutual attention from qualitative and quantitative researchers who work in the same field. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  7. Trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome: a 20 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianetti, T M; Dall'Asta, L; Torroni, A; Gasparini, G; Pelo, S

    2014-07-01

    Trismus-Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome (TPS) is a rare autosomal syndrome characterised by the inability to open the mouth fully, pseudocamptodactyly, short stature and foot deformities. The maxillofacial feature entails hyperplasia of the coronoid processes which mechanically interfere with the zygomatic processes during mouth opening. A 22-year- old girl affected by a severe form of TPS was followed from the age of three years. Bone reossification was observed after two coronoidotomies of both hyperplasic coronoid processes. After the decision to perform a coronoidectomy, the four-year follow-up showed a favourable outcome. Meanwhile the patient developed an anterior open bite which was treated with a fourth orthognathic surgery. The follow-up underscores how the correction of malformation leads to the generation of EMG activity of the masticatory muscles after many years of passiveness.

  8. Is follow-up capacity the current NHS bottleneck?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allder, Steven; Walley, Paul; Silvester, Kate

    2011-02-01

    Capacity and demand theory suggests that the presence of a queue is not necessarily an indication of a shortage of capacity in a system. It is much more likely that either there is a demand and capacity variation that creates queues or there is a delay designed into the system. A shortage of capacity is only really indicated where a backlog is not stable and continues to grow. In this article, data are taken from one NHS trust that provides evidence for a continually growing backlog for follow-up outpatient services. It is believed that these data are representative of most locations within the NHS in England and therefore suggest an immediate shortage in effective follow-up capacity. To avoid compromise to patient care, the problem will have to be addressed before the situation becomes unmanageable. The paper highlights options to reduce or deflect demand or to increase effective capacity.

  9. The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, V A; Bauman, K E; Greene, W F; Koch, G G; Linder, G F; MacDougall, J E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program. METHODS: Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended. RESULTS: The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance. PMID:11029999

  10. EMCS Installation Follow-Up Study. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    were in progress at the time of this site visit. A post occupancy evaluation (POE) was performed on August 9 & 10. Copies of three documents related to...FOLLOW-UP INVESTIGATION SITE VISIT ATTACHMENTS I. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Post Occupancy Evaluation Field 1 Notes 2. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Additional... Post Occupancy Evaluation Comments 3. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Post Occupancy Evaluation Station Comments 4. Langley Air Force Base - F-i. F-2 POST

  11. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida; Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Paula Vanessa Pedron Oltramari-Navarro; Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira Conti; Ricardo de Lima Navarro; Karen Regina Siqueira de Souza

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been re...

  12. Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, M J; Kinsella, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion. DESIGN: Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 to 1146 physicians who could be traced through the 1994 Medical Directory of the provincial college of physicians and surgeons; 25 questionnaires were returned because they could not be delivered. OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' opinions about (a) the morality of active euthanasia, (b) changes in the law to permit active euthanasia and (c) the practice of legalized euthanasia. RESULTS: Of the 1121 physicians sent a follow-up questionnaire 866 (77%) returned it completed. The responses of these same 866 physicians in 1991 provided a basis for comparison. Of the 866, 360 (42%) stated in the 1994 survey that it is sometimes right to practise active euthanasia; a similar proportion (384 [44%]) gave this response in 1991. However, other opinions changed significantly. In 1991, 250 of the respondents (29%) indicated that they would practise active euthanasia if it were legalized, as compared with 128 (15%) in 1994 (p euthanasia, as compared with 316 (37%) in 1994 (p euthanasia between 1991 and 1994, in both surveys at least 70% of those who responded to this question indicated that active euthanasia, if it were legalized, should be performed only by physicians and should be taught at medical sites. CONCLUSION: Alberta physicians' support for the practice and legalization of active euthanasia decreased considerably between 1991 and 1994. However, most physicians remain in favour of restricting active euthanasia, if it were legalized, to the medical profession. These results suggest a

  13. A Follow-Up Study of 69 Discharged SARS Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩云; 庚慧; 冯维斌; 汤湘江; 欧爱华; 老膺荣; 许银姬; 林浩; 刘惠; 李咏文

    2003-01-01

    @@ Sixty-nine patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) discharged from Guangdong Provincial TCM Hospital were followed up from January to April 2003 during which the patients were asked to fill the questionnaire form and at the same time received blood routine examination, hepatic, renal,pulmonary and immune function tests, and spiral computerized tomography (CT) of the chest, color Bultrasonography of the heart with the collected data treated by descriptive analysis and deductive analysis.

  14. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  15. Paediatrician office follow-up of common minor fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelink, Eric; Boutis, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that minor paediatric fractures can be followed by primary care paediatricians (PCPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine PCP opinions, knowledge and perceived barriers to managing minor paediatric fractures in the office. METHODS: An online survey was sent between June and September 2013 to all paediatricians who subscribed to the American Academy of Pediatrics PROS-Net Listerv and to those who were registered with the Scott’s Canadian Medical Directory as paediatricians who treated children in a primary care capacity. The primary outcome was the proportion of PCPs who agreed with PCP follow-up of minor paediatric fractures. Secondary outcomes included PCP’s perceived barriers to office follow-up. RESULTS: A total of 1752 surveys were sent; 1235 were eligible and 459 (37.2%) responded to the survey. Overall, 296 (69.5% [95% CI 65.2% to 74.0%]) PCPs agreed that minor paediatric fractures could be followed in a PCP office. The most frequently reported barriers were lack of materials to replace immobilization (58.1%), PCP knowledge deficits (44.8%) and a perceived parental preference for an orthopedic surgeon (38.6%). Finally, 58.8% of respondents believed that further education was necessary if PCPs assumed responsibility for follow-up of midshaft clavicle fractures, while 66.5% and 77.1% (Pmanagement strategy, including a desire for more education on this topic. PMID:25382996

  16. Investigating follow-up outcome change using hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodniczuk, J S; Piper, W E; Joyce, A S

    2001-03-01

    Individual change in outcome during a one-year follow-up period for 98 patients who received either interpretive or supportive psychotherapy was examined using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). This followed a previous study that had investigated average (treatment condition) change during follow-up using traditional methods of data analysis (repeated measures ANOVA, chi-square tests). We also investigated whether two patient personality characteristics-quality of object relations (QOR) and psychological mindedness (PM)-predicted individual change. HLM procedures yielded findings that were not detected using traditional methods of data analysis. New findings indicated that the rate of individual change in outcome during follow-up varied significantly among the patients. QOR was directly related to favorable individual change for supportive therapy patients, but not for patients who received interpretive therapy. The findings have implications for determining which patients will show long-term benefit following short-term supportive therapy and how to enhance it. The study also found significant associations between QOR and final outcome level.

  17. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  18. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. Quality of evidence A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Main message Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Conclusion Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. PMID:27737976

  19. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessels, Jan-Albert, E-mail: janalbert.wessels@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Environmental Assessment, School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, Australia. (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  20. International clinical guideline for the management of classical galactosemia: diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Lindsey; Bernstein, Laurie E; Berry, Gerard T; Burlina, Alberto B; Eyskens, François; Gautschi, Matthias; Grünewald, Stephanie; Gubbels, Cynthia S; Knerr, Ina; Labrune, Philippe; van der Lee, Johanna H; MacDonald, Anita; Murphy, Elaine; Portnoi, Pat A; Õunap, Katrin; Potter, Nancy L; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Spencer, Jessica B; Timmers, Inge; Treacy, Eileen P; Van Calcar, Sandra C; Waisbren, Susan E; Bosch, Annet M

    2017-03-01

    Classical galactosemia (CG) is an inborn error of galactose metabolism. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and follow-up of CG are currently lacking, and treatment and follow-up have been demonstrated to vary worldwide. To provide patients around the world the same state-of-the-art in care, members of The Galactosemia Network (GalNet) developed an evidence-based and internationally applicable guideline for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of CG. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. A systematic review of the literature was performed, after key questions were formulated during an initial GalNet meeting. The first author and one of the working group experts conducted data-extraction. All experts were involved in data-extraction. Quality of the body of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were formulated. Whenever possible recommendations were evidence-based, if not they were based on expert opinion. Consensus was reached by multiple conference calls, consensus rounds via e-mail and a final consensus meeting. Recommendations addressing diagnosis, dietary treatment, biochemical monitoring, and follow-up of clinical complications were formulated. For all recommendations but one, full consensus was reached. A 93 % consensus was reached on the recommendation addressing age at start of bone density screening. During the development of this guideline, gaps of knowledge were identified in most fields of interest, foremost in the fields of treatment and follow-up.

  1. New psycho-pedagogic approach to obesity treatment: a 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buclin-Thiébaud, Sévrine; Pataky, Zoltan; Bruchez, Vanessa; Golay, Alain

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the body weight evolution in obese patients admitted for a 2-week residential program and followed-up on ambulatory basis, as well as to evaluate factors having impact on weight evolution after 5 years. Thirty-nine obese patients participated in a 2-week structured interdisciplinary weight loss program, involving individual and group therapies, and including physical activity, nutritional education and standard cognitive-behavioral techniques. Patients were then followed-up regularly by their general practitioners for 5 years. After 5 years, 33 subjects completed the study. Seventy percent of the patients lost weight or maintained their weight loss. Total score for dietary structure, eating behavior disorders, dietary surveillance and weight management strategies, as evaluated by a validated questionnaire, was significantly lower in the weight loss group (22.4+/-4.3) as compared to maintenance group (24.4+/-6.1, pactivity (p<0.05) that the regain group. The present study demonstrated that an initial multidimensional and multidisciplinary in-hospital program with a consecutive long-term ambulatory follow-up may lead to a significant weight loss (55%) and/or weight maintenance (15%). A multidisciplinary and well-designed initial treatment and long-term follow-up program is mandatory for obesity management. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High Risk Infants Follow-Up: A Case Study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A follow-up program for high risk infants was initiated in Alzahra Maternity Hospital in Tabriz city, Iran, in 2013. The aim of this paper is to give a brief report of the program. Material and Methods. Two groups of high risk neonates were studied. The first group comprising 509 infants received services in Alzahra Maternity Hospital implemented by the follow-up program. This included a full package for family to look after high risk infant and periodic clinical evaluation at two and four weeks after birth and then two, three, four, five, and six months later again. The second group including 131 infants in Taleqani Maternity Hospital received routine services after birth with no specific follow-up care. Results. Some anthropometric indices showed a significant improvement in the intervention hospital compared to control group. These included the following: head circumference at first and second months; weight in the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth months; and height in sixth month only. Clinical evaluation of infants showed an improvement for some of the medical conditions. Conclusion. Follow-up care program for a minimum of six months after discharge from maternity hospitals may help to avoid adverse and life threatening consequences in high risk infants.

  3. Children of Mothers at Psychosocial Risk Growing Up: A Follow up at the Age of 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsby, Marie; Svedin, Carl Goran; Sydsjo, Gunilla

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to make a 16-year follow-up of children of psychosocial risk mothers as concerns emotional/behavioural problems, self-esteem, life events, and academic grades. Forty-three teenagers (index group) and 61 reference teenagers were personally interviewed and asked to answer the Youth Self-report (YSR), the Self-image…

  4. Treatment of generalized social phobia : Results at long-term follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholing, A; Emmelkamp, PMG

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the long-term follow-up effectiveness-of (cognitive-)behavioural group and individual treatments for generalized social phobia. Patients were reassessed 18 months after they had finished one of the following treatment packages: (1) exposure in vivo; (2) cognitive therapy foll

  5. Transition Follow-Up System Development for Youth with Disabilities: Stakeholders' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youn-Young

    2014-01-01

    In this study I examined in depth the perspectives of stakeholders in Manitoba on the development and implementation of a transition follow-up system (TFS) for youth with disabilities. I conducted focus groups and individual interviews with a total of 76 stakeholders and obtained qualitative data. The stakeholders who participated in this study…

  6. Children of Mothers at Psychosocial Risk Growing Up: A Follow up at the Age of 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsby, Marie; Svedin, Carl Goran; Sydsjo, Gunilla

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to make a 16-year follow-up of children of psychosocial risk mothers as concerns emotional/behavioural problems, self-esteem, life events, and academic grades. Forty-three teenagers (index group) and 61 reference teenagers were personally interviewed and asked to answer the Youth Self-report (YSR), the Self-image…

  7. Panoramic imaging is not suitable for quantitative evaluation, classification, and follow up in unilateral condylar hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, J.W.; Karssemakers, L.H.E.; Grootendorst, D.C.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with suspected unilateral condylar hyperplasia are often screened radiologically with a panoramic radiograph, but this is not sufficient for routine diagnosis and follow up. We have therefore made a quantitative analysis and evaluation of panoramic radiographs in a large group of patients w

  8. Forgotten antibiotics: a follow-up inventory study in Europe, the USA, Canada and Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulcini, C.; Mohrs, S.; Beovic, B.; Gyssens, I.C.; Theuretzbacher, U.; Cars, O.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to update a 2011 survey, conducted on behalf of the ESCMID Study Group for Antibiotic Policies (ESGAP), studying the availability of old but clinically useful antibiotics in North America, Europe and Australia. This follow-up survey was performed in 2015 in 40

  9. Grupo de acompanhamento de portadores de Esquizofrenia em uso de Clozapina e de seus familiares: percepção dos participantes Grupo de seguimiento de portadores de Esquizofrenía con uso de Clozapina y de sús familiares: percepción de los participantes Follow-up group for Schizophrenic patients using Clozapine and their relatives: the participants' perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Sertori Durão

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo descreveu a visão do portador de Esquizofrenia e de seu familiar sobre o acompanhamento em grupo. A população constou de 11 pacientes que participam do grupo e 11 familiares que os acompanham com maior freqüência ao mesmo. Para coleta de dados foram utilizadas entrevistas. Estas foram gravadas e, posteriormente, transcritas na íntegra. Obteve-se que o grupo: constituiu espaço oportuno para conversar e ouvir sobre a doença, trocar experiências; proporcionou maior segurança e auto-estima para seus integrantes e melhora nos relacionamentos dos pacientes e, constituiu ajuda terapêutica para os familiares. Tais resultados apontam a necessidade de um novo olhar para o portador de transtorno mental, no sentido de buscar atitudes terapêuticas mais adequadas que atuem na produção de vida.Este estudio tuvo como objetivo describir la visión del portador de esquizofrenia y de su familia sobre el seguimiento en grupo. La población en estudio constó de 11 pacientes, que participaron del grupo y 11 familiares, que los acompañaban con mayor frecuencia. Para la recopilación de los datos se utilizaron entrevistas, las cuales fueron grabadas y, posteriormente, transcritas por entero. Como resultado se obtuvo que el grupo: crea un espacio adecuado y oportuno para conversar y oir sobre la enfermedad, intercambiar experiencias, proporciona más seguridad y auto-estima a sus integrantes, mejora las relaciones de los pacientes y otorga un ayuda terapéutica para los familiares. Tales resultados apuntan hacia la necesidad de una nueva visión sobre el portador de transtornos mentales, en el sentido de buscar actitudes terapéuticas más adecuadas que mejoren su calidad de vida.This study described the views of Schizophrenic patients as well as those of their relatives concerning the group follow-up. The population consisted of 11 patients participating in the group and of 11 relatives who most often accompanied them to group meetings

  10. Depressive symptoms in first-episode psychosis: a 10-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Nasrettin; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Evensen, Julie; Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Haahr, Ulrik; Ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Langeveld, Hans; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Melle, Ingrid; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Simonsen, Erik; Vaglum, Per; McGlashan, Thomas; Friis, Svein

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined if any patient characteristics at baseline predicted depressive symptoms at 10 years and whether patients prone to depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment had a different prognosis in the following years. A total of 299 first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were assessed for depressive symptoms with PANSS depression item (g6) at baseline, and 1, 2, 5 and 10 years of follow up. At 10 years, depressive symptoms were also assessed with Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). A PANSS g6 ≥ 4 and CDSS score ≥ 6 were used as a cut-off score for depression. A total of 122 (41%) patients were scored as depressed at baseline, 75 (28%) at 1 year, 50 (20%) at 2 years, 33 (16%) at 5 years, and 35 (19%) at 10 years of follow up. Poor childhood social functioning and alcohol use at baseline predicted depression at 10 years of follow up. Thirty-eight patients were depressed at both baseline and 1 year follow up. This group had poorer symptomatic and functional outcome in the follow-up period compared to a group of patients with no depression in the first year of treatment. Depressive symptoms are frequent among FEP patients at baseline but decrease after treatment because their general symptoms have been initiated. Patients with poor social functioning in childhood and alcohol use at baseline are more prone to have depressive symptoms at 10 years of follow up. Patients struggling with depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment should be identified as having poorer long-term prognosis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  12. Colonic resection for colovesical fistula: 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K. G; Anderson, J. H; Iskander, N; McKee, R. F; Finlay, I. G

    2002-07-01

    OBJECTIVES: The outcome of colovesical fistula management may be unsatisfactory; complications are reported in up to 45% of patients. Published studies are retrospective and tend to lack standardized management strategies and long-term follow-up. This cohort study assesses a policy of resection of colovesical fistulae in continuity with any distal colorectal stricture, and includes 5-year follow-up. METHOD: All patients undergoing surgery in our institution for colovesical fistula between February 1991 and April 1995 were entered into the study. The fistulae were resected in continuity with any distal bowel stricture, according to a standard single-stage operative protocol. Postoperative mortality and morbidity were recorded, and prospective review was undertaken at April 2000. RESULTS: Nineteen consecutive patients entered the study. The source of the fistula was diverticular disease (n = 14), colorectal cancer (n = 3), trauma (n = 1) or Crohn's (n = 1) disease. Thirteen patients had a colorectal stricture. One patient died due to ischaemic colitis within 30 days of surgery. Eleven other patients died of unrelated causes before April 2000, in whom there was no evidence of fistula recurrence before death at a median of 37 months after operation (range 2-95 months). At 5-year follow-up there was no evidence of fistula recurrence in the seven remaining patients. CONCLUSIONS: A policy of resection of the fistula and associated colorectal stricture with primary bowel anastomosis and bladder drainage, resulted in no recurrences and low morbidity. However comorbidity is important in this patient population, most of whom will die from unrelated causes within a few years.

  13. Education On Prehospital Pain Management: A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. French

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most common reason patients seek medical attention is pain. However,there may be significant delays in initiating prehospital pain therapy. In a 2001 qualityimprovement (QI study, we demonstrated improvement in paramedic knowledge,perceptions, and management of pain. This follow-up study examines the impact of thisQI program, repeated educational intervention (EI, and effectiveness of a new painmanagement standard operating procedure.Methods: 176 paramedics from 10 urban and suburban fire departments and two privateambulance services participated in a 3-hour EI. A survey was performed prior to the EI andrepeated one month after the EI. We reviewed emergency medical services (EMS runs withpain complaints prior to the EI and one month after the EI. Follow-up results were comparedto our prior study. We performed data analysis using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests.Results: The authors reviewed 352 surveys and 438 EMS runs with pain complaints. Usingthe same survey questions, even before the EI, 2007 paramedics demonstrated significantimprovement in the knowledge (18.2%; 95% CI 8.9%, 27.9%, perceptions (9.2%; 95% CI6.5%, 11.9%, and management of pain (13.8%; 95% CI 11.3%, 16.2% compared to 2001.Following EI in 2007, there were no significant improvements in the baseline knowledge (0%;95% CI 5.3%, 5.3% but significant improvements in the perceptions of pain principles (6.4%;95% CI 3.9%, 9.0% and the management of pain (14.7%; 95% CI 11.4%, 18.0%.Conclusion: In this follow up study, paramedics’ baseline knowledge, perceptions, andmanagement of pain have all improved from 6 years ago. Following a repeat educationalintervention, paramedics further improved their field management of pain suggestingparamedics will still benefit from both initial and also ongoing continuing education on thetopic of pain management.

  14. Cervical disc prosthesis: 2-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Pinto de Oliveira Bilhar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the medical records of patients who underwent surgery for placement of cervical disc prosthesis after two years of postoperative follow-up, showing the basic epidemiological data, the technical aspects and the incidence of complications.METHODS: Medical records of seven patients who underwent surgery for placement of cervical disc prosthesis were reviewed after two years of follow-up, at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo.RESULTS: The average age of patients participating in this study was 43.86 years. Six patients (85.7% had one level approached while one patient (14.3% had two levels addressed. The level C5-C6 has been approached in one patient (14.3% while the C6-C7 level was addressed in five patients (71.4%. One patient (14.3% had these two levels being addressed, C5-C6 and C6-C7. The mean operative time was 164.29±40 minutes. Three patients were hospitalized for 2 days and four for 3 days making an average of 2.57±0.535 days. Two patients (28.6% underwent a new surgical intervention due to loosening of the prosthesis. The mean follow-up was 28.14±5.178 months (23-35 months.CONCLUSIONS: Although cervical arthroplasty appears to be a safe procedure and present promising results in our study as well as in many other studies, it requires long-term studies.

  15. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this

  16. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  17. GRBs Optical follow-up observation at Lulin observatory, Taiwan

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K

    2005-01-01

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  18. Bobath or motor relearning programme? A follow-up one and four years post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhammer, Birgitta; Stanghelle, Johan K

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this follow-up one and four years post stroke was to find out whether the initial physiotherapy approach had had any long-term effects on mortality, motor function, postural control, activities of daily living, life quality, follow-up from community services and living conditions. A randomized controlled trial of first time ever stroke patients. Group 1 (n = 33) and group 2 (n = 28) had initial physiotherapy according to the Motor Relearning Programme and Bobath, respectively. The Motor Assessment Scale (MAS), the Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale (SMES), the Barthel ADL Index, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and Berg Balance Scale were used. The following parameters were also registered: incidence of new strokes, other diseases, use of assistive devices, the patient's accommodation and use of services from the community. The mortality rates were similar in the two groups. In both groups the motor function, postural control and ADL had decreased rapidly, leaving many of the patients dependent and with a high risk of falling. Life quality had increased compared to the acute stage, but was still low in comparison with healthy persons. Patients in both groups lived at home, but were dependent on help from relatives and community services. Physiotherapy as follow-up service was seldom used. The initial physiotherapy approach did not seem to have a major influence on the patients' ability to cope in the long-term. This follow-up at one and four years post stroke showed no major influence of two different initial physiotherapy regimens on long-term function. The study confirmed a rapid deterioration of ADL and motor function and an increased dependence on relatives. The study reveals a gap between the intense treatment in the acute phase and little or no follow-up of physiotherapy treatment or other rehabilitation activities later.

  19. Secure surveillance videotapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnik, W.M.; Kadner, S.P. [Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olsen, R.; Chitumbo, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pepper, S. [International Safeguards Project Office, Vienna (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    With assistance from the US Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), Aquila Technologies Group developed the Tamper-Resistant Analog Media (TRAM-1000) system to provide standard VHS surveillance video tapes with an enhanced tamper-indicating capability. This project represents further implementation of the partnership approach in facilities including light water reactors with MOX facilities. These facilities use Uniplex Digiquad system video tapes. The partnership approach ensures that one organization can exchange the tapes in a machine without the presence of the other, without losing continuity of information. The TRAM-1000 system development project was accomplished in two stages. In the first stage of the project, the original system delivered to the IAEA, consists of three parts: (1) the tamper detection unit, (2) a specially augmented VHS video tape, and (3) an HP-95 reader. The tamper detection unit houses a VACOSS active fiber-optic seal and an electronic identification tag (E-TAG) reader. In the second stage of the project, the original TRAM-1000 was modified to its current design based on agency input. After delivery of the original TRAM-1000 system to the IAEA, it was reviewed by inspectors. The inspectors felt that the initial system`s tape storage/transport method could be simplified. Rather than threading the fiber through the tape spindles, the inspectors suggested that the tape be placed in a bag capable of being sealed. Also, a more flexible fiber-optic cable was recommended. As a result of these suggestions, Aquila developed a tamper-proof bag specifically for holding a surveillance video tape and sealable with a VACOSS fiber optical seal.

  20. Dr. Leary's Concord Prison Experiment: a 34-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblin, R

    1998-01-01

    This study is a long-term follow-up to the Concord Prison Experiment, one of the best-known studies in the psychedelic psychotherapy literature. The Concord Prison Experiment was conducted from 1961 to 1963 by a team of researchers at Harvard University under the direction of Timothy Leary. The original study involved the administration of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy to 32 prisoners in an effort to reduce recidivism rates. This follow-up study involved a search through the state and federal criminal justice system records of 21 of the original 32 subjects, as well as personal interviews with two of the subjects and three of the researchers: Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner and Gunther Weil. The results of the follow-up study indicate that published claims of a treatment effect were erroneous. This follow-up study supports the emphasis in the original reports on the necessity of embedding psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy with inmates within a comprehensive treatment plan that includes post-release, nondrug group support programs. Despite substantial efforts by the experimental team to provide post-release support, these services were not made sufficiently available to the subjects in this study. Whether a new program of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy and post-release programs would significantly reduce recidivism rates is an empirical question that deserves to be addressed within the context of a new experiment.

  1. Use of Videotape Feedback with Severely Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jane; Blitstein, Sheldon

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the design and effects of a group therapy project using videotape feedback with seriously disturbed adolescents. Offers anecdotal evidence that the feedback facilitated the correction of the participants' distorted body images, low self-esteem, lack of capacity for self-observation, and poor peer relationships. (SS)

  2. Demographic factors associated with loss to follow up in the management of chronic otitis media: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, R; Fox, R; Srinivasan, R; Majithia, A; Singh, A

    2016-02-01

    The likelihood of a patient attending regular follow up can affect decision making when planning and performing tympanomastoid surgery. This study investigated whether demographic factors were associated with loss to follow up. A database of patients who had been investigated and treated for chronic otitis media was searched. Patients lost to follow up and a matching sample of patients who were formally discharged were identified. The demographic factors of age, sex and postcode were compared between the two groups. The information collected was also used to provide measures of deprivation. Fifty patients in each group were identified. Patients lost to follow up were significantly younger than patients formally discharged (p < 0.02), and were more likely to live in an area of education and training deprivation (p < 0.05). Younger patient age, and living in an area of education and training deprivation, are associated with a higher incidence of loss to follow up.

  3. Effects of a group rational-emotive behavior therapy program on the Type A behavior pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, A T; Botha, H C

    1996-06-01

    A sample of 44 male Type A insurance representatives, selected by means of the Videotaped Structured Interview, were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 22) and a delayed treatment control group (n = 22). The treatment group participated in 9 weekly sessions of group Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy and were followed up after 10 weeks. After the control period, the delayed treatment control group received the same treatment program. Repeated measurements were obtained by means of the Videotaped Structured Interview, Jenkins Activity Survey, Cook-Medley Hostility Scale, and Type A Cognitive Questionnaire. Self and spouse/friend ratings of Type A behavior were obtained by means of the Bortner Rating Scale. Analysis indicated that, compared to the control condition, the therapy significantly reduced the intensity of Type A behavior and its time urgency component. These improvements were maintained at follow-up and were accompanied by self-reports of significant positive changes in Type A behavior and irrational beliefs.

  4. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: A 13-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Antonio Guerrero-González

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with poikiloderma and other clinical features, affecting the bones and eyes and, in type II RTS, presenting an increased risk for malignancy. With about 300 cases reported so far, we present a 13-year follow-up including clinical images, X-rays and genetic analysis. A 13-month-old female started with a facial rash with blisters on her cheeks and limbs at the age of 3 months along with congenital hypoplastic thumbs, frontal bossing and fine hair, eyebrows and eyelashes. The patient was lost to follow-up and returned 12 years later with palmoplantar hyperkeratotic lesions, short stature, disseminated poikiloderma and sparse scalp hair, with absence of eyelashes and eyebrows. Radiographic analysis showed radial ray defect, absence of the thumb and three wrist carpal bones, and reduced bone density. Gene sequencing for the RECQL4 helicase gene revealed a mutation on each allele. RTS is a rare disease, and in this patient we observed the evolution of her skin lesions and other clinical features, which were important for the classification of type II RTS. The next years will provide even more information on this rare disease.

  5. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; de SOUZA, Karen Regina Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment. PMID:23032213

  6. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cold urticaria: a 20-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S V; Mullins, R J

    2016-12-01

    Chronic cold urticaria results in significant morbidity, yet information on its natural history is limited. We examined the natural history of chronic cold urticaria and its impact on quality of life. We analysed the characteristics of patients diagnosed with cold urticaria at a community-based specialist allergy practice in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) between 1995 and 2015. Follow-up data were obtained using a mailed questionnaire. Possible predictive factors of disease severity and symptom duration were evaluated. A total of 99 patients were assessed with a median age of 42 (range 5-81 years); 63% were female and the median age of onset of symptoms was 22 years. Of 41 questionnaire responders (14 ± 10.9 years follow-up; median 12 years), 5- and 10-year resolution rates were 17.9% ± 6.2% and 24.5% ± 7.2%, respectively. Whereas 22% reported resolution and 23% described improvement, the remaining 55% reported stable or worsening disease. Most individuals relied on lifestyle modification to ameliorate symptoms rather than medication. Risk factors for persistent disease were intercurrent atopic disease (P = 0.025) and those with longer duration of symptoms at the time of initial assessment (P urticaria were identified in only two patients, both with B-cell malignancy. In a subset of patients, cold urticaria has low rates of spontaneous resolution and results in lifestyle changes and impaired quality of life. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Souza, Karen Regina Siqueira de

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  9. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program, and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  10. THE FOLLOW-UP STUDY IN α-KETOADIPIC ACIDURIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To follow up study on α-ketoadipic aciduria , which is a rare inborn error of metabolism of L-ly sine, hydroxy-L-lysine, and L-tryptophan. Methods The case with α-ketoadipic aciduria was investigated clinically and metabolites were detected by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques during a period of 15 years (9months~ 15years). Results The case had growth retardation at the onset but later grew normally. The urinary metabolites showed persisent abnormality compatible with α-ketoadipic aciduria. The concentrations of α-ketoadipate , α-aminoadipate and α-hy droxyadipate were 33mmol/mol creatinine, 92~266mmol/mol creatinine and 17~28mmol/mol creatinine , respectively. Glutarate also increased in their urine. Conclusion The study suggested the clinical course of a-ketoadipic aciduria is benign and the clinical manifestations are various. The follow-up study on this case with α-ketoadipic aciduria must be continued.

  11. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  12. Overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data in 32 diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Makoto; Nagai, Akiko; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Yamagata, Zentaro; Kubo, Michiaki; Muto, Kaori; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Mushiroda, Taisei; Murakami, Yoshinori; Yuji, Koichiro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ohnishi, Yozo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    We established a patient-oriented biobank, BioBank Japan, with information on approximately 200,000 patients, suffering from any of 47 common diseases. This follow-up survey focused on 32 diseases, potentially associated with poor vital prognosis, and collected patient survival information, including cause of death. We performed a survival analysis for all subjects to get an overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data. A total of 141,612 participants were included. The survival data were last updated in 2014. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed after categorizing subjects according to sex, age group, and disease status. Relative survival rates were estimated using a survival-rate table of the Japanese general population. Of 141,612 subjects (56.48% male) with 1,087,434 person-years and a 97.0% follow-up rate, 35,482 patients died during follow-up. Mean age at enrollment was 64.24 years for male subjects and 63.98 years for female subjects. The 5-year and 10-year relative survival rates for all subjects were 0.944 and 0.911, respectively, with a median follow-up duration of 8.40 years. Patients with pancreatic cancer had the least favorable prognosis (10-year relative survival: 0.184) and patients with dyslipidemia had the most favorable prognosis (1.013). The most common cause of death was malignant neoplasms. A number of subjects died from diseases other than their registered disease(s). This is the first report to perform follow-up survival analysis across various common diseases. Further studies should use detailed clinical and genomic information to identify predictors of mortality in patients with common diseases, contributing to the implementation of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A predictive scoring instrument for tuberculosis lost to follow-up outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is troublesome, due to long therapy duration, quick therapeutic response which allows the patient to disregard about the rest of their treatment and the lack of motivation on behalf of the patient for improved. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the probability of lost to follow-up outcome in TB patients as a way to identify patients suitable for directly observed treatments (DOT) and other interventions to improve adherence. Methods Two prospective cohorts, were used to develop and validate a logistic regression model. A scoring system was constructed, based on the coefficients of factors associated with a lost to follow-up outcome. The probability of lost to follow-up outcome associated with each score was calculated. Predictions in both cohorts were tested using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results The best model to predict lost to follow-up outcome included the following characteristics: immigration (1 point value), living alone (1 point) or in an institution (2 points), previous anti-TB treatment (2 points), poor patient understanding (2 points), intravenous drugs use (IDU) (4 points) or unknown IDU status (1 point). Scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 points were associated with a lost to follow-up probability of 2,2% 5,4% 9,9%, 16,4%, 15%, and 28%, respectively. The ROC curve for the validation group demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0,67 [95% CI; 0,65-0,70]). Conclusion This model has a good capacity to predict a lost to follow-up outcome. Its use could help TB Programs to determine which patients are good candidates for DOT and other strategies to improve TB treatment adherence. PMID:22938040

  14. Apparent diffusion coefficient parametric response mapping MRI for follow-up of glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seo-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Sung; Hong, Gil Sun; Kim, Sang Joon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yoon [Bundang Jesaeng Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To determine the diagnostic superiority of parametric response mapping of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCPR) for predicting glioblastoma treatment response, compared to single time point measurement. Fifty post-treatment glioblastoma patients were enrolled. ADCPR was calculated from serial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps acquired before and at the time of first detection of an enlarged contrast-enhancing lesion on voxel-by-voxel basis. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR and tenth percentile histogram cutoff value of ADC (ADC10) were compared at subsequent 3-month and 1-year follow-ups. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR was significantly higher in the progression group (mean = 33.2-38.3 %) than in the stable-response group (mean = 9.7 %) at 3 months follow-up (corrected p < 0.001 for both readers). ADCPR significantly improved area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.67 to 0.88 (corrected p = 0.037) and from 0.70 to 0.92 (corrected p = 0.020) for both readers, respectively, compared to ADC10 at 3-month follow-up, but did not significantly improve at 1-year follow-up. The inter-reader agreement was higher for ADCPR than ADC10 (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.93 versus 0.86). Voxel-based ADCPR appears to be a superior imaging biomarker than ADC, particularly for predicting early tumour progression in patients with glioblastoma. (orig.)

  15. Long term follow-up of a randomised controlled trial of services for urinary symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Nicola J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the extent and priority of urinary symptoms there is little evidence available to inform service provision in relation to the long term effects of interventions. This study aims to determine the long term (6 year clinical effectiveness and costs of a new continence nurse led service compared to standard care for urinary symptoms. Methods A long term follow-up study of a 2-arm, non-blinded randomised controlled trial that recruited from a community based population between 1998-2000 in Leicestershire and Rutland UK was undertaken. 3746 men and women aged 40 years and over were followed up from the original trial. The continence nurse practitioner (CNP intervention comprised a continence service provided by specially trained nurses delivering evidence-based interventions using pre-determined care pathways. The standard care (SC arm comprised access to existing primary care including General Practitioner and continence advisory services in the area. Primary outcome: Improvement in one or more symptom. Secondary outcomes included: a Leicester Impact scale; b patient perception of problem; c number of symptoms alleviated and cost-effectiveness; all were recorded at long term follow-up (average 6 years post-randomisation. Results Overall at long-term follow-up (average 6 years significantly more individuals in the CNP group (72% had improved (i.e had fewer symptoms compared to those in the SC group (67% (difference of 5% 95% (CI = 0.6 to 9;p = 0.02. Conclusion The differences in outcome between the two randomised groups shown immediately post treatment had decreased by half in terms of symptom improvement at long term follow-up. Although the difference was statistically significant, the clinical significance may not be, although the direction of the difference favoured the new CNP service.

  16. Videotapes

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanne, A

    1989-01-01

    1666 : impact de la creation de l'Academie des Sciences par Colbert, trente ans apres le proces de Galile, et au moment des disparitions de Pascal, Descartes et Fermat. Elle dirigee par le hollandais Huyggens jusqu'a sa fuite de France au moment de la revocation de l'Edit de Nantes. - 1750 : l'Encyclopedie (ou "Dictionnaire raisonne des Sciences, des Arts et des Metiers") de Diderot et d'Alembert, soutenus par Malherbes, Buffon, Condorcet et Rousseau. - 1789 : Revolution francaise. - 8 aout 1793 : l'Assemblee, par une declaration de Marat, dissout l'Academie des Sciences. Celle-ci continue cependant ses travaux pour les poids et mesures jusqu'en 1795. - la Terreur : la condamnation a mort, pas au nom d'une "Revolution qui n'a pas besoin de savants", de trois grands hommes de science : Lavoisier, Bailly et Condorcet. - 1793-1794 : Au printemps 93, le Comite de Salut Publique s'inquiete du demi-million de soldats etrangers de toutes les pays frontaliers qui essaient de penetrer en France pour occuper le pays. C...

  17. Follow-up on Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Three Dimensional Ultrasound: Volume Versus Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulam, Q M; Bredahl, K K; Lönn, L; Rouet, L; Sillesen, H H; Eiberg, J P

    2017-10-01

    Rupture risk in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is assessed using AAA diameter; yet 10% of ruptures occur in a small aneurysm. This underlines the inadequacy of diameter as a standalone parameter. In this prospective follow-up study, ultrasound determined aneurysm diameter was compared with aneurysm volume determined by three dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) in a group of 179 AAAs. This was a prospective cohort study with repeated diameter and volume measurements by 3D-US. In total, 179 patients with small infrarenal AAAs (diameter 30-55 mm) were enrolled consecutively. At enrolment and at 12 month follow-up, maximum diameter, using dual plane technique, and three dimensional volume were measured. Based on a previous accuracy study, significant change in diameter and volume were defined as an increase exceeding the known range of variability (ROV) of each US technique; ±3.7 mm and ±8.8 mL, respectively. Post-hoc Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to estimate time to conversion to treatment after the conclusion of the follow-up period between two groups. In total, 125 patients (70%) had an unchanged diameter during follow-up. In this group, 50 patients (40%) had an increasing aortic volume. Forty-five (83%) of the 54 patients with an increasing aortic diameter showed a corresponding volume increase. During a median follow-up of 367 days (364-380 days), a mean increase in diameter of 2.7 mm (±2.6 mm) and a mean increase in volume of 11.6 mL (±9.9 mL) were recorded. In post-hoc analysis, it was found that more AAAs with a stable diameter and a growing volume than AAAs with a stable diameter and volume were undergoing aortic repair during follow-up, based on the maximum diameter. In this cohort of small AAAs, 40% of patients with a stable diameter had an increasing volume at 12 month follow-up. From this perspective, 3D-US could have a future supplemental role in AAA surveillance programmes. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published

  18. [Obesity surgery--useful knowledge in indication and follow up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiwiller, A; Sykora, M

    2009-10-07

    In the last years, obesity has become one of the main problems of health care systems in Western countries. Among morbid obese patients, four out of five will develop comorbidities doubling the mortality risk in women and increase the numbers in men at a threefold risk. According to evidence based guidelines, nowadays surgery is the best and most effective treatment resulting in excellent long-term weight loss, reduction of comorbidities while extending expectation of life. A sound indication is the most important step for successful surgery. In this paper we focus on Swiss regulations and some special indications which have to be taken into consideration. After bariatric surgery clinical follow up on a regular basis is also of great importance. Furthermore, we explain typical mechanical and nutritional complications after different types of surgery and give some recommendations.

  19. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nordbye-Nielsen, Kirsten; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne;

    2016-01-01

    -15 years and children with symptoms of CP aged 0-5 years. MAIN VARIABLES: In the follow-up program, the children are offered examinations throughout their childhood by orthopedic surgeons, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and pediatricians. Examinations of gross and fine motor function, manual...... ability, muscle tone, passive range of motion, use of orthotics, and assistive devices are performed once a year; radiographic examination of the hips is planned based on the child's age and gross motor function; and the diagnosis is performed once before the age of 5 years. Six indicators were developed...... based on scientific literature and consensus in the steering committee, and their calculation is based on the following four main variables: radiographic examination of the hip, gross motor function, manual ability, and diagnosis. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The 2014 annual report includes results of the quality...

  20. Home/community monitoring using telephonic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elisabeth Moy; French, Louis; Janos, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Service members who have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a war theatre [Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)] may have associated injuries far different and/or more complex (i.e., polytrauma) than injuries obtained outside the theatre of operation. This article expands on what has been learned from monitoring patients injured during peacetime to the newly injured war veterans being monitored in the home setting via routine telephonic follow-up. As Tanielian et al. state TBI, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression may occur during and following deployment/s which then pose a significant health risk to these veterans. This is particularly important as veterans of these two conflicts may incur these "invisible wounds of war". Thus, safe and effective monitoring of these veterans by nurses/case managers in the home/community setting becomes important in the recovery process.

  1. Spheroid degeneration of conjunctiva and cornea. Two years' follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M

    1980-10-01

    Twenty-six subjects with spheroid degeneration were followed up after two years. The number of colourless conjunctival droplets was seen to have increased by on an average 46% (2 alpha = 0.05) and that of autofluorescent conjunctival droplets by 223% (2 alpha less than 0.01). Counting within the individual sites sites disclosed that some droplets will disappear (not less than 30 and 21% respectivelY), while recently formed will constitute at least 76 and 243%. The number of areas with band-shaped keratopathy was found to rise from 3 to 26 (P less than 0.001) out of 104 possibilities, (nasally and temporally of right and left eye). Vital staining (fluorescein, rose bengal, tetrazolium, alcian blue) showed the epithelium above the droplets to be intact, and the droplet-containing eyes were found not to be abnormally dry (break up time, tear production).

  2. Vertebral sarcoidosis: long-term follow-up with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefere, M. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Larbi, A.; Malghem, J.; Vande Berg, B.; Dallaudiere, B. [University Hospitals St Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Vertebral involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and its clinical and imaging features are non-specific. Indeed, because the lesions are hard to differentiate from metastatic disease based on imaging alone, a histological confirmation is advised. Fatty replacement is a well-known finding indicating stabilization and healing in both benign and malignant conditions. It can be used as an indicator of a favorable disease course and response to treatment. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman with multifocal vertebral sarcoidosis lesions and long-term follow-up showing progressive and gradual fatty involution on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during 4 years of steroid treatment with a final favorable outcome. (orig.)

  3. MANDIBULAR INCISOR EXTRACTION: A 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir BEYCAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents the mandibular incisor extraction treatment of a patient with dental Class I malocclusion and lower crowding, in whom one mandibular incisor extraction was selected as the treatment of choice to improve the dental occlusion. A 19-year-old male patient’s chief complaint was the crowding of lower incisors. He had a straight profile with normal upper and lower lip projection. Upper and lower dental midlines were coincident with the facial midline. The patient had Class I molar and canine relationships on both sides. He had Class I skeletal relationship, low angle vertical pattern, and proclined upper and lower incisors. The treatment plan included the extraction of lower right central incisor to resolve the crowding. At the end of 16-month active fixed treatment, lower dental crowding was resolved. At the 5-year follow-up, the patient had a stable occlusion, with the results of the orthodontic treatment maintained.

  4. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 2): Procedure and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation requires more than just interventional radiology skills. Patients must be selected carefully, and the acts that need to be done before, during, and after the procedure must be coordinated. To guarantee patient safety, radiologists need to know the variants of the technique, the precautions that must be taken, the complications that can occur, and the risks involved. Early differentiation between tumor tissue and normal changes secondary to treatment on imaging tests will make it possible to repeat the treatment without delays, and this will increase survival. This article describes how to coordinate and carry out pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, the complications of the technique, and the current evidence in follow-up. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic Whiteboards and Intensive Care Unit follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kija Lin; Brandrup, Morten

    /collaboration and 2) information. However no literature has been found on how to maintain the communication and collaboration between wards when time of the respectively project has run out. Research on electronic whiteboards in hospital settings find that supporting communication between e.g. wards and the transfer......This paper is reviewing the existing literature on Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Outreach, in-hospital follow up 24 hours after the transition to a general ward from an ICU. It also touches upon the use of Electronic Whiteboards in a hospital setting and how the electronic whiteboards might support...... of information is optimized using an electronic whiteboard. Negative findings in the research on electronic whiteboards are present too e.g. it is crucial to have the same use language when sharing the same interface and reports on system in-flexibility; dash-board (standardized use of language) vs. open...

  6. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  7. Role of imaging in glaucoma diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizzeri Gianmarco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review is to provide an update on the role of imaging devices in the diagnosis and follow-up of glaucoma with an emphasis on techniques for detecting glaucomatous progression and the newer spectral domain optical coherence tomography instruments. Imaging instruments provide objective quantitative measures of the optic disc and the retinal nerve fiber layer and are increasingly utilized in clinical practice. This review will summarize the recent enhancements in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser polarimetry, and optical coherence tomography with an emphasis on how to utilize these techniques to manage glaucoma patients and highlight the strengths and limitations of each technology. In addition, this review will briefly describe the sophisticated data analysis strategies that are now available to detect glaucomatous change overtime.

  8. Facilitation of DDD follow-up using the DDT mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, W; Nitschke, M; Gutschker, A; Worzewski, W

    1992-11-01

    To facilitate follow-up, modern dual chamber pacemakers provide a variety of diagnostic features like ECG interpretation channels and intracardiac electrograms. For evaluation of the sensing performance at rest and during exercise, for assessment of the presence of crosstalk, and for measurement of the retrograde conduction time, dual chamber triggered pacing, particularly the DDT mode, can be used alternatively or additionally in pacemakers equipped with this option. In contrast to ECG interpretation channels, ECG documentation is not required for evaluation of the sensing performance, because the triggered pulses serving as markers for sense events can also be seen on the monitor. Selection of the DDT mode not only as temporary but also as permanent program serves to facilitate pacemaker ECG interpretation for exercise tests and Holter recordings as well.

  9. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bussmann, Shane [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78731 (United States); Lonsdale, Carol [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rho, Jeonghee [SETI Institute, 189 BERNARDO Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Stanford, S. Adam, E-mail: jingwen.wu@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  10. Male sexual dysfunctions and multimedia immersion therapy (follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optale, Gabriele; Marin, Silvia; Pastore, Massimiliano; Nasta, Alberto; Pianon, Carlo

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency, after 1 year, of combined use of psychodynamic psychotherapy integrating virtual reality (VR) for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and premature ejaculation (PE) in 160 heterosexual males who had neither any prior sexual therapy nor had made use (either before, during or after therapy) of any specific pharmaceuticals for the treatment of primary sexual dysfunction. All subjects had given their informed consent. After a clinical diagnosis in an andrologic center, 50 presumably psychological ED (average age 43.7 years), 60 mixed ED (53.9 years) and 50 primary PE (39 years) who suffered these problems over 6 months were undergoing a cycle of 12 sessions, over a 25-week period, of psychotherapy, integrating an audio CD and helmet with miniature television screens that projected specially designed CD-ROM program on the ontogenetic development of male sexual identity. The clinical follow up was done after 6 and 12 months after the cycle. After one year, the overall partial (two times out of three) and complete positive response rate for psychological ED was 75%, for mixed ED was 47% and for PE was 54%. We considered drop-out cases as only before the 7th session of the treatment cycle, the drop-outs after session 7 and the patients that did not show up for follow-up are counted as negative results. Two patients reported nausea and one, vertigo during the first 15-min virtual reality experience. Considering the particular way that full-immersion virtual reality involves the subject who experiences it, we hypothesized that this methodological approach could speed up the therapeutic process. The evidence that positive results persist over time allows us to hypothesize that certain changes in cerebral function can be possible and that these changes are correlated to favorable sexual performance in the male.

  11. Rectal leiomyosarcoma, three-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Alves Figueiredo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rectal leiomyosarcomas are rare tumors originated from smooth muscle cells. Differential diagnosis includes gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, leiomyomas or schwannomas, and the differentiation of these tumors is usually made through immunohistochemistry. Due to its rarity, the standard treatment has not been defined. The purpose of this study was to present the follow-up of a patient with leiomyosarcoma of medium rectum submitted to exclusive operative treatment. The tumor size was 6 cm and it had a high mitotic index. The patient remains with good urinary function and good sphincter function, and free of the disease after a three-year follow-up.Os leiomiossarcomas retais são tumores raros e originários de células de músculo liso. O diagnóstico diferencial inclui tumores estromais do trato gastrointestinal (GIST, leiomiomas ou schwannomas, e a diferenciação desses tumores normalmente é feita por imunohistoquímica. Devido a sua raridade, o tratamento-padrão ainda não está bem definido. O objetivo deste relato foi mostrar o seguimento de um paciente com leiomiossarcoma de reto médio submetido a tratamento operatório exclusivo. O paciente se manteve com bom controle urinário e boa função evacuatória. O tumor tinha alto índice mitótico e tamanho de 6 cm, mas não há sinais de recidiva após três anos da operação.

  12. Long-term follow-up of elite controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Kristen A.; Rikhtegaran Tehrani, Zahra; Saadat, Saman; Ebadi, Maryam; Redfield, Robert R.; Sajadi, Mohammad M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To estimate the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on the development of complications and progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease among HIV-infected elite controllers. Single-center retrospective cohort. Kaplan–Meier methods, prevalence ratios, and Cox proportional-hazards models were used. In all, 55 HIV-infected elite controllers were included in this study. Among them, 45% were HIV/HCV coinfected and 55% were HIV mono-infected. Median follow-up time for the cohort was 11 years. Twenty-five patients experienced a complication and 16 lost elite controller status during the study period. HCV coinfected patients were 4.78 times (95% confidence interval 1.50–15.28) more likely to develop complications compared with HIV mono-infected patients. There was no association between HCV coinfection status and loss of elite control (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.27–2.06). Hepatitis C virus coinfection was significantly associated with the risk of complications even after controlling for sex, injecting drug use, and older age. HCV coinfected patients had higher levels of cellular activation while also having similar levels of lipopolysaccharide and soluble CD14. HCV coinfection was not associated with loss of elite controller status. Taken together, this suggests that HCV coinfection does not directly affect HIV replication dynamics or natural history, but that it may act synergistically with HIV to produce a greater number of associated complications. Continued follow-up will be needed to determine whether HCV cure through the use of direct-acting antivirals among HIV/HCV coinfected elite controllers will make the risk for complications among these patients similar to their HIV mono-infected counterparts. PMID:28658155

  13. The Iowa follow-up of chemically sensitive persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D W; Okiishi, C; Schlosser, S

    2001-03-01

    Clinical symptoms and self-reported health status in persons reporting multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) are presented from a 9-year follow-up study. Eighteen (69%) subjects from a sample of 26 persons originally interviewed in 1988 were followed up in 1997 and given structured interviews and self-report questionnaires. In terms of psychiatric diagnosis, 15 (83%) met DSM-IV criteria for a lifetime mood disorder, 10 (56%) for a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 10 (56%) for a lifetime somatoform disorder. Seven (39%) of subjects met criteria for a personality disorder using the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-IV. Self-report data from the Illness Behavior Questionnaire and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised show little change from 1988. The 10 most frequent complaints attributed to MCS were headache, memory loss, forgetfulness, sore throat, joint aches, trouble thinking, shortness of breath, back pain, muscle aches, and nausea. Global assessment showed that 2 (11%) had "remitted", 8 (45%) were "much" or "very much" improved, 6 (33%) were "improved", and 2 (11%) were "unchanged/worse". Mean scores on the SF-36 health survey showed that, compared to U.S. population means, subjects reported worse physical functioning, more bodily pain, worse general health, worse social functioning, and more emotional-role impairment; self-reported mental health was better than the U.S. population mean. All subjects maintained a belief that they had MCS; 16 (89%) acknowledged that the diagnosis was controversial. It is concluded that the subjects remain strongly committed to their diagnosis of MCS. Most have improved since their original interview, but many remain symptomatic and continue to report ongoing lifestyle changes.

  14. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  15. Clinical outcome and follow-up of prenatal hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Safaei Asl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis is probably the most common congenital abnormality detected prenatally by ultrasonography This study was performed to determine the cause and outcome of prenatal hydronephrosis in our hospital. A total of 45 infants, with 57 prenatally hydronephrotic renal units, were enrolled into this study. For the purpose of this study, the degree of hydronephrosis was defined as mild, moderate or severe. Postnatal ultrasonography was performed as soon as possible in those with bilateral hyronephrosis and 3-7 days after birth in those with unilateral hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 6-8 weeks time. In the absence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, Diethylenetriamene penta acetate scan was performed to exclude obstructive uropathy. There were 29 males and 16 females (male:female ratio 1.8:1, and unilateral and bilateral hydronephrosis were seen in 33 (73% and 12 (27% of the cases, res-pectively. Hydronephrosis was caused by ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO in 20 (44.5%, VUR in 10 (22.2%, ureterovesical junction obstruction in four (8.9 %, posteriorurethral valves in four (8.9 %, UPJO with VUR in two (4.4% and non-VUR non-obstructive in one (2.2%. During follow-up, 16 patients (35.5% required operative intervention while seven (15.5% improved spontaneously. Fetal hydronephrosis needs close follow-up during both ante-natal and postnatal periods. In this study, the most common cause for hydronephrosis were UPJO and VUR. Also seen in this study is the noteworthy point that mild fetal hydronephrosis is relatively benign and does not require surgical intervention in most cases and surgery should be performed only if there is renal function compromise. Prenatal consultation with a pediatric nephrologist and urologist is useful in decreasing parental anxiety and facilitating postnatal management.

  16. Study protocol: follow-up home visits with nutrition: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Anne Marie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geriatric patients are at high risk of re-admission after discharge. Pre-existing nutritional risk amongst these patients is of primary concern, with former nutritional intervention studies being largely ineffective. None of these studies has included individual dietary counselling by a registered dietician or has considered competing medical conditions in the participants. A former randomised study has shown that comprehensive discharge follow-up in geriatric patients homes by general practitioners and district nurses was effective in reducing the re-admission risk in the intervention group compared to the control group. That study did not include a nutritional intervention. The purpose of this study is to assess the combined benefits of an intervention consisting of discharge follow-up in geriatric patients' home by a general practitioner and a registered dietician. Methods/design This single-blind randomised controlled study, will recruit 160 hospitalised geriatric medical patients (65+ y at nutritional risk. Participants will be randomly allocated to receive in their homes, either 12 weeks individualised nutritional counselling by a registered dietician complemented with follow-up by general practitioners or a 12 weeks follow-up by general practitioners alone. Discussion This trial is the first of its kind to provide individual nutritional intervention combined with follow-up by general practitioner as an intervention to reduce risk of re-admission after discharge among geriatric medical patients. The results will hopefully help to guide the development of more effective rehabilitation programs following hospital admissions, which may ultimately lead to reduced health care costs, and improvement in mobility, independence and quality of life for geriatric patients at nutritional risk. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov 2010 NCT01249716

  17. Self-assessment of drinking on the Internet--3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski-Jännes, Anja; Cunningham, John; Tolonen, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to report on the results of a pilot study of a web-based self-assessment service (DHT) for Finnish drinkers (www.paihdelinkki.fi/testaa/juomatapatesti). During the 7-month recruitment period in 2004 altogether 22,536 anonymous self-assessments were recorded in the database of this service. The study sample was recruited from the 1598 service users who also participated to a survey evaluating the DHT. Those who consented by providing required baseline data and their e-mail address (n = 343) were sent a message asking them to fill in the follow-up questions 3, 6 and 12 months later. Their self-reported use of alcohol and drinking-related problems served as the main outcome variables in this single-group follow-up study. At 3, 6 and 12 months, 78%, 69% and 61% of the study participants, respectively, responded to the follow-up. The intention-to-treat (ITT) results revealed significant reductions (P < 0.001) in all the outcome measures. The reductions occurred during the first 3 months, after which the changes were non-significant. The results are in line with previous studies with mostly shorter follow-up periods suggesting that Internet-based self-assessment services can be useful tools in reducing excessive drinking. A randomized controlled trial would, however, increase our certainty about the causes of the observed changes.

  18. Evolution of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: results of a multicenter study at 20 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti, S; Jouve, J-L; Morin, C; Wolff, S; Sales de Gauzy, J; Chalopin, A; Ibnoulkhatib, A; Polirsztok, E; Walter, A; Schuller, S; Abelin-Genevois, K; Leroux, J; Lechevallier, J; Kabaj, R; Mary, P; Fuentes, S; Parent, H; Garin, C; Bin, K; Peltier, E; Blondel, B; Chopin, D

    2015-09-01

    To date there is no consensus on therapeutic indications in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) with curvature between 30° and 60° at the end of growth. The objective of this study was to assess outcome in patients with moderate AIS. A multicenter retrospective study was conducted. Inclusion criteria were: Cobb angle, 30-60° at end of growth; and follow-up > 20 years. The data collected were angular values in adolescence and at last follow-up, and quality of life scores at follow-up. A total of 258 patients were enrolled: 100 operated on in adolescence, 116 never operated on, and 42 operated on in adulthood. Mean follow-up was 27.8 years. Cobb angle progression significantly differed between the 3 groups: 3.2° versus 8.8° versus 23.6°, respectively; P scoliosis, the risk of progression to ≥ 20° was significantly higher for initial Cobb angle > 35° (OR=4.278, P=0.002). There were no significant differences in quality of life scores. Patients operated on in adolescence showed little radiological progression, demonstrating the efficacy of surgical treatment for curvature greater than 50°. Curvature greater than 40° was progressive and may require surgery in adulthood. Lumbar scoliosis showed greater potential progression than thoracic scoliosis in adulthood, requiring fusion as of 35° angulation. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of a weight loss program in obese adolescents: a long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Rohm

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Obesity during adolescence is an increasing health problem in industrial countries. The comorbidities associated with obesity include important metabolic diseases. Methods: To analyze the effect of a weight-loss program, we recruited 12 obese, male adolescents before entering this program. We determined body weight measures at baseline, 6-week and 36-month follow-up. Also, the long-term changes of blood pressure, HbAlc, and CRP were evaluated. Twenty healthy age-matched adolescents served as controls. Results: Within the intervention group ((body mass index [BMI, kg/m²] > 95th percentile for age and sex, age 13-17 years the BMI and BMI-standard deviation score [SDS] were significantly reduced in the 6-week follow-up after completing the weight loss program. However, the significant weight-reduction effect was not persistent until the 36-month follow-up. Conclusion: The 6-week weight-loss program had beneficial short-term effects on body weight, BMI, and BMI-SDS in obese adolescents, but these effects could not be maintained until the 36-month follow-up.

  20. Flat affect and social functioning: a 10 year follow-up study of first episode psychosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Julie; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Barder, Helene; Haahr, Ulrik; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Larsen, T K; Melle, Ingrid; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Simonsen, Erik; Vaglum, Per; McGlashan, Thomas; Friis, Svein

    2012-08-01

    Affective flattening has been described as enduring, but long term follow-up studies of first episode psychosis patients are lacking. The aim of this study was to follow the symptom development of flat affect (FA), over a 10 year follow-up period, with focus on prevalence, predictors and outcome factors including social functioning. Three-hundred-and-one patients with FEP were included at baseline, 186 participated in the 10 year follow-up. These were followed on PANSS item N1 (FA) from baseline through 5 follow-up assessments over 10 years. Patients were grouped as having never-present, improving, deteriorating, fluctuating or enduring FA. The groups were compared on baseline variables, variables at 10 year follow-up, and social functioning throughout the follow-up period. Twenty nine percent never displayed FA, 66% had improving, deteriorating or fluctuating FA, while 5% of patients had enduring FA. Premorbid social function predicted enduring FA. The patients with enduring, fluctuating and deteriorating FA did poorer on all outcome variables, including remission and recovery rates. The enduring FA group did significantly poorer in social functioning over the 10 year period. FA is expressed at some point of time in the majority of FEP patients in a 10 year follow-up period, and appears more fluctuant than expected from the relevant literature. FA is associated with poorer outcome after 10 years, and enduring FA to poorer social function at all points of assessment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. RU OK? The acceptability and feasibility of remote technologies for follow-up after early medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Hillary; Lohr, Patricia A; Taylor, Jeanette; Morroni, Chelsea; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-07-01

    We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of remote communication technologies to increase follow-up after early medical abortion. Women (n=999) were randomized to 'remote' follow-up incorporating a low-sensitivity pregnancy test and standardized symptom questionnaire administered online, by text message or telephone by a non-clinical call center operator 2 weeks after treatment, or to 'clinic-based' follow-up with ultrasound at 1 week. Women in the clinic-based group who could not return performed a high-sensitivity pregnancy test at 3 weeks and had a telephone call with clinic staff. The primary outcome was completion of follow-up. Rates of complications, acceptability and preferences were compared. The overall follow-up rate did not differ by group {clinic-based, 73% vs. remote, 69%; risk ratio (RR) 1.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-1.2]}. In the clinic-based group, 83% did not return for an ultrasound scan and were followed up by phone. In the remote group, follow-up by phone or text was more successful than online (text: 75.4%; phone: 73.7%; online: 46.5%, pafter medical abortion using remote communication is feasible and, for most women, preferable to a clinic visit. Medical abortion protocols typically use follow-up visits to ensure early identification of complications. This study demonstrates that follow-up can be achieved using remote communication technologies. This model may reduce the burden of multiple clinic visits on patients and providers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Profile and follow-up of patients with tuberculosis in a priority city in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jisleny da Cruz; Silva, Marcio Roberto; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cases of tuberculosis and the impact of direct follow-up on the assessment of treatment outcomes. METHODS This open prospective cohort study evaluated 504 cases of tuberculosis reported in the Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN – Notifiable Diseases Information System) in Juiz de Fora, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. The incidence of treatment outcomes was compared between a group of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and directly followed up by monthly consultations during return visits (287) and a patient group for which the information was indirectly collected (217) through the city’s surveillance system. The Chi-square test was used to compare the percentages, with a significance level of 0.05. The relative risk (RR) was used to evaluate the differences in the incidence rate of each type of treatment outcome between the two groups. RESULTS Of the outcomes directly and indirectly evaluated, 18.5% and 3.2% corresponded to treatment default and 3.8% and 0.5% corresponded to treatment failure, respectively. The incidence of treatment default and failure was higher in the group with direct follow-up (p < 0.05) (RR = 5.72, 95%CI 2.65;12.34, and RR = 8.31, 95%CI 1.08;63.92, respectively). CONCLUSIONS A higher incidence of treatment default and failure was observed in the directly followed up group, and most of these cases were neglected by the disease reporting system. Therefore, effective measures are needed to improve the control of tuberculosis and data quality. PMID:25741659

  3. Long-term follow-up of thyroid nodule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadbeck, B; Pruellage, J; Roggenbuck, U; Hirche, H; Janssen, O E; Mann, K; Hoermann, R

    2002-10-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are common in iodine deficient countries. Although many recent studies have addressed the molecular basis and short-term outcome of treatment in nodular thyroid disease, data on the long-term follow-up of thyroid nodule growth are widely lacking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term behaviour of benign thyroid nodules growth. We followed 109 consecutive patients seen at yearly intervals in our Outpatient Clinic for at least 3 years (range 3-12 years, mean 4.9 +/- 2.6 years) presenting with 139 benign nodules in uni- or multinodular goiters. The size of the nodules and thyroid glands was analysed retrospectively. The study included a spectrum of benign thyroid nodules, 86 functioning and 53 non-functioning. 27 patients were treated with levothyroxine, 8 with iodide and 16 with a combination of both. 58 patients were not treated mainly because of thyroid functional autonomy. Patients with overt hyperthyroidism or suspected malignancy by fine-needle aspiration were excluded from the study. The nodules and glands were assessed by ultrasonography at yearly intervals and documented by photoprints. Relevant growth was defined as an increase in nodule volume of at least 30%. For statistical analyses, Cox Proportional Hazard Model and life-table analyses according to Kaplan-Meier were performed. Most thyroid nodules grew slowly but continuously during follow-up. After about 3 years, half of the nodules had increased their volume by at least 30%. Growth of the nodules was significantly faster than of the corresponding thyroid glands (p < 0.0001). Age and sex of the patients and size or function of the nodules at initial presentation were not significantly related to their growth. Suppression of TSH did not affect growth of the nodules irrespective of the source of thyroid hormones, endogenous or by administration of levothyroxine. In conclusion, benign thyroid nodules have a slow intrinsic growth potential, which is apparently

  4. Using Videotape Technology: Innovations in Behavioral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, Robert E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reviews present and potential uses of videotape technology in behavioral research. Emphasis is placed on research methodology and the value of incorporating videotape in current research practices, including behavior observation studies, in modeling research, and in perceptual attribution investigations. Concludes with an analysis of advantages…

  5. Videotaping as a Counseling Technique with Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy G.; Nininger, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Videotape and audiotape can be used very effectively to give counselees feedback, yet this method has received little attention in the literature. Describes a videotaping approach that can be used to enhance communication and resolve problems between troubled children and their families. Presents case example of a 10-year-old boy, threatening to…

  6. Innovation of High-risk Infants Follow-up Surveillance System in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodeiry, Behzad; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Heidarabadi, Seifoallah; Ebadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood development is one of the most social determinants of health that must be notified in order to reducing social gap and inequity. In spite of increasingly developing intensive neonatal care wards and decreasing neonatal mortality rate, there is no follow-up surveillance system to identify high-risk infants (HRI) and their health problems for timely intervention after discharge. This study was carried out to design and pilot high-risk infant follow-ups (HRIFs) surveillance system, in Alzahra Hospital, a tertiary level center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUOMS), in 2012-2013. In this qualitative research after studying international documents, consensus about criteria of HRIs accomplished by focus group discussion. Then, Delphi agreement technique was used to finalizing assessment timetable. In the second phase, we piloted the designed surveillance system in Alzahra Hospital, a tertiary level center of TUOMS. Pilot study was implemented by follow-up team organized in designed model at the first phase of the study. Then, the findings of the pilot study were being assessed by an expert panel. If the members agreed on made decisions, they were being placed on the agenda of the national committee of development care of newborns for final approval. High-risk infants follow-up surveillance system was designed in following steps: Defining of evidence-based criteria of HRIs, organizing the follow-up team, regulating the organs and neurodevelopment assessment timetable, publishing a health certificate notebook for HRIs, and designing Access database software for data collection, report and evaluation. We designed and piloted HRIFs surveillance system, so this system was institutionalized in Alzahra Hospital, finally. It can be prepared to apply in the whole country, after detecting the quantitative outcomes and developing the program in East Azarbijan.

  7. Cognitive behavioural therapy for obesity: one-year follow-up in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchionda, N; Besteghi, L; Di Domizio, S; Pasqui, F; Nuccitelli, C; Migliorini, S; Baraldi, L; Natale, S; Manini, R; Bellini, M; Belsito, C; Forlani, G; Marchesini, G

    2003-09-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is the most comprehensive means of medically treating obesity, but only few data have so far been published concerning its long-term effectiveness. We here report our experience of 1068 consecutive patients (868 females) treated with CBT at a university-based obesity centre. The patients were enrolled into three different programmes: a 14-week LEARN programme (672 patients), a 16-week MOB programme for the morbidly obese (259 patients), or a 20-week BINGE programme for subjects affected by binge eating (137 patients). Eighty-five percent of the subjects completed the weekly programmes. The percentage of patients attending the scheduled control visits during the 1-year follow-up gradually decreased, being very low in the BINGE group (10%). The percentage weight loss was an average of 6% during the weekly courses, being higher in the MOB programme; by the end of the weekly sessions, it exceeded 10% of initial body weight in 22% of cases and increased to 36% during the follow-up. The cumulative probability of follow-up was higher among the patients undergoing the MOB and LEARN programmes than among the BINGE patients (p obesity. Female gender and a weight loss of > 10% i.b.w. increased compliance to follow-up. The study further demonstrates the difficulty of achieving compliance to chronic management of obesity and the critical role of binge eating disorder in the medium-term treatment of obesity. Strategies are needed to improve adherence to a follow-up protocol.

  8. Congenital hypothyroidism: follow up of a case for 13 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir M Naik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation in children. The prognosis of infants detected by neonatal screening and started on treatment early is excellent, with intelligence quotients similar to sibling or classmate without the disease. Setting: Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, KVG Medical College, Sullia. 1Case report: A 15 year old boy came with history of head ache, generalized body ache and lack of concentration in school. He was a case of congenital hypothyroidism and was on irregular treatment for the last 13 years. Intervention: The patient was advised strictly to continue the oral l-thyroxine 100μg one hour before food and come for regular follow-up. Conclusion: Definite intellectual deterioration is seen if oral l-thyroxine is not started within 50 days of life and the deterioration is irreversible. So in India newborn screening programs should be implemented as a national program as it is very important to diagnose and treatcongenital hypothyroidism as soon as possible and to treat it effectively.

  9. Myxedema madness complicating postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosán Allo, Yanina J; Rosmarin, Melanie; Urrutia, Agustina; Faingold, Maria Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Although hypothyroidism is associated with an increased prevalence of psychiatric manifestations, myxedema madness is rarely observed. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with no prior history of psychiatric disorders, who presented to the emergency department with psychomotor agitation 6 weeks after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on admission was 62.9 mIU/L and free T4 was madness was considered; hence, antipsychotic drug treatment and intravenous levothyroxine were prescribed. Behavioral symptoms returned to normal within 4 days of presentation, while levels of thyroid hormones attained normal values 1 week after admission. Recombinant TSH (Thyrogen®) was used successfully to prevent new episodes of mania due to thyroid hormone withdrawal in further controls for her thyroid cancer. This case illustrates that myxedema madness can occur in the setting of acute hypothyroidism, completely reverting with levothyroxine and antipsychotic treatment. Recombinant TSH may be a useful tool to prevent myxedema madness or any severe manifestation of levothyroxine withdrawal for the follow-up of thyroid cancer.

  10. Follow-up Sonography after Sonoguided Renal Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    To assess ultrasonographic findings and clinical significance after renal biopsy. 174 cases of post-biopsy sonography were studied retrospectively. We classified post-biopsy hematoma on the basis of their size as small (thickness less than 1 cm, length less than 3cm), medium (thickness less than 1cm, length greater than 3 cm), large (thickness greater than 1 cm, length greater than 3 cm). We also compared bleeding parameters (prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time) and renal function in both cases which had hematoma or not. Total 33 hematomas were found (19%). Small hematoma was observed in 14 cases, medium hematoma in 16 cases, large hematoma in 3 cases. Severe complications requiring prompt therapy occurred in 1 case(0.6%). In 6 cases hematocrit fell by more than 4%, all of these hematomas were observed on US. Severe complications after sonoguided renal biopsy were rare. There was poor correlation between prebiopsybleeding parameter, renal function and post-biopsy hematomas. And sonography is considered as adequate method for follow up of post-biopsy hematoma

  11. [Follow-up and counselling after pelvic inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derniaux, E; Lucereau-Barbier, M; Graesslin, O

    2012-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can be responsible for infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Treatment of acute PID is very important as it can reduce the risk of sequelae. However, follow-up, partner treatment and counselling are also useful to reduce the reinfection rate. Few weeks after PID, clinical evaluation as well as transvaginal and transabdominal sonography must be performed. The interest of systematic bacteriological tests is not proved. Hysterosalpingography and second-look laparoscopy should be considered only for women with infertility and severe infection. Use of condom is advisable in this population in order to prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STD) including HIV and to decrease rate of recurrence, associated to contraceptive pill, which is also a good option. In selected cases, intrauterine devices can be used in patients with history of PID if the infection is resolved and no significant risk factors for STD exist. Infertility and chronic pelvic pain are the most common sequelae in the population of young women with severe and recurrent infection. The risk of ectopic pregnancy is higher for these women and must be kept in mind. Counselling and risk-reduction interventions decreased significatively the rate of recurrence and sequelae in PID. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. A long-term follow-up of postpartum thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, S; Phillips, D I; Parkes, A B; Richards, C J; Harris, B; Fung, H; Darke, C; John, R; Hall, R; Lazarus, J H

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT), 43 patients with PPT and 171 control women were evaluated 3.5 (range 2-4) years postpartum. Ten (23%) PPT patients were hypothyroid compared to none of the controls (P less than 0.001). Factors associated with the development of hypothyroidism were high antimicrosomal antibody titre measured at 16 weeks gestation (P less than 0.01), severity of hypothyroid phase of PPT, multiparity, and a previous history of spontaneous abortion. The presence of microsomal antibody but no PPT in one pregnancy did not prevent the occurrence of PPT in the next pregnancy in two patients and a further five patients had PPT in two successive pregnancies. There was no association between HLA haplotype, family history of thyroid disease, smoking or frequency of oral contraception, and the development of long-term hypothyroidism after PPT. It is concluded that permanent hypothyroidism is an important sequel to PPT and patients with PPT should be followed up appropriately.

  13. Long-term follow-up of trigonoplasty antireflux operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Mahmoudnejad, Nastaran; Kashi, Amir H; Ramezani, Mehdi H; Narouie, Behzad

    2017-02-03

    Open trigonoplasty antireflux operation has been associated with promising results. However, its success in controlling reflux has not been evaluated in the long term. All patients who underwent trigonoplasty for vesicoureteral reflux by one surgeon from 2004 to 2014 were included. Preoperative evaluations included direct radionuclide cystography (DRNC) or voiding cystourethrography, urine analysis and culture and abdominal sonography. Urodynamic study and cystoscopy was performed in selected patients. Trigonoplasty was done by a modified Gil-Verent method. The latest available patients' DRNCs were used to judge for reflux relapse. Ninety-one patients, 142 refluxing units; median (range) age, 10.5 (1-45) years; M/F, (11/80) were followed for 18 to 135 months. Reflux resolution rate was 73.6% for patients and 75.4% for refluxing units. Relapse was associated with reflux grade (67% in grade V), ureteral orifice appearance (40% in golf hole/stadium), and patients with a history of pyelonephritis. Multivariable model based on the above variables had less than 10% sensitivity in predicting relapse. Trigonoplasty success rate can decrease with long-term follow-up.

  14. COPD and microalbuminuria: a 12-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romundstad, Solfrid; Naustdal, Thor; Romundstad, Pål Richard; Sorger, Hanne; Langhammer, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), low lung function independent of diagnosis and markers of inflammation are all associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Microalbuminuria, reflecting endothelial dysfunction, could be a relevant inflammatory marker of potential systemic effects of COPD. We hypothesised that there was a positive association between microalbuminuria and mortality in individuals with COPD. We conducted a 12-year follow-up study of 3129 participants in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. At baseline, albuminuria was analysed in three urine samples and spirometry was performed. Among the participants, 136 had COPD and microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio between 2.5 and 30.0 mg·mmol(-1). The main outcome measures were hazard ratio of all-cause mortality according to microalbuminuria. Compared to those with COPD without microalbuminuria, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in those with COPD and microalbuminuria was 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.04. This result was similar after excluding cardiovascular disease at baseline. Classifying COPD severity by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, there was a positive association trend with increasing severity stages. Microalbuminuria is associated with all-cause mortality in individuals with COPD and could be a relevant tool in identification of patients with poor prognosis.

  15. Follow-up of MARVELS Brown Dwarf Candidates using EXPERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bo; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Thomas, Neil; Wang, Ji; De Lee, Nathan

    2013-02-01

    The SDSS-III MARVELS survey is a comprehensive radial velocity survey of 3,300 nearby F-K stars, between 7.6 < V < 12.0 in 2008-2012. All of the survey data for 2580 FGK stars from the first two and half years have been processed with the latest data pipeline. A total of 26 new brown dwarfs (BD) candidates have been identified in the processed RV data. We expect to have 8 more BD candidates from the ~800 stars currently under processing, which will make a total of 34 BD candidates. This proposal requests KPNO 2.1m telescope time with the EXPERT instrument, to follow up all of these BD candidates to confirm the detections and characterize the orbits. The results will be used to (1) reveal the overall distribution of the new BDs in the parameter space; (2) measure the occurrence rate of BD around FGK type stars; (3) measure dryness of the brown dwarf desert around stars with different mass and metallicity; (4) constrain theoretical models regarding the formation of brown dwarfs; (5) confirm the discovery of `desert in the brown dwarf desert'; (6) identify additional companions associated with the detected systems.

  16. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_⊙) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  17. [Surgery for phimosis with Plastibell. A follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M K

    1998-06-22

    Fifty-three boys were interviewed 11 years (9-14 years) after an operation for phimosis using the Plastibell technique. The interview concentrated on the cosmetic result, sexual function and late complications. Seventeen patients (31%) experienced cosmetic complications, and 11 patients (21%) claimed to have experienced psycho-social problems due to the appearance of the penis after the operation. Nonetheless an overall of 44 patients (83%) were fully satisfied/satisfied with the cosmetic result. Four patients (8%) claimed to have pain or discomfort on erection or intercourse. One patient (2%) was re-operated three years after the primary operation because of a recurrence of the symptoms. Overall 48 patients (91%) were fully satisfied or satisfied with the result after the operation. In conclusion we find the Plastibell procedure to be a safe and reliable method in treating phimosis. There are some minor technical pitfalls that have to be addressed in learning the technique, but performed in trained hands, the technique offers a very high satisfaction rate at long term follow-up.

  18. Measles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramsay, M E

    1994-04-01

    In 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.

  19. Patients’ follow-up using biomechanical analysis of rehabilitation exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bonnechère

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the evolution of game controllers video games are becoming more and more popular in physical rehabilitation. The integration of serious games in rehabilitation has been tested for various pathologies. Parallel to this clinical research, a lot of studies have been done in order to validate the use of these game controllers for simple biomechanical evaluation. Currently, it is thus possible to record the motions performed by the patients during serious gaming exercises for later analysis. Therefore, data collected during the exercises could be used for monitoring the evolution of the patients during long term rehabilitation. Before using the parameters extracted from the games to assess patients’ evolution two important aspects must be verified: the reproducibility of measurement and a possible effect of learning of the task to be performed. Ten healthy adults played 9 sessions of specific games developed for rehabilitation over a 3-weeks period. Nineteen healthy children played 2 sessions to study the influence of age. Different parameters were extracted from the games: time, range of motion, reaching area. Results of this study indicates that it is possible to follow the evolution of the patients during the rehabilitation process. The majority of the learning effect occurred during the very first session. Therefore, in order to allow proper regular monitoring, the results of this first session should not be included in the follow-up of the patient.

  20. Intensity of follow-up after pancreatic cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Jason A; Merchant, Nipun B

    2014-03-01

    The prognosis of patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains dismal. Of the 15-20 % of patients who are candidates for potentially curative resection, 66-92 % will develop recurrent disease. Although guidelines for surveillance in the postoperative setting exist, they are not evidence based, and there is wide variability of strategies utilized. Current surveillance guidelines as suggested by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) include routine history and physical, measurement of serum cancer-associated antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels, and computed tomographic imaging at 3- to 6-month intervals for the first 2 years, and annually thereafter. However, the lack of prospective clinical data examining the efficacy of different surveillance strategies has led to a variability of the intensity of follow-up and a lack of consensus on its necessity and efficacy. Recent therapeutic advances may have the potential to significantly alter survival after recurrence, but a careful consideration of current surveillance strategies should be undertaken to optimize existing approaches in the face of high recurrence and low survival rates.

  1. Evaluation of nurse-led follow up for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Faithfull, S; Corner, J.; MEYER L.; Huddart, R; Dearnaley, D.

    2001-01-01

    This study reports results from a randomised controlled trial of nurse-led care and was designed to determine whether nurse-led follow up improved patients morbidity and satisfaction with care in men treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate and bladder cancer. The aim was to compare outcomes in terms of toxicity, symptoms experienced, quality of life, satisfaction with care and health care costs, between those receiving nurse-led care and a group receiving standard care. The study popul...

  2. B-cell Lymphoma in retrieved femoral heads: a long term follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Kemenade Folkert J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relatively high incidence of pathological conditions in retrieved femoral heads, including a group of patients having low grade B-cell lymphoma, has been described before. At short term follow up none of these patients with low-grade B-cell lymphoma showed evidence of systemic disease. However, the long term follow up of these patients is not known. Methods From November 1994 up to and including December 2005 we screened all femoral heads removed at the time of primary total hip replacement histopathologically and included them in the bone banking protocol according to the guidelines of the American Associations of Tissue Banks (AATB and the European Association of Musculo-Skeletal Transplantation (EAMST. We determined the percentage of B-cell lymphoma in all femoral heads and in the group that fulfilled all criteria of the bone banking protocol and report on the long-term follow-up. Results Of 852 femoral heads fourteen (1.6% were highly suspicious for low-grade B-cell lymphoma. Of these 852 femoral heads, 504 were eligible for bone transplantation according to the guidelines of the AATB and the EAMST. Six femoral heads of this group of 504 were highly suspicious for low-grade B-cell lymphoma (1.2%. At long term follow up two (0.2% of all patients developed systemic malignant disease and one of them needed medical treatment for her condition. Conclusion In routine histopathological screening we found variable numbers of low-grade B-cell lymphoma throughout the years, even in a group of femoral heads that were eligible for bone transplantation. Allogenic transmission of malignancy has not yet been reported on, but surviving viruses are proven to be transmissible. Therefore, we recommend the routine histopathological evaluation of all femoral heads removed at primary total hip arthroplasty as a tool for quality control, whether the femoral head is used for bone banking or not.

  3. Retrospective analysis of follow-up results in patients with skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasov V.V.

    2011-01-01

    Administration of specific chemotherapy (cytostatics) has great significance in the treatment of skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy. The research goal is to study follow-up results of cytostatic therapy of skin lymphomas. Retrospective observation of survival of patients with T-cell epidermothropic skin lymphomas using special therapy and without its use has been studied. Comparative analysis of survival rate in two groups of patients has been done. 40 patients received cytostatics and 3...

  4. Endodontic surgery with and without inserts of bioactive glass PerioGlas--a clinical and radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantchev, Alexander; Nohlert, Eva; Tegelberg, Ake

    2009-03-01

    This study evaluated the use of bioactive glass, PerioGlas, after retrograde filling with Super EBA cement in the treatment of periapical bone destruction. Healing outcomes were followed up after endodontic surgery in 186 teeth. Outcomes were divided into two groups according to follow-up time: short- and long-term. The EBA group (n = 110) underwent endodontic surgery and retrograde filling with EBA cement. In the EBA + PerioGlas group (n = 76), PerioGlas was embedded in the bone cavity after retrograde filling. The success rate in the EBA + PerioGlas group was 72% compared with 56% in the Super EBA group at the short-term follow-up and 74% and 84%, respectively, at the long-term follow-up. Healing of periapical bone destruction classified as uncertain at the short-term follow-up was considered successful in two out of three cases at the long-term follow-up. This study found that PerioGlas as bone substitute did not significantly improve endodontic healing outcome.

  5. Influence of structured telephone follow-up on patient compliance with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen MC

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mochuan Chen,1 Pihong Li,2 Feiou Lin3 1Department of Orthopaedics, 2Department of General Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital & Yuying Children’s Hospital, 3Orthodontic Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Introduction: To assess the effects of structured telephone follow-up on patient’s home-exercise compliance after total knee arthroplasty (TKA.Methods: A total of 202 elderly patients who received a unilateral TKA were enrolled in this study. The participants were randomized into two groups: the intervention group that received structured telephone follow-up after discharge and the control group that received routine health care. Pain, functional ability, quality of life, and depression survey scores were measured before and after TKA. The intergroup and intragroup differences were analyzed during the 12 months following discharge.Results: There were no significant differences in the sociodemographic characteristics of both groups. The mean home-exercise time and total days in the intervention group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Variable scores differed significantly between groups. Pain, functional ability, quality of life, and depression improved significantly after TKA in both groups, and the intervention group had greater improvement in mental health and active range of motion.Conclusion: Undergoing a TKA can significantly reduce the patient’s pain from osteoarthritis while improving the overall physical function and quality of life. Furthermore, a structured telephone follow-up can improve patient adherence to home exercise after TKA. Keywords: quality of life, pain, home exercises, patient-reported outcomes

  6. Improving Adolescent Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Follow-up From the Emergency Department: Randomized Controlled Trial With Text Messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret; Balamuth, Fran; Sampayo, Esther; Mollen, Cynthia

    2016-05-01

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines recommend follow-up within 72 hours of diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease because patients with inadequate treatment are at increased risk of acute and chronic complications. Follow-up rates in adolescents after diagnosis range between 10% and 16%. The primary objective is to assess the effect of text message reminders to adolescent patients receiving a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease on obtaining follow-up care within 72 hours of emergency department (ED) discharge. This was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial of adolescents receiving a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease in the ED. Patients received standard discharge instructions or standard discharge instructions plus text message reminders. Patients in the text message group received daily, tailored text messages for 4 days, with a reminder to schedule and attend primary care provider follow-up. The primary outcome was follow-up within 72 hours of ED discharge. Ninety-five patients (48 standard; 47 text message) were randomized. Three patients were excluded, leaving 92 patients (46 standard; 46 text message) for analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar between treatment groups. Follow-up was 15.2% in the standard group and 43.5% in the text message group. Patients receiving text message reminders were more likely to follow up compared with the standard group (relative risk 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4 to 5.7). The absolute efficacy difference was 28.3% (95% CI 9.5% to 46.9%), yielding number needed to treat of 4 (95% CI 2.2 to 9.5). Personalized text message reminders were efficacious in improving follow-up for adolescents after ED diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Thin-Section CT Characteristics and Longitudinal CT Follow-up of Chemotherapy Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Na; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol; Song, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of chemotherapy-induced interstitial pneumonitis (CIIP) with longitudinal follow-up. The study was approved by the local ethics committee. One hundred consecutive patients with CIIP between May 2005 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. The initial CT was reviewed by 2 independent chest radiologists and categorized into 1 of 4 CT patterns in accordance with the 2013 guidelines for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) mimicking desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). We assessed semiquantitative analysis on a 5% scale to assess the extent of parenchymal abnormalities (emphysema, reticulation, ground-glass opacity, consolidation, honeycombing cyst) and their distribution on initial (n = 100), subsequent (n = 87), and second follow-up CT (n = 48). Interval changes in extent on follow-up CT were compared using paired t test. The clinic-radiologic factors were compared between Group 1 (NSIP and OP patterns) and Group 2 (HP and DAD patterns) using χ2 and independent t tests. The most common pattern of CIIP on the initial CT was HP (51%), followed by NSIP (23%), OP (20%), and DAD (6%). Diffuse ground-glass opacity was the most common pulmonary abnormality. The predominant distribution was bilateral (99%) and symmetric (82%), with no craniocaudal (60%) or axial (79%) dominance. Subsequent and second follow-up CTs showed decreased extent of total pulmonary abnormalities (P CIIP, Group 2 CIIP was more likely to be caused by molecularly targeted drugs (P = 0.030), appeared earlier (P = 0.034), and underwent more complete resolution (P CIIP is appropriate and practical in interpreting radiological findings. PMID:26765442

  8. Three-Year Follow-Up of Insomnia and Hypnotics after Controlled Internet Treatment for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Kerstin; Jernelöv, Susanna; Rück, Christian; Lindefors, Nils; Kaldo, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the long-term effects of therapist-guided Internet-based insomnia treatment on insomnia severity and sleep medication use, compared with active control. This study was an 8 week randomized controlled trial with follow-up posttreatment and at 6, 12, and 36 months, set at the Internet Psychiatry Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden. Participants were 148 media-recruited nondepressed adults with insomnia. Interventions were Guided Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (ICBT-i) or active control treatment (ICBT-ctrl). Primary outcome was insomnia severity, measured with the Insomnia Severity Index. Secondary outcomes were sleep medication use and use of other treatments. The large pretreatment to posttreatment improvements in insomnia severity of the ICBT-i group were maintained during follow-up. ICBT-ctrl exhibited significantly less improvement posttreatment (between-Cohen d = 0.85), but after 12 and 36 months, there was no longer a significant difference. The within-group effect sizes from pretreatment to the 36-months follow-up were 1.6 (ICBT-i) and 1.7 (ICBT-ctrl), and 74% of the interviewed participants no longer had insomnia diagnosis after 36 mo. ICBT-ctrl used significantly more sleep medication (P = 0.017) and underwent significantly more other insomnia treatments (P CBT for insomnia has long-term effects. After 36 months, the groups did not differ in insomnia severity, but ICBT-ctrl had used more sleep medication and undergone more other additional insomnia treatments during the follow-up period. The trial was registered, together with a parallel trial, at Clinicaltrials.gov as "Internet-CBT for Insomnia" registration ID: NCT01256099. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Marques

    2015-12-01

    electrodes (SPCEs were used as the transducers. These SPCEs (working volume: ~40 μL are widely employed in the construction of electrochemical (biosensors because of several reasons: simplicity and low cost, versatility of design, small dimensions and possibility of incorporation in portable systems, as well as adequate electroanalytical characteristics. These SPCEs were modified with gold nanoparticles (nAu through the electrochemical deposition of ionic gold from a solution. The developed sensors were applied to the analysis of the selected biomarkers in spiked human serum samples.Besides these immunosensors, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP sensor was developed for the analysis of HER2-ECD. In this case a gold electrode was used as the transducer. The MIP was formed by surface imprinting and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry were used for detection purposes.Results: For the immunoassays the following parameters were optimized: capture and detection antibody concentration, surface blocking, reaction mixtures and incubation times. The best limits of detection obtained were below the established cut-off values (25 U/mL and 15 ng/mL for CA15-3 and HER2-ECD, respectively. For the MIP sensor the most adequate polymer was chosen and the electropolymerization, template removal, and incubation conditions were optimized. The lowest HER2-ECD concentration that was analyzed was 50 µg/mL.Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that the developed sensors could be promising tools in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. However, further studies should be conducted using patients' samples and the results of these assays should be validated with the established analysis procedures for these cancer biomarkers.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Marques R, Pacheco J, Rama EC, Viswanathan S, Nouws H, Delerue-Matos C. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34012.[This

  10. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  11. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Cancer mortality among German aircrew: second follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Langner, Ingo; Schafft, Thomas; Bennack, Sabrina; Blettner, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Aircrew members are exposed to cosmic radiation and other specific occupational factors. In a previous analysis of a large cohort of German aircrew, no increase in cancer mortality or dose-related effects was observed. In the present study, the follow-up of this cohort of 6,017 cockpit and 20,757 cabin crew members was extended by 6 years to 2003. Among male cockpit crew, the resulting all-cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR) (n = 127) is 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.8), while for brain tumors it is 2.1 (95% CI 1.0-3.9). The cancer risk is significantly raised (RR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) among cockpit crew members employed 30 years or more compared to those employed less than 10 years. Among both female and male cabin crew, the all-cancer SMR and that for most individual cancers are close to 1. The SMR for breast cancer among female crew is 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.8). Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma among male cabin crew is increased (SMR 4.2; 95% CI 1.3-10.8). However, cancers associated with radiation exposure are not raised in the cohort. It is concluded that among cockpit crew cancer mortality is low, particularly for lung cancer. The positive trend of all cancer with duration of employment persists. The increased brain cancer SMR among cockpit crew requires replication in other cohorts. For cabin crew, cancer mortality is generally close to population rates. Cosmic radiation dose estimates will allow more detailed assessments, as will a pooling of updated aircrew studies currently in planning.

  13. [Delirium in elderly inpatients. An 18 month follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Fernando J; Benchimol, Javier; Giunta, Diego; Cafferata, Carlos; Freixas, Antonio; Vallone, Marcelo; Andresik, Diego; Pollan, Javier; Aprile, Ana; Lorenzo, Jimena; Waisman, Gabriel; Camera, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Delirium usually hardens care during hospitalization and increases morbidity during hospital stay and after discharge. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of delirium in elderly inpatients in a Buenos Aires hospital, its morbidity and mortality during hospital stay and the next 18 month follow-up. Patients aged 70 or older admitted to internal medicine unit between September 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled. Delirium was assessed with the Spanish version of Confusion Assessment Method. Demographic data, cause of admition and length of stay, destination after discharge and mortality were registered. A new evaluation was made 18 months after discharge. We evaluated 194 patients and 74 were excluded. Of the 120 included, 52 (43.3%) presented delirium. We found significant differences between patients with and without delirium in previous placement in nursing home (17.3% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.002), dementia (40.4% vs. 8.8%; p < 0.001), median activity of daily living (5 vs. 6; p < 0.001), length-of-stay (7 vs. 5; p = 0.04) and mortality rate (21.2% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.001). Evaluation 18 months later showed differences between patients with and without delirium in median of activity of daily living (1/6 vs. 5/6), patients living in nursing homes (27.5% vs. 7.9%), estimated survival 35.3% (CI 95%: 24-49%) at day 569 and 49% (CI 95%: 32.9-65.4%) at day 644. The difference between survival curves was statistically significant (p = 0.027). Delirium increases morbidity and mortality during hospital stay. Elderly with delirium are at risk of worsening disability and of becoming dependent after discharge and it is a risk factor for higher mortality during the following months after discharge.

  14. Cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in type 1 diabetic patients. A 7-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Nielsen, F S

    1999-01-01

    placebo-treated patients had normal UAER (P ...-2) declined from baseline to end of follow-up (1994) by 6.3 +/- 6.0 in the former CsA group, whereas it rose by 7.4 +/- 5.0 in the placebo group (P = 0.05). In 1994, 24-h blood pressure was nearly the same: 131/77 +/- 4/2 vs. 127/75 +/- 2/2 mmHg (NS) in the CsA and placebo groups, respectively. Five...

  15. A Comparison of four pulpotomy techniques in primary molars: a long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Deniz; Sari, Saziye; Cetinbaş, Tuğba

    2008-08-01

    The study evaluated the effects of formocresol (FC), ferric sulphate (FS), calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH](2)), and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as pulp dressing agents in pulpotomized primary molars. Sixteen children each with at least four primary molars requiring pulpotomy were selected. Eighty selected teeth were divided into four groups and treated with one of the pulpotomy agent. The children were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination every 6 months during 2 years of follow-up. Eleven children with 56 teeth arrived for clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluation at 24 months. The follow-up evaluations revealed that the success rate was 76.9% for FC, 73.3% for FS, 46.1% for Ca(OH)(2), and 66.6% for MTA. In conclusion, Ca(OH)(2)is less appropriate for primary teeth pulpotomies than the other pulpotomy agents. FC and FS appeared to be superior to the other agents. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups.

  16. OSTA program: A French follow up intervention program for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouaffak, Fayçal; Marchand, Arnaud; Castaigne, Emmanuelle; Arnoux, Armelle; Hardy, Patrick

    2015-12-30

    Attempted suicide is a strong risk factor for subsequent suicidal behavior. In recent years, a particular interest has been given to follow-up interventions as a potential effective strategy in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. We developed a follow-up intervention program called OSTA (organization of a suitable monitoring for suicide attempters) aimed at addressing this issue and tested its effectiveness in a 1-year randomized controlled trial. Individuals who attempted suicide and were admitted to the emergency department (ED) of Bicêtre Hospital (n=320) were randomly allocated to receive either the OSTA program or a control treatment. On an intention to treat basis, the proportion of patients who reattempted suicide did not differ significantly between the interventional group (IG) 14.5% (22/152) and the control group (CG) 14% (21/150). There were also no significant differences, between the two arms, in the number of suicide attempts. Although no significant difference has been found between the OSTA program and the control treatment concerning the rate of suicide reattempts, we believe that further studies should be conducted to test the effectiveness of more standardized follow-up studies in suicide prevention.

  17. The value of ultrasound in the follow-up of thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedbæk, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    The value of ultrasound in the follow-up of thyroid cancer The commonly used tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) staging system is designed to predict death and not recurrence. Based on this, patients with thyroid cancer are grouped into risk categories at the time of initial treatment. However, recent...... guidelines proposed a novel staging system focusing on microscopic invasion into the perithyroidal tissues, neck lymph node involvement and 131I uptake outside the thyroid bed following treatment. This risk re-assessment improves the prediction of recurrent/persistent disease. The cornerstone in the follow......-up is measurement of plasma-thyroglobulin concentration and ultrasound of the neck focusing on the thyroid bed and classification of lymph nodes according to their location and high risk signs....

  18. Five-Year Follow-Up of Supportive Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Susanne; Køster, Anne; Valbak, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    -term outcome of SPP in a prospective, longitudinal, comparative, multicenter investigation of successively referred patients diagnosed with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder. METHOD: Manualized SPP for up to 3 years as a supplement to standard treatment (ST) were compared to ST alone and followed...... up for 5 years (N = 269). The SPP targeted interpersonal relationships, emotion regulation, social cognition, and self-coherence. RESULTS: Significant between-group effects in favor of SPP+ST on social functioning, overall symptoms, and positive psychotic symptoms were found during the period...... of active SPP intervention. These differential effects, however, were not sustained after end of additional SPP at 5-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: The findings are in line with results from other approaches targeting social functioning in schizophrenia and support SPP as a valuable treatment. Further research...

  19. Long-term use and follow-up of autologous and homologous cartilage graft in rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemali Khorasani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cartilage grafting is used in rhinoplasty and reconstructive surgeries. Autologous rib and nasal septum cartilage (auto graft is the preferred source of graft material in rhinoplasty, however, homologous cartilage (allograft has been extensively used to correct the nasal framework in nasal deformities. Autologous cartilage graft usage is restricted with complication of operation and limiting availability of tissue for extensive deformities. Alternatively, preserved costal cartilage allograft represents a readily available and easily contoured material. The current study was a formal systematic review of complications associated with autologous versus homologous cartilage grafting in rhinoplasty patients. Methods: In this cohort retrospective study, a total of 124 patients undergone primary or revision rhinoplasty using homologous or autologus grafts with postoperative follow-up ranging from 6 to 60 months were studied. The types of grafts and complications related to the grafts were evaluated. This included evaluation for warping, infection, resorption, mobility and fracture. Results: The total complications related to the cartilage grafts were 7 cases, which included 1 warped in auto graft group, three cases of graft displacement (two in allograft group and one in auto graft group and three fractures in allograft group. No infection and resorption was recorded. Complication rate (confidence interval 0.95 in autologous and homologous group were 1.25(0.4-3.88 and 2.08(0.78-5.55 in 1000 months follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between autologous and homologous group complications. Onset of complication in autologous and homologous group were 51.23(49.27-53.19 and 58.7(54.51-62.91 month respectively (P=0.81. Conclusion: The allograft cartilage has the advantage of avoiding donor-site scar. Moreover, it provides the same benefits as autologous costal cartilage with comparable complication rate. Therefore, it

  20. Pterygium surgery by means of conjunctival autograft: long term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentín Huerva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the long term of follow-up of the recurrence rate after conjunctival autograft for pterygium surgery. METHODS: A total of 112 patients operated for pterygium with conjunctival autografts and with more than one year follow-up were registered. Patients were called for voluntary examinations of their respective ocular surface statuses. Completing the study was only possible in 44 cases. Seven had bilateral pterygium. (N=51 operated pterygium. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 49.06 months. In 29.45% of the cases, attachment was performed using non-absorbable sutures (nylon 10/0, while fibrin glue was used in 70.55% of the cases. Six cases of recurrence (11.76% were found. The recurrence rate between primary and recurrent pterygium, and between sutures and fibrin glue proved to be not statistically significant; p>0.05. There were no significant differences between women and men with respect to recurrence. The median of age in the recurrence group was 40 years old, in contrast to 55 in the non-recurrence group; p=0.01517. All of these recurrences were associated with patients of Hispanic origins (from Latin America; p=0.001506. CONCLUSIONS: After a long follow-up period after autograft pterygium surgery, there were no statistically significant differences in recurrence rates for the application of sutures as opposed to fibrin glue; similarly, there were no statistically significant differences between the use of autograft in primary and recurrent pterygium. The greatest risk factors for recurrence were young age and Hispanic ethnicity.

  1. RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: THE FIRST RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE OF 15-YEAR FOLLOW-UP AFTER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the maximum of more than 15 years of follow-up of Russia’s first large series of patients after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE were traced. The data of 1367 patients who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology, S.P. Kirov Military Medical Academy, in 1997 to 2003 and at the Clinic of Urology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, in 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively studied. After excluding 626 patients who had an incomplete set of preoperative/postoperative characteristics, a postoperative follow-up of < 6 months, neoadjuvant hormonal or radiation therapy, the trial included 741 patients. Their median age at surgery was 64 years (interquartile range (IQR: 59-68; median prostatespecific antigen (PSA, 8.7 ng/ml (IQR: 6.2-14; median follow-up, 65 months (IQR: 50-87; the maximum follow-up period, 189 months. Out of the 741 patients, 30.2, 28.3, and 41.5% were referred to as D’Amico classification low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Five-, 10-, and 15-year relapse-free survival rates were 80.3, 74.7, and 66.7%; 5-, 10-, and 15-year cancer-specific survival rates were 98.3, 95.9, and 85.7%; and 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rates were 92.5, 81.4, and 64.3%, respectively. The significant predictors of biochemical recurrence were a preoperative PSA level of 10.1–20 ng/ml (p = 0.041, > 20 ng/ml (p = 0.003; pathological stage pT3b–4N0 (p = 0.006 and any stage pT N1 (p = 0.003. Further investigations are needed to identify groups of patients who will have the most benefit from surgery.

  2. RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: THE FIRST RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE OF 15-YEAR FOLLOW-UP AFTER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the maximum of more than 15 years of follow-up of Russia’s first large series of patients after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE were traced. The data of 1367 patients who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology, S.P. Kirov Military Medical Academy, in 1997 to 2003 and at the Clinic of Urology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, in 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively studied. After excluding 626 patients who had an incomplete set of preoperative/postoperative characteristics, a postoperative follow-up of < 6 months, neoadjuvant hormonal or radiation therapy, the trial included 741 patients. Their median age at surgery was 64 years (interquartile range (IQR: 59-68; median prostatespecific antigen (PSA, 8.7 ng/ml (IQR: 6.2-14; median follow-up, 65 months (IQR: 50-87; the maximum follow-up period, 189 months. Out of the 741 patients, 30.2, 28.3, and 41.5% were referred to as D’Amico classification low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Five-, 10-, and 15-year relapse-free survival rates were 80.3, 74.7, and 66.7%; 5-, 10-, and 15-year cancer-specific survival rates were 98.3, 95.9, and 85.7%; and 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rates were 92.5, 81.4, and 64.3%, respectively. The significant predictors of biochemical recurrence were a preoperative PSA level of 10.1–20 ng/ml (p = 0.041, > 20 ng/ml (p = 0.003; pathological stage pT3b–4N0 (p = 0.006 and any stage pT N1 (p = 0.003. Further investigations are needed to identify groups of patients who will have the most benefit from surgery.

  3. Percutaneous closure of secundum type atrial septal defects:More than 5-year follow-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel; JR; Snijder; Maarten; J; Suttorp; Jurri?n; M; Ten; Berg; Martijn; C; Post

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term efficacy of two different devices more than five years after percutaneous atrial septal defect(ASD) closure in adults.METHODS: All patients who underwent percutaneous closure of an ASD in the St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands, between February 1998 and December 2006 were included. Percutaneous closure took place under general anaesthesia and transesophageal echocardiographic moni toring. Transthoracic echocardiography(TTE) was performed 24 h post-procedure to visualize the device position and to look for residual shunting using color Doppler. All complications were registered. All patients were invited for an outpatient visit and contrast TTE more than 5-years after closure. Efficacy was based on the presence of a residual right-to-left shunt(RLS), graded as minimal, moderate or severe. The presence of a residual left-to-right shunt(LRS) was diagnosed using color Doppler, and was not graded. Descriptive statistics were used for patients’ characteristics. Univariate analysis was used to identify predictors for residual shunting.RESULTS: In total, 104 patients(mean age 45.5 ± 17.1 years) underwent percutaneous ASD closure using an Amplatzer device(ASO) in 76 patients and a Cardioseal/Starflex device(CS/SF) in 28 patients. The mean follow-up was 6.4 ± 3.4 years. Device migration occurred in 4 patients of whom two cases occurred during the index hospitalization(1 ASO, 1 CS/SF). The other 2 cases of device migration occurred during the first 6 mo of follow-up(2 CS/SF). The recurrent thrombo-embolic event rate was similar in both groups: 0.4% per follow-up year. More than 12 mo post-ASD closure and latest follow-up, new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmia’s occurred in 3.9% and 0% for the ASO and CS/SF group, respectively. The RLS rate at latest follow-up was 17.4%(minimal 10.9%, moderate 2.2%, severe 4.3%) and 45.5%(minimal 27.3%, moderate 18.2%, severe 0%) for the ASO- and CS/SF groups, respectively. There was no

  4. Changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity: a follow-up study

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    Lahelma Eero

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is known to have health benefits across population groups. However, less is known about changes over time in socioeconomic differences in leisure-time physical activity and the reasons for the changes. We hypothesised that class differences in leisure-time physical activity would widen over time due to declining physical activity among the lower occupational classes. We examined whether occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity change over time in a cohort of Finnish middle-aged women and men. We also examined whether a set of selected covariates could account for the observed changes. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort mail surveys; the respondents were 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki at baseline in 2000-2002 (n = 8960, response rate 67%. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to the baseline respondents in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%. The outcome measure was leisure-time physical activity, including commuting, converted to metabolic equivalent tasks (MET. Socioeconomic position was measured by occupational class (professionals, semi-professionals, routine non-manual employees and manual workers. The covariates included baseline age, marital status, limiting long-lasting illness, common mental disorders, job strain, physical and mental health functioning, smoking, body mass index, and employment status at follow-up. Firstly the analyses focused on changes over time in age adjusted prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. Secondly, logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for covariates of changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Results At baseline there were no occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Over the follow-up leisure-time physical activity increased among those in the higher classes and decreased among manual workers, suggesting the emergence of

  5. Pattern of follow-up care and early relapse detection in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.M.E.; Vegt, de F.; Siesling, S.; Flobbe, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; Heiden-van der Loo, van der M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Dijck, van J.A.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Routine breast cancer follow-up aims at detecting second primary breast cancers and loco regional recurrences preclinically. We studied breast cancer follow-up practice and mode of relapse detection during the first 5 years of follow-up to determine the efficiency of the follow-up schedule. The Neth

  6. Residual intrahepatic stones after percutaneous biliary extraction : longterm follow up of complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Min; Shim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Lim, Sang Jun; Park, Hyo Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Choi, Young Hee [Chungang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Byung Kuck [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Young [Sung Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the radiologic and clinical follow-up of complications between a group in whom stone removal after percutaneous biliary extraction had been complete, and a group in whom this had been incomplete. Twenty-two patients in whom stone removal had been incomplete, and 20 from whom stones had been completely removed were evaluated with particular attention to complications such as cholangitis, liver abscess, biliary sepsis, and pain. Cholangitis was diagnosed on the basis of typical clinical symptoms such as pain, high fever, jaundice and leukocytosis. Pain without other cholangitic symptoms was excluded. Liver abscess was diagnosed by percutaneous aspiration of pus, and biliary sepsis by bacterial growth on blood culture, or laboratory findings such as increased fibrinogen products, decreased fibrinogen, and increased prothrombin time with cholangitic symptoms. 'Complete removal' means no residual stones on follow-up sonogram and cholangiogram performed within three to seven days after pecutaneous biliary extraction. Mean follow-up period was 26.5 months in the incomplete removal group and 34.2 months in the complete removal group. In twelve of 22 patients (54.5%) in the incomplete removal group, complications occurred, as follows:cholangitis, ten cases (45.5%);liver absces, one (4.5%);biliary sepsis, one (4.5%);and pain, seven(31.8%). In contrast, only two of twenty patients (10%) in the complete removal group suffered complications, all of which involved the recurrence of stones in the common duct, and cholangitis. Complete removal of intrahepatic stones significantly helps to reduce the incidence of possible complications. Even in the case of an impacted stone, aggressive interventional procedures, aimed at complete removal, should be considered. If nonsurgical procedures fail, early partial hepatectomy should be considered, particulary for the stones localized in the left intrahepatic duct.

  7. Patient responses to research recruitment and follow-up surveys: findings from a diverse multicultural health care setting in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidir, Amal; Asad, Humna; Abdelrahim, Huda; Elnashar, Maha; Killawi, Amal; Hammoud, Maya; Al-Khal, Abdul Latif; Haddad, Pascale; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-26

    Health care researchers working in the Arabian Gulf need information on how to optimize recruitment and retention of study participants in extremely culturally diverse settings. Implemented in Doha, Qatar in 2012 with 4 language groups, namely Arabic, English, Hindi, and Urdu, this research documents persons' responses to recruitment, consent, follow-up, and reminder procedures during psychometric testing of the Multicultural Assessment Instrument (MAI), a novel self- or interviewer-administered survey. Bilingual research assistants recruited adults in outpatient clinics by approaching persons in particular who appeared to be from a target language group. Participants completed the MAI, a second acculturation instrument used for content-validity assessment, and a demographics questionnaire. Participants were asked to take the MAI again in 2-3 weeks, in person or by post, to assess test-retest reliability. Recruitment data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. Of 1503 persons approached during recruitment, 400 enrolled (27%)-100 per language group. The enrollment rates in the language groups were: Arabic-32%; English-33%; Hindi-18%; Urdu-30%. The groups varied somewhat in their preferences regarding consent procedure, follow-up survey administration, contact mode for follow-up reminders, and disclosure of personal mailing address (for postal follow-up). Over all, telephone was the preferred medium for follow-up reminders. Of 64 persons who accepted a research assistant's invitation for in-person follow-up, 40 participants completed the interview (follow-up rate, 63%); among 126 persons in the postal group with a deliverable address, 29 participants mailed back a completed follow-up survey (response rate, 23%). Researchers in the Arabian Gulf face challenges to successfully identify, enroll, and retain eligible study participants. Although bilingual assistants-often from the persons' own culture-recruited face-to-face, and our questionnaire contained no

  8. Patient responses to research recruitment and follow-up surveys: findings from a diverse multicultural health care setting in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Khidir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care researchers working in the Arabian Gulf need information on how to optimize recruitment and retention of study participants in extremely culturally diverse settings. Implemented in Doha, Qatar in 2012 with 4 language groups, namely Arabic, English, Hindi, and Urdu, this research documents persons’ responses to recruitment, consent, follow-up, and reminder procedures during psychometric testing of the Multicultural Assessment Instrument (MAI, a novel self- or interviewer-administered survey. Methods Bilingual research assistants recruited adults in outpatient clinics by approaching persons in particular who appeared to be from a target language group. Participants completed the MAI, a second acculturation instrument used for content-validity assessment, and a demographics questionnaire. Participants were asked to take the MAI again in 2–3 weeks, in person or by post, to assess test-retest reliability. Recruitment data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. Results Of 1503 persons approached during recruitment, 400 enrolled (27 %—100 per language group. The enrollment rates in the language groups were: Arabic-32 %; English-33 %; Hindi-18 %; Urdu-30 %. The groups varied somewhat in their preferences regarding consent procedure, follow-up survey administration, contact mode for follow-up reminders, and disclosure of personal mailing address (for postal follow-up. Over all, telephone was the preferred medium for follow-up reminders. Of 64 persons who accepted a research assistant’s invitation for in-person follow-up, 40 participants completed the interview (follow-up rate, 63 %; among 126 persons in the postal group with a deliverable address, 29 participants mailed back a completed follow-up survey (response rate, 23 %. Conclusions Researchers in the Arabian Gulf face challenges to successfully identify, enroll, and retain eligible study participants. Although bilingual assistants

  9. Adolescent Kawasaki disease: usefulness of 64-slice CT coronary angiography for follow-up investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbone, Iacopo; Cannata, David; Algeri, Emanuela; Galea, Nicola; Napoli, Alessandro; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto; Francone, Marco [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Onchological and Anatomopathological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy); De Zorzi, Andrea [Bambino Gesu Hospital, Cardiology Division, Rome (Italy); Bosco, Giovanna; D' Agostino, Rita [Sapienza University of Rome, Unit of Paediatric Cardiology, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy); Menezes, Leon [University College of London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis that mainly affects coronary arteries in children, and requires regular follow-up from the time of diagnosis. To evaluate the feasibility of 64-slice CT angiography (CTA) for follow-up of patients with KD using previously performed invasive catheter coronary angiography (CCA) as reference standard. The study group comprised 12 patients (age 17.6 {+-} 2.9 years, mean{+-}SD) with a diagnosis of KD and a previously performed CCA (interval, 32.6 {+-} 13.5 months) who underwent 64-slice cardiac CTA. The quality of the images for establishing the presence of coronary abnormalities was determined by two observers. The CTA findings were compared with those from the prior CCA. Adequate image quality was obtained in all patients. Mean effective dose for CTA was 6.56 {+-} 0.95 mSv. CTA allowed accurate identification, characterization and measurement of all coronary aneurysms (n = 32), stenoses (n = 3) and occlusions (n = 9) previously demonstrated by CCA. One patient with disease progression went on to have percutaneous coronary intervention. Coronary lesions were reliably evaluated by 64-slice CTA in the follow-up of compliant patients with KD, reducing the need for repeated diagnostic invasive CCA. Hence, in an adequately selected patient population, the role of CCA could be limited almost only to therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  10. Patient relationship management: an overview and study of a follow-up system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Räisänen, Teppo; Hummastenniemi, Niko

    2008-01-01

    Customer relationship management research is utilized to explain the need for a more patient-oriented support in patient care. This article presents a European study on how various hospital units of a single healthcare organization have utilized a patient relationship management system--in particular a patient treatment follow-up system--and how it affects patient care and the knowledge work performed by the medical staff. Eight physicians were interviewed at a university hospital on whether patient treatment was improved through a follow-up system that had been in use in the case organization for three years. The interviewees represented various hospital units, and all of them had used the system at their own unit. The results indicate that it is possible to improve patient care through more personalized treatment. The follow-up treatment system seems to be a tool to create and maintain better communication with the patients rather than just a technological solution. It may help better understand and analyze both individual patients and patient groups. For individual physicians it provides a way to reflect professional skills. The system was lacking in its support for one-to-one communication with patients. Nevertheless, the system is an example of patient relationship management which may help healthcare units to move towards a more patient-oriented care.

  11. Are Breast Cancer Molecular Classes Predictive of Survival in Patients with Long Follow-Up?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danae Pracella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the clinical outcomes of 305 breast cancer (BC patients, aged 55 years or younger, with long follow-up and according to intrinsic subtypes. The cohort included 151 lymph node negative (LN− and 154 lymph node positive (LN+ patients. Luminal A tumors were mainly LN−, well differentiated, and of stage I; among them AR was an indicator of good prognosis. Luminal B and HER2 positive nonluminal cancers showed higher tumor grade and nodal metastases as well as higher proliferation status and stage. Among luminal tumors, those PR positive and vimentin negative showed a longer survival. HER2-positive nonluminal and TN patients showed a poorer outcome, with BC-specific death mostly occurring within 5 and 10 years. Only luminal tumor patients underwent BC death over 10 years. When patients were divided in to LN− and LN+ no differences in survival were observed in the luminal subgroups. LN− patients have good survival even after 20 years of follow-up (about 75%, while for LN+ patients survival at 20 years (around 40% was comparable to HER2-positive nonluminal and TN groups. In conclusion, in our experience ER-positive breast tumors are better divided by classical clinical stage than molecular classification, and they need longer clinical follow-up especially in cases with lymph node involvement.

  12. Long-term follow-up care for pediatric cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Progress in therapy has made survival into adulthood a reality for most children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today. Notably, this growing population remains vulnerable to a variety of long-term therapy-related sequelae. Systematic ongoing follow-up of these patients, therefore, is important for providing for early detection of and intervention for potentially serious late-onset complications. In addition, health counseling and promotion of healthy lifestyles are important aspects of long-term follow-up care to promote risk reduction for health problems that commonly present during adulthood. Both general and subspecialty pediatric health care providers are playing an increasingly important role in the ongoing care of childhood cancer survivors, beyond the routine preventive care, health supervision, and anticipatory guidance provided to all patients. This report is based on the guidelines that have been developed by the Children's Oncology Group to facilitate comprehensive long-term follow-up of childhood cancer survivors (www.survivorshipguidelines.org).

  13. Fifteen-year follow-up of quality of life in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter; R; van; Dijk; Susan; JJ; Logtenberg; Klaas; H; Groenier; Joost; C; Keers; Henk; JG; Bilo; Nanne; Kleefstra

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate metabolic control and health-related quality of life(HRQOL)in a type 1 diabetes mellitus(T1DM)population.METHODS:As part of a prospective cohort study,283T1DM patients treated with various insulin treatment modalities including multiple daily injections(MDI)and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion(CSII)were examined annually.HRQOL was measured using the SF-36 and EuroQol questionnaires.Data regarding HRQOL,glycaemic and metabolic control from baseline and follow-up measures in 2002 and 2010 were analysed.Linear mixed models were used to calculate estimated values and differences between the three moments in time and the three treatment modalities.RESULTS:Significant changes[meanΔ(95%CI)]in body mass index[2.4 kg/m2(1.0,3.8)],systolic blood pressure[-6.4 mmHg(-11.4,-1.3)]and EuroQol-VAS[-7.3(-11.4,-3.3)]were observed over time.In 2010,168 patients were lost to follow-up.Regarding mode of therapy,52 patients remained on MDI,28 remained on CSII,and 33 patients switched from MDI to CSII during follow-up.Among patients on MDI,HRQOL decreased significantly over time:mental component summary[-9.8(-16.3,-3.2)],physical component summary[-8.6(-15.3,-1.8)]and EuroQol-VAS[-8.1(-14.0,-2.3)],P<0.05 for all.For patients using CSII,the EuroQol-VAS decreased[-9.6(-17.5,-1.7)].None of the changes over time in HRQOL differed significantly with the changes over time within the other treatment groups.CONCLUSION:No differences with respect to metabolic and HRQOL parameters between the various insulin treatment modalities were observed after 15 years of follow-up in T1DM patients.

  14. Long-term follow-up results of primary and recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verspoor, Floortje G M; Zee, Aniek A G; Hannink, Gerjon; van der Geest, Ingrid C M; Veth, Rene P H; Schreuder, H W Bart

    2014-11-01

    Adequate documentation of the outcome of treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is sparse. Available case series show relatively short follow-up times and often combine locations or subtypes to increase patient numbers. This article describes the long-term follow-up of a single institution's large consecutive series of PVNS. Retrospectively, 107 PVNS patients were identified between 1985 and 2011 by searching pathology and radiology records. Treatment complications, recurrences and quality of life were evaluated. Most patients (85.2%) were primarily or secondarily treated at our institution. Both subtypes, localized PVNS [29 (27%)] and diffuse PVNS [75 (70%)] were represented. The knee was affected in 88% of patients. Treatments received were surgery, external beam radiotherapy, radiosynovectomy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy or combinations of these. Forty-nine (46%) patients had prior treatment elsewhere. The mean follow-up from diagnosis until last contact was 7.0 years (range 0.3-27.4) for localized PVNS and 14.5 years (range 1.1-48.7) for diffuse PVNS. The 1- and 5-year recurrence-free survival rates for diffuse PVNS were 69% and 32%, respectively. Quality of life, estimated by 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, were not significantly different between localized and diffuse PVNS. However, both patient groups scored lower than the general population norms on the general health component (59.2 and 56.3, respectively, P PVNS increase with time. Long-term follow-up shows, particularly in diffuse PVNS, it is a continually recurring problem, and over time it becomes increasingly difficult to cure. The quality of life is decreased in patients with PVNS compared with the general population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The international follow-up of individuals potentially exposed to polonium-210 in London 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, K; Anders, K; Olowokure, B; Fraser, G; Maguire, H; Bailey, M; Smith, J; Frossell, S; Yap, K; Evans, B

    2010-06-01

    Following a death from polonium-210 ((210)Po), contamination was found at several sites in London. This paper describes the UK Health Protection Agency's follow-up and assessment of individuals resident overseas who were potentially exposed to (210)Po. Descriptive follow-up study. Individuals were classified into three exposure groups (higher, lower and unknown). Presence and degree of internal contamination were measured by 24-h urinary (210)Po activity (mBq/day). Results over 30mBq/day were taken to indicate probable contact with (210)Po in this incident. Dose assessments were conducted to determine degree of exposure and to identify individuals requiring further follow-up. Overall, 664 potentially exposed persons from 52 countries and territories were identified. Of these, 157 (24%) were in the higher exposure category, and urinary measurements were reported for 31% (48/157). Results for 19% (9/48) of those at higher exposure were more than 30mBq/day. For those at lower exposure, the percentage was 4% (3/68). Results above 30mBq/day were significantly more likely to be reported for the higher exposure category than the lower exposure category (Fisher's exact test P=0.010). Reported dose assessments suggested that identified individuals were not at increased health risk in the long term. Challenges and practical lessons were identified during the investigation. The results suggest that it is unlikely that any overseas resident had significant internal contamination with (210)Po. However, this incident clearly demonstrated the scale of international involvement likely to be necessary in other public health emergencies in large cities. The lessons identified have implications for the international health community, particularly with regard to the follow-up of individuals exposed to radiation in one country who then travel to another. Copyright 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of de novo major involvement during follow-up in Behçet's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; d'Ascanio, Anna; Figus, Michele; Favati, Benedetta; Baldini, Chiara; Tani, Chiara; Neri, R; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of de novo major involvement during follow-up in a cohort of patients with Behçet's syndrome (BS); the secondary aim was to analyse the epidemiological profile and the long-term outcome of those patients who developed new major involvement. Among our cohort of 120 BS patients, we evaluated all subjects who had no major organ involvement during the early years of their disease; specifically, at disease onset, the 52% of the cohort presented a prevalent mucocutaneous involvement. The primary outcomes were represented by the following: Hatemi et al. (Rheum Dis Clin North Am 39(2):245-61, 2013) the incidence of de novo major involvement during the follow-up and Hatemi et al. (Clin Exp Rheumatol 32(4 Suppl 84):S112-22, 2014) the use of immunosuppressive drugs during the follow-up. We have defined the development of de novo major involvement during the follow-up as the occurrence of severe ocular, vascular or CNS involvement after a latency period from the diagnosis of at least 3 years. Among 62 patients characterized by a mild onset of disease, we observed that after at least 3 years from the diagnosis, 21 BS patients (34%) still developed serious morbidities. Specifically, three patients developed ocular involvement, nine patients developed neurological involvement and nine patients presented vascular involvement. Comparing main epidemiological and clinical findings of the two groups, we observed that patients who developed de novo major involvement were more frequently males and younger; furthermore, 95% of these patients were characterized by a young onset of disease (p < 0.001). Being free of major organ complication in the first years of BS is not necessary a sign of a favourable outcome. Globally, the development of de novo major involvement during the coursfce of BS suggests that a tight control is strongly recommended during the course of the disease.

  17. A follow-up study of the fate of small asymptomatic deep venous thromboses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Lena M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative asymptomatic deep venous thromboses (ADVT can give rise to posttthrombotic syndrome (PTS, but there are still many unresolved issues in this context. For example, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the fate of small ADVT following minor orthopedic surgery. This follow-up study evaluates postthrombotic changes and clinical manifestations of PTS in a group of patients with asymptomatic calf vein DVT after surgery for Achilles tendon rupture. Methods Forty-six consecutive patients with distal ADVT were contacted and enrolled in a follow-up consisting of a single visit at the hospital at a mean time of 5 years postoperatively, including clinical examination and scoring, ultrasonography and venous plethysmography. All patients had participated in DVT-screening with colour duplex ultrasound (CDU 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively and 80% of them were treated with anticoagulation. Results With CDU postthrombotic changes and deep venous reflux were detected at follow-up in more than 50% of the patients, more commonly in somewhat larger calf DVT:s initially affecting more than one vessel. However, only about 10% of the patients had significant venous reflux according to venous plethysmography. No patient had plethysmographic evidence of remaining outflow obstruction, but presence of postthrombotic changes shown with CDU negatively influenced venous outflow capacity measured with plethysmography. A clinical entity of PTS was rarely found and occurred only in two patients (4% and then classified by Villalta scoring as of mild degree with few clinical signs of disease. Distal ADVT:s detected in the early postoperative period (3 weeks showed DVT-progression in 75% of the limbs that were still immobilized and without anticoagulation. Conclusions Asymptomatic postoperative distal DVT:s following surgery for Achilles tendon rupture have a good prognosis and a favourable clinical outcome. In our material of 46 patients the

  18. Clinical and Radiologic Follow-up Study for Biopsy Diagnosis of Radial Scar/Radial Sclerosing Lesion without Other Atypia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalife, Elizabeth Tágide; Lourenco, Ana P; Baird, Grayson L; Wang, Yihong

    2016-11-01

    To determine the incidence of malignancy for radial scars (RS)/radial sclerosing lesions (RSL) without associated atypia or malignancy identified at needle biopsy. Retrospective review of the pathology data base from January 2004 to July 2013 yielded 100 needle biopsies diagnosed as RS/RSL without associated atypia/malignancy. The RS/RSL was considered "incidental" if the target was calcifications and "targeted" if imaging revealed a mass, architectural distortion, or suspicious magnetic resonance imaging enhancement. The electronic medical record was used to identify surgical pathology, follow-up imaging, and clinical course; all pathology slides and imaging were reviewed by a board-certified pathologist and radiologist, respectively. Patient age, laterality, RS/RSL size, microcalcifications, and associated benign lesions were recorded. Among 100 cases, 54 were "incidental" and 46 were "targeted." In the incidental group, 14 underwent excision, 30 had imaging follow-up, and 10 were lost to follow-up. In the targeted group, 27 underwent excision, 11 had imaging follow-up, and 8 were lost to follow-up. Atypia was identified in four excisions: three from the incidental group and one from the targeted group. Among these, three had negative imaging follow-up (mean 45 months; range 15-60 months); the fourth patient (one of the incidental group) underwent excision alone. One of the 27 "targeted" patients who underwent excision developed ductal carcinoma in situ of the contralateral breast at 96 months. There have been no ipsilateral malignancies. We found no evidence of associated malignancy at excision for either incidental or targeted biopsies of RS/RSL without atypia. Our study suggests that close imaging follow-up is adequate for patients with RS/RSL without associated atypia/malignancy on needle biopsy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Developing Instructional Videotapes Step by Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the eight steps in developing an instructional videotape: planning, brainstorming content, sequencing the storyline, defining the treatment, developing the introduction and conclusion, scripting the video and audio, controlling the production, and specifying the postproduction. (DMM)

  20. Tuberculosis screening and follow-up of asylum seekers in Norway: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garåsen Helge

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 80% of new tuberculosis cases in Norway occur among immigrants from high incidence countries. On arrival to the country all asylum seekers are screened with Mantoux test and chest x-ray aimed to identify cases of active tuberculosis and, in the case of latent tuberculosis, to offer follow-up or prophylactic treatment. We assessed a national programme for screening, treatment and follow-up of tuberculosis infection and disease in a cohort of asylum seekers. Methods Asylum seekers ≥ 18 years who arrived at the National Reception Centre from January 2005 to June 2006, were included as the total cohort. Those with a Mantoux test ≥ 6 mm or positive x-ray findings were included in a study group for follow-up. Data were collected from public health authorities in the municipality to where the asylum seekers had moved, and from hospital based internists in case they had been referred to specialist care. Individual subjects included in the study group were matched with the Norwegian National Tuberculosis Register which receive reports of everybody diagnosed with active tuberculosis, or who had started treatment for latent tuberculosis. Results The total cohort included 4643 adult asylum seekers and 97.5% had a valid Mantoux test. At least one inclusion criterion was fulfilled by 2237 persons. By end 2007 municipal public health authorities had assessed 758 (34% of them. Altogether 328 persons had been seen by an internist. Of 314 individuals with positive x-rays, 194 (62% had seen an internist, while 86 of 568 with Mantoux ≥ 15, but negative x-rays (16% were also seen by an internist. By December 31st 2006, 23 patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis (prevalence 1028/100 000 and another 11 were treated for latent infection. Conclusion The coverage of screening was satisfactory, but fewer subjects than could have been expected from the national guidelines were followed up in the community and referred to an internist. To

  1. An evaluation of survival of space maintainers: a six-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulunoglu, Ozlem; Ulusu, Tezer; Genç, Yasemin

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the median survival time of fixed and removable space maintainers related to age groups, gender, and their distribution in upper and lower dental arches. The adherence of patients to a periodic recall program and the success rate of different types of space maintainers related to different arches were also evaluated. This study included 663 patients aged between 4-15 years old that were treated between the years of 1997 and 2002. The patients were categorized into four main groups: lost to follow-up, failed, successful, and censored at the end of study. Three hundred forty-five space maintainers were considered lost to follow-up, 83 were considered failed, 206 successful, and 20 censored-at-end. The overall median survival time of the appliances was 6.51 months. Median survival time was 7.25 months in the 4-6 age group, 6.35 months in the 7-12 age group, and 7.0 months in the 13+ age groups. Median survival time was 5.76 months in girls and 7.11 months in boys. Median survival time of space maintainers was 7.17 months for maxilla and 6.69 months in the mandible. Median survival time was 5.25 months for space maintainers fabricated in both arches.

  2. The follow-up and results of laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetje, Jan Harm

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a common disease in the Western world. In addition to lifestyle advice, treatment consists of the use of antacids. Some of the patients do not benefit from antacids, do not want to swallow lifelong antacids or suffer from a diaphragmatic hernia. For this group, a

  3. Developmental screening: predictors of follow-up adherence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    defaulting were employment, logistical issues, other responsibilities and forgetfulness. ... minority group, and having fewer economic resources ... Centralised data management and quality control moni- ... Developmental screening: The Parents' Evaluation of ..... A replication of the study with a larger sample size is also.

  4. Filling the Gap for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Follow-Up: An Overview for Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Bero, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Earlier detection and newer treatments now make breast cancer highly survivable, and breast cancer survivors are the largest female cancer survivor group in the United States. With earlier detection, more women are being diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer and need follow-up care. With the increasing number of breast cancer survivors, there is a projected shortage in the workforce of oncology specialists to care for these women. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends that breast cancer follow-up care can be provided by an oncologist or primary care provider, as long as the primary care provider has spoken to the oncologist about appropriate follow-up care. Several studies have shown that primary care providers and oncologists have comparable outcomes for follow-up care of women with early-stage breast cancer. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) are considered the gold standard for breast cancer treatment and follow-up. These guidelines are clear and straightforward. Using knowledge of the NCCN Guidelines, primary care providers can fill the gap for follow-up care of women with early-stage breast cancer.

  5. The effectiveness of an improved multidisciplinary pain management programme: a 6- and 12-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysvik, Elin; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Natvig, Gerd Karin

    2012-05-01

      This article is a report of a Norwegian-revised study on the effectiveness of a follow-up multidisciplinary management programme for chronic pain to investigate the change processes associated with treatment.   Substantial evidence supports the use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy approaches to chronic pain. As relapse is often reported, follow-up sessions should be included.   A follow-up quasi-experimental design was performed, and a previous control group was used. The study initially included 117 participants, and 104 of the sample completed the 6- and 12-month follow-up programme. The 6-month follow-up consisted of therapeutic dialogue and education combined with physical activity. At the 12-month follow-up, a telephonic consultation was conducted. The data collection period was between September 2006 and January 2008. The statistical and clinical significance were considered.   Findings suggest that this follow-up programme can potentially maintain the positive results of the basic programme in terms of reduced pain perception, improved health-related quality of life, and movement towards self-management.   These results are consistent with the ultimate goal of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy approaches, which is to help patients with chronic pain to cope more effectively and to improve their health-related quality of life and functioning. To maintain treatment improvements and advance nursing, there is a clear need for research that tests the efficacy of follow-up interventions that are designed to prevent drop out and relapse. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Long-term follow-up of patients with choroidal neovascularization due to angioid streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Serrano, Maria Guadalupe; Rodriguez-Reyes, Abelardo; Guerrero-Naranjo, Jose Luis; Salcedo-Villanueva, Guillermo; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; García-Aguirre, Gerardo; Morales-Canton, Virgilio; Velez-Montoya, Raul

    2017-01-01

    Background The following case series describes the long-term anatomical and functional outcome of a group of seven patients with choroidal neovascularization (CNV), secondary to angioid streaks (AS), who were treated with antiangiogenic drugs in a pro re nata (PRN) regimen. After the 4-year mark, visual acuity tends to return to pretreatment level. Treatment delays and lack of awareness and self-referral by the patients are believed to be the cause of the PRN regimen failure. Purpose To assess the long-term outcomes (>4 years) of patients with CNV due to AS treated with a PRN regimen of antiangiogenic. Methods This was a retrospective, case series, single-center study. We reviewed the electronic medical records from patients with CNV due to AS. From each record, we noted general demographic data and relevant medical history; clinical presentation, changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) over time, optical coherent tomography parameters, treatment and retreatment details, and systemic associations. Changes in BCVA and central macular thickness were assessed with a Wilcoxon two-sample test, with an alpha value of ≤0.05 for statistical significance. Results The mean follow-up time was 53.8±26.8 months. BCVA at baseline was: 1.001±0.62 logMAR; at the end of follow-up: 0.996±0.56 logMAR (P=0.9). Central macular thickness at baseline was: 360.85±173.82 μm; at the end of follow-up: 323.85±100.34 μm (P=0.6). Mean number of intravitreal angiogenic drugs: 6±4.16 injections (range 4–15). Mean time between injections was 3.8±2.7 months (range 1.9–5.8 months). Conclusion Despite initial anatomical and functional improvement, patients at the end of the follow-up had no visual improvement after a pro re nata regimen of antiangiogenic drugs. The amount of retreatments, number of recurrences, and time between intravitreal injections were similar to previous reports with shorter follow-up. PMID:28031699

  7. Thermography in the detection and follow up of chondromalacia patellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujcić, M; Nedeljković, R

    1991-01-01

    Although diagnostic criteria for chondromalacia patellae exist, the disease is often accompanied by physical signs which are limited or non-diagnostic. Thermographic examination was performed in 157 patients with clinical diagnosis of chondromalacia patellae in 86 patients after surgical treatment for chondromalacia, and in 308 controls. Thermography can help the clinicians in establishing the diagnosis of chondromalacia patellae, but by itself is not sufficiently specific. The specificity of thermography was dependent on age, ranging from 90% for the 15-24 year age group to 65% for the 45-54 year age group. Sensitivity of the method was 68%. Thermography can disclose other knee disorders which imitate chondromalacia patellae. Images PMID:1768161

  8. Treatment of missing data in follow-up studies of randomised controlled trials: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Thomas R; Yelland, Lisa N; Lee, Katherine J; Ryan, Philip; Salter, Amy B

    2017-08-01

    After completion of a randomised controlled trial, an extended follow-up period may be initiated to learn about longer term impacts of the intervention. Since extended follow-up studies often involve additional eligibility restrictions and consent processes for participation, and a longer duration of follow-up entails a greater risk of participant attrition, missing data can be a considerable threat in this setting. As a potential source of bias, it is critical that missing data are appropriately handled in the statistical analysis, yet little is known about the treatment of missing data in extended follow-up studies. The aims of this review were to summarise the extent of missing data in extended follow-up studies and the use of statistical approaches to address this potentially serious problem. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed to identify extended follow-up studies published from January to June 2015. Studies were eligible for inclusion if the original randomised controlled trial results were also published and if the main objective of extended follow-up was to compare the original randomised groups. We recorded information on the extent of missing data and the approach used to treat missing data in the statistical analysis of the primary outcome of the extended follow-up study. Of the 81 studies included in the review, 36 (44%) reported additional eligibility restrictions and 24 (30%) consent processes for entry into extended follow-up. Data were collected at a median of 7 years after randomisation. Excluding 28 studies with a time to event primary outcome, 51/53 studies (96%) reported missing data on the primary outcome. The median percentage of randomised participants with complete data on the primary outcome was just 66% in these studies. The most common statistical approach to address missing data was complete case analysis (51% of studies), while likelihood-based analyses were also well represented (25%). Sensitivity analyses around

  9. Factors Affecting Reading Habit and Media Follow-Up in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Hizel Bulbul

    2014-02-01

    Of the people, 95.3% had a television at home. The most watched programs were the series (34.5%, and news programs (35.7%, respectively. 16.6% of the group did not listen to radio at all and the rest were listening only while driving or doing housework. CONCLUSION: Our study is important in terms of covering people from different sections of Turkish society and emphasizing the low reading habit and media follow-up once more [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(1.000: 47-56

  10. 15-year follow-up of the Second Nordic Mantle Cell Lymphoma trial (MCL2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskelund, Christian W.; Kolstad, Arne; Jerkeman, Mats;

    2016-01-01

    , developed by the Nordic Lymphoma Group. We here present the 15-year updated results of the Nordic MCL2 study after a median follow-up of 11·4 years: For all patients on an intent-to-treat basis, the median overall and progression-free survival was 12·7 and 8·5 years, respectively. The MCL International......In recent decades, the prognosis of Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) has been significantly improved by intensified first-line regimens containing cytarabine, rituximab and consolidation with high-dose-therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. One such strategy is the Nordic MCL2 regimen...

  11. Long-term follow-up of a pilot project on smoking prevention with adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telch, M J; Killen, J D; McAlister, A L; Perry, C L; Maccoby, N

    1982-03-01

    Seventh graders (N = 353) in one junior high school received an experimental smoking prevention program aimed at teaching students to resist the social pressures to smoke cigarettes. Seventh graders (N = 217) in another school served as controls. Teams of high-school students trained in basic behavior change skills led seven classroom sessions of instruction in counter-arguing during the school year. Significant differences were found between groups in reported smoking at a 9-month posttest. Results were maintained at 21- and 33-month follow-ups.

  12. Wilson disease:Histopathological correlations with treatment on follow-up liver biopsies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandy; Cope-Yokoyama; Milton; J; Finegold; Giacomo; Carlo; Sturniolo; Kyoungmi; Kim; Claudia; Mescoli; Massimo; Rugge; Valentina; Medici

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the progression of hepatic histopathology in serial liver biopsies from Wilson disease(WD)patients.METHODS:We report a group of 12 WD patients treated with zinc and/or penicillamine who underwent multiple follow-up liver biopsies.Demographic,clinical and laboratory data were gathered and all patients underwent an initial biopsy and at least one repeat biopsy.RESULTS:Time to repeat biopsy ranged from 2 to 12 years.Six patients(non-progressors)showed stable hepatic histology or improvement....

  13. Long-Term Follow-Up of Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Evaluation of 53 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk Beşer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study it was aimed to determine the long-term demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the responses to therapy, in children diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three cases, aged 0 to 18 years, followedup with the diagnosis of IBD were included in this study. The study grouponsisted of patients diagnosed as IBD according to clinical, serologic, endoscopic and histopathological criteria. Dates of birth, esophagogastroduodenoscopy/colonoscopy findings, laboratory results at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up, complaints and their durations, treatments received presently and previously and comorbid diseases were documented. Patients’ heights, weights and Z scores at the time of diagnosis and following treatment were documented, calculated and compared. Family history of IBD and autoimmune disorders were questioned and recorded together with physical examination findings.Results: Among our cases, 18 were followed up with the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease (CD and 35 had the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC. Male to female ratio was 3.5/1 in CD and 1.33/1 in UC. Ten cases (18.9% had the history of having a relative with IBD in their families. Mean age for start of complaints of this group was statistically significantly lower than the group having no family history of IBD (p=0.042. Twenty of the cases (37.8% had history of consanguinity between parents. Mean age for start of complaints of this group, whose parents were consanguine, was statistically significantly lower than the group with non-related parents (p=0.025. Weight-for-age Z-score was below -2 in 18.9% of cases and seven of them were diagnosed with CD. Height-forage Z-score was below -2 in 17% of cases and nine of them were also followed-up with the diagnosis of CD. The white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein value at the time of diagnosis were

  14. Risk factors for loss to follow-up during active surveillance of patients with Stage I seminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Koji; Kamba, Tomomi; Inai, Hiromu; Uchida, Kazunori; Miyazaki, Jun; Kamoto, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    To elucidate the patterns and risk factors for loss to follow-up during active surveillance for Stage I seminoma. A total of 425 cases with Stage I seminoma underwent radical orchiectomy from 1985 to 2006 at 25 Japanese institutions, including 22 community hospitals and 3 university hospitals. The post-orchiectomy management selected was active surveillance for 186 patients, adjuvant radiotherapy for 182 patients and chemotherapy for 57 patients. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the recurrence-free survival and loss to follow-up rate. The risk factors for loss to follow-up were examined using Cox's proportional hazards model with multiple variables. The 2-, 5- and 10-year loss to follow-up rates in the active surveillance group were 14.2, 37.8 and 71.3%, respectively, which were not significantly different in comparison with those in the active surveillance and adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy groups. With regard to the active surveillance group, the multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients younger than 36 years at diagnosis, patients diagnosed since 2000 and patients treated at hospitals that enrolled more than 10 cases had a significant risk for loss to follow-up. No significant correlation between the loss to follow-up rate and pathological risk factors such as tumor size (≤4 versus >4 cm) and rete testis invasion (presence versus absence) was shown. The loss to follow-up rates beyond 5 years were unsatisfactorily high during active surveillance. Further approaches to improve the quality of active surveillance are needed, especially for high-risk patients such as those of younger age.

  15. Effects of Self-management Education Through Telephone Follow-up in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjoo Nasab, Mahmood; Ghavam, Abbas; Yazdanpanah, Abbas; Jahangir, Fereidoun; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    It is expected that the number of people living with diabetes rise especially in low- and middle-income countries. In Iran, more than four million adults have diabetes mellitus, and self-management education is essential for effective diabetes self-care. This study aimed to investigate the effect of self-management education with telephone follow-up in diabetic patients of rural areas of Fars province in Lamerd city, Iran. In this experimental study, 64 participants were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups (32 patients for each group). In the intervention group, the participants attended four educational sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. The control group received the usual care. Outcome measures were clinical variables and the patients' scores in Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) in the preintervention and postintervention phases. Effects of the intervention were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and analysis of covariance. Data of 60 patients (30 in each group) were analyzed. There were significant differences between the two groups in fasting blood sugar after 3 months of intervention. There was a significant difference between the intervention and control groups in DSMQ sum scale after adjusting for baseline value. In subscales of DSMQ, there were significant differences between the intervention and control groups in glucose management, dietary control, and physical activity, whereas no significant difference was found in health care use between the intervention and control groups. Self-management education with telephone follow-up in diabetic patients in rural areas is effective, especially in improving fasting blood sugar level and increasing scores of patients based on DSMQ.

  16. [Long-term follow up of patients with pernicious anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, K; Laub, W M

    1990-05-13

    The authors give several data of 357 patients with megaloblastic anaemia diagnosed, treated and controlled between 1958-1988. 334 of the patients had anaemia perniciosa and 23 of them had postresectional megaloblastic anaemia. After listing the criteria of the diagnosis the authors detail the mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis, the distribution of sexes, age and blood groups among the patients, the number of new cases per year, the frequency of relapsus of the disease and its association with other autoimmune diseases. They also deal with the characteristic seasonal fluctuation and the accumulated cases in families. Its association with malignant tumours, especially with stomach carcinoma was examined.

  17. Depleted Uranium (DU) Follow-up Program Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    fragments Thun, 1975 = 65.1 µg U/L Dietary Limit = 0.365 µg DU Cut point = 0.1µg U/g creatinine NHANES 95th percentile = 0.043 µg U/g creatinine NHANES...analysis (HPRT, PIG - A, FISH, micronulcei) • Neurocognitive testing • Dermatologic testing for hypersensitivity to U • Focus group/risk communication...hybridization (FISH); Mean number of total mutations per subject in chromo- somes 5, 7, 11, and 13 h>l p=.08 ns ns PIG -A l>hp=.08 Micronuclei ns ns

  18. Lane Community College Student Follow-Up Study, Spring 2001. 1999-2000 Students: One Year Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Sylvia J.

    This 2001 follow-up study conducted in the spring of 2001 and reported in the fall of 2001,targeted 2 groups of former Lane Community College (LCC) (Oregon) students. Surveys were mailed to all 1990-2000 graduates (students who earned a degree or certificate). The second group contacted were students who had achieved no formal award (NFA). These…

  19. Exploring outcomes of a nurse practitioner-managed cardiac surgery follow-up intervention: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Christie, Sandra; Singal, Rohit K

    2013-09-01

    To describe and compare the outcomes of a nurse practitioner-managed cardiac surgery follow-up model of care with the standard model of primary care provider follow-up for coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients. Advances in healthcare have had a favourable impact on length of stay following cardiac surgery; however, the shorter length of stay has not been accompanied by enhanced support to bridge the gap between acute care and the community setting. Prospective (2009-2010) randomized study. Elective cardiac surgery patients (N = 200) were randomly assigned to the nurse practitioner follow-up intervention or to the standard model of follow-up care. The main outcomes were health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction, symptoms, and health resource use. Outcome data were elicited via telephone interviews at 2 and 6 weeks postdischarge. Baseline differences between the two groups were non-significant; however, at 2 weeks postdischarge, the intervention group reported significantly fewer symptoms and higher physical functioning status. At 2 and 6 weeks postdischarge, the intervention group was significantly more satisfied with the amount of help, as well as the quality of the services received. Differences in healthcare resource use were not statistically significant. This evidence suggests that the nurse practitioner-managed model of follow-up care effectively bridges the gap between institutional and primary care in the cardiac surgery population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. [The Octabaix study. Baseline assessment and 5 years of follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Assumpta; Formiga, Francesc; Padrós, Gloria; Badia, Teresa; Almeda, Jesús; Octabaix, Grupo Estudio

    This is a review of a prospective, community-based study with a follow-up period of 5years. It is a study of 328 participants aged 85 at baseline, of which 62% were female, 53% widows, and a third of them living alone. High blood pressure was observed in 75.9%, dyslipidaemia in 51.2%, and diabetes in 17.7%. At baseline the median Barthel Index was 95, the Spanish version of the Mini-Mental State Examination was 28, the Charlson index 1, the Mini Nutritional Assessment 25, the Gijón test 10, the visual analogue scale of the Quality of Life Test was 60, and with a mean of 6.1 prescription drugs. A lower quality of life was also associated with female gender, a phenotype of frailty, heart failure, and a high level of social risk. At 5years of follow-up, the mortality rate was high, with 138 (42.1%) of the population sample dying at the end of the period. It represents an annual mortality rate of 8.4%. Thus, a common denominator of this review has been the high importance of functionality and overall comorbidity factors associated with mortality in this very old age group, compared to other more traditional factors in younger populations. Several studies of frailty have also been assessed in this group, as well as falls, nutritional risk, diabetes and successful aging, including important aspects to better understand this population group.

  1. Treatment and follow-up of children with transient congenital hypothyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ru-lai; ZHU Zhi-wei; ZHOU Xue-lian; ZHAO Zheng-yan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical therapy and prognosis in children with transient congenital hypothyroidism (CH).Methods: Fifty-seven children with CH diagnosed after neonatal screening were treated with low-dosage levothyroxine (L-T4).Follow-up evaluation included the determination of TT3, TT4 and TSH serum levels and the assessment of thyroid gland morphology, bone age, growth development and development quotients (DQ). A full check-up was performed at age 2, when the affected children first discontinued the L-T4 treatment for 1 month, and one year later. Development quotients were compared (16.25±3.87) μg/d. Mean duration of therapy was (28.09±9.56) months. No significant difference was found between study group and control group in the DQ test (average score (106.58± 14.40) vs (102.4±8.6), P>0.05) and 96.49% of the CH children achieved a test score above 85. Bone age, 99mTc scans and ultrasonographic findings were all normal, and evaluation of physical development was normal too, as were the serum levels of TT3, TT4 and TSH after one year of follow-up. Conclusion: A L-T4 dosage of and physical development at age 2. So it is possible for CH children to stop taking medicine if their laboratory findings and physical development are all normal after regular treatment and 2~3 years of follow-up.

  2. Cardiovascular follow-up at school age after perinatal glucocorticoid exposure in prematurely born children: perinatal glucocorticoid therapy and cardiovascular follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Willem B; Karemaker, Rosa; Mooy, Nicole F; Strengers, Jan L M; Kemperman, Hans; Baerts, Wim; Veen, Sylvia; Visser, Gerard H A; Heijnen, Cobi J; van Bel, Frank

    2008-08-01

    To study whether antenatal or neonatal glucocorticoid therapy to reduce the incidence and severity of chronic lung disease in preterm infants is associated with long-term adverse cardiac effects and hypertension. Retrospective matched-cohort study. Outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital. One hundred ninety-three children aged 7 to 10 years who had been born prematurely between December 2, 1993, and September 15, 1997. Main Exposure Neonatal treatment with dexamethasone disodium phosphate(n = 48) or the clinically equally effective glucocorticoid hydrocortisone (n = 51), or only antenatal treatment with betamethasone disodium phosphate and betamethasone acetate (n = 51). These 3 groups were compared with a reference group of prematurely born children who had not been exposed to perinatal glucocorticoid therapy (n = 43). General hemodynamic data (heart rate and blood pressure), cardiovascular function as assessed at echocardiography, intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries, and cardiac biochemical features as early markers of expansion and volume overload of the cardiac left ventricle (B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide). No significant group differences were found for heart rate, blood pressure, biochemical features, intima-media thickness, or systolic or diastolic left ventricular function. Although no differences were found in blood pressure and cardiovascular function at school age in children antenatally or neonatally treated with glucocorticoids, further cardiovascular follow-up may be advisable because cardiovascular dysfunction may become apparent only later in life.

  3. [Mucopolysaccharidosis I: management and follow up of three patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Luz María; Del Ángel-Cruz, Edith; Domínguez-Sansores, Luis Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I or mucopolisacaridosis type I is a rare genetic disease, with a severe and fast multiorganic damage profile and fatal prognosis in the early years of age. It belongs to the lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) group pathologies. As an LSD, mucopolisacaridosis type I is due to the lack of the α-L-iduronidase enzyme. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with laronidase is an effective treatment choice. It is available in Mexico since 2005. In the Hospital UMAE 25 of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, three patients have been treated and followed since 2006, with a close surveillance on their clinical evolution. The ERT with laronidase is expensive, relatively new and with little experience in Mexico, so there is a real need of knowing clinical evolution as well as overall treatment efficacy from baseline pre-treatment stage to date. Data on physical, functional and biochemical changes in these patients is presented.

  4. X-ray follow up observations of new IGRs

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jerome; Tomsick, John A

    2011-01-01

    Since the launch of INTEGRAL in 2002, about 300 new sources have been discovered. Understanding the nature of these objects is of prime importance for many aspects of astrophysics, such as the evolution of stars, population of sources (Galactic and extra-Galactic), and ultimately the physics powering them. However, their nature cannot be established from the soft gamma-ray observations. The first step towards unveiling the nature of those sources is to refine their X-ray position, in order to finally find counterparts at other wavelengths. X-ray spectra are also of prime importance to obtain clues on the nature of the objects. Since the discovery of the first IGR in 2003, our group has been active in several aspects of these studies. Here, we present the main results we have obtained through 7 years of multi-instrumental (Chandra, XMM, Swift, RXTE) campaigns.

  5. Performance of the "house doctor". Effect of physician-to-patient ratio on follow up in long-term care facilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, J P; Buchanan, B.

    1993-01-01

    Do physicians with many patients in a long-term care facility provide more timely follow up of their drug orders than those with only a few? We reviewed 60 charts at random in three intermediate care facilities. Physician practices fell into two distinct groups. Those with more than 17 patients followed up sooner than those with fewer than six. We recommend a "house doctor" model of care for patients whose follow up is poor.

  6. Primary care follow-up of radical prostatectomy patients: A regional New Zealand experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Yassaie

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study identified that follow-up by GPs after RP is insufficient. Accordingly, there is a requirement for formal educational programs if primary care is to take a greater role in follow-up of these patients.

  7. Follow-up of long-term survivors of breast cancer in primary care versus specialist attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Cañada, José M; Ramírez-Daffós, Patricia; Cortés-Carmona, Cristina; Rosado-Varela, Petra; Nieto-Vera, Juan; Benítez-Rodríguez, Encarnación

    2013-10-01

    Hospitals have traditionally been the place where the follow-up of breast cancer patients occurs in Spain. To describe the evolution of long-term survivors of breast cancer according to type of follow-up received (in primary or specialist/hospital care), measuring impact of care type on health, cost, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and satisfaction results. Retrospective study of cohorts with disease-free patients followed up for at least 5 years in Oncology. Using personal questionnaires, the type and cost of the follow-up, events, HRQL and satisfaction were analysed. Ninety-eight women were surveyed, 60 in primary and 38 in specialist care. There were no differences between groups in diagnosis of metastasis or new primary tumours. The number of annual visits per patient was 0.98 (0.48) in primary and 1.11 (0.38) in specialist care (P = 0.19). In primary, 44.6% were programmed and 55.4% on demand; in specialist, 94.6% were programmed and 5.4% on demand (P = 0.0001). The costs of follow-up in primary care were lower--€112.86 (77.54) versus €184.61 (85.87) per patient and year (P = 0.0001). No differences were reported in HRQL. Preference for specialist care was expressed by 80%, versus 10% for primary, with 10% indifferent. Patients showed greater satisfaction with specialist care in all questionnaire dimensions. Compliance with follow-up protocol was high in both groups. In specialist care nearly all the visits were programmed and in primary almost half were on demand. In our locality, primary is more cost-effective than specialist care, but patients express greater satisfaction with specialist follow-up and hence prefer it.

  8. Hyperphosphatasia with massive osteoectasia: a 45-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, E.F. [Division of Surgical Pathology, Department of Pathology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sack, G.H. [Department of Internal Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Hyperphosphatasia is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a generalized skeletal disease and increased alkaline phosphatase. Increased bone remodeling secondary to increased osteoclastic activity appears to be the underlying feature of these disorders. These disorders include juvenile Paget's disease, expansile skeletal hyperphosphatasia, hyperostosis generalisata with striations, and Camurati-Engelmann's disease, type II. The genetic mutations for a number of these disorders have been identified. We present a patient with congenital hyperphosphatasia whose clinical and radiographic features were somewhat different from these other well-defined syndromes. The patient was followed for 45 years until his death of at age 49. The patient had massive osteoectasia with dense striations involving the entire shaft of his long bones. His spine, pelvis, short tubular bones, and calvarium were also involved. He suffered hearing loss and optic atrophy, but he kept his teeth throughout his life. He was tall with a marfanoid habitus, and he had hypogonadism and hypothyroidism. There was no evidence of mental retardation, and other laboratory studies where within normal limits. This case, as well as other manifestations of hyperphosphatasia, attests to the complexity of the bone remodeling system. (orig.)

  9. Periapical endodontic surgery: a 3-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalone, M; Gagliani, M

    2003-03-01

    To monitor the outcome of periradicular surgery in a group of teeth treated with microsurgical technology and ultrasonic root-end preparation. One hundred and twenty-eight teeth with failed conventional root canal treatment were included. The surgical procedure was completed using ultrasonic retrotips and a zinc oxide-EBA (Super Seal, Ogna Pharmaceuticals. Milan, Italy)-reinforced material was used to seal the root end cavities. Lesions were examined radiologically at 1. 3. 6. 12, 24 and 36-month intervals. Radiographs were independently analysed according to a previously published classification. Eight teeth were extracted due to fracture or perforations undetected radiologically: these cases were excluded from the study. Of the 120 teeth examined. the overall success rate was 92.5%; 94 healed with complete bone filling of the surgical cavity, 17 were considered to have healed by apical scar formation, four demonstrated uncertain healing and five were considered failures. Eighty of 120 teeth examined had successfully healed from a radiological point of view within 12 months. No differences in outcome occurred between anterior, premolar and molar teeth. Although all failures occurred in teeth with posts, no statistically significant difference was noted (Mann-Whitney U-test, P = 0.37). Modern surgical endodontic procedures associated and ERA (Super Seal, Ogna Pharmaceuticals, Milan, Italy) root end fillings were successful over 3 years in 92.5% of cases.

  10. [Evaluation and follow-up of living kidney donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessing, M; Schönberger, B; Fritsche, L; Budde, K

    2004-01-23

    An increase in waiting time for a cadaveric organs and a better graft-function, graft- and patient-survival with kidneys from a living donors have lead to an increase in living-donor renal transplantation in the therapy of end-stage renal disease. In Germany, with the implementation of a transplantation law in 1997 and due to improved surgical techniques (laparoscopy) the proportion of living renal donors has almost tripled during the last five years. The transplantation law also names the potential donors, including not only genetically related but also emotionally related donors. Inclusion criteria for living donation are age > 18 years, mental ability to give consent and an altruistic motivation (exclusion of financial benefits for the donor). If ABO blood group compatibility between donor and recipient is given and a cross match does not reveal immunologic obstacles a thorough medical and psychological examination must be performed with the potential donor. All risk factors for the donor beyond the actual operation must be excluded. Therefore all organ-systems have to be evaluated and risks for the donor as well as transferable pathologies and infections must be ruled out. International guidelines help to perform an efficient evaluation. Following organ donation the donor should be medically controlled as requested by law. Also, psychological counselling should be offered. The aim is to minimize risks for the single kidney and to recognize early potentially kidney damaging affections.

  11. A follow-up of adolescents with conduct disorder:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Martin; Hansson, Kjell

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study examines Swedish young adults (age 21) with a history of conduct disorder (CD) in adolescence. Research has established CD as a condition for a range of adverse outcomes. Intelligence, aggression, parent–child conflict, parent–child relation and peer-rejection are ......Abstract Background: This study examines Swedish young adults (age 21) with a history of conduct disorder (CD) in adolescence. Research has established CD as a condition for a range of adverse outcomes. Intelligence, aggression, parent–child conflict, parent–child relation and peer......-rejection are known factors influencing the outcome. Aim: The aim of this longitudinal study is to find how self-confidence and intelligence in an inpatient group diagnosed with CD are related to health in young adulthood. Methods: The subjects were diagnosed with CD in their adolescence at the inpatient child...... and adolescent psychiatric unit. Using structured questionnaires as independent variables, this study uses multiple regression analysis to predict health outcomes. Results: The results showed that self-concept and verbal intelligence could significantly predict health outcomes. However, in the multivariate...

  12. Four-year follow-up study of pharmacological treatment in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Oded; Dinur, Limor Klein; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed the emergence of pharmacological treatments for pathological gambling with some success but many question marks. We aimed to explore pharmacological treatments that have been previously explored with some success, with the intent of comparing their efficacy and pave the way to larger placebo-controlled trials. In this study, we allocated 78 patients to 4 different types of psychotropic medications: naltrexone, topiramate, bupropion, and escitalopram. We treated patients for more than 2 years, with additional 2-year follow-ups without medication. The sample was evaluated using the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Global Assessment of Functioning, and the Visual Analog Scale to measure general well-being before enrollment as well as at 1 month, 6 months, 24 months, and 48 months after beginning medication treatment. During the first 2 years of treatment, 34 patients dropped out, with one more dropping out during the additional 2 years of follow-up. Significant improvement on all rating scales was seen in all groups after 2 years, except HAMD in the group that received topiramate. We found the naltrexone-treated group of patients to have a statistically significant lower dropout rate compared with other groups, statistically significant lower HAMD scores in comparison to the group treated with bupropion, statistically significant lower Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale score compared to the groups treated with escitalopram and topiramate, and significantly higher Visual Analog Scale scores compared to the groups treated with bupropion and topiramate. Pathological gambling is essentially a biopsychological disorder that may be attenuated provided that patients adhere to medication. In our study, among 4 medications with different mechanisms of action, naltrexone was found to be the most effective. Placebo-controlled studies involving large numbers of subjects are required before

  13. Follow-up of hearing thresholds among forge hammering workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, A.A.; Mikael, R.A.; Faris, R. (Ain Shams Univ., Abbasia, Cairo (Egypt))

    1989-01-01

    Hearing threshold was reexamined in a group of forge hammering workers investigated 8 years ago with consideration of the age effect and of auditory symptoms. Workers were exposed to impact noise that ranged from 112 to 139 dB(A)--at an irregular rate of 20 to 50 drop/minute--and a continuous background noise that ranged from 90 to 94 dB(A). Similar to what was observed 8 years ago, the present permanent threshold shift (PTS) showed a maximum notch at the frequency of 6 kHz and considerable elevations at the frequencies of 0.25-1 kHz. The age-corrected PTS and the postexposure hearing threshold were significantly higher than the corresponding previous values at the frequencies 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 8 kHz only. The rise was more evident at the low than at the high frequencies. Temporary threshold shift (TTS) values were significantly less than those 8 years ago. Contrary to the previous TTS, the present TTS were higher at low than at high frequencies. Although progression of PTS at the frequencies 0.25 and 0.5 kHz was continuous throughout the observed durations of exposure, progression at higher frequencies occurred essentially in the first 10 to 15 years of exposure. Thereafter, it followed a much slower rate. Tinnitus was significantly associated with difficulty in hearing the human voice and with elevation of PTS at all the tested frequencies, while acoustic after-image was significantly associated with increment of PTS at the frequencies 0.25-2 kHz. No relation between PTS and smoking was found. PTS at low frequencies may provide an indication of progression of hearing damage when the sensitivity at 6 and 4 kHz diminishes after prolonged years of exposure. Tinnitus and acoustic after-image are related to the auditory effect of forge hammering noise.

  14. The impact of phone calls on follow-up rates in an online depression prevention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Muñoz

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Adding phone call contacts to email reminders and monetary incentives did increase follow-up rates. However, the rate of response to follow-up was low and the number of phone calls required to achieve one completed follow-up raises concerns about the utility of adding phone calls. We also discuss difficulties with using financial incentives and their implications.

  15. Overgeneral autobiographical memory at baseline predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yansong; Zhang, Fuquan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Leiming; Wang, Jun; Na, Aiguo; Sun, Yujun; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-09-30

    Previous studies have shown that overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a characteristic of depression. However, there are no studies to explore the association between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression (FE). This study investigated whether baseline OGM predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. We recruited 125 patients with FE. The participants were divided into remitted group and non-remitted group according to the severity of their depression at 12 months follow-up. The measures consisted of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Ruminative Response Scale, and Autobiographical Memory Test. Hierarchical linear regression analyses and bootstrap mediation analyses were conducted. The results showed that non-remitted patients had more OGM at baseline. Baseline OGM predicted depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. Rumination mediated the relationship between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up. Our findings highlight OGM as a vulnerability factor involved in the maintenance of depression in patients with FE.

  16. Obesity paradox disappears in coronary artery bypass graft patients during 20-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hällberg, Ville; Kataja, Matti; Lahtela, Jorma; Tarkka, Matti; Inamaa, Tapio; Palomäki, Ari

    2016-02-24

    Although obesity is a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), it might be associated with a favourable prognosis in patients with CHD. The aim of the study was to evaluate this so called 'obesity paradox' during a follow-up period of 20 years in patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The study population consisted of 922 CHD patients who had undergone CABG between 1993 and 1994. Pre and perioperative data was collected from patient records and supplemented with patient questionnaires, telephone contacts and data from national archives. The 10-year postoperative prognosis of normal-weight patients (body mass index (BMI) 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) was inferior to that of overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obese patients (BMI⩾30.0 kg/m(2)) and to the background population. Beyond 10 years the prognosis of obese patients deteriorated when compared with the overweight group. At the end of the 20-year follow-up, survival of the normal weight group was 0.68 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.49-0.87; pparadox seems to disappear due to progression of cardiometabolic disease in patients who have undergone CABG. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  17. Psychological effects of chemical weapons: a follow-up study of First World War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E; Everitt, B; Ironside, S; Palmer, I; Wessely, S

    2008-10-01

    Chemical weapons exercise an enduring and often powerful psychological effect. This had been recognized during the First World War when it was shown that the symptoms of stress mimicked those of mild exposure to gas. Debate about long-term effects followed the suggestion that gassing triggered latent tuberculosis. A random sample of 103 First World War servicemen awarded a war pension for the effects of gas, but without evidence of chronic respiratory pathology, were subjected to cluster analysis using 25 common symptoms. The consistency of symptom reporting was also investigated across repeated follow-ups. Cluster analysis identified four groups: one (n=56) with a range of somatic symptoms, a second (n=30) with a focus on the respiratory system, a third (n=12) with a predominance of neuropsychiatric symptoms, and a fourth (n=5) with a narrow band of symptoms related to the throat and breathing difficulties. Veterans from the neuropsychiatric cluster had multiple diagnoses including neurasthenia and disordered action of the heart, and reported many more symptoms than those in the three somatic clusters. Mild or intermittent respiratory disorders in the post-war period supported beliefs about the damaging effects of gas in the three somatic clusters. By contrast, the neuropsychiatric group did not report new respiratory illnesses. For this cluster, the experience of gassing in a context of extreme danger may have been responsible for the intensity of their symptoms, which showed no sign of diminution over the 12-year follow-up.

  18. Gallbladder stones following ileal resection for gangrenous intussusceptions: A follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Iheanyichukwu Osuoji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusceptions are the most common causes of bowel obstruction in infancy and childhood in this environment they present late, resulting in gangrene of the intussusception consequently resection of the affected bowel and a limited or extended right hemicolectomy (RH to establish bowel continuity. Aim: The aim of the following study is to follow-up these children that had a limited ileal resection for gangrenous intussusceptions and document the formation of stones in their gallbladders. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients who had limited ileal resection during infancy for gangrenous intussusceptions were matched with sixteen patients who had manual reduction for viable intussusceptions during infancy. Both groups had ultrasound scans of their gallbladders to document the formation of stones in their gallbladders. Results: No gallbladder stones were found in both groups, however, one male child that had a resection and a RH for a gangrenous intussusception at the age of 4 months and was seen at an interval of 72 months had a thickened gallbladder on ultrasonography, another child, a female child operated on at the age of 6 months and seen at an interval of 57 months also had a thickened gallbladder on ultrasonography . Conclusion: Although no stones were seen, we suggest a prolonged follow-up of these patients with either periodic ultrasonography of the their gallbladders or with the periodic estimation of their serum bile acids.

  19. Feasibility of epilepsy follow-up care through telemedicine: a pilot study on the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Nizamuddin; Mann, Carly; Sinclair, D Barry; Heino, Angela; Iskiw, Blayne; Quigley, Daphne; Ohinmaa, Arto

    2008-04-01

    Cost analysis and patient satisfaction with telemedicine in epilepsy care. This controlled study included out-of-town epilepsy patients coming to follow-up at the University of Alberta hospital epilepsy clinic. After an informed consent, patients were randomized to either conventional (n = 18) or telemedicine (n = 23) clinics. Patients or caregivers filled patient satisfaction and travel cost questionnaires in both alternatives. Cost per visit analysis included costs of traveling, lodging, and lost productivity. Average age of the population was 41 years (range 19-73; 45% women). Eighty-three percent of patients preferred their next visit through telemedicine. About 90% of patients indicated a need for companion travel (mainly by car) to conventional clinic. For the conventional group patients the value of lost productivity was CAD $201, hotel cost CAD $8.50, and the value of car mileage CAD $256.50, totaling about CAD $466.00. Patient costs for telemedicine were CAD $35.85. Telemedicine production costs are similar to the patients' savings in traveling and lost productivity. About 90% of patients in both groups were satisfied with the quality of the service. Telemedicine can play a role in follow-up care of epilepsy patients, reduce patient costs, and improve patient satisfaction. This is the first full-time epilepsy telemedicine clinic in Western Canada.

  20. [Peyronie's disease: ultrasonographic follow-up of ESWT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, F; Nicola, M

    2000-12-01

    concerned (70.4%). At the clinical check, based on the ultrasonic scans carried out after ESWT, in 34 cases of 82 (41%), it was possible to note a reduction in the echogenicity or in the size of the treated plaque. In 32 patients (39%) an unchanged plaque was observed, and in 16 case a larger plaque or a calcific evolution was established. For what the bending of the penis concerns, the comparison between the photographs revealed a reduction of the curvature in 24 patients out of 78 (30.7%). Of the 46 patients in whom the disease had non-calcific characteristics, according to the ultrasonic scans, 21 (46%) showed improved disease since in 25 (54%) the treated plaque had stabilized or worsened. In the group of 36 patients with the calcific plaques, 13 (36%) improved while 23 (64%) resulted unchanged or worsened.

  1. Long-term follow-up of coronary angioplasty in patients with diabetes compared with nondiabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueren, B R G; Ten Berg, J M; Kelder, J C; Suttorp, M J; Mast, E G; Bal, E; Ernst, S M P G; Plokker, H W T

    2004-04-01

    Some reports have indicated that in patients with diabetes mellitus and multivessel disease, coronary artery bypass surgery is preferred over percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We retrospectively compared outcome PCI in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Ninety-seven diabetics and 971 nondiabetics were included and randomised before PCI to aspirin alone or aspirin plus coumadin. Fifty diabetics and 481 nondiabetics underwent follow-up angiography. The primary endpoint comprised all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction or targetvessel revascularisation. Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups except for significantly more males and smokers among the nondiabetics. The diabetics had significantly more previous strokes, more left anterior descending coronary artery disease as well as more restenotic lesions and multivessel disease. At 30 days, the primary endpoint had occurred in five diabetics (5.2%) and 47 nondiabetics (4.9%), (p=0.8) and at one year in 17 (17.5%) and in 165 (17.1%), respectively (p=0.9). Event-free survival remained comparable during long-term follow-up (four years). Multivariate analysis showed no differences for the occurrence of any event (p=0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.7). At six months, the minimal luminal diameter was significantly smaller in the diabetics (1.55±0.76 mm vs. 1.78±0.66 mm, p=0.01). Diabetics also had more restenosis (41% vs. 23%, p=0.003). Despite angiographical differences at six months between the diabetics and nondiabetics, both short-term and long-term clinical follow-up appeared to be similar.

  2. Surgical therapy and long-term follow-up of childhood hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, C R; Konzen, K M; Perrault, J

    1992-03-01

    Treatment and a 15-year follow-up survey of 42 patients with hereditary pancreatitis (HP) were compared with 28 patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis (RP) of childhood. There was no difference between the two groups except for pancreatic ductal dilatation and stones in patients with HP. Longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (20) or resection and drainage procedures (7) were more commonly required in patients with HP than RP (55% v 14%). There was no surgical mortality. Postoperatively, immediate and complete relief of symptoms was obtained in 43% of patients with HP and 25% of patients with RP. In the remainder, recurrent attacks of pancreatitis abated over 2 years such that 81% of the surgical patients were in good or excellent health. Occasional symptoms persisted in 52% of HP patients and 25% of RP patients. Of the 20 patients with HP or RP undergoing longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy extending from the head to the tail, 75% were symptom-free on follow-up. However, 3 of 6 patients with poor results had also undergone this procedure. At long-term follow-up of patients who did not undergo operation, 75% of HP patients and 90% of RP patients reported excellent or good health despite the persistent symptoms in 68% and 42%, respectively. Surgery for childhood HP is dependent on the complications present. Longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy is beneficial for ductal dilatation and associated pseudocysts or pancreatic ascites. The performance of this procedure in the absence of consistent pancreatic duct dilatation will give poor results. Patients without ductal dilatation and the majority of patients with RP may eventually lead near normal lives without resorting to surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Follow-Up Visit Patterns in an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART programme in Zomba, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Rachlis

    Full Text Available Identifying follow-up (FU visit patterns, and exploring which factors influence them are likely to be useful in determining which patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART may become Lost to Follow-Up (LTFU. Using an operation and implementation research approach, we sought 1 to describe the timing of FU visits amongst patients who have been on ART for shorter and longer periods of time; and 2 to determine the median time to late visits, and 3 to identify specific factors that may be associated with these patterns in Zomba, Malawi.Using routinely collected programme monitoring data from Zomba District, we performed descriptive analyses on all ART visits among patients who initiated ART between Jan. 1, 2007-June 30, 2010. Based on an expected FU date, each FU visit was classified as early (≥4 day before an expected FU date, on time (3 days before an expected FU date/up to 6 days after an expected FU date, or late (≥7 days after an expected FU date. In total, 7,815 patients with 76417 FU visits were included. Ninety-two percent of patients had ≥2 FU visits. At the majority of visits, patients were either on time or late. The median time to a first late visit among those with 2 or more visits was 216 days (IQR: 128-359. Various patient- and visit-level factors differed significantly across Early, On Time, and Late visit groups including ART adherence and frequency of, and type of side effects.The majority of patients do not demonstrate consistent FU visit patterns. Individuals were generally on ART for at least 6 months before experiencing their first late visit. Our findings have implications for the development of effective interventions that meet patient needs when they present early and can reduce patient losses to follow-up when they are late. In particular, time-varying visit characteristics need further research.

  4. Progression of remnant gastric cancer is associated with duration of follow-up following distal gastrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhei Komatsu; Yoshiaki Kuriu; Masayoshi Nakanishi; Hitoshi Fujiwara; Toshiya Ochiai; Yukihito Kokuba; Eigo Otsuji; Daisuke Ichikawa; , Kazuma Okamoto; Daito Ikoma; Masahiro Tsujiura; Yukihisa Nishimura; Yasutoshi Murayama; Atsushi Shiozaki; Hisashi Ikoma

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To re-evaluate the recent clinicopathological features of remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and to develop desirable surveillance programs.METHOIDS:Between 1997 and 2008,1149 patients underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer at the Department of Digestive Surgery,Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine,Japan.Of these,33 patients underwent gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy for RGC.Regarding the initial gastric disease,there were 19 patients with benign disease and 14 patients with gastric cancer.The hospital records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively.RESULTS:Concerning the initial gastric disease,the RGC group following gastric cancer had a shorter interval [P < 0.05; gastric cancer vs benign disease:12 (2-22) vs 30 (4-51) years] and were more frequently reconstructed by Billroth- I procedure than those following benign lesions (P < 0.001).Regarding reconstruction,RGC following Billroth-Ⅱ reconstruction showed a longer interval between surgical procedures [P < 0.001; Billroth- 11 vs Billroth- Ⅰ:32 (5-51) vs 12 (2-36) years] and tumors were more frequently associated with benign disease (P < 0.001) than those following Billroth- I reconstruction.In tumor location of RGC,after Billroth- I reconstruction,RGC occurred more frequently near the suture line and remnant gastric wall.After Billroth- Ⅱ reconstruction,RGC occurred more frequently at the anastomotic site.The duration of followup was significantly associated with the stage of RGC (P < 0.05).Patients diagnosed with early stage RGC such as stage I -Ⅱ tended to have been followed up almost every second year.CONCLUSION:Meticulous follow-up examination and early detection of RGC might lead to a better prognosis.Based on the initial gastric disease and the procedure of reconstruction,an appropriate follow-up interval and programs might enable early detection of RGC.

  5. Elevated cancer mortality in a German cohort of bitumen workers: extended follow-up through 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Thomas; Schill, Walter; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    The mortality follow-up in a cohort of German asphalt workers covered an additional 6 years. Male workers (N = 7919) were classified into four exposure categories: (1) exposure to bitumen only, (2) to bitumen and coal tar, (3) neither to tar nor to bitumen, and (4) unknown exposure. Exposure-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMR) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on age- and calendar period-specific national mortality rates were calculated. To compare exposed and unexposed workers, relative risks were estimated by Poisson regression. By the end of 2004, 835 workers had died. The SMR for lung cancer was 1.77 (95% CI 1.46-2.16). Head and neck cancer showed an SMR of 2.36 (95% CI 1.78-3.07). Bladder cancer mortality was elevated threefold. Significantly elevated cancer-related SMRs were also found for all malignant tumors. In addition, elevated mortality rates of nonmalignant causes such as alcoholism, liver cirrhosis, and unnatural causes of deaths including accidents were observed. After stratification by exposure group, cancer mortality was elevated among bitumen-exposed and unexposed subjects. In the internal analysis, the association between lung cancer and bitumen exposure was weakened as compared with the previous follow-up (relative risk [RR] = 1.15; 95% CI 0.72-1.84). The follow-up demonstrated an excess of cancer in this cohort of asphalt workers. However, the observed mortality patterns were not clear. Although exposure to bitumen cannot be ruled out as being responsible for the observed results, a higher prevalence of alcohol and tobacco consumption may partially explain the observed risk increases. Exposure assessment in future studies should account for multiple occupational agents and nonoccupational factors to rule out that the observed differences in SMR are not due simply to random variation.

  6. The IRRS follow-up mission to the Nuclear Safety Council; La mision follow-up de la IRRS al Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgi Ferrer, A. P.; Collet Campo, D.

    2011-07-01

    The IRRS follow-up mission to the Nuclear Safety Council. From January 25th to February 1st last the CSN headquarters hosted a follow-up to the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission carried out in January 2008. The objective of this follow-up has been to check the extent to which the suggestions and recommendations made by the original IRRS mission have been adopted by the audited regulator and, as a result, to verify its degree of adherence to the strictest international standards. (Author)

  7. Smartphone Application WeChat for Clinical Follow-up of Discharged Patients with Head and Neck Tumors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xing Lyu; Jing Zhao; Bin Wang; Guan-Xia Xiong; Wei-Qiang Yang; Qi-Hong Liu; Xiao-Lin Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Nowadays,social media tools such as short message service,Twitter,video,and web-based systems are more and more used in clinical follow-up,making clinical follow-up much more time-and cost-effective than ever before.However,as the most popular social media in China,little is known about the utility of smartphone WeChat application in follow-up.In this study,we aimed to investigate the feasibility and superiority of WeChat application in clinical follow-up.Methods:A total of 108 patients diagnosed with head and neck tumor were randomized to WeChat follow-up (WFU) group or telephone follow-up (TFU) group for 6-month follow-up.The follow-ups were delivered by WeChat or telephone at 2 weeks,1,2,3,and 6 months to the patients after being discharged.The study measurements were time consumption for follow-up delivery,total economic cost,lost-to-follow-up rate,and overall satisfaction for the follow-up method.Results:Time consumption in WFU group for each patient (23.36 ± 6.16 min) was significantly shorter than that in TFU group (42.89 ± 7.15 min) (P < 0.001);total economic cost in WFU group (RMB 90 Yuan) was much lower than that in TFU group (RMB 196 Yuan).Lost-to-follow-up rate in the WFU group was 7.02% (4/57) compared with TFU group,9.80% (5/51),while no significance was observed (95% confidence interval [CI]:0.176-2.740;P =0.732).The overall satisfaction rate in WFU group was 94.34% (50/53) compared with 80.43% (37/46) in TFU group (95% CI:0.057-0.067;P =0.034).Conclusions:The smartphone WeChat application was found to be a viable option for follow-up in discharged patients with head and neck tumors.WFU was time-effective,cost-effective,and convenient in communication.This doctor-led follow-up model has the potential to establish a good physician-patient relationship by enhancing dynamic communications and providing individual health instructions.

  8. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS......: This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK...

  9. Multimethod psychoeducational intervention for preschool children with disruptive behavior: two-year post-treatment follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, T L; Barkley, R A; Crosswait, C; Moorehouse, M; Fletcher, K; Barrett, S; Jenkins, L; Metevia, L

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the 2-year post-treatment follow-up of preschool children identified as having high levels of disruptive behavior at kindergarten entry. They were assigned to four treatment conditions: A no-treatment group, parent-training only, treatment classroom only, and the combination of parent training with the treatment classroom. Interventions lasted the entire kindergarten academic year. Initial post-treatment results reported previously indicated no effects for the parent-training program but some efficacy for the classroom intervention program. For this report, the disruptive behavior (DB) children were subdivided into those who did (n = 74) and did not (n = 77) receive the treatment classroom. Two-year post-treatment follow-up results indicated no differences between the classroom treated and untreated DB groups. These groups also failed to differ in the percentage of children using available treatments across the follow-up period. The DB children in both groups had significantly more symptoms of ADHD and ODD than a community control group (N = 47) at follow-up. They also received higher ratings of externalizing problems on the parent Child Behavior Checklist, more severe ratings of behavior problems at home, and ratings of more pervasive behavior problems at school, and had poorer academic skills. Results suggested that early intervention classrooms for DB children may not produce enduring effects once treatment is withdrawn, and that better approaches are needed for identifying those DB children at greatest risk for later maladjustment.

  10. Follow-up of multiple sclerosis patients treated with Endotherapia (GEMSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffard, Michel; Mangas, Arturo; Coveñas, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    Endotherapia (GEMSP) is a novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the efficiency of Endotherapia in the follow-up of 193 patients with MS. The efficiency coefficient that was evaluated was the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, which is a functional scale of MS progression. The evaluated score of each patient during follow-up visits was compared with the theoretical score of the disease progression without GEMSP. The evolution of the EDSS score was evaluated according to the inclusion score. The quantitative global study of the EDSS score highlighted a statistically significant difference between the final average scores of the treatment with GEMSP (M) and worldwide reference (R) groups. The improvement of the M group compared with the R group was 24.5%. According to the final EDSS scores, the study highlighted a difference in favor of the M group with 62.0% for scores ≤3, 7.8% for scores between 3 and 6 and 19.6% for scores ≥6. According to the qualitative evolution of the EDSS scores, the improvements in favor of group M were 49.3% for scores ≤3, 79.1% for scores between 3 and 6 and 19.5% for scores ≥6. The qualitative study of the EDSS score showed a statistically significant success percentage; the success percentages were between 59.1 and 90.0%. In a larger population of MS patients, the data confirm the beneficial effects of GEMSP that were previously reported in pre-clinical and clinical studies. In addition, 78% of patients showed an improvement or deceleration of the disease.

  11. Follow-up of multiple sclerosis patients treated with Endotherapia (GEMSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffard, Michel; Mangas, Arturo; Coveñas, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Endotherapia (GEMSP) is a novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the efficiency of Endotherapia in the follow-up of 193 patients with MS. The efficiency coefficient that was evaluated was the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, which is a functional scale of MS progression. The evaluated score of each patient during follow-up visits was compared with the theoretical score of the disease progression without GEMSP. The evolution of the EDSS score was evaluated according to the inclusion score. The quantitative global study of the EDSS score highlighted a statistically significant difference between the final average scores of the treatment with GEMSP (M) and worldwide reference (R) groups. The improvement of the M group compared with the R group was 24.5%. According to the final EDSS scores, the study highlighted a difference in favor of the M group with 62.0% for scores ≤3, 7.8% for scores between 3 and 6 and 19.6% for scores ≥6. According to the qualitative evolution of the EDSS scores, the improvements in favor of group M were 49.3% for scores ≤3, 79.1% for scores between 3 and 6 and 19.5% for scores ≥6. The qualitative study of the EDSS score showed a statistically significant success percentage; the success percentages were between 59.1 and 90.0%. In a larger population of MS patients, the data confirm the beneficial effects of GEMSP that were previously reported in pre-clinical and clinical studies. In addition, 78% of patients showed an improvement or deceleration of the disease. PMID:28451391

  12. Back posture education in elementary schoolchildren: a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldhof, Elisabeth; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; De Clercq, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    Within the scope of primary prevention regarding back functioning in children, research on the stability of intervention effects is indispensable. Along this line, the transition from childhood to adolescence is an important phase to evaluate the potential stability of intervention effects because of the typically mechanical and psychological demands related to adolescence. The main aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of a back education program at 2-year follow-up, in youngsters aged 13-14 years, on back posture knowledge, fear-avoidance beliefs and self-reported pain. An additional purpose was to evaluate which aspects of postural behavior were integrated in youngsters' lifestyles. At 2-year follow-up, the study sample included 94 secondary schoolchildren in the intervention group (mean age 13.3 +/- 0.8 years) and 101 controls (mean age 13.2 +/- 0.7 years). The back posture program that had been implemented for two school years consisted of back education and the stimulation of postural dynamism in the class through support and environmental changes. A questionnaire was completed comparable to the pretest, posttest and follow-up evaluations. The current study demonstrated at 2-year follow-up stability of the improved general (F = 1.590, ns) and specific (F = 0.049, ns) back posture knowledge in children who had received early back posture education. Back posture education did not result in increased fear-avoidance beliefs (F = 1.163, ns) or mounting back and/or neck pain reports (F = 0.001, ns). Based on self-reports for postural behavior, youngsters who had received the back posture program in the elementary school curriculum integrated crucial sitting and lifting principles conform to biomechanical favorable postural behavior. The steady intervention effects 2-year post-intervention demonstrated that intensive back posture education through the elementary school curriculum is effective till adolescence. Future research on the impact of early

  13. A 3-year follow-up of sun behavior in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idorn, Luise Winkel; Datta, Pameli; Heydenreich, Jakob; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2014-02-01

    IMPORTANCE UV radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary environmental risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). OBJECTIVE To measure changes in sun behavior from the first until the third summer after the diagnosis of CMM using matched controls as a reference. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three-year follow-up, observational, case-control study performed from May 7 to September 22, 2009, April 17 to September 15, 2010, and May 6 to July 31, 2011, at a university hospital in Denmark of 21 patients with CMM and 21 controls matched to patients by sex, age, occupation, and constitutive skin type participated in the study. Exposure to UVR was assessed the first and second summers (n=20) and the first and third summers (n=22) after diagnosis. Data from 40 participants were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Exposure to UVR was assessed by personal electronic UVR dosimeters that measured time-related UVR in standard erythema dose (SED) and corresponding sun diaries (mean, 74 days per participant each participation year). RESULTS Patients' daily UVR dose and UVR dose in connection with various behaviors increased during follow-up (quantified as an increase in daily UVR dose each year; all days: mean, 0.3 SED; 95% CI, 0.05-0.5 SED; days with body exposure: mean, 0.6 SED; 95% CI, 0.07-1.2 SED; holidays: mean, 1.2 SED; 95% CI, 0.3-2.1 SED; days abroad: 1.9 SED; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 SED; and holidays with body exposure: mean, 2.3 SED; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4 SED). After the second year of follow-up, patients' UVR dose was higher than that of controls, who maintained a stable UVR dose. No difference was found between groups in the number of days with body exposure or the number of days using sunscreen in the second and third years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings suggest that patients with CMM do not maintain a cautious sun behavior in connection with an increase in UVR exposure, especially on days with body exposure, when abroad, and on holidays.

  14. Postoperative Follow-up After Bariatric Surgery: Effect on Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Kasten, Kevin R; Celio, Adam; Burruss, Matthew B; Pories, Walter J

    2016-04-01

    While adherence to long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery is a mandate for center of excellence certification, the effect of attrition on weight loss is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of postoperative follow-up on 12-month weight loss using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database (BOLD) dataset. Patients with complete follow-up (3, 6, and 12 months) were compared to patients who had one or more prior missed visits. There were 51,081 patients with 12-month follow-up data available. After controlling for baseline characteristics, complete follow-up was independently associated with excess weight loss ≥50%, and total weight loss ≥30%. Adherence to postoperative follow-up is independently associated with improved 12-month weight loss after bariatric surgery. Bariatric programs should strive to achieve complete follow-up for all patients.

  15. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    : This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK......INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS......) completed a structured interview. RESULTS: A total of 97% patients found follow-up useful. Continuity and consistency were important. One third of patients felt some degree of pre follow-up anxiety. The number of anxious MM patients was significantly greater than that of NMSC patients. No significant...

  16. Retrospective analysis of follow-up results in patients with skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov V.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Administration of specific chemotherapy (cytostatics has great significance in the treatment of skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy. The research goal is to study follow-up results of cytostatic therapy of skin lymphomas. Retrospective observation of survival of patients with T-cell epidermothropic skin lymphomas using special therapy and without its use has been studied. Comparative analysis of survival rate in two groups of patients has been done. 40 patients received cytostatics and 32 patents were not treated by chemotherapy. The first group of patients showed the reduction of survival level and increase of mortality level from skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy. The research findings proved the influence of cytostatic therapy on the survival of patients with skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy

  17. 125I implantation for carcinoma of prostate. Further follow-up of first 100 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.B.; Batata, M.; Hilaris, B.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Analysis of the first 100 patients at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with Stage B or C prostatic cancer treated by pelvic lymph node dissection and Iodine-125 implantation and endocrine therapy when specifically indicated revealed five-year survival rates of 87 and 77 per cent, respectively. Tumor stage, tumor grade, and lymph node metastasis each correlated with survival, but the latter was the most significant factor. Although routine follow-up biopsies were not performed, local tumor control as judged by serial digital rectal examination defined a prognostically favored group of patients. In the absence of controls, however, whether the latter response indicates a salutary effect of the treatment which produces an improved survival or merely identifies a group of patients who were predetermined to have a more favorable survival is undetermined.

  18. 125I implantation for carcinoma of prostate. Further follow-up of first 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, H B; Batata, M; Hilaris, B; Whitmore, W F

    1982-12-01

    Analysis of the first 100 patients at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with Stage B or C prostatic cancer treated by pelvic lymph node dissection and Iodine-125 implantation and endocrine therapy when specifically indicated revealed five-year survival rates of 87 and 77 per cent, respectively. Tumor stage, tumor grade, and lymph node metastasis each correlated with survival, but the latter was the most significant factor. Although routine follow-up biopsies were not performed, local tumor control as judged by serial digital rectal examination defined a prognostically favored group of patients. In the absence of controls, however, whether the latter response indicates a salutary effect of the treatment which produces an improved survival or merely identifies a group of patients who were predetermined to have a more favorable survival is undetermined.

  19. Open access follow-up care for early breast cancer: a randomised controlled quality of life analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshbaum, M N; Dent, J; Stephenson, J; Topping, A E; Allinson, V; McCoy, M; Brayford, S

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated the acceptability of a supportive model of follow-up. One hundred and twelve women recovering from breast cancer were randomised to receive standard breast clinic aftercare (Control n = 56) or on demand by open access aftercare by breast care nurses (Intervention n = 56). Participants attended a support-based psycho-educational programme delivered in four half-day group sessions. Three quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-BR23, HADS) were administered at baseline and 6-monthly intervals for 2 years. Multilevel linear regression modelling methods were used for evaluation. Age was found to be a statistically significant predictor of quality of life in several sub-scales. Increasing age was negatively associated with sexual functioning, systematic therapy side effects and physical functioning, and positively associated with future perspective. Aftercare assignment was not found to be a statistically significant predictor. Women treated for early breast cancer were not disadvantaged by allocation to the open access supportive care model in terms of quality of life experienced. The model for follow-up was demonstrated to be a feasible alternative to routinised hospital-based follow-up and adds to the evidence for stratified follow-up for low-risk cancer patients, incorporating self-management education. Stratified follow-up pathways are viewed as a preferable approach. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Utility of spiral CAT scan in the follow-up of patients with pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbritti, M. [Respiratory Diseases Section, Dept. Clinical Medicine and Immunological Sciences, Siena University (Italy); Mazzei, M.A. [Dept. Human Pathology and Oncology, Section of Radiological Sciences, Siena University, Siena (Italy); Bargagli, E., E-mail: bargagli2@gmail.com [Respiratory Diseases Section, Dept. Clinical Medicine and Immunological Sciences, Siena University (Italy); Refini, R.M.; Penza, F.; Perari, M.G. [Respiratory Diseases Section, Dept. Clinical Medicine and Immunological Sciences, Siena University (Italy); Volterrani, L. [Dept. Human Pathology and Oncology, Section of Radiological Sciences, Siena University, Siena (Italy); Rottoli, P. [Respiratory Diseases Section, Dept. Clinical Medicine and Immunological Sciences, Siena University (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare disease that occurs almost exclusively in smokers, generally young adults between 20 and 40 years old. Prognostic biomarkers of the disease are lacking. This study describes the clinical-radiological features of a group of PLCH patients and applies a semi-quantitative CT score of the chest to verify the prognostic value of radiological findings in this disease. Clinical-radiological and immunological data from 12 Caucasian patients (6 M, 7 smokers and 5 ex-smokers, mean age 36 {+-} 8 years) were recorded at onset and after a follow-up period of 4 years. Application of the semi-quantitative CT score revealed a prevalently cystic pattern at onset and follow-up in the majority of the patients. Patients with a prevalently nodular pattern developed cystic lesions during follow-up. Interestingly, significant correlations were found between the extent of cystic lesions and DLCO values at onset (time 0: p < 0.05) and at the end of follow-up (time 1, p < 0.05) and with FEV1 values at time 0 (p < 0.05) and time 1 (p < 0.05). Patients with progressive functional decline were those with CT evidence of severe cystic alterations. The results suggest that high resolution CT scan of the chest is mandatory for characterizing PLCH patients at diagnosis and during follow-up. The proposed CT score of the chest showed potential prognostic value.

  1. HBPF: a Home Blood Pressure Framework with SLA guarantees to follow up hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Cuadrado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension or high blood pressure is a condition on the rise. Not only does it affect the elderly but is also increasingly spreading to younger sectors of the population. Treating it involves exhaustive monitoring of patients. A tool adapted to the particular requirements of hypertension can greatly facilitate monitoring and diagnosis. This paper presents HBPF, an efficient cloud-based Home Blood Pressure Framework. This allows hypertensive patients to communicate with their health-care centers, thus facilitating monitoring for both patients and clinicians. HBPF provides a complete, efficient, and cross-platform framework to follow up hypertensive patients with an SLA guarantee. Response time below one second for 80,000 requests and 28% increase in peak throughput going from one to three virtual machines were obtained. In addition, a mobile app (BP for Android and iOS with a user-friendly interface is also provided to facilitate following up hypertensive patients. Among them, between 54% and 87% favorably evaluated the tool. BP can be downloaded for free from the website Hesoft Group repository (http://www.hesoftgroup.eu.

  2. Pectus excavatum. A clinical study with long-term postoperative follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshuis, W J; Mulder, H; Wapperom, G; Folgering, H T; Assman, M; Cox, A L; van Lier, H J; Vincent, J G; Lacquet, L K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1972 and 1987, 192 patients have been operated upon for pectus excavatum of which 152 patients were included in the study (79%). Mean age at operation was 15.3 +/- 5.5 years; 117 were male. Mean follow-up was 8.1 +/- 3.6 years. The deformity was noted before the age of 5 in 90%. Type I symmetrical and localized deformity was seen in 33.2%, type II symmetrical but diffuse depression in 23.7% and type III localized or diffuse asymmetrical deformity in 43.1%. It was considered severe in 68.9%, fair in 16.9% and mild in 14.2%. There were significantly more asymmetrical defects in the older age groups. The operation consisted of subperichondral chondrectomy, transverse sternotomy and division of the intercostal bundles at the outer limit of the chondrectomy and suturing the edge of this broad sheet of muscle and perichondrium to the anterior surface of the chest wall more laterally and under tension, elevating and stabilizing the sternum. Results were satisfactory in 83.6% (excellent 44.1%, good 39.5%). Results were not significantly influenced by age, sex, severity, type, symmetry, the extent of cartilage resection or follow-up. Results were inversely influenced by the occurrence of wound problems. The optimal age for operation is considered to be between 5 and 10 years. Both physical as well as psychological cosmetic factors may serve as an indication for operation.

  3. Short-term follow-up of patients after aneurysmectomy of the left ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Wilson Luiz da

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Left ventricular aneurysm is a complication of myocardial infarction that can best be treated by reconstructive surgeries that can restore ventricular geometry. We analyzed immediate results in a group of consecutive patients who underwent surgical correction of left ventricular aneurysms. METHODS: From January '90 to August '99, 94 patients - mean age 58.4 (ranging from 36 to 73 years, 65 (69.1% males and 9 ( 30.8% females - were operated upon. Pre-operative ejection fraction ranged from 0.22 to 0.58 (mean = 0.52, and the aneurysm was located in the antero-lateral area in 90.4% of the cases. Functional class III and IV (NYHA was present in 82 (87.2% patients, and 12 (12.7% were in functional class I and II. Congestive heart failure was the most frequent cause (77.6%, occurring in isolation in 24.4% or associated with coronary artery diseases in 53.2%. RESULTS: Short-term follow-up showed a 7.4% mortality, and low cardiac output was the main cause of death. Coming off pump was uneventful in 73 patients (77.6%, with a 3.2% mortality and with the use of inotropics in 20 (21.3%. One patient (1% did not come off the pump. CONCLUSION: Surgical correction was adequate in the immediate follow-up of operated patients, and mortality was higher in patients with higher functional class.

  4. Mortality of workers exposed to ethylene oxide: extended follow up of a British cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, D; Harris, E C; Poole, J; Palmer, K T

    2004-04-01

    To obtain further information about the risks of cancer associated with occupational exposure to ethylene oxide Follow up was extended by 13 years for a cohort of 2876 men and women with definite or potential exposure to ethylene oxide in the chemical industry or in hospital sterilising units. Subjects were traced through National Health Service and social security records, and their mortality was compared with that expected from rates in the national population by the person-years method. Analysis was based on 565 deaths, of which 339 had occurred during the additional period of follow up. Mortality was close to or below expectation for all causes (565 deaths v 607.6 expected), all cancers (188 v 184.2), and for all specific categories of malignancy including stomach cancer (10 v 11.6), breast cancer (11 v 13.2), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (7 v 4.8), and leukaemia (5 v 4.6). All five deaths from leukaemia occurred in the subset of subjects with greatest potential for exposure to ethylene oxide, but even in this group the excess of deaths was small (2.6 expected). The balance of evidence from this and other epidemiological investigations indicates that any risk of human cancer from ethylene oxide is low, particularly at the levels of occupational exposure that have occurred in Britain over recent decades. This may reflect the capacity of human cells to repair DNA damage caused by the chemical, which is a potent genotoxin and animal carcinogen.

  5. Nutritional status of young children in Mumbai slums: a follow-up anthropometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sushmita

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic childhood malnutrition remains common in India. As part of an initiative to improve maternal and child health in urban slums, we collected anthropometric data from a sample of children followed up from birth. We described the proportions of underweight, stunting, and wasting in young children, and examined their relationships with age. Methods We used two linked datasets: one based on institutional birth weight records for 17 318 infants, collected prospectively, and one based on follow-up of a subsample of 1941 children under five, collected in early 2010. Results Mean birth weight was 2736 g (SD 530 g, with a low birth weight ( Discussion Our data support the idea that much of growth faltering was explained by faltering in height for age, rather than by wasting. Stunting appeared to be established early and the subsequent decline in height for age was limited. Our findings suggest a focus on a younger age-group than the children over the age of three who are prioritized by existing support systems. Funding The trial during which the birth weight data were collected was funded by the ICICI Foundation for Inclusive Growth (Centre for Child Health and Nutrition, and The Wellcome Trust (081052/Z/06/Z. Subsequent collection, analysis and development of the manuscript was funded by a Wellcome Trust Strategic Award: Population Science of Maternal and Child Survival (085417ma/Z/08/Z. D Osrin is funded by The Wellcome Trust (091561/Z/10/Z.

  6. Longitudinal follow-up of patients with mild traumatic brain injury by magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Chen; Xiang-Jun Han; Zi-Yi Guo; Yin Zhang; Qi-Zhou Liang; Hai-Yan Liao; Wen-Rui Su; Qian-Yu Tang; Shui-Xi Fu; Cai-Xiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes in the concentrations of neural markers immediately or several months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Methods: The metabolic markers of neurons in white matter tissues above the lateral ventricle were semi-quantitatively determined by employing 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique (1-H-MRS) in 30 clinically diagnosed cases of mTBI. At the same time, the neurological functions of the subjects, including ability to pay attention, memory, working memory and operational capacity etc were also assessed.Results:The patients were followed up for, on average, 13 days after mTBI and the results showed that Cre, PCre and Glx in the white matter tissues were significantly elevated in mTBI patients. 17 patients (57%) recovered from the injury during the follow-up (median was defined as the 40th post-trauma day). Comparison in terms of intelligence among groups revealed that the levels of neural markers of intelligence development was positively related with intelligence scores). Conclusions: Change in Glx concentrations is most sensitive during trauma or in ensuing repairing processes, and might be different from normal status in the following months and Glx level tends to be accompanied with change in Cre, another energy-related marker.

  7. Uric acid and cognition in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annanmaki, Tua; Pohja, Marjatta; Parviainen, Tiina; Hakkinen, Paula; Murros, Kari

    2011-06-01

    Cognitive changes are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Low plasma uric acid (UA) level is associated with risk of PD and predicts faster progression of motor symptoms in established disease. Whether UA levels predict cognitive changes has not been studied. In a crossectional study, our group has previously shown an association of plasma and urine UA levels with cognition in PD. The aim of the present controlled longitudinal study was to examine the evolution of cognitive changes and the prognostic value of the UA levels on cognition in the previously reported PD-patient cohort. Of the original 40 patients, 31 were available for follow-up after three years. Both plasma and daily urine UA levels were measured, nutrition was evaluated using 4-day dietary recall diary and cognition was assessed by a thorough neuropsychological examination including computerized tasks with Cognispeed©. The plasma and urine UA levels of the patients remained stable during the follow-up. At the same time, the rate of cognitive decline was unexpectedly slow. A statistically significant deterioration was noted in verbal fluency (p=0.04) and in Cognispeed©'s vigilance task (p=0.0001). In forward linear regression analysis only the baseline daily urine UA level contributed to verbal fluency (p=0.01), picture completion (p=0.001), block design (p=0.006), vigilance (p=0.006), subtraction (p=0.01) and statement verification (p=0.04) tasks. The implications of the study results are discussed.

  8. Incidence of thyroid disorders in mixed cryoglobulinemia: Results from a longitudinal follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Ruffilli, Ilaria; Elia, Giusy; Giuggioli, Dilia; Colaci, Michele; Ferri, Clodoveo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    No study has evaluated the incidence of new cases of thyroid autoimmunity (AT) and dysfunction (TD) in hepatitis C-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) patients. We aimed to evaluate the incidence of new cases of AT and TD in a wide group of MC patients vs. age- and gender-matched controls from the same geographic area. After exclusion of MC patients with TD at the initial evaluation, the appearance of new cases of TD was evaluated in 112 MC patients and 112 matched controls, with similar iodine intake (median follow-up 67months in MC vs. 78 in controls). A high incidence (P<0.05) of new cases of hypothyroidism, TD, anti-thyroperoxidase antibody (AbTPO) positivity, appearance of a hypoechoic thyroid pattern, and thyroid autoimmunity in MC patients vs. controls was shown. A logistic regression analysis showed that in MC, the appearance of hypothyroidism was related to female gender, a borderline high initial thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), AbTPO positivity, a hypoechoic, and small thyroid. In conclusion, we show a high incidence of new cases of AT and TD in MC patients. MC patients at high risk (female gender, a borderline high initial TSH, AbTPO positivity, a hypoechoic, and small thyroid) should have periodically thyroid function follow-up.

  9. Complete follow-up and evaluation of a skin cancer screening in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L; Berwick, M; Fine, J A

    1990-12-01

    On May 21, 1988, 251 persons were screened for skin cancer in New Haven, Connecticut. A total body skin examination was performed on 98% of the participants. On the basis of follow-up of 93% of persons with positive screens for basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, or Bowen's disease, positive predictive values were 43% for basal cell carcinoma, 14% for squamous cell carcinoma, and 50% for Bowen's disease. In the group with atypical nevi, a person with two or more clinically atypical nevi was 16 times more likely to have histologic confirmation than a person with a single clinically atypical nevus (p = 0.003). Eighty persons were screened by both a dermatologist and a dermatology nurse; the crude agreement rate for actinic keratoses was 0.62; for atypical nevi, 0.53; and for BCC, 0.88. Both nurses and physicians overdiagnosed in the screening setting, the nurses more so than the physicians. Of the 128 persons screened who were advised to seek medical follow-up, 16 did not do so despite several reminders; their reasons are discussed.

  10. Follow-up the outcome of treatment of inhalant users in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanaphithuk, Wirut; Ratanasiri, Amornrat; Kanato, Manop

    2013-07-01

    Drug treatment in Thailand is categorized into three types, namely voluntary system, correctional system, and compulsory system. The latter is under Inhalants Law and Drug Addict Rehabilitation Act 2002 A.D. Follow-up the outcome of the compulsory system treatment in inhalant user on probation program and evaluate hospital referrals and the process of follow-up in community. A survey questionnaire adopted from KKU-VOUDIT was used in the present study in nine selected provinces of Thailand. Nine hundred ninety two people formed the study population and were divided into 95 administrators, 71 stakeholders, and 760 inhalant users. Inhalant users were classified as experimental (56.8%), harmful (24.2%), dependent (13.9%), and psychosis (5.1%). Majority of inhalant users were male (95.0%), 12 to 19 (61.3%), single (83.4%). In this group, 15.5% were students while 45.1% were temporarily employed, and 40.3% were unemployed. Most inhalant users never reused (72.2%). However some users re-used but were not incarcerated (12.2%) while others re-used and were incarcerated (15.5%). As the targets are youths, sub-district administrative organization, basic education office, and primary healthcare organizations should come together to bring about necessary changes.

  11. Twenty-nine-month follow-up of a paediatric zirconia dental crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Cazaux, Serena; Hyon, Isabelle; Prud'homme, Tony; Dajean Trutaud, Sylvie

    2017-06-14

    The aim of this paper is to present the long-term follow-up of one paediatric zirconia crown on a deciduous molar. Preformed crowns are part of the armamentarium in paediatric dentistry. In recent years, aesthetic alternatives to preformed metal crowns have been developed, first preveneered crowns and then zirconia crowns. This paper describes the restoration of a primary molar with a zirconia crown (EZ-Pedo, Loomis, California, USA) in an 8-year-old boy. In this clinical case, the protocol for the implementation and maintenance of zirconia crowns is detailed. The patient was followed up for 29 months until the natural exfoliation of his primary molar. The adaptation of the zirconia crown, the gingival health and the wear on the opposing tooth were considered. In this case, the paediatric zirconia crown allowed sustainable functional restoration while restoring a natural appearance of the tooth. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Panoramic imaging is not suitable for quantitative evaluation, classification, and follow up in unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, J W; Karssemakers, L H E; Grootendorst, D C; Tuinzing, D B; Becking, A G

    2015-05-01

    Patients with suspected unilateral condylar hyperplasia are often screened radiologically with a panoramic radiograph, but this is not sufficient for routine diagnosis and follow up. We have therefore made a quantitative analysis and evaluation of panoramic radiographs in a large group of patients with the condition. During the period 1994-2011, 132 patients with 113 panoramic radiographs were analysed using a validated method. There was good reproducibility between observers, but the condylar neck and head were the regions reported with least reliability. Although in most patients asymmetry of the condylar head, neck, and ramus was confirmed, the kappa coefficient as an indicator of agreement between two observers was poor (-0.040 to 0.504). Hardly any difference between sides was measured at the gonion angle, and the body appeared to be higher on the affected side in 80% of patients. Panoramic radiographs might be suitable for screening, but are not suitable for the quantitative evaluation, classification, and follow up of patients with unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

  13. Social inclusion: An effort to end loss-to-treatment follow-up in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, S; Manikantan, J; Sreenivas, A; Jayasankar, S; Sunilkumar, M; Rakesh, P S; Karthickeyan, D S A; Mohandas, C R

    2015-10-01

    Pathanamthitta district is implementing Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program as a pilot district since 1993. The district programme was reporting approximately 5% of their diagnosed smear positive patients as never put on treatment (Initial lost to follow up - ILFU) and 5% of the new smear positive [NSP] Pulmonary TB patients as lost to follow up [LFU] during treatment. Attempts based on reengineering of DOTS were not largely successful in bringing down these proportions. A treatment support group [TSG] is a non-statutory body of socially responsible citizens and volunteers to provide social support to each needy TB patient safeguarding his dignity and confidentiality by ensuring access to information, free and quality services and social welfare programs, empowering the patient for making decision to complete treatment successfully. It is a complete fulfilment of social inclusion standards enumerated by Standards for TB Care in India. Pathanamthitta district started implementing this strategy since 2013. After intervention, proportion of LFU among NSPTB cases dropped markedly and no LFU were reported among the latest treatment cohorts. Proportion of ILFU keeps similar trend and none were reported among the latest diagnostic cohorts. Social support for TB care is feasible under routine program conditions. Addition of standards for social inclusion in STCI is meaningful. Its meaning is translated well by a society empowered with literacy and political sense. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term follow-up of beryllium sensitized workers from a single employer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Anne M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 12% of beryllium-exposed American workers would test positive on beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT screening, but the implications of sensitization remain uncertain. Methods Seventy two current and former employees of a beryllium manufacturer, including 22 with pathologic changes of chronic beryllium disease (CBD, and 50 without, with a confirmed positive test were followed-up for 7.4 +/-3.1 years. Results Beyond predicted effects of aging, flow rates and lung volumes changed little from baseline, while DLCO dropped 17.4% of predicted on average. Despite this group decline, only 8 subjects (11.1% demonstrated physiologic or radiologic abnormalities typical of CBD. Other than baseline status, no clinical or laboratory feature distinguished those who clinically manifested CBD at follow-up from those who did not. Conclusions The clinical outlook remains favorable for beryllium-sensitized individuals over the first 5-12 years. However, declines in DLCO may presage further and more serious clinical manifestations in the future. These conclusions are tempered by the possibility of selection bias and other study limitations.

  15. Impact of Periodic Follow-Up Testing Among Urban American Indian Women With Impaired Fasting Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peg Allen, MPH

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionImpaired fasting glucose (IFG often progresses to type 2 diabetes. Given the severity and prevalence of this disease, primary prevention is important. Intensive lifestyle counseling interventions have delayed or prevented the onset of type 2 diabetes, but it is not known whether less intensive, more easily replicable efforts can also be effective.MethodsIn a lifestyle intervention study designed to reduce risks for type 2 diabetes, 200 American Indian women without diabetes, aged 18 to 40 years, were recruited from an urban community without regard to weight or IFG and block-randomized into intervention and control groups on the basis of fasting blood glucose (FBG. Dietary and physical activity behaviors were reported, and clinical metabolic, fitness, and body composition measures were taken at baseline and at periodic follow-up through 18 months. American Indian facilitators used a group-discussion format during the first 6 months to deliver a culturally influenced educational intervention on healthy eating, physical activity, social support, and goal setting. We analyzed a subset of young American Indian women with IFG at baseline (n = 42, selected from both the intervention and control groups.ResultsAmong the women with IFG, mean FBG significantly decreased from baseline to follow-up (P < .001 and converted to normal (<5.6 mmol/L or <100 mg/dL in 62.0% of the 30 women who completed the 18-month follow-up, irrespective of participation in the group educational sessions. Other improved metabolic values included significant decreases in mean fasting blood total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The women reported significant overall mean decreases in intake of total energy, saturated fat, total fat, total sugar, sweetened beverages, proportion of sweet foods in the diet, and hours of TV watching.ConclusionVolunteers with IFG in this study benefited from learning their FBG values and reporting their dietary

  16. Vertical scar versus the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty: a 10-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Lesley R; van der Biezen, Jan Jaap; Spronk, Cees A; van der Lei, Berend

    2012-10-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate whether the initial outcome of two types of reduction mammaplasty techniques (vertical scar reduction mammaplasty vs. the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty) remains stable in the long term: Sixty-nine patients who had undergone breast reduction surgery in the period 1997-2000 at the Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at the Medical Center of Leeuwarden were willing and able to participate in this study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the degree of patient satisfaction. For subjective evaluation, the Strasser Grading System on photographs at the 3 months after surgery and after long-term follow-up (10 years) was used. The median general appreciation mark for the entire surgical procedure given by patients was 8 (1-10) on a scale from 1 to 10. Forty-six of the 69 patients could be scored according to Strasser: at 3 months in 17 patients (37%) the result was 'good', in 21 patients (46%) 'mediocre' and in eight patients (17%) 'poor'. After 10 years, in 37 of the patients (80%) the result was 'good', in six patients (13%) 'mediocre' and in three patients (7%) 'poor'. At 3 months, there was a higher incidence of bottoming out in the vertical scar group (one on two patients) as compared to the inverted-T scar group (one on 10 patients); however, at the 10-years follow-up bottoming out was 50% in the inverted-T scar group and 20% in the vertical scar group. Despite bottoming out, in both the vertical scar reduction mammaplasty technique and the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty technique, high patient satisfaction rates are achieved that remains for years.

  17. Randomized Clinical Trials on Deep Carious Lesions: 5-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørndal, L; Fransson, H; Bruun, G; Markvart, M; Kjældgaard, M; Näsman, P; Hedenbjörk-Lager, A; Dige, I; Thordrup, M

    2017-07-01

    Deep caries presents a dilemma in terms of which treatment that will render an optimal prognosis by maintaining pulp vitality with absence of apical pathology. Previously, 2 randomized clinical trials were performed testing the short-term effects of stepwise carious tissue removal versus nonselective carious removal to hard dentin with or without pulp exposure. The aim of this article was to report the 5-y outcome on these previously treated patients having radiographically well-defined carious lesions extending into the pulpal quarter of the dentin but with a well-defined radiodense zone between the carious lesion and the pulp. In this long-term study, 239 of 314 (76.2%) patients were analyzed. The stepwise removal group had a significantly higher proportion of success (60.2%) at 5-y follow-up compared with the nonselective carious removal to hard dentin group (46.3%) ( P = 0.031) when pulp exposures per se were included as failures. Pulp exposure rate was significantly lower in the stepwise carious removal group (21.2% vs. 35.5%; P = 0.014). Irrespective of pulp exposure status, the difference (13.3%) was still significant when sustained pulp vitality without apical radiolucency and unbearable pain was considered (95% confidence interval, 3.1-26.3, P = 0.045). After pulp exposure, only 9% ( n = 4) of the analyzed patients were assessed as successful, indicating that the prognosis is highly dubious following conventional pulp-capping procedures (direct pulp capping or partial pulpotomy) in deep carious lesions in adults. In conclusion, the stepwise carious removal group had a significantly higher proportion of pulps with sustained vitality without apical radiolucency versus nonselective carious removal of deep carious lesions in adult teeth at 5-y follow-up ( ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00187837 and NCT00187850).

  18. Ferric sulphate and formocresol in pulpotomy of primary molars: long term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibricevic, H; Al-Jame, Q

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of ferric sulphate (FS) to that of the full strength of formocresol (Buckley's formula) (FC) as pulpotomy agents in primary human molar teeth 42-48 months after treatment. This was to assess the succeeding premolar teeth for decalcification, abnormal morphology or any other defect. Seventy children, ranging in age from 3 to 6 years, mean 4.3 years, were treated for pulpotomy of primary molars. Ferric sulphate 15.5% solution (applied for 15 seconds for 84 teeth) and formocresol solution (5 minutes procedure for next the 80 teeth) were used as pulpotomy agents. In both groups, pulp stumps were covered with zinc oxide eugenol paste. Permanent restorations were, in most cases, stainless steel crowns and in some of them amalgams. Follow-up clinical assessments were every 3 months and the radiographic follow-up time was 6, 20 and 42-48 months after treatment. The differences were statistically analyzed using the Chi square test. These revealed 96.4% clinical success rate in the FS and 97.5% in the FC groups. Radiographic success rate in the FS group was 92.0%, while 94.6% in the FC group. No statistical significant differences were found between the radiographic assessment of the two pulpotomy agents. Ferric sulphate showed similar clinical and radiographic success rate as a pulpotomy agent for primary molar teeth after long term evaluation period, compared with formocresol. Ferric sulphate, because of its lower toxicity, may become a replacement for formocresol in primary molar teeth.

  19. Background parenchymal enhancement on baseline screening breast MRI: impact on biopsy rate and short-interval follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hambly, Niamh M

    2011-01-01

    Background parenchymal enhancement on breast MRI refers to normal enhancement of the patient\\'s fibroglandular tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of background parenchymal enhancement on short-interval follow-up, biopsy, and cancer detection rate on baseline screening MRI in a high-risk group.

  20. Trajectories of Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescents with Spina Bifida: A 6-Year, Four-Wave Longitudinal Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmbeck, Grayson N.; DeLucia, Christian; Essner, Bonnie; Kelly, Lauren; Zebracki, Kathy; Friedman, Deborah; Jandasek, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objective: As a follow-up to an earlier cross-sectional study (Holmbeck et al., 2003), the current multimethod, multi-informant investigation examined individual growth in psychosocial adjustment across the adolescent transition in 2 samples: young adolescents with spina bifida (SB) and typically developing adolescents (N = 68 in both groups at…

  1. Trajectories of Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescents with Spina Bifida: A 6-Year, Four-Wave Longitudinal Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmbeck, Grayson N.; DeLucia, Christian; Essner, Bonnie; Kelly, Lauren; Zebracki, Kathy; Friedman, Deborah; Jandasek, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objective: As a follow-up to an earlier cross-sectional study (Holmbeck et al., 2003), the current multimethod, multi-informant investigation examined individual growth in psychosocial adjustment across the adolescent transition in 2 samples: young adolescents with spina bifida (SB) and typically developing adolescents (N = 68 in both groups at…

  2. Psychological Vulnerability in Children Next-Born after Stillbirth: A Case-Control Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Penelope; Badenhorst, William; Pawlby, Susan; White, Sarah; Hughes, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Background: Case studies and anecdotal accounts suggest that perinatal loss may impact upon other children in the family, including those born subsequent to loss. However, there is a dearth of systematically collected quantitative data on this potentially vulnerable group. Methods: Case-controlled follow-up of 52 mothers with history of stillbirth…

  3. What Facilitates "Patient Empowerment" in Cancer Patients During Follow-Up: A Qualitative Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Clara R; Thomsen, Thora G; Ross, Lone; Dietz, Susanne M; Therkildsen, Signe; Groenvold, Mogens; Rasmussen, Charlotte L; Johnsen, Anna T

    2017-07-01

    Empowerment is a concept of growing importance in cancer care, but little is known about cancer patients' experiences of empowerment during follow-up. To explore this area, a qualitative systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A total of 2,292 papers were identified and 38 articles selected and included in the review. The thematic synthesis of the papers resulted in seven analytical themes being identified: empowerment as an ongoing process, knowledge is power, having an active role, communication and interaction between patients and health care professionals, support from being in a group, religion and spirituality, and gender. Very few articles explicitly explored the empowerment of cancer patients during follow-up, and the review identified a lack of attention to patients' own understandings of empowerment, a lack of specific focus on empowerment during follow-up, and insufficient attention to collective empowerment, as well as ethnic, social, and gender differences.

  4. Subjective memory complaints in primary care patients and death from all causes: a four-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Waldemar, Gunhild; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2013-01-01

    -related quality of life were collected at the enrolment primary care consultation. Dates of death from all causes occurring during the four-year follow-up were retrieved from the national databases. Cox proportional hazard regression models on time to death (censored after four years) were used to examine......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prognostic value of subjective memory complaints for all-cause mortality in order to determine whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of vulnerable patients who need close follow-up. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study...... the influence of subjective memory complaints on all-cause mortality. RESULTS: 88 patients died during the four-year follow-up. The association between subjective memory complaints and mortality had a statistically not significant hazard ratio (HR) of 0.91, adjusting for known confounders. Statistically...

  5. Risk Factors of Proximal Junctional Kyphosis after Multilevel Fusion Surgery: More Than 2 Years Follow-Up Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Keun; Kim, Ji Yong; Kim, Do Yeon; Rhim, Seung Chul; Yoon, Seung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is radiologic finding, and is defined as kyphosis of >10° at the proximal end of a construct. The aim of this study is to identify factors associated with PJK after segmental spinal instrumented fusion in adults with spinal deformity with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Methods A total of 49 cases of adult spinal deformity treated by segmental spinal instrumented fusion at two university hospitals from 2004 to 2011 were enrolled in this study. All enrolled cases included at least 4 or more levels from L5 or the sacral level. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of PJK during follow-up, and these two groups were compared to identify factors related to PJK. Results PJK was observed in 16 of the 49 cases. Age, sex and mean follow-up duration were not statistically different between two groups. However, mean bone marrow density (BMD) and mean back muscle volume at the T10 to L2 level was significantly lower in the PJK group. Preoperatively, the distance between the C7 plumb line and uppermost instrumented vertebra (UIV) were no different in the two groups, but at final follow-up a significant intergroup difference was observed. Interestingly, spinal instrumentation factors, such as, receipt of a revision operation, the use of a cross-link, and screw fracture were no different in the two groups at final follow-up. Conclusion Preoperative BMD, sagittal imbalance at UIV, and thoracolumbar muscle volume were found to be strongly associated with the presence of PJK. PMID:28264237

  6. Two-year follow-up of a randomized effectiveness trial evaluating MST for juveniles who sexually offend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Elizabeth J; Henggeler, Scott W; McCart, Michael R; Borduin, Charles M; Schewe, Paul A; Armstrong, Kevin S

    2013-12-01

    Building on prior efficacy trials (i.e., university-based, graduate students as therapists), the primary purpose of this study was to determine whether favorable 12-month outcomes, obtained in a randomized effectiveness trial (i.e., implemented by practitioners in a community mental health center) of multisystemic therapy (MST) with juveniles who had sexually offended (JSO), were sustained through a second year of follow-up. JSO (n = 124 male youth) and their families were randomly assigned to MST, which was family based and delivered by community-based practitioners, or to treatment as usual (TAU), which was primarily group-based cognitive-behavioral interventions delivered by professionals within the juvenile justice system. Youth averaged 14.7 years of age (SD = 1.7) at referral, were primarily African American (54%), and 30% were Hispanic. All youth had been diverted or adjudicated for a sexual offense. Analyses examined whether MST effects reported previously at 1-year follow-up for problem sexual behaviors, delinquency, substance use, and out-of-home placement were sustained through a second year of follow-up. In addition, arrest records were examined from baseline through 2-year follow-up. During the second year of follow-up, MST treatment effects were sustained for 3 of 4 measures of youth problem sexual behavior, self-reported delinquency, and out-of-home placements. The base rate for sexual offense rearrests was too low to conduct statistical analyses, and a between-groups difference did not emerge for other criminal arrests. For the most part, the 2-year follow-up findings from this effectiveness study are consistent with favorable MST long-term results with JSO in efficacy research. In contrast with many MST trials, however, decreases in rearrests were not observed.

  7. Cotidiano de portadores de esquizofrenia após uso de clozapina e acompanhamento grupal El cotidiano de portadores de esquizofrenia después del uso de clozapina y acompañamiento del grupo Daily life of schizofrenia patients after the use of clozapine and group follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Sertori Durão

    2007-06-01

    nuevo sentido para la existencia, en las diferentes formas de convivencia y de sociabilidad.This study was carried out with a sample of 11 patients who are part of the atypical medication group at the Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto's School of Medicine. For data collection semi-structured interviews guided by a script were held in April 2003. The interviews were first taped and fully transcribed afterwards. Results indicated an improvement in patients' symptoms, demonstrated by decreased social isolation, resumption of home/work activities and studies, as well as by participation in social events. They also point out to the need for a new vision regarding patients who suffer from mental disorders and their family members in the sense of searching for adequate therapeutic attitudes that have an impact on the production of life, aimed at giving a new existential meaning in the different forms of social contact and sociability.

  8. Regular aquatic exercise for chronic kidney disease patients: a 10-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechter, Ülle; Raag, Mait; Ots-Rosenberg, Mai

    2014-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients not yet in dialysis can benefit from increased physical activity; however, the safety and outcomes of aquatic exercise have not been investigated in observational studies. The aim of this study was to analyze association of 10 years of regularly performed aquatic exercise with the study endpoint--that is, all-cause death or start of dialysis. Consecutive CKD patients were included in the study in January 2002. The exercise group (n=7) exercised regularly under the supervision of physiotherapist for 10 years; the control group (n=9), matched in terms of age and clinical parameters, remained sedentary. Low-intensity aerobic aquatic exercise was performed regularly twice a week; 32 weeks or more of exercise therapy sessions were conducted annually. None of the members of the aquatic exercise group reached dialysis or died in 10 years. In the sedentary control group, 55% reached the study endpoint--renal replacement therapy (n=2) or all-cause death (n=3). Occurrence of the study endpoint, compared using the exact multinomial test with unconditional margins, was statistically significantly different (P-value: 0.037) between the study groups. Regular supervised aquatic exercise arrested CKD progression. There was a statistically significant difference between the sedentary group and the exercise group in reaching renal replacement therapy or all-cause death in a follow-up time of 10 years.

  9. Interstitial cystitis: a retrospective analysis of treatment with pentosan polysulfate and follow-up patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, M G; Suleskey, J F; Finkelstein, L J; Van Overbeke, M E; Zizza, V J; Stommel, M

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) in relieving symptoms of interstitial cystitis, the authors retrospectively reviewed charts of 260 patients in whom interstitial cystitis had been diagnosed. Subsequently, they conducted a follow-up phone interview or mail survey of those patients who were treated with PPS to investigate changes in the patients' symptoms, adverse effects, and change in quality of life. The control group consisted of patients whose interstitial cystitis had been diagnosed at cystoscopy and had a duration of at least 1 year and who had taken at least one or more oral medications for their symptoms. The average length of treatment was 9.3 months among the 27 subjects on PPS therapy. The mean length of time that they had diagnosed interstitial cystitis was 35.63 months and 48.78 months for the PPS-treated and control groups, respectively, with no statistically significant difference. Changes in frequency, urgency, and pain were greater in the treatment group and statistically significant (P = .11, P = .49, and P = .004, respectively). No change occurred in the rate of nocturia in the PPS-treated group compared with that in the control group. Symptoms of both groups improved over time, but improvement was statistically significantly greater in the treatment group (P = .001) over the treatment interval. The most common side effect attributable to PPS was diarrhea in 15% of subjects. Pentosan proved to be an efficacious option for reducing the debilitating symptoms of interstitial cystitis.

  10. Patients lost to follow-up in acromegaly: results of the ACROSPECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delemer, B; Chanson, Ph; Foubert, L; Borson-Chazot, F; Chabre, O; Tabarin, A; Weryha, G; Cortet-Rudelli, C; Raingeard, I; Reznik, Y; Reines, C; Bisot-Locard, S; Castinetti, F

    2014-05-01

    The complex management of acromegaly has transformed this disease into a chronic condition, with the risk of patients being lost to follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of acromegalic patients lost to follow-up in France and to determine the impact that abandoning follow-up has on the disease and its management. ACROSPECT was a French national, multicentre, cross-sectional, observational study. Acromegalic patients were considered lost to follow-up if no new information had been entered in their hospital records during the previous 2 years. They were traced where possible, and data were collected by means of a recall visit or questionnaire. In the study population, 21% of the 2392 acromegalic patients initially followed in 25 tertiary endocrinology centres were lost to follow-up. At their last follow-up visit, 30% were uncontrolled, 33% were receiving medical therapy and 53% had residual tumour. Of the 362 traced, 62 had died and 77% were receiving follow-up elsewhere; the leading reason for abandoning follow-up was that they had not been informed that it was necessary. Our analysis of the questionnaires suggests that they were not receiving optimal follow-up. This study underlines the need to better inform acromegalic patients of the need for long-term follow-up, the absence of which could be detrimental to patients' health, and to develop shared care for what must now be regarded as a chronic disease.

  11. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan, Susan R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  12. Teaching Mathematics with Computer Animated Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Tom M.

    1991-01-01

    Described are some of the visualization techniques employed in the computer-animated videotapes generated through the blending of commentary, animated imagery, music, and special effects. Instructions for procurement are included for these tapes, which are produced by Project MATHEMATICS! at the California Institute of Technology. (JJK)

  13. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  14. Cold atom microtraps above a videotape surface

    CERN Document Server

    Retter, J A

    2002-01-01

    Much progress has been made in the last two years towards miniaturizing magnetic traps for cold atoms. This will enable manipulation of coherent samples of atoms, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, or single atoms, on the scale of the atomic de Broglie wavelength. This thesis concerns an array of microscopic magnetic potentials formed close to the surface of magnetized videotape, when a uniform bias field is applied. The recorded magnetization is a 100 mu m sine wave, which covers a 12.5mm x 22mm piece of commercial videotape. This videotape is glued flat onto a thin glass substrate and is gold coated by evaporation so that atoms can be trapped close to the surface in a mirror-MOT. An 'atom chip' has been developed, incorporating the videotape and current-carrying wires located below the magnetized surface. A single wire and bias field create a magnetic tube potential, oriented parallel with the microtraps and with a quadrupole radial field. This allows the mirror-MOT to be compressed and distorted in order t...

  15. Producing videotapes as professional marketing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, L J; Harlan, N; Dyer, E; Lubker, B

    1992-05-01

    Professional quality videotapes are an effective way to reach audiences. Developing such tapes takes careful planning, time, and money, but they are well worth the effort involved. Our new role as "marketing agent" must be played with professionalism, expertise, persistence, and a sense of humor.

  16. Motion Picture and Videotape Analysis of Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Geoffrey C.; Duvall, David

    1983-01-01

    Use of motion pictures and videotape recordings to analyze animal behavior is described. Indicates that accuracy/amount of data available is greatly increased and that simultaneous behaviors of different animals can be studied or individual behavior patterns increased/decreased, providing observers with temporal perceptions similar to the animals…

  17. Long-term follow-up of patients with choroidal neovascularization due to angioid streaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Serrano MG

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Maria Guadalupe Martinez-Serrano,1 Abelardo Rodriguez-Reyes,2 Jose Luis Guerrero-Naranjo,1,3 Guillermo Salcedo-Villanueva,1 Jans Fromow-Guerra,1,3 Gerardo García-Aguirre,1,3 Virgilio Morales-Canton,1 Raul Velez-Montoya1,3 1Retina Department, 2Pathology Department, Asociación para Evitar la Ceguera en Mexico, Hospital “Dr Luis Sanchez Bulnes” IAP, 3Macula Retina Consultants, Mexico City, Mexico Background: The following case series describes the long-term anatomical and functional outcome of a group of seven patients with choroidal neovascularization (CNV, secondary to angioid streaks (AS, who were treated with antiangiogenic drugs in a pro re nata (PRN regimen. After the 4-year mark, visual acuity tends to return to pretreatment level. Treatment delays and lack of aware­ness and self-referral by the patients are believed to be the cause of the PRN regimen failure. Purpose: To assess the long-term outcomes (>4 years of patients with CNV due to AS treated with a PRN regimen of antiangiogenic. Methods: This was a retrospective, case series, single-center study. We reviewed the electronic medical records from patients with CNV due to AS. From each record, we noted general demographic data and relevant medical history; clinical presentation, changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA over time, optical coherent tomography parameters, treatment and retreatment details, and systemic associations. Changes in BCVA and central macular thickness were assessed with a Wilcoxon two-sample test, with an alpha value of ≤0.05 for statistical significance. Results: The mean follow-up time was 53.8±26.8 months. BCVA at baseline was: 1.001±0.62 logMAR; at the end of follow-up: 0.996±0.56 logMAR (P=0.9. Central macular thickness at baseline was: 360.85±173.82 µm; at the end of follow-up: 323.85±100.34 µm (P=0.6. Mean number of intravitreal angiogenic drugs: 6±4.16 injections (range 4–15. Mean time between injections was 3.8±2.7 months (range

  18. Telephonic consultation and follow-up in diabetics: Impact on metabolic profile, quality of life, and patient compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupinderjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM, being a long-term condition, requires consistent blood glucose monitoring and adjustment of doses of the antidiabetic drugs and insulin. Telehealth is an emerging field that can have a positive impact on the management of this disease. Aim: The aim was to study the impact of the frequency of consultation and follow-up on telephone of diagnosed follow-up patients of DM on glycemic and metabolic profiles, the patients′ compliance, and their quality of life (QoL, and to compare the effectiveness of different modes of follow-up. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty patients were enrolled from the outpatient department (OPD including both type 1 and type 2 DM patients who had already been diagnosed and were on treatment. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups, each consisting of 40 subjects, according to the mode of follow-up: A (rare, i.e., less frequent outpatient visits, B (moderate, i.e., more frequent outpatient visits, and C (frequent, i.e., more frequent outpatient visits with weekly telephonic consultation. Metabolic profiles and the QoL were monitored. The patients′ compliance with and adherence to the treatment, and dietary and exercise advice were assessed. Results: The patients′ compliance with and adherence to the treatment was higher in group C, followed by groups B and A. There was a net decrease in adverse events, with an increase in the frequency of follow-up. Changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c suggested a positive impact of weekly telephonic consultation. The lipid profile was also positively affected, with maximum improvement being in high-density lipoproteins (HDLs and triglycerides. There was an improvement in the QoL domains pertaining to physical health and endurance in patients with higher frequency of follow-ups. There was no effect on emotional or mental health. There was an overall deterioration of the financial domain, being most marked in group B. The treatment

  19. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen ML

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mikaela L Jorgensen,1 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon2,3 1Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe, Sydney Local Health District and University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of

  20. "Yes! Animation Is Possible with Your Videotape Recorder!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Alfreda; Martin, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project in which students are involved in producing an animated videotape recording and discusses the advantages of modern videotape equipment over other film media. An outline of the process covers materials used, storyboard and artwork production, videotaping procedures, and audio dubbing. (CLB)

  1. Follow-up of isolated neutron star candidates from the eROSITA survey

    CERN Document Server

    Pires, Adriana M; Motch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Peculiar groups of X-ray emitting isolated neutron stars, which include magnetars, the "Magnificent Seven", and central compact objects in supernova remnants, escape detection in standard pulsar surveys. Yet, they constitute a key element in understanding the neutron star evolution and phenomenology. Their use in population studies in the galactic scale has been hindered by the scarcity of their detection. The all-sky survey of eROSITA on-board the forthcoming Spectrum-RG mission has the unique potential to unveil the X-ray faint part of the population and constrain evolutionary models. To create a forecast for the four-year all-sky survey, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of a population synthesis model, where we follow the evolutionary tracks of thermally emitting neutron stars in the Milky Way and test their detectability. In this work, we discuss strategies for pinpointing the most promising candidates for follow-up observing campaigns using current and future facilities.

  2. Endodontic surgery with ultrasonic retrotips: one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschieri, Silvio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Testori, Tiziano; Francetti, Luca; Weinstein, Roberto

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this prospective clinical study was to monitor the outcome of ultrasonic root-end preparation, in relation to tooth type and location, presence of post restoration and type of retrotip. Teeth treated surgically showed a periradicular lesion of strictly endodontic origin. Fifty teeth were included in the study, according to specific selection criteria. Cases were followed for a period of 1 year and then classified in 3 groups (success, uncertain healing, and failure) according to radiographic and clinical criteria. Of the 46 teeth evaluated at 1-year follow-up, 42 teeth (91.3%) successfully healed, 1 tooth had uncertain healing, and 3 failed. We found no statistically significant differences in treatment results related to the type of tooth, tooth location, post restoration, and type of retrotip. Adherence to a strict endodontic surgical protocol and the use of contemporary techniques and materials can lead to a predictable outcome.

  3. Evolution of analogical reasoning in children: follow-up from six to eleven years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fidel Abregú Tueros

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to establish the time and period of development of Analogical Reasoning (AR and evaluate its independence and performance with respect to the age. We performed a longitudinal cohort study of two age groups and six annual follow-up phases from each one (2000-2005, 2001-2006 in six to eleven years-old children in the city of Huanuco (Peru with a sample of 167 children (first stage, and N=121 (sixth stage. The Raven’s progressive matrices test, coloured version, was applied individually without time limits. Results indicate that AR development occurs in a constant and late way from seven to eleven years-old children, and also that there is independence between the ability of AR and the children age. We discuss the importance of knowledge in the relationships between analogies topics, adjusted to the age, as a mediating factor in the development of AR.

  4. Dimensions of post-stroke fatigue: a two-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Doris; Johnsen, Soeren Paaske; Watt, Torquil;

    2008-01-01

    , Reduced Activity, Reduced Motivation, and Mental Fatigue). RESULTS: Compared to the general population, stroke patients reported higher levels of Physical Fatigue. Minor or no differences were found for the other fatigue scales. Pathological fatigue, defined as a score >or=12 on the General Fatigue scale......BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the course of poststroke fatigue in a cohort of first-time stroke patients compared to the general population, and to identify clinically relevant features of post-stroke fatigue. METHODS: We performed a follow-up study of 165 patients with first......-time stroke admitted to acute stroke units at the Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. A reference group of 1,069 persons was sampled from the general population. Fatigue was assessed using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) covering five scales of fatigue (General Fatigue, Physical Fatigue...

  5. A Decade of GRB Follow-Up by BOOTES in Spain (2003–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jelínek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in a previous article and are here reviewed and updated, and additional detection data points are included as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  6. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, T.D.; Abernathy, M.R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.X.; Adya, V.B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P.A.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M.C.; Arceneaux, C.C.; Areeda, J.S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K.G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S.M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M.K.M.; Baker, P.T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.W.; Barayoga, J.C.; Barclay, S.E.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A.S.; Bell, C.J.; Berger, B.K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C.P.L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I.A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M.A.; Blackburn, J.K.; Blair, C.D.; Blair, D.G.; Blair, R.M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T.P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B.A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P.R.; Braginsky, V.B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J.E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A.F.; Brown, D.A.; Brown, D.D.; Brown, N.M.; Buchanan, C.C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H.J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R.L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J.C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J.B.; Cannon, K.C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J.C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.B.; Baiardi, L.C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S.J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H.Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H.S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J.H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J.A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C.A.; Coughlin, M.W.; Coughlin, S.B.; Coulon, J.P.; Countryman, S.T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E.E.; Coward, D.M.; Cowart, M.J.; Coyne, D.C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J.D.E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S.G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S.L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N.S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.S.; Daw, E.J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M.C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K.L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T.P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R.W.P.; Driggers, J.C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.E.; Edo, T.B.; Edwards, M.C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S.S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R.C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M.M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E.C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R.P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T.T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V.V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.A.G.; Gair, J.R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J.A.; Giardina, K.D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, G.; Castro, J.M.G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N.A.; Gorodetsky, M.L.; Gossan, S.E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P.B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A.C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G.M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.K.; Gushwa, K.E.; Gustafson, E.K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.J.; Hall, B.R.; Hall, E.D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M.M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M.D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.M.; Harry, I.W.; Hart, M.J.; Hartman, M.T.; Haster, C.J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I.S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A.W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K.A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S.E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D.E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D.J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.A.; Howell, E.J.; Hu, Y.M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E.A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S.H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D.R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H.N.; Isac, J.M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B.R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.W.; Jones, D.I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R.J.G.; Ju, L.; H. K; Kalaghatgi, C.V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J.B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M.S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J.S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F.Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E.A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.M.; King, E.J.; King, P.J.; Kinzel, D.L.; Kissel, J.S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S.M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W.Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B.D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P.D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, H.K.; Lee, H.M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J.R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.M.; Li, T.G.F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T.B.; Lockerbie, N.A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A.L.; Lord, J.E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.D.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A.P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D.M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G.L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A.S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I.W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D.V.; Marx, J.N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T.J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D.E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S.C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D.J.; McWilliams, S.T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G.D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R.A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P.M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E.E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V.P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S.R.P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C.J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S.R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C.M.; Mueller, C.L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A.W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.T.; Nielsen, A.B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M.E.N.; Nuttall, L.K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G.H.; Oh, J.J.; Oh, S.H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D.J.; Ottens, R.S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B.J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.A.; Palamos, J.R.; Palashov, O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B.C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M.A.; Paris, H.R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B.L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I.M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L.R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G.A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F.J.; Rabeling, D.S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C.M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D.H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S.D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N.A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.G.; Roma, V.J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J.H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E.J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J.R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B.S.; Saulson, P.R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R.L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; R. Schilling$^; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B.F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S.M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D.A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M.S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D.H.; Shoemaker, D.M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A.D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A.M.; Slagmolen, B.J.J.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R.J.E.; Son, E.J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A.K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B.C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K.A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N.A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A.L.; Summerscales, T.Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P.J.; Swinkels, B.L.; Szczepanczyk, M.J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D.B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S.P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M.P.; Thomas, E.G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K.A.; Thorne, K.S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K.V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; C.V. Torres$^; Torrie, C.I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M.C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Urban, A.L.; Usman, S.A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D.C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J.V.; van Veggel, A.A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D.J.; Vinet, J.Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W.D.; Vyatchanin, S.P.; Wade, A.R.; Wade, L.E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R.L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J.T.; White, D.J.; Whiting, B.F.; Williams, R.D.; Williamson, A.R.; Willis, J.L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C.C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C.C.; Yap, M.J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X.J.; Zucker, M.E.; Zuraw, S.E.; Zweizig, J.; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M.E.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A.P.; Edwards, P.G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R.J.; Voronkov, M.A.; Whiting, M.T.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J.C.; Oates, S.R.; Zhang, B.B.; Hu, Y.D.; Kubanek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellon, A.; Garcia-Cerezo, A.; Munoz, V.F.; Perez, C.; Castillo-Carrion, S.; Castro, J.M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-Garcia, M.D.; Pata, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J.A.; Konig, S.; Rendon, F.; de J. Mateo, T.; Fernandez-Munoz, R.; Yock, P.C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W.H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I.H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W.H.; Claret, A.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Pandey, S.B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Abbott, T.M.C.; Abdalla, F.B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R.A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F.J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P.S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C.E.; D'Andrea, C.B.; da Costa, L.N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H.T.; Dietrich, J.P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M.R.; Eifler, T.F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A.E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D.A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R.J.; Fong, W.F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D.B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C.L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.W.; Goldstein, D.A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R.A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.J.; Johnson, M.D.; Johnson, M.W.G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.G.; Kind, M.C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T.S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M.A.G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B.D.; Miller, C.J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R.C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A.A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A.K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A.C.; Rykoff, E.S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R.C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.E.C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R.C.; Tucker, D.L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A.R.; Wechsler, R.H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M.S.; Zhang, B.B.; Hui, C.M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M.M.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R.M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H.F.; Blackburn, L.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T.J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P.A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L.R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S.W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dominguez, A.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E.C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G.A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I.A.; Grove, J.E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A.K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.W.; Hill, A.B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M.N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M.N.; McEnery, J.E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A.A.; Monzani, M.E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J.S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T.A.; Racusin, J.L.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.M.; Sgro, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E.J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D.J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J.B.; Thompson, D.J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D.F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T.M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K.S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L.A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J.P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; Kasliwal, M.M.; Singer, L.P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A.A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S.V.; Aptekar, R.L.; Frederiks, D.D.; Svinkin, D.S.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D.M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K.S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; Bersier, D.F.; Bode, M.F.; Collins, C.A.; Copperwheat, C.M.; Darnley, M.J.; Galloway, D.K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C.G.; Piascik, A.S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I.A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Broderick, J.W.; Fender, R.P.; Jonker, P.G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B.W.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N.M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T.M.O.; Gaensler, B.M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D.L.; Morales, M.F.; Tingay, S.J.; Wayth, R.B.; Williams, A.; Smartt, S.J.; Chambers, K.C.; Smith, K.W.; Huber, M.E.; Young, D.R.; Wright, D.E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E.A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C.W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J.P.; Botticella, M.T.; Chen, T.W.; Valle, M.D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J.D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cwiek, A.; Cwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Onken, C.A.; Scalzo, R.A.; Schmidt, B.P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; Evans, P.A.; Kennea, J.A.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S.B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F.E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Racusin, J.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; Beroiz, M.; Penuela, T.; Macri, L.M.; Oelkers, R.J.; Lambas, D.G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J.L.; DePoy, D.L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N.A.; Benacquista, M.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A.J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C.G.; McMahon, R.G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de U. Postigo, A.; Thoene, C.C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.

    2016-01-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current electromagnetic follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the electromagnetic follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  7. A decade of GRB follow-up by BOOTES in Spain (2003-2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Jelínek, Martin; Cunniffe, Ronan; Gorosabel, Javier; Vítek, Stanislav; Kubánek, Petr; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; Guziy, Sergey; Tello, Juan C; Páta, Petr; Sánchez-Ramírez, Rubén; Oates, Samantha; Jeong, Soomin; Štrobl, Jan; Castillo-Carrión, Sebastián; Sanguino, Tomás Mateo; Rabaza, Ovidio; Pérez-Ramírez, Dolores; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Carretero, Benito A de la Morena; Hudec, René; Reglero, Víctor; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    2016-01-01

    This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in the previous article, and are here reviewed, updated, and include additional detection data points as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  8. Sociodemographic Predictors of Anal Cancer Screening and Follow-up in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Watkins Bruner, Deborah

    2017-07-14

    Anal cancer in the United States is generally rare; however, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are 28 times more likely to be given a diagnosis of anal cancer than the general population. The aim of this study was to examine the rates and sociodemographic predictors of anal cancer screening and follow-up anoscopy in a sample of HIV-infected individuals. Data for this study (n = 200) were derived from a retrospective chart review of randomly selected HIV-infected individuals. Data analyses included Pearson's correlation coefficient statistic to examine bivariate associations and logistic regression modeling for prediction of anal Papanicolaou test screening and follow-up anoscopy. Screening rates and follow-up after an abnormal anal Pap test were low. Women were less likely to be screened for anal cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.244; P = .007). Men who have sex with men were almost 4 times more likely to be screened for anal cancer (OR, 3.7; P = .02). Men who have sex with men were 6 times more likely to have follow-up after an abnormal anal Pap test compared with heterosexual men or women of any sexual orientation (OR, 6.88; P = .002). High-risk groups for anal cancer should be targeted for preventative measures as part of a cancer prevention plan to decrease the personal and clinical burden associated with anal cancer. Cancer prevention is a multistep process that requires screening and follow-up efforts, where healthcare providers play a vital role in these efforts. Findings from this study can inform strategies to improve screening and follow-up rates in HIV-infected individuals.

  9. Proteinuria during Follow-Up Period and Long-Term Renal Survival of Childhood IgA Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Koichi; Harada, Ryoko; Hamada, Riku; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Hamasaki, Yuko; Hataya, Hiroshi; Ito, Shuichi; Ishikura, Kenji; Honda, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is the most important risk factor for IgA nephropathy progression. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcome and risk factors for poor prognosis in childhood IgA nephropathy. Patients who were diagnosed with IgA nephropathy between 1972 and 1992 at the Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children's Hospital were included. We analyzed risk factors for progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) using Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analyses of Cox proportional hazard model. One hundred patients were included and the median observation period was 11.8 years. Twelve and 17 patients progressed to ESKD and CRI, respectively. The survival probabilities were 90.0% at 10 years and 79.8% at 20 years for ESKD, and 86.1% at 10 years and 72.3% at 20 years for CRI. Notably, patients with heavy proteinuria with hypoalbuminemia during follow-up period showed extremely poor prognosis. In this group, the survival rate at 10 years from ESKD and CRI was 40.6% and 20.8%, respectively. By multivariate analysis, proteinuria at diagnosis and proteinuria during follow-up period were risk factors for ESKD, whereas glomeruli showing mesangial proliferation ≥50% and proteinuria during follow-up period were risk factors for CRI. Patients without heavy proteinuria during follow-up period did not develop CRI and 63% of patients with mild proteinuria during follow-up period showed no proteinuria at the last observation. The degree of proteinuria during follow-up period is the strongest risk factor for ESKD and CRI.

  10. Interdisciplinary evidence-based recommendations for the follow-up of early stage seminomatous testicular germ cell cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hartmann, Michael [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Krege, Susanne [Krankenhaus Maria-Hilf GmbH, Krefeld (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Lorch, Anja [Universitaetsklinikum Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Mayer, Frank [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Santis, Maria de [KFJ-Spital, ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP and LBI-ACR VIEnna-CTO, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Oncology; Gillessen, Silke [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Beyer, Joerg [Vivantes Klinikum am Urban, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Cathomas, Richard [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland). Medical Oncology

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To provide guidance regarding follow-up procedures after initial treatment of early stage testicular seminoma (clinical stages (CS) I-II A/B) based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Material: An interdisciplinary, multinational working group consisting of urologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists analyzed the published evidence regarding follow-up procedures in various stages of seminomatous and nonseminomatous testicular cancers. Focusing on radiooncological aspects, the recommendations contained herein are restricted to early stage seminoma (with radiotherapy being a standard treatment option). In particular, extent, frequency, and duration of imaging at follow-up were analyzed concerning relapse patterns, risk factors, and mode of relapse detection. Results: Active surveillance, adjuvant carboplatin or radiotherapy are equally accepted options for CS I seminoma but they result in different relapse rates and patterns. Usually relapses occur within the first 2(-6) years. Routinely performed follow-up using computerized tomography (CT) after adjuvant treatment yield only low detection rates of recurrences. Therefore, there is no evidence to maintain routine examinations every 3-4 months. After treatment of stage IIA/B, detection rates of relapses or progression identified solely by routinely performed CT during follow-up are low. Conclusion: Considering lifelong cure rates of up to 99% for patients treated for seminoma CS I-IIA/B, the negative impact of unnecessary ionizing radiation exposure has to be considered. The presented recommendations for various follow-up scenarios for early stage seminoma strongly promote the restrictive use of imaging procedures that utilize ionizing radiation (especially CT), due to its potential to induce secondary malignancies. (orig.)

  11. Right ventricular septal pacing: Safety and efficacy in a long term follow up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eraldo; Occhetta; Gianluca; Quirino; Lara; Baduena; Rosaria; Nappo; Chiara; Cavallino; Emanuela; Facchini; Paolo; Pistelli; Andrea; Magnani; Miriam; Bortnik; Gabriella; Francalacci; Gabriele; Dell’Era; Laura; Plebani; Paolo; Marino

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the permanent high interventricular septal pacing in a long term follow up, as alternative to right ventricular apical pacing. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated:(1) 244 patients(74 ± 8 years; 169 men, 75 women) implanted with a single(132 pts) or dual chamber(112 pts) pacemaker(PM) with ventricular screw-in lead placed at the right ventricular high septal parahisian site(SEPTAL pacing);(2) 22 patients with permanent pacemaker and low percentage of pacing(< 20%)(NO pacing);(3) 33 patients with high percentage(> 80%) right ventricular apical pacing(RVA). All patients had a narrow spontaneous QRS(101 ± 14 ms). We evaluated New York Heart Association(NYHA) class, quality of life(Qo L), 6 min walking test(6MWT) and left ventricular function(end-diastolic volume, LV-EDV; end-systolic volume, LVESV; ejection fraction, LV-EF) with 2D-echocardiography. RESULTS: Pacing parameters were stable duringfollow up(21 mo/patient). In SEPTAL pacing group we observed an improvement in NYHA class, Qo L score and 6MWT. While LV-EDV didn’t significantly increase(104 ± 40 m L vs 100 ± 37 m L; P = 0.35), LV-ESV slightly increased(55 ± 31 m L vs 49 ± 27 m L; P = 0.05) and LV-EF slightly decreased(49% ± 11% vs 53% ± 11%; P = 0.001) but never falling < 45%. In the RVA pacing control group we observed a worsening of NYHA class and an important reduction of LV-EF(from 56% ± 6% to 43% ± 9%, P < 0.0001).CONCLUSION: Right ventricular permanent high septal pacing is safe and effective in a long term follow up evaluation; it could be a good alternative to the conventional RVA pacing in order to avoid its deleterious effects.

  12. Pyridoxine-dependent convulsions among children with refractory seizures: A 3-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epilepsy accounts for 1% of the global disease burden and about 8–10 million epilepsy patients live in India. About 30–40% of these patients become drug-resistant and land up with palliative or disease-modifying surgeries. This is a situation causing great concern in view of the psychosocial and economic burden on the patient and the family apart from severe cognitive and motor consequences, especially in children. Therefore, it is mandatory to have an insight into the wide spectrum of causes with reference to refractoriness to antiepileptic medications in children with epilepsy. Patients and Methods: Children admitted under our team with refractory epilepsy as per the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE criteria in the last 3 years were included in the study. Results: Refractory epilepsy constituted 13.3% of inpatients in the pediatric group. Males dominated with 68.9% of these patients. Nearly 34.4% of these patients were found to suffer from various neurometabolic diseases. Almost 3.5% were due to pyridoxine-dependent convulsions. This group of patients showed an excellent response to dietary manipulation, disease-modifying treatment for the metabolic disorder, and supportive small-dose anticonvulsants. During follow-up, they showed very good response with reference to global development and seizure control. Conclusion: Pyridoxine-dependent convulsions are relatively rare forming about 3.5% of refractory epilepsies in this series. With initiation of appropriate therapy, results with reference to seizure control as well as neurodevelopment became evident within 2 weeks, and at 1-year follow-up, complete independence for majority of the needed activities is achieved with minimum cost, almost zero side effects, and absolute elimination of the need for palliative surgery.

  13. 26. Effectiveness of telephone follow up in managing patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Taiyem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable diseases globally, labeled as the greatest healthcare challenge according to the World Health Organization and the International Diabetes Federation. This complex disease requires the involvement of multidisciplinary teams to reduce the risk and impact of long-term diabetes complications through intensive monitoring, education and lifestyle modifications with a great emphasis on promoting self-care. A brief and cost-effective interventions to improve diabetes self care management are needed. This study evaluated the effect of “educational” telephone intervention delivered by nurse specialist on glycemic control “Glyclated hemoglobin A1c”, and diabetes self-care management for patients with type 2 diabetes followed-up by a nurse-led cardiovascular disease management program of a tertiary hospital within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This quantitative descriptive and qauzi-experimental study was conducted over three months, included 60 adult patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. Participants within the intervention group received usual care and six educational phone calls promoting them to improve their diabetic self-care activities. Patients within the control arm continued to receive their usual care only. The telephone follow-up intervention increased frequency of exercise and foot care, improved diet and adherence to anti-diabetes medication. Modest improvement was detected on the glycemic control and home glucose monitoring. As a conclusion, the study indicated positive effect of the intervention on glycemic control and self-care management. Multi-centers and longitudinal studies with larger sample size are recommended for future studies.

  14. Is training in psychosocial interventions worthwhile? Report of a psychosocial intervention trainee follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charlie; Saul, Carol; Robinson, Jeannie; King, Jenny; Dudley, Mike

    2003-09-01

    A follow-up study of psychosocial intervention (PSI) trainees from the Sheffield and Maudsley training centres was undertaken in three stages. In Stage 1, 141 students, at two PSI training centres, were sent a simple postal questionnaire to elicit career trajectory following PSI training. A response rate of 82% was achieved. The sub-group, who had been trained and who still engaged in clinical practice were identified and followed-up in more detail (n=96). The effect of PSI training in a range of domains was investigated. The impact of training may not be to equip students with formal technical skills in CBT and family work. What is more likely is that trainees acquired proficiency in: working effectively using a case management model; conveying 'therapeutic optimism'; enabling users to meet their own goals and helping them to develop better coping strategies; using 'stress vulnerability' and formal outcome measures as means of structuring this approach. The secondary aim of the study was to identify and prioritise the barriers that impede the effective implementation of PSI skills in routine service settings. For the second phase of the survey the response rate was again 82%. This group's service managers were identified and surveyed for the same information and 59% responded. The aim was to gather information about implementation issues from both the clinical and service perspectives. The results of the survey indicate that PSI training has a positive impact on the development of services for people with serious mental health problems although there are serious organisational hurdles for managers, trainees and organisations to overcome if PSI skills are to be properly implemented. Key factors that impact upon faithful implementation are related to resource issues (caseload size), organisational factors (the existence of an implementation plan and training strategy), and the extent to which the trainee's team is supportive.

  15. Is social inequality related to different patient concerns in routine oral cancer follow-up clinics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sarah; Lowe, Derek; Harris, Rebecca V; Brown, Steve; Rogers, Simon N

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer has a higher incidence in the lower social strata, and these patients are less likely to engage in supportive interventions and report a poorer quality of life (QoL). The aim of this paper is to compare the Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI) responses across social groups attending routine oral cancer follow-up clinics with particular focus on the deprivation lower quartile. The PCI package is completed by patients as part of their routine review consultation with SNR. Patients were those diagnosed between 2008 and 2012. Deprivation was stratified using the IMD 2010 from postcode. Of the 106 eligible patients, 85 % used the PCI. Just over half (54 %) were living in the most deprived quartile, with two-thirds (68 %) of males in the most deprived quartile, compared with 35 % of females (p = 0.004). In regard to number and type of PCI items selected by patients at their first PCI clinic, there were no notable differences in respect of IMD classification. The two commonest concerns were fear of recurrence (43 %) and sore mouth (43 %). The most deprived quartile reported significant problems in regard to mood (p = 0.004) and recreation (p = 0.02), and a non-significant trend (36 vs 18 %, p = 0.09) in stating their overall QoL as being less than good. It is possible to identify the concerns of patients from lower socioeconomic strata as part of routine follow-up clinics. This allows for targeted multi-professional intervention and supports to improve the outcome in this hard to reach group.

  16. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    -up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... follow-up, or because of organizational aspects of the screening program, where communication regarding test results can fail either in content or with delay.This study will evaluate two interventions designed to increase follow-up: 1) A letter with the test result and potential recommendation for follow...

  17. Hypofractionation in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients: seven-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldeeb, Hany; Awad, Iman; Elhanafy, Osman

    2012-12-01

    To compare three fractionation schedules in post-mastectomy patients treated with radiotherapy as regard acute and early late effects as well as local recurrence rates. One hundred and seven breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy±adjuvant systemic treatments between November 2001 and July 2004 were enrolled in this study. Patients were categorized into three groups. Group A (41 patients) received conventional fractionation 50 Gy over 25 fractions. Group B (36 patients) received other fractionation regimen 45 Gy over 17 fractions. Group C (30 patients) received 40 Gy over 15 fractions. The median follow-up period was 23 months. There has been no statistical significant difference in local control (P=0.88), pain (P=0.98), telangectasis (P=0.23), fibrosis (P=0.13), arm oedema (P=0.96) or pigmentation (P=0.80) between the three groups. GII-III Erythema was significantly higher in the two hypofractionation arms compared to the control arm (P=0.001). Although acute skin reactions were higher in the hypofractionated arms, there was no significant difference in the local recurrence rates or late radiation effects. A national randomized multicentre study is recommended to explore this further.

  18. Maternal Preeclampsia and Androgens in the Offspring around Puberty: A Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janszky, Imre; Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Økland, Inger; Forman, Michele R.; Vatten, Lars J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children born after preeclampsia may have a dominant androgen profile in puberty compared with other children. Circulating androgen concentrations at 11–12 years of age were compared between offspring born after preeclampsia, and children whose mothers did not have preeclampsia. Methods A total of 611 mother-offspring pairs were followed up 11 (daughters) or 12 (sons) years after birth: 218 pairs in the preeclampsia group, and 383 pairs without preeclampsia. Circulating total testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were measured in the children. In boys, testicular volume was also measured. Results Among girls born after preeclampsia, DHEAS concentrations were higher than in unexposed girls (ppreeclampsia with severe features had the lowest DHEAS levels. In contrast, testosterone concentrations were highest in girls born after preeclampsia with severe features, both compared to other girls in the preeclampsia group, and compared to unexposed girls (ppreeclampsia group compared with unexposed boys (ppreeclampsia with severe features had the lowest concentrations of DHEAS. Compared with unexposed boys, testicular volume (p = 0.015) and IGF-I (p = 0.004) were higher for boys in the preeclampsia group, except for boys in the clinically severe preeclampsia group. Conclusions In utero exposure to preeclampsia is associated with androgen hormonal patterns in early puberty that depend on clinical severity of preeclampsia and sex of the offspring. The hormonal differences may reflect different timing of pubertal development, and may have consequences for future health of the offspring. PMID:27992610

  19. Survival outcome of radioiodine therapy in post thyroidectomy thyroid carcinoma patients: Outcome of long term follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, F.; Nahar, N.; Sultana, S.; Nasreen, F.; Jabin, Z.; Alam, A. S. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    The overall prognosis of patients with thyroid carcinoma is excellent whenever managed following best practice guidelines. Objective: To calculate sex and age group affected by thyroid cancer; to compare between single or multiple dose of radio ablation needed after thyroidectomy and to determine the percentage of patients become disease free during their follow up. Methods: This was a retrospective study done in NINMAS, Bangladesh on 687 patients from 1984 to 2004. In all cases total or near total thyroidectomy was done before commencing radioiodine therapy. Patients TG level, neck ultrasonography, thyroid scan, whole body I131 scans, neck examination were done every six monthly/yearly. Results: Among 687 patients, female were more sufferers (68.1%) and female to male ratio was 2:1. Age group 19-40 years was mostly affected (57.8%). Most common type seen was papillary carcinoma (81.8%). After ablation 100 patients did not follow-up. Total 237 patients discontinued within 4 years. Remaining 450 patients undergone regular follow-up for 5 years and more, 394 were disease free (87.6%). Total recurrence of metastasis was 23 and 12 patients expired at different times. Conclusions: Long-term regular follow-up is necessary after radioiodine ablation to become free of disease.

  20. Loss to follow-up in a cohort of HIV-negative men who have sex with men: Project Horizonte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Paula; Greco, Marília; Fausto, Maria Arlene; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to estimate the attrition rates and evaluate factors associated with loss to follow-up between 1994 and 2011 in an open cohort of HIV-negative men who have sex with men. METHODS The Project Horizonte is an open cohort study that aimed to assess the incidence of HIV infection, evaluate the impact of educational interventions, and identify potential volunteers for HIV vaccine trials. The rates of losses to follow-up were estimated for three periods (1994–1999, 2000–2005, and 2006–2011). The variables analyzed were collected in a psychosocial questionnaire. Volunteers who dropped out were compared with the ones who remained in the study using a Cox regression model. RESULTS A total of 1,197 volunteers were recruited. The median follow-up time in the study (n = 626) was 4.2 years. The median follow-up time for the volunteers who dropped out of the study (n = 571) was 1.46 years. The overall rate of loss to follow-up was 11.6/100 person-years. Attrition rates by period were: 12.60 (1994–1999), 11.80 (2000–2005), and 9.00 (2006–2011) per 100 person-years. Factors associated with losses to follow-up were: age group of 21–30 years old, monthly per capita income of more than six or less than one Brazilian minimum wage, having more than two dependents, report of bisexual practice, and inconsistent use of condoms for receptive anal sex. CONCLUSIONS A slight decrease of the loss to follow-up was observed over time. Higher attrition rates happened in the first three years of follow-up. It is possible that the link of the volunteers were not yet well established. Those who reported inconsistent condom use in receptive anal sex were more likely to leave the study, suggesting an underestimation of the incidence of HIV infection in a cohort population. For greater effectiveness, retention strategies must be reassessed considering the connection between the characteristics of homosexual and bisexual behavior and the

  1. Cognitive evolution in hypertensive patients: a six-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicario A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Augusto Vicario1,2,3, Mildren A del Sueldo2,3, Judith M Zilberman2,3, Gustavo H Cerezo2,31Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Hospital Español de Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Argentine Federation of Cardiology, (AFC, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 3Research Group, Human Health Commission, CERTUS Foundation, Buenos Aires, Argentina Background: Several studies have examined the links between hypertension, vascular damage, and cognitive impairment. The functions most commonly involved seem to be those associated with memory and executive function.Aims: 1 to report the cognitive evolution in a cohort of hypertensive patients, 2 to identify the affected domains, and 3 to correlate the results obtained with blood pressure measurements.Materials and Methods: Observational 6-year follow-up cohort study including both males and females aged ≥65 and ≤80 years, and hypertensive patients under treatment. Patients with a history of any of the following conditions were excluded: stroke, transient ischemic attack, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, cardiac surgery, dementia, or depression. Four neurocognitive evaluations were performed (at baseline and every 2 years. The tests used evaluated memory and executive function domain. Blood pressure was measured on every cognitive evaluation.Results: Sixty patients were followed for 76.4 ± 2.8 months. The average age at baseline was 72.5 ± 4.2 and 77.9 ± 4.6 at 6 years (65% were women. Two patients were lost to follow up (3.3% and 8 patients died (13.3%.The density incidence for dementia was 0.6% patients per year (pt/y (n = 3 and for depression was 1.6% pt/y (n = 12. No changes were observed in either memory impairment or the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE results (p = ns during follow-up. A progressive impairment of the executive function was shown regardless of the blood pressure measurements.Conclusion: 1 the incidence of dementia doubled to general population, 2 the initial memory

  2. Results from the LCOGT Near-Earth Object Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric; Larson, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter and two 2-meter telescopes to five locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with plans to extend to twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. The versitility and design of this network allows for rapid response to target of opportunity events as well as the long-term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The network's global coverage and the apertures of telescopes available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). This is complimented by the two 2-meter telescopes at Haleakala (Hawaii) and Siding Spring Observatory. The telescope network has been fully operational since May 2014, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet are planned for 2016.The LCOGT near-Earth object group is using the network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), PanSTARRS (PS1) and NEOWISE, with several hundred targets being followed per year. Follow-up astrometry and photometry of radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists are improving orbits, producing light curves and rotation periods, and better characterizing these NEOs. Recent results include the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. In addition, we are in the process of building a NEO portal that will allow

  3. Home-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Care Through Videoconferencing for Depression: A Randomized Controlled Follow-Up Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Wulf

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a tremendous opportunity for innovative mental health care solutions such as psychiatric care through videoconferencing to increase the number of people who have access to quality care. However, studies are needed to generate empirical evidence on the use of psychiatric outpatient care via videoconferencing, particularly in low- and middle-income countries and clinically unsupervised settings. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of home-based treatment for mild depression through psychiatric consultations via videoconferencing. Methods A randomized controlled trial with a 6- and 12-month follow-up including adults with mild depression treated in an ambulatory setting was conducted. In total, 107 participants were randomly allocated to the videoconferencing intervention group (n=53) or the face-to-face group (F2F; n=54). The groups did not differ with respect to demographic characteristics at baseline. The F2F group completed monthly follow-up consultations in person. The videoconferencing group received monthly follow-up consultations with a psychiatrist through videoconferencing at home. At baseline and after 6 and 12 months, in-person assessments were conducted with all participants. Clinical outcomes (severity of depression, mental health status, medication course, and relapses), satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic relationship, treatment adherence (appointment compliance and dropouts), and medication adherence were assessed. Results The severity of depression decreased significantly over the 12-month follow-up in both the groups. There was a significant difference between groups regarding treatment outcomes throughout the follow-up period, with better results in the videoconferencing group. There were 4 relapses in the F2F group and only 1 in the videoconferencing group. No significant differences between groups regarding mental health status, satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic

  4. [Impact of follow-up loss over visual deficiency in open-globe ocular trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Gómez, Virgilio; García-Rubio, Yatzul Zuhaila; Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros Razo

    2013-01-01

    Open-globe ocular trauma causes visual deficiency; calculating the magnitude of the latter often misses the estimation in patients without follow-up. to identify the modification of the postoperative proportion of visual deficiency in open-globe ocular trauma, which would introduce considering the proportion estimated in patients without follow-up. Non-interventional, retrospective, longitudinal, analytical study. Visual outcome in eyes with open-globe trauma, with and without follow-up, was calculated using the Ocular Trauma Score. The observed postoperative proportion of visual deficiency was identified in eyes with follow-up; in eyes without follow-up, the postoperative proportion of visual deficiency was estimated using an analysis of scenarios: best (Ocular Trauma Score), mean (that of eyes with follow-up) and worst (last observation/no visual improvement). The estimated proportion of visual deficiency was added to that observed in eyes with follow-up, and the resulting proportion was compared with that expected in the sample, using the Ocular Trauma Score (χ(2)). 104 eyes, 70 without follow-up and 34 without it. In eyes with follow-up the expected proportion of visual deficiency was 58.6%, and the observed one was 71.4% (p = 0.1); the estimated proportion of visual deficiency in eyes without follow-up was 76.5%. The resulting postoperative proportion of visual deficiency in the sample would be 73.1%, which would overcome that expected by the Ocular Trauma Score (59.6%, p = 0.04). In open-globe ocular trauma, the efficacy of surgery to reduce the proportion of visual deficiency would decrease with regard to the standard expected by the Ocular Trauma Score, if the deficiency estimated in eyes without follow-up were considered.

  5. The process and outcomes of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, K; Dixon, L; Wakeman, C J; Robertson, G M; Eglinton, T W; Frizelle, F A

    2012-05-01

    Evidence suggests that follow-up after colorectal cancer improves survival. Colorectal cancer is so common that patient follow-up can overwhelm a service, affecting the ability to see new referrals and reassess patients seen previously who have new symptoms. In order to cope with this demand a nurse-led follow-up service was started in 2004. We aimed to review the results of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic. Between 1 December 2004 and 31 January 2011, patients who underwent resection for colorectal cancer were followed up by a nurse specialist according to a protocol determined by the colorectal surgeons in the unit. All patient details were recorded prospectively in a purpose designed database. Nine hundred and fifty patients were followed up over 7 years. Some 368 patients were discharged from the follow-up programme, 474 patients remain actively involved in the programme and 108 patients died. Of the patients discharged from the follow-up scheme 269 (73%) were discharged to their general practitioner free of disease after 5 years. Of the 108 who patients died, 98 were as a result of colorectal cancer. Twenty patients (2.1%) were identified with local (peri-anastomotic) disease recurrence and 93 patients (9.8%) were found to have developed distant metastatic disease. Of these, 65 patients (6.8%) were referred for palliative care and 28 (2.9%) had surgery for focal metastatic disease of whom 18 were still alive at the time of this analysis. This paper shows that a nurse-led clinic for colorectal cancer follow-up can achieve satisfactory results with detection rates of recurrent or metastatic disease comparable to consultant follow-up. A nurse-led clinic provides the benefits of follow-up without overwhelming the consultant colorectal surgical clinic practice. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Patient satisfaction with nurse-led telephone follow-up after curative treatment for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirksen Carmen D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current frequent follow-up after treatment for breast cancer does not meet its intended aims, but does depend on expensive and scarce specialized knowledge for routine history taking and physical examinations. The study described in this paper compared patient satisfaction with a reduced follow-up strategy, i.e. nurse-led telephone follow-up, to satisfaction with traditional hospital follow-up. Methods Patient satisfaction was assessed among patients (n = 299 who were participants of a randomized controlled trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of several follow-up strategies in the first year after treatment for breast cancer. Data on patient satisfaction were collected at baseline, three, six and 12 months after treatment, using the Dutch version of Ware's Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire III (PSQ III. In addition to general satisfaction, the PSQ III reports on satisfaction scores for technical competence, interpersonal aspects, and access of care. Regression analysis was used to predict satisfaction scores from whether or not nurse-led telephone follow-up was received. Results Nurse-led telephone follow-up had no statistically significant influence on general patient satisfaction (p = 0.379, satisfaction with technical competence (p = 0.249, and satisfaction with interpersonal aspects (p = 0.662. Regarding access of care, patient satisfaction scores were significantly higher for patients receiving telephone follow-up (p = 0.015. However, a mean difference at 12 months of 3.1 points was judged to be not clinically relevant. Conclusions No meaningful differences were found in satisfaction scores between nurse-led telephone and hospital follow-up in the first year after breast cancer treatment. With high satisfaction scores and the potential to substantially reduce clinic visits, nurse-led telephone follow-up may be an acceptable alternative to traditional hospital follow-up. Trial registration number ISRCTN 74071417.

  7. Profile and pattern of follow-ups of psychiatry outpatients at Christian Medical College, Ludhiana

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    Mamta Singla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: As psychiatric illness requires long-term treatment, some patients are lost to follow-up. Aims: The present study aimed to find the follow-up pattern of psychiatric patients attending psychiatry outpatient department (OPD and to determine the correlation of follow-up with socio-demographic profile and diagnosis, if any. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective data analysis study carried out at the OPD of Psychiatry, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. Subjects and Methods: New cases attending the OPD from April 2010 to March 2011 were included in this study. The data were scrutinized 1 year after the initial assessment. Socio-demographic data, diagnosis and follow-up information were obtained from the files. The collected data were statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and P value. Results: 53.1% of the patients dropped out after first visit, 29.4% patients had 1-3 follow-up, 14.9% had 4-10 follow-ups and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow-ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables such as age, gender, place of living or distance from hospital, occupation, religion and marital status was not statistically significant. It was, however, seen that cognitive disorders, conversion disorder, mental retardation, and patients in which diagnosis was deferred, had more dropout rate after first visit. Conclusions: In our study 53.1% of the patients did not attend follow-up at all and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables was not statistically significant. Patients in which diagnosis was deferred had more drop out rate than patients who had a diagnosis and the difference was statistically significant.

  8. Evaluation of Single-Bundle versus Double-Bundle PCL Reconstructions with More Than 10-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Deie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL injuries are not rare in acute knee injuries, and several recent anatomical studies of the PCL and reconstructive surgical techniques have generated improved patient results. Now, we have evaluated PCL reconstructions performed by either the single-bundle or double-bundle technique in a patient group followed up retrospectively for more than 10 years. Methods. PCL reconstructions were conducted using the single-bundle (27 cases or double-bundle (13 cases method from 1999 to 2002. The mean age at surgery was 34 years in the single-bundle group and 32 years in the double-bundle group. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 years. Patients were evaluated by Lysholm scoring, the gravity sag view, and knee arthrometry. Results. The Lysholm score after surgery was 89.1±5.6 points for the single-bundle group and 91.9±4.5 points for the double-bundle group. There was no significant difference between the methods in the side-to-side differences by gravity sag view or knee arthrometer evaluation, although several cases in both groups showed a side-to-side difference exceeding 5 mm by the latter evaluation method. Conclusions. We found no significant difference between single- and double-bundle PCL reconstructions during more than 10 years of follow-up.

  9. Two-year follow-up of a randomised trial with repeated antenatal betamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, O M; Kari, M A; Lano, A; Yliherva, A; Puosi, R; Lehtonen, L; Tammela, O; Hallman, M

    2009-11-01

    Weekly repeated antenatal corticosteroid treatment improves respiratory outcome but decreases fetal growth and may impair neurodevelopmental outcome. We have previously reported that a single repeat betamethasone (BM) dose neither decreased fetal growth nor improved the outcome of preterm infants during the first hospitalisation. To study prospectively whether a single repeat dose of BM influences neurodevelopment and growth within 2 years. Women with imminent delivery before 34.0 gestational weeks were eligible if they remained undelivered for >7 days after a single course of antenatal BM. After stratification, a single repeat dose of BM (12 mg) or placebo was given. The children underwent neurological and psychometric examinations and a speech evaluation at a corrected age of 2 years. Prospective, blinded evaluation following the randomised multicentre trial. 259 (82%) surviving infants completed the 2-year follow-up, 120 in the BM group and 139 in the placebo group. The rate of survival without severe neurodevelopmental impairment was similar in both groups (BM 98%, placebo 99%). The risk of cerebral palsy (BM 2%, placebo 1%), growth or re-hospitalisation rates (BM 60%, placebo 50%) did not differ between the groups. A single repeat dose of antenatal BM tended not to influence physical growth or neurodevelopment at 2 years of age.

  10. Mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol pulpotomy of primary teeth: a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, G; Ranjpour, M

    2010-05-01

    To compare the clinical and radiographic response of primary teeth to vital pulpotomy using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or formocresol (FC). A group of 17 children aged 4-9 were selected from those referred to the Paedodontic Department at Shahid Beheshti University, Dental School. Cases with at least two matching teeth were selected (40 teeth), showing signs of pulp involvement. A pulpotomy procedure was carried out in all cases with FC in control teeth whilst MTA was placed in experimental teeth. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1-, 6-, 12- and 24-month recall. Statistical analysis using a Fischer exact test was performed on the data to determine significant differences between the groups. Overall, 22 second and 18 first primary molars were included. The gender ratio was one male to three female. No significant difference was found between the clinical and radiographic outcomes of the two groups at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up (P > 0.05). Internal resorption was seen significantly more often in FC cases after 12 months than MTA cases. Overall radiographic appearance of normal structures at 24th month was seen in more than 95% of the cases in MTA and 90% in the FC-treated group (P > 0.05). Mineral trioxide aggregate for pulp treatment of primary teeth can be considered a replacement for FC.

  11. A randomized controlled study of early headgear treatment on occlusal stability--a 13 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusinskiene, Viktorija; Kiuttu, Päivi; Julku, Johanna; Silvola, Anna-Sofia; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Pirttiniemi, Pertti

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the long-term occlusal stability in a group treated early with headgear (HG) compared with a control group. The total study group comprised 68 children (40 males and 28 females) aged 7.6 years (standard deviation 0.3), randomly divided into two groups of equal size. In the first group, HG treatment was initiated immediately, while in the control group only minor interceptive procedures were performed during the follow-up period. Fixed appliance treatment, if needed, including extraction of permanent teeth due to crowding, was undertaken after the completion of early treatment. The records were available from the start of the early treatment and at follow-up after 2, 4, 8, and 13 years. The US-weighted Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) Index, graded according to the severity of malocclusion, was used to evaluate occlusal stability. Little's Irregularity Index (LII)and intercanine distance in the lower arch were measured at all time periods. The Aesthetic Component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) scores was used for evaluation of dental aesthetics at the last follow-up. Parametric tests were applied for statistical analyses, except for the evaluation of aesthetics, where a non-parametric test was used. No significant differences were found when long-term stability between the HG and control groups was evaluated at the 13 year follow-up. Lower PAR scores were observed in patients treated without extraction of teeth. A greater irregularity in lower incisor alignment before treatment was found in subjects later treated with extractions. The findings of this study seem to suggest that treatment timing has only a minor influence on stability.

  12. Costs of remote monitoring vs. ambulatory follow-ups of implanted cardioverter defibrillators in the randomized ECOST study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédon-Moreau, Laurence; Lacroix, Dominique; Sadoul, Nicolas; Clémenty, Jacques; Kouakam, Claude; Hermida, Jean-Sylvain; Aliot, Etienne; Kacet, Salem

    2014-01-01

    Aims The Effectiveness and Cost of ICD follow-up Schedule with Telecardiology (ECOST) trial evaluated prospectively the economic impact of long-term remote monitoring (RM) of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Methods and results The analysis included 310 patients randomly assigned to RM (active group) vs. ambulatory follow-ups (control group). Patients in the active group were seen once a year unless the system reported an event mandating an ambulatory visit, while patients in the control group were seen in the ambulatory department every 6 months. The costs of each follow-up strategy were compared, using the actual billing documents issued by the French health insurance system, including costs of (i) (a) ICD-related ambulatory visits and transportation, (b) other ambulatory visits, (c) cardiovascular treatments and procedures, and (ii) hospitalizations for the management of cardiovascular events. The ICD and RM system costs were calculated on the basis of the device remaining longevity at the end of the study. The characteristics of the study groups were similar. Over a follow-up of 27 months, the mean non-hospital costs per patient-year were €1695 ± 1131 in the active, vs. €1952 ± 1023 in the control group (P = 0.04), a €257 difference mainly due to device management. The hospitalization costs per patient-year were €2829 ± 6382 and €3549 ± 9714 in the active and control groups, respectively (P = 0.46). Adding the ICD to the non-hospital costs, the savings were €494 (P = 0.005) or, when the monitoring system was included, €315 (P = 0.05) per patient-year. Conclusion From the French health insurance perspective, the remote management of ICD patients is cost saving. Clinical trials registration NCT00989417, www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:24614572

  13. Cervical disc herniation. Follow-up studies on morphological changes seen by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Kensei; Ohashi, Teruaki; Ishibashi, Kazumasa; Abe, Jun; Morita, Masakazu; Hirohashi, Akiyuki; Satou, Kimiaki; Ishida, Hyota; Inoue, Akio [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-03-01

    In recent years, many authors have reported that an extruded lumbar intervertebral disc was absorbed through phagocytosis and dehydration. However, absorption of an extruded cervical intervertebral disc has rarely been reported. We have investigated the follow-up MRI of all 24 patients with cervical disc herniation seen between 1991 and 1995. Of these, 8 patients with radiculopathy and 7 with myelopathy had been treated nonoperatively, and a further 9 patients with severe myelopathy had undergone expansive laminoplasty. In follow-up MRI, a reduction in the size of the extruded disc was seen in 5 of the 15 nonoperative patients and in 8 of the 9 operative patients. The 9 operative patients showed a mean recovery rate of 68.4{+-}15.2% (range from 44 to 90%) according to their JOA score. In the nonoperative group, recovery of symptoms was seen in all 5 patients with reduction, and in only 4 of 10 patients with nonreduction. The initial MRI of the 5 patients with reduction was taken between 2 and 7 weeks (mean 4 weeks) after onset, and between 1 month and 14 years (mean 13 months, not including the one at 14 years) after onset in the 10 patients with nonreduction. The initial MRI of the 9 operative patients was taken between 1 month and 6 years (mean 14 months after onset). The pathomechanism for disc reduction was concluded to have been the same as for lumbar disc herniation in the nonoperative patients. However, the pathomechanism in the operative patients was inconclusive and was likely to be different from that in the nonoperative patients. (author).

  14. Floating shoulders: Clinical and radiographic analysis at a mean follow-up of 11 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ReÌ gis Pailhes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The floating shoulder (FS is an uncommon injury, which can be managed conservatively or surgically. The therapeutic option remains controversial. Aims: The goal of our study was to evaluate the long-term results and to identify predictive factors of functional outcomes. Settings and Design: Retrospective monocentric study. Materials and Methods: Forty consecutive FS were included (24 nonoperated and 16 operated from 1984 to 2009. Clinical results were assessed with Simple Shoulder Test (SST, Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE, Short Form-12 (SF12, Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand score (DASH, and Constant score (CST. Plain radiographs were reviewed to evaluate secondary displacement, fracture healing, and modification of the lateral offset of the gleno-humeral joint (chest X-rays. New radiographs were made to evaluate osteoarthritis during follow-up. Statistical Analysis Used: T-test, Mann-Whitney test, and the Pearson′s correlation coefficient were used. The significance level was set at 0.05. Results: At mean follow-up of 135 months (range 12-312, clinical results were satisfactory regarding different mean scores: SST 10.5 points, OSS 14 points, SANE 81%, SF12 (50 points and 60 points, DASH 14.5 points and CST 84 points. There were no significant differences between operative and non-operative groups. However, the loss of lateral offset influenced the results negatively. Osteoarthritis was diagnosed in five patients (12.5% without correlation to fracture patterns and type of treatment. Conclusions: This study advocates that floating shoulder may be treated conservatively and surgically with satisfactory clinical long-term outcomes. However, the loss of gleno-humeral lateral offset should be evaluated carefully before taking a therapeutic option.

  15. Internet-based treatment of pathological gambling with a three-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlbring, Per; Degerman, Nicklas; Jonsson, Jakob; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Effective therapies for pathological gambling exist, but their use is limited to about 10% of the target population. In an attempt to lower the barriers for help, Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) has been shown to be effective when delivered to a non-depressed sample with pathological gambling. This study sought to extend this finding to a larger, more representative population, and also test a model to predict responder status. Following advertisement, a total of 284 participants started an 8-week ICBT programme with minimal therapist contact via e-mail and weekly telephone calls of less than 15 min. The average time spent on each participant, including telephone conversations, e-mail, and administration, was 4 h. In addition to a mixed effects model to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment, two logistic regression analyses were performed with the following eight pre-defined response predictor variables: work-life satisfaction, primary gambling activity, debts due to gambling, social support, personal yearly salary, alcohol consumption, stage of change, and dissociative gambling. ICBT resulted in statistically significant reductions in the scores of pathological gambling, anxiety, and depression as well as an increase in quality of life compared to pre-treatment levels. Follow-ups carried out in the treatment group at 6, 18, and 36 months indicated that treatment effects were sustained. Using the eight predictor variable model rendered an acceptable predictive ability to identify responders both at post-test (AUC = .72, p < .01) and at 36-month follow-up (AUC = .70, p < .01). We conclude that ICBT for pathological gamblers, even if depressed, can be effective and that outcome can partly be predicted by pre-treatment characteristics.

  16. Postpartum Varicose Veins: Supplementation with Pycnogenol or Elastic Compression-A 12-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, Gianni; Dugall, Mark; Luzzi, Roberta; Ippolito, Edmondo; Cesarone, M Rosaria

    2017-03-01

    This open registry aimed to evaluate the clinical evolution of postpartum varicose veins (VVs), in healthy women after the second pregnancy, how these veins regain shape and competence, and possible treatments. The registry included two groups of women: (1) those who used elastic compression stockings, and (2) who used an oral venotonic agent (Pycnogenol, 100 mg/d). A total of 12 evaluation targets were established. Minor symptoms were scored in an analogue scale line. A visual analogue scale line evaluated the overall satisfaction relative to elastic compression or Pycnogenol. Overall 133 women completed the registry evaluation with at least 3 months of follow-up. The resulting two registry groups were comparable. At 3 and 6 months in the Pycnogenol group the number of veins and incompetent sites were lower. At 6 months there were 13.3% of patients with edema in controls versus 3.2% in the Pycnogenol group. Spider veins decreased in Pycnogenol patients. Cramps and other minor symptoms were less common in the Pycnogenol group. In both groups there was a significant improvement at 6 months with better results in the Pycnogenol group. The need for treatment was limited with a decreased need for sclerotherapy, surgery, and conservative treatments in the Pycnogenol group. The overall satisfaction was higher among Pycnogenol patients, and compliance was optimal. Re-evaluation at 12 months indicated that the variations in VVs and spider vein clusters and the associated symptoms did not change. Most remodeling appeared to happen within 6 months after the pregnancy. It was concluded that the use of Pycnogenol improves signs/symptoms of postpartum VVs, and venous function and shape seem to return faster to prepartum, physiological pattern with its use.

  17. CARDIAC RUPTURE IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: INCIDENCE AND PREDISPOSING FACTORS (15 YEAR FOLLOW-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Shulman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the incidence of cardiac rupture (CR in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI as well as predisposing factors during 15-year follow-up.Material and methods. 1453 patients with acute MI who were admitted to Krasnoyarsk cardiological center during 1989, 1993 and 2003 years were studied. All patients were divided into three groups: group I - 447 patients, who were on treatment in 1989, group II - 475 patients of 1993, and group III – 531 patients of 2003. There were no differences in groups on patient sex, location and depth of MI, previous MI, arrhythmias, heart failure and diabetes mellitus.Results. CR was found in 18 of 447 patients (4% of group I (1989, in 16 of 475 patients (3,4% of group II (1993 and in 10 of 531 patients (1,9% of group 3 (2003, (p1,3 <0,05. Incidence of CR significantly decreased from 1989 to 2003 in female patients (7,2%; 5,7% and 1,6% in 1989, 1993 and 2003, respectively; p1,3 < 0,01, p2,3 < 0,05. Incidence of CR in male patients didn’t changed (2,5%, 1,8% and 2,1%, respectively. The average blood pressure (BP during the first day of MI in female patients was higher than this in male ones in 1989 and 1993. There were no significant differences in BP between women and men in 2003. Heart rate (HR during the first day of MI in female patients was higher than this in male patients in 1989. However in 1993 and 2003 there were no differences in HR between women and men. MI therapy more often included betablockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, intravenous nitrates, statins, thrombolythics and anticoagulants in 2003 than in 1989 and 1993.Conclusion. Effective BP and HR control is the most effective way to prevent CR in patients with MI.

  18. CARDIAC RUPTURE IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: INCIDENCE AND PREDISPOSING FACTORS (15 YEAR FOLLOW-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Shulman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the incidence of cardiac rupture (CR in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI as well as predisposing factors during 15-year follow-up.Material and methods. 1453 patients with acute MI who were admitted to Krasnoyarsk cardiological center during 1989, 1993 and 2003 years were studied. All patients were divided into three groups: group I - 447 patients, who were on treatment in 1989, group II - 475 patients of 1993, and group III – 531 patients of 2003. There were no differences in groups on patient sex, location and depth of MI, previous MI, arrhythmias, heart failure and diabetes mellitus.Results. CR was found in 18 of 447 patients (4% of group I (1989, in 16 of 475 patients (3,4% of group II (1993 and in 10 of 531 patients (1,9% of group 3 (2003, (p1,3 <0,05. Incidence of CR significantly decreased from 1989 to 2003 in female patients (7,2%; 5,7% and 1,6% in 1989, 1993 and 2003, respectively; p1,3 < 0,01, p2,3 < 0,05. Incidence of CR in male patients didn’t changed (2,5%, 1,8% and 2,1%, respectively. The average blood pressure (BP during the first day of MI in female patients was higher than this in male ones in 1989 and 1993. There were no significant differences in BP between women and men in 2003. Heart rate (HR during the first day of MI in female patients was higher than this in male patients in 1989. However in 1993 and 2003 there were no differences in HR between women and men. MI therapy more often included betablockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, intravenous nitrates, statins, thrombolythics and anticoagulants in 2003 than in 1989 and 1993.Conclusion. Effective BP and HR control is the most effective way to prevent CR in patients with MI.

  19. Cardiac abnormalities in a follow-up study on carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westrum, S. M. Schade; Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Dekker, L.; Standaar, T. S.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; van Essen, A. J.; Leschot, N. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; de Haan, R. J.; de Visser, M.; van der Kooi, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Cardiac involvement has been reported in carriers of dystrophin mutations giving rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The progress of these abnormalities during long-term follow-up is unknown. We describe the long-term follow-up of dilated cardio

  20. Long-term follow-up after urethral injection with polyacrylamide hydrogel for female stress incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Lone; Lose, Gunnar; Møller-Bek, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Urethral injection therapy for treatment of stress urinary incontinence has been in use for years, but only a few long-term follow-up studies have been published. Twenty-five women, injected with polyacrylamide hydrogel 8 years earlier, were invited for follow-up. Twenty-four could be contacted; ...

  1. How Do Mode and Timing of Follow-up Surveys Affect Evaluation Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koundinya, Vikram; Klink, Jenna; Deming, Philip; Meyers, Andrew; Erb, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the analysis of evaluation methods used in a well-designed and comprehensive evaluation effort of a significant Extension program. The evaluation data collection methods were analyzed by questionnaire mode and timing of follow-up surveys. Response rates from the short- and long-term follow-ups and different questionnaire…

  2. Follow Up Study of Non College Bound Somerset County High School Graduates June 1990, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Charles R.

    A follow-up study sought to determine what happened to the 1990 noncollege-bound graduates of all the high schools in Somerset County, New Jersey. Data were gathered through a mailed survey and telephone follow-up (approximately 45 percent response) of the 408 graduates of the 12 of 13 high schools providing names. Some of the findings from…

  3. Two-Year Follow-Up of Bibliotherapy and Individual Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; Rohen, Noelle; Shackelford, Jodie A. M.; Hubbard, Karen L.; Parnell, Marsha B.; Scogin, Forrest; Coates, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving either cognitive bibliotherapy or individual cognitive psychotherapy for depression in older adults. A 2-year follow-up of 23 participants from Floyd, Scogin, McKendree-Smith, Floyd, and Rokke (2004) was conducted by comparing pre- and posttreatment scores with follow-up scores…

  4. PERMANENT CARDIAC PACING IN CHILDREN - MORBIDITY AND EFFICACY OF FOLLOW-UP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KERSTJENSFREDERIKSE, MWS; BINKBOELKENS, MTE; DEJONGSTE, MJL; VANDERHEIDE, JNH

    1991-01-01

    The data from 50 permanently paced children [mean standard deviation follow-up 5.3 +/- 3.7 years] were reviewed, with special attention being paid to the cause of complications and the efficacy of follow-up. The 5-year survival (SD) of the patients was 78 +/- 6%; mortality was mainly due to the unde

  5. Follow-up after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: volumetric and axial control rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A prospective long-term follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. Both axial and volumetric measurements are used to determine tumor size during follow-up. STUDY DESIGN: Individual prospect

  6. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  7. Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-up: Improving Options for Women With Endometrial Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Kent, E.; McCullough, Z.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurse-led follow-up (NLFU) has been identified as a suitable means of follow-up care in cancer patients, and its acceptability has already been demonstrated in other areas of cancer care. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of NLFU on quality of life and

  8. Routine follow-up after laryngeal cancer treatment : the assessment of pre-symptomatic recurrence detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritoe, Savitri Christine

    2007-01-01

    The principal goal of the follow-up program as formulated for patients with laryngeal carcinoma is the pre-symptomatic detection of local and regional recurrences. Different studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiviness of this follow-up protocol. The first study comprised 402 patients with s

  9. Effective follow-up consultations : the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Paul L. P.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's agen

  10. Long-term follow-up results of primary and recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspoor, F.G.; Zee, A.A.; Hannink, G.; Geest, I.C. van der; Veth, R.P.H.; Schreuder, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adequate documentation of the outcome of treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is sparse. Available case series show relatively short follow-up times and often combine locations or subtypes to increase patient numbers. This article describes the long-term follow-up of a sin

  11. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Requiring Neurological Intensive Care Unit Follow-up: Review with Nine Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlı Gamze Bülbül

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but life-threatening clinical manifestation induced by neuroleptic medication. Although NMS is regarded as a psychiatric diagnosis, its treatment requires a systematic approach and thus intensive care follow-up. In this paper, we report nine cases with NMS followed up in our Neurology Intensive Care Unit over the last three years.

  12. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  13. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  14. Individual Risk Profiling For Breast Cancer Recurrence: Towards Tailored Follow-Up Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraeima, J.; Vliegen, I.; Siesling, S.; Klaase, J.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Current international guidelines for breast cancer follow-up are not specific to individual risk of local regional recurrences. Instead, for personalised follow-up it is required to have more precise estimates of local regional recurrence probability as a function of time. The objective o

  15. Clinical and radiological long-term follow-up after embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2005-01-01

    . Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO(2) and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment...

  16. Patient preference regarding assessment of clinical follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: the PAPAYA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Birgelen, von C.; Lam, M.K.; Lowik, M.; Houwelingen, van G.; Stoel, M.; Louwerenburg, H.; Man, de F.H.; Hartmann, M.; Doggen, C.J.; Til, van J.A.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To keep patients in long-term clinical follow-up programmes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), knowledge of the patient-preferred mode for follow-up assessment is crucial. We systematically assessed patient preference, and explored potential relationships with age and gender.Metho

  17. Patient preference regarding assessment of clinical follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: the PAPAYA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Marlies M.; Birgelen, von Clemens; Lam, Ming Kai; Löwik, Marije M.; Houwelingen, van K. Gert; Stoel, Martin G.; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.; Man, de Frits H.A.F.; Hartmann, Marc; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Til, van Janine A.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To keep patients in long-term clinical follow-up programmes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), knowledge of the patient-preferred mode for follow-up assessment is crucial. We systematically assessed patient preference, and explored potential relationships with age and gender.Metho

  18. Effect on Mail Survey Return Rates of Including Questionnaires With Follow-Up Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrell, Charles M.; Lamb, Charles W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Two thousand questionnaires were mailed to respondents allocated among seven treatments. Controls received an initial mailing (questionnaire and cover letter) only. The remaining six treatments varied by number of follow-up mailings and whether another questionnaire copy was included. Results suggest more than one follow-up letter with a…

  19. Follow-up after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: volumetric and axial control rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A prospective long-term follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. Both axial and volumetric measurements are used to determine tumor size during follow-up. STUDY DESIGN: Individual

  20. Long-term follow-up of surgical treatment for thumb duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, M; Nicolai, JPA

    2005-01-01

    There are few long-term follow-up reports concerning the treatment of thumb duplication. We reviewed the treatment of 19 of 74 patients treated at our institution between 1956 and 2002. The average follow-up was 22 (range, 7 years to 35 years) years. Satisfactory function was achieved in 18 thumbs a

  1. Individual Risk Profiling For Breast Cancer Recurrence: Towards Tailored Follow-Up Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraeima, J.; Vliegen, I.; Siesling, Sabine; Klaase, J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Current international guidelines for breast cancer follow-up are not specific to individual risk of local regional recurrences. Instead, for personalised follow-up it is required to have more precise estimates of local regional recurrence probability as a function of time. The objective

  2. Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-up: Improving Options for Women With Endometrial Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Kent, E.; McCullough, Z.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurse-led follow-up (NLFU) has been identified as a suitable means of follow-up care in cancer patients, and its acceptability has already been demonstrated in other areas of cancer care. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of NLFU on quality of life and

  3. Two-Year Follow-Up of Bibliotherapy and Individual Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; Rohen, Noelle; Shackelford, Jodie A. M.; Hubbard, Karen L.; Parnell, Marsha B.; Scogin, Forrest; Coates, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving either cognitive bibliotherapy or individual cognitive psychotherapy for depression in older adults. A 2-year follow-up of 23 participants from Floyd, Scogin, McKendree-Smith, Floyd, and Rokke (2004) was conducted by comparing pre- and posttreatment scores with follow-up scores…

  4. Patient's needs and preferences in routine follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Bonnema, J; Zwaan, RE; de Velde, CJH; Kievit, J; Stiggelbout, AM

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the needs of women who participated in a routine follow-up programme after treatment for primary breast cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a postal questionnaire among women without any sign of relapse during the routine follow-up period. The

  5. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck : the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Bart M; Merkx, Matthias A W; Krabbe, Paul F M; Marres, Henri A M; Van den Hoogen, Frank J A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  6. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck: the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, B.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  7. Factors predicting adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointments for patients assessed by the liaison psychiatric team in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O

    2010-01-01

    Several factors may predict adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointment for patients seen in the emergency department (ED) by liaison psychiatric teams. Awareness of these factors would allow for interventions targeted at vulnerable groups.

  8. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for total knee replacement; medium term results with minimum five year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Olivia; Hassaballa, Mohammed; Murray, James; Harries, William; Porteous, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    MIS TKA has been shown to offer a reduced in-patient stay, but no clinical difference at two years. Whilst there may be a benefit from earlier discharge, we need to ensure that there are no detrimental effects in the medium and long-term following MIS-TKA. To report the mid-term result from a prospective randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing MIS-TKA with standard approach for TKA. Using knee score questionnaires, we collected patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) regarding pain and function. Sixty-six patients (from an eligible cohort of 83 patients) completed the mid-term postal follow-up. There was no significant difference between groups for change in score from pre-operative to final follow-up in all three PROMs. Mean MIS and standard group improvement was: AKSS 53 and 51 (p=0.7644), OKS 15 and 16 (p=0.2341) or WOMAC 15 and 15 (p=0.9900) respectively. Both groups showed improvement in pain and function with no significant difference between groups. There was no difference between groups for revision due to malalignment at a mean six year follow-up. In addition to the early benefits regarding hospital stay and complications, we have found that at a mean of six years there was no increase in malalignment, pain or function with MIS techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  10. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents: a systematic review of follow-up studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Davis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To conduct a systematic review about the long-term response to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT for anxiety disorders (ADs in children and adolescents. Methods The PubMed and ISI Web of Science databases were consulted. Search in the databases was performed in November 2012 and included cohort studies after CBT for ADs in children and adolescents with a follow-up period over 12 months. Results A total of 10 papers met the inclusion criteria. The follow-up period ranged from 12 months to 13 years and the results generally showed maintenance of the short-term benefits with CBT. However, the studies presented limitations, especially regarding methods, such as lack of a control group and losses to follow-up. Conclusion The long-term benefits of CBT were identified, however it would be interesting to conduct other studies with more frequent assessment periods, in order to minimize losses to follow-up, in addition to evaluating children and adolescents in the various stages of their development.

  11. Efficacy of three treatment protocols for adolescents with social anxiety disorder: a 5-year follow-up assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis-Joaquin; Olivares, Jose; Beidel, Deborah; Albano, Anne-Marie; Turner, Samuel; Rosa, Ana I

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have reported long-term follow-up data in adults and even fewer in adolescents. The purpose of this work is to report on the longest follow-up assessment in the literature on treatments for adolescents with social phobia. A 5-year follow-up assessment was conducted with subjects who originally received either Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents (CBGT-A), Social Effectiveness Therapy for Adolescents--Spanish version (SET-Asv), or Intervención en Adolescentes con Fobia Social--Treatment for Adolescents with Social Phobia (IAFS) in a controlled clinical trial. Twenty-three subjects completing the treatment conditions were available for the 5-year follow-up. Results demonstrate that subjects treated either with CBGT-A, SET-Asv and IAFS continued to maintain their gains after treatments were terminated. Either the CBGT-A, SET-Asv and IAFS can provide lasting effects to the majority of adolescents with social anxiety. Issues that may contribute to future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  12. Nurse-Led Follow-Up at Home vs. Conventional Medical Outpatient Clinic Follow-Up in Patients With Incurable Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Randomized Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Uitdehaag (Madeleen); P.G. van Putten (Paul); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); E.M.L. Verschuur (Els); A. van der Gaast (Ate); C.J. Pek (Chulja); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); R.A. de Man (Robert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); C. Laheij (Claudia); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Upper gastrointestinal cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. The multidimensional problems of incurable patients require close monitoring and frequent support, which cannot sufficiently be provided during conventional one to two month follow-up visits to the outpatient cli

  13. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appiah-Opoku, Seth, E-mail: sappiah@bama.ua.edu [Geography Department, University of Alabama, 230 Farrah Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Bryan, Hobson C. [Geography Department, University of Alabama, 330 Farrah Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries.

  14. Post-surgical tympanostomy tube follow up with audiology: experience at the Freeman Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Husband, C R; Harker, C; Davison, T; Yates, P D

    2012-02-01

    Tympanostomy tube (grommet) insertion is a common procedure, with little guidance in the current literature regarding post-operative surveillance. Our institution implemented a protocol to follow up post-surgical grommet patients via audiology at six weeks. A retrospective audit of all patients less than 16 years old who had undergone grommet insertion during a three-month period. A total of 149 patients had grommets inserted. Exclusion criteria left a cohort of 123 individuals; 82 (67 per cent) were followed up by audiology. Of these, 13 (11 per cent) did not attend follow up, and were discharged; 53 (43 per cent) were discharged from audiology with normal thresholds; and 16 (13 per cent) were referred back to a consultant. Therefore, the overall reduction in patients followed up by an otolaryngologist was 54 per cent. We recommend a six-week follow up with audiology following grommet insertion, allowing for referral back to ENT services in the event of related complications.

  15. Effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for discharged patients treated with chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nurse-led telephone follow-up is effective in meeting information and psycho-social needs. We explored the potential effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for patients treated with chemotherapy in China. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was employed in the research. 300 cases of cancer inpatients in a cancer hospital in Beijing during July-October 2012 were selected by convenience sampling. To compare the satisfaction and response regarding to chemotherapy adverse side effects, patients who discharged on Monday and Friday were provided with telephone follow-up. Patients who discharged on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday received routine care. Results: Via telephone follow-up, patient satisfaction relating to nursing care increased. Moreover, their response to chemotherapy adverse side effects showed a significant difference. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up by specialist nurses may be a feasible option. It was well received by patients, with no physical or psychological disadvantage.

  16. Recurrence after surgery due to cervical cancer - An evaluation of the follow-up program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Katrine; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Blaakær, Jan

    Objective During the last 20 years the follow-up program after surgical treatment for cervical cancer has remained unchanged. Surprisingly, little is communicated in relation to the follow-up program even though it has a huge impact on the life of the women and their relatives for five years....... The focus for this study is to evaluate the follow-up program in fulfilling the purpose for early diagnosis of recurrence while reminding and concerning women, who we consider healthy after surgery, 10 times during five years. Already politicians are focusing on the subject due to the socioeconomic...... consequences, but there is a need for a foundation prior to an adjustment of the follow-up program. Methods Design: retrospective study of a cohort of women attending follow-up program after surgery due to cervical cancer. Material: From the patient register at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics...

  17. Differences in survival based on the type of follow-up for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma: an analysis of 547 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen; Shirahama; Onohara; Miyamoto; Torii; Irie; Ishibashi

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify any significant variables in the prognosis of 547 cases with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and simultaneously confirm the survival among the different surveillance modalities for the initial detection of HCC in a closely followed-up group (regular periodic follow-up with monthly alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and ultrasonography at least every 4 months), a not closely followed-up group (neither performed with AFP nor ultrasonography regularly) and an incidental group (incidentally discovered due to related symptoms). Five hundred and forty-seven consecutive patients with HCC diagnosed at the Internal Medicine Department of Saga Prefectural Hospital Koseikan from January 1989 to December 1998 were retrospectively analyzed. The 1-, 3- and 5-year survivals in all 547 cases were 69.7, 42.4 and 26.9%, respectively. The 1-, 3- and 5-year survivals in the cases found to have solitary HCC measuring 2 cm or less in diameter at the time of diagnosis were 97.3, 76.2 and 52.3%, respectively. Forty-seven point one percent of the closely followed-up group, which was the high-risk group were found to have solitary HCC measuring 2 cm or less in diameter (48 out of the 102 followed-up cases), while only 18.5 and 11.8% were found in the not closely followed-up group (46 out of 248 cases) and the incidental group (22 out of 186 cases), respectively. The 5-year survival in the closely followed-up, the not closely followed-up and the incidental groups were 42.9, 26.1 and 15.3%, respectively. The significant factors obtained in the closely followed-up group compared to those from the not closely followed-up group included AFP, tumor size, tumor number and portal thrombosis. These findings indicate the importance of a close follow-up for high-risk groups in order to identify HCC at an early stage, and thereby have a positive influence on survival.

  18. Seguimiento al hijo de madre adolescente Follow-up of the adolescent mother's offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Alonso Uría

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo y prospectivo entre 2 grupos poblacionales: el grupo A, integrado por todas las madres adolescentes y sus hijos, y el B representado por 506 madres mayores de 20 años, atendidas todas en el año 2001 en el Hospital Docente Ginecoobstétrico de Guanabacoa. Se identificaron algunas variables perinatológicas y otras obtenidas en la consulta de seguimiento al grupo riesgo. Se realizó el procesamiento estadístico para variables cualitativas y cuantitativas y se midió la probabilidad asociada. Se encontró un índice de bajo peso al nacer de un 12,2 %, con un 9,1 % de recién nacidos pretérminos y el 13,8 % de partos instrumentados. Predominó el normopeso en consultas de seguimiento, y los ingresos hospitalarios fueron bajos, y se demostró la importancia de esta consulta en la orientación profiláctica del rol de la familia y la madre adolescente hacia su descendencia, para lograr así una salud positiva en el entorno psicosocial del niño.A descriptive prospective study was conducted between 2 population groups: group A was composed of all the adolescent mothers and their children, and group B was made up of 506 mothers over 20 that received attention at the Gynecoobstetric Hospital of Guanabacoa, in 2001.Some perinatal variables were identified and others were obtained in the follow-up visits of the risk group. The statistical processing for qualitative and quantitative variables was carried out and the associated probability was measured. It was found a low birth weight index of 12.2 %, with 9.1 % of preterm infants and 13.8 % of instrumented deliveries. The normal weight predominated in follow-up visits and admissions were low. It was demonstrated the importance of this visit as regards the prophylactic guidance of the role played by the family and the adolescent mother in the attainment of a positive health in the child's psychosocial setting.

  19. Postoperative Mortality after Hip Fracture Surgery: A 3 Years Follow Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, Canan; Sacan, Ozlem; Gamli, Mehmet; Baskan, Semih; Baydar, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims To determine mortality rates and predisposing factors in patients operated for a hip fracture in a 3-year follow-up period. Methods The study included patients who underwent primary surgery for a hip fracture.The inclusion criteria were traumatic, non-traumatic, osteoporotic and pathological hip fractures requiring surgery in all age groups and both genders. Patients with periprosthetic fractures or previous contralateral hip fracture surgery and patients who could not be contacted by telephone were excluded. At 36 months after surgery, evaluation was made using a structured telephone interview and a detailed examination of the hospital medical records, especially the documents written during anesthesia by the anesthesiologists and the documents written at the time of follow-up visits by the orthopaedic surgeons. A total of 124 cases were analyzed and 4 patients were excluded due to exclusion criteria. The collected data included demographics, type of fracture, co-morbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores, anesthesia techniques, operation type (intramedullary nailing or arthroplasty; cemented-noncemented), peroperative complications, refracture during the follow-up period, survival period and mortality causes. Results The total 120 patients evaluated comprised 74 females(61.7%) and 46 males(38.3%) with a mean age of 76.9±12.8 years (range 23–95 years). The ASA scores were ASA I (0.8%), ASA II (21.7%), ASA III (53.3%) and ASA IV (24.2%). Mortality was seen in 44 patients (36.7%) and 76 patients (63.3%) survived during the 36-month follow-up period. Of the surviving patients, 59.1% were female and 40.9% were male.The survival period ranged between 1–1190 days. The cumulative mortality rate in the first, second and third years were 29.17%, 33.33% and 36.67% respectively. The factors associated with mortality were determined as increasing age, high ASA score, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, Alzheimer

  20. LOST to follow-up Information in Trials (LOST-IT: a protocol on the potential impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar Arturo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incomplete ascertainment of outcomes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs is likely to bias final study results if reasons for unavailability of patient data are associated with the outcome of interest. The primary objective of this study is to assess the potential impact of loss to follow-up on the estimates of treatment effect. The secondary objectives are to describe, for published RCTs, (1 the reporting of loss to follow-up information, (2 the analytic methods used for handling loss to follow-up information, and (3 the extent of reported loss to follow-up. Methods We will conduct a systematic review of reports of RCTs recently published in five top general medical journals. Eligible RCTs will demonstrate statistically significant effect estimates with respect to primary outcomes that are patient-important and expressed as binary data. Teams of 2 reviewers will independently determine eligibility and extract relevant information from each eligible trial using standardized, pre-piloted forms. To assess the potential impact of loss to follow-up on the estimates of treatment effect we will, for varying assumptions about the outcomes of participants lost to follow-up (LTFU, calculate (1 the percentage of RCTs that lose statistical significance and (2 the mean change in effect estimate across RCTs. The different assumptions we will test are the following: (1 none of the LTFU participants had the event; (2 all LTFU participants had the event; (3 all LTFU participants in the treatment group had the event; none of those in the control group had it (worst case scenario; (4 the event incidence among LTFU participants (relative to observed participants increased, with a higher relative increase in the intervention group; and (5 the event incidence among LTFU participants (relative to observed participants increased in the intervention group and decreased in the control group. Discussion We aim to make our objectives and methods

  1. Impact of Prosthetic Care on Oral Health Related Quality of Life - A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Geetha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure the impact of the type of prosthetic treatment on oral health related quality of life (OHR QoL using 0ral Health impact Profile-14(0HIP-14. Materials & Method: A follow-up study was conducted amongst 105 patients attending the Department of Prosthodontics of M.R Ambedkar Dental College & Hospital, Bangalore for replacement of missing teeth. Initially, they were interviewed by a single calibrated interviewer to collect demographic details and subsequently, OHIP-14 questionnaire was used to assess their pre- prosthetic and one month post-prosthetic quality of life. Information regarding dentate status and type of prostheses was collected from their case records and based on this information the patients were divided into 3 groups i.e., Complete Denture (CD group, Removable Partial Denture (RPD group and Fixed Partial Denture (FPD group. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test was used to compare between groups using SPSS version 20. Results: This study revealed that there was improved taste sensation (0.82±0.76, less irritability with others (1.61±0.49, more comfortable to eat (1.42±0.70, less self-conscious (1.48±0.61, had a satisfactory diet (1.58±0.61 and less embarrassment (1.36±0.5 among the CD group as compared RPD and FPD groups. Conclusions: The results indicated that the type of prostheses placed had a major influence on improving OHR QoL among denture users.

  2. Echocardiographic Follow-Up of Patent Foramen Ovale and the Factors Affecting Spontaneous Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ali; Aydin, Alperen; Demir, Tevfik; Aydin, Fatma; Ucar, Birsen; Kilic, Zubeyir

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the echocardiographic follow-up of patent foramen ovale, which is considered a potential etiological factor in various diseases, and to determine the factors affecting spontaneous closure. Between January 2000 and June 2012, records of 918 patients with patent foramen ovale were retrospectively reviewed. Patency of less than 3 mm around the fossa ovalis is called patent foramen ovale. Patients with cyanotic congenital heart diseases, severe heart valve disorders and severe hemodynamic left to right shunts were excluded from the study. The patients were divided into three groups based on age; 1 day-1 month in group 1, 1 month-12 months in group 2, and more than 12 months in group 3. Of the 918 patients, 564 (61.4%) had spontaneous closure, 328 (35.8%) had patent foramen ovale continued, 15 (1.6%) patients had patent foramen ovale enlarged to 3-5 mm, 6 patients were enlarged to 5-8 mm, and in one patient patent foramen ovale reached to more than 8 mm size. Defect was spontaneously closed in 65.9% of the patients in group 1, 66.7% of the patients in group 2, and 52.3% of the patients in group 3. There was a negative correlation between the age of diagnosis and spontaneous closure (p patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal aneurysm did not have any effect on spontaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (p > 0.05). However, ventricular septal defect and spontaneous closure of patent foramen ovale had a positive correlation (p patent foramen ovale is high. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between spontaneous closure of patent foramen ovale with early diagnosis and small defect size.

  3. Gynaecological cancer follow-up: national survey of current practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, Simon; Stuart, Nick; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Hall, Liz; Whitaker, Rhiannon

    2013-01-01

    To establish a baseline of national practice for follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. Questionnaire survey. Gynaecological cancer centres and units. Members of the British Gynaecological Cancer Society and the National Forum of Gynaecological Oncology Nurses. A questionnaire survey. To determine schedules of follow-up, who provides it and what routine testing is used for patients who have had previous gynaecological cancer. A total of 117 responses were obtained; 115 (98%) reported hospital scheduled regular follow-up appointments. Two involved general practitioners. Follow-up was augmented or replaced by telephone follow-up in 29 responses (25%) and patient-initiated appointments in 38 responses (32%). A total of 80 (68%) cancer specialists also offered combined follow-up clinics with other specialties. Clinical examinations for hospital-based follow-up were mainly performed by doctors (67% for scheduled regular appointments and 63% for patient-initiated appointments) while telephone follow-up was provided in the majority by nurses (76%). Most respondents (76/117 (65%)) provided routine tests, of which 66/76 (87%) reported carrying out surveillance tests for ovarian cancer, 35/76 (46%) for cervical cancer, 8/76 (11%) for vulval cancer and 7/76 (9%) for endometrial cancer. Patients were usually discharged after 5 years (82/117 (70%)), whereas three (3%) were discharged after 4 years, nine (8%) after three years and one (1%) after 2 years. Practice varied but most used a standard hospital-based protocol of appointments for 5 years and routine tests were performed usually for women with ovarian cancer. A minority utilised nurse-led or telephone follow-up. General practitioners were rarely involved in routine care. A randomised study comparing various models of follow-up could be considered.

  4. Postural education program for elementary school: a one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Luis Ritter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objective of this study was to verify the short- and long-term effectiveness of the Elementary School Postural Program in the performance, generalization, and perception of daily school activities. The final sample consisted of 61 subjects divided into experimental (14 years ±0.93; ♀=22; ♂=10 and control group (15.38 years ±0.97; ♀=16; ♂=13, all participants attended a Brazilian public school in Porto Alegre, State of Rio Grande do Sul. The postural program included 20 sessions over a 10-week period. In each session, participants discussed and practiced routine actions that typically occurred at schools. Eight other meetings were required for the completion of the pre- and post-tests. The experimental group performed significantly better than the control group in the short-term evaluations, although there were no significant statistical differences in the long-term follow-up evaluations. The children demonstrated a good behavioral response to the postural program; nevertheless, the knowledge had not been completely mastered after a year.

  5. Effectiveness of a therapeutic community treatment in Spain: a long-term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Hermida, José-Ramón; Secades-Villa, Roberto; Fernández-Ludeña, José-Javier; Marina-González, Pedro-Antonio

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the effectiveness of the treatment program developed by Proyecto Hombre ('Project Mankind') in Asturias, Spain, is evaluated. In a long-term follow-up (range from 73 days to 8 years) with a sample of 249 subjects, the results obtained by subjects completing the treatment (194) were compared with pre-treatment results and with those of the group that dropped out (55). The measurements used were relapses in illegal drugs, alcohol, changes in family situation, educational level, employment, criminal involvement and state of health. External validation of self-report measures given in the questionnaire was carried out. Findings support the effectiveness of the treatment in all measures and the validity of self-report items. Relapse rate in 'treatment-completed' group was 10.3%, whilst in the non-completers group it reached 63.6% (significant difference, p < 0.001). Relapses of non-completers were more severe, occurred sooner after leaving the program (they stayed abstinent for shorter periods) and lasted longer than those of subjects completing the treatment.

  6. Follow-up of preterm children: II. Growth and development at four years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, M; Bjerre, I

    1990-11-01

    In a long-term prospective study, 46 unselected infants born before 35 completed weeks of gestation were compared with 26 full-term infants. At four years of age, 44 preterms and 25 full-terms were available to follow-up. The preterms were somewhat shorter in stature and lighter in weight than the full-terms but fell well within the normal range for Swedish children. Head circumference in the preterm group was significantly correlated to neurological development. Psychometric evaluation with Griffiths' mental developmental scale showed the preterms to fall within the normal range, though their performance was inferior to that of the full-terms. The greatest differences between the groups were in scores for the subscales eye and hand coordination, performance, and practical reasoning. There was no correlation within the preterm group between the test results and birthweight, gestational age, prenatal score, perinatal score, or parental social status or education. Language development was delayed among the preterms, more of whom required speech therapy. Visual and hearing disorders were more common among preterms than expected. Although they were all in good health, more preterms than full-terms needed hospital care during the first four years of life.

  7. Sodium hypochlorite vs formocresol as pulpotomy medicaments in primary molars: 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabzendedar, Mahboobeh; Mazhari, Fatemeh; Alami, Maliheh; Talebi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluated the effects of 3 percent sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and formocresol (FC) as pulp dressing agents in pulpotomized primary molars. One hundred children between three and six years each with at least one primary mandibular second molar requiring pulpotomy were randomly allocated to two groups (of 50 each). All the teeth received stainless steel crown after conventional pulpotomy procedure with either NaOCI (applied for 15 second) or FC (applied for one minute). Clinical and radiographic signs/symptoms were blindly recorded at zero, six. and 12 months. The differences were statistically analyzed using the Fisher's exact test. At six months, 100 percent clinical success was found with both NaOCl, and FC. Radiographic success rates for NaOCl were 98 percent and 92 percent at 6- and 12-month recalls respectively. FC group showed 94 percent and 93 percent radiographic success rates at the same periods respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups. NaOCl can be suggested as a pulpotomy agent for primary teeth pulpotomies. However further clinical studies with long-term follow-ups are needed to test the efficacy of NaOCl as a pulpotomy medicament in primary teeth.

  8. Large Regional Differences in Serological Follow-Up of Q Fever Patients in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morroy, Gabriëlla; Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Kruisbergen, Mandy J. B.; van der Hoek, Wim; Marcelis, Jan H.; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C. A.; Wijkmans, Clementine J.; Schneeberger, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Background During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion of acute Q fever patients that received serological follow-up, and to identify regional differences in follow-up rates and contributing factors, such as knowledge of medical practitioners. Methods Serological datasets of Q fever patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 (N = 3,198) were obtained from three Laboratories of Medical Microbiology (LMM) in the province of Noord-Brabant. One LMM offered an active follow-up service by approaching patients; the other two only tested on physician's request. The medical microbiologist in charge of each LMM was interviewed. In December 2011, 240 general practices and 112 medical specialists received questionnaires on their knowledge and practices regarding the serological follow-up of Q fever patients. Results Ninety-five percent (2,226/2,346) of the Q fever patients diagnosed at the LMM with a follow-up service received at least one serological follow-up within 15 months of diagnosis. For those diagnosed at a LMM without this service, this was 25% (218/852) (OR 54, 95% CI 43–67). Although 80% (162/203) of all medical practitioners with Q fever patients reported informing patients of the importance of serological follow-up, 33% (67/203) never requested it. Conclusions Regional differences in follow-up are substantial and range from 25% to 95%. In areas with a low follow-up rate the proportion of missed chronic Q fever is potentially higher than in areas with a high follow-up rate. Medical practitioners lack knowledge regarding the need, timing and implementation of serological follow-up, which contributes to patients receiving incorrect or no follow-up. Therefore, this information should be incorporated in national guidelines

  9. Large regional differences in serological follow-up of Q fever patients in the Netherlands.

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    Gabriëlla Morroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion of acute Q fever patients that received serological follow-up, and to identify regional differences in follow-up rates and contributing factors, such as knowledge of medical practitioners. METHODS: Serological datasets of Q fever patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 (N = 3,198 were obtained from three Laboratories of Medical Microbiology (LMM in the province of Noord-Brabant. One LMM offered an active follow-up service by approaching patients; the other two only tested on physician's request. The medical microbiologist in charge of each LMM was interviewed. In December 2011, 240 general practices and 112 medical specialists received questionnaires on their knowledge and practices regarding the serological follow-up of Q fever patients. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent (2,226/2,346 of the Q fever patients diagnosed at the LMM with a follow-up service received at least one serological follow-up within 15 months of diagnosis. For those diagnosed at a LMM without this service, this was 25% (218/852 (OR 54, 95% CI 43-67. Although 80% (162/203 of all medical practitioners with Q fever patients reported informing patients of the importance of serological follow-up, 33% (67/203 never requested it. CONCLUSIONS: Regional differences in follow-up are substantial and range from 25% to 95%. In areas with a low follow-up rate the proportion of missed chronic Q fever is potentially higher than in areas with a high follow-up rate. Medical practitioners lack knowledge regarding the need, timing and implementation of serological follow-up, which contributes to patients receiving incorrect or no follow-up. Therefore, this information should be incorporated in

  10. The Effect of Fetal Liver-Derived Cell Suspension Allotransplantation on Patients with Diabetes: First Year of Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghodsi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies have recently opened up new horizons for treatment of various types of diseases including diabetes mellitus. However, long-term efficacy and safety of these novel modalities still remain a serious question. Hereby, we aim to report the one-year follow-up results in the diabetic patients who underwent fetal liver-derived hematopoietic stem cell allotransplantation. Fifty six patients with type one (n=30 and type two (n=26 diabetes, aged 10-58 years old (32.8 ± 16.3 were divided into the intervention and placebo group. The patients in the intervention group underwent fetal liver-derived hematopoietic stem cell transplantation while the patients in the placebo group received 5 ml of normal saline both via an intravenous route. The patients were visited at regular intervals to evaluate the efficacy of transplantation in glycemic control as well as possible complications. In the 6th month of the follow-up, there was a significant decrease in HbA1c levels in all groups without any rise in the fasting c-peptide. However, none of the precipitants transiently or continuously became insulin free in the first year after transplantation. It can be concluded that, in this study, fetal liver-derived hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had no significant effects on glycemic control. The heterogeneity of our patients might account for the negative results. Hence, longer follow-up results will be reported in the near future.

  11. A Prospective Comparative Study of Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Latarjet Procedure With a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Blandine; Klouche, Shahnaz; Deranlot, Julien; Bauer, Thomas; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Hardy, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    To compare postoperative pain during the first postoperative week and the position of the coracoid bone block at the anterior aspect of the glenoid after the arthroscopic and the mini-open Latarjet procedure. The secondary purpose was to assess functional results and recurrence after at least 2 years of follow-up. This comparative prospective study included patients who underwent a Latarjet-Bristow procedure for anterior shoulder instability in 2012. The Latarjet procedure was performed by a mini-open approach (G1) in one center and by an arthroscopic approach (G2) in the other. The main evaluation criterion was average shoulder pain during the first postoperative week assessed by the patient on a standard 10-cm visual analog scale (0-10). Secondary criteria were consumption of analgesics during the first week, the position of the coracoid bone block on radiograph and computed tomography scan at the 3-month follow-up and clinical outcomes (Western Ontario Score Index and new surgery) after at least 2 years of follow-up. Fifty-eight patients were included, 22 G1 and 36 G2, 13 women and 45 men, mean age 26.9 ± 7.7 years. The mean follow-up was 29.8 ± 4.4 months. There was significantly less pain in the arthroscopic Latarjet group than in the mini-open group during the first postoperative week (2.5 ± 1.4 vs 1.2 ± 1.2, P = .002) with comparable consumption of analgesics (P > .05). The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure resulted in a more lateral coracoid bone block (P = .04) and a better equatorial position than the mini-open technique (P = .02). Three patients underwent revision surgery (1 recurrence [2.8%], 1 block fracture, 1 screw ablation) in the arthroscopic group, none in the mini-open group (P = .54). At the final follow-up, the Western Ontario Score Index score was good in all patients (G1: 78.5 ± 7.5% vs G2: 82.3 ± 7%, P = .03). This prospective comparative study showed that the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure was significantly less painful than

  12. One-year follow-up of two exercise interventions for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Alguacil-Diego, Isabel Maria; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2006-07-01

    To assess the long-term effects on functional and mobility outcomes of two exercise interventions for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In an extended 12-mo follow-up of a randomized controlled trial, 40 patients who were diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis according to the modified criteria of New York, allocated to control or experimental groups using a random numbers table, and who performed their respective exercise program at least three times per month, were included in this long-term study. The control group was treated during 15 sessions with a conventional exercise regimen in ankylosing spondylitis, whereas the experimental group received 15 sessions of exercises based on the treatment of the shortened muscle chains following the guidelines described by the Global Posture Reeducation method. These patients were followed up and assessed again 1 yr after entering the study, re-applying the same validated indexes: BASMI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index [tragus to wall distance, modified Schober test, cervical rotation, lumbar side flexion, and intermalleolar distance]), BASDAI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index), and BASFI (Bath Ankylosin