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Sample records for group discussions tutorial

  1. Renormalization Group Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    Complex physical systems sometimes have statistical behavior characterized by power- law dependence on the parameters of the system and spatial variability with no particular characteristic scale as the parameters approach critical values. The renormalization group (RG) approach was developed in the fields of statistical mechanics and quantum field theory to derive quantitative predictions of such behavior in cases where conventional methods of analysis fail. Techniques based on these ideas have since been extended to treat problems in many different fields, and in particular, the behavior of turbulent fluids. This lecture will describe a relatively simple but nontrivial example of the RG approach applied to the diffusion of photons out of a stellar medium when the photons have wavelengths near that of an emission line of atoms in the medium.

  2. How experienced tutors facilitate tutorial dynamics in PBL groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gin-Hong; Lin, Chaou-Shune; Lin, Yu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial are conducted in small groups, and successful learning in such groups requires good group facilitating skills. There is a lack of research on actual skills employed by tutors in facilitating the group dynamics. To explore the process of PBL tutorial small groups, focusing on the tutors' actual behavior in facilitating group dynamics. Eight experienced tutors from various departments in medical colleges participated in this research. Forty tutorial group sessions were videotaped. Among the 636 tutorial intervention episodes, 142 of them were associated with facilitating group dynamics. Tutors interventions as well as their recalls were transcribed verbatim. Qualitative research methods were utilized to analyze the data. There were 10 tutorial group dynamic situations and 48 tutorial skills. Analysis of the tutors' intentions employing these skills in the 10 situations showed that tutors were trying to achieve the following aims: (1) iteration of PBL principles, (2) delegation of responsibility to the students, (3) creation of a good discussion forum, and (4) the generation of a good learning atmosphere. Results from this study provide PBL tutors with a practical frame of reference on group dynamic facilitating skills and stimulate further research on this topic.

  3. Peer Discussions in Lecture-Based Tutorials in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the types of peer discussion that occur during lecture-based tutorial sessions. It focuses in particular on whether discussions of this kind have certain characteristics that might indicate success in the post-testing phase. The data were collected during an introductory physics course. The main data set was gathered with the…

  4. Peer discussions in lecture-based tutorials in introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzes the types of peer discussion that occur during lecture-based tutorial sessions. It focuses in particular on whether discussions of this kind have certain characteristics that might indicate success in the post-testing phase. The data were collected during an introductory physics course. The main data set was gathered with the aid of audio recordings. Data-driven content analysis was applied in the analysis to facilitate the placement of students' discussions in particular categories related to different types of discussions. Four major discussion types were found: discussions related to the content knowledge, metalevel discussions including metaconceptual and metacognitive elements, discussions related to practical issues, and creating a base for discussion, seen here in the order of their prevalence. These categories were found to possess individual substructures that involved, for example, asking and answering questions, participating in a dialogue, or disagreeing with a peer. Analyzing the substructures of the categories revealed that there were evident differences between the groups, some of them related to the group size. With regard to the characteristics of discussions considered to be connected to a better learning outcome, it was observed that a great number of lines uttered related to the physics content or metalevel discussions seemed to have a direct bearing on success in the post test at the group level. For individual students, answering content-related questions posed by their peers might also indicate success in the post test. We would encourage researchers to continue this type of research in order to discover the essential characteristics of students' discussions that facilitate learning.

  5. The Purpose of Tutorial Groups: Social Influence and the Group as Means and Objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosander, Michael; Chiriac, Eva Hammar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how first-year students view the purpose of tutorial groups in problem-based learning. In all, 147 students from 24 groups participated, providing 399 statements. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed a focus on both learning and social influence. Learning involved the tutorial as…

  6. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  7. Summaries of group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    Group discussions following the presentations of reports on the remote sensing of Chesapeake Bay resources are presented. The parameters to be investigated by the remote sensors and the specifications of the sensors are described. Specific sensors for obtaining data on various aspects of the ecology are identified. Recommendations for establishing a data bank and additional efforts to obtain increased understanding of the ecology are submitted.

  8. Group discussion improves lie detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadav Klein; Nicholas Epley

    2015-01-01

    ... identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions...

  9. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  10. PBL curriculum improves medical students' participation in small-group tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wun, Y T; Tse, Eileen Y Y; Lam, T P; Lam, Cindy L K

    2007-09-01

    Group learning is the core of problem-based learning (PBL) but has not been extensively studied, especially in Asian students. This study compared students of PBL and non-PBL curricula in students' talking time and participation in small-group tutorials in a medical school in Asia. The proportions of student talking of 46 tutorials in three teaching rotations of the PBL curriculum and those of 43 corresponding tutorials in the non-PBL curriculum were counted. Twelve videotapes of tutorials (six from each curriculum), stratified for tutor, case scenario and students' learning stage, were randomly selected and transcribed. They were rated with the group-interaction (5 items) and active-participation (four items) tutorial assessment scales developed by Valle et al. These outcomes were compared between the students of PBL and non-PBL curricula. Students from the PBL curriculum talked significantly more. In only two (4.7%) of 43 tutorials in the non-PBL curriculum did the students talk more than the tutors; but students talked more than the tutors in 17 (37.0%) of 46 tutorials in the PBL curriculum. PBL students scored significantly higher than non-PBL students in all items except one item (respect to peers) of the tutorial assessment scales, and in the mean scores of both the group interaction scale (items 1-5) and the active participation scale (items 6-9). The results suggested that PBL starting from the early years of a medical curriculum was associated with more active student participation, interaction and collaboration in small-group tutorials.

  11. Learning in the tutorial group: a balance between individual freedom and institutional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Anita; Aanstoot, Janna; Hammarström, Inger Lundeborg; Samuelsson, Christina; Johannesson, Eva; Sandström, Karin; Berglind, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility. Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases student's motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful.

  12. An Audit of the Effectiveness of Large Group Neurology Tutorials for Irish Undergraduate Medical Students

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearney, H

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this audit was to determine the effectiveness of large group tutorials for teaching neurology to medical students. Students were asked to complete a questionnaire rating their confidence on a ten point Likert scale in a number of domains in the undergraduate education guidelines from the Association of British Neurologists (ABN). We then arranged a series of interactive large group tutorials for the class and repeated the questionnaire one month after teaching. In the three core domains of neurological: history taking, examination and differential diagnosis, none of the students rated their confidence as nine or ten out of ten prior to teaching. This increased to 6% for history taking, 12 % in examination and 25% for differential diagnosis after eight weeks of tutorials. This audit demonstrates that in our centre, large group tutorials were an effective means of teaching, as measured by the ABN guidelines in undergraduate neurology.

  13. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment.

  14. The Use of Small Group Tutorials as an Educational Strategy in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Small group tutorials are an educational strategy that is growing in popularity in medical education. This is indicative of the movement from a traditional teacher centred approach to more student-centred learning, which is characterised by active participation and autonomous learning (Hedge et al, 2011). However, small group teaching is one of…

  15. A review and tutorial discussion of noise and signal-to-noise ratios in analytical spectrometry—III. Multiplicative noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.; Snelleman, W.; Boutilier, G.D.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, signal-to-noise ratios are discussed in a tutorial fashion for the case of multiplicative noise. Multiplicative noise is introduced simultaneously with the analyte signal and is therefore much more difficult to reduce than additive noise. The sources of noise, the mathematical repres

  16. Interteaching: Discussion Group Size and Course Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Jacob C.; Saville, Bryan K.; Van Patten, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have yet to examine whether discussion group size affects student performance in an interteaching-based course. In the current study, we addressed this question by manipulating discussion group size (smaller groups of 2 students vs. larger groups of 4 students) across 2 sections of an undergraduate psychology course. We found no…

  17. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  18. National GAP Conference 2007-Discussion Groups Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Lamb, Berton Lee

    2010-01-01

    We led two discussion groups during the 2007 National GAP Conference. These discussion groups provided information to help develop a survey of National Gap Analysis Program (GAP) data users. One group discussed technical issues, and the second group discussed the use of GAP data for decisionmaking. Themes emerging from the technical issues group included concerns about data quality, need for information on how to use data, and passive data distribution. The decisionmaking discussion included a wide range of topics including the need to understand presentation of information, the need to connect with and understand users of data, the revision of GAP's mission, and the adaptability of products and data. The decisionmaking group also raised concerns regarding technical issues. One conclusion is that a deep commitment to ongoing information transfer and support is a key component of success for the GAP program.

  19. Enhancing Understanding and Interest through Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Group discussion allows students to learn how to "talk to someone." Through group discussion, students can acquire or refine a broad range of attributes, from basic oratory skills to a more sophisticated development of communicative competence to embracing and valuing dialogic interchange and reflexivity. In this article, the author explains how…

  20. Group decision making with the analytic hierarchy process in benefit-risk assessment: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, J Marjan; Bridges, John F P; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) has been increasingly applied as a technique for multi-criteria decision analysis in healthcare. The AHP can aid decision makers in selecting the most valuable technology for patients, while taking into account multiple, and even conflicting, decision criteria. This tutorial illustrates the procedural steps of the AHP in supporting group decision making about new healthcare technology, including (1) identifying the decision goal, decision criteria, and alternative healthcare technologies to compare, (2) structuring the decision criteria, (3) judging the value of the alternative technologies on each decision criterion, (4) judging the importance of the decision criteria, (5) calculating group judgments, (6) analyzing the inconsistency in judgments, (7) calculating the overall value of the technologies, and (8) conducting sensitivity analyses. The AHP is illustrated via a hypothetical example, adapted from an empirical AHP analysis on the benefits and risks of tissue regeneration to repair small cartilage lesions in the knee.

  1. Teaching Organizational Behavior Through Discussion Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Stephen; Hamblin, Anthony C.

    1978-01-01

    An educational experiment in teaching organizational behavior to undergraduates in England is reported, with focus on the value and limitations of a systematic form of discussion-group learning based upon a framework outlined by Fawcett Hill. (LBH)

  2. Multiple-Group Confirmatory Factor Analysis in R--A Tutorial in Measurement Invariance with Continuous and Ordinal Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Gerrit; von Brachel, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (MG-CFA) is among the most productive extensions of structural equation modeling. Many researchers conducting cross-cultural or longitudinal studies are interested in testing for measurement and structural invariance. The aim of the present paper is to provide a tutorial in MG-CFA using the freely…

  3. An Action Research Process on University Tutorial Sessions with Small Groups: Presentational Tutorial Sessions and Online Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Salarirche, Noelia; Gallardo-Gil, Monsalud; Herrera-Pastor, David; Servan-Nunez, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyse the action research process carried out by us as teachers in a general didactics course in the University of Malaga (Spain). The course methodology combined lectures to the whole class and small-group work. We were in charge of guiding small-group work. In the small groups, students researched on an educational innovation…

  4. Group reports. The recommendations proposed by the seven discussion groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1989-01-01

    GROUP 1 — Discussion leader S.H. Sohmer — Organization and the ideal format of a large Flora (over 10,000 species) The Working Group first recognized that there are really two major categories of Flora projects serving quite different needs in the Malesian region: the local/national projects that

  5. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  6. Machiavellianism, Discussion Time, and Group Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Helmut; Myers, David G.

    1976-01-01

    Social-emotional and rational-cognitive explanations of group risky shift on choice dilemmas (hypothetical life situations) were evaluated by comparing shift in groups of low Mach (emotional) and high Mach (non-emotional) subjects. Effects of Machiavellian beliefs on social functioning are examined. Group composition was not observed to affect…

  7. Summary of Study Group Session Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between gravitational physiology and calcium metabolism is examined. The role of gravity on the problems of bone response, low gravity environments, calcium in plants, and the potential in animal systems for alterations in nerve and muscle function as variations in extracellular calcium levels occurred are discussed. Innovative materials for experiments on interactions between calcium and gravity, experiments that could utilize ionospheres or calcium-measuring dyes, and specific gravity calcium experiments are also addressed.

  8. The influence of ethnic group composition on focus group discussions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenwood, Nan; Ellmers, Theresa; Holley, Jess

    2014-01-01

    ... of importance to them in their own words [2]. They are particularly useful for gaining insight from minority ethnic groups [1, 3] because of their sensitivity to cultural variables [2, 4]. One of the main differences between focus groups and one-to-one interviews is the interaction between participants. Focus group participants can...

  9. The Facilitation of Problem-Based Learning in Medical Education Through a Computer-Mediated Tutorial Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, A.; Barrows, H.S.; Koschmann, T.D.; Feltovich, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the means by which a computer-supported group interaction system known as the Computer-Mediated Tutorial Laboratory (CMTL) is used to support Problem-Based Learning Tutorials. The Problem-Based Learning Tutorial process has traditionally been solely a group process, sharing both the advantages and the disadvantages of any group process. This paper discusses the nature of Problem-Based Learning, the logistics of integrating computer mediation with the tutorial process and how computer mediation can be used to facilitate the eliciting and recording of individual input while enhancing the powerful effects of the group process.

  10. Using Optimal Combination of Teaching-Learning Methods (Open Book Assignment and Group Tutorials) as Revision Exercises to Improve Learning Outcome in Low Achievers in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappa, Medha; Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H.; Suryapriya, R.; Ragul, Anithasri; Yuvaraj, B.; Revathy, G.; Priyadarssini, M.

    2016-01-01

    Graduate medical students of India are taught Biochemistry by didactic lectures and they hardly get any opportunity to clarify their doubts and reinforce the concepts which they learn in these lectures. We used a combination of teaching-learning (T-L) methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) to study their efficacy in improving…

  11. Karibu Tutorials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    These tutorials demonstrate how to use Karibu for high quality data collection, in particular how to setup a distributed Karibu system and how to adapt Karibu to your particular data collection needs....

  12. Simulating social dilemmas: promoting cooperative behavior through imagined group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleady, Rose; Hopthrow, Tim; Crisp, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    A robust finding in social dilemmas research is that individual group members are more likely to act cooperatively if they are given the chance to discuss the dilemma with one another. The authors investigated whether imagining a group discussion may represent an effective means of increasing cooperative behavior in the absence of the opportunity for direct negotiation among decision makers. Five experiments, utilizing a range of task variants, tested this hypothesis. Participants engaged in a guided simulation of the progressive steps required to reach a cooperative consensus within a group discussion of a social dilemma. Results support the conclusion that imagined group discussion enables conscious processes that parallel those underlying the direct group discussion and is a strategy that can effectively elicit cooperative behavior. The applied potential of imagined group discussion techniques to encourage more socially responsible behavior is discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  13. The Effects of Unstructured Group Discussion on Ethical Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Clinton H.; Alder, G. Stoney

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine the effects of shared information and group discussion on ethical judgment when no structure is imposed on the discussion to encourage ethical considerations. Discussants were asked to identify arguments for and against a variety of business behaviors with ethical implications. A group moderator solicited and recorded arguments…

  14. The Effects of Unstructured Group Discussion on Ethical Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Clinton H.; Alder, G. Stoney

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine the effects of shared information and group discussion on ethical judgment when no structure is imposed on the discussion to encourage ethical considerations. Discussants were asked to identify arguments for and against a variety of business behaviors with ethical implications. A group moderator solicited and recorded arguments…

  15. Electromagnetism Tutorial (Tutorial de Eletromagnetismo)

    CERN Document Server

    Dantas, Christine C

    2009-01-01

    The present tutorial aims at covering the fundamentals of electromagnetism, in a condensed and clear manner. Some solved and proposed exercises have been included. The reader is assumed to have knowledge of basic electricity, partial derivatives and multiple integrals. ----- O presente tutorial visa cobrir os fundamentos do eletromagnetismo, de forma condensada e clara. Alguns exercicios resolvidos e propostos foram incluidos. Assume-se conhecimento de eletricidade basica, derivadas parciais e integrais multiplas.

  16. Learning Physics in Small-Group Discussions--Three Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benckert, Sylvia; Pettersson, Sune

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of students learning of physics during group discussions around context-rich problems in introductory physics courses at university level. We present the results from video recordings of student groups solving three different problems. We found that group discussions around physics problems can lead to…

  17. Increasing Social Presence in Online Learning through Small Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcaoglu, Mete; Lee, Eunbae

    2016-01-01

    Social presence is difficult to achieve, but an imperative component of online learning. In this study, we investigated the effect of group size on students' perceptions of social presence in two graduate-level online courses, comparing small group versus whole class discussions. Our results indicated that when in small group discussions, students…

  18. Focus group discussion: a tool for health and medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, L P

    2008-03-01

    Focus group discussion is a research methodology in which a small group of participants gather to discuss a specified topic or an issue to generate data. The main characteristic of a focus group is the interaction between the moderator and the group, as well as the interaction between group members. The objective is to give the researcher an understanding of the participants' perspective on the topic in discussion. Focus groups are rapidly gaining popularity in health and medical research. This paper presents a general introduction of the use of focus groups as a research tool within the context of health research, with the intention of promoting its use among researchers in healthcare. A detailed methodology for the conduct of focus groups and analysis of focus group data are discussed. The potentials and limitations of this qualitative research technique are also highlighted.

  19. The impact of maths support tutorials on mathematics confidence and academic performance in a cohort of HE Animal Science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veggel, Nieky; Amory, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Students embarking on a bioscience degree course, such as Animal Science, often do not have sufficient experience in mathematics. However, mathematics forms an essential and integral part of any bioscience degree and is essential to enhance employability. This paper presents the findings of a project looking at the effect of mathematics tutorials on a cohort of first year animal science and management students. The results of a questionnaire, focus group discussions and academic performance analysis indicate that small group tutorials enhance students' confidence in maths and improve students' academic performance. Furthermore, student feedback on the tutorial programme provides a deeper insight into student experiences and the value students assign to the tutorials.

  20. The group discussion effect: integrative processes and suggestions for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleady, Rose; Hopthrow, Tim; Crisp, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    One of the most consistent findings in experimental social dilemmas research is the positive effect group discussion has on cooperative behavior. At a time when cooperation and consensus is critical to tackle global problems, ranging from debt to deforestation, understanding the dynamics of group discussion is a pressing need. Unfortunately, research investigating the underlying processes and implementation of the effect has been inconclusive. The authors present a critical review of existing explanations and integrate these perspectives into a single process model of group discussion, providing a more complete theoretical picture of how interrelated factors combine to facilitate discussion-induced cooperation. On the basis of this theoretical analysis, they consider complimentary approaches to the indirect and feasible implementation of group discussion. They argue that such strategies may overcome the barriers to direct discussion observed across a range of groups and organizations.

  1. Searching for Intertextual Connections in Small Group Text Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Feng-ming

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the sources for and intentions of intertextuality made by 10 groups of Taiwanese university students in the process of discussing two American stories. Two types of data, small group text discussions and oral interviews, were gathered. The results indicated that participants used diverse sources of intertextual links, and with…

  2. The Discursive Construction of Group Cohesion in Problem-Based Learning Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Gillian; Wiggins, Sally; Anderson, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that educators may be reluctant to implement group work in their teaching due to concerns about students partaking in off-task behaviours. However, such off-task interactions have been shown to promote motivation, trust, and rapport-building. This paper details a study in which student groups were video recorded as they engaged…

  3. The power of talk : Developing discriminatory group norms through discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Laura G. E.; Postmes, Tom

    Research has shown that group discussion can increase intergroup prejudice and discrimination. However, we know little about the process by which discussion has this effect. Therefore, four studies were conducted in a real-world context to investigate this process. Results suggest that discussing a

  4. The power of talk : Developing discriminatory group norms through discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Laura G. E.; Postmes, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that group discussion can increase intergroup prejudice and discrimination. However, we know little about the process by which discussion has this effect. Therefore, four studies were conducted in a real-world context to investigate this process. Results suggest that discussing a

  5. Literature Discussion Groups: The Role of Teacher Talk in Discussing Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teacher talk influenced the way issues of race, culture, and disability were addressed in literature discussion groups. Discussions of one teacher with two groups of students, of varying reading levels, were studied. The research questions were: 1) How does the teacher's perspective on the students…

  6. Augmenting cognitive learning of community nutrition by tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, S

    1998-01-01

    Community health interventions are increasingly being considered a priority area in medical curriculum. In the topic of nutrition, a situation analysis of final MBBS students in our institution revealed significantly lower levels of knowledge in community applications as compared to basics and clinical aspects, indicating the need for some educational intervention. An improvised tutorial was conducted to address this deficiency at cognitive level. The intervention was a special scheme of flow of discussion with a positive bias in favour of nutritional applications at community level. Half of the learners were given routine tutorial, as part of existing teaching schedule in nutrition and the remaining were subjected to educational intervention, to provide control and study groups respectively. Before and after assessment of the recall of learners on community applications demonstrated a positive impact of improvised tutorial. The learners' level of knowledge in two groups was comparable before the tutorial but it was significantly higher ('P' < 0.001) in study group as compared to control, after the tutorial (mean scores: 134.38/150 and 91.20/150 respectively). No extra resources, tutor time or student's learning hours were needed for the improvised tutorial. Tutor's positive bias in favour of applied aspects can bring about a desired change even in conventional teaching-learning process, without asking for extra resources. It can be a supplement to community-based learning.

  7. The power of talk: developing discriminatory group norms through discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura G E; Postmes, Tom

    2011-06-01

    Research has shown that group discussion can increase intergroup prejudice and discrimination. However, we know little about the process by which discussion has this effect. Therefore, four studies were conducted in a real-world context to investigate this process. Results suggest that discussing a negative societal stereotype (relative to individual rumination in Studies 1 and 3 and alternative discussions in Studies 2 and 3) increases intentions to engage in discrimination against the out-group target of the stereotype. This is mediated by the formation of an in-group norm which supports discrimination (Study 1) and the extent to which the discussion validates the stereotype (Study 2). A fourth study manipulated the extent to which consensus on the negative stereotype was reached through discussion. When the discussion ended in consensus, participants have greater intention to undertake collective action against the stereotyped out-group, mediated by a congruent in-group norm. These results provide evidence that the process by which discussion increases intergroup discrimination is via the formation of discriminatory local group norms. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  8. [The function of the group tutorial in training human resources in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Pizarro, L; Rodríguez-Roa, G

    1994-01-01

    Within the educational system, the method of group tutor was developed as a teaching strategy: the tutor goes along with a group of students to field training and works with them on the systematization and analysis of the study to obtain the final report. The purpose of this paper is to recuperate the work experience of the Department of Didactics of the School of Public Health of Mexico during 1991. A relevant conclusion is that this form of work needs to be studied and developed, since it demands a greater amount of independence from the students and requires a different participation from the teacher, both as coordinator and advisor.

  9. NVidia Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; MESSMER, Peter; DEMOUTH, Julien

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial will present Caffee, a powerful Python library to implement solutions working on CPUs and GPUs, and explain how to use it to build and train Convolutional Neural Networks using NVIDIA GPUs. The session requires no prior experience with GPUs or Caffee.

  10. Unitary representations of three dimensional Lie groups revisited: A short tutorial via harmonic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.; Rausch de Traubenberg, M.

    2017-04-01

    The representation theory of three dimensional real and complex Lie groups is reviewed from the perspective of harmonic functions defined over certain appropriate manifolds. An explicit construction of all unitary representations is given. The realisations obtained are shown to be related with each other by either natural operations as real forms or Inönü-Wigner contractions.

  11. Tutorial to SARAH

    CERN Document Server

    Staub, Florian

    2016-01-01

    I give in this brief tutorial a short practical introduction to the Mathematica package SARAH. First, it is shown how an existing model file can be changed to implement a new model in SARAH. In the second part, masses, vertices and renormalisation group equations are calculated with SARAH. Finally, the main commands to generate model files and output for other tools are summarised.

  12. Facilitating Meaningful Discussion Groups in the Primary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Lindsey; Ogden, Meridith; Kelly, Laura Beth

    2015-01-01

    This Teaching Tips describes a yearlong process of facilitating meaningful discussion groups about literature with first-grade students in an urban Title I school. At the beginning of the year, the teacher provided explicit instruction in speaking and listening skills to support students with the social skills needed for thoughtful discussion. She…

  13. Values and Commitments Underlying Discussion. Professional Development on Discussion: Group Images in Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Eileen

    The Discussion Development Group (DDG) at Moray House College of Education, Scotland, is a resource center designed as an open learning system to provide inservice training, consultancy support, and resources on classroom discussion. A case study involving 17 teachers and recently conducted by the DDG explored features of process innovation and…

  14. Learning What Works: Promoting Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Anna F.; Dao, Jennifer N.; González, Gloriana

    2014-01-01

    Many teachers have designed lessons for students who will be working in groups to discuss and solve a problem. After investing time in constructing an interesting problem, creating strategically designed groups, and introducing the problem carefully, teachers may be left wondering how to help students collaborate to make sense of mathematical…

  15. TMVA tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; VOSS, Helge

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial will both give an introduction on how to use TMVA in root6 and showcase some new features, such as modularity, variable importance, interfaces to R and python. After explaining the basic functionality, the typical steps required during a real life application (such as variable selection, pre-processing, tuning and classifier evaluation) will be demonstrated on simple examples. First part of the tutorial will use the usual Root interface (please make sure you have Root 6.04 installed somewhere). The second part will utilize the new server notebook functionality of Root as a Service. If you are within CERN but outside the venue or outside CERN please consult the notes attached.

  16. Impact of discussion on preferences elicited in a group setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milne Ruairidh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completeness of preferences is assumed as one of the axioms of expected utility theory but has been subject to little empirical study. Methods Fifteen non-health professionals was recruited and familiarised with the standard gamble technique. The group then met five times over six months and preferences were elicited independently on 41 scenarios. After individual valuation, the group discussed the scenarios, following which preferences could be changed. Changes made were described and summary measures (mean and median before and after discussion compared using paired t test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out to explore attitudes to discussing preferences. These were transcribed, read by two investigators and emergent themes described. Results Sixteen changes (3.6% were made to preferences by seven (47% of the fifteen members. The difference between individual preference values before and after discussion ranged from -0.025 to 0.45. The average effect on the group mean was 0.0053. No differences before and after discussion were statistically significant. The group valued discussion highly and suggested it brought four main benefits: reassurance; improved procedural performance; increased group cohesion; satisfying curiosity. Conclusion The hypothesis that preferences are incomplete cannot be rejected for a proportion of respondents. However, brief discussion did not result in substantial number of changes to preferences and these did not have significant impact on summary values for the group, suggesting that incompleteness, if present, may not have an important effect on cost-utility analyses.

  17. Tutorials for large classes of Common Foundation Program biomedical science students: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Modhefer, Abdul-Kadhum J A; Roe, Sean M

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the problems encountered conducting biomedical science tutorials for nursing students in large classes with a typical student: staff ratio of 45:1. The study is based on level 1 Common Foundation Program students from the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast at the conclusion of two phases of biomedical sciences education which include a course of 12 interactive tutorials. Survey and interview methodologies were employed to investigate difficulties encountered by students in these large tutorial classes, to ascertain what characterises a good tutor and to explore student attitudes to interactive learning. The barriers to effective teaching and learning in tutorials are discussed and subsequently, a set of guidelines is proposed to enhance learning in them. These include being aware of the ability of the student group, having a compassionate questioning style, tailoring the teaching environment to fit the aims of the class and experimenting with different tutorial formats.

  18. Using Tutorials in Introductory Physics on circuits in a German university course: observations and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegler, Peter; Simon, Andreas; Prochaska, Marcus; Kautz, Christian; Bierwirth, Rebekka; Hagendorf, Susan; Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-11-01

    We describe the implementation of Tutorials in Introductory Physics in a German university course. In particular, we investigate if the conceptual challenges that gave rise to the development of Tutorials are also found among German students, which hurdles to the implementation of Tutorials are encountered in a German context, and how Tutorials are perceived in this different context. To that end, video recordings from workgroup sessions and guided group discussions with students and teaching assistants, as well as interviews with faculty are analysed. It was found that German students enter introductory physics courses with a different set of prior knowledge than their US-American counterparts, which together with implementation hurdles and negative perceptions by students, teaching assistants, and faculty led to the discontinuation of Tutorials after only one semester.

  19. Analysis of the Characteristics of Discussion Materials that Promote Group Discussion in the Medical Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hee; Jeon, Woo Taek

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to analyze the characteristics of discussion materials that promote student participation in discussions, satisfaction with student instruction, and tutor intervention in the medical humanities. We surveyed 117 premedical students and 7 tutors who attended 4-week group discussions in the medical humanities in 2010. We described the discussion materials using the following 4 characteristics as independent variables: material type, level of understanding, interest, and quantity. Dependent variables were: student participation in the discussion, student instruction satisfaction, and tutor intervention. Correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis, and crosstab were performed using SPSS 15.0. The correlation between the characteristics of the discussion materials differed by grade. When the books were chosen as the discussion material in the instruction of first-year premedical students, the correlation between level of understanding, interest, and quantity was negative. Higher levels of understanding of the material and interest in the material led to an increase in discussion participation among both first- and second-year premedical students. Higher levels of understanding and interest of the discussion material also increased student satisfaction with the instruction, regardless of grade. Finally, levels of understanding of the material affected the degree of tutor intervention. Tutors intervened more often in discussions with first-year premedical students than with second-year premedical students. Differences in grades and the understanding of the discussion material should be considered when choosing discussion materials. Further study is required to continue the development of the discussion model and improve methods of facilitate discussion among students in the medical humanities.

  20. How Introverts versus Extroverts Approach Small-Group Argumentative Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, E. Michael

    2002-01-01

    Explored in two studies disparities between how students with different degrees of extroversion and introversion engaged in small-group discussions requiring construction and critique of arguments. Found that extroverted students exhibited a greater tendency to use conflictual discourse, whereas introverted students worked with one another…

  1. Academic Discourse Socialization through Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei-ching

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the nature of small-group discussion and explores how it fosters oral academic discourse socialization in a TESOL postgraduate course. The participants included four native-English speaking and six non-native English Speaking postgraduate students at a state university in the U.S. The findings revealed that small-group…

  2. Academic Discourse Socialization through Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei-ching

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the nature of small-group discussion and explores how it fosters oral academic discourse socialization in a TESOL postgraduate course. The participants included four native-English speaking and six non-native English Speaking postgraduate students at a state university in the U.S. The findings revealed that small-group…

  3. Extending Students' Mathematical Thinking during Whole-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Nesrin; Kline, Kate; Grant, Theresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that extending students' mathematical thinking during whole-group discussions is a challenging undertaking. To better understand what extending student thinking looks like and how teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) supports teachers in their efforts to extend student thinking, the teaching of six experienced…

  4. Lexical Bundles: Facilitating University "Talk" in Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Chan Swee; Kashiha, Hadi; Tan, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Group discussion forms an integral language experience for most language learners, providing them with an opportunity to express themselves in a naturalistic setting. Multi-word expressions are commonly used and one of them is lexical bundles. Lexical bundles are types of extended collocations that occur more commonly than we expect; they are…

  5. Extending Students' Mathematical Thinking during Whole-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Nesrin; Kline, Kate; Grant, Theresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that extending students' mathematical thinking during whole-group discussions is a challenging undertaking. To better understand what extending student thinking looks like and how teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) supports teachers in their efforts to extend student thinking, the teaching of six experienced…

  6. Forming a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group - An Overview and Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal to form a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group is discussed. Survey responses regarding the purpose, membership, and meeting frequency are presented as well as the areas of expertise and experience of the respondents. The types of seals used, designed, or sold, current work, and technical challenges of turbomachinery seals, their materials, analysis, geometry, manufacturing, maintenance, testing, and incorporation into engine systems are also presented.

  7. Supervised Group Discussion To Teach Investigation Of An Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soudarssanane M.B

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of investigation of an epidemic was taught to three successive batches of medical students using the data of an actual local outbreak of gastro â€" enteritis. The method used was supervised group discussion using audio â€" visual aids. The objectives achieved about the conduct of the sessions and the suggestions given by the students for improvement have also been highlighted.

  8. Discussions of Fatherhood in Male Batterer Treatment Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Veteläinen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine how men who have perpetrated violence toward their partners and participated in batterer group talked about being a father and how they perceived their own fatherhood. The discussion in the group was analyzed qualitatively by using the methods of content analysis. In traditional fatherhood, they talked about avoidant, passiveness, distant, indifference, and authoritative controlling ways of acting. These men also created an image of themselves as active and caring fathers, thus including empathy and nurture in the concept of fatherhood. This new fatherhood was considered an achieved goal and an objective for the men as being a father. Talking about fatherhood in these groups is important as fatherhood and relations to children are both an important motivator toward nonviolence.

  9. The ethics of research using electronic mail discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Debbie; Warren, Jim; Price, Kay; Koch, Tina; Pignone, Gino

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss the ethical considerations that have confronted and challenged the research team when researchers facilitate conversations using private electronic mail discussion lists. The use of electronic mail group conversations, as a collaborative data generation method, remains underdeveloped in nursing. Ethical challenges associated with this approach to data generation have only begun to be considered. As receipt of ethics approval for a study titled; 'Describing transition with people who live with chronic illness' we have been challenged by many ethical dilemmas, hence we believe it is timely to share the issues that have confronted the research team. These discussions are essential so we can understand the possibilities for research interaction, communication, and collaboration made possible by advanced information technologies. Our experiences in this study have increased our awareness for ongoing ethical discussions about privacy, confidentiality, consent, accountability and openness underpinning research with human participants when generating data using an electronic mail discussion group. We describe how we work at upholding these ethical principles focusing on informed consent, participant confidentiality and privacy, the participants as threats to themselves and one another, public-private confusion, employees with access, hackers and threats from the researchers. A variety of complex issues arise during cyberspace research that can make the application of traditional ethical standards troublesome. Communication in cyberspace alters the temporal, spatial and sensory components of human interaction, thereby challenging traditional ethical definitions and calling to question some basic assumptions about identity and ones right to keep aspects of it confidential. Nurse researchers are bound by human research ethics protocols; however, the nature of research by electronic mail generates moral issues as well as ethical

  10. Social Network Analysis of an Online Melanoma Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Kathleen T.; McCray, Alexa T.; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    We have developed tools to explore social networks that share information in medical forums to better understand the unmet informational needs of patients and family members facing cancer treatments. We define metrics that demonstrate members discussing interleukin-2 receive a stronger response from the melanoma discussion group than a typical topic. The interleukin-2 network has a different topology than the melanoma network, has a higher density, and its members are more likely to have a higher intimacy level with another member and a lower inquisitiveness level than a typical melanoma user. Members are more likely to join the interleukin-2 network to answer a question than in the melanoma network (probability =.2 ±.05 p-value=.001). Within the melanoma network 20% of the questions posed to the community do not get an answer. In the interleukin-2 network, 1.3% of the questions (one question) do not get a response. PMID:21347134

  11. Audience design through social interaction during group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Shane L; Fay, Nicolas; Maybery, Murray

    2013-01-01

    This paper contrasts two accounts of audience design during multiparty communication: audience design as a strategic individual-level message adjustment or as a non-strategic interaction-level message adjustment. Using a non-interactive communication task, Experiment 1 showed that people distinguish between messages designed for oneself and messages designed for another person; consistent with strategic message design, messages designed for another person/s were longer (number of words) than those designed for oneself. However, audience size did not affect message length (messages designed for different sized audiences were similar in length). Using an interactive communication task Experiment 2 showed that as group size increased so too did communicative effort (number of words exchanged between interlocutors). Consistent with a non-strategic account, as group members were added more social interaction was necessary to coordinate the group's collective situation model. Experiment 3 validates and extends the production measures used in Experiment 1 and 2 using a comprehension task. Taken together, our results indicate that audience design arises as a non-strategic outcome of social interaction during group discussion.

  12. CERN Technical Training 2005: IT3T - IT Technical Training Tutorials (Summer 2005)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training and the Internet Services group of the IT department (IT/IS) are jointly organizing a series of free tutorials, addressing some topics of common interest: the IT Technical Training Tutorials (IT3T). The next IT3T will be offered, in English, with the following schedule: IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP: June 28 (Michel Christaller) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with FrontPage 2003: June 30 (Andreas Wagner) The IT Technical Training Tutorials will take place in the Training Centre Auditorium (building 593, room 11), from 14h30 to 15h30. The tutorials are free of charge, but separate registration to each is required. Participation to any of the tutorials is open: attendance to any tutorial is not a prerequisite to attend subsequent ones. If you are interested in attending, please discuss with your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH. Registered participants will be invited to each tutorial; attendance will be recorded in the personal training records. Mo...

  13. CERN Technical Training 2005: IT3T - IT Technical Training Tutorials (Summer 2005)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training and the Internet Services group of the IT department (IT/IS) are jointly organizing a series of free tutorials, addressing some topics of common interest: the IT Technical Training Tutorials (IT3T). The next IT3T will be offered, in English, with the following schedule: IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP: June 28 (Michel Christaller) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with FrontPage 2003: June 30 (Andreas Wagner) The IT Technical Training Tutorials will take place in the Training Centre Auditorium (building 593, room 11), from 14:30 to 15:30. The tutorials are free of charge, but separate registration to each is required. Participation to any of the tutorials is open: attendance to any tutorial is not a prerequisite to attend subsequent ones. If you are interested in attending, please discuss with your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH. Registered participants will be invited to each tutorial; attendance will be recorded in the personal training records. Mo...

  14. Advocacy and IPR, tutorial 4

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    With open access and repositories assuming a high profile some may question whether advocacy is still necessary. Those involved in the business of setting up and populating repositories are aware that in the majority of institutions there is still a great need for advocacy. This tutorial will give participants an opportunity to discuss different advocacy methods and approaches, including the 'top down' and 'bottom up' approach, publicity methods and the opportunities offered by funding body positions on open access. Participants will have the opportunity to share experiences of what works and what doesn't. The advocacy role often encompasses responsibility for advising academics on IPR issues. This is a particularly critical area where repository staff are engaged in depositing content on behalf of academics. The tutorial will offer an opportunity to discuss the IPR issues encountered by those managing repositories. The tutorial will draw on the experience of participants who have been engaged in advocacy act...

  15. Success of the Tutorial Program in Biochemistry at The Federal University of Vi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Baracat-Pereira

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Institutionalized at UFV in 2001, the Tutorial Program in Biochemistry aims to reduce the une-venness of basic prior knowledge among the students enrolled in regular Biochemistry courses. Thework methodology has been periodically evaluated and rened in order to overcome identied pro-blems. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the Tutorial Program based on the stu-dentsachievement, to show implemented modications and proposed alternatives to adjust methodo-logies. The student-nal-grades were obtained from UFV les. Questionnaires were applied to thePrograms students at the end of each semester. Suggestions and criticism from tutors and coordinatingprofessors were discussed at weekly meetings. Along six semesters (2001-2003, a leveling o of thetutorial students was observed with the attending students (S, minimum of 75% attendance, averagegrade 71.3 that got grades close to the average of no-tutorial students (average grade 71.5. For thetutorial students with attendance below the required minimum (N, the average grade was 58.8. Thefailure rate for grade S students (7.4% was lower then that for no-tutorial students (9.9% and forgrade N students (27.9%. Based on the lled out questionnaire from tutorial students, we observeas follows: 96.7% stated that it is eective to participate in the Program and 79.9% modied theirstudy approach. Among the modications implemented in the Program, are as folows: 1 Increase inthe number of tutorial groups (from 4 to 6; 2 Reduction in the number of volunteer-students, givingpriority to students with decient prior knowledge in pre-requisite-disciplines; and 3 Time reductionof tutorial sessions (from 3 to 2h weekly, with smaller groups and exercise classes. Thus, the observedmotivation, the leveling o and the lower failure rate of the S grade tutorial students indicated that theTutorial Program at UFV is improving and reaching its objectives.

  16. Online Group Discussion pada Mata Kuliah Teknologi Pembelajaran Fisika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuberti Yuberti

    2015-10-01

    penawaran akses internet yang menggiurkan demi menarik minat penggunanya. Beberapa fenomena tersebut menunjukkan semakin banyak kalangan yang memanfaatkan internet dan menjadikanya sebagai gaya hidup untuk berintaksi, bersosialisasi, belajar dan mendapatkan informasi. Meluasnya pemanfaatan internet bisa menjadi potensi besar dalam pengembangan pembelajaran dengan sistem online memungkinkan pebelajar untuk mengakses infromasi secara fleksibel tanpa terbatas waktu dan tempat. Diskusi tidak lagi terjadi secara tatap muka, namun dapat terus berlangsung meskipun dalam lingkungan maya. Sebagaimana pelaksanaan metode pembelajaran maya lainnya. Pelaksanaannya diskusi online itu sendiri pada dasarnya mengadopsi dari metode pembelajaran diskusi tatap muka. Kata kunci: online group discussion, teknologi pembelajaran

  17. Groups of Groups: The Role of Group Learning in Building Social Capital. CRLRA Discussion Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Bell, Rowena; Falk, Ian

    The Centre for Research and Learning in Regional Australia is investigating the elements of social capital and developing a set of indicators that show when social capital is building. The indicators can be used where groups or organizations with a shared purpose engage in productive interactions that benefit not only the individual member groups…

  18. Increasing Student Participation in Online Group Discussions via Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    A comparison study between two different methods of conducting online discussions in an introductory astronomy course was performed to determine if the use of Facebook as an online discussion tool has an impact on student participation as well as student response time. This study shows that students using Facebook for their online discussions…

  19. Increasing Student Participation in Online Group Discussions via Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    A comparison study between two different methods of conducting online discussions in an introductory astronomy course was performed to determine if the use of Facebook as an online discussion tool has an impact on student participation as well as student response time. This study shows that students using Facebook for their online discussions…

  20. Responding to Financial Reductions Reports from the Discussion Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Journal of Institutional Management in Higher Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The discussions of participants of a workshop concerning the effects of retrenchment on teaching and research, institutional policies, and institutional operations in European higher educational institutions are summarized. (MSE)

  1. Pretest online discussion groups to augment teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Hasbargen, Barbara; Miziniak, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Tests and final examination scores of three semesters of control students in a nursing foundation course were compared with tests and final examination scores of three semesters of participating students. Participating students were offered access to an asynchronous pretest online discussion activity with a faculty e-moderator. While the simplified Bloom's revised taxonomy assisted in creating appropriate preparatory test and final examination questions for pretest online discussion, Salmon's five-stage online method provided direction to the e-moderator on how to encourage students to achieve Bloom's higher-order thinking skills during the pretest online discussions. Statistical analysis showed the pretest online discussion activity had a generally positive impact on tests and final examination scores, when controlling for a number of possible confounding variables, including instructor, cumulative grade point average, age, and credit hours.

  2. The "Us" in Discuss: Grouping in Literature Circles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This article describes one middle school teacher's use of literature circles using heterogeneous grouping. It begins with a brief rationale for using literature circles in the language arts classroom. Next, it describes techniques to form literature circles. Then, it shares how to build and establish a supportive environment within each group. It…

  3. Puerperal Group A Streptococcal Infections: A Case Series and Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Busowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Puerperal group A streptococcal infections, a major postpartum killer during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, have become (fortunately rare. We describe a cluster of 4 serious peripartum group A streptococcal infections occurring within the past five years at a single medical center. These cases were not epidemiologically linked and serve to illustrate the continuing risk of these potentially fulminant infections.

  4. A Blueprint for Implementing Small-Group Collaborative Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu-Jones, Lisa; Proctor, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of the Common Core in many states across the country means we need to explore instructional approaches that promote student language use in order to meet many of the complex linguistic standards that comprise the Common Core. In this Teaching Tip, we provide a blueprint for a 4-week collaborative discussion mini-unit that a second…

  5. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TEAM-BASED LEARNING ON THE TRADITIONAL METHOD OF CONDUCTING TUTORIALS IN PHYSIOLOGY FOR FIRST YEAR MBBS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Vishweshwar Amalladinna

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In medical education, didactic lectures, tutorials, bedside clinics, etc. are some of the teaching-learning method incorporated in the curriculum. Most of the methods are teacher oriented where students are not involved much. Active participation of the students, i.e. student centered approach increases the understanding of the subject. In physiology, the tutorials are conducted to discuss the individual topics. It was observed that active participation of students in physiology tutorials is less. This study was undertaken to actively involve the students during tutorials and to assess their understanding by Team-Based Learning (TBL. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, the performance of the students in team-based learning was compared with the traditional learning. The pretest and post-test was conducted at the beginning and at the end of the tutorial in both the groups. In the study group, the tutorial topics were discussed in teams, whereas in control group, the tutorial was conducted by traditional method. RESULTS There was a significant increase in performance in post-test in study group compared to control group (p <0.001. TBL sessions will be more interesting and interacting compared to traditional method. TBL method improves the student’s understanding of the topics in detail and hence enhances the performance. CONCLUSION The different teaching-learning methods, which increase the student’s involvement should be implemented in the medical education to facilitate the learning process.

  6. Tutorial Facilitation in the Humanities Based on the Tenets of Carl Rogers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a model for group facilitation in the humanities based on Carl Rogers' model for group psychotherapy. Certain aspects of Carl Rogers' reflective learning strategies are reappraised and principles, specific only to psychotherapy, are introduced. Five of Rogers' axioms are applied to the tutorial discussion model: a…

  7. Studying Problem Solving through Group Discussion in Chat Rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Kozlova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present article we use a chat conversations’ corpus to study the process of resolving language problems. Our corpus includes chat conversations which took place between LSP students engaged in correcting errors in their peers’ summaries. The participants worked in groups and used the Windows Messenger program for communication within the group. Their task also included making use of electronic dictionaries and other reference materials. The conversations’ corpus obtained as a result of this exercise was analyzed holistically for possible indicators of each particular stage of the problem solving process. Later these indicators were validated throughout the entire corpus. Each problem solving process was thus represented as a chain of indicators and acceptability was determined for each error correction. The resulting problem solving chains were used to prove our hypotheses concerning internal and external support in text reproduction.

  8. CJS 211 Course Tutorial/TutorialRank

    OpenAIRE

    candice

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialrank.com Tutorial Purchased: 8 Times, Rating: A+   CJS 211 Week 1 Individual Assignment Ethical Dilemma Paper CJS 211 Week 1 DQ 1 CJS 211 Week 1 DQ 2 CJS 211 Week 2 Individual Assignment Ethical Dilemma Worksheet Law Enforcement CJS 211 Week 2 DQ 1 CJS 211 Week 2 DQ 2 CJS 211 Week 2 Team Assignment Ethical Decision Making Paper CJS 211 Week 3 Individual Assignment Ethical Dilemma Worksheet Prosecutors...

  9. CERN Technical Training 2005: IT3T - IT Technical Training Tutorials (Summer 2005)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training and the Internet Services group of the IT department (IT/IS) are jointly organizing a series of free tutorials, addressing some topics of common interest: the IT Technical Training Tutorials (IT3T). The first IT3T will be offered in June 2005, in English, with the following schedule: IT3T/1 - Read your mail and more with Outlook 2003: June 14 (Ruben Gaspar) IT3T/2 - Creating, managing and using distribution lists with Simba2: June 16 (Ruben Leivas) IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP: June 28 (Michel Christaller) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with FrontPage 2003: June 30 (Andreas Wagner) All IT Technical Training Tutorials will take place in the Training Centre Auditorium (building 593, room 11), from 14h30 to 15h30. The tutorials are free of charge, but separate registration to each is required. Participation to any of the tutorials is open: attendance to any tutorial is not a prerequisite to attend subsequent ones. If you are interested in attending, please discuss with your sup...

  10. The Effect of Instructional Methods (Lecture-Discussion versus Group Discussion) and Teaching Talent on Teacher Trainees Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrofin; Degeng, Nyoman Sudana; Ardhana, Wayan; Setyosari, Punaji

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine difference in the effect of instructional methods (lecture-discussion versus group discussion) and teaching talent on teacher trainees student learning outcomes. It was conducted by a quasi-experimental design using the factorialized (2 x 2) version of the nonequivalent control group design. The subjects were…

  11. Fuzzy Control Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotoli, M.; Jantzen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The tutorial concerns automatic control of an inverted pendulum, especially rule based control by means of fuzzy logic. A ball balancer, implemented in a software simulator in Matlab, is used as a practical case study. The objectives of the tutorial are to teach the basics of fuzzy control......, and to show how to apply fuzzy logic in automatic control. The tutorial is distance learning, where students interact one-to-one with the teacher using e-mail....

  12. Fuzzy Control Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotoli, M.; Jantzen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The tutorial concerns automatic control of an inverted pendulum, especially rule based control by means of fuzzy logic. A ball balancer, implemented in a software simulator in Matlab, is used as a practical case study. The objectives of the tutorial are to teach the basics of fuzzy control, and t......, and to show how to apply fuzzy logic in automatic control. The tutorial is distance learning, where students interact one-to-one with the teacher using e-mail....

  13. The genre tutorial and social networks terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Sales Santiago

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the terminology in the Internet social networks tutorials. A tutorial is a specialized text, full of terms, aiming to teach an individual or group of individuals who need some guidelines to operationalize a computerized tool, such as a social network. It is necessary to identify linguistic and terminological characteristics from the specialized lexical units in this digital genre. Social networks terminology is described and exemplified here. The results show that it is possible to refer to two specific terminologies in tutorials which help to determine the terminological profile of the thematic area, specifically from the point of view of denomination.

  14. CRJ 305 ASH Tutorial/ Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit   www.uoptutorial.com       Law - General Law Factors that Cause Crime. In Chapter 1 of Crime Prevention, the author discusses factors that cause crime. Select a specific crime or criminal issue. What are three factors that lead to the crime or criminal justice issue you identified? Identify possible solutions to the crime or criminal justice issue you selected. Why do you think these solutions would be effective ...

  15. Creating R Packages: A Tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Leisch, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    This tutorial gives a practical introduction to creating R packages. We discuss how object oriented programming and S formulas can be used to give R code the usual look and feel, how to start a package from a collection of R functions, and how to test the code once the package has been created. As running example we use functions for standard linear regression analysis which are developed from scratch.

  16. A Tutorial on Variational Integrators

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    We present a brief tutorial on the nuts and bolts computation of a multisymplectic particle-in-cell algorithm using the discretized Lagrangian approach. This approach, originated by Marsden, Shadwick, and others, brings the benefits of symplectic integration of Hamiltonian systems to full electromagnetic particle-in-cell algorithms. To make the work more approachable, we present a basic discussion of the philosophy, combined with a detailed derivation of a standard 1-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell algorithm.

  17. Generating Consistent Program Tutorials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestdam, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a tool that supports construction of program tutorials. A program tutorial provides the reader with an understanding of an example program by interleaving fragments of source code and explaining text. An example program can for example illustrate how to use a library...

  18. EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC TUTORIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes effective electronic tutorials creation and application based on the theory of pedagogy. Herewith the issues of necessary electronic tutorial functional, ways of the educational process organization with the use of information and communication technologies and the logistics of electronic educational resources are touched upon. 

  19. 2014 CESM Tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Marika

    2014-08-11

    The 2014 annual tutorial for the Community Earth System Model (CESM) was held on August 11-August 15, 2014 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO. It included lectures and practical sessions on numerous aspects of the CESM model. The proceedings submitted here include a description of the tutorial.

  20. IL web tutorials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette; Lund, Haakon

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results from a study on information literacy in a higher education (HE) context based on a larger research project evaluating 3 Norwegian IL web tutorials at 6 universities and colleges in Norway. The aim was to evaluate how the 3 web tutorials served students’ information...... seeking and writing process in an study context and to identify barriers to the employment and use of the IL web tutorials, hence to the underlying information literacy intentions by the developer. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed. A clear mismatch was found between intention...... and use of the web tutorials. In addition, usability only played a minor role compared to relevance. It is concluded that the positive expectations of the IL web tutorials tend to be overrated by the developers. Suggestions for further research are presented....

  1. Effects of Tagcloud-Anchored Group Discussions on Pre-Service Teachers' Collaborative Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Yuan; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Group discussions are critical for students constructing new understanding and knowledge in both classroom and distance education. Tagclouds can provide an intuitive overview about the group's collective knowledge and could potentially be used as an anchor for group discussions. The effect of using tagclouds as anchors for group discussions was…

  2. Assessment of an electronic voting system within the tutorial setting: A randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN54535861

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Young Neville J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic voting systems have been used in various educational settings with little measurement of the educational impact on students. The goal of this study was to measure the effects of the inclusion of an electronic voting system within a small group tutorial. Method A prospective randomised controlled trial was run at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, a teaching hospital in Adelaide, Australia. 102 students in their first clinical year of medical school participated in the study where an electronic voting system was introduced as a teaching aid into a standard tutorial. Long-term retention of knowledge and understanding of the topics discussed in the tutorials was measured and student response to the introduction of the electronic voting system was assessed. Results Students using the electronic voting system had improved long-term retention of understanding of material taught in the tutorial. Students had a positive response to the use of this teaching aid. Conclusion Electronic voting systems can provide a stimulating learning environment for students and in a small group tutorial may improve educational outcomes.

  3. IL web tutorials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette; Lund, Haakon

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results from a study on information literacy in a higher education (HE) context based on a larger research project evaluating 3 Norwegian IL web tutorials at 6 universities and colleges in Norway. The aim was to evaluate how the 3 web tutorials served students’ information...... seeking and writing process in an study context and to identify barriers to the employment and use of the IL web tutorials, hence to the underlying information literacy intentions by the developer. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed. A clear mismatch was found between intention...

  4. Symmetry and group theory in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of group theory in the context of molecular and crystal symmetry, this book covers both point-group and space-group symmetries.Provides a comprehensive discussion of group theory in the context of molecular and crystal symmetryCovers both point-group and space-group symmetriesIncludes tutorial solutions

  5. Adult nutrition assessment tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tutorial presents a systematic approach to nutrition assessment based on a modern appreciation for the contributions of inflammation that serve as the foundation for newly proposed consensus definitions for malnutrition syndromes. Practical indicators of malnutrition and inflammation have been ...

  6. Group Discussions and Test-Enhanced Learning: Individual Learning Outcomes and Personality Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik U.; Jonsson, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions…

  7. Group Discussions and Test-Enhanced Learning: Individual Learning Outcomes and Personality Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik U.; Jonsson, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions…

  8. discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S. Poznyak

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a version of Robust Stochastic Maximum Principle (RSMP applied to the Minimax Mayer Problem formulated for stochastic differential equations with the control-dependent diffusion term. The parametric families of first and second order adjoint stochastic processes are introduced to construct the corresponding Hamiltonian formalism. The Hamiltonian function used for the construction of the robust optimal control is shown to be equal to the Lebesque integral over a parametric set of the standard stochastic Hamiltonians corresponding to a fixed value of the uncertain parameter. The paper deals with a cost function given at finite horizon and containing the mathematical expectation of a terminal term. A terminal condition, covered by a vector function, is also considered. The optimal control strategies, adapted for available information, for the wide class of uncertain systems given by an stochastic differential equation with unknown parameters from a given compact set, are constructed. This problem belongs to the class of minimax stochastic optimization problems. The proof is based on the recent results obtained for Minimax Mayer Problem with a finite uncertainty set [14,43-45] as well as on the variation results of [53] derived for Stochastic Maximum Principle for nonlinear stochastic systems under complete information. The corresponding discussion of the obtain results concludes this study.

  9. Use of IBM LinkWay for Developing Tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkatte, Umesh P.; Nagarkatte, Shailaja U.

    IBM LinkWay is an example of a hypertext and hypermedia authoring system. This paper summarizes a workshop presentation that demonstrates how to create a mathematics tutorial using LinkWay. An introduction discusses the guidelines for the tutorial. The guidelines consider the presentation of questions, help features for the students, feedback,…

  10. The Use of Epistemic Distancing to Create a Safe Space to Sensemake in Introductory Physics Tutorials

    CERN Document Server

    Conlin, Luke D

    2015-01-01

    In active engagement physics classrooms, students get opportunities to make sense of physics together through discussion. They do not always take up these opportunities, in part because of the risk of sharing their ideas and having them rejected by their classmates or the instructors. In this case study, I analyze videotaped discourse of a tutorial group's early discussions to investigate how students manage these risks in creating a safe space to sensemake. I find that the students and instructors alike rely on a common discursive resource - epistemic distancing - to share their ideas while protecting themselves affectively if others disagree. Epistemic distancing includes hedging, joking, deferring, and other discourse moves used to soften one's stance in conversation. I use video analysis to illustrate the effects of these moves on tutorial groups' sensemaking discussions, and discuss implications for instructors wishing to encourage sensemaking discussions in their physics classrooms.

  11. Choosing none of the above: Persistence of negativity after group discussion and group decision refusal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Within psychology and other disciplines, group decision making is a much-studied topic. However, the conditions in which groups do not decide but rather refuse to choose among available options have not been studied systematically. This research begins to fill this void, studying the effects of the

  12. Choosing none of the above : Persistence of negativity after group discussion and group decision refusal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Bernard A.

    2008-01-01

    Within psychology and other disciplines, group decision making is a much-studied topic. However, the conditions in which groups do not decide but rather refuse to choose among available options have not been studied systematically. This research begins to fill this void, studying the effects of the

  13. Group discussions and test-enhanced learning: individual learning outcomes and personality characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik; Jonsson, Bert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N?=?98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions benefit learning when compared to test-enhanced learning over time. The results showed that feedback does not seem to have any effect if provid...

  14. Learning from tutorials: a qualitative study of approaches to learning and perceptions of tutorial interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Kim Jesper

    2014-01-01

    This study examines differences in university students’ approaches to learning when attending tutorials as well as variation in students’ perceptions of tutorials as an educational arena. In-depth qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with undergraduates showed how surface and deep...... approaches to learning were revealed in the students’ note-taking, listening, and engaging in dialogue. It was also shown how variation in the students’ approaches to learning were coherent with variation in the students’ perceptions of the tutors’ pedagogical role, the value of peer interaction......, and the overall purpose of tutorials. The results are discussed regarding the paradox that students relying on surface approaches to learning seemingly are the ones least likely to respond to tutorials in the way they were intended....

  15. Learning from tutorials: a qualitative study of approaches to learning and perceptions of tutorial interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Kim Jesper

    2014-01-01

    This study examines differences in university students’ approaches to learning when attending tutorials as well as variation in students’ perceptions of tutorials as an educational arena. In-depth qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with undergraduates showed how surface and deep...... approaches to learning were revealed in the students’ note-taking, listening, and engaging in dialogue. It was also shown how variation in the students’ approaches to learning were coherent with variation in the students’ perceptions of the tutors’ pedagogical role, the value of peer interaction......, and the overall purpose of tutorials. The results are discussed regarding the paradox that students relying on surface approaches to learning seemingly are the ones least likely to respond to tutorials in the way they were intended....

  16. The influence of group discussion on performance judgments: rating accuracy, contrast effects, and halo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jerry K; Loveland, James M

    2008-03-01

    The authors investigated the effect of group discussion, such as may occur formally in panel interview scenarios, assessment centers, or 360-degree feedback situations, on judgments of performance. Research on group polarization suggests that the effect of group discussion combined with raters' preexisting impressions of ratees or interviewees should result in an extremitization of impressions. Thus, the authors hypothesized that group discussion would (a) make ratings less accurate, (b) polarize impressions that were already good or poor as reflected by greater contrast effects, and (c) increase positive halo. Results indicated that group discussion resulted in less accurate ratings and greater contrast effects. Additional analyses suggested that group discussion increased positive halo. The authors discuss implications for research on group or panel judgments.

  17. Student Opinions on Factors Influencing Tutorials at Walter Sisulu University, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garí Calzada, Mayra A; Iputo, Jehu E

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Problem-based learning harmonized with education in and for the community is the cornerstone of the curriculum for the undergraduate medical degree at Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha, South Africa. In tutorials, students construct knowledge and learn to work collaboratively while interacting with one another in their search for solutions to a pedagogically modeled health issue based on a patient. Problems cover students' needs defined by the learning cycle of the second year medical curriculum, organized into four learning blocks. OBJECTIVES Determine student perspectives on which factors affect tutorial group functioning and detect the reported presence of these factors in the four learning blocks comprising the second year of medical studies at Walter Sisulu University. METHODS Twenty second-year medical students were chosen by stratified random sampling and assigned to two focus groups. One group discussed factors that foster smooth functioning of the tutorial group; the other focused on factors hindering effective group work. Later, in a joint session, 17 items previously identified by both groups were selected and included in a survey given to all 97 students at the end of second year. The survey assessed presence of each item in 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 of the learning blocks. RESULTS Survey response was 93.8%. Mean reported presence of factors that influenced tutorials in the four learning blocks was 2.71 (SD 0.31) for the social dimension, 3.02 for motivational (SD 0.02), 3.00 for cognitive (SD 0.42), and 2.22 for self-directed learning (SD 0.79). CONCLUSIONS Tutorial group performance at Walter Sisulu University is positively influenced more by motivational and cognitive factors than by social and self-directed learning factors. Social dimensions should be prioritized when training tutors and self-directed learning stressed for students. The poor productivity of extra-tutorial group discussions suggests the need for a critical evaluation of this

  18. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  19. The Relationship Between Attendance in Student-Centred Physics Tutorials and Performance in University Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Mendez, Alberto; O'Byrne, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The School of Physics at the University of Sydney has introduced voluntary workshop tutorials in large first-year courses. The tutorials are based on informal cooperative groupings with structured worksheets and short hands-on activities. In this study we explore the relationship between attendance at the workshop tutorials and student performance…

  20. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  1. The Effects of Group Members' Personalities on a Test Taker's L2 Group Oral Discussion Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockey, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    The second language group oral is a test of second language speaking proficiency, in which a group of three or more English language learners discuss an assigned topic without interaction with interlocutors. Concerns expressed about the extent to which test takers' personal characteristics affect the scores of others in the group have limited its…

  2. Challenges in the doctor-patient relationship: 12 tips for more effective peer group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hamish

    2015-09-01

    In New Zealand, almost all general practitioners are members of peer groups, which provide opportunities for both clinical discussion and collegial support. This article proposes that peer groups can also be a useful medium for exploring specific challenges within the doctor-patient relationship. However, the peer group culture needs to be receptive to this particular goal. Structured discussion can help peer group members explore interpersonal issues more thoroughly.

  3. A Shape Dynamics Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Mercati, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Shape Dynamics (SD) is a new theory of gravity that is based on fewer and more fundamental first principles than General Relativity (GR). The most important feature of SD is the replacement of GR's relativity of simultaneity with a more tractable gauge symmetry, namely invariance under spatial conformal transformations. This Tutorial contains both a quick introduction for readers curious about SD and a detailed walk-through of the historical and conceptual motivations for the theory, its logical development from first principles and an in-depth description of its present status. The Tutorial is sufficiently self-contained for an undergrad student with some basic background in General Relativity and Lagrangian/Hamiltonian mechanics. It is intended both as a reference text for students approaching the subject, and as a review article for researchers interested in the theory. This is a first version of the Tutorial, which will be periodically expanded and updated with the latest results.

  4. Dynamical systems on networks a tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, Mason A

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a tutorial for the study of dynamical systems on networks. It discusses both methodology and models, including spreading models for social and biological contagions. The authors focus especially on “simple” situations that are analytically tractable, because they are insightful and provide useful springboards for the study of more complicated scenarios. This tutorial, which also includes key pointers to the literature, should be helpful for junior and senior undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers from mathematics, physics, and engineering who seek to study dynamical systems on networks but who may not have prior experience with graph theory or networks. Mason A. Porter is Professor of Nonlinear and Complex Systems at the Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, UK. He is also a member of the CABDyN Complexity Centre and a Tutorial Fellow of Somerville College. James P. Gleeson is Professor of Industrial and Appli...

  5. Web-tutorials in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Haakon; Pors, Niels Ole

    2012-01-01

    affordances and different forms of usability. Design/methodology/approach – The research has employed a variety of data‐collection methods including interviews with librarians, interviews and focus group interviews with students, coupled with tests of their capabilities using the systems. A detailed research...... of students were also interesting, clearly indicating marked differences in perceptions depending on study year and discipline but also different valuation of the different forms of usability. Overall, the research indicated a discrepancy between design intentions versus use and perception of the tutorials...

  6. Plane geometry drawing tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gutiérrez de Ravé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se ha desarrollado un tutorial para facilitar la docencia del d ibujo geométrico. Con la idea de servir de apoyo a las explicac iones teóricas y prácticas de los conceptos correspondientes a los trazados ge ométricos planos necesarios en la ingeniería. Este tutorial es de fácil manejo y permite interactividad con el usuario, animaciones prá cticas, autoevaluaciones, explicaciones amplias del temario y l a enseñanza "paso a paso" de los conceptos gracias a los diferent es niveles de complejidad conceptual que incluye en su contenido.

  7. A Tutorial on UPPAAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; David, Alexandre; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2004-01-01

    This is a tutorial paper on the tool Uppaal. Its goal is to be a short introduction on the flavor of timed automata implemented in the tool, to present its interface, and to explain how to use the tool. The contribution of the paper is to provide reference examples and modeling patterns.......This is a tutorial paper on the tool Uppaal. Its goal is to be a short introduction on the flavor of timed automata implemented in the tool, to present its interface, and to explain how to use the tool. The contribution of the paper is to provide reference examples and modeling patterns....

  8. Information Hiding Techniques: A Tutorial Review

    CERN Document Server

    Thampi, Sabu M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this tutorial is to present an overview of various information hiding techniques. A brief history of steganography is provided along with techniques that were used to hide information. Text, image and audio based information hiding techniques are discussed. This paper also provides a basic introduction to digital watermarking.

  9. Relevant Research on Audio-Tutorial Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Joseph D.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews two aspects of research related to audio-tutorial instructional methods. First, the learning theory of David P. Ausebel is summarized and applied to instructional procedures. Secondly, learning time for attainment of concept and knowledge levels is discussed. Concludes that studies are needed on designs based on Ausebel's theory,…

  10. The Effect of Small Group Discussion on Cutoff Scores during Standard Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deunk, Marjolein I.; van Kuijk, Mechteld F.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2014-01-01

    Standard setting methods, like the Bookmark procedure, are used to assist education experts in formulating performance standards. Small group discussion is meant to help these experts in setting more reliable and valid cutoff scores. This study is an analysis of 15 small group discussions during two standards setting trajectories and their effect…

  11. Relevant Prior Knowledge Moderates the Effect of Elaboration during Small Group Discussion on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion about thunder and lightning. In the video, a teacher asked…

  12. Promoting Thinking, Problem-Solving and Reasoning during Small Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2011-01-01

    The study reports on the types of questioning strategies teachers use to promote thinking, problem-solving and reasoning during small group discussions. The study also reports on the types of discourses students use to problem-solve and reason during their small group discussions. An audiotape of one class lesson from the three teachers included…

  13. Relevant prior knowledge moderates the effect of elaboration during small group discussion on academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. van Blankenstein (Floris); D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); C.P.M. van der Vleuten (Cees); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion

  14. Qualitative Research and Consumer Policy: Focus Group Discussions as a Form of Consumer Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Eva; Jarvela, Katja; Pulliainen, Annukka; Saastamoinen, Mika; Timonen, Paivi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes our ongoing attempts to involve consumers in innovation and technology policy by means of a national Consumer Panel, using focus group discussions as the primary method of consumer participation. We evaluate our experiences of the usefulness of focus group discussions in this context by considering two examples of studies…

  15. Group discussions and test-enhanced learning: individual learning outcomes and personality characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik U; Jonsson, Bert

    2017-02-07

    This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions benefit learning when compared to test-enhanced learning over time. The results showed that feedback does not seem to have any effect if provided to a discussion group, and that test-enhanced learning leads to better learning than the discussion groups, independent of retention interval. Moreover, we examined whether memory and learning might be influenced by the participants' need for cognition (NFC). The results showed that those scoring high on NFC remembered more than those who scored low. To conclude, testing trumps discussion groups from a learning perspective, and the discussion groups were also the least beneficial learning context for those scoring low on NFC.

  16. A Tentative Study of Agreement among University Freshmen in Oral English Group Discussions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨非

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to find out how university freshmen came to an agreement in oral English. There were twenty groups in two classes of freshmen who took part in this activity and got involved in the classroom discussions and after-class communications. The classes were divided into groups of six members. The results of the research showed that while the freshmen got involved in the group discussions, they used social communicative skills to reach a final agreement.

  17. A Tentative Study of Agreement among University Freshmen in Oral English Group Discussions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨非

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to find out how university freshmen came to an agreement in oral English. There weretwenty groups in two classes of freshmen who took part in this activity and got involved in the classroom discussions and after-classcommunications. The classes were divided into groups of six members. The results of the research showed that while the freshmen gotinvolved in the group discussions, they used social communicative skills to reach a final agreement.

  18. The impact of service-specific staffing, case scheduling, turnovers, and first-case starts on anesthesia group and operating room productivity: a tutorial using data from an Australian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Catherine; Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2006-12-01

    In this tutorial, we consider the impact of operating room (OR) management on anesthesia group and OR labor productivity and costs. Most of the tutorial focuses on the steps required for each facility to refine its OR allocations using its own data collected during patient care. Data from a hospital in Australia are used throughout to illustrate the methods. OR allocation is a two-stage process. During the initial tactical stage of allocating OR time, OR capacity ("block time") is adjusted. For operational decision-making on a shorter-term basis, the existing workload can be considered fixed. Staffing is matched to that workload based on maximizing the efficiency of use of OR time. Scheduling cases and making decisions on the day of surgery to increase OR efficiency are worthwhile interventions to increase anesthesia group productivity. However, by far, the most important step is the appropriate refinement of OR allocations (i.e., planning service-specific staffing) 2-3 mo before the day of surgery. Reducing surgical and/or turnover times and delays in first-case-of-the-day starts generally provides small reductions in OR labor costs. Results vary widely because they are highly sensitive both to the OR allocations (i.e., staffing) and to the appropriateness of those OR allocations.

  19. Fiber Nonlinearities: A Tutorial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Govind P. Agrawal

    2003-01-01

    Fiber nonlinearities have long been regarded as being mostly harmful for fiber-optic communication systems. Over the last few years, however, the nonlinear effects are increasingly being used for practical telecommunications applications,the Raman amplification being only one of the recent examples. In this tutorial I review the vario us nonlinear effects occurring in optical fibers from both standpoints..

  20. Fiber Nonlinearities: A Tutorial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Govind; P.; Agrawal

    2003-01-01

    Fiber nonlinearities have long been regarded as being mostly harmful for fiber-optic communication systems. Over the last few years, however, the nonlinear effects are increasingly being used for practical telecommunications applications, the Raman amplification being only one of the recent examples. In this tutorial I review the various nonlinear effects occurring in optical fibers from both standpoints..

  1. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  2. Hyperspectral image analysis. A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigo, José Manuel, E-mail: jmar@food.ku.dk [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Babamoradi, Hamid [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-10-08

    This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processing will be exposed, and some guidelines given and discussed. Due to the broad character of current applications and the vast number of multivariate methods available, this paper has focused on an industrial chemical framework to explain, in a step-wise manner, how to develop a classification methodology to differentiate between several types of plastics by using Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Partial Least Squares – Discriminant Analysis. Thus, the reader is guided through every single step and oriented in order to adapt those strategies to the user's case. - Highlights: • Comprehensive tutorial of Hyperspectral Image analysis. • Hierarchical discrimination of six classes of plastics containing flame retardant. • Step by step guidelines to perform class-modeling on hyperspectral images. • Fusion of multivariate data analysis and digital image processing methods. • Promising methodology for real-time detection of plastics containing flame retardant.

  3. Cutting the Cord: Student-Led Discussion Groups in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, John; McGuinness, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of leaderless group discussions and peer assessment in undergraduate classes to develop teamwork skills and the capacity for independent thought and action students will need on the job. (SK)

  4. Discussing group work in the EFL classroom from a Chinese cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊宇; 张冬瑜

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help the EFL teachers, particularly those western teachers, who are teaching in China, to obtain a better understanding of group work by exploring and discussing its use from a Chinese cultural perspective.

  5. Student satisfaction and self-assessment after small group discussion in a medical ethics education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hee-Kyung; Shin, Jwa-Seop

    2009-09-01

    Small group discussions are useful tools in medical ethics education. We aimed to assess student satisfaction with specific components of a small group discussion and to evaluate student self-assessment of the objectives of education. A structured questionnaire was developed after a literature review and a focus group interview. Components of the small group discussion were categorized by discussion case (self, other), individual activities (self-study, making materials, presentation experience), and group activities (preclass/in-class/postclass/plenary discussion, instructor's comments). The items for student self-assessment were: "To specify ethical issue in actual practice", "To get new knowledge", "To consider doctor's entity", "Empathy to others", "To get multidimensional viewpoint", "Viewpoint change", "To deliver my thought clearly", and "Ability to confront the medical ethics dilemma in the future". After the survey, an in-depth interview was performed to determine the reason behind the students' answers. A total of 121 students responded, for whom overall satisfaction and self-assessment were high. Students reported greater satisfaction with self-case, presentation experience, in-class discussion, and instructor's comments but less satisfaction with self-study before class and postclass discussion. Student self-assessment was highest in the ability to specify an ethical issue and lowest for viewpoint change and self-confidence. After multivariate analysis, higher student self-assessment was associated with greater satisfaction with the small group discussion. To improve the quality of medical ethics education, close investigation and monitoring of each component of the small group discussion and student achievement are essential, as is continuous feedback.

  6. [The Mechanism of Free-Floating Discussion in a Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Supervisory Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2015-06-01

    Although the free-floating discussion format is widely used in group therapy, the application of this format in the context of supervisory groups has yet to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanisms involved in facilitating and learning the free-floating discussion format in a supervisory group. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate the group content and personal feedback of a psychiatric-nurse supervisory group. The group held on 12 sessions. Each session was conducted once weekly and lasting 150 minutes. The findings identified the functions of free-floating discussions in the context of supervisory groups as: embodied interaction and initiation by handling. Embodied interaction included: reflection on the experience of the other, sense of body, and present action. Initiation by handling included: facilitating the self-narrative, following the lead of the group, and reflecting in accordance with the group. The role of the facilitator is to parallel process rather than to lead in order to produce practical wisdom. Free-floating discussion and self-evidence from initiation by handling has the potential to promote spontaneity, creativity, and self-confidence in clinical practice and to promote deep learning.

  7. Social Skills and Leadership Abilities among Children in Small-Group Literature Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certo, Janine L.

    2011-01-01

    Many childhood educators are attempting to shift from the dominant "recitation" format of discussions found in today's classrooms. This study draws on reader response, and sociocognitive and sociocultural theories to investigate children's perceptions of social skills and leadership moves after participating in small-group discussions of…

  8. Advances and bottlenecks in modelling the greenhouse climate: summary of a group discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seginer, I.; Bakker, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a summary of a group discussion at the symposium 'Models in protected cultivation' held in Wageningen, August 1997. The discussion focused on the reasons for the relatively limited acceptance and application of greenhouse climate models, especially in commercial practice. The discussi

  9. Indian Youth Speak about Tobacco: Results of Focus Group Discussions with School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arima; Arora, Monika; Stigler, Melissa H.; Komro, Kelli A.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Reddy, K. Srinath; Perry, Cheryl L.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the findings of Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) that were conducted as a formative assessment for Project MYTRI (Mobilizing Youth for Tobacco Related Initiatives in India), a randomized, multicomponent, school-based trial to prevent and control tobacco use among youth in India. Forty-eight FGDs were conducted with students (N…

  10. Using the Self-Consciousness Scale to Predict Student Discussion Group Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Michael G.; Keller, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    This study used the Self-Consciousness Scale to test the hypothesis that socially anxious people could seek to avoid embarrassment and do poorly in small group discussions as a result. Those people high in private self-consciousness (lacking concern for social evaluation) would participate more in discussions. Findings supported the hypothesis.…

  11. Using Multimodal Presentation Software and Peer Group Discussion in Learning English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-jung

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an application of multimedia in a blended learning environment in which students engaged in multimodal presentations and peer group discussion. Students' presentation files were commented upon by their peers on the discussion board and scored by the researcher, based on questions developed by Levy and Kimber (2009) to apply…

  12. Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Mats Gunnar; Folkesson, Anne-Mari

    2016-01-01

    The school systems of many countries have been pervaded by student-centred pedagogy making students' small group discussion a common feature of the classroom practice.However, there is a lack of studies focussing different modes of discussion for the purpose of finding out whether some modes are more beneficial than others. Hence, the aim of this…

  13. Literacy and Technology: Integrating Technology with Small Group, Peer-Led Discussions of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Genya

    2012-01-01

    This review examines research of computer-mediated small group discussion of literature. The goal of this review is to explore several instructional formats for integrating print-based and new literacies skills. First, the theoretical foundations for the shift from teacher-led to student led discussion are outlined. Research exploring ways in…

  14. Learning through Discussions: Comparing the Benefits of Small-Group and Large-Class Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Philip H.; Hamann, Kerstin; Wilson, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    The literature on teaching and learning heralds the benefits of discussion for student learner outcomes, especially its ability to improve students' critical thinking skills. Yet, few studies compare the effects of different types of face-to-face discussions on learners. Using student surveys, we analyze the benefits of small-group and large-class…

  15. Social Skills and Leadership Abilities among Children in Small-Group Literature Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certo, Janine L.

    2011-01-01

    Many childhood educators are attempting to shift from the dominant "recitation" format of discussions found in today's classrooms. This study draws on reader response, and sociocognitive and sociocultural theories to investigate children's perceptions of social skills and leadership moves after participating in small-group discussions of…

  16. Gender Issues on the Information Highway: An Analysis of Communication Styles in Electronic Discussion Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Paolo

    A study investigated gender differences in language use in electronic mail discussion groups. A review of research on discourse analysis identifies areas in which gender differences are found in interpersonal interaction and language use in general, and how these reflect differences in socialization. Research on electronic discussion groups…

  17. A Glimpse of Interactional Strategies Used in Group Discussion in the EFL Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林美笑

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of literature review, this paper discusses what interactional strategies are in group discussions conducted in the EFL classroom. Two frameworks for interactional strategies are investigated to explore the types of interactional strategies. This aims to shed light upon the analysis of interactional features in face-to-face communication.

  18. Design and evaluation of a computer tutorial on electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeanne Jackson

    Research has shown that students do not fully understand electric fields and their interactions with charged particles after completing traditional classroom instruction. The purpose of this project was to develop a computer tutorial to remediate some of these difficulties. Research on the effectiveness of computer-delivered instructional materials showed that students would learn better from media incorporating user-controlled interactive graphics. Two versions of the tutorial were tested. One version used interactive graphics and the other used static graphics. The two versions of the tutorial were otherwise identical. This project was done in four phases. Phases I and II were used to refine the topics covered in the tutorial and to test the usability of the tutorial. The final version of the tutorial was tested in Phases III and IV. The tutorial was tested using a pretest-posttest design with a control group. Both tests were administered in an interview setting. The tutorial using interactive graphics was more effective at remediating students' difficulties than the tutorial using static graphics for students in Phase III (p = 0.001). In Phase IV students who viewed the tutorial with static graphics did better than those viewing interactive graphics. The sample size in Phase IV was too small for this to be a statistically meaningful result. Some student reasoning errors were noted during the interviews. These include difficulty with the vector representation of electric fields, treating electric charge as if it were mass, using faulty algebraic reasoning to answer questions involving ratios and proportions, and using Coulomb's law in situations in which it is not appropriate.

  19. All 2006 ATLAS Tutorials online

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb,; Mitch McLachlan,; Homer A. Neal

    The University of Michigan has completed its full agenda of Web Lecture recording for ATLAS for 2006. The archives include all three ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as a large variety of tutorials. They are accessible at target="_top" this location. Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. This is the first year our group has been asked to provide this complete service to the collaboration, so any and all feedback is welcome. We would especially like to know if you had any difficulties viewing the lectures, if you found the selection of material to be useful, and/or if you think there are any other specific events we ought to cover in 2007. Please send you comments to wlap@umich.edu. We look forward to bringing you a rich variety of new lectures in 2007, starting with the ATLAS Distributed Computing Tutorial on Feb 1, 2 in Edinburgh and concluding with the Higgs discovery talk (of course). Enjoy the Lec...

  20. Theorising Dyslexic Student Discussion/Action Groups in UK Higher Education: Research in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jenny; Herrington, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This "research in practice" analyses the experience of operating discussion/action groups with dyslexic students in higher education in three British universities which reflects a shift from the practice of developing "support groups" to a more developmental, proactive stance. It does so in the current UK legislative context…

  1. Designing a bone health and soy focus group discussion guide based on the health belief model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focus groups were used to assess the knowledge and skills of women in order to support curricula development. The Health Belief Model was applied to the discussion guide to enhance focus group findings and applications. Constructs related to perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers...

  2. The Effects of L1 and L2 Group Discussions on L2 Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Blake; Evans, Moyra Sweetnam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of post-reading group discussions in both first (L1) and second (L2) languages on L2 reading comprehension. The participants were fifteen Japanese university students of intermediate-level English. Three cohorts read four English texts and produced individual written recalls. Group 1 (the control…

  3. Using a Facebook Group as a Forum to Distribute, Answer and Discuss Content: Influence on Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bannon, Blanche W.; Britt, Virginia G.; Beard, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of using a Facebook group to increase preservice teachers' knowledge when one was used as a forum to share, answer, and discuss content-related questions in a technology course required for all students seeking teacher licensure. Further, it examined the students' prior use of Facebook groups, how the…

  4. Reducing Preschoolers' Disruptive Behavior in Public with a Brief Parent Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Sabine; Sanders, Matthew R.; Turner, Karen M. T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a brief 2-h discussion group for parents of preschool children that show disruptive behavior on shopping trips. Forty-six parents with children aged 2-6 years were randomly assigned to either the intervention condition or a waitlist control group. Significant intervention effects were found for measures of…

  5. Reinforcement Learning: A Tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this tutorial is to provide an introduction to reinforcement learning (RL) at a level easily understood by students and researchers in...provides a simple example to develop intuition of the underlying dynamic programming mechanism. In Section (2) the parts of a reinforcement learning problem... reinforcement learning algorithms. These include TD(lambda) and both the residual and direct forms of value iteration, Q-learning, and advantage learning

  6. Talking Mats in a discussion group for people with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Lisa; Mellgren, Elin; Hartelius, Lena; Ferm, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the function of Talking Mats (TM) in a discussion group for people with Huntington's disease (HD). Four persons with HD and their group leader participated. The group was videotaped during four discussions, two with and two without TM. A mixed method quantitative and qualitative study was implemented by evaluating the conversations using the protocol Effectiveness Framework of Functional Communication by analyzing the number of follow-up questions and by post discussion interviews. The results showed improved effectiveness of communication for all participants and an increased number of follow-up questions, both from the group leader and from some of the participants. All participants and the leader were positive regarding the use of TM but there were also drawbacks. TM could be useful in discussion groups for people with HD. An increased number of follow-up questions when TM is used may lead to a deeper understanding within the group. This study is the first of its kind and more research in the area is needed. [Box: see text].

  7. Hyperspectral image analysis. A tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Babamoradi, Hamid; Elcoroaristizabal Martin, Saioa

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processi...... to differentiate between several types of plastics by using Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Partial Least Squares - Discriminant Analysis. Thus, the reader is guided through every single step and oriented in order to adapt those strategies to the user's case....... will be exposed, and some guidelines given and discussed. Due to the broad character of current applications and the vast number of multivariate methods available, this paper has focused on an industrial chemical framework to explain, in a step-wise manner, how to develop a classification methodology...

  8. Health information, credibility, homophily, and influence via the Internet: Web sites versus discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoming; Walther, Joseph B; Pingree, Suzanne; Hawkins, Robert P

    2008-07-01

    Despite concerns about online health information and efforts to improve its credibility, how users evaluate and utilize such information presented in Web sites and online discussion groups may involve different evaluative mechanisms. This study examined credibility and homophily as two underlying mechanisms for social influence with regard to online health information. An original experiment detected that homophily grounded credibility perceptions and drove the persuasive process in both Web sites and online discussion groups. The more homophilous an online health information stimulus was perceived as being, the more likely people were to adopt the advice offered in that particular piece of information.

  9. FIN 320 UOP Course Tutorial/TutorialRank

    OpenAIRE

    apj

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialrank.com Tutorial Purchased: 0 Times, Rating: No Rating   What are differences between accounting and finance? What are the roles of financial managers? What are their fiduciary responsibilities? By what ethical standards should they abide?

  10. FIN 320(UOP) UOP Course Tutorial/TutorialRank

    OpenAIRE

    apj

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialrank.com Tutorial Purchased: 0 Times, Rating: No Rating   What are differences between accounting and finance? What are the roles of financial managers? What are their fiduciary responsibilities? By what ethical standards should they abide?

  11. The Hampstead Clinic at work. Discussions in the Diagnostic Profile Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Minutes of the Hampstead Clinic's Diagnostic Profile Research Group during a fifteen-month period (1964-1965) are reviewed and discussed. A wide range of topics were considered and discussed, with a special focus on the affective life, object relations, and ego function of atypical children in comparison to the early ego functions and differentiation of normal and neurotic children. These lively clinical and theoretical discussions and their implications for therapeutic work with a wide range of children, demonstrate the multifaceted leadership and contributions of Anna Freud as teacher, clinician, and thinker, and of the Hampstead Clinic as a major center for psychoanalytic studies.

  12. Effects of communication strategy training on EFL students’ performance in small-group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Benson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of studies have been conducted with regard to communication strategy training and performance on communicative tasks (Lam, 2009; Nakatani, 2010; Naughton, 2006. This study aims to add to the literature by examining how two strategies, clarifying/confirming and extending a conversation, and two methods of teaching the strategies, affected the interactional sequences and overall group discussion performance of EFL students at a university in Japan. Pre and posttreatment small-group discussions were recorded for assessment, and a stimulated recall interview was administered to determine the participants’ perceptions of their learning and language use. Posttest results reveal that the experimental groups that were taught predetermined phrases aimed at clarifying/confirming and extending a conversation employed such phrases more frequently than the control group. However, this employment of phrases did not lead to higher gains in group discussion skills as the control group enjoyed the largest gains from pre to posttest. The researchers consider the findings in light of previous research, and conclude with recommendations for future research on the topic with special regard to research design.

  13. Implementation of Inquiry-Based Tutorials in AN Introductory Physics Course: the Role of the Graduate Teaching Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Carol Wiggins

    1994-01-01

    This study determined if the training provided physics teaching assistants was sufficient to accomplish the objectives of inquiry-based tutorials for an introductory physics course. Qualitative research methods were used: (1) to determine if the Physics by Inquiry method was modeled; (2) to describe the process from the teaching assistant perspective; (3) to determine TA opinions on training methods; (4) to develop a frame of reference to better understand the role of TA's as instructional support staff. The study determined that the teaching assistants verbalized appropriate instructional actions, but were observed to use a predominantly didactic teaching style. TA's held a variety of perceptions and beliefs about inquiry -based learning and how science is learned. They felt comfortable in the role of tutorial instructor. They were satisfied with the training methods provided and had few suggestions to change or improve training for future tutorial instructors. A concurrent theme of teacher action dependent on teacher beliefs was sustained throughout the study. The TA's actions, as tutorial instructors, reflected their educational beliefs, student background and learning experiences. TA's performance as tutorial instructors depended on what they think and believe about learning science. Practical implications exist for training teaching assistants to be tutorial instructors. Some recommendations may be appropriate for TA's required to use instructional methods that they have not experienced as students. Interview prospective teaching assistants to determine educational experience and beliefs. Employ inexperienced teaching assistants whose perspectives match the proposed instructional role and who might be more receptive to modeling. Incorporate training into staff meetings. Provide time for TA's to experience the instructional model with simulation or role play as students and as instructors, accompanied by conference discussion. Use strategies known to enhance

  14. Tagging Thinking Types in Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Effects on Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellens, T.; Van Keer, H.; De Wever, B.; Valcke, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study focuses on the use of thinking types as a possible way to structure university students' discourse in asynchronous discussion groups and consequently promote their learning. More specifically, the aim of the study is to determine how requiring students to label their contributions by means of De Bono's (1991) thinking hats…

  15. Upper Secondary Students in Group Discussions about Physics and Our Presuppositions of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Lena; Redfors, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    In this article we report on a group activity, based on previous work [Hansson & Redfors: 2006b, "Science & Education" (accepted)], in an upper secondary physics class in Sweden. The aim was to engage students in a discussion about which presuppositions that are really necessary for physics. During the activity the students were to decide about…

  16. Examination of Students' Small Groups Discussion in Argumentation Process: Scientific and Socio-Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memis, Esra Kabatas; Cevik, Ebru Ezberci

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine processes experienced by students of different achievement levels in small group discussions in argumentation applications conducted in scientific and socio-scientific issues. Case study which is a qualitative research design was used for the study. In this line, a success test including mechanical subjects…

  17. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  18. A Framework for Conducting Critical Dialectical Pluralist Focus Group Discussions Using Mixed Research Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Frels, Rebecca K.

    2015-01-01

    Although focus group discussions (FGDs) represent a popular data collection tool for researchers, they contain an extremely serious flaw: FGD researchers have ultimate power over all decisions made at every stage of the research process--from the conceptualization of the research, to the planning of the research study, to the implementation of the…

  19. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  20. Creating Spaces for Critical Transformative Dialogues: Legitimising Discussion Groups as Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Groves, Christine J.

    2013-01-01

    Focussed dialogue (as lived and living practices) can have a powerful role in renewing professional practice, advancing its sustainability and development as administrative and political systems colonise the practices of teachers and teacher educators. However, participating in discussion groups for many teachers, including those in academia, is…

  1. Communicating for Diversity: Using Teacher Discussion Groups to Transform Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Mare, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    The author argues that in order to create space for authentic multicultural engagement in the face of Eurocentric norms, teachers should form discussion groups that follow five basic guidelines: engage, don't enrage; be comfortable with negative emotion; watch for and change unproductive language; talk about everything; and engage in classroom…

  2. Evaluating Impact of Small-Group Discussion on Learning Utilizing a Classroom Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flosason, Thorhallur O.; McGee, Heather M.; Diener-Ludwig, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Classroom response systems (also referred to as clickers) can enhance learning outcomes and are generally viewed favorably by students and instructors alike. The current study used an alternating treatments design to examine whether discussing questions in small groups before responding to clicker questions during lecture improved accurate…

  3. Talk in the Science Classroom: Using Verbal Behaviour Analysis as a Tool for Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lynne; Booth, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a pilot study following on from a curriculum development activity with teachers and children in primary school classrooms, using a framework for group discussion developed by Huthwaite International. The Centre for Science Education at Sheffield Hallam University and Huthwaite International worked with teachers from three…

  4. Online Reflective Group Discussion--Connecting First Year Undergraduate Students with Their Third Year Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Annetta K. L.

    2011-01-01

    University professional programs seek to develop students as reflective practitioners. The ability to critically reflect is often assumed to occur along the way. The explicit development of critical reflective skills among students is challenging. This study describes the utilization of online group discussion for critical reflection and provides…

  5. Talking Science: The Research Evidence on the Use of Small Group Discussions in Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Judith; Hogarth, Sylvia; Lubben, Fred; Campbell, Bob; Robinson, Alison

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of two systematic reviews of the use and effects of small group discussions in high school science teaching. Ninety-four studies were included in an overview (systematic map) of work in the area, and 24 studies formed the basis of the in-depth reviews. The reviews indicate that there is considerable diversity in the…

  6. Influence of a Teacher's Scaffolding Moves during Child-Led Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadallah, May; Anderson, Richard C.; Nguyen-Jahiel, Kim; Miller, Brian W.; Kim, Il-Hee; Kuo, Li-Jen; Dong, Ting; Wu, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    The influence of one teacher's scaffolding moves on children's performance in free-flowing child-led small-group discussions was investigated. Three moves were examined: prompting for and praising the use of evidence, asking for clarification, and challenging. Lag sequential analysis was applied to a corpus of over 5,300 speaking turns during 30…

  7. The Influence of Group Discussion on Students' Responses and Confidence during Peer Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Bill J.; Koretsky, Milo D.

    2011-01-01

    Peer instruction is an active-learning pedagogy in which students answer short, conceptually based questions that are interspersed during instruction. A key element is the group discussion that occurs among students between their initial and final answers. This study analyzes student responses during a modified form of peer instruction in two…

  8. Students discussing their mathematical ideas: Group-tests and mind-maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pijls; D. de Kramer

    2008-01-01

    In an explorative research project, teachers experimented with new ideas to make their students discuss (i.e. show, explain, justify and reconstruct their work) their mathematical ideas with each other. Two kind of special tasks were developed: group tests and mind maps. Also, the role of the teache

  9. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  10. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  11. Preparing for microbicide trials in Rwanda: Focus group discussions with Rwandan women and men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Veldhuijzen; J. Nyinawabega; M. Umulisa; B. Kankindi; E. Geubbels; P. Basinga; J. Vyankandondera; J. van de Wijgert

    2006-01-01

    The acceptability and feasibility of microbicide studies and future microbicide use are influenced by existing norms and values regarding sexual and contraceptive behaviour. In preparation for microbicide research in Rwanda, focus group discussions were conducted to assess sexual and contraceptive b

  12. Evaluating Impact of Small-Group Discussion on Learning Utilizing a Classroom Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flosason, Thorhallur O.; McGee, Heather M.; Diener-Ludwig, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Classroom response systems (also referred to as clickers) can enhance learning outcomes and are generally viewed favorably by students and instructors alike. The current study used an alternating treatments design to examine whether discussing questions in small groups before responding to clicker questions during lecture improved accurate…

  13. The Influence of Group Discussion on Students' Responses and Confidence during Peer Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Bill J.; Koretsky, Milo D.

    2011-01-01

    Peer instruction is an active-learning pedagogy in which students answer short, conceptually based questions that are interspersed during instruction. A key element is the group discussion that occurs among students between their initial and final answers. This study analyzes student responses during a modified form of peer instruction in two…

  14. Women's experiences of participation in a pregnancy and postnatal group incorporating yoga and facilitated group discussion: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Frances; Hornibrook, Julie

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a small qualitative research study which explored women's experiences of participation in a pregnancy and postnatal group that incorporated yoga and facilitated discussion. The group is offered through a community based feminist non-government women's health Centre in Northern NSW Australia. The purpose of the research was to explore women's experiences of attending this pregnancy and postnatal group. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to explore women's experiences of attending the group. Fifteen women participated in individual, in-depth face-to-face interviews. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was undertaken to analyse the qualitative data. Six themes were developed, one with 3 subthemes. One theme was labelled as: 'the pregnancy and motherhood journey' and included 3 sub-themes which were labelled: 'preparation for birth', 'connecting with the baby' and 'sharing birth stories.' The other five themes were: 'feminine nurturing safe space', 'watching and learning the mothering', 'building mental health, well-being and connections', the "group like a rock and a seed' and 'different from mainstream'. This research adds to the overall body of knowledge about the value of yoga in pre and postnatal care. It demonstrates the value of sharing birth stories and the strong capacity women have to support one another, bringing benefits of emotional and social well-being, information, resources and support derived from group based models of care. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactive learning tutorials on quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development and evaluation of quantum interactive learning tutorials (QuILTs) which are suitable for undergraduate courses in quantum mechanics. QuILTs are based on the investigation of student difficulties in learning quantum physics. They exploit computer-based visualization tools and help students build links between the formal and conceptual aspects of quantum physics without compromising the technical content. They can be used both as supplements to lectures or as a self-study tool.

  16. Uptodate: tutorial. Desembre 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Universitat de Barcelona. CRAI

    2010-01-01

    Tutorial de consulta de base de dades UpToDate, de medicina clínica basada en l'evidència Uptodate. Proporciona accés sintetitzat a informació mèdica. Conté revisions originals escrites per reconeguts experts que analitzen casos clínics concrets i proporcionen les recomanacions pertinents. Centrat en resoldre qüestions sobre l'atenció als pacients i facilitar la pressa de decisions en la pràctica clínica diària.

  17. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox & Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Benveniste, Jerome; Breebaart, Leo; Bronner, Emilie; Dinardo, Salvatore; Earith, Didier; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Niejmeier, Sander; Picot, Nicolas

    2010-12-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the last mission launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. Nearly 1200 people downloaded it (as of end of June 2010), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2. Others are ongoing, some are in discussion. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason- 1, Envisat, Jason- 2, CryoSat and also the future Saral and Sentinel 3 missions, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: - as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL - as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode - as an educational and a quick-look tool both, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data, additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. BRAT is developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info and http://earth.esa.int/brat/

  18. Teaching medical ethics: problem-based learning or small group discussion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Akram; Adeli, Seyyed-Hassan; Taziki, Sadegh-Ali; Akbari, Valliollahe; Ghadir, Mohammad-Reza; Moosavi-Movahhed, Seyyed-Majid; Ahangari, Roghayyeh; Sadeghi-Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Mirzaee, Mohammad-Rahim; Damanpak-Moghaddam, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Lecture is the most common teaching method used in ethics education, while problem-based learning (PBL) and small group discussion (SGD) have been introduced as more useful methods. This study compared these methods in teaching medical ethics. Twenty students (12 female and 8 male) were randomly assigned into two groups. The PBL method was used in one group, and the other group was taught using the SGD method. Twenty-five open-ended questions were used for assessment and at the end of the course, a course evaluation sheet was used to obtain the students' views about the advantages and disadvantages of each teaching method, their level of satisfaction with the course, their interest in attending the sessions, and their opinions regarding the effect of teaching ethics on students' behaviors. The mean score in the PBL group (16.04 ± 1.84) was higher than the SGD group (15.48 ± 2.01). The satisfaction rates in the two groups were 3.00 ± 0.47 and 2.78 ± 0.83 respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Since the mean score and satisfaction rate in the PBL group were higher than the SGD group, the PBL method is recommended for ethics education whenever possible.

  19. Facebook Discussion Groups Provide a Robust Worldwide Platform for Free Pathology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Raul S; Amer, Sadiq M; Yahia, Nejib Ben; Costa, Felipe D'Almeida; Noatay, Manu; Qiao, Jian-Hua; Rosado, Flavia G; Rosen, Yale; Sedassari, Bruno Tavares; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Gardner, Jerad M

    2017-05-01

    - Facebook (Menlo Park, California) is one of many online sites that provide potential educational tools for pathologists. We have each founded Facebook groups dedicated to anatomic pathology, in which members can share cases, ask questions, and contribute to discussions. - To report our experiences in founding and maintaining these Facebook groups and to characterize the contributed content. - We circulated a survey among the group founders, then compiled and analyzed the responses. - The groups varied in membership and in the quality of member contribution. Most posts were of pathology cases, although other topics (such as research articles) were also shared. All groups remained active and received posts from users all over the world, although all groups had many noncontributing members and received unwanted messages (which were screened and removed). Most founders were glad they had founded the groups because they provided an opportunity to both teach and learn. - Each analyzed Facebook group had a different character, and some downsides exist, but the groups all provided a no-cost way for pathologists and others across the world to interact online with many colleagues.

  20. Effect of Small Group Discussion in Residency Education Versus Conventional Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tabrizi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:There are various methods of training for medical students in different colleges. Fast knowledge transfer and maximum learning are the main goals of education. Due to the limited time and also high volume of content knowledge during residency, using the best methods of training can play an important role in enhancing the skills of residents. In the current study, small group discussion as a teaching method was compared with the traditional method. Methods:In this cohort study, two groups of residents that had finished a 4-year course of orthopedic residency training programs in Tabriz and Urmia universities of medical sciences was being examined. They were divided in two groups. In order to compare the impact of the training on residents, it was compared with the result of the State Board standardized exam. The number of residents passing the written test and the Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE per year have been identified and compared with the groups under investigation. Results:Fifty-one residents, including 4 women (7.8% and 47 men (92.2%, were studied for this purpose. Success rate for the small group discussion in the written exam was 59.2% and in the OSCE was 24% (95% CI. On the other hand, the success rates for the group who were trained in the traditional way were 37% and 16.6% in the written exam and OSCE, respectively. In both cases the differences were significant. Conclusion:The small group discussion method is an effective method in residency training in surgical fields that increases medical students’ learning abilities compared to traditional methods of education.

  1. A Hypertext tutorial for teaching cephalometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R D; Weekrakone, S; Rock, W P

    1997-11-01

    Hypertext is a non-linear method of text presentation. It necessitates the use of a computer to store data as a series of nodes that can be called up in any desired sequence and, as such, is a new form of discovery-based learning. This paper describes a Hypertext tutorial in cephalometrics and its subsequent testing on first-year clinical dental students. Students were divided into two groups: the first received a conventional lecture; the second used the Hypertext tutorial. Testing was by means of conventional multiple choice questions. The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups, although the computer tutor was shown more consistently to improve the knowledge of the students than did the conventional lecture. Most students who used the computer program found it enjoyable, but time consuming; less than half found it easy to follow.

  2. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-06-01

    As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems). We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their own pace. We

  3. EDU 626 ASH COURSE Tutorial/UOPHELP

    OpenAIRE

    dsftr

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   EDU 626 Complete Class, New Coursework Business - General Business Week 1 Brainstorm. Brainstorm potential educational research topics that are of interest to you. What is a topic that will motivate you to want to explore it further? Try to focus in as much as possible. For example, if you are interested in education for gifted children, you may want to focus on the advantages/disadvantages of homogeneous grouping ...

  4. An online monogenic diabetes discussion group: supporting families and fueling new research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Marie E; Carmody, David; Philipson, Louis H; Greeley, Siri Atma W

    2015-11-01

    Many online support groups are available for patients with rare disorders, but scant evidence is available on how effectively such groups provide useful information or valuable psychosocial support to their participants. It is also unclear to what extent physicians and researchers may learn more about these disorders by participating in such groups. To formally assess the utility of the Kovler Monogenic Diabetes Registry online discussion group for patients and families affected by KATP channel-related monogenic neonatal diabetes in providing psychosocial and informational support and in identifying concerns unique to patients with this rare form of diabetes. We qualitatively analyzed all 1,410 messages from the online group that consisted of 64 participants affected by KATP channel monogenic diabetes and 11 researchers. We utilized the Social Behavior Support Code to assign each message to a support category and deductive thematic analysis to identify discussion topics addressed by each message. 44% of messages provided/requested informational support, whereas 31.4% of the messages contained psychosocial/emotional support. The most popular topics of postings to the forums were diabetes treatment (503 messages) and neurodevelopmental concerns (472 messages). Participation in the discussion led researchers to modify survey instruments and design new studies focusing on specific topics of concern, such as sleep. We demonstrate that an online support group for a monogenic form of diabetes is an effective informational tool that also provides psychosocial support. Participation by researchers and care providers can inform future research directions and highlight issues of patient concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Malaysian cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction: focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, W Y; Wong, Y L; Zulkifli, S N; Tan, H M

    2002-12-01

    This qualitative study aimed to examine cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction (ED) utilizing focus group discussion. Six focus groups consisting of 66 men, 45-70-y-old were conducted-two Malay groups (n=18), two Chinese groups (n=25) and two Indian groups (n=23). Participants were purposely recruited from the general public on a voluntary basis with informed consent. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative data analysis software ATLASti. The Malay and Chinese traditional remedies for preventing or treating ED are commonly recognized among all races. Many have a negative perception of someone with ED. Malay and Chinese men tended to blame their wife for their problem and thought that the problem might lead to extra-marital affairs, unlike the Indian men who attributed their condition to fate. Malays would prefer traditional medicine for the problem. The Chinese felt they would be more comfortable with a male doctor whilst this is not so with the Malays or Indians. Almost all prefer the doctor to initiate discussion on sexual issues related to their medical condition. There is a need for doctors to consider cultural perspectives in a multicultural society as a lack of understanding of this often contributes to an inadequate consultation.

  6. Qualitative research methods in drug abuse research: discussing the potential use of focus group in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Carlini-Cotrim

    1996-01-01

    Descreve-se e discute-se o grupo focal, método qualitativo de coleta de dados de ampla aplicação na Saúde Pública. Especial ênfase é conferida às potencialidades do uso do grupo focal em investigações, na área de abuso de drogas.The focus group, a qualitative research method useful for Public Health investigation, is described and discussed. The potential application of the focus group method in drug abuse research in Brazil is emphasized.

  7. Making Space to Sensemake: Epistemic Distancing in Small Group Physics Discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Conlin, Luke D

    2015-01-01

    Students in inquiry science classrooms face an essential tension between sharing new ideas and critically evaluating those ideas. Both sides of this tension pose affective risks that can discourage further discussion, such as the embarrassment of having an idea rejected. This paper presents a close discourse analysis of three groups of undergraduate physics students in their first discussions of the semester, detailing how they navigate these tensions to create a safe space to make sense of physics together. A central finding is that students and instructors alike rely on a common discursive resource, epistemic distancing, to protect affect while beginning to engage with ideas in productive ways. The groups differ in how soon, how often, and how deeply they engage in figuring out mechanisms together, and these differences can be explained, in part, by differences in how they epistemically distance themselves from their claims. Implications for research include the importance of considering the coupled dynamic...

  8. Traditional male circumcision in Uganda: a qualitative focus group discussion analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sabet Sarvestani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The growing body of evidence attesting to the effectiveness of clinical male circumcision in the prevention of HIV/AIDS transmission is prompting the majority of sub-Saharan African governments to move towards the adoption of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC. Even though it is recommended to consider collaboration with traditional male circumcision (TMC providers when planning for VMMC, there is limited knowledge available about the TMC landscape and traditional beliefs. METHODOLOGY AND MAIN FINDINGS: During 2010-11 over 25 focus group discussions (FGDs were held with clan leaders, traditional cutters, and their assistants to understand the practice of TMC in four ethnic groups in Uganda. Cultural significance and cost were among the primary reasons cited for preferring TMC over VMMC. Ethnic groups in western Uganda circumcised boys at younger ages and encountered lower rates of TMC related adverse events compared to ethnic groups in eastern Uganda. Cutting styles and post-cut care also differed among the four groups. The use of a single razor blade per candidate instead of the traditional knife was identified as an important and recent change. Participants in the focus groups expressed interest in learning about methods to reduce adverse events. CONCLUSION: This work reaffirmed the strong cultural significance of TMC within Ugandan ethnic groups. Outcomes suggest that there is an opportunity to evaluate the involvement of local communities that still perform TMC in the national VMMC roll-out plan by devising safer, more effective procedures through innovative approaches.

  9. Adding to the mix: Students use of Facebook groups and blackboard discussion forums in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Kent

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a case study of the use of Facebook in learning and teaching in higher education. Facebook was used as a venue for online discussion to support the existing Learning Management System (in this case Blackboard in the unit Internet Collaboration and Organisation as part of the Internet Communications degree taught fully online through Open Universities Australia (OUA. Students’ posts to both Facebook and the Blackboard discussion forum were analysed for content, length, and when throughout the study period they were posted. This is significant as much of the previous work in this area has relied on students self-reporting, rather than direct observation of student behaviour. These results were then compared to earlier instances of the same unit that ran within the previous twelve months, one fully online with OUA only using the Blackboard discussion group, and a second taught at Curtin University with both blended learning for students at the University’s Bentley campus as well as fully online for external students, that utilised both Blackboard and Facebook. The results show that Facebook greatly increases the level of student activity in online discussions, both absolutely and in the level of sustained activity across the unit’s study period. Facebook groups also had a different pattern of content from Blackboard. In Blackboard discussion is more focused on the set unit learning content, in Facebook students were using the groups to discuss administration and assignments and also bring in additional material from outside the units set learning materials. Facebook posts, while more sustained over the semester, were shorter in length. This study found that the addition of a Facebook discussion forum does not noticeably impact on the use of Blackboard’s discussion forum, but rather adds a new dimension to the mix of online interaction. The paper concludes that there is value in using both of these forums for student

  10. Tutorials in endovascular neurosurgery and interventional neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, James Vincent [Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2012-07-01

    This book aims to provide the trainee and practicing minimally invasive neurological therapist with a comprehensive understanding of the background science and theory that forms the foundation of their work. The contents are based on the tutorial teaching techniques used at the University of Oxford and are authored by the MSc Course Director. The tutorial is a learning episode focussed on a particular topic and intended to guide the student/reader through the background literature, to highlight the research on which standard practices are based and to provide the insights of an experienced practitioner. Each chapter of the book covers a different topic to build a complete review of the subspecialty, with in-depth discussion of all currently used techniques. The literature is reviewed and presented in context to illustrate its importance to the practice of this rapidly expanding field of medical treatment.

  11. Patients' views on improving sickle cell disease management in primary care: focus group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuburi, Ghida; Phekoo, Karen J; Okoye, Nv Ogo; Anie, Kofie; Green, Stuart A; Nkohkwo, Asaah; Ojeer, Patrick; Ndive, Comfort; Banarsee, Ricky; Oni, Lola; Majeed, Azeem

    2012-12-01

    To assess sickle cell disease (SCD) patient and carer perspectives on the primary care services related to SCD that they receive from their general practitioner (GP). A focus group discussion was used to elicit the views of patients about the quality of care they receive from their primary health-care providers and what they thought was the role of primary care in SCD management. The focus group discussion was video recorded. The recording was then examined by the project team and recurring themes were identified. A comparison was made with notes made by two scribes also present at the discussion. Sickle Cell Society in Brent, UK. Ten participants with SCD or caring for someone with SCD from Northwest London, UK. Patients' perceptions about the primary care services they received, and a list of key themes and suggestions. Patients and carers often bypassed GPs for acute problems but felt that GPs had an important role to play around repeat prescriptions and general health care. These service users believed SCD is often ignored and deemed unimportant by GPs. Participants wanted the health service to support primary health-care providers to improve their knowledge and understanding of SCD. Key themes and suggestions from this focus group have been used to help develop an educational intervention for general practice services that will be used to improve SCD management in primary care.

  12. Observing real-world groups in the virtual field: The analysis of online discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, David C

    2016-09-01

    This article sets out to establish the naturalistic study of online social communication as a substantive topic in social psychology and to discuss the challenges of developing methods for a formal analysis of the structural and interactional features of message threads on discussion forums. I begin by outlining the essential features of online communication and specifically discussion forum data, and the important ways in which they depart from spoken conversation. I describe the handful of attempts to devise systematic analytic techniques for adapting methods such as conversation and discourse analysis to the study of online discussion. I then present a case study of a thread from the popular UK parenting forum Mumsnet which presents a number of challenges for existing methods, and examine some of the interactive phenomena typical of forums. Finally, I consider ways in which membership categorization analysis and social identity theory can complement one another in the exploration of both group processes and the rhetorical deployment of identities as dynamic phenomena in online discussion.

  13. A hypertext-based tutorial with links to the Web for teaching statistics and research methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C; Gobell, J

    1999-02-01

    An online tutorial for research design and statistics is described. This tutorial provides a way for students to learn how scales of measure, research design, statistics, and graphing data are related. The tutorial also helps students determine what statistical analysis is appropriate for a given design and how the results of the analysis should be plotted in order to effectively communicate the results of a study. Initial research suggests that students using the tutorial are more accurate in their decisions about the design and statistics associated with a study. Students are also more confident in the decisions and find them easier to make when using the tutorial. Furthermore, practice with the tutorial appears to improve problem-solving ability in subsequent design and statistics scenarios. Implications for teaching statistics and research design are discussed.

  14. The MueLu Tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jonathan Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiesner, Tobias A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Prokopenko, Andrey [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gee, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The MueLu tutorial is written as a hands-on tutorial for MueLu, the next generation multigrid framework in Trilinos. It covers the whole spectrum from absolute beginners’ topics to expert level. Since the focus of this tutorial is on practical and technical aspects of multigrid methods in general and MueLu in particular, the reader is expected to have a basic understanding of multigrid methods and its general underlying concepts. Please refer to multigrid textbooks (e.g. [1]) for the theoretical background.

  15. Indico CONFERENCE tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Manzoni, Alex Marc

    2017-01-01

    This short tutorial explains how to create a CONFERENCE in indico and how to handle abstracts and registration forms, in detail: Timestamps: 1:01 - Programme  2:28 - Call for abstracts  11:50 - Abstract submission  13:41 - Abstract Review 15:41 - The Judge's Role 17:23 - Registration forms' creation 23:34 - Candidate participant's registration/application 25:54 - Customisation of Indico pages - Layout 28:08 - Customisation of Indico pages - Menus 29:47 - Configuring Event reminders and import into calendaring tools   See HERE a recent presentation by Pedro about the above steps in the life of an indico CONFERENCE event.

  16. Qualitative findings from focus group discussions on hand hygiene compliance among health care workers in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Sharon; McLaws, Mary-Louise

    2015-10-01

    It is accepted by hospital clinical governance that every clinician's "duty of care" includes hand hygiene, yet globally, health care workers (HCWs) continue to struggle with compliance. Focus group discussions were conducted to explore HCWs' barriers to hand hygiene in Vietnam. Twelve focus group discussions were conducted with HCWs from 6 public hospitals across Hanoi, Vietnam. Discussions included participants' experiences with and perceptions concerning hand hygiene. Tape recordings were transcribed verbatim and then translated into English. Thematic analysis was conducted by 2 investigators. Expressed frustration with high workload, limited access to hand hygiene solutions, and complicated guidelines that are difficult to interpret in overcrowded settings were considered by participants to be bona fide reasons for noncompliance. No participant acknowledged hand hygiene as a duty of care practice for her or his patients. Justification for noncompliance was the observation that visitors did not perform hand hygiene. HCWs did acknowledge a personal duty of care when hand hygiene was perceived to benefit her or his own health, and then neither workload or environmental challenges influenced compliance. Limited resources in Vietnam are amplified by overcrowded conditions and dual bed occupancy. Yet without a systematic systemic duty of care to patient safety, changes to guidelines and resources might not immediately improve compliance. Thus, introducing routine hand hygiene must start with education programs focusing on duty of care. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Small Student-Led Discussion Groups as an Adjunct to a Course in Abnormal Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents data related to student involvement in biweekly student-led discussion groups in an undergraduate abnormal psychology course. Evaluates the degree to which students felt they benefited from discussion groups composed of similar and dissimilar students. (Author/AV)

  18. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Sara; Rowe, Heather; Kirkman, Maggie; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; Bayly, Christine; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane

    2016-02-15

    As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health.

  19. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. Objective To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. Methods To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. Results There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Conclusions Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health. PMID:26878865

  20. Adding problem-based learning tutorials to a traditional lecture-based curriculum: a pilot study in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on the implementation of a problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial in our advanced program for second year students within an existing curriculum. The program was opened on the last 5 days of the summer vacation and students could volunteer to be part of the group. Students separated themselves into small groups by random sampling. The PBL tutorials were done during the first 3 days for medical problems according to our original scenarios (based on medical cases), and during the last 2 days, students made presentations of their learning outcomes, using information technology (IT) by themselves. Throughout this program, students were expected to engage in self-learning, except for a 1(1/2)-h group session with a tutor. Assessment was done by attendance at a group session and by portfolio analysis. Following the portfolio analysis, students identified the number of learning issues (group A, 26 +/- 7 issues; group B, 20 +/- 3 issues; group C, 21 +/- 7 issues). Research, by questionnaire, revealed that 84% of the students were strongly interested in each scenario and 95% of the students felt familiar with each scenario. The levels of satisfaction with the tutor were different in the three groups. All of the students were comfortable in the discussion room and IT center. These results suggested that PBL tutorials are supported by the scenario, the tutor, and the location of the group session, as well as by self-learning. Moreover, one of the most important factors for a PBL tutorial that the student is ready for the free discussions and has enough time for individual self-learning.

  1. Two recommendations to the Teaching of EFL Extensive Reading: Group Discussion and Suitable Reading Material Selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉

    2008-01-01

    <正>This paper is going to review the way in which EFL extensive reading is usually taught at mainly college level in China; and then make two recommendations in terms of classroom activity and the selection of extensive reading material for the purpose of trying to get students better involved in classroom activity, and to arouse their interest in reading. Group discussion and suitable reading material selection are suggested to be adopted in the traditional extensive reading class to improve the classroom atmosphere and the teaching & learning effects.

  2. Human dimensions in bedside teaching: focus group discussions of teachers and learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Subha; Orlander, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this shift. Yet, essential clinical skills, professionalism, and humanistic patient interactions are best taught at the bedside. Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this decline. This study explored perceptions of teachers and learners on the value of bedside teaching and the humanistic dimensions of bedside interactions that make it imperative to shift clinical teaching back to the bedside. Focus group methodology was used to explore teacher and learner opinions. Four teacher groups consisted of (a) Chief Residents, (b) Residency Program Directors, (c) skilled bedside teachers, and (d) a convenience group of other Department of Medicine faculty at Boston University School of Medicine. Six learner groups consisted 2 each of 3rd-year students, PGY1 medicine residents, and PGY2 medicine residents. Each discussion lasted 60 to 90 minutes. Sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. Teachers and learners shared several opinions on bedside teaching, particularly around humanistic aspects of bedside interactions. The key themes that emerged included (a) patient involvement in discussions, (b) teachers as role models of humanism, (c) preserving learner autonomy, (d) direct observation and feedback of learners at the bedside, (e) interactions with challenging patients, and (e) admitting limitations. Within these themes, participants noted some behaviors best avoided at the bedside. Teachers and learners regard the bedside as a valuable venue in which to learn core values of medicine. They proposed many strategies to preserve these humanistic values and improve bedside teaching. These strategies are essential for true patient-centered care.

  3. Activities in a social networking-based discussion group by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Na; Wang, Xiangping; Zhang, Rongchun; Liu, Zhiguo; Liang, Shuhui; Yao, Shaowei; Tao, Qin; Jia, Hui; Pan, Yanglin; Guo, Xuegang

    2017-10-01

    Online social networking is increasingly being used among medical practitioners. However, few studies have evaluated its use in therapeutic endoscopy. Here, we aimed to analyze the shared topics and activities of a group of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) doctors in a social networking-based endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography discussion group (EDG). Six ERCP trainers working in Xijing Hospital and 48 graduated endoscopists who had finished ERCP training in the same hospital were invited to join in EDG. All group members were informed not to divulge any private information of patients when using EDG. The activities of group members on EDG were retrospectively extracted. The individual data of the graduated endoscopists were collected by a questionnaire. From June 2014 to May 2015, 6924 messages were posted on EDG, half of which were ERCP related. In total, 214 ERCP-related topics were shared, which could be categorized into three types: sharing experience/cases (52.3%), asking questions (38.3%), and sharing literatures/advances (9.3%). Among the 48 graduated endoscopists, 21 had a low case volume of less than 50 per year and 27 had a high volume case volume of 50 or more. High-volume graduated endoscopists posted more ERCP-related messages (P=0.008) and shared more discussion topics (P=0.003) compared with low-volume graduated endoscopists. A survey showed that EDG was useful for graduated endoscopists in ERCP performance and management of post-ERCP complications, etc. A wide range of ERCP-related topics were shared on the social networking-based EDG. The ERCP-related behaviors on EDG were more active in graduated endoscopists with an ERCP case volume of more than 50 per year.

  4. Stakeholders' Perceptions on Shortage of Healthcare Workers in Primary Healthcare in Botswana: Focus Group Discussions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oathokwa Nkomazana

    Full Text Available An adequate health workforce force is central to universal health coverage and positive public health outcomes. However many African countries have critical shortages of healthcare workers, which are worse in primary healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare workers, policy makers and the community on the shortage of healthcare workers in Botswana.Fifteen focus group discussions were conducted with three groups of policy makers, six groups of healthcare workers and six groups of community members in rural, urban and remote rural health districts of Botswana. All the participants were 18 years and older. Recruitment was purposive and the framework method was used to inductively analyse the data.There was a perceived shortage of healthcare workers in primary healthcare, which was believed to result from an increased need for health services, inequitable distribution of healthcare workers, migration and too few such workers being trained. Migration was mainly the result of unfavourable personal and family factors, weak and ineffective healthcare and human resources management, low salaries and inadequate incentives for rural and remote area service.Botswana has a perceived shortage of healthcare workers, which is worse in primary healthcare and rural areas, as a result of multiple complex factors. To address the scarcity the country should train adequate numbers of healthcare workers and distribute them equitably to sufficiently resourced healthcare facilities. They should be competently managed and adequately remunerated and the living conditions and rural infrastructure should also be improved.

  5. Equine Welfare Assessment: Exploration of British Stakeholder Attitudes Using Focus-Group Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horseman, Susan V; Hockenhull, Jo; Buller, Henry; Mullan, Siobhan; Barr, Alistair R S; Whay, Helen R

    2017-01-01

    The equine industry in Great Britain has not been subject to the same pressures as the farming industry to engage with welfare assessment, but this may change as concern about equine welfare increases. Stakeholder attitudes toward welfare assessment may impact the implementation of welfare assessment practices. Focus-group discussions regarding welfare assessment were conducted with 6 equine stakeholder groups: leisure horse owners (caregivers; n = 4), grooms (n = 5), veterinary surgeons (n = 3), welfare scientists (n = 4), welfare charity workers (n = 5), and professional riders (n = 4). Three themes emerged from the discussions: (a) Participants predominantly interpreted welfare assessment as a means of identifying and correcting poor welfare in an immediate way; (b) participants believed that horse welfare varied over time; and (c) attributes of the assessor were viewed as an important consideration for equine welfare assessment. The views of equine industry members give insight into the value welfare assessments may have to the industry and how equine welfare assessment approaches can achieve credibility within the industry and increase the positive impact of welfare assessments on equine welfare.

  6. Auto-Tutorial Instruction in Entomology: Principles of Entomology (Orders).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnick, D. R.; Steele, K. L.

    Auto-tutorial instruction was compared to traditional lecture instruction in a university entomology course. In seven consecutive terms, undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory entomology course were divided into two groups: Group I received only lecture instruction on insect orders, while Group II was dismissed for three consecutive…

  7. Staying on Top of Your Game and Scoring Big with Adobe Presenter Multimedia Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koury, Regina; Francis, Marcia J.; Gray, Catherine J.; Jardine, Spencer J.; Guo, Ruiling

    2010-01-01

    In order to reach distance students in times of financial uncertainty, librarians must be creative. While much has been written about Camtasia, Captivate and Jing tutorial software, Adobe Presenter, a Microsoft PowerPoint plug-in, has not been discussed. This article describes how our library team created multimedia tutorial projects at Idaho…

  8. Implementation and Student Testing of a Web-Based, Student-Centered Stereochemistry Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrmann, Nicola J.; Moore, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of a web-based stereochemistry tutorial, which allows students to select their preferred structural representation and method for making stereochemical comparisons between molecules, is discussed. The tutorial was evaluated by students in three different introductory organic chemistry courses at a large midwestern university.…

  9. Staying on Top of Your Game and Scoring Big with Adobe Presenter Multimedia Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koury, Regina; Francis, Marcia J.; Gray, Catherine J.; Jardine, Spencer J.; Guo, Ruiling

    2010-01-01

    In order to reach distance students in times of financial uncertainty, librarians must be creative. While much has been written about Camtasia, Captivate and Jing tutorial software, Adobe Presenter, a Microsoft PowerPoint plug-in, has not been discussed. This article describes how our library team created multimedia tutorial projects at Idaho…

  10. The challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive e-learning tutorials for introductory physics

    CERN Document Server

    DeVore, Seth; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    As research-based self-paced e-learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we discuss the effectiveness of research-based e-learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses. These interactive tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these self-paced tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems). We find that many students, who struggled in the courses in which these adaptive e-learning tutorials were assigned as a self-stu...

  11. The undergraduate physics tutorial program at CSU Los Angeles assessment of utility and areas of interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetyan, Smbat

    The Physics Education Research (PER) group at the University of Washington have researched traditional teaching methods and found that students in introductory physics are lacking a conceptual understanding of the physics material. The solution they put forth is an interactive tutorial program designed to meet the lack of conceptual understanding. Since the tutorial programs inception at CSU Los Angeles in Fall 2006 no evaluation has been successfully undertaken therefore the effect of the tutorial program in the physics 200 series is deeply obscure to the department. The research has shed light on the tutorial program and brought into context its effectiveness on the overall physics 200 series courses at CSU Los Angeles. The researcher has addressed the following research questions, what overall effect does the tutorial program have on the Physics 200 series curriculum? What is the size and significance of gains attributable to the undergraduate calculus based Physics 200 series tutorial program at CSU Los Angeles? What can we learn from gains about individual weekly lessons from the Physics 200 series tutorial courses? What is the correlation of tutorial gains with student final course grades? Are the gains from the tutorial program different for genders? Is there a difference in gains based on the different students' colleges?

  12. Exploration and Practice of Improving College Students’Speaking Com-petence through Group Discussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jin-zhong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of English teaching is not only to make the students learn new words and grammar, answer multiple- choice questions to get good scores, but also to enhance the students’abilities of the integrated application of English, speaking and listen⁃ing in particular. The ultimate goal of learning English is to use English to communicate with others in the future jobs and real life. However, the non-English majors have great trouble speaking English in class and in real life. Such ways as Socratic dialogues, cause analysis and questionnaire are used to investigate the reasons. In order to improve speaking ability, group discussion is used in class. In consequence, the students have more interest, motivation, courage and confidence in speaking English. Meanwhile, they have also established the concept of using what they learned in class, in practical work and real life.

  13. Hadoop Tutorials - Hadoop Foundations

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Lanza Garcia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Hadoop ecosystem is the leading opensource platform for distributed storage and processing of "big data". The Hadoop platform is available at CERN as a central service provided by the IT department. This tutorial organized by the IT Hadoop service, aims to introduce the main concepts about Hadoop technology in a practical way and is targeted to those who would like to start using the service for distributed parallel data processing. The main topics that will be covered are: Hadoop architecture and available components How to perform distributed parallel processing in order to explore and create reports with SQL (with Apache Impala) on example data. Using a HUE - Hadoop web UI for presenting the results in user friendly way. How to format and/or structure data in order to make data processing more efficient - by using various data formats/containers and partitioning techniques (Avro, Parquet, HBase). ...

  14. Which Cognitive Processes Support Learning during Small-Group Discussion? The Role of Providing Explanations and Listening to Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2011-01-01

    Seventy students participated in an experiment to measure the effects of either providing explanations or listening during small group discussions on recall of related subject-matter studied after the discussion. They watched a video of a small group discussing a problem. In the first experimental condition, the video was stopped at various points…

  15. Which cognitive processes support learning during small-group discussion? The role of providing explanations and listening to others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. van Blankenstein (Floris); D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); C.P.M. van der Vleuten (Cees); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSeventy students participated in an experiment to measure the effects of either providing explanations or listening during small group discussions on recall of related subject-matter studied after the discussion. They watched a video of a small group discussing a problem. In the first

  16. Interactive Intragroup Tutorials: A Need-Based Modification to Enhance Learning in Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tripti K.; Waghmare, Lalitbhushan S.; Jagzape, Arunita; Mishra, Vedprakash

    2015-01-01

    A tutorial is a period of instruction given by a university or college tutor to an individual or a very small group. Essentially, it is a small class of a few students in which the tutor (a lecturer or other academic staff member) gives individual attention to every learner. The tutorial focuses on certain subject areas and generally proceeds with…

  17. Proposing a Web-Based Tutorial System to Teach Malay Language Braille Code to the Sighted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Lee Lay; Keong, Foo Kok

    2010-01-01

    The "e-KodBrailleBM Tutorial System" is a web-based tutorial system which is specially designed to teach, facilitate and support the learning of Malay Language Braille Code to individuals who are sighted. The targeted group includes special education teachers, pre-service teachers, and parents. Learning Braille code involves memorisation…

  18. Effects of Using a Web-Based Individualized Education Program Decision-Making Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriner, James G.; Carty, Susan J.; Rose, Chad A.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Kim, Myungjin; Trach, John S.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a web-based decision support system ("Tutorial") for writing standards-based Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). A total of 35 teachers and 154 students participated across two academic years. Participants were assigned to one of three intervention groups based on level of "Tutorial"…

  19. Effects of Using a Web-Based Individualized Education Program Decision-Making Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriner, James G.; Carty, Susan J.; Rose, Chad A.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Kim, Myungjin; Trach, John S.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a web-based decision support system ("Tutorial") for writing standards-based Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). A total of 35 teachers and 154 students participated across two academic years. Participants were assigned to one of three intervention groups based on level of "Tutorial"…

  20. Factors influencing food choices of adolescents: findings from focus-group discussions with adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, D; Story, M; Perry, C; Casey, M A

    1999-08-01

    To assess adolescents' perceptions about factors influencing their food choices and eating behaviors. Data were collected in focus-group discussions. The study population included 141 adolescents in 7th and 10th grade from 2 urban schools in St Paul, Minn, who participated in 21 focus groups. Data were analyzed using qualitative research methodology, specifically, the constant comparative method. Factors perceived as influencing food choices included hunger and food cravings, appeal of food, time considerations of adolescents and parents, convenience of food, food availability, parental influence on eating behaviors (including the culture or religion of the family), benefits of foods (including health), situation-specific factors, mood, body image, habit, cost, media, and vegetarian beliefs. Major barriers to eating more fruits, vegetables, and dairy products and eating fewer high-fat foods included a lack of sense of urgency about personal health in relation to other concerns, and taste preferences for other foods. Suggestions for helping adolescents eat a more healthful diet include making healthful food taste and look better, limiting the availability of unhealthful options, making healthful food more available and convenient, teaching children good eating habits at an early age, and changing social norms to make it "cool" to eat healthfully. The findings suggest that if programs to improve adolescent nutrition are to be effective, they need to address a broad range of factors, in particular environmental factors (e.g., the increased availability and promotion of appealing, convenient foods within homes schools, and restaurants).

  1. Teacher Identity and the Marketizised Society. Discursive Constructions in Teachers’ Discussion Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the latest decennium, there have been several and gradual changes in the Swedish and other European school systems. The steering system has become more decentralized and the entire school system is now a part of the freedom of trade. Schools are competing with each other and this has, according to previous research, an effect on how teachers think about, and carry out their everyday activities (Gerwitz et al. 1995; Irisdotter 2006. How teachers think about themselves, their students and the educational task is of great importance for the social climate of the classroom and, in the longer run, society in general. The current study dicusses how teachers‘ identities and self-understandings are influenced by the marketization of society. The material analysed consists of group discussions in three different teacher groups in compulsory school in Sweden. Questions raised are: Can teachers work within the context of marketization and yet relate to it with an attitude of self-awareness and critical reflection? And how can teachers deal with both traditional teacher values and progressive, democratic values that may be in conflict with the conditions of a marketizised school system?

  2. A peer-led supplemental tutorial project for medical physiology: implementation in a large class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Jonathan D

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practicality of implementing a peer-teaching program in a large class (>350 students) of medical students and whether such a program is beneficial. Case-based problems were developed by faculty members to facilitate student problem solving and discussion. Voluntary student enrollment was available during the first week of a semester. Tutorials took place during out of class time and were facilitated by peers from the previous class. Tutors were selected for their outstanding performance in physiology; they were provided with training in facilitation skills and were given a package of model answers. Sixty-eight students enrolled in this pilot program and were organized into groups of approximately 8 students. On average, students attended four of six tutorials. Posttutorial quiz scores were significantly greater than paired pretest scores. Surveys showed that students had high expectations at the outset, which were matched with positive perceptions at the end of the tutorial program; the use of near-peer tutors was especially well received. Tutors also gave high approval ratings for their experiences. In conclusion, the peer tutoring program was logistically straightforward to implement in a large class and was endorsed by the participants.

  3. weighting of items in a tutorial performance evaluation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-21

    May 21, 2009 ... learning performance, including their performance in tutorial groups. ... small group interaction, reasoning and autonomy (Niemenin, Saure ... role is to foster cooperation, stimulate thinking, promote enquiry and ... These processes require the individual learner to possess or, in the longer term, to develop a ...

  4. Sonic effervescence: A tutorial on acoustic cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfel, R.E. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8286 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This article on acoustic cavitation is a revision of a tutorial lecture presented at the Acoustical Society of America meeting in Austin, Texas, on 28 November 1994. The general approach adopted here differs from a review article in stressing the overarching themes that come under the category of acoustic cavitation, rather than being an encyclopedic reference on the topic. When possible, specific order-of-magnitude estimates have been given so that the reader can better understand the particular phenomena being described. The basic physics is discussed, and applications are reviewed with the goal of putting them in a useful context. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  5. Communication of geohazard risks by focus group discussions in the Mount Cameroon area, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Marmol, M.-A.; Suh Atanga, M. Bi; Njome, S.; Mafany Teke, G.; Jacobs, P.; Suh, C. E.

    2012-04-01

    The inappropriate translation of scientific information of geohazard (volcanic, landslide and crater lake outgassing) risks to any local population leaves people with incongruent views of the real dangers. Initial workshops organized under the supervision of the VLIR-OI (Flemish Interuniversity Council - Own Initiatives) members have led to the deployment of billboards as requested and drawn up by the locals. The VLIR-OI project has also organized focus group discussions (FGD) with the local stakeholders to find out in various cities, the state of preparedness, the response to emergency situations, the recovery from the emergency and the mitigation. Researchers have preferred open discussion with the local population and its representatives in order to elicit information that otherwise might not be found on a structured questionnaire. FGD provide a meaningful interactive opportunity to collect information and reflection on a wide range of input. The method provides an insight into problems that require a solution through a process of discovering the meaning attributed to certain events or issues. In this research four cardinal points as preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation (Fothergill, 1996) guided the FGD. The population (i.e. local town councils) were constituted by a mix of chiefs, engineers, technicians and civil servants and government officials. In all the three city councils concerned, the engineers in charge complained about the lack of strategic planning, and about the missing of an elaborated strategy for disasters. They are aware of the existence of an organigram in the "Département de l'Action Civile" in Yaounde but never received any "strategic" document. Therefore inappropriate actions might be taken by the municipalities themselves. Fortunately all people interrogated at the FDG always mentioned solidarity in any event. Fothergill, 1996, Gender, Risk, and Disasters, Intern. Jour. of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, vol.14, n°1, 33-56

  6. FIN 370new UOP Course Tutorial/TutorialRank

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialrank.com Tutorial Purchased: 24 Times, Rating: A+   1.Which of the following is true regarding Investment Banks? 2. We compute the profitability index of a capital-budgeting proposal by Initial outlay = $1,748.80 3. Project Sigma requires an investment of $1 million and has a NPV of $10. Project Delta requires an investment of $500,000 and has a NPV of $150,000. The projects involve unrelated new product lines. What ...

  7. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial - Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides a Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) primer that organizes QMRA tutorials. The tutorials describe functionality of a QMRA infrastructure, guide the user through software use and assessment options, provide step-by-step instructions for implementi...

  8. Defibrillation beliefs of rural nurses: focus group discussions guided by the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, T A; Mosel Williams, L; Mummery, K

    2005-01-01

    The endorsement of the chain of survival concept and early defibrillation has challenged health professionals to reconsider their beliefs about how they respond to in-hospital resuscitation. In the rural context, where 24 hour coverage is not available nurse-initiated defibrillation is expected. Despite literature and policy change in Australia to allow nurses to initiate defibrillation, there is no current research that uses a systemic theoretical approach to investigate the specific beliefs of nurses and their use of defibrillators. The purpose of this study was to elicit a beginning understanding of the defibrillation beliefs of rural nurses. This research used focus groups within the framework of the Theory of Planned Behavior to describe the defibrillation beliefs of rural registered nurses. The sites selected for this study were two acute care hospitals in rural Australia (RRMA Classification). Each of these hospitals was in located 'other rural areas' (RRMA Classification) in separate towns and had 25 and 30 beds. The study sample consisted of 10 females and two males. Focus group questions were designed to elicit salient beliefs within the theoretical framework. Three constructs of behavioral, normative and control beliefs guided the development of the question and analysis of the discussions. In accordance with the authors of the theoretical framework, content analysis was used to analyse the data from the study. Two behavioral beliefs, four control beliefs and four normative belief categories were elicited. Two behavioral beliefs categories emerged from the open-ended question: 'What, if any are the advantages of you being able to use a defibrillator?' Participants were congruent when discussing the advantages of nurses initiating defibrillation. The two categories were 'quicker response times' (15 responses) and 'increased success with resuscitation' (8 responses). Participants were asked to identify any events that might influence their decision to use

  9. Recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults through community sites for focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E; Shedlin, Michele; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Estrada, Ivette; De La Cruz, Leydis; Peralta, Rogelina; Birdsall, Stacia; Metcalf, Sara S; Chakraborty, Bibhas; Kunzel, Carol

    2017-06-09

    Despite a body of evidence on racial/ethnic minority enrollment and retention in research, literature specifically focused on recruiting racially/ethnically diverse older adults for social science studies is limited. There is a need for more rigorous research on methodological issues and the efficacy of recruitment methods. Cultural obstacles to recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults include language barriers, lack of cultural sensitivity of target communities on the part of researchers, and culturally inappropriate assessment tools. Guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), this study critically appraised the recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults for focus groups. The initial approach involved using the physical and social infrastructure of the ElderSmile network, a community-based initiative to promote oral and general health and conduct health screenings in places where older adults gather, to recruit racial/ethnic minority adults for a social science component of an interdisciplinary initiative. The process involved planning a recruitment strategy, engaging the individuals involved in its implementation (opinion leaders in senior centers, program staff as implementation leaders, senior community-based colleagues as champions, and motivated center directors as change agents), executing the recruitment plan, and reflecting on the process of implementation. While the recruitment phase of the study was delayed by 6 months to allow for ongoing recruitment and filling of focus group slots, the flexibility of the recruitment plan, the expertise of the research team members, the perseverance of the recruitment staff, and the cultivation of change agents ultimately resulted in meeting the study targets for enrollment in terms of both numbers of focus group discussions (n = 24) and numbers of participants (n = 194). This study adds to the literature in two important ways. First, we leveraged the social and

  10. Images of Environmental Management: Competing Metaphors in Focus Group Discussions of Swedish Environmental Quality Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibeck, Victoria

    2012-04-01

    In managing environmental problems, several countries have chosen the management by objectives (MBO) approach. This paper investigates how focus group participants from the Swedish environmental administration used metaphors to describe the mode of organization needed to attain environmental objectives. Such analysis can shed light on how an MBO system is perceived by actors and how it works in practice. Although the Swedish government intended to stimulate broad-based cooperation among many actors, participants often saw themselves as located at a certain "level," i.e., "higher" or "lower," in the MBO system—that is, their conceptions corresponded to a traditional, hierarchical interpretation of MBO. Prepositions such as "in" and "out" contributed to feelings of inclusion and exclusion on the part of MBO actors. However, horizontal metaphors merged with vertical ones, indicating ongoing competition for the right to interpret how the system of environmental objectives should best be managed. The paper concludes that any organization applying MBO could benefit from discussing alternate ways of talking and thinking about its constituent "levels."

  11. Barriers to asymptomatic screening and other STD services for adolescents and young adults: focus group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leone Peter A

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs are a major public health problem among young people and can lead to the spread of HIV. Previous studies have primarily addressed barriers to STD care for symptomatic patients. The purpose of our study was to identify perceptions about existing barriers to and ideal services for STDs, especially asymptomatic screening, among young people in a southeastern community. Methods Eight focus group discussions including 53 White, African American, and Latino youth (age 14–24 were conducted. Results Perceived barriers to care included lack of knowledge of STDs and available services, cost, shame associated with seeking services, long clinic waiting times, discrimination, and urethral specimen collection methods. Perceived features of ideal STD services included locations close to familiar places, extended hours, and urine-based screening. Television was perceived as the most effective route of disseminating STD information. Conclusions Further research is warranted to evaluate improving convenience, efficiency, and privacy of existing services; adding urine-based screening and new services closer to neighborhoods; and using mass media to disseminate STD information as strategies to increase STD screening.

  12. [Adaptation of peer evaluation to small group discussion (SGD) and its validity for summative evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Yamaguchi, Takafumi; Sone, Tomomichi; Yanada, Kazuo; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Kurio, Wasako; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Yamamoto, Yumi; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2012-01-01

    We adopted peer evaluation (mutual evaluation between students) for small group discussion (SGD) among first graders. The peer evaluation criteria were 5 grade scales for 5 fields: "preparation," "remark," "listening," "activeness," and "role." A comparison with tutor evaluation clarified the validity of peer evaluation for summative evaluation. Although the average of peer evaluation (4.2 (4.0-4.4)) was higher than that of tutor evaluation (3.8 (3.7-4.1)) (p=0.0601, Mann-Whitney U test), the value of the correlation coefficient between peer evaluation and summative evaluation of SGD (average 0.35 (0.12-0.54)) was almost the same as that of the coefficient between tutor evaluation and summative evaluation of SGD (average 0.36 (0.24-0.42)) (p=0.6761, Mann-Whitney U test). Principal component analysis showed that the tutor could not evaluate "remark" and "listening" independently, while students evaluate "listening" independently from other evaluation criteria. The combination of peer and tutor evaluation may be multilateral evaluation for SGD. The questionnaire about peer evaluation for students showed that they recognized the value of peer evaluation and favorably accepted its use.

  13. Pedagogical Considerations in Developing an Online Tutorial in Information Literacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Skagen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the pedagogical background on which the design of the online tutorial Søk & Skriv ('Search and Write' is based. The tutorial Søk & Skriv is specially designed for distance learning students, but can also be used by students on campus. Søk & Skriv aims at increasing students' information and digital literacy with the ultimate goal of empowering them to gradually become legitimate members of the academic community, as well as lifelong learners. Further, the tutorial sets out to make a contribution to the pedagogical development of user education at the academic library. The article shows how a general didactical model, namely the didactical relationship model (Hiim & Hippe, 1998, has been applied to enrich information literacy education practice, and in this case specifically, to enrich the design of online education.

  14. Lab-Tutorials for teaching quantum physics (Lab-Tutorials fuer den Quantenphysik Unterricht)

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmann, M C

    2006-01-01

    English abstract: In the "Intuitive Quantum Physics" course, we use graphical interpretations of mathematical equations and qualitative reasoning to develop and teach a simplified model of quantum physics. Our course contains three units: Wave physics, Development of a conceptual toolbox, and quantum physics. It also contains three key themes: wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, and tunneling of quantum particles. Students learn most new material in lab-tutorials in which students work in small groups (3 to 3 people) on specially designed worksheets. Lecture reinforces the lab-tutorial content and focuses more on issues about the nature of science. Data show that students are able to learn some of the most difficult concepts in the course, and also that students learn to believe that there is a conceptually accessible structure to the physics in the course. German abstract: Im Kurs "Intuitive Quantum Physics" werden graphische Interpretationen mathematischer Gleichungen und qualitatives Denken d...

  15. CJA 444 Tutorials / cja444dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    sunshine384

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.cja444.com   CJA 444 Week 1 DQ 1 CJA 444 Week 1 DQ 2 CJA 444 Week 1 Individual Assignment Organizational Behavior Paper CJA 444 Week 1 Team Assignment Weekly Summary CJA 444 Week 2 DQ 1 CJA 444 Week 2 DQ 2 CJA 444 week 2 Individual Assignment Group Behavior and Processes Paper CJA 444 Week 2 Team Assignment Team Diversity Paper CJA 444 Week 2 Learning Team Weekly Summary CJA 444 Week 3 DQ 1 CJA 444 We...

  16. Factors Influencing Iranian Untrained EFL Raters' Rating Group Oral Discussion Tasks: A Mixed Methods Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasimeh Nouhi Jadesi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a mixed methods design, the present study attempted to identify the factors influencing Iranian untrained EFL raters in rating group oral discussion tasks. To fulfil this aim, 16 language learners of varying proficiency levels were selected and randomly assigned to groups of four and performed a group discussion task. Thirty two untrained raters were also selected based on their volunteer participations. They listened to the audio files of the group discussions and assigned a score of one to six to each language learners based on their own judgments. They also provided comments on each language learners’ performance pointing to why they assigned such scores. The researchers had an interview with the raters after the rating session as well. The quantitative phase investigated whether linguistic features of accuracy, fluency, complexity and amount of talk were attended to by the raters in terms of having any relationship to the scores the raters assigned. Speech rate as an index of fluency and amount of talk turned out to be significantly correlated with the scores. Of more importance was the qualitative phase with the aim of identifying other factors that may account for the scores. The comments provided by the raters on each score and the interviews were codified based on Content Analysis (CA approach. It was found that the raters attend not only to the linguistic features in rating oral group discussions, but they are also sensitive to the interactional features like the roles the participants take in groups tasks and the overall interaction patterns of the groups. The findings of this study may shed light on group oral assessment in terms of training the raters rating group oral tests and developing rating scales specific for group oral assessment. Persian Abstract:پژوهش حاضر، با بهره گیری از روش تحقیق ترکیبی به بررسی عوامل مؤثر بر ارزیابان آموزش ندیده

  17. Tutorials in complex photonic media

    CERN Document Server

    Noginov, Mikhail A; McCall, Martin W; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2010-01-01

    The field of complex photonic media encompasses many leading-edge areas in physics, chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, and engineering. In Tutorials in Complex Photonic Media , leading experts have brought together 19 tutorials on breakthroughs in modern optics, such as negative refraction, chiral media, plasmonics, photonic crystals, and organic photonics. This text will help students, engineers, and scientists entering the field to become familiar with the interrelated aspects of the subject. It also serves well as a supplemental text in introductory and advanced courses on optica

  18. Mail2Print online tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Mail2print is a feature which allows you to send documents to a printer by mail. This tutorial (text attached to the event page) explains how to use this service. Content owner: Vincent Nicolas Bippus Presenter: Pedro Augusto de Freitas Batista Tell us what you think via e-learning.support at cern.ch More tutorials in the e-learning collection of the CERN Document Server (CDS) https://cds.cern.ch/collection/E-learning%20modules?ln=en All info about the CERN rapid e-learning project is linked from http://twiki.cern.ch/ELearning  

  19. Position paper: Web tutorials and Information Literacy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    2011-01-01

    Position paper on future research challenges regarding web tutorials with the aim of supporting and facilitating Information Literacy in an academic context. Presented and discussed at the workshop: Social media & Information Practices, track on Information literacy practices, University of Borås...

  20. Position paper: Web tutorials and Information Literacy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    2011-01-01

    Position paper on future research challenges regarding web tutorials with the aim of supporting and facilitating Information Literacy in an academic context. Presented and discussed at the workshop: Social media & Information Practices, track on Information literacy practices, University of Borås...

  1. Software engineering techniques in design automation: a tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.J. II

    1977-04-18

    Several useful software engineering techniques, disciplines, and perspectives are related to typical software development problems in design automation. Specific examples from recent experience illustrate both beneficial and undesirable practices. Oriented toward managers and practicing software engineers, the tutorial discusses system structure, control and data structures, programing guidelines, work habits, testing, documentation, and operational maintenance. 10 figures.

  2. Investigating the purpose of an online discussion group for health professionals: a case example from forensic occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Crystal; Duncan, Edward A S

    2013-07-03

    Thousands of health-related online discussion groups are active world-wide however, very little is known about the purpose and usefulness of such groups. In 2003 an online discussion group called 'forensic occupational therapy' was established in the United Kingdom. This group was examined to gain an understanding of the purpose and use of online discussion groups for health professionals who may be practically and geographically isolated from others in similar areas of practice. Following a case study design, descriptive characteristics on members' locations and number of posts were collected from the forensic occupational therapy online discussion group. Eight years of posts (2003-2011) were examined using a theoretical thematic analysis process to identify and describe the purposes for which members were using the group. Members from 20 countries contributed to the discussion group; the vast majority of posts being from members in the United Kingdom. Activity within the group was consistently high for the first five years however, activity within the group declined in the final three years. Six purposes for which members use the online discussion group were identified: seeking and giving advice, networking, requesting and sharing material resources, service development, defining the role of occupational therapists, and student learning. Findings suggest that health professionals in specialized and often isolated areas of practice are keen to connect with colleagues and learn from each other's experiences. The main purposes for which the online discussion group was used could be summarized as communication, information sharing and networking; though activity within the group declined significantly during the last three years of the data collection period. This raises questions about the sustainability of online discussion groups within the rapidly developing social media environment.

  3. Investigating the purpose of an online discussion group for health professionals: a case example from forensic occupational therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Thousands of health-related online discussion groups are active world-wide however, very little is known about the purpose and usefulness of such groups. In 2003 an online discussion group called ‘forensic occupational therapy’ was established in the United Kingdom. This group was examined to gain an understanding of the purpose and use of online discussion groups for health professionals who may be practically and geographically isolated from others in similar areas of practice. Methods Following a case study design, descriptive characteristics on members’ locations and number of posts were collected from the forensic occupational therapy online discussion group. Eight years of posts (2003–2011) were examined using a theoretical thematic analysis process to identify and describe the purposes for which members were using the group. Results Members from 20 countries contributed to the discussion group; the vast majority of posts being from members in the United Kingdom. Activity within the group was consistently high for the first five years however, activity within the group declined in the final three years. Six purposes for which members use the online discussion group were identified: seeking and giving advice, networking, requesting and sharing material resources, service development, defining the role of occupational therapists, and student learning. Conclusions Findings suggest that health professionals in specialized and often isolated areas of practice are keen to connect with colleagues and learn from each other’s experiences. The main purposes for which the online discussion group was used could be summarized as communication, information sharing and networking; though activity within the group declined significantly during the last three years of the data collection period. This raises questions about the sustainability of online discussion groups within the rapidly developing social media environment. PMID:23822895

  4. Evaluating the role of web-based tutorials in educational practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moring, Camilla; Schreiber, Trine

    The paper describes and discusses a two step analysis for evaluating web based information literacy tutorials in educational practice. In a recent evaluation project the authors used the analysis to examine three web based tutorials developed by three different academic libraries in Norway. Firstly......, each web-based tutorial is analyzed as a communicative act by looking at how it argues for its purpose, how it is rhetorically organized and the interpretative repertoires used. Secondly, the tutorial is analyzed as a tool that users form opinions about while using it, and therefore the second part...... of the analysis focuses on user reception and meaning negotiation. In combination the two different analyses strengthen the evaluation of how web-tutorials as communicative acts become meaningful to users, and how this meaning is negotiated in relation to an educational practice. This approach can be recommended...

  5. Exploring Reflective Teaching through Informed Journal Keeping and Blog Group Discussion in the Teaching Practicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insuasty Edgar Alirio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of a study which examined how student teachers could be empowered as more reflective practitioners through journal keeping and blog group discussions. It was carried out with six student teachers who developed their practicum over six months. Data were collected through journals, blogs, metaphors, conferences and a questionnaire. The results demonstrated that student teachers enriched their perceptions about what reflective teaching implied. Furthermore, journal keeping was approached as an informed process by virtue of which student- teachers could go beyond the descriptive documentation of what happened in their classes. Their journal entries also revealed reflective references, most of which were mainly focused on evaluating teaching, diagnosing and solving problems. Este artículo reporta los resultados de un estudio que examinó cómo se podía potenciar los practicantes como docentes más reflexivos a través del uso de diarios y discusiones mediante blogs. En el estudio participaron seis practicantes, quienes desarrollaron sus prácticas durante seis meses. Los datos se recogieron a través de diarios, blogs, metáforas, conferencias y cuestionarios. Los resultados demostraron que los practicantes enriquecieron sus percepciones acerca de lo que significa la enseñanza reflexiva. Por otra parte, el diligenciamiento del diario, el cual se hizo como un proceso informado, les permitió ir más allá de una etapa descriptiva y enfocarse en la evaluación del proceso de enseñanza, la identificación y solución de los problemas que surgieron en la clase.

  6. In-Class Reflective Group Discussion as a Strategy for the Development of Students as Evolving Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Annetta Kit Lam

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine perceptions of three cohorts of third year undergraduate students (n = 65) on in-class reflective group discussion as a critical reflective approach for evolving professionals. Reflective group discussions were embedded into a final year course within the University of Queensland Bachelor of Oral…

  7. Talking while Computing in Groups: The Not-so-Private Functions of Computational Private Speech in Mathematical Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, William; Moschkovich, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Students often voice computations during group discussions of mathematics problems. Yet, this type of private speech has received little attention from mathematics educators or researchers. In this article, we use excerpts from middle school students' group mathematical discussions to illustrate and describe "computational private…

  8. Talking while Computing in Groups: The Not-so-Private Functions of Computational Private Speech in Mathematical Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, William; Moschkovich, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Students often voice computations during group discussions of mathematics problems. Yet, this type of private speech has received little attention from mathematics educators or researchers. In this article, we use excerpts from middle school students' group mathematical discussions to illustrate and describe "computational private…

  9. Historical review of tutorial in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Luna Pérez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, tutorials have always been of an individual character in the history of education. The paper reviews how tutorials in education have evolved from ancient Greece to the present by considering taking into account the following aspects: a its general understanding, b the favorite areas of orientation c the role of learning guiding process d the supporting role of tutorials. We offer a historical account of tutorials development in Mexican Education. The study provides the main trends of tutorial activities in primary education, the evidence confirmed that tutoring has evolved from the learning of philosophical and ethical questions to the multiple learning involving competencies.

  10. Qualitative assessment of student-teacher communication using focus group discussion in a Dental College in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahasweta Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The communication between faculty and students is a vital component of optimal facilitation of knowledge and learning. Various factors influence this dynamic. Aim: To assess communication levels between students and teachers in a dental college scenario via focus group discussion. Materials and Methods: The focus group discussion consisted of 10 groups; 5 groups representing the teachers, and 5 groups representing the students. Each group consisted of 6 participants. Hence there were a total of 30 teacher and 30 student participants. Focus group discussion was conducted for each of the groups for 30–45 min duration in the presence of a moderator and a note-taker. Open-ended questions were put across by the moderator to initiate and continue the discussions. The hand-written data taken by the note-taker were transcribed onto a computer on the same day of the discussion. Based on the transcription, domains were created for the student and teacher groups. Results: The issues raised by both the teacher and student groups in this focus group discussion were broadly classified into the following themes: (1 Past versus current scenario, (2 attitudes toward communication and learning, (3 hindrances to effective communication, and (4 potential solutions. Conclusions: Focus group discussion exposed many differences in the perceptions of teachers and students to communication. Each group, however, felt that bridging the teacher-student communication barrier was crucial to improve the teaching-learning experience. Many constructive solutions were provided by both the groups which can help to improve the quality of teaching-learning experience resulting in better quality of education.

  11. Investigating and accounting for physics graduate students' tutorial classroom practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Renee Michelle

    Physics Education researchers have been working to understanding how students learn physics, which has led to the creation of a body of research-based curricula. It is equally important to study novice instructors, graduate teaching assistants (TAs), who often teach these students. The study of TAs has similarities to how students have been studied: it is important to identify what preconceptions they often enter the classroom with, what resources they may have that they could apply to their physics teaching, and how both the classroom environment and past experiences affect what they are doing in the classroom. Although TAs are responsible for a significant portion of students' instruction at many universities, science TAs and their teaching have not been the focus of any significant amount of study. This dissertation begins to fill this gap by examining physics graduate students who teach discussion sections for introductory courses using tutorials, which are guided worksheets completed by groups of students. While assisting students with their conceptual understanding of physics, TAs are also expected to convey classroom norms of constructing arguments and listening and responding to the reasoning of others. Physics graduate students enter into the role of tutorial TA having relative content expertise but minimal or no pedagogical expertise. This analysis contends that considering the broader influences on TAs can account for TA behavior. Observations from two institutions (University of Colorado, Boulder and University of Maryland, College Park) show that TAs have different valuations (or buy-in) of the tutorials they teach, which have specific, identifiable consequences in the classroom. These differences can be explained by differences in the TAs' different teaching environments. Next, I examine cases of a behavior shared by three TAs, in which they focus on relatively superficial indicators of knowledge. Because the beliefs that underlie their teaching

  12. The Influence of Collaborative Group Work on Students' Development of Critical Thinking: The Teacher's Role in Facilitating Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis Chun-Lok; To, Helen; Leung, Kit

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the incorporation of group work in a teaching intervention can effectively foster students' critical thinking skills. Building upon Kuhn's critical thinking model, the research involved comparison of pretest and post-test results for 140 secondary four (10th grade) students in Hong Kong on two…

  13. MuPAD tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Creutzig, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    This book explains the basic use of the software package called MuPAD and gives an insight into the power of the system. MuPAD is a so-called com­ puter algebra system, which is developed mainly by Sciface Software and the MuPAD Research Group of the University of Paderborn in Germany. This introduction addresses mathematicians, engineers, computer scientists, natural scientists and, more generally, all those in need of mathematical com­ putations for their education or their profession. Generally speaking, this book addresses anybody who wants to use the power of a modern computer algebra package. There are two ways to use a computer algebra system. On the one hand, you may use the mathematical knowledge it incorporates by calling system functions interactively. For example, you can compute symbolic integrals or generate and invert matrices by calling appropriate functions. They comprise the system's mathematical intelligence and may implement sophisticated al­ gorithms. Chapters 2 through 15 discuss this...

  14. Elaboration during Problem-Based Group Discussion: Effects on Recall for High and Low Ability Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    Although elaboration has been investigated frequently, there is little evidence for the beneficial effect of elaboration in problem-based learning. A controlled experiment tested the effect of elaboration during problem-based discussion on recall. Sixty-seven students observed a video-recorded, problem-based discussion. In one experimental…

  15. Patient advisory groups in practice improvement: sample case presentation with a discussion of best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstman, Kurt B; Bender, Robert O; Bruce, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Using patient advisory groups can affect practice changes and create a patient-centric focus for a primary care practice. A successful patient advisory group has been developed for our primary care clinics. Utilizing this group, we have implemented practice improvement changes that have had a significant impact in patient care. This will be demonstrated in a case presentation involving the implementation of depression care managers at our practice sites. We will review key "best practices," as defined by the group, regarding size, composition, and meeting frequency that can be used for the development of a clinical patient advisory group.

  16. Online Searching in PBL Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan M.; Botelho, Michael G.; Chan, Lap Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore how online searching plays a role during PBL tutorials in two undergraduate health sciences curricula, Medicine and Dentistry. Utilizing Interactional Ethnography (IE) as an organizing framework for data collection and analysis, and drawing on a critical theory of technology as an explanatory lens, enabled a textured…

  17. Web-tutorials in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Haakon; Pors, Niels Ole

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the research is to investigate Norwegian web‐tutorials in contexts consisting of organizational issues and different forms of usability in relation to students’ perception and use of the system. Further, the research investigates the usefulness of the concepts concerning...

  18. Tutorial Instruction in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Miles

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the tutorial practices of in-service teachers to address the underachievement in the science education of K-12 students. Method: In-service teachers in Virginia and North Carolina were given a survey questionnaire to examine how they tutored students who were in need of additional instruction. Results: When these teachers were asked, “How do you describe a typical one-on-one science tutorial session?” the majority of their responses were categorized as teacher-directed. Many of the teachers would provide a science tutorial session for a student after school for 16-30 minutes, one to three times a week. Respondents also indicated they would rely on technology, peer tutoring, scientific inquiry, or themselves for one-on-one science instruction. Over half of the in-service teachers that responded to the questionnaire stated that they would never rely on outside assistance, such as a family member or an after school program to provide tutorial services in science. Additionally, very few reported that they incorporated the ethnicity, culture, or the native language of ELL students into their science tutoring sessions.

  19. Online Searching in PBL Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan M.; Botelho, Michael G.; Chan, Lap Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore how online searching plays a role during PBL tutorials in two undergraduate health sciences curricula, Medicine and Dentistry. Utilizing Interactional Ethnography (IE) as an organizing framework for data collection and analysis, and drawing on a critical theory of technology as an explanatory lens, enabled a textured…

  20. Hypermedia 1990 structured Hypertext tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Hypermedia 1990 structured Hypertext tutorial is presented in the form of view-graphs. The following subject areas are covered: structured hypertext; analyzing hypertext documents for structure; designing structured hypertext documents; creating structured hypertext applications; structuring service and repair documents; maintaining structured hypertext documents; and structured hypertext conclusion.

  1. Determinants of eating behaviour in university students: a qualitative study using focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2014-01-18

    College or university is a critical period regarding unhealthy changes in eating behaviours in students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore which factors influence Belgian (European) university students' eating behaviour, using a qualitative research design. Furthermore, we aimed to collect ideas and recommendations in order to facilitate the development of effective and tailored intervention programs aiming to improve healthy eating behaviours in university students. Using a semi-structured question guide, five focus group discussions have been conducted consisting of 14 male and 21 female university students from a variety of study disciplines, with a mean age of 20.6 ± 1.7 yrs. Using Nvivo9, an inductive thematic approach was used for data analysis. After the transition from secondary school to university, when independency increases, students are continuously challenged to make healthful food choices. Students reported to be influenced by individual factors (e.g. taste preferences, self-discipline, time and convenience), their social networks (e.g. (lack of) parental control, friends and peers), physical environment (e.g. availability and accessibility, appeal and prices of food products), and macro environment (e.g. media and advertising). Furthermore, the relationships between determinants and university students' eating behaviour seemed to be moderated by university characteristics, such as residency, student societies, university lifestyle and exams. Recommendations for university administrators and researchers include providing information and advice to enhance healthy food choices and preparation (e.g. via social media), enhancing self-discipline and self-control, developing time management skills, enhancing social support, and modifying the subjective as well as the objective campus food environment by e.g. making healthy foods price-beneficial and by providing vending machines with more healthy products. This is the first European

  2. Students and Graduates Learn Library Educational Content from Interactive Multimedia Tutorials. A review of: Markey, Karen, Annie Armstrong, Sandy De Groote, Michael Fosmire, Laura Fuderer, Kelly Garrett, Helen Georgas, Linda Sharp, Cheri Smith, Michael Spaly, and JoniE. Warner. “Testing the Effectiveness of Interactive Multimedia for Library‐User Education.” portal: Libraries & the Academy 5.4 (Oct. 2005: 527‐54

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Herron

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective –To demonstrate the effectiveness of interactive multimedia tutorials in delivering library educational content, and to evaluate librarian experiences of developing multimedia tutorials, both aspart of the LUMENS (Drabenstott project.Design – User study (questionnaire and interviews using pretest‐posttest design.Setting – Four academic libraries in the United States. One library dropped out during the course of the project.Subjects – Ninety university students from the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC, Purdue University, and the University of Notre Dame participated in the main study to evaluate three of the tutorials: “Doing research an introduction to the concepts of online searching,” “How to read a scientificp aper,” and “Hungry for information?” Another group of 15 subjects from UIC, consisting of 10 graduate students, 2 faculty, 2 librarians, and one fellow, assessed a fourth tutorial “Keeping current in your field.” Librarians were interviewed about their experiences producing the interactive multimedia tutorials.Methods – The 90 students were given a pretest containing questions about library educational content and five demographic questions. The students used the multimedia tutorial for 15‐30 minutes and immediately afterward were given a posttest containing comparable questions to the pretest in terms of content and difficulty. The students were also asked to rate their experiences of using the tutorials in various ways on a scale from 0‐10. At UIC, the experiences of the subjects using the multimedia tutorial were assessed by personal interviews. Librarians producing the multimedia tutorials were asked about their experiences of developing multimedia tutorials through e‐mail, listserv discussion, phone calls, and face‐to‐face personal and group interviews.Main results – All three libraries measured a significant increase (using a one sample t test, p75% of students were familiar

  3. Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Faraji, Mona

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students' attitude and practice was assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Before the intervention, no significant difference was found between the group designated to group discussion and that designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303) and practice (P=0.493) toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001). Moreover, the students' practice score increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001). Both methods were effective on the students' attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

  4. Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. Methods A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students’ attitude and practice was assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Results Before the intervention, no significant difference was found between the group designated to group discussion and that designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303 and practice (P=0.493 toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001. Moreover, the students’ practice score increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001. Conclusion Both methods were effective on the students’ attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

  5. A standardized approach to qualitative content analysis of focus group discussions from different countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moretti, F.; Vliet, L. van; Bensing, J.; Deledda, G.; Mazzi, M.; Rimondini, M.; Zimmermann, C.; Fletcher, I.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the methodological procedures of a multi-centre focus group research for obtaining content categories also suitable for categorical statistical analyses. METHODS: Inductive content analyses were performed on a subsample of 27 focus groups conducted in three different countries

  6. A standardized approach to qualitative content analysis of focus group discussions from different countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moretti, F.; Vliet, L. van; Bensing, J.; Deledda, G.; Mazzi, M.; Rimondini, M.; Zimmermann, C.; Fletcher, I.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the methodological procedures of a multi-centre focus group research for obtaining content categories also suitable for categorical statistical analyses. METHODS: Inductive content analyses were performed on a subsample of 27 focus groups conducted in three different countries

  7. Sex, Pregnancy and Contraception: A Report of Focus Group Discussions with Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugland, Barbara W.; Wilder, Kathleen J.; Chandra, Anita

    Findings in this report summarize the first phase of a larger, multi-year study that is combining qualitative and quantitative methods to outline a conceptual framework to guide future demographic/fertility research, pregnancy prevention programs and policies. Twelve focus groups--involving a multiculturally representative group of male and female…

  8. Comparative study of problem based learning versus structured group discussion in teaching pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveesh M. R.

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: PBL and SGD are effective small group methods for teaching undergraduate medical students. However learning outcome with PBL is better than SGD. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1877-1880

  9. The critical value of focus group discussions in research with women living with HIV in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Stevens, Patricia E

    2010-05-01

    This article is based on a critical ethnography about HIV and gender-based issues of power and violence conducted in Malawi in 2008. In all, 72 women living with HIV were recruited from four antiretroviral treatment clinics, three rural and one urban, to participate in 12 focus groups. Informed by a postcolonial feminist perspective, we analyze the process and products of these focus groups to interrogate their capacity to facilitate collective engagement with the social and structural realities confronting women in a resource-limited, highly AIDS-affected country. We present exemplars to show how women together created collective narratives to mobilize individuals to action. Findings indicate that focus groups can be used innovatively to benefit both the research and the participants, not only as a critical method of inquiry with marginalized groups but also as a forum in which validating dialogue, mutual support, and exchange of strategic information can generate transformative change to improve women's lives.

  10. Facilitating dental student reflections: using mentor groups to discuss clinical experiences and personal development

    OpenAIRE

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Christiaens, Véronique; Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Despite the consensus on the importance of reflection for dental professionals, a lack of understanding remains about how students and clinicians should develop their ability to reflect. The aim of this study was to investigate dental students’ and mentors’ perceptions of mentor groups as an instructional method to facilitate students’ reflection in terms of the strategy’s learning potential, role of the mentor, group dynamics, and feasibility. At Ghent University in Belgium, third- and fourt...

  11. [A discussion on setting up target age group for immunization against leptospirosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, J T; Wang, S S; Lan, W L

    1995-08-01

    This paper presented the lesson of setting up a false immunization priority age group for leptospirosis which failed to prevent the leptospirosis outbreak. Our experience was that in the rice paddy field type endemic area the priority age group for the vaccination against leptopirosis should be 15 to 34 year olds followed by 35 years old or above. There was no preventive effect in the vaccination for the children 14 years old or yaunger, to our observation.

  12. Using Facebook Groups to Encourage Science Discussions in a Large-Enrollment Biology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Aditi; McGinnis, Gene; Bryant, Dana; Cole, Megan; Kovacs, Jennifer; Stovall, Kyndra; Lee, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This case study reports the instructional development, impact, and lessons learned regarding the use of Facebook as an educational tool within a large enrollment Biology class at Spelman College (Atlanta, GA). We describe the use of this social networking site to (a) engage students in active scientific discussions, (b) build community within the…

  13. Students' Evaluation of Google Hangouts through a Cross-Cultural Group Discussion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated perceived ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts as an instructional/learning tool. Forty-two teacher education students at U.S and Japanese universities participated in an online cross-cultural activity using Google Hangouts and discussed cultural differences between the two countries and their teaching philosophies.…

  14. Science Information Literacy Tutorials and Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study examined information literacy tutorials in science. The goals of the research were to identify which of the information literacy standards for science, engineering and technology were addressed in the tutorials, and the extent that the tutorials incorporated good pedagogical elements.Methods – The researcher chose for review 31 of the tutorials selected by members of the ACRL Science & Technology Section (STS Information Literacy Committee. She carefully analyzed the tutorials and developed a database with codes for the topic of each tutorial, the STS information literacy standard(s addressed by the tutorial, and whether good pedagogical elements were incorporated. The entire analysis and coding procedure was repeated three times to ensure consistency.Results – The tutorials analyzed in this study covered various subjects and addressed all the (STS information literacy standards. The tutorials presented information clearly and allowed users to select their own learning paths. The incorporation of good pedagogical elements was limited, especially in relation to active learning elements.Conclusions – Web tutorials have been accepted as effective information literacy instruction tools and have been used to teach all elements of the STS information literacy standards. Yet, ensuring they provide a real learning experience for students remains a challenge. More serious thought needs to be given to integrating good pedagogy into these instructional tools in order to attain deep learning.

  15. Children's Behaviors and Emotions in Small-Group Argumentative Discussion: Explore the Influence of Big Five Personality Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting

    2009-01-01

    The assessment and structure of personality traits and small group learning during classroom discussions are both research fields that have undergone fast development in the past few decades. However, very few studies have investigated the relationship between individual personality characteristics and performance in discussions, especially with…

  16. Effectiveness of interactive discussion group in suicide risk assessment among general nurses in Taiwan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Mei Chang; Huang, Lian-Hua; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of suicide prevention training for nurses is scarce. Strategies to enhance general nurses' ability in suicide risk assessment are critical to develop effective training programs in general medical settings. This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of an interactive discussion group in a suicide prevention training program for general nurses. In this randomized study with two groups of pre-post study design, the sample was recruited from the Medical, Surgical, and Emergency/Intensive Care Sectors of a 2000-bed general hospital via stratified randomization. Among the 111 nurses, 57 participants randomly assigned to the control group received a two-hour baseline suicide gatekeeper lecture, and 54 participants assigning to the experimental group received an additional five-hour group discussion about suicide risk assessment skills. Using a case vignette, the nurses discussed and assessed suicide risk factors specified in a 10-item Chinese SAD PERSONS Scale during a group discussion intervention. The findings revealed that the nurses achieved significant and consistent improvements of risk identification and assessment after the intervention without influencing their mental health status for assessing suicide risks. The result suggested an effective approach of interactive group discussion for facilitating critical thinking and learning suicide risk assessment skills among general nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cultural Ways of Constructing Knowledge: The Role of Identities in Online Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztok, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Learning scientists and the CSCL community have argued that knowledge construction is a process of collective thinking; a process that is simultaneously personal and social that requires group cognition. However, while CSCL researchers have investigated situated knowledge in the process of collective thinking, little work has been done to fully…

  18. Social Influence in Online Health Discussions: An Evaluation of Online Graduate Student Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Erin Kay

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a field experimental design assessing online support groups testing hypotheses derived from the social identification model of deindividuation effects (SIDE; Lea & Spears, 1992) and social information processing theory (SIP; Walther, 1992). Specifically, it is predicted that individuals in an online support…

  19. An Annotated Bibliography of Materials Designed and Organized for Adult Use in Discussion Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, John W.

    This first annotated bibliography of materials designed and organized for adult use in disucssion groups includes both book and nonbook material. Areas dealt with are: art, censorship, change, child guidance, communication, crime, democracy, economics, education, evolution, food, foreign affairs, forgetting, generation gap, gold, good and evil,…

  20. Cultural Ways of Constructing Knowledge: The Role of Identities in Online Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztok, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Learning scientists and the CSCL community have argued that knowledge construction is a process of collective thinking; a process that is simultaneously personal and social that requires group cognition. However, while CSCL researchers have investigated situated knowledge in the process of collective thinking, little work has been done to fully…

  1. Making Foundational Assumptions Transparent: Framing the Discussion about Group Communication and Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Renee A.; Seibold, David R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors seek to augment Dean Hewes's (1986, 1996) intriguing bracketing and admirable larger effort to "return to basic theorizing in the study of group communication" by making transparent the foundational, and debatable, assumptions that underlie those models. Although these assumptions are addressed indirectly by Hewes, the…

  2. Teaching medical students to recognise their strengths and limitations in leadership, teamwork and communication by military led tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James; Hall, T Falconer; O'Mahony, K

    2013-12-01

    The General Medical Council has stipulated that greater importance must be placed on undergraduate students developing their ability to lead and work effectively as part of a team. Wales Universities' Officer Training Corps have attempted to meet this requirement through a third year interactive tutorial which aims to encourage students to recognise their strengths and limitations in the six outcomes of leadership, teamwork, accountability, management, feedback and communication. 16 tutorial groups of 10-15 students were each led by one officer who divided the tutorial group into three teams. The teams worked on complex planning exercises with an intrateam constructive feedback discussion to raise students' awareness of their strengths and limitations as individuals during the task, as perceived by others. The student perception was that all six learning outcomes were achieved by the session. 163 students returned feedback questionnaires and learning outcomes 1-4 were felt to have been addressed effectively or very effectively by 90%, 91%, 90% and 86% respondents, respectively. The fifth and sixth outcomes were less well achieved with only 66% and 64% respondents agreeing that the outcomes were achieved effectively or very effectively. Students commended the instructor's demonstration of leadership and the novel teaching method but improvements could be made in reinforcing why these skills are important.

  3. Online interactive tutorials for creating graphs with excel 2007 or 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanselow, Nicholas R; Bourret, Jason C

    2012-01-01

    Graphic display of clinical data is a useful tool for the behavior-analytic clinician. However, graphs can sometimes be difficult to create. We describe how to access and use an online interactive tutorial that teaches the user to create a variety of graphs often used by behavior analysts. Three tutorials are provided that cover the basics of Microsoft Excel 2007 or 2010, creating graphs for clinical purposes, and creating graphs for research purposes. The uses for this interactive tutorial and other similar programs are discussed.

  4. Evaluating the role of web-based tutorials in educational practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moring, Camilla; Schreiber, Trine

    The paper describes and discusses a two step analysis for evaluating web based information literacy tutorials in educational practice. In a recent evaluation project the authors used the analysis to examine three web based tutorials developed by three different academic libraries in Norway. Firstly...... of the analysis focuses on user reception and meaning negotiation. In combination the two different analyses strengthen the evaluation of how web-tutorials as communicative acts become meaningful to users, and how this meaning is negotiated in relation to an educational practice. This approach can be recommended...

  5. Making Meaning with Friends: Exploring the Function, Direction and Tone of Small Group Discussions of Literature in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The merits of decentralized small groups has been questioned in literature and by practicing teachers; thus this study shows the academic and identity work children do as they attempt to make meaning in these spaces. This study explores the affordances and drawbacks of decentralized small group discussion contexts in a multiage (3rd/4th) grade…

  6. Examining the Impact of Novel Pre-activity Tasks on Macroskills: The Case of Group Discussion on Writing Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Khoshsima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main concern of most researchers in the field of second and foreign language teaching is lessening the problems and eliminating the hinders on the way of learning a language. Writing is considered as one of the most challenging and complicated tasks for learners to perform particularly when they have to write in a second or foreign language. Numerous studies were done on the importance of the pre-writing stage and activities which are directly and indirectly related to the theme of the writing. Accordingly, the main aim of this study was to examine the effects of group discussion as a pre- activity task on writing ability. To this aim, 27 Iranian EFL learners, who were at the same level –intermediate- studying at Shokuh and Safir Institutes, Birjand, Iran were chosen randomly. Two groups- one control and one experimental group- were studied. In control group the conventional method was used in teaching writing, while in experimental group, group discussion pre-activity task was administered. After 16 sessions, the obtained data of the pretests and posttests was analyzed by SPSS software. According to the results, researcher strongly concluded that group discussion has no significant effect on writing ability of Iranian intermediate learners. This study can help teachers and syllabus designers in choosing and applying an effective pre-activity task. Keywords: writing ability, pre-activity task, group discussion, EFL learners

  7. Phases and Changes: Using I Ching as a Source of Generative Metaphors in Teaching Small Group Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, G. Richard; Chang, Hui-Ching

    1992-01-01

    This essay describes the use of I Ching hexagrams as a focus to improve the ability of college student groups to evolve creative solutions and improve decision-making skills. The philosophy of I Ching is briefly explained, and examples are given of hexagram interpretations which are applicable to group discussion and problem solving. (DB)

  8. ROOT Tutorial for Summer Students

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Piparo, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    ROOT is a "batteries-included" tool kit for data analysis, storage and visualization. It is widely used in High Energy Physics and other disciplines such as Biology, Finance and Astrophysics. This event is an introductory tutorial to ROOT and comprises a front lecture and hands on exercises. IMPORTANT NOTE: The tutorial is based on ROOT 6.04 and NOT on the ROOT5 series.  IMPORTANT NOTE: if you have ROOT 6.04 installed on your laptop, you will not need to install any virtual machine. The instructions showing how to install the virtual machine on which you can find ROOT 6.04 can be found under "Material" on this page.

  9. Technicians or patient advocates?--still a valid question (results of focus group discussions with pharmacists)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Morgall, Janine Marie

    1999-01-01

    discussions with community pharmacists in the capital area Reykjavík and rural areas were employed to answer the research question: How has the pharmacists' societal role evolved after the legislation and what are the implications for pharmacy practice? The results showed firstly that the public image......, the results showed that the pharmacists have difficulties reconciling their technical paradigm with a legislative and professional will specifying customer and patient focus. This study describes the challenges of a new legislation with a market focus for community pharmacists whose education emphasized...... technical skills. This account of the changes in the drug distribution system in Iceland highlights some of the implications for pharmacists internationally....

  10. Technicians or patient advocates?--still a valid question (results of focus group discussions with pharmacists)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Morgall, Janine Marie

    1999-01-01

    New legislation went into effect in Iceland in March 1996 making it the first Nordic country to liberate their drug distribution system. The term liberalization implies the abolishment of the professional monopoly in that ownership was not tied to the pharmacy profession anymore. Focus group disc...... technical skills. This account of the changes in the drug distribution system in Iceland highlights some of the implications for pharmacists internationally....

  11. Tutorial on Online Partial Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Cook

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short tutorial introduction to online partial evaluation. We show how to write a simple online partial evaluator for a simple, pure, first-order, functional programming language. In particular, we show that the partial evaluator can be derived as a variation on a compositionally defined interpreter. We demonstrate the use of the resulting partial evaluator for program optimization in the context of model-driven development.

  12. Tutorial on Online Partial Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, William R; 10.4204/EPTCS.66.8

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a short tutorial introduction to online partial evaluation. We show how to write a simple online partial evaluator for a simple, pure, first-order, functional programming language. In particular, we show that the partial evaluator can be derived as a variation on a compositionally defined interpreter. We demonstrate the use of the resulting partial evaluator for program optimization in the context of model-driven development.

  13. ECO 204 NEW Tutorial / Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Armugam

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uoptutorial.com   Circular Flow Diagram. Explain how the circular flow diagram relates to the current economic situation. Using the circular flow diagram, explain a way that your family interacts in the factor market and a way that it interacts in the products market. Supply and Demand. Analyze how the law of demand applies to a recent purchase that you made. Describe how the product has changed in price and explain whether the price ch...

  14. Teaching Game Programming using Video Tutorials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver

    Background. What are the learning potentials of using online video tutorials as educational tools in game programming of Mixed Reality? The paper reports on the first experiences of teaching third semester engineering students design of Mixed Reality using online step-by-step programming video...... tutorials. Mixed Reality covers in this case both Augmented and Virtual Reality. Until recently, most of the instructional support for the software and game development came from paper tutorials (van der Meij et al, 2016:332). YouTube’s rapid growth in popularity and easy to use programs for video...... and emerging topics such as Mixed Reality. Students tend to use video tutorial on their own initiative as supplementary tutorials for new and hard topics. This motivated me to use existing video tutorials as teaching materials in the course titled Mixed Reality for third semester engineering students...

  15. Effectiveness of group discussions and commitment in improving cleaning behaviour of shared sanitation users in Kampala, Uganda slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumwebaze, Innocent K; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Access to and use of hygienic shared sanitation facilities is fundamental in reducing the high risk of diseases such as diarrhoea and respiratory infections. We evaluated the effectiveness of group discussions and commitment in improving the cleaning behaviour of shared sanitation users in three urban slums in Kampala, Uganda. The study follows the risk, attitudes, norms, abilities and self-regulation (RANAS) model of behaviour change and some factors of the social dilemma theory. A pre-versus post-intervention survey was conducted in three slums of Kampala, Uganda, between December 2012 and September 2013. From the pre-intervention findings, users of dirty sanitation facilities were randomly assigned to discussions, discussions + commitment and control interventions. The interventions were implemented for 3 months with the aim of improving cleaning behaviour. This paper provides an analysis of 119 respondents who belonged to the intervention discussion-only (n = 38), discussions + commitment (n = 41) and the control (no intervention, n = 40) groups. Compared to the control, discussions and discussions + commitment significantly improved shared toilet users' cleaning behaviour. The rate of improvement was observed through behavioural determinants such as cleaning obligation, cleaning ease, cleaning approval and affective beliefs. Our study findings show that group discussions and commitment interventions derived from RANAS model of behaviour change are effective in improving the shared sanitation users' cleaning behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Initiation of student-TA interactions in tutorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond A. Hodges

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available At the University of Maryland we videotaped several semesters of tutorials as part of a large research project. A particular research task required us to locate examples of students calling the teaching assistants (TAs over for assistance with a physics question. To our surprise, examples of this kind of interaction were difficult to find. We undertook a systematic study of TA-student interactions in tutorial: In particular, how are the interactions initiated? Do the students call the TA over for help with a particular issue, does the TA stop by spontaneously, or does the worksheet require a discussion with the TA at that point? The initiation of the interaction is of particular interest because it provides evidence of the motivation for and purpose of the interaction. This paper presents the results of that systematic investigation. We discovered that the majority of student-TA interactions in tutorial are initiated by teaching assistants, confirmed our initial observation that relatively few interactions are initiated by students, and found, further, that even fewer interactions are worksheet initiated. Perhaps most importantly, we found that our sense of who initiates tutorial interactions—based on extensive but informal observations—is not necessarily accurate. We need systematic investigations to uncover the reality of our classroom experiences.

  17. Technicians or patient advocates?--still a valid question (results of focus group discussions with pharmacists)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, A B; Morgall, J M

    1999-01-01

    New legislation went into effect in Iceland in March 1996 making it the first Nordic country to liberate their drug distribution system. The term liberalization implies the abolishment of the professional monopoly in that ownership was not tied to the pharmacy profession anymore. Focus group...... and the self-image of the pharmacist has changed in the short time since the legislative change. The pharmacists generally said that their patient contact is deteriorating due to the discount wars, the rural pharmacists being more optimistic, and believing in a future competition based on quality. Secondly...

  18. Effects of an additional small group discussion to cognitive achievement and retention in basic principles of bioethics teaching methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Afandi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim The place of ethics in undergraduate medical curricula is essential but the methods of teaching medical ethics did not show substantial changes. “Basic principles of bioethics” is the best knowledge to develop student’s reasoning analysis in medical ethics In this study, we investigate the effects of an additional small group discussion in basic principles of bioethics conventional lecture methods to cognitive achievement and retention. This study was a randomized controlled trial with parallel design. Cognitive scores of the basic principles of bioethics as a parameter was measured using basic principles of bioethics (Kaidah Dasar Bioetika, KDB test. Both groups were attending conventional lectures, then the intervention group got an additional small group discussion.Result Conventional lectures with or without small group discussion significantly increased cognitive achievement of basic principles of bioethics (P= 0.001 and P= 0.000, respectively, and there were significant differences in cognitive achievement and retention between the 2 groups (P= 0.000 and P= 0.000, respectively.Conclusion Additional small group discussion method improved cognitive achievement and retention of basic principles of bioethics. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 48-52Keywords: lecture, specification checklist, multiple choice questions

  19. Students’ Evaluation of Google Hangouts Through A Cross-Cultural Group Discussion Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko KOBAYASHI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated perceived ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts as an instructional/learning tool. Forty-two teacher education students at U.S and Japanese universities participated in an online cross-cultural activity using Google Hangouts and discussed cultural differences between the two countries and their teaching philosophies. After the activity, students responded to a survey to evaluate the ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts. Qualitative data were also collected through the survey to examine their overall learning experience. The results indicated that Google Hangouts is a useful instructional tool, but not easy to use. Although technical problems occurred during the conference, the activity provided valuable experiences for both U.S. and Japanese students. The study provides suggestions for how Google Hangouts can be integrated into online classrooms based on the findings.

  20. La Acción Tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Campillo Frutos, Sebastián; Sánchez López, María Cristina; Gomariz Vicente, María Ángeles; Martínez Juárez, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Contenidos: La Acción tutorial. El tutor. El Plan de Acción Tutorial. Técnicas para el desarrollo de la Acción Tutorial. Materia que se imparte en el Master Universitario en Formación del Profesorado de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y Bachillerato, Formación Profesional, Enseñanzas de Idiomas y Enseñanzas Artísticas

  1. Hydroxyl groups in nonmetamict chevkinite-(Ce):a crystal chemical discussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhuming; Franz Pertlik; Michel Fleck

    2008-01-01

    The minerals of chevkinite group were commonly considered to be anhydrous minerals. The infrared absorption spectrum of natural nonmetamict chevkinite-(Ce) from the aegirine-alkali granite, Mianning, Sichuan Province, China, exhibited two broad peaks in the 3600-2800 cm-1 region owing to the OH stretching. The corresponding H2O content required for the charge balance in formula was 1.27%. The O-H ··· O bond lengths maight cover from 0.2658 to 0.2794 nm by the correlated OH stretching energies. An electrostatic charge balance for chevkinite-(Ce) based on the assigned site-population from chemical data was calculated without the hydrogen contribution. The resulting empirical bond-valence sum on O6, O8, O2, O3, O5, and O4 ranged from 1.73 to 1.95 vu. The partial substitution of O by OH may occur in four atom sites: O6, O2, O4, and O5. The small differences in the bond-valence sums between the supposed donors and acceptors may mean a mixed donor/acceptor role of the involved oxygen atoms. The IR spectral features between 3394 and 3035 cm-1 consisted of various hydrous species at different structural sites and orientations. The OH groups in the chevkinite-(Ce) appeared to be involved in local charge imbalance in the structure and to be present when the mineral crystallized hydrothermally.

  2. Discussion on Group Learning%浅谈小组合作学习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨艳萍

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely used in many countries in the world a kind of creative teaching theory and strategy. Refers to two or more than twostudents or groups,in order to achieve a common purpose in action are matched with each other.%合作学习是目前世界上许多国家普遍采用的一种富有创意的教学理论与方略,是指两个或两个以上的学生或群体,为了达到共同的目的而在行动上相互配合的过程。

  3. Operational Modal Analysis Tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the basic principles in operational modal testing and analysis are presented and discussed. A brief review of the techniques for operational modal testing and identification is presented, and it is argued, that there is now a wide range of techniques for effective identification of modal parameters of practical interest - including the mode shape scaling factor - with a high degree of accuracy. It is also argued that the operational technology offers the user a number of advanta...

  4. Informed Source Separation: A Bayesian Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2005-01-01

    Source separation problems are ubiquitous in the physical sciences; any situation where signals are superimposed calls for source separation to estimate the original signals. In h s tutorial I will discuss the Bayesian approach to the source separation problem. This approach has a specific advantage in that it requires the designer to explicitly describe the signal model in addition to any other information or assumptions that go into the problem description. This leads naturally to the idea of informed source separation, where the algorithm design incorporates relevant information about the specific problem. This approach promises to enable researchers to design their own high-quality algorithms that are specifically tailored to the problem at hand.

  5. Multiplicity: discussion points from the Statisticians in the Pharmaceutical Industry multiplicity expert group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alan; Fletcher, Chrissie; Atkinson, Gary; Channon, Eddie; Douiri, Abdel; Jaki, Thomas; Maca, Jeff; Morgan, David; Roger, James Henry; Terrill, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In May 2012, the Committee of Health and Medicinal Products issued a concept paper on the need to review the points to consider document on multiplicity issues in clinical trials. In preparation for the release of the updated guidance document, Statisticians in the Pharmaceutical Industry held a one-day expert group meeting in January 2013. Topics debated included multiplicity and the drug development process, the usefulness and limitations of newly developed strategies to deal with multiplicity, multiplicity issues arising from interim decisions and multiregional development, and the need for simultaneous confidence intervals (CIs) corresponding to multiple test procedures. A clear message from the meeting was that multiplicity adjustments need to be considered when the intention is to make a formal statement about efficacy or safety based on hypothesis tests. Statisticians have a key role when designing studies to assess what adjustment really means in the context of the research being conducted. More thought during the planning phase needs to be given to multiplicity adjustments for secondary endpoints given these are increasing in importance in differentiating products in the market place. No consensus was reached on the role of simultaneous CIs in the context of superiority trials. It was argued that unadjusted intervals should be employed as the primary purpose of the intervals is estimation, while the purpose of hypothesis testing is to formally establish an effect. The opposing view was that CIs should correspond to the test decision whenever possible. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Media Memories in Focus Group Discussions - Methodological Reflections Instancing the Global Media Generations Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Hug

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Medienereignisse wie auch die Einführung und Verbreitung neuer Medientechnologien und Formate bringen mannigfaltige Wege des „Eintretens von Medien ins Leben“ mit sich. Im Projekt Globale Mediengenerationen (GMG wurden Medienerinnerungen aus der Kindheit im Kontext von Gruppendiskussionen am Beispiel dreier Generationen aus verschiedenen Ländern aller Kontinente untersucht. Dabei wurden medienbezogene Wissensbestände von drei Alterskohorten globaler Generationen analysiert. Der Artikel diskutiert methodologische Aspekte des Projekts und komplexe und selektive Prozesse des Erinnerns vergangener Ereignisse. Er untersucht Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede des GMG-Ansatzes mit dem dokumentarischen Ansatz von Ralf Bohnsack, die beide in der Wissenssoziologie von Karl Mannheim verwurzelt sind. Darüber hinaus wird Medialität als basale methodologische Kategorie in Erwägung gezogen, nicht nur im Hinblick auf die Klärung begrifflicher Grundlagen, sondern auch als inhärente Dimension von Forschungsprozessen. Media events in general and the introduction and divulgence of new media technologies and formats in particular implicate various (new ways of “media entering life.” In the Global Media Generations (GMG research project, articulation of individuals’ memories of childhood experiences with the media was afforded by context of focus groups of three generations in different countries of six continents. In this project media related knowledge segments of different age cohorts have been analyzed and interpreted. The article deals with methodological questions of the project and complex processes of ‘remembering’ past events. It explores commonalities and differences of the GMG approach with Ralf Bohnsack’s documentary approach, both rooted in the sociology of knowledge of Karl Mannheim. Furthermore, mediality is taken into consideration as a basic methodological category, which means that it is perceived not only as subject matter to

  7. Operational Modal Analysis Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Palle

    analysis in an easier way and in many cases more effectively than traditional modal analysis methods. It can be applied for modal testing and analysis on a wide range of structures and not only for problems generally investigated using traditional modal analysis, but also for those requiring load......In this paper the basic principles in operational modal testing and analysis are presented and discussed. A brief review of the techniques for operational modal testing and identification is presented, and it is argued, that there is now a wide range of techniques for effective identification...... estimation, vibration level estimation and fatigue analysis....

  8. Servlet & JSP A Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Kurniawan, Budi

    2012-01-01

    Servlet and JavaServer Pages (JSP) are the underlying technologies for developing web applications in Java. They are essential for any programmer to master in order to effectively use frameworks such as JavaServer Faces, Struts 2, or Spring MVC. Covering Servlet 3.0 and JSP 2.2, this book explains the important programming concepts and design models in Java web development as well as related technologies and new features in the latest versions of Servlet and JSP. With comprehensive coverage and a lot of examples, this book is a guide to building real-world applications. Topics discussed in

  9. Perspectives on Positioning, Interaction, and Learning in Small-Group Discussion: Possibilities for Extending the Analytic Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittleson, Julie M.; Wilson, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    In this forum piece, we respond to Karin Due's study of social dynamics in groups of students in physics class and gender issues that play out in this context. We discuss two threads that appear in Due's paper: one pertains to patterns of talk within groups and how these patterns open up possibilities for learning, the other pertains to…

  10. Using the tutorial approach to improve physics learning from introductory to graduate level

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth

    In this thesis, I discuss the development and evaluation of tutorials ranging from introductory to graduate level. Tutorials were developed based upon research on student difficulties in learning relevant concepts and findings of cognitive research. Tutorials are a valuable resource when used either in-class or as a self-study tool. They strive to help students develop a robust knowledge structure of relevant topics and improve their problem solving skills. I discuss the development of a tutorial on the Lock-in amplifier (LIA) for use as both an on-ramp to ease the transition of students entering into the research lab and to improve student understanding of the operation of the LIA for those already making use of this device. The effectiveness of this tutorial was evaluated using think aloud interviews with graduate students possessing a wide range of experience with the LIA and the findings were uniformly positive. I also describe the development and evaluation of a Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) that focuses on quantum key distribution using two protocols for secure key distribution. One protocol used in the first part of the QuILT is administered to students working collaboratively in class while the second protocol used in the second part of the QuILT was administered as homework. Evaluation of student understanding of the two protocols used in this QuILT shows that it was effective at improving student understanding both immediately after working on the QuILT and two months later. Finally, I discuss the development and evaluation of four web-based tutorials focusing on quantitative problem solving intended to aid introductory students in the learning of effective problem-solving heuristics while helping them learn physics concepts. Findings suggest that while these tutorials are effective when administered in one-on-one think-aloud interviews, this effectiveness is greatly diminished when students are asked to use the tutorials as a self

  11. Transverse Anderson localization of light: a tutorial review

    CERN Document Server

    Mafi, Arash

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial review gives an overview of the transverse Anderson localization of light in one and two transverse dimensions. A pedagogical approach is followed throughout the presentation, where many aspects of localization are illustrated by means of a few simple models. The tutorial starts with some basic aspects of random matrix theory, and light propagation through and reflection from a random stack of dielectric slabs. Transverse Anderson localization of light in one- and two-dimensional coupled waveguide arrays is subsequently established and discussed. Recent experimental observations of localization and image transport in disordered optical fibers are discussed. More advanced topics, such as hyper-transport in longitudinally varying disordered waveguides, the impact of nonlinearity, and propagation of partially coherent and quantum light, are also examined.

  12. A Computer-based Tutorial on Double-Focusing Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbar, Richard R.; Browman, Andrew A.; Mead, William C.; Williams, Robert A.

    1998-10-01

    WhistleSoft is developing a set of computer-based, self-paced tutorials on particle accelerators that targets a broad audience, including undergraduate science majors and industrial technicians. (See http://www.whistlesoft.com/s~ilbar/.) We use multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and retention of the material. The tutorials feature interactive On-Screen Laboratories and use hypertext, colored graphics, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. Parts of our Dipoles module deal with the double-focusing spectrometer and occur throughout the piece. Radial focusing occurs in the section on uniform magnets, while vertical focusing is in the non-uniform magnets section. The student can even understand the √2π bend angle on working through the (intermediate-level) discussion on the Kerst-Serber equations. This talk will present our discussion of this spectrometer, direct to you from the computer screen.

  13. UCSC genome browser tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Ann S; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2008-08-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Bioinformatics website consists of a suite of free, open-source, on-line tools that can be used to browse, analyze, and query genomic data. These tools are available to anyone who has an Internet browser and an interest in genomics. The website provides a quick and easy-to-use visual display of genomic data. It places annotation tracks beneath genome coordinate positions, allowing rapid visual correlation of different types of information. Many of the annotation tracks are submitted by scientists worldwide; the others are computed by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics group from publicly available sequence data. It also allows users to upload and display their own experimental results or annotation sets by creating a custom track. The suite of tools, downloadable data files, and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/.

  14. Social networks and cooperation in electronic communities : a theoretical-empirical analysis of academic communication and Internet discussion groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matzat, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    The study examines the use of academic e-mailing lists and newsgroups on the Internet by university researchers in the Netherlands and England. Their use is related to three clusters of problems that are analyzed. Firstly, while there are considerable time costs for using Internet Discussion Groups,

  15. Social networks and cooperation in electronic communities : a theoretical-empirical analysis of academic communication and Internet discussion groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matzat, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    The study examines the use of academic e-mailing lists and newsgroups on the Internet by university researchers in the Netherlands and England. Their use is related to three clusters of problems that are analyzed. Firstly, while there are considerable time costs for using Internet Discussion Groups,

  16. Structuring Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Comparing Scripting by Assigning Roles with Regulation by Cross-Age Peer Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wever, Bram; Van Keer, Hilde; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The present study focuses on comparing the impact of role assignment and cross-age peer tutors on students' level of knowledge construction in 15 asynchronous discussion groups of nine students each in a first-year university course (N=135). Content analysis was applied to analyse the level of knowledge construction in students' online postings.…

  17. Video Modeling of Cooperative Discussion Group Behaviors with Students with Learning Disabilities in a Secondary Content-area Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Chris; Wood, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Peer-mediated instructional strategies such as cooperative learning are commonly used in general education classrooms in secondary schools; however, students with disabilities often lack the group interaction and discussion skills necessary to fully benefit from evidence-based interventions. The present study used a multiple baseline across…

  18. Qualitative Inquiry into Church-Based Assets for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control: A Forum Focus Group Discussion Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aja, Godwin N.; Modeste, Naomi N.; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2012-01-01

    Assets church members believed they needed to engage in effective HIV/AIDS prevention and control activities. We used the three-step forum focus group discussion (FFGD) methodology to elicit responses from 32 church leaders and lay members, representing five denominations in Aba, Nigeria. Concrete resources, health expertise, finances,…

  19. Structuring Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Comparing Scripting by Assigning Roles with Regulation by Cross-Age Peer Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wever, Bram; Van Keer, Hilde; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The present study focuses on comparing the impact of role assignment and cross-age peer tutors on students' level of knowledge construction in 15 asynchronous discussion groups of nine students each in a first-year university course (N=135). Content analysis was applied to analyse the level of knowledge construction in students' online postings.…

  20. GEN 480 UOP TUTORIAL / Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uoptutorial.com           GEN 480 Week 1 DQ 1  GEN 480 Week 1 DQ 2  GEN 480 Week 1 DQ 3  GEN 480 Week 1 DQ 4  GEN 480 Week 1 Individual AssignmentEthics Awareness  GEN 480 Week 1 Summary  GEN 480 Week 2 DQ 1  GEN 480 Week 2 DQ 2  GEN 480 Week 2 DQ 3  GEN 480 Week 2 DQ 4  GEN 480 Week 2 Individual Assignment Ethics Awareness &...

  1. Agregar recursos en Studium. Tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Universidad de Salamanca (España). Universidad Virtual

    2009-01-01

    A través de este tutorial se pretende dar a conocer las opciones que presenta Studium para agregar diversos tipos de recursos. Se explica de forma textual y gráfica cómo añadir y editar una etiqueta, una página de texto, una página web, enlazar diversos tipos de documentos, como un archivo o una web. Por otra parte, se presenta cómo gestionar el uso de carpetas.

  2. ACC 230 UOP TUTORIAL / Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Justin Bieber

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uoptutorial.com   ACC 230 Week 1 Checkpoint Financial Statements ACC 230 Week 1 DQ 1 and DQ 2 ACC 230 Week 2 CheckPoint Differentiating Depreciation Methods ACC 230 Week 2 Assignment Lucent Technologies Case ACC 230 Week 3 CheckPoint Preparing an Income Statement ACC 230 Week 3 DQ 1 and DQ 2 ACC 230 Week 4 CheckPoint Analyzing an Income Statement ACC 230 Week 4 Assignment Web Sites Search ACC 230 Week 5 Chec...

  3. Using VMD: an introductory tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Jen; Arkhipov, Anton; Yin, Ying; Stone, John E; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-12-01

    VMD (Visual Molecular Dynamics) is a molecular visualization and analysis program designed for biological systems such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipid bilayer assemblies, etc. This unit will serve as an introductory VMD tutorial. We will present several step-by-step examples of some of VMD's most popular features, including visualizing molecules in three dimensions with different drawing and coloring methods, rendering publication-quality figures, animating and analyzing the trajectory of a molecular dynamics simulation, scripting in the text-based Tcl/Tk interface, and analyzing both sequence and structure data for proteins.

  4. Using VMD - An Introductory Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Jen; Arkhipov, Anton; Yin, Ying; Stone, John E.; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    VMD (Visual Molecular Dynamics) is a molecular visualization and analysis program designed for biological systems such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipid bilayer assemblies, etc. This unit will serve as an introductory VMD tutorial. We will present several step-by-step examples of some of VMD’s most popular features, including visualizing molecules in three dimensions with different drawing and coloring methods, rendering publication-quality figures, animate and analyze the trajectory of a molecular dynamics simulation, scripting in the text-based Tcl/Tk interface, and analyzing both sequence and structure data for proteins. PMID:19085979

  5. Supporting Interactive Teaching Methods at the New Faculty Workshop with Astronomy Lecture-Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.; Brissenden, G.; Duestua, S.; Prather, E. E.

    2004-05-01

    Ongoing research by the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona Steward Observatory suggests that, although faculty realize that lecture-based instruction is ineffective for many students, they are not aware of what interactive teaching strategies are available, particularly for large enrollment courses. A major emphasis of the AAPT/AAS New Faculty Workshop was to introduce faculty to effective active-learning strategies based on an understanding of how people learn. Faculty were introduced to think-pair-share methods where students work together to explain difficult concepts to each other. Faculty were also introduced to authentic assessment strategies that go beyond using traditional multiple-choice tests. In particular, faculty were introduced to Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy. The Lecture-Tutorials are instructional materials intended for use with collaborative student learning groups and are designed specifically to be easily integrated into existing courses centered on conventional lectures and do not require any outside equipment or a drastic course revision for implementation. The materials are based on research into student beliefs and reasoning difficulties and use effective instructional strategies that center on student learning. Each workshop presentation was complimented by a follow-up small group discussion session.

  6. Educational Outcomes of Small-Group Discussion Versus Traditional Lecture Format in Dental Students' Learning and Skills Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Ana; Scott, Raymond; Peters, Ove A; McClain, Elizabeth; Gluskin, Alan H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this prospective quantitative study was to compare the effect of different instructional formats on dental students' skills and knowledge acquisition for access cavity preparation. All first-year dental students were invited to participate in this study conducted during the four consecutive two-week endodontic rotation courses at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in spring semester 2015. Four alphabetically distributed intact groups of students were randomly allocated to two groups (n=70 each) that participated in either small-group discussion or a traditional lecture on access preparation. The first outcome measure was skill acquisition, measured by the quality of access cavities prepared in extracted teeth at the conclusion of the session. Two blinded raters scored direct observations on a continuous scale. Knowledge, the second outcome measure, was scored with a multiple-choice and open-ended question test at the end of each two-week session. Data were obtained for 134 of the 140 students, for a 96% response rate. The results showed that students in the small-group discussion groups scored significantly higher than those in the lecture groups when skill performance was tested (p=8.9 × 10(-7)). However, no significant differences were found in the acquisition of knowledge between the two groups on the written test. Active student participation was significantly related to improved manual skill acquisition, but the format of the session does not seem to have had a direct influence on acquired knowledge.

  7. Using standardized patient with immediate feedback and group discussion to teach interpersonal and communication skills to advanced practice nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Esther Ching-Lan; Chen, Shiah-Lian; Chao, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yueh-Chih

    2013-06-01

    Interpersonal and communication skills (IPCS) are essential for advanced practice nursing (APN) in our increasingly complex healthcare system. The Standardized Patient (SP) is a promising innovative pedagogy in medical and healthcare education; however, its effectiveness for teaching IPCS to graduate nursing students remains unclear. We examined the effectiveness of using SP with SP feedback and group discussion to teach IPCS in graduate nursing education. Randomized-controlled study. First-year APN students in Taiwan. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (SP assessments with SP feedback and group discussion) or control (SP assessments only) group. There were two outcome indicators: IPCS and student learning satisfaction (SLS). The IPCS were assessed before and after the study in interviews with the SPs. SLS was measured when the study ended. All participants expressed high SLS (94.44%) and showed significant (p ≤ 0.025) improvements on IPCS total scores, interviewing, and counseling. However, there were no significant differences between groups. Qualitative feedback from encounters with SPs is described. Using SPs to teach IPCS to APN students produced a high SLS. The students learned and significantly improved their IPCS by interviewing SPs, but future studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of SP feedback and group discussions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison the Effect of Student-Based Group Discussion and Lecture Methods Teaching on Midwifery Student\\'s Learning Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghapour SA.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: True learning needs the utilization of proper teaching methods leading to students’ interests in the learning activities to gain useful learning experiences. Therefore, it is needed to reform the traditional teaching methods and to use new student-focused methods by the educational systems.  The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the student-focused group discussion method and lecture method on the learning level in the Midwifery students. Materials & Methods: In the semi-experimental study, 72 third-semester Midwifery bachelor students of Islamic Azad University, Gorgan Branch, were selected via census method to participate in the theoretical clinical pregnancy course presented as lecture and group discussion methods in 2014. The final test was done after the end of the training courses. And, material durability test was done 8 weeks after the end of the course sessions. Data was analyzed, using SPSS 16 software and Wilcoxon Non-parametric Test. Findings: There was a significant difference between the mean scores of all the sessions conducted through lecture method (45.00±8.00 and group discussion method (57.00±10.00; p=0.0001. There was a significant difference in the material durability after 8 weeks between the mean scores of lecture (24.50±13.90 and group discussion (35.10±13.10 methods (p=0.0001. Conclusion: Standard student-focused group discussion training affects the midwifery students’ learning more than the lecture method does and there is higher information durability.  

  9. Who is the competent physics student? A study of students' positions and social interaction in small-group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students. The analysis was based on gender theory viewing gender both as a process and a discourse. Specifically discursive psychology analysis was used to examine how students position themselves and their peers within discourses of physics and gender. The results of the study reveal how images of physics and of "skilled physics student" were constructed in the context of the interviews. These discourses were reconstructed in the students' discussions and their social interactions within groups. Traditional gendered positions were reconstructed, for example with boys positioned as more competent in physics than girls. These positions were however also resisted and challenged.

  10. Evaluering af web-baserede tutorials i forhold til uddannelsespraksis:anvendelse af fortolkningsrepertoirer og meningsforhandling i en to-trins analyse

    OpenAIRE

    Moring, Camilla; Schreiber, Trine

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes and discusses a two step analysis for evaluating web based information literacy tutorials in educational practice. In a recent evaluation project the authors used the analysis to examine three web based tutorials developed by three different academic libraries in Norway. Firstly, each web-based tutorial is analyzed as a communicative act by looking at how it argues for its purpose, how it is rhetorically organized and the interpretative repertoires used. Secondly, the tuto...

  11. Tutorial on Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, M. J. Penny; Goodzeit, Carl L.

    1997-05-01

    A multimedia CD-ROM tutorial on the physics and engineering concepts of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators is being developed under a U.S. Dept. of Energy SBIR grant. The tutorial, scheduled for distribution this summer, is targeted to undergraduate junior or senior level science students. However, its unified presentation of the broad range of issues involved in the design of superconducting magnets for accelerators and the extensive detail about the construction process (including animations and video clips) will also be of value to staff of research institutes and industrial concerns with an interest in applied superconductivity or magnet development. The source material, which is based on the world-wide R and D programs to develop superconducting accelerator magnets, is organized in five units with the following themes: Introduction to magnets and accelerators; (2) Superconductors for accelerator magnets; (3) Magnetic design methods for accelerator magnets; (4) Electrical, mechanical, and cryogenic considerations for the final magnet package; (5) Performance characteristics and measurement methods. A detailed outline and examples will be shown.

  12. Fit Minded College Edition Pilot Study: Can a Magazine-Based Discussion Group Improve Physical Activity in Female College Freshmen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellitteri, Katelyn; Huberty, Jennifer; Ehlers, Diane; Bruening, Meg

    Initial efficacy of a magazine-based discussion group for improving physical activity (PA), self-worth, and eating behaviors in female college freshmen. Randomized control trial. A large university in southwestern United States. Thirty-seven female college freshmen were randomized to the intervention (n = 17) and control groups (n = 20) in September 2013. Participants completed an 8-week magazine-based discussion group program, Fit Minded College Edition, adapted from Fit Minded, a previously tested theory-based intervention. Education on PA, self-worth, and nutrition was provided using excerpts from women's health magazines. Participants also had access to a Web site with supplementary health and wellness material. The control group did not attend meetings or have access to the Web site but received the magazines. Interventions focusing on concepts of self-worth with less focus on weight and appearance may promote long term PA participation and healthy eating behaviors in college women. Self-reported PA, global self-worth, knowledge self-worth, self-efficacy, social support, eating behaviors (ie, fruit/veggie/junk food/sugar-sweetened beverage consumption), satisfaction, and Web site usage. Mean age of participants was 18.11 (SD = 0.32) years. Time × Intervention effects were observed for PA minutes per week (Partial η = 0.34), knowledge self-worth (Partial η = 0.02), and daily sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (Partial η = 0.17) (P < .05), with the intervention group reporting greater increases in PA and knowledge self-worth and greater decreases in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. A magazine-based discussion group may provide a promising platform to improve health behaviors in female college freshmen.

  13. Oracle support provides a range of new tutorials

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The IT DB is pleased to announce a new series of Oracle tutorials, with the proposed schedule. Note that these tutorials will take place in the Filtration Plant (Building 222) and that no registration is required.   4 June (Monday) 09:00 Oracle Architecture, Przemyslaw Adam Radowiecki The objective is to go through Oracle database physical and logical structures, highlighting the consequences of some of Oracle's internal design choices for developers of database applications. The presentation defines Oracle-related basic terms and illustrates them based on the database architecture. The following topics will be discussed: • Database with its physical and logical structures (tablespace, segment, extent, block, database user, schema, user's quota) • Single instance (significant memory structures: buffer cache, shared pool) • Real Application Cluster (RAC) • Connecting to the database (TNS, database service) • SQL statement processing (h...

  14. Developing Tutorials for Advanced Physics Students: Processes and Lessons Learned

    CERN Document Server

    Baily, Charles; Pollock, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    When education researchers describe newly developed curricular materials, they typically concentrate on the research base behind their design, and the efficacy of the final products, but do not highlight the initial stages of creating the actual materials. With the aim of providing useful information for faculty engaged in similar projects, we describe here our development of a set of in-class tutorials for advanced undergraduate electrodynamics students, and discuss factors that influenced their initial design and refinement. Among the obstacles to be overcome was the investigation of student difficulties within the short time frame of our project, and devising ways for students to engage in meaningful activities on advanced-level topics within a single 50-minute class period. We argue for a process that leverages faculty experience and classroom observations, and present several guidelines for tutorial development and implementation in upper-division physics classrooms.

  15. An interactive e-learning tutorial for medical students on how to conduct the performance-oriented mobility assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Smith, Michael; Rodriguez, Osvaldo; van Zuilen, Maria H; Mintzer, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an e-learning tutorial (iPOMA) as a supplement to traditional teaching of the Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment. Second-year medical students (137) completed the iPOMA, in preparation for a session on fall risk assessment consisting of a lecture, practice with elder volunteers and small group debriefing. Before and after the tutorial, students completed online questionnaires, a quiz on POMA scoring immediately after the tutorial and competency assessments on POMA performance 1 month later. Self-efficacy in using the POMA increased and post-tutorial quiz scores were significantly correlated with self-efficacy. Students who completed the tutorial performed significantly better on the verbal instructions portion of the POMA. The iPOMA is an effective instructional modality.

  16. Does a research group increase impact on the scientific community or general public discussion? Alternative metric-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Manuela; Scotti, Valeria; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Curti, Moreno; Fanelli, Guido; Allegri, Massimo; Schatman, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of scientific publications of the Italian SIMPAR (Study In Multidisciplinary PAin Research) group by using altmetrics, defined as nontraditional metrics constituting an alternative to more traditional citation-impact metrics, such as impact factor and H-index. By correlating traditional and alternative metrics, we attempted to verify whether publications by the SIMPAR group collectively had more impact than those performed by its individual members, either in solo publications or in publications coauthored by non-SIMPAR group investigators (which for the purpose of this study we will refer to as "individual publications"). For all the 12 members of the group analyzed (pain therapists, biologists, and pharmacologists), we created Open Researcher and Contributor ID and Impact Story accounts, and synchronized these data. Manually, we calculated the level metrics for each article by dividing the data obtained from the research community by those obtained from the public community. We analyzed 759 articles, 18 of which were published by the SIMPAR group. Altmetrics demonstrated that SIMPAR group publications were more likely to be saved (77.8% vs 45.9%), discussed (61.1% vs 1.1%, Paltmetrics in estimating the value of the research products of a group.

  17. Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele; Zeeb, Hajo

    2005-01-01

    Confidence intervals represent a routinely used standard method to document the uncertainty of estimated effects. In most cases, for the calculation of confidence intervals the conventional fixed 95% confidence level is used. Confidence curves represent a graphical illustration of confidence...... attention to the different interpretation of one- and two-sided statistical inference. It is shown that these two options also have influence on the plotting of appropriate confidence curves. We illustrate the use of one- and two-sided confidence curves and explain their correct interpretation. In medical...

  18. Gay-Straight Alliances as settings to discuss health topics: individual and group factors associated with substance use, mental health, and sexual health discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V P; Heck, N C; Yoshikawa, H; Calzo, J P

    2017-06-01

    Sexual minority (e.g. lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning; LGBQ) and gender minority (e.g. transgender) youth experience myriad health risks. Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based settings where they may have opportunities to discuss substance use, mental health, and sexual health issues in ways that are safe and tailored to their experiences. Attention to these topics in GSAs could aid in developing programming for these settings. Among 295 youth from 33 Massachusetts high-school GSAs (69% LGBQ, 68% cisgender female, 68% White, Mage = 16.06), we examined how often youth discussed these topics within their GSA and identified factors associated with having more of these discussions. Youth and GSAs as a whole varied in their frequency of discussing these topics. Youth who accessed more information/resources in the GSA and did more advocacy more frequently engaged in discussions around substance use, mental health and sexual health. Youth who reported greater victimization more often discussed substance use and mental health, but not sexual health. Finally, GSAs whose members collectively reported greater victimization more frequently discussed these topics. These findings can assist the development of health programming to be delivered within GSAs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. OAI-PMH basics Tutorial 3

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial is aimed at those who are new to the area of repositories and who want to learn more about key advocacy and policy issues. The tutorial will include information and advice on putting together an institutional advocacy campaign and developing policies for your repository. There will be opportunities for participants to share experiences and to ask questions. The tutorial will include a practical exercise in developing an advocacy presentation. Participants with experience of advocacy are welcome to attend the session to share their experiences, but should bear in mind that it is aimed primarily at those looking for help and advice in advocacy matters.

  20. Advocacy and policy issues Tutorial 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial is aimed at those who are new to the area of repositories and who want to learn more about key advocacy and policy issues. The tutorial will include information and advice on putting together an institutional advocacy campaign and developing policies for your repository. There will be opportunities for participants to share experiences and to ask questions. The tutorial will include a practical exercise in developing an advocacy presentation. Participants with experience of advocacy are welcome to attend the session to share their experiences, but should bear in mind that it is aimed primarily at those looking for help and advice in advocacy matters.

  1. Selective traditions in group discussions: teachers' views about good science and the possible obstacles when encountering a new topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Eva; Sund, Per

    2016-11-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about what content that should be taught in science education and there are different views among teachers about what represent good science content. However, teachers are not isolated individuals making their own interpretations, but are part of institutionalised systems building on patterns in the selection of teaching goals and content. Earlier research shows that teachers teach in alignment with different selective traditions, which can be understood as well-developed teaching habits. Individual teachers seem to develop their personal habits on the basis of the contextual situations created by earlier generations of teachers. In order to find out which content teachers find representative for science education, we asked nine teachers to take part in group interviews to talk about what they value as "good" science content. The participants were grouped according to their selective traditions expressed in earlier studies. The method was used to dynamically explore, challenge and highlight teachers' views. The starting point for the group discussions is national tests in science. In Sweden, national tests in biology, physics and chemistry were introduced in secondary school science (year 9) in 2009. One overarching aim of these tests is to support the implementation of the science curricula and to include for example knowledge about socio-scientific issues (SSI). The content of the tests can consequently be seen as important for teachers to consider. The findings show that `resistance' to including SSI is not just an issue for individual teachers. As individuals teachers can create many kinds of obstacles, but still be interested in integrating SSI in their science teaching. However, in group discussions the teachers tend to collectively adopt the scientific rational discourse. This discourse is what joins them and creates their common identity as science teachers. In turn, they seek to free scientific knowledge from social knowledge

  2. Hadoop Tutorial - Efficient data ingestion

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Baranowski, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The Hadoop ecosystem is the leading opensource platform for distributed storage and processing of "big data". The Hadoop platform is available at CERN as a central service provided by the IT department. Real-time data ingestion to Hadoop ecosystem due to the system specificity is non-trivial process and requires some efforts (which is often underestimated) in order to make it efficient (low latency, optimize data placement, footprint on the cluster). In this tutorial attendees will learn about: The important aspects of storing the data in Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS).  Data ingestion techniques and engines that are capable of shipping data to Hadoop in an efficient way. Setting up a full data ingestion flow into a Hadoop Distributed Files System from various sources (streaming, log files, databases) using the best practices and components available around the ecosystem (including Sqoop, Kite, Flume, Kafka...

  3. Sundance 2.0 tutorial.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Kevin R.

    2004-07-01

    Sundance is a system of software components that allows construction of an entire parallel simulator and its derivatives using a high-level symbolic language. With this high-level problem description, it is possible to specify a weak formulation of a PDE and its discretization method in a small amount of user-level code; furthermore, because derivatives are easily available, a simulation in Sundance is immediately suitable for accelerated PDE-constrained optimization algorithms. This paper is a tutorial for setting up and solving linear and nonlinear PDEs in Sundance. With several simple examples, we show how to set up mesh objects, geometric regions for BC application, the weak form of the PDE, and boundary conditions. Each example then illustrates use of an appropriate solver and solution visualization.

  4. Randomized controlled trial of group cognitive behavioral therapy compared to a discussion group for co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrich, V M; Rapee, R M; Kangas, M; Perini, S

    2016-03-01

    Co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults is associated with worse physical and mental health outcomes and poorer response to psychological and pharmacological treatments in older adults. However, there is a paucity of research focused on testing the efficacy of the co-morbid treatment of anxiety and depression in older adults using psychological interventions. Accordingly, the primary objective of the current study was to test the effects of a group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating co-morbid anxiety and depression in a sample of older age adults. A total of 133 community-dwelling participants aged ⩾60 years (mean age = 67.35, s.d. = 5.44, male = 59) with both an anxiety disorder and unipolar mood disorder, as assessed on the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS), were randomly allocated to an 11-week CBT group or discussion group. Participants with Mini-Mental State Examination scores group × time interaction effects emerged at post-treatment only for diagnostic severity of the primary disorder, mean severity of all anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and all disorders, and recovery rates on primary disorder. Group CBT produced faster and sustained improvements in anxiety and depression on diagnostic severity and recovery rates compared to an active control in older adults.

  5. 小组讨论及研讨会总结%Summary of Working Group Discussion and the Seminar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This composition collects the discussion conclusions of each group during the seminar.Each group discussion has a topic,and each group sends an expert giving a speech in the summary meeting to report the outcome of the discussion.All of the outcomes put forward the direction and methods in the development of industrialised housing in Chongqing,and also set up a basis for the work of the next stage of this project.%文章汇集了研讨会小组讨论的各组总结,每小组有一个论题,并由一名相关专家在讨论总结会上发言,报告本小组的讨论成果。这些讨论成果指出了在重庆开展住宅产业化的方向和途径,为项目下一步工作的开展奠定了良好的基础。此外,还包括研讨会的总结,提出了重庆实施住宅产业化的具体意见。

  6. EFEKTIVITAS METODE BUZZ GROUP DISCUSSION UNTUK MENINGKATKAN PERILAKU PEMBERANTASAN SARANG NYAMUK IBU-IBU PKK KELURAHAN SRAGEN TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulfah Nuristia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Demam Berdarah Dengue (DBD adalah penyakit menular yang berbahaya yang dapat menimbulkan kematian dalam waktu singkat dan sering menimbulkan wabah serta kepanikan masyarakat. Pemberian informasi tentang pemberantasan sarang nyamuk (PSN dengan metode Buzz Group Discussion diharapkan dapat meningkatkan pengetahuan dan merubah perilaku masyarakat menjadi lebih baik yang diharapkan dapat dilakukan oleh kader PKK sehingga dapat ditularkan kepada masyarakat lain. Jenis penelitian ini bersifat Quasi eksperimental. Subjek dalam penelitian ini terdiri dari 2 kelompok yaitu kelompok eksperimen sebanyak 18 orang diberi metode buzz group disscussion dan kelompok kontrol sebanyak 18 orang diberi metode ceramah. Hasil uji perbedaan posttest perilaku antara kelompok eksperimen dan kelompok kontrol didapatkan dengan p value sebesar 0,000 lebih kecil dari 0,05 dan diperoleh nilai rata-rata post test kelompok sebesar 6,555 sedangkan pada kelompok kontrol diperoleh hasil post test dengan rata-rata sebesar  4,27, lebih kecil dari rata-rata posttesteksperimen. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian dapat disimpulkan bahwa metode Buzz Group Discussion efektif dalam meningkatkan perilaku pemberantasan sarang nyamuk pada Ibu PKK di kelurahan Sragen Tengah, Kabupaten Sragen

  7. TUTORIAL: Electrical resistance: an atomistic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Supriyo

    2004-07-01

    This tutorial article presents a 'bottom-up' view of electrical resistance starting from something really small, like a molecule, and then discussing the issues that arise as we move to bigger conductors. Remarkably, no serious quantum mechanics is needed to understand electrical conduction through something really small, except for unusual things like the Kondo effect that are seen only for a special range of parameters. This article starts with energy level diagrams (section 2), shows that the broadening that accompanies coupling limits the conductance to a maximum of q2/h per level (sections 3, 4), describes how a change in the shape of the self-consistent potential profile can turn a symmetric current-voltage characteristic into a rectifying one (sections 5, 6), shows that many interesting effects in molecular electronics can be understood in terms of a simple model (section 7), introduces the non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) formalism as a sophisticated version of this simple model with ordinary numbers replaced by appropriate matrices (section 8) and ends with a personal view of unsolved problems in the field of nanoscale electron transport (section 9). Appendix A discusses the Coulomb blockade regime of transport, while appendix B presents a formal derivation of the NEGF equations. MATLAB codes for numerical examples are listed in appendix C. (The appendices are available in the online version only.)

  8. Does a research group increase impact on the scientific community or general public discussion? Alternative metric-based evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Gregori M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Manuela De Gregori,1-3,* Valeria Scotti,4,* Annalisa De Silvestri,4 Moreno Curti,4 Guido Fanelli,2,5,6 Massimo Allegri,2,5,6 Michael E Schatman,2,7 1Pain Therapy Service, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 2Study In Multidisciplinary PAin Research Group, Parma, Italy; 3Young Against Pain Group, Parma, Italy; 4Center for Scientific Documentation and Biometry Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 5Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Italy; 6Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Therapy Service, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Parma, Parma, Italy; 7US Pain Foundation, Bellevue, WA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: In this study, we investigated the impact of scientific publications of the Italian SIMPAR (Study In Multidisciplinary PAin Research group by using altmetrics, defined as nontraditional metrics constituting an alternative to more traditional citation-impact metrics, such as impact factor and H-index. By correlating traditional and alternative metrics, we attempted to verify whether publications by the SIMPAR group collectively had more impact than those performed by its individual members, either in solo publications or in publications coauthored by non-SIMPAR group investigators (which for the purpose of this study we will refer to as “individual publications”. For all the 12 members of the group analyzed (pain therapists, biologists, and pharmacologists, we created Open Researcher and Contributor ID and Impact Story accounts, and synchronized these data. Manually, we calculated the level metrics for each article by dividing the data obtained from the research community by those obtained from the public community. We analyzed 759 articles, 18 of which were published by the SIMPAR group. Altmetrics demonstrated that SIMPAR group publications were more likely to be saved (77.8% vs 45.9%, discussed

  9. Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/medwords/medicalwordsdownload.html Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions To use the sharing features ... no Internet connection is available. Download: Understanding Medical Words [16MB zip file] Download instructions : Click on the ...

  10. The BTeV Software Tutorial Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert K. Kutschke

    2004-02-20

    The BTeV Collaboration is starting to develop its C++ based offline software suite, an integral part of which is a series of tutorials. These tutorials are targeted at a diverse audience, including new graduate students, experienced physicists with little or no C++ experience, those with just enough C++ to be dangerous, and experts who need only an overview of the available tools. The tutorials must both teach C++ in general and the BTeV specific tools in particular. Finally, they must teach physicists how to find and use the detailed documentation. This report will review the status of the BTeV experiment, give an overview of the plans for and the state of the software and will then describe the plans for the tutorial suite.

  11. Tutorials in university students with a disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Gairín Sallán

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article places an emphasis on the importance of tutorials for students with a disability in universities. It presented the most significant results of the study of tutorials carried out in help services, units or offices for students with a disability inmore than 45 Spanish universities, in relation to promotion, reception, completion and graduation. The contributions highlight the importance of organising a response through a Tutorial Action Plan made up of the stages of motivation and awareness-raisin, planning, execution, evaluation and institutionalisation. Among the principle conclusions, the importance of moving towards a truly inclusive university through tutorial activity is highlighted, thereby providing a guide for providing assistance to university students with a disability.

  12. PLANES DE ACCIÓN TUTORIAL

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jorge Orós

    2014-01-01

    ... de Acción Tutorial que contribuyan a la mejora de los resultados académicos. Los Planes de Acción Tutorial, en su sentido más amplio, pueden incluir los siguientes aspectos: * Programa de captación de estudiantes Objetivo: incrementar la demanda de preinscripciones y en consecuencia, aumentar la nota mínima de ingreso. * Programa de acogida Objetivo: fac...

  13. Pharmacometrics and Systems Pharmacology Software Tutorials and Use: Comments and Guidelines for PSP Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicini, P; Friberg, L E; van der Graaf, P H; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2013-12-18

    In addition to methodological Tutorials,(1) CPT:PSP has recently started to publish software Tutorials.(2,3) Our readership and authors may be wondering what kind of format or product is expected, and the review of submissions we have already received prompted several discussions within the PSP Editorial Team. This editorial reflects on these discussions and summarizes their salient points. It aims at providing some details about the current vision of CPT:PSP for software tutorial articles. In addition, it brings some clarity on the topic of what role commercial software tutorials can have in CPT:PSP and how CPT:PSP tutorials differ from publications which describe the software itself, as those which can be found in other computer science journals. Finally, the discussion includes reproducibility considerations and the general use of commercial and noncommercial software in CPT:PSP publications. We hope our thoughts, and especially a stated requirement to publish user input to the software to aid in reproducibility, will help in guiding our authors and will stimulate healthy debate among our readers about the evolving nature of our science, how it can be facilitated using software and associated databases as a conduit, and what role this journal can play in fostering both the best modeling and simulation practices and the best scientific approaches to computational modeling, to bring the advantages of modeling and simulation to all regular practitioners, and not to just a (self) selected few.

  14. Efficacy of multimedia learning modules as preparation for lecture-based tutorials in electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the efficacy of online, multimedia learning modules (MLMs) as preparation for in-class, lecture-based tutorials in electromagnetism in a physics course for natural science majors (biology and marine science). Specifically, we report the results of a multiple-group pre/post-test research design comparing two groups receiving different treatments with respect to activities preceding participation in Tutorials in Introductory Physics. The different pre-tutorial activities where as follows: (1) students were assigned reading from a traditional textbook, followed by a traditional lecture; and (2) students completed online multimedia learning modules developed by the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC), and commercially known as smartPhysics. The MLM treatment group earned significantly higher mid-term examination scores and larger gains in content knowledge as measured by the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM). Student at...

  15. A Self-Study Tutorial using the Allen Brain Explorer and Brain Atlas to Teach Concepts of Mammalian Neuroanatomy and Brain Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Bruce G

    2009-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas is a repository of neuroanatomical data concerning the mouse brain. The core of the database is a Nissl-stained reference atlas of the brain accompanied by in situ hybridization data for essentially the entire mouse genome. This database is freely available at the Allen Institute for Brain Science website, as is an innovative tool to explore the database, the Brain Explorer. This tool is downloaded and installed on your own computer. I have developed a self-study tutorial, "Explorations with the Allen Brain Explorer", which uses the Brain Explorer and the Brain Atlas to teach fundamentals of mammalian neuroanatomy and brain function. In this tutorial background information and step-by-step exercises on the use of the Brain Explorer are given using PowerPoint as a platform. To do the tutorial both the PowerPoint and the Brain Explorer are opened on the computer and the students switch from one program to the other as they go, in a step-wise fashion, through the various exercises. There are two main groups of exercises, titled "The Basics" and "Explorations", with both groups accessed from a PowerPoint "Start Menu" by clicking on dynamic links to the appropriate exercises. Most exercises have a number of dynamic links to PowerPoint slides where background information for the exercises is given or the neuroanatomical data collected from the Brain Atlas is discussed.

  16. Editorial research and the publication process in biomedicine and health: Report from the Esteve Foundation Discussion Group, December 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Ana; Malički, Mario; von Elm, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that there are more than twenty thousand biomedical journals in the world, research into the work of editors and publication process in biomedical and health care journals is rare. In December 2012, the Esteve Foundation, a non-profit scientific institution that fosters progress in pharmacotherapy by means of scientific communication and discussion organized a discussion group of 7 editors and/or experts in peer review biomedical publishing. They presented findings of past editorial research, discussed the lack of competitive funding schemes and specialized journals for dissemination of editorial research, and reported on the great diversity of misconduct and conflict of interest policies, as well as adherence to reporting guidelines. Furthermore, they reported on the reluctance of editors to investigate allegations of misconduct or increase the level of data sharing in health research. In the end, they concluded that if editors are to remain gatekeepers of scientific knowledge they should reaffirm their focus on the integrity of the scientific record and completeness of the data they publish. Additionally, more research should be undertaken to understand why many journals are not adhering to editorial standards, and what obstacles editors face when engaging in editorial research.

  17. 'Will I be able to have a baby?' Results from online focus group discussions with childhood cancer survivors in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J; Jervaeus, A; Lampic, C; Eriksson, L E; Widmark, C; Armuand, G M; Malmros, J; Marshall Heyman, M; Wettergren, L

    2014-12-01

    What do adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer think about the risk of being infertile? The potential infertility, as well as the experience of having had cancer, affects well-being, intimate relationships and the desire to have children in the future. Many childhood cancer survivors want to have children and worry about possible infertility. For this qualitative study with a cross-sectional design, data were collected through 39 online focus group discussions during 2013. Cancer survivors previously treated for selected diagnoses were identified from The Swedish Childhood Cancer Register (16-24 years old at inclusion, ≥5 years after diagnosis) and approached regarding study participation. Online focus group discussions of mixed sex (n = 133) were performed on a chat platform in real time. Texts from the group discussions were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in the main category Is it possible to have a baby? including five generic categories: Risk of infertility affects well-being, Dealing with possible infertility, Disclosure of possible infertility is a challenge, Issues related to heredity and Parenthood may be affected. The risk of infertility was described as having a negative impact on well-being and intimate relationships. Furthermore, the participants described hesitation about becoming a parent due to perceived or anticipated physical and psychological consequences of having had cancer. Given the sensitive topic of the study, the response rate (36%) is considered acceptable. The sample included participants who varied with regard to received fertility-related information, current fertility status and concerns related to the risk of being infertile. The results may be transferred to similar contexts with other groups of patients of childbearing age and a risk of impaired fertility due to disease. The findings imply that achieving parenthood, whether or not with biological children, is an area that

  18. Developing and evaluating a tutorial on the double-slit experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Sayer, Ryan; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-01-01

    Learning quantum mechanics is challenging, even for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. Interactive tutorials which build on students' prior knowledge can be useful tools to enhance student learning. We have been investigating student difficulties with the quantum mechanics pertaining to the double-slit experiment in various situations. Here we discuss the development and evaluation of a Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) which makes use of an interactive simulation to improve student understanding. We summarize common difficulties and discuss the extent to which the QuILT is effective in addressing them in two types of courses.

  19. Exploring views on long term rehabilitation for people with stroke in a developing country: findings from focus group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors. PMID:24606911

  20. A 5' online tutorial about 'how to prepare for a 5' online tutorial'

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This 4' video summarises our experience from short online tutorial recordings for the last 6 months. It contains important points for speakers' preparation and things to observe during the online tutorial recordings. For more details, check out our e-learning twiki.

  1. Making generic tutorials content specific: recycling evidence-based practice (EBP) tutorials for two disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Keven M; Maggio, Lauren; Blanchard, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Librarians at the Boston University Medical Center constructed two interactive online tutorials, "Introduction to EBM" and "Formulating a Clinical Question (PICO)," for a Family Medicine Clerkship and then quickly repurposed the existing tutorials to support an Evidence-based Dentistry course. Adobe's ColdFusion software was used to populate the tutorials with course-specific content based on the URL used to enter each tutorial, and a MySQL database was used to collect student input. Student responses were viewable immediately by course faculty on a password-protected Web site. The tutorials ensured that all students received the same baseline training and allowed librarians to tailor a subsequent library skills workshop to student tutorial answers. The tutorials were well-received by the medical and dental schools and have been added to mandatory first-year Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) and Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD) courses, meaning that every medical and dental student at BUMC will be expected to complete these tutorials.

  2. Mass spectrometry in food proteomics: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    In the last decades, the continuous and rapid evolution of proteomic approaches has provided an efficient platform for the characterization of food-derived proteins. Particularly, the impressive increasing in performance and versatility of the MS instrumentation has contributed to the development of new analytical strategies for proteins, evidencing how MS arguably represents an indispensable tool in food proteomics. Investigation of protein composition in foodstuffs is helpful for understanding the relationship between the protein content and the nutritional and technological properties of foods, the production of methods for food traceability, the assessment of food quality and safety, including the detection of allergens and microbial contaminants in foods, or even the characterization of genetically modified products. Given the high variety of the food-derived proteins and considering their differences in chemical and physical properties, a single proteomic strategy for all purposes does not exist. Rather, proteomic approaches need to be adapted to each analytical problem, and development of new strategies is necessary in order to obtain always the best results. In this tutorial, the most relevant aspects of MS-based methodologies in food proteomics will be examined, and their advantages and drawbacks will be discussed.

  3. MSTAR extended operating conditions: a tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, Eric R.; Lee, Shung W.; Moore, John T.

    1996-06-01

    One key advantage of the model-based approach for automatic target recognition (ATR) is the wide range of targets and acquisition scenarios that can be accommodated without algorithm re-training. This accrues from the use of predictive models which can be adjusted to hypothesized scenarios on-line. Approaches which rely on measured signature exemplars as the source of reference data for signature matching are constrained to those scenarios represented in the reference data base. The moving and stationary target recognition (MSTAR) program will advance the state-of-the-art in model-based ATR by developing, evaluating, and testing algorithm performance against a set of extended operating conditions (EOCs) designed to reflect real-world battlefield scenarios. In addition to full 360 deg target aspect coverage over a range of depression angles, the EOCs include variations in squint angle, target articulation and configurations, obscuration due to occlusion and/or layover, and intra-class target variability. These conditions can have a profound impact on the nature of the target signature, necessitating the development of explicit prediction and reasoning algorithms to provide robust target recognition. This paper provides a tutorial description of the impact of the MSTAR EOCs on SAR target signatures. A brief background discussion of the SAR imaging process is presented first. This is followed by a description of the impact of each EOC category on the target signature along with synthetic imagery examples to illustrate this impact.

  4. Topics and features of academic medical library tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rozalynd P; Wilson, Steven P; Yeh, Felicia; Phillips, Betty; Livingston, Mary Briget

    2008-01-01

    In a 2007 study, librarians at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Library examined freely available online tutorials on academic medical library Web sites. The team identified tutorial topics, determined common design features, and assessed elements of active learning in library-created tutorials; the team also generated a list of third-party tutorials to which medical libraries link. This article updates the earlier study, describing changes and trends in tutorial content and design on medical libraries' Web sites; the project team plans to continue to track trends in tutorial development by repeating this study annually.

  5. Tutorial on Protein Ontology Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arighi, Cecilia N; Drabkin, Harold; Christie, Karen R; Ross, Karen E; Natale, Darren A

    2017-01-01

    The Protein Ontology (PRO) is the reference ontology for proteins in the Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) foundry and consists of three sub-ontologies representing protein classes of homologous genes, proteoforms (e.g., splice isoforms, sequence variants, and post-translationally modified forms), and protein complexes. PRO defines classes of proteins and protein complexes, both species-specific and species nonspecific, and indicates their relationships in a hierarchical framework, supporting accurate protein annotation at the appropriate level of granularity, analyses of protein conservation across species, and semantic reasoning. In the first section of this chapter, we describe the PRO framework including categories of PRO terms and the relationship of PRO to other ontologies and protein resources. Next, we provide a tutorial about the PRO website ( proconsortium.org ) where users can browse and search the PRO hierarchy, view reports on individual PRO terms, and visualize relationships among PRO terms in a hierarchical table view, a multiple sequence alignment view, and a Cytoscape network view. Finally, we describe several examples illustrating the unique and rich information available in PRO.

  6. Trilinos 4.0 tutorial.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Marzio; Day, David Minot; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2004-05-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to facilitate the design, development, integration and ongoing support of mathematical software libraries. The goal of the Trilinos Project is to develop parallel solver algorithms and libraries within an object-oriented software framework for the solution of large-scale, complex multiphysics engineering and scientific applications. The emphasis is on developing robust, scalable algorithms in a software framework, using abstract interfaces for flexible interoperability of components while providing a full-featured set of concrete classes that implement all the abstract interfaces. This document introduces the use of Trilinos, version 4.0. The presented material includes, among others, the definition of distributed matrices and vectors with Epetra, the iterative solution of linear systems with AztecOO, incomplete factorizations with IF-PACK, multilevel and domain decomposition preconditioners with ML, direct solution of linear system with Amesos, and iterative solution of nonlinear systems with NOX. The tutorial is a self-contained introduction, intended to help computational scientists effectively apply the appropriate Trilinos package to their applications. Basic examples are presented that are fit to be imitated. This document is a companion to the Trilinos User's Guide [20] and Trilinos Development Guides [21,22]. Please note that the documentation included in each of the Trilinos' packages is of fundamental importance.

  7. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, J.; Knudsen, P.

    2013-12-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products. GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations, and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Recently, the second version of the GOCE User Toolbox (GUT) was developed to enhance the exploitation of GOCE level 2 data with ERS ENVISAT altimetry. The developments of GUT focused on the following issues: Data Extraction, Generation, Filtering, and Data Save and Restore Without any doubt the development of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for oceanography. The results of the preliminary analysis carried out in this phase of the GUTS project have already demonstrated a significant advance in the ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features compared with earlier satellite only solutions. Calculation of the geostrophic surface currents from the MDT reveals improvements for all of the ocean's major current systems.

  8. The lay user perspective on the quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services--results of focus group discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    : The lay perspective emphasizes a definite split between lay and expert views on the value and quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services, as well as in their assessment of risk. Participants voiced spontaneous criticism of the roles of both physicians and pharmacists in drug therapy......BACKGROUND: This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland. OBJECTIVES: This sub-study addressed the question: what...... is the lay user perspective on pharmaceuticals and pharmacy services, including their perception of risk? METHODS: To answer this question, seven focus group discussions were conducted with pharmacy customers in different locations in Iceland following new drug distribution legislation in 1996. RESULTS...

  9. The Colombian conference of bishops and its participation in peace negotiations with insurgent groups: origins and discussions (1982-1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cristancho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the most representative academic works about the participation of the Colombian Bishops’ Conference in negotiations with insurgent groups during the eighties, focusing on their perspective about their vision of peace. In that sense, this paper analyses how the Colombian clergy adapted to the national reality their perspective of peace, identifying the main debates and the wide variety of answers, focusing on two main issues: the relevance of establishing a relationship between the need to address social issues with the overcoming of violence and the participation of bishops and priests in the talks with the insurgency. As a result of these discussions, the Colombian Catholic Church gained greater unity in action on peace and conflict.

  10. Survey and online discussion groups to develop a patient-rated outcome measure on acceptability of treatment response in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Selina K; Thomas, Kim S; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Leighton, Paul; Yong, Adrian Sw; Batchelor, Jonathan M

    2014-06-14

    Vitiligo is a chronic depigmenting skin disorder which affects around 0.5-1% of the world's population. The outcome measures used most commonly in trials to judge treatment success focus on repigmentation. Patient-reported outcome measures of treatment success are rarely used, although recommendations have been made for their inclusion in vitiligo trials. This study aimed to evaluate the face validity of a new patient-reported outcome measure of treatment response, for use in future trials and clinical practice. An online survey to gather initial views on what constitutes treatment success for people with vitiligo or their parents/carers, followed by online discussion groups with patients to reach consensus on what constitutes treatment success for individuals with vitiligo, and how this can be assessed in the context of trials. Participants were recruited from an existing database of vitiligo patients and through posts on the social network sites Facebook and Twitter. A total of 202 survey responses were received, of which 37 were excluded and 165 analysed. Three main themes emerged as important in assessing treatment response: a) the match between vitiligo and normal skin (how well it blends in); b) how noticeable the vitiligo is and c) a reduction in the size of the white patches. The majority of respondents said they would consider 80% or more repigmentation to be a worthwhile treatment response after 9 months of treatment. Three online discussion groups involving 12 participants led to consensus that treatment success is best measured by asking patients how noticeable their vitiligo is after treatment. This was judged to be best answered using a 5-point Likert scale, on which a score of 4 or 5 represents treatment success. This study represents the first step in developing a patient reported measure of treatment success in vitiligo trials. Further work is now needed to assess its construct validity and responsiveness to change.

  11. [Development of clinical trial education program for pharmaceutical science students through small group discussion and role-playing using protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imakyure, Osamu; Shuto, Hideki; Nishikawa, Fumi; Hagiwara, Yoshifuka; Inoue, Sachiko; Koyanagi, Taeko; Hirakawa, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2010-08-01

    The acquirement of basic knowledge of clinical trials and professional attitude in their practices is a general instructional objective in the Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education. Unfortunately, the previous program of clinical trial education was not effective in the acquirement of a professional attitude in their practices. Then, we developed the new clinical trial education program using protocol through small group discussion (SGD) and roll-playing. Our program consists of 7 steps of practical training. In step 1, the students find some problems after presentation of the protocol including case and prescription. In step 2, they analyse the extracted problems and share the information obtained in SGD. In steps 3 and 5, five clinical case scenarios are presented to the students and they discuss which case is suitable for entry to the clinical trial or which case corresponds to the discontinuance criteria in the present designed protocol. In steps 4 and 6, the roll-playing is performed by teachers and students as doctors and clinical research coordinators (CRC) respectively. Further, we conducted a trial practice based on this program for the students. In the student's self-evaluation into five grades, the average score of the skill acquisition level in each step was 3.8-4.7 grade. Our clinical trial education program could be effective in educating the candidates for CRC or clinical pharmacists.

  12. The effectiveness of web-based, multimedia tutorials for teaching methods of human body composition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzell, Paul R; Chamberlain, Valerie M; Pintauro, Stephen J

    2002-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a series of Web-based, multimedia tutorials on methods of human body composition analysis. Tutorials were developed around four body composition topics: hydrodensitometry (underwater weighing), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and total body electrical conductivity. Thirty-two students enrolled in the course were randomly assigned to learn the material through either the Web-based tutorials only ("Computer"), a traditional lecture format ("Lecture"), or lectures supplemented with Web-based tutorials ("Both"). All students were administered a validated pretest before randomization and an identical posttest at the completion of the course. The reliability of the test was 0.84. The mean score changes from pretest to posttest were not significantly different among the groups (65.4 plus minus 17.31, 78.82 plus minus 21.50, and 76 plus minus 21.22 for the Computer, Both, and Lecture groups, respectively). Additionally, a Likert-type assessment found equally positive attitudes toward all three formats. The results indicate that Web-based tutorials are as effective as the traditional lecture format for teaching these topics.

  13. Investigating the Effectiveness of the Tutorials in Introductory Physics in Multiple Instructional Settings

    CERN Document Server

    Slezak, C; Endorf, R J; Braun, G A

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the educational impact of the implementation of "Changes in Energy and Momentum" from the Tutorials in Introductory Physics in five different instructional settings. These settings include (1) a completely computer-based learning environment and (2) use of cooperative learning groups with varying levels of instructor support. Pre- and post-tests provide evidence that a computer-based implementation falls significantly short of classroom implementations which involve both collaborative learning groups and interactions with a teaching assistance. Other findings provide insight into the importance of certain elements of instructor training and the appropriate use of the tutorial as an initial introduction to a new concept.

  14. Students and tutors' social representations of assessment in problem-based learning tutorials supporting change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bollela Valdes R

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical programmes that implement problem-based learning (PBL face several challenges when introducing this innovative learning method. PBL relies on small group as the foundation of study, and tutors facilitate learning by guiding the process rather than teaching the group. One of the major challenges is the use of strategies to assess students working in small groups. Self-, peer- and tutor-assessment are integral part of PBL tutorials and they're not easy to perform, especially for non experienced students and tutors. The undergraduate PBL medical programme was introduced in 2003, and after two years the curriculum committee decided to evaluate the tutorial assessment in the new program. Methods A random group of ten students, out of a cohort of sixty, and ten tutors (out of eighteen were selected for semi-structured interviews. The social representations' theory was used to explore how the students and tutors made sense of "assessment in tutorials". The data were content analyzed using software for qualitative and quantitative processing of text according to lexicological distribution patterns. Results Even though students and tutors are aware of the broader purpose of assessment, they felt that they were not enough trained and confident to the tutorial assessment. Assigning numbers to complex behaviors on a regular basis, as in tutorials, is counter productive to cooperative group learning and self assessment. Tutors believe that students are immature and not able to assess themselves and tutors. Students believe that good grades are closely related to good oral presentation skills and also showed a corporative attitude among themselves (protecting each other from poor grades. Conclusion Faculty training on PBL tutorials' assessment process and a systematic strategy to evaluate new programs is absolutely necessary to review and correct directions. It is envisaged that planners can make better-informed decisions about

  15. Developing an Interactive Tutorial on a Quantum Eraser

    CERN Document Server

    Marshman, Emily

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a quantum interactive learning tutorial (QuILT) on a quantum eraser for students in upperlevel quantum mechanics. The QuILT exposes students to contemporary topics in quantum mechanics and uses a guided approach to learning. It adapts existing visualization tools to help students build physical intuition about quantum phenomena and strives to help them develop the ability to apply quantum principles in physical situations. The quantum eraser apparatus in the gedanken (thought) experiments and simulations that students learn from in the QuILT uses a MachZehnder Interferometer with single photons. We also discuss findings from a preliminary in-class evaluation.

  16. A tutorial on testing the race model inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Minakata, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    , to faster responses to redundant signals. In contrast, coactivation models assume integrated processing of the combined stimuli. To distinguish between these two accounts, Miller (1982) derived the well-known race model inequality, which has become a routine test for behavioral data in experiments...... with redundant signals. In this tutorial, we review the basic properties of redundant signals experiments and current statistical procedures used to test the race model inequality during the period between 2011 and 2014. We highlight and discuss several issues concerning study design and the test of the race...

  17. Investigating the effectiveness of the tutorials in introductory physics in multiple instructional settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Slezak1

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the educational impact of the implementation of the tutorial activity “Changes in Energy and Momentum” from The Tutorials in Introductory Physics in five different instructional settings. These settings include (1 a completely computer-based learning environment and (2 use of cooperative learning groups with varying levels of instructor support. Pre- and post-tests provide evidence that a computer-based implementation falls significantly short of classroom implementations which involve both collaborative learning groups and interactions with a teaching assistance. Other findings provide insight into the importance of certain elements of instructor training and the appropriate use of the tutorial as an initial introduction to a new concept.

  18. Neural networks and applications tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, I.

    1991-09-01

    The importance of neural networks has grown dramatically during this decade. While only a few years ago they were primarily of academic interest, now dozens of companies and many universities are investigating the potential use of these systems and products are beginning to appear. The idea of building a machine whose architecture is inspired by that of the brain has roots which go far back in history. Nowadays, technological advances of computers and the availability of custom integrated circuits, permit simulations of hundreds or even thousands of neurons. In conjunction, the growing interest in learning machines, non-linear dynamics and parallel computation spurred renewed attention in artificial neural networks. Many tentative applications have been proposed, including decision systems (associative memories, classifiers, data compressors and optimizers), or parametric models for signal processing purposes (system identification, automatic control, noise canceling, etc.). While they do not always outperform standard methods, neural network approaches are already used in some real world applications for pattern recognition and signal processing tasks. The tutorial is divided into six lectures, that where presented at the Third Graduate Summer Course on Computational Physics (September 3-7, 1990) on Parallel Architectures and Applications, organized by the European Physical Society: (1) Introduction: machine learning and biological computation. (2) Adaptive artificial neurons (perceptron, ADALINE, sigmoid units, etc.): learning rules and implementations. (3) Neural network systems: architectures, learning algorithms. (4) Applications: pattern recognition, signal processing, etc. (5) Elements of learning theory: how to build networks which generalize. (6) A case study: a neural network for on-line recognition of handwritten alphanumeric characters.

  19. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, Jérôme; Knudsen, Per

    2016-07-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products. GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations, and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Without any doubt the development of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for oceanography. The GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and beside some bug-fixes it adds the capability for the computation of Simple Bouguer Anomaly (Solid-Earth). During this fall a new GUT version 3 has been released. GUTv3 was further developed through a collaborative effort where the scientific communities participate aiming on an implementation of remaining functionalities facilitating a wider span of research in the fields of Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid earth studies. Accordingly, the GUT version 3 has: - An attractive and easy to use Graphic User Interface (GUI) for the toolbox, - Enhance the toolbox with some further software functionalities such as to facilitate the use of gradients, anisotropic diffusive filtering and computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies. - An associated GUT VCM tool for analyzing the GOCE variance covariance matrices.

  20. SFO-Project: The New Generation of Sharable, Editable and Open-Access CFD Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Javaherchi, Ardeshir; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    One of the most common approaches to develop a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation for a new case study of interest is to search for the most similar, previously developed and validated CFD simulation among other works. A simple search would result into a pool of written/visual tutorials. However, users should spend significant amount of time and effort to find the most correct, compatible and valid tutorial in this pool and further modify it toward their simulation of interest. SFO is an open-source project with the core idea of saving the above-mentioned time and effort. This is done via documenting/sharing scientific and methodological approaches to develop CFD simulations for a wide spectrum of fundamental and industrial case studies in three different CFD solvers; STAR-CCM +, FLUENT and Open FOAM (SFO). All of the steps and required files of these tutorials are accessible and editable under the common roof of Github (a web-based Git repository hosting service). In this presentation we will present the current library of 20 + developed CFD tutorials, discuss the idea and benefit of using them, their educational values and explain how the next generation of open-access and live resource of CFD tutorials can be built further hand-in-hand within our community.

  1. Determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in university students: a qualitative study using focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Deforche, Benedicte; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Clarys, Peter

    2015-02-28

    College or university is a critical period regarding unhealthy changes in energy related behaviours in students. The first objective of this explorative study was to identify determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in Belgian university students. Secondly, we aimed to collect ideas and recommendations to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behaviours in university students. Using a semi-structured question guide, seven focus group discussions were conducted consisting of 17 male and 29 female university students from a variety of study disciplines, with a mean age of 20.7 ± 1.6 yrs. Using Nvivo9, an inductive thematic approach was used for data analysis. Students reported that both physical and sedentary activities were influenced by individual factors (e.g. perceived enjoyment, self-discipline, time and convenience), their social networks (e.g. (lack of) parental control, modelling, social support), physical environment (e.g. availability and accessibility, travel time/distance, prices), and macro environment (e.g. media and advertising). Furthermore, the relationships between determinants and university students' physical activity and sedentary behaviour seemed to be moderated by university characteristics, such as residency, university lifestyle, exams and academic pressure. Recommendations for future physical activity interventions include improving information strategies regarding on-campus sports activities, cheaper and/or more flexible sports subscriptions and formulas, including 'sports time' into the curricula, and providing university bicycles around campus. Students also believed that increasing students' physical activity might decrease their sedentary behaviour at the same time. The recommendations and ideas discussed in this study may facilitate the development of effective and tailored (multilevel) intervention programs aiming to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behaviours in university students.

  2. Changing the marks-based culture of learning through peer-assisted tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, E.; Cutler, P. S.; Eisenbach, S.; Field, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    We describe and evaluate an approach to student learning that aims to instil a culture of formative assessment based on peer-assisted learning. The idea is for suitably qualified undergraduates to assist in the running of weekly first-year tutorials. They mark submitted work, provide written and verbal feedback and lead problem-solving discussions during tutorials. However, contrary to normal practice, the marks they award do not contribute to the students' end-of-year total; all tutorial work becomes essentially voluntary. We report results from a pilot implementation of the scheme over a 12 month period in an engineering department at a leading academic institution. The scheme was such that a comparative and triangulated assessment was possible among the students and tutor team. Results show no discernible degradation in student attendance, submission rates and performance in either the weekly exercises or end-of-year examinations. Important benefits to the peer tutors are also found.

  3. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  4. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  5. Progress Report--Microsoft Office 2003 Lynchburg College Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tom

    2004-01-01

    For the past several years Lynchburg College has developed Microsoft tutorials for use with academic classes and faculty, student and staff training. The tutorials are now used internationally. Last year Microsoft and Verizon sponsored a tutorial web site at http://www.officetutorials.com. This website recognizes ASCUE members for their wonderful…

  6. Analysis of Web-Based Tutorials Created by Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza-Fernandez, Marta; Abadal, Ernest

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to analyse the characteristics of tutorials created by academic libraries. It evaluates a sample of 180 tutorials by applying thirty basic indicators referring to general characteristics, content, teaching methodology, usability and technology. The general conclusion is that most of the tutorials are at an early stage of…

  7. CERN Technical Training 2007: IT3T - IT Technical Training Tutorials (Autumn 2007)

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    CERN Technical Training and the Internet Services group of the IT department (IT/IS) are jointly organizing a series of free tutorials, addressing some topics of common interest: the IT Technical Training Tutorials (IT3T). The first IT3T series will be offered in October 2007, in French, with the following schedule: IT3T/2007/1 "Introduction to Collaboration Workspaces using SharePoint", October 23rd , 14:30-16:00, Alexandre Lossent IT3T/2007/2 "What is new in Office 2007", October 25th, 14:30-15:30, Emmanuel Ormancey IT3T/2007/3 "Working with Windows Vista at CERN", October 30th, 14:30-15:30, Michal Kwiatek IT3T/2007/4 "Read your mail and more with Outlook 2007", November 1st, 14:30-15:30, Sebastien Dellabella All IT Technical Training Tutorials will take place in the Training Centre Auditorium (building 593, room 11), at 14h30. The tutorials are free of charge, but separate registration to each is required. Participation to any of the tutorials is open: attendance to any ...

  8. PHI 200 ASH Course Tutorial/ Tutorialrank

    OpenAIRE

    john

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialrank.com Tutorial Purchased: 5 Times, Rating: A+   PHI 200 Week 2 DQ 1 Ethics and Relativism PHI 200 Week 2 DQ 2 Animal Rights PHI 200 Week 2 Written Assignment Assisted Suicide PHI 200 Week 3 DQ 1 The Limits of Skepticism PHI 200 Week 3 DQ 2 Creationism and Science PHI 200 Week 3 Written Assignment Final Paper (Death Penalty) PHI 200 Week 4 DQ 1 Proof of God's Existence PHI 200 Week 4 DQ 2 The Tu...

  9. Subtitled video tutorials, an accessible teaching material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Bengochea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of short-lived audio-visual tutorials constitutes an educational resource very attractive for young students, widely familiar with this type of format similar to YouTube clips. Considered as "learning pills", these tutorials are intended to strengthen the understanding of complex concepts that because their dynamic nature can’t be represented through texts or diagrams. However, the inclusion of this type of content in eLearning platforms presents accessibility problems for students with visual or hearing disabilities. This paper describes this problem and shows the way in which a teacher could add captions and subtitles to their videos.

  10. First year clinical tutorials: students’ learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Annette Burgess,1 Kim Oates,2 Kerry Goulston,2 Craig Mellis1 1Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: Bedside teaching lies at the heart of medical education. The learning environment afforded to students during clinical tutorials contributes substantially to their knowledge, thinking, and learning. Situated cognition theory posits that the depth and breadth of the students' learning experience is dependent upon the attitude of the clinical teacher, the structure of the tutorial, and the understanding of tutorial and learning objectives. This theory provides a useful framework to conceptualize how students' experience within their clinical tutorials impacts their knowledge, thinking, and learning. Methods: The study was conducted with one cohort (n=301 of students who had completed year 1 of the medical program at Sydney Medical School in 2013. All students were asked to complete a three-part questionnaire regarding their perceptions of their clinical tutor's attributes, the consistency of the tutor, and the best features of the tutorials and need for improvement. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: The response rate to the questionnaire was 88% (265/301. Students perceived that their tutors displayed good communication skills and enthusiasm, encouraged their learning, and were empathetic toward patients. Fifty-two percent of students reported having the same communications tutor for the entire year, and 28% reported having the same physical examination tutor for the entire year. Students would like increased patient contact, greater structure within their tutorials, and greater alignment of teaching with the curriculum. Conclusion: Situated cognition theory provides a valuable lens to view students' experience of learning within the

  11. Use of an online writing tutorial to improve writing skills in nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Susan T; Goss, Gay

    2009-01-01

    Nursing students often struggle with writing style and the presentation of a logical flow of ideas. To help students enhance their scholastic writing skills, nursing faculty implemented an online program to improve syntax, grammar, and presentation of thoughts. The authors discuss a descriptive study and its results, which did demonstrate the effectiveness of the writing tutorial in Web-based nursing courses.

  12. Face-to-Face Tutorial Provision in the Universitas Terbuka (The Open University of Indonesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiola, Yahya; Moss, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    Describes an evaluative study conducted at the Universitas Terbuka (Indonesia) that examined the role of face-to-face tutorials as an optional supplement to other instructional materials at a distance education institution. Attitudes, characteristics, and roles of the tutors are examined, and student attitudes are briefly discussed. (21…

  13. Tutorial on Atomic Oxygen Effects and Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is the most predominant specie in low Earth orbit (LEO) and is contained in the upper atmosphere of many other planetary bodies. Formed by photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, it is highly reactive and energetic enough to break chemical bonds on the surface of many materials and react with them to form either stable or volatile oxides. The extent of the damage for spacecraft depends a lot on how much atomic oxygen arrives at the surface, the energy of the atoms, and the reactivity of the material that is exposed to it. Oxide formation can result in shrinkage, cracking, or erosion which can also result in changes in optical, thermal, or mechanical properties of the materials exposed. The extent of the reaction can be affected by mechanical loading, temperature, and other environmental components such as ultraviolet radiation or charged particles. Atomic oxygen generally causes a surface reaction, but it can scatter under coatings and into crevices causing oxidation much farther into a spacecraft surface or structure than would be expected. Contamination can also affect system performance. Contamination is generally caused by arrival of volatile species that condense on spacecraft surfaces. The volatiles are typically a result of outgassing of materials that are on the spacecraft. Once the volatiles are condensed on a surface, they can then be fixed on the surface by ultraviolet radiation andor atomic oxygen reaction to form stable surface contaminants that can change optical and thermal properties of materials in power systems, thermal systems, and sensors. This tutorial discusses atomic oxygen erosion and contaminate formation, and the effect they have on typical spacecraft materials. Scattering of atomic oxygen, some effects of combined environments and examples of effects of atomic oxygen and contamination on spacecraft systems and components will also be presented.

  14. The "Magic" of Tutorial Centres in Hong Kong: An Analysis of Media Marketing and Pedagogy in a Tutorial Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask…

  15. Easy Implementation of Internet-Based Whiteboard Physics Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    The requirement for a method of capturing problem solving on a whiteboard for later replay stems from my teaching load, which includes two classes of first-year university general physics, each with relatively large class sizes of approximately 80-100 students. Most university-level teachers value one-to-one interaction with the students and find working out problems on a board a useful teaching method. However, in most institutions of higher education, the staff-to-student ratio precludes giving every student this learning experience. The syllabus of the algebra-based physics course at the University of Saskatchewan (Physics 111) is relatively ambitious in terms of the content covered, given the physics and mathematics background knowledge of the average student. This means that the number of problems worked on in class is rather limited if a thorough discussion of the basic principles is required. Some form of tutorial that records the essence of working out a problem on a board, with both visual and audio elements and which can be replayed over the Internet, is desirable. Obviously, this loses the interactive question-and-answer element possible in a true tutorial where the student and teacher are both physically present, but it does have the significant advantage that the tutorial can be replayed as many times as the student deems it necessary, thus allowing the lesson to proceed at a pace dictated by the student. Moreover, these lessons only have to be prepared once, can be used many times over, and can be used in distance-learning courses. In this paper, I describe the necessary hardware and software required to do this, all of which is relatively affordable and requires little specialist IT knowledge to set up.

  16. Online Bioinformatics Tutorials | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioinformatics is a scientific discipline that applies computer science and information technology to help understand biological processes. The NIH provides a list of free online bioinformatics tutorials, either generated by the NIH Library or other institutes, which includes introductory lectures and "how to" videos on using various tools.

  17. Professionalizing tutors and tutorials in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colunga, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the necessity of professionalizing training of university teachers performing tutorial activities in higher education as a response to the demands of pupils following a part-time model. Permanent training of tutor is emphasized as a way to enhance professional and personal accomplishments. This training gives priority to educative orientation and interventional actions.

  18. Migrant Education Tutorial Aide Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Community Services and Migrant Education.

    Designed by California's Region II Office of Migrant Education to aid in training teacher aides working with migrant children, this manual outlines activities used in teaching by the aides. Each activity is described in terms of the concept to be taught, the tutorial skill required, standard instructional media, rationale for the media, expected…

  19. Action perception and imitation : a tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, H; Wohlschlager, A; Prinz, W; Hommel, B

    2002-01-01

    Currently, imitation, or performing an act after perceiving it, is in the focus of attention of researchers from many different disciplines. Although this tutorial attempts to provide some interdisciplinary background, it will concentrate on possible cognitive mechanisms that underlie imitation perf

  20. Screencast Tutorials Enhance Student Learning of Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Steven A.; Robertson, Chuck L.

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of computer-assisted instruction has rapidly increased, there is little empirical research evaluating these technologies, specifically within the context of teaching statistics. The authors assessed the effect of screencast tutorials on learning outcomes, including statistical knowledge, application, and interpretation. Students…

  1. Audi-Tutorial Instruction in Basic Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study in which audio-tutorial instruction was compared to illustrated lecture instruction are reported. No great differences in achievement levels in the two strategies of instruction were found. The development of such an alternative teaching strategy forces better teacher organization, leading to improvement of the illustrated…

  2. Audi-Tutorial Instruction in Basic Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study in which audio-tutorial instruction was compared to illustrated lecture instruction are reported. No great differences in achievement levels in the two strategies of instruction were found. The development of such an alternative teaching strategy forces better teacher organization, leading to improvement of the illustrated…

  3. Statistical Analysis of Random Simulations : Bootstrap Tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deflandre, D.; Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2002-01-01

    The bootstrap is a simple but versatile technique for the statistical analysis of random simulations.This tutorial explains the basics of that technique, and applies it to the well-known M/M/1 queuing simulation.In that numerical example, different responses are studied.For some responses, bootstrap

  4. The Development of e-tutorial on Implementation National Curriculum 2013 for Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Yenita; Satria, Gita; Nur Siregar, Syarifah

    2017-06-01

    Curriculum 2013 is the new national Curriculum in Indonesia that is targeted to be used in all Indonesian schools in 2019. At this time the teacher training continues but the number and locations of teachers very diffuse and time constraints to be an obstacle for the government to be able to conduct training for teachers. This research resulted in the e-tutorial which is designed for mathematics teachers in studying the process of Curriculum implementation. This product will assist the government in accelerating the preparation of teachers in implementation of Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial contains the dynamics of Curriculum development, learning model, learning assessment, lesson plan, curriculum stages of implementation and government regulation that is relevant to the implementation of Curriculum 2013. The product development started with a needs analysis through discussions with mathematics teachers about their difficulties in the implementation of the Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial was developed using Application of Adobe Director 11. This paper discusses the results of need analysis, process development and results of product revisions made based on input from teachers during the FGD. From the discussion, it can be concluded that this e-tutorial easily understood by teachers and help them to understand the implementation of Curriculum 2013

  5. Evaluating the Instructional Efficacy of Computer-Mediated Interactive Multimedia: Comparing Three Elementary Statistics Tutorial Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gerardo M.; Birch, Marc A.

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated three tutorial modules, equivalent in content but different in mode of presentation, for introducing elementary statistics concepts. Fifty-seven college students participated in one of four randomly assigned conditions: paper-and-pencil, basic computerized, computerized multimedia, or control group. Participant evaluations…

  6. Achievement of Audi-Tutorial and Conventional Biology Students, A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Phillip D.; Unbehaun, Laraine M.

    1971-01-01

    Students studying a biology course by audio-tutorial or conventional lecture-laboratory methods differed in achievement on course examinations, with the A-T group scoring significantly higher on the total test and 3 of the 9 subtests. (AL)

  7. Achievement of Audi-Tutorial and Conventional Biology Students, A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Phillip D.; Unbehaun, Laraine M.

    1971-01-01

    Students studying a biology course by audio-tutorial or conventional lecture-laboratory methods differed in achievement on course examinations, with the A-T group scoring significantly higher on the total test and 3 of the 9 subtests. (AL)

  8. Teacher-student co-construction processes in biology: Strategies for developing mental models in large group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Oviedo, Maria Cecilia

    The aim of this study was to describe co-construction processes in large group discussions. Co-construction, as used here, is a process by which the teacher and the students work together to construct and evaluate mental models of a target concept. Data were collected for an in-depth case study of a single teacher instructing middle school students with an innovative curriculum on human respiration. Data came from transcripts of video taped lessons, drawings, and pre- and post-test scores. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were conducted. In the quantitative analysis, differences in gains between one and two standard deviations in size were found between the pre- and post-test scores indicating that the students increased their understanding about human respiration. In the qualitative analysis, a generative exploratory method followed by a convergent coded method was conducted to examine teacher-student interaction patterns. The aim of this part was to determine how learning occurred by attempting to connect dialogue patterns with underlying cognitive processes. The main outcome of the study is a hypothesized model containing four layers of nested teaching strategies. Listed from large to small time scales these are: the Macro Cycle, the Co-construction Modes, the Micro Cycle, and the Teaching Tactics. The most intensive analysis focused on identifying and articulating the Co-construction Modes---Accretion Mode, Disconfirmation Mode, Modification Mode, Evolution Mode, and Competition Mode---and their relations to the other levels of the model. These modes can either describe the construction and evaluation of individual model elements or of entire models giving a total of ten modes. The frequency of these co-construction modes was then determined by coding, twenty-six hours of transcripts. The most frequent modes were the Accretion Mode and the Disconfirmation Mode. The teacher's and the students' contributions to the co-construction process were also examined

  9. Using Lecture Tutorials to Increase Student Learning in Introductory Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortz, K. M.; Smay, J. J.; Murray, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    Students often leave introductory geoscience courses with their misconceptions still intact, and we developed Lecture Tutorials (LTs) to help alleviate this problem. LTs are 10-15 minute interactive worksheets that students complete in small groups in class, after a short introductory lecture. Topics for the LTs (e.g., climate change, the rock cycle, etc.) were chosen because they are commonly taught in introductory classes and include recognized misconceptions. The LTs typically follow a sequence beginning with factual-based questions that progressively become more difficult and culminating in application-type questions designed to provoke both discussion and critical thinking. Often, one of the latter questions is presented in the form of a debate between two students, where one student expresses the scientifically held view and the other espouses a view based on a common misconception. Students in the class must determine with which student in the LT they agree and explain why. These hypothetical debates allow students to confront their own misconceptions and replace them with the accepted scientific views. Lecture Tutorials increase student learning more than lectures alone. After a short lecture, students correctly answered 58% of multiple-choice questions (including embedded Geoscience Concept Inventory questions), and that value increased by 18% after they completed the LT. To determine if the increase resulted from extra time spent on the topic rather than the unique approach of LTs, we also tested how an extended lecture, in lieu of LTs, affected student scores. After an extended lecture, student scores increased by only 5% on multiple-choice questions. Therefore, we conclude that LTs are more effective than lecture alone in increasing student knowledge. LTs have been written to be relatively easy to implement in classrooms without a large time commitment or dramatic course redesign. Thirteen LTs have currently been tested, and more are being developed

  10. Psychiatry resident-led tutorials increase medical student knowledge and improve national board of medical examiners shelf exam scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, A J S; Palmer, B A

    2015-06-01

    Psychiatry residents have tremendous potential as educators. The authors envisioned residents as small-group tutors, efficiently assessing and correcting knowledge deficits using cases with discussion prompts and teaching points. They empirically tested whether this improves knowledge acquisition. Senior residents delivered eight tutorials during clerkship, which covered child and adolescent psychiatry, anxiety, mood, psychotic, cognitive, and substance use disorders. A 50-item multiple-choice quiz was administered at the beginning and end of clerkship. National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) shelf exam scores from intervention year were compared to the 4 years prior to resident involvement. Mean score on the initial quiz was 34.5 ± 3.7 and 41.8 ± 3.5 on second attempt (p < 0.001). Mean score for NBME psychiatry subject exam during intervention year was 83.2 ± 8.9 and for the four prior years was 78.0 ± 9.3, which was significant (p = 0.002). Resident-led tutorials provide an effective means of increasing psychiatric knowledge and improving performance on NBME subject exams.

  11. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, T.P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Jones, N.L. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  12. Student-led objective tutorials in Pharmacology: An interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhlecha, Anupama; Jadav, Shilpa P; Gosai, Tushar R; Balusamy, Divakar

    2016-10-01

    Students learn in a better way if they are involved in active learning. Hence, the study was designed to introduce student-led objective tutorials (SLOTs) as an alternative to conventional tutorials (CTs) in pharmacology and to compare SLOT and CT on outcomes such as improved score in tests, active involvement of students, and faculty requirement of each. Didactic lectures taken on a topic in pharmacology were followed by a preintervention test for a batch of the 2(nd) year medical undergraduates. They were allotted either in SLOT or CT group. For a SLOT session, students of Group A (interventional group) were divided into teams and each team prepared five multiple choice questions on the given topic in PowerPoint format, which were presented to other teams and audience. The proceedings were facilitated by two lecturers. Group B undertook CT (controls). A postintervention test was then taken for both groups. Feedback was sought from students and teachers on SLOT. The total marks for the test were 20. The mean marks in Group A improved by 31% (from 5.1 to 11.2). In Group B, they improved by 11% (from 5 to 7.2). Academic performance following SLOT was better than CT. Students (63%) favored SLOT as it stimulated their interest in the topic, improved self-learning skills, and teamwork. The teachers also favored SLOT for similar reasons. SLOT leads to greater satisfaction and better performance in tests. SLOT is an effective alternative to CT to promote active learning among students through group work. It helps overcome the logistic difficulties due to faculty shortage.

  13. Quimiometria I: calibração multivariada, um tutorial Chemometrics I: multivariate calibration, a tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia M. C. Ferreira

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present a tutorial on Multivariate Calibration, a tool which is nowadays necessary in basically most laboratories but very often misused. The basic concepts of preprocessing, principal component analysis (PCA, principal component regression (PCR and partial least squares (PLS are given. The two basic steps on any calibration procedure: model building and validation are fully discussed. The concepts of cross validation (to determine the number of factors to be used in the model, leverage and studentized residuals (to detect outliers for the validation step are given. The whole calibration procedure is illustrated using spectra recorded for ternary mixtures of 2,4,6 trinitrophenolate, 2,4 dinitrophenolate and 2,5 dinitrophenolate followed by the concentration prediction of these three chemical species during a diffusion experiment through a hydrophobic liquid membrane. MATLAB software is used for numerical calculations. Most of the commands for the analysis are provided in order to allow a non-specialist to follow step by step the analysis.

  14. Life Cycle Leadership Theory vs. Theory on the Phases of Small Group Discussion: Comparisons, Contrasts, and Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Charles Thomas, Jr.

    The work of Paul Hersey and Kenneth Blanchard on life-cycle leadership was compared and contrasted to three studies on group phase theories. The studies on group phases were conducted by Robert Bales and Fred Strodtbeck in 1951, Thomas Scheidel and Laura Crowell in 1964, and B. Aubrey Fisher in 1970. The two theoretical approaches were found to…

  15. A Multiple Group Measurement Model of Children's Reports of Parental Socioeconomic Status. Discussion Papers No. 531-78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, Robert D.; Mason, William M.

    An important class of applications of measurement error or constrained factor analytic models consists of comparing models for several populations. In such cases, it is appropriate to make explicit statistical tests of model similarity across groups and to constrain some parameters of the models to be equal across groups using a priori substantive…

  16. When Scientific Knowledge, Daily Life Experience, Epistemological and Social Considerations Intersect: Students' Argumentation in Group Discussions on a Socio-scientific Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albe, Virginie

    2008-01-01

    Socio-scientific issues in class have been proposed in an effort to democratise science in society. A micro-ethnographic approach has been used to explore how students elaborate arguments on a socio-scientific controversy in the context of small group discussions. Several processes of group argumentation have been identified. Students’ arguments were elaborated from scientific data, common ideas and epistemological and strategic considerations. Students’ social interactions influenced the patterns of argumentation elaborated within the group discussions. Implications of this study for the teaching of socio-scientific issues in class are discussed.

  17. Redesigning nursing tutorials for ESL students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, Caroline; Townsend, Lisa; Waters, Cheryl

    2013-04-01

    Increased enrolments of Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students who speak English as a second language (ESL) can help create a multilingual and culturally diverse workforce that is better prepared to meet the needs of increasingly diverse health populations. However, although ESL enrolments are increasing, attrition rates for ESL students tend to be higher than those of native speakers of English, partly due to academic failure. At the same time, concerns have been expressed in some quarters about the low levels of English language of entering students. As it is unlikely that language entry levels to university will be raised, sustainable programmes that help ESL students better meet the academic challenges they may face need to be developed. So far, models of ESL support have been mostly an adjunct to their degree, voluntary and not well attended. This paper discusses a model using tutorials integrated into the first year nursing curriculum that were specifically designed for ESL students with low levels of English language proficiency. The paper also examines students' perceptions of such tutorials, which they found beneficial to their learning.

  18. Agricultural producers’ groups in the Czech Republic: introductory review and discussion of the problem area economic performance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vavřina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Each company is surrounded by the micro- and macro-environment affecting also its economic performance. These factors are not only individual accounting entries, but also analytical inputs as the internal company processes, management of costs or short-term financial decisions and specifically in the case of agriculture within the EU also the public subsidy schemes implemented through the EU Common Agricultural Policy. Groups of agricultural producers are created as a response to current market dynamics and the opportunity for each agricultural enterprise regardless the size. In this paper, the basis for agricultural cooperation is provided, traditional economic performance measures are presented and their applicability on the sample of agricultural producers’ groups and wholesale entities is empirically verified. Wholesale entities are analysed by its business activity and performance features to consider whether they are suitable peer group for comparing economic performance of examined agricultural producers’ group. Since the economic performance of agricultural producers’ groups directly affects the economic performance of all participating entities, and vice versa, their economic performance measurement may involve specific constraints. According to the structure and characteristics of agricultural producers’ groups may be inferred that whilst the common performance measurement techniques are applicable on the majority of companies, agricultural producers’ groups represent specific entities and therefore need adjusted performance measurement approach.

  19. The Effect of Education-Based Intervention Using Small Group Discussion in Empowering Adolescent Girls to Prevent Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemehsadat Seyed Nematollah Roshan

    2014-10-01

    Results: At baseline, independent T-test showed no significant difference between the two groups in the perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, and self efficacy, all of which could be regarded as empowerment process components (P>0.05. However, significant differences were observed after intervention. Also, the paired T-test showed a significant difference before and after the intervention in the test group in means of the perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, self efficacy and, in the grand scheme, adolescent girls' empowerment (P

  20. Speech rate treatments for individuals with dysarthria: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Paul G; Snyder, Gregory J

    2010-06-01

    Research confirms the long-standing clinical observation that patients with dysarthria exhibit variability in speech rate. Thus, modifying speech rate has been documented as one of the best treatment options for these patients. In this tutorial, several published rate control interventions for dysarthric speakers are presented. Studies discussed utilized various interventions, including pacing boards, alphabet board supplementation, visual and auditory feedback, cueing and pacing strategies, and delayed auditory feedback. Interventions discussed represent a hierarchy from "rigid" strategies, which impose maximal rate control, to techniques allowing for greater speech naturalness and independent rate control. All procedures are examined with respect to effectiveness in reducing rate, effect on intelligibility and prosody, training requirements, specific alterations made to speech rate, and other relevant aspects.

  1. A study of space station needs, attributes and architectural options. Final briefing: Cost working group discussion session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The economic factors involved in the design and utilization of the space station are investigated. Topics include the economic benefits associated with research and production, the orbit transfer vehicle, and satellite servicing. Program costs and design options are examined. The possibilities of financing from the private sector are discussed.

  2. PEMANFAATAN PEMBELAJARAN BERBASIS KOMPUTER MODEL CD INTERAKTIF TUTORIAL UNTUK MENINGKATKAN HASIL BELAJAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adang Sutarman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study raised the issue about the low quality of education is reflected in the low average academic achievement, especially high school students (SMP. The cause of the low quality of education was allegedly due to lack of teacher skills in managing information resources in a medium of learning. From this background then this research tries to apply the instructional media that are considered effective in improving learning outcomes of computer-based learning tutorial model. This study aims to find out how to use computer-based learning tutorial model to improve student learning outcomes compared with conventional models in teaching science in Serang district. The method used in this research is Quasi Experiment and descriptive method, which became the target population in this study all the students of SMP Negeri Serang, while the entire student population of inaccessibility is a Class VII SMP Negeri 1 Pamarayan SMP Negeri 2 Pamarayan with each school is taken two classes. To determine the two groups will be conducted using purposive sampling technique. Samples of each class taken as many as 36 students. The results of this study concluded that: (1 computer-based learning tutorial model to improve student learning outcomes if followed with high interest and ability to operate a computer, (2 the success of computer-based learning tutorial model in improving learning outcomes SMPN 1 Pamarayan and SMPN 2 Pamarayan because the factors supporting the success of computer-based learning has been met very well, both in terms of infrastructure, the ability of teachers and students and time available in the computer lab. (3 computer-based learning tutorial model effectively to improve student learning outcomes if the inhibiting factors of computer-based learning tutorial model can be resolved by way of complementary infrastructure, provide computer training for teachers and arranging the schedule of computer labs organized. The success of computer

  3. Uruguayan secondary school students speak up about tobacco: results from focus group discussions in and around Montevideo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin; Harrell, Melissa; Springer, Andrew; Medina, José; Martinez, Lucía; Perry, Cheryl; Estol, Diego

    2017-07-01

    This qualitative research study investigated intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental factors that shape young adolescent tobacco use behaviors in Uruguay. Focus groups were conducted in the summer of 2012 and fall of 2013 in four secondary schools in Montevideo, Uruguay, including two private schools and two public schools. A total of four focus groups were led in each school, composed of 4-6 students each, 16 focus groups in total. Data analysis utilized NVivo software and included deductive and inductive content analysis. Overwhelmingly, students reported that the onset of smoking occurred in the second year of secondary school. The primary intrapersonal factors that were found to be universal among respondents identified that smoking was a performance in groups, to garner attention from their peers. Students interviewed most often stated that the greatest interpersonal factors for smoking were to look older, as a rite of passage, and for group membership. Environmental factors cited most often indicate that they smoked during unsupervised time, either at night or around the short Uruguayan school day. Focus group interviews revealed that adolescents had easy access to cigarettes for purchase through small family owned grocery stores, even though laws exist preventing the sale of cigarettes to minors. Few differences were cited between strata related to cigarette use in adolescents. The differences that do exist are most apparent across gender, though there were a few observed differences when stratified by public and private school. Findings from this study indicate that key factors across ecological levels (intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental) should be taken into consideration when designing tobacco prevention programs for youth in Uruguay. A multiple-component approach which addresses risk factors at all of these levels, implemented in schools, may be particularly well-suited to this setting.

  4. Positioning of Fifth Grade Students in Small-Group Settings: Naming Participation in Discussion-Based Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Ingrid S.

    2010-01-01

    Through the lens of Schegloff's (1996) Action Theory, this study examined the dynamics of four groups of fifth-grade students as they learned to talk about academic mathematical reasoning over the course of a school year using Freeze Frame Analysis (Leander & Rowe, 2006) to help map "talking spaces" and Critical Discourse Analysis to understand…

  5. Barriers to Disclosing and Reporting Violence among Women in Pakistan: Findings from a National Household Survey and Focus Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Neil; Cockcroft, Anne; Ansari, Umaira; Omer, Khalid; Ansari, Noor M.; Khan, Amir; Chaudhry, Ubaid Ullah

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, many women who experience domestic violence keep their experience secret. Few report to official bodies. In a national survey of abuse against women in Pakistan, we examined factors related to disclosure: women who had experienced physical violence telling someone about it. In focus groups, we explored why women do not report domestic…

  6. From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J.; Jaques, Hayden; Johnson, Amanda; Brotherton, Michelle L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability often have few friends and experience social exclusion. Recognising this gap, supported social groups with the aim of inclusion and interdependence were created by a supported employment provider. Methods: Interviews were undertaken with 10 adults with intellectual disability exploring their lived…

  7. "Accelerators and beams," a multimedia tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbar, Richard R.

    1997-02-01

    We are developing a computer-based tutorial for charged-particle beam optics under a grant from the DOE. This subject is important to the DOE not only for its use in providing basic research tools but because the physics is the underpinning for accelerators used in industry and medicine. The tutorial, which will be delivered on Macintosh and Windows platforms, uses multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. As such, it integrates our interactive On-Screen Laboratories™ with hypertext, line drawings, photographs, animation, video, and sound. We are targeting an audience from technicians to graduate students in science and engineering. At this time we have about a fourth of the material (about equivalent to a one-semester three-credit-hour upper under-graduate physics course) available in prototype form.

  8. MacSelfService online tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Mac Self-Service is a functionality within the Mac Desktop Service built and maintained to empower CERN users by giving them easy access to applications and configurations through the Self-Service application. This tutorial (text attached to the event page) explains how to install Mac Self-Service and how to use it to install applications and printers. Content owner: Vincent Nicolas Bippus Presenter: Pedro Augusto de Freitas Batista Tell us what you think via e-learning.support at cern.ch More tutorials in the e-learning collection of the CERN Document Server (CDS) https://cds.cern.ch/collection/E-learning%20modules?ln=en All info about the CERN rapid e-learning project is linked from http://twiki.cern.ch/ELearning  

  9. Who Is the Competent Physics Student? A Study of Students' Positions and Social Interaction in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students.…

  10. When Scientific Knowledge, Daily Life Experience, Epistemological and Social Considerations Intersect: Students' Argumentation in Group Discussions on a Socio-Scientific Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albe, Virginie

    2008-01-01

    Socio-scientific issues in class have been proposed in an effort to democratise science in society. A micro-ethnographic approach has been used to explore how students elaborate arguments on a socio-scientific controversy in the context of small group discussions. Several processes of group argumentation have been identified. Students' arguments…

  11. Who Is the Competent Physics Student? A Study of Students' Positions and Social Interaction in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students.…

  12. ReSTful OSGi Web Applications Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Khawaja; Norris, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation accompanies a tutorial on the ReSTful (Representational State Transfer) web application. Using Open Services Gateway Initiative (OSGi), ReST uses HTTP protocol to enable developers to offer services to a diverse variety of clients: from shell scripts to sophisticated Java application suites. It also uses Eclipse for the rapid development, the Eclipse debugger, the test application, and the ease of export to production servers.

  13. ESE 631 ASH COURSE Tutorial/UOPHELP

    OpenAIRE

    sdzfghj

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   ESE 631 Complete Class, New Syllabus Business - General Business LRE and FAPE. Please read the article “Least Restrictive Environment: How Do We Prepare Both Our Special Educators and Our General Educators to Comply with the Provision?” (Keuhne, 1998). According to IDEA, what do the terms Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) and Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) mean? How does inclusion fi...

  14. Thermophysics Universal Research Framework (TURF) Tutorial Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-02

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Thermophysics Universal Research Framework (TURF) Tutorial Package 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 THERMOPHYSICS UNIVERSAL RESEARCH FRAMEWORK – INFRASTRUCTURE RELEASE – (TURF-IR V1.0...a C-R physics module), there are no hooks to indicate that a particular module is missing. In this way, reverse engineering the functionality of a

  15. abs417ashcoursesTutorial /uophelp

    OpenAIRE

    smith

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com     ABS 417 Week 1 DQ 1 ( The Power of Many )    ABS 417 Week 1 DQ 2 ( Social Change Model )    ABS 417 Week 2 DQ 1 ( Empowerment, Disempowerment and Social Change )   ABS 417 Week 2 DQ 2 ( Non-Profit vs. For-Profit Organizations )    ABS 417 Week 2 Assignment ( Reflection Paper )    ABS 417 Week 3 DQ 1 ( Social Problems )  &nb...

  16. ACC 220 Tutorials / acc220dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    modumteja

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.acc220.com   ACC 220 Week 1 Checkpoint Career Opportunities ACC 220 Week 1 DQ 1 & DQ 2 ACC 220 Week 2 Checkpoint Proprietorships, Partnerships, and Corporations ACC 220 Week 2 Assignment Financial Statements ACC 220 Week 3 Checkpoint Classified Balance Sheets ACC 220 Week 3 DQ 1 and DQ 2 ACC 220 Week 4 Checkpoint Cash Management Matrix Appendix B ACC 220 Week 4 Assignment Internal Cash Control ACC 220 Wee...

  17. 在探索与实践中收获--写在《声乐集体课教程》出版之际%Harvest in the Exploration and Practice-for Publishing The Tutorial of Group Class of Vocal Music

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蓉

    2015-01-01

    相比较于声乐个别课教学中,教师教材实施的高度灵活性、开放性、针对性和自主性选择而言,声乐集体课教学则迫切需要一份相对统一、系统、规范的教材来组织教学活动。武汉音乐学院声乐教师团队为满足这种教学需求,经过数年努力推出的教材成果《声乐集体课教程》将“教科书与工具书融为一体,理论性和实践性集于一身,主体性与参考性合为一处”,对个别课和集体课在声乐教学中的作用意义分别做了说明与阐释。%Compared to the individual lesson of vocal music, which of teachers’teaching mate-rials to implement high flexibility, openness, relevance and autonomy of choice, the group class of vocal teaching is an urgent need for a relatively unified, systematic and standardized materials to organize teaching activities. In order to meet this demand, the vocal teaching team in Wuhan Conservatory of Music launched of The Tutorial of Group Class of Vocal Music after several years of efforts, which “integrated textbooks and reference books, set theory and practice all in one, subjectivity and reference collection in one”, interpreted and explained the significance to vocal teaching of individual lesson and group class separately.

  18. A discussion group program enhances the conceptual reasoning skills of students enrolled in a large lecture-format introductory biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteroy-Kelly, Marcy A

    2007-01-01

    It has been well-established that discussion groups enhance student learning in large lecture courses. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of a discussion group program on the development of conceptual reasoning skills of students enrolled in a large lecture-format introductory biology course. In the discussion group, students worked on problems based on topics discussed in lecture. The program was evaluated using three assessment tools. First, student responses to pre- and posttests were analyzed. The test question asked the students to demonstrate the relationships between 10 different but related terms. Use of a concept map to link the terms indicated an advanced level of conceptual reasoning skills. There was a 13.8% increase in the use of concept maps from pre- to posttest. Second, the students took a Likert-type survey to determine the perceived impact of the program on their conceptual reasoning skills. Many of the students felt that the program helped them understand and use the main course concepts to logically solve problems. Finally, average exam grades increased as the semester progressed. The average final grade in the course was 75%. Students enrolled in the course the previous year (where the lecture component of the course did not assess or reflect student learning in the discussion group) had an average final grade of 69%. The results of this study demonstrate that the discussion group program improves the conceptual reasoning skills of students enrolled in a large lecture-format introductory biology course.

  19. Tutorial for Authors and Referees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editors from Physical Review Letters and Physical Review will provide information and tips for our less experienced referees and authors. This session is aimed at anyone looking to submit to or review for any of the APS journals, as well as anyone who would like to learn more about the authoring and refereeing processes. Topics for discussion will include advice on how to write good manuscripts, similarities and differences in writing referee reports for PRL and PR, and other ways in which authors, referees, and editors can work together productively. Following a short presentation from the editors, there will be a moderated discussion.

  20. Identification of mistakes and their correction by a small group discussion as a revision exercise at the end of a teaching module in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H; Sridhar, M G; Soundravally, R; Setiya, Sajita; Babu, M Sathish; Niranjan, G

    2014-01-01

    Graduate medical students often get less opportunity for clarifying their doubts and to reinforce their concepts after lecture classes. The Medical Council of India (MCI) encourages group discussions among students. We evaluated the effect of identifying mistakes in a given set of wrong statements and their correction by a small group discussion by graduate medical students as a revision exercise. At the end of a module, a pre-test consisting of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) was conducted. Later, a set of incorrect statements related to the topic was given to the students and they were asked to identify the mistakes and correct them in a small group discussion. The effects on low, medium and high achievers were evaluated by a post-test and delayed post-tests with the same set of MCQs. The mean post-test marks were significantly higher among all the three groups compared to the pre-test marks. The gain from the small group discussion was equal among low, medium and high achievers. The gain from the exercise was retained among low, medium and high achievers after 15 days. Identification of mistakes in statements and their correction by a small group discussion is an effective, but unconventional revision exercise in biochemistry. Copyright 2014, NMJI.

  1. Online Focus Group Discussion is a Valid and Feasible Mode When Investigating Sensitive Topics Among Young Persons With a Cancer Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettergren, Lena; Eriksson, Lars E; Nilsson, Jenny; Jervaeus, Anna; Lampic, Claudia

    2016-05-09

    Clinical research often lacks participants of young age. Adding to the small amount of scientific studies that focus on the population entering adulthood, there are also difficulties to recruit them. To overcome this, there is a need to develop and scientifically evaluate modes for data collection that are suitable for adolescents and young adults. With this in mind we performed 39 online focus group discussions among young survivors of childhood cancer to explore thoughts and experiences around dating, being intimate with someone, and having children. The aim of the study was to evaluate online focus group discussions as a mode for data collection on sensitive issues among young persons with a cancer experience. One hundred thirty-three young persons (16-25 years) previously diagnosed with cancer, participated in 39 synchronous online focus group discussions (response rate 134/369, 36%). The mode of administration was evaluated by analyzing participant characteristics and interactions during discussions, as well as group members' evaluations of the discussions. Persons diagnosed with central nervous tumors (n=30, 27%) participated to a lower extent than those with other cancer types (n=103, 39%; χ 2= 4.89, P=.03). The participants described various health impairments that correspond to what would be expected among cancer survivors including neuropsychiatric conditions and writing disabilities. Even though participants were interested in others' experiences, sexual issues needed more probing by the moderators than did fertility-related issues. Group evaluations revealed that participants appreciated communicating on the suggested topics and thought that it was easier to discuss sex when it was possible to be anonymous toward other group members. Online focus group discussions, with anonymous participation, are suggested to be a feasible and valid mode for collecting sensitive data among young persons with a cancer experience.

  2. Review: Ralf Bohnsack, Aglaja Przyborski & Burkhard Schäffer (Eds. (2010. Das Gruppendiskussionsverfahren in der Forschungspraxis [The Group Discussion Technique in Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Schmidt-Pfister

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This edited volume comprises a range of studies that have employed a group discussion technique in combination with a specific strategy for reconstructive social research—the so-called documentary method. The latter is an empirical research strategy based on the meta-theoretical premises of the praxeological sociology of knowledge, as developed by Ralf BOHNSACK. It seeks to access practice in a more appropriate manner, namely by differentiating between various dimensions of knowledge and sociality. It holds that habitual collective orientations, in particular, are best accessed through group discussions. Thus this book does not address the group discussion technique in general, as might be expected from the title. Instead, it presents various contributions from researchers interpreting transcripts of group discussions according to the documentary method. The chapters are grouped into three main sections, representing different frameworks of practice and habitual orientation: childhood, adolescence, and organizational or societal context. A fourth section includes chapters on further, potentially useful ways of employing this particular technique and approach, as well as a chapter on teaching it in a meaningful way. Each chapter is structured in the same way: introduction to the research field and focus; methodological discussion; exemplary interpretation of group discussions; and concluding remarks. Whilst the transcripts referred to by the authors are very helpfully presented in the chapters, there is a lack of methodological reflection on the group discussion technique itself, which, as mentioned above, is only evaluated in regard to the documentary method. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs110225

  3. Formulation of questions followed by small group discussion as a revision exercise at the end of a teaching module in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobby, Zachariah; Koner, Bidhan Chandra; Sridhar, M G; Nandeesha, H; Renuka, P; Setia, Sajita; Kumaran, S Senthil; Asmathulla, S

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate medical students get fewer opportunities to clarify their doubts and to reinforce their understanding of concepts after lecture classes. There is no information available in the literature that addresses the question of usefulness of prior formulation of questions followed by small group discussion by undergraduate medical students as a revision exercise. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effect of formulation of objective type short answer questions by undergraduate medical students followed by small group discussion on the answers of the questions prepared as a revision exercise on their understanding of the topic "amino acid metabolism" and the retention of the gain after 15 days. At the end of a regular teaching module on the topic of amino acid metabolism, undergraduate medical students were asked to prepare 16 objective type short answer questions on the various aspects of the topic as homework. Small group discussions involving 12-14 students in each group and lasting one hour were conducted on the questions and answers prepared by them in the presence of a faculty member. The effects on low, medium, and high achievers were evaluated with multiple choice questions by pre-test and post-tests before and after the group discussion. Formulation of questions was highly effective in improving understanding on the topic for all the students. The overall mean post-test scores after the formulation of questions (12.6) and after the small group discussion that followed (14.7) were significantly higher than the mean pre-test score (8.5). For high achievers, the gain from formulation of questions was higher than the gain from small group discussion. Small group discussion was highly effective for all students. The gain from small group discussion was higher among the low and medium achievers in comparison with the high achievers. The gain from the exercise was retained among the low, medium, and high achievers after 15 days. In conclusion

  4. Retention of allied health professionals in rural New South Wales: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keane Sheila

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uneven distribution of the medical workforce is globally recognised, with widespread rural health workforce shortages. There has been substantial research on factors affecting recruitment and retention of rural doctors, but little has been done to establish the motives and conditions that encourage allied health professionals to practice rurally. This study aims to identify aspects of recruitment and retention of rural allied health professionals using qualitative methodology. Methods Six focus groups were conducted across rural NSW and analysed thematically using a grounded theory approach. The thirty allied health professionals participating in the focus groups were purposively sampled to represent a range of geographic locations, allied health professions, gender, age, and public or private work sectors. Results Five major themes emerged: personal factors; workload and type of work; continuing professional development (CPD; the impact of management; and career progression. ‘Pull factors’ favouring rural practice included: attraction to rural lifestyle; married or having family in the area; low cost of living; rural origin; personal engagement in the community; advanced work roles; a broad variety of challenging clinical work; and making a difference. ‘Push factors’ discouraging rural practice included: lack of employment opportunities for spouses; perceived inadequate quality of secondary schools; age related issues (retirement, desire for younger peer social interaction, and intention to travel; limited opportunity for career advancement; unmanageable workloads; and inadequate access to CPD. Having competent clinical managers mitigated the general frustration with health service management related to inappropriate service models and insufficient or inequitably distributed resources. Failure to fill vacant positions was of particular concern and frustration with the lack of CPD access was strongly represented by

  5. Discussion on thermal dynamical-vacuum group deoxidization%热力--真空组合除氧的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德宁

    2015-01-01

    针对油田注汽锅炉水处理现在采用的真空——化学除氧法时,加化学药品来提高除氧效果致使蒸汽含盐量升高,影响蒸汽的品质,影响锅炉的寿命这一问题。本文探讨即能保证除氧效果又保证蒸汽的品质,延长锅炉的寿命,同时又降低生产成本的除氧方法。%According to the chemical deoxidization method - vacuum treatment of steam injection boiler in oil field water , the addition of chemicals to improve the removal effect of salinity resulted in increase of saltness in steam, steam quality, affect the service life of the boiler this problem. This paper discusses that can guarantee the removal effect and ensure the steam quality, prolongs the service life of the boiler, and reduce the production cost of deoxidization method.

  6. A tutorial on testing the race model inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Minakata, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    , to faster responses to redundant signals. In contrast, coactivation models assume integrated processing of the combined stimuli. To distinguish between these two accounts, Miller (1982) derived the well-known race model inequality, which has become a routine test for behavioral data in experiments...... with redundant signals. In this tutorial, we review the basic properties of redundant signals experiments and current statistical procedures used to test the race model inequality during the period between 2011 and 2014. We highlight and discuss several issues concerning study design and the test of the race...... model inequality, such as inappropriate control of Type I error, insufficient statistical power, wrong treatment of omitted responses or anticipations and the interpretation of violations of the race model inequality. We make detailed recommendations on the design of redundant signals experiments...

  7. Tutorial on health economics and outcomes research in nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipson, Tomas; Linthicum, Mark T; Snider, Julia Thornton

    2014-11-01

    As healthcare costs climb around the world, public and private payers alike are demanding evidence of a treatment's value to support approval and reimbursement decisions. Health economics and outcomes research, or HEOR, offers tools to answer questions about a treatment's value, as well as its real-world effects and cost-effectiveness. Given that nutrition interventions have to compete for space in budgets along with biopharmaceutical products and devices, nutrition is now increasingly coming to be evaluated through HEOR. This tutorial introduces the discipline of HEOR and motivates its relevance for nutrition. We first define HEOR and explain its role and relevance in relation to randomized controlled trials. Common HEOR study types--including burden of illness, effectiveness studies, cost-effectiveness analysis, and valuation studies--are presented, with applications to nutrition. Tips for critically reading HEOR studies are provided, along with suggestions on how to use HEOR to improve patient care. Directions for future research are discussed.

  8. Cold bosons in optical lattices: a tutorial for exact diagonalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, David; Graß, Tobias; Lewenstein, Maciej; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Exact diagonalization (ED) techniques are a powerful method for studying many-body problems. Here, we apply this method to systems of few bosons in an optical lattice, and use it to demonstrate the emergence of interesting quantum phenomena such as fragmentation and coherence. Starting with a standard Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we first revise the characterisation of the superfluid to Mott insulator (MI) transitions. We then consider an inhomogeneous lattice, where one potential minimum is made much deeper than the others. The MI phase due to repulsive on-site interactions then competes with the trapping of all atoms in the deep potential. Finally, we turn our attention to attractively interacting systems, and discuss the appearance of strongly correlated phases and the onset of localisation for a slightly biased lattice. The article is intended to serve as a tutorial for ED of Bose-Hubbard models.

  9. Development of an interactive tutorial on quantum key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    DeVore, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development of a Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) on quantum key distribution, a context which involves a practical application of quantum mechanics. The QuILT helps upper-level undergraduate students learn quantum mechanics using a simple two state system and was developed based upon the findings of cognitive research and physics education research. One protocol used in the QuILT involves generating a random shared key over a public channel for encrypting and decrypting information using single photons with non-orthogonal polarization states, and another protocol makes use of two entangled spin-1/2 particles. The QuILT uses a guided approach and focuses on helping students build links between the formalism and conceptual aspects of quantum physics without compromising the technical content. We also discuss findings from a preliminary in-class evaluation.

  10. INFORMATION AND COMPLEXITY IN CONTROL SYSTEMS: A TUTORIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Leyi

    2001-01-01

    This is a tutorial paper which presents schematically theconcepts of information, uncertainty, and complexity, and their relationships in their applications to control systems. By focusing on exact or lower bounds on achievable performance in the presence of uncertainties, studies of complexity in a control system can potentially reveal fundamentally limiting factors of the system, suggest beneficial modifications to system structures and hardware configurations to remove these limitations, provide benchmark values for evaluating a design and for quantifying rooms for performance improvement, and demonstrate intrinsic tradeoffs. Compared to its counterparts in communications (Shannon's information theory), computations (computational complexity and information-based complexity), and approximations (n-widths and Kolmogorov entropy), studies of information and complexity in control systems encounter further challenges, such as characterization of feedback robustness, interaction between identification and control, and co-existence of deterministic and stochastic uncertainties. Some of these issues are outlined and discussed.

  11. WLCG Operations portal demo tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This is a navigation through http://wlcg-ops.web.cern.ch/ the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) Operations' portal. In this portal you will find documentation and information about WLCG Operation activities for: System Administrators at the WLCG sites LHC Experiments Operation coordination people, including Task Forces and Working Groups

  12. Student-Led Objective Tutorial (SLOT) in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagnanam, Gurusamy; Saraswathi, Simansalam; Rajasekaran, Aiyalu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose - To assess an innovative tutoring program named 'Student-Led Objective Tutorial' (SLOT) among undergraduate medical students. Method - The program was conceptualized by the Pharmacology Unit of Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Asian Institute of Medicine Science & Technology (AIMST), Malaysia and implemented in the middle of 2005. A cohort of 246 medical undergraduate students (spread across 5 consecutive batches) participated. Following a brief explanation on the purpose and nature of SLOT, each batch was divided into small groups and was given a reading assignment on 4 previously delivered lecture topics. Each group was asked to prepare 3-5 multiple choice questions (MCQs) of their own in PowerPoint format to be presented, in turns, to the whole class on the day of SLOT. The proceedings were facilitated by 2 lecturers. Student feedback on the efficacy and benefits were assessed through an anonymous self administered questionnaire. Results - About 76% (188) of the students favored SLOT. The acceptance rate of SLOT was higher among males. There was no significant difference between batches in their opinions on whether to pursue SLOT in future. The most prevalent positive comment was that SLOT enhanced learning skills, and the negative comment being, it consumed more time. Conclusions - SLOT is a novel tutorial method which can offset faculty shortage with advantages like enhanced interest among teachers and learners, uniform reach of content, opportunities for group learning, and involvement of visual aids as teaching-learning (T-L) method. SLOT unraveled the students' potential of peer tutoring both inside as well as outside the classroom. Consumer tutors (students) can be tapped as a resource for SLOT for all subjects and courses in healthcare teaching.

  13. The "magic" of tutorial centres in Hong Kong: An analysis of media marketing and pedagogy in a tutorial centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-12-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask these questions. This paper examines the phenomenon of tutorial centres in Hong Kong and seeks to understand what draws students to these centres. Combining theories of marketing semiotics and emotion studies, the author investigates the pivotal role of media marketing in generating the "magic" of tutorial centres, whose advertising strategy includes, for example, a display of billboard posters featuring stylishly-dressed "celebrity teachers". The author reviews some of the literature available on the subject of tutorial centres. In a case study approach, he then maps out the pedagogy he observed in an English tutorial class, seeking heuristic insights into the kind of teaching students in the study were looking for. He argues that part of the "magical" attraction of what are essentially "cram schools" is their formulaic pedagogy of teaching and reinforcing exam skills. Finally, the paper considers the social implications of the tutorial centre industry in terms of media marketing of education and unequal access to tutorial services.

  14. A Tutorial on Heuristic Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Werra, D. de; Silver, E.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper we define a heuristic method as a procedure for solving a well-defined mathematical problem by an intuitive approach in which the structure of the problem can be interpreted and exploited intelligently to obtain a reasonable solution. Issues discussed include: (i) the measurement...... of the quality of a heuristic method, (ii) different types of heuristic procedures, (iii) the interactive role of human beings and (iv) factors that may influence the choice or testing of heuristic methods. A large number of references are included....

  15. Effectiveness of student-led objective tutorials in pharmacology teaching to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Kriti; Hashilkar, Nayana Kamalnayan

    2016-10-01

    Current teaching in pharmacology is passive with less emphasis on clinical application. There is a need to incorporate newer instructional designs into pharmacology. Student-led objective tutorial (SLOT) is one of the novel designs to enhance interest among learners, provide opportunities for group learning, and facilitate self-directed learning. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of SLOTs over conventional tutorials (CTs) in pharmacology and to obtain feedback from the students regarding their perceptions about it. The regular batch of MBBS 2(nd) professional in pharmacology was randomly divided into two groups. Five topics from central nervous system (CNS) were selected. One group received SLOT as the instructional strategy, whereas the other group went through CTs. At the end of the module, a written test was conducted to assess the effectiveness of both strategies. The students provided feedback regarding their experience using a prevalidated questionnaire. The mean scores of both the groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test. There was no significant difference in the mean scores of the end of the module test. However, the overall passing percentage was significantly higher in the intervention group (P = 0.043). A total of 45.71% students favored it as a future tutorial method and expressed that SLOT enhanced their ability to learn independently. SLOT is an effective teaching-learning method to teach pharmacology to medical undergraduates. It enhances interest among learners and increases the ability to learn independently.

  16. [Development of integrated clinical abilities by simulated patient assisted problem-based learning tutorial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norose, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    In Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University, problem-based learning (PBL) has been introduced as a part of the laboratory and practice curriculum for all school years to promote active learning skills and enhance students' problem-solving ability. The PBL program at our school has been developed using a tutorial study based on scenarios and learning strategies, such as experiments and/or standardized patients (SPs) and role-playing, according to students' developmental stage and learning objectives. The course "Practice VIII/Principles of Clinical Communication" for the fifth-grade students is an example of the new PBL program to improve students' clinical communication skills and ability to design a care plan for patients. We divided 196 students into 49 groups (each group had 4 members). We used the large-class PBL model, in which the students had discussions with several facilitators. The students were presented with a patient-case scenario, in which they were first provided with a brief background of the patient. Afterward, students interviewed SPs to obtain detailed information, based on which a care plan was designed for each patient. Students role-played with SPs as a part of patient support, consulted using the patient care plan, and made Subjective information, Objective information, Assessment, and Plan (SOAP) notes at the end. Some students commented that the PBL program was very helpful in understanding how to design a patient care plan and that they understood the importance of communication in obtaining information for designing a patient care plan.

  17. The Effect of Group Discussion on the Quality of Life and HbA1c Levels of Adolescents With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Mohamad; Memarian, Robabe; Mohammadi, Esa

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic syndrome and the most common endocrine disorder in childhood and adolescence. Diabetes occurs at any age but the highest outbreak is during ten to 15 years of age and 75% of the cases are diagnosed at the age 18. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a group discussion on the quality of life (QOL) and glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c) levels of adolescents with diabetes. This quasi-experimental study was performed on 56 adolescents with diabetes who were referred to Golabchi Diabetes Center in Kashan, Iran. After obtaining written informed consent from the patients, blood sample was drawn for measuring sugar and HbA1c levels. The participants completed the questionnaire regarding the QOL. Patients were randomly allocated to four groups. All the groups attended similar group discussion sessions, which were conducted according to the guidance of diabetic specialists. The groups' members followed the discussed instructions for four months. Then, another questionnaire was completed and blood sugar and HbA1c levels were measured again. The results were compared by paired-samples t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. After the group discussion sessions, in 56% of the patients the HbA1c levels (8.45 ± 1.35 and 6.98 ± 0.89 before and after intervention, respectively) and QOL were improved significantly. The mean age of these patients was 14.75 ± 1.80 years and the mean of daily insulin injection was 35.70 ± 13.42 units. Sharing experiences trough group discussions and receiving instructive feedbacks can improve the QOL and metabolic status of adolescents with diabetes.

  18. The Internet, Images and Archaeology: ideas for interactive tutorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Wace

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a small-scale study into how the Internet might be used for tutorial teaching in archaeology, which was undertaken by the authors as part of their project work for a Teaching Diploma at Oxford University. A workshop was developed to explore how the Internet and image-rich resources online could be exploited within the curriculum, and in turn what changes might need to be made to that curriculum in order to embed a critical, reflective approach to student learning. The practicalities of using the computer in the classroom were also investigated, in terms of available facilities, staff and student training, and the impact of computers on staff-student dynamics. Condron was also involved in a more extensive study of the use of C&IT (communication and information technologies in small-group teaching across a range of subjects (the ASTER project, to which the Oxford case studies have contributed.

  19. Oracle support provides a range of new tutorials

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    CERN IT-DB Group is pleased to announce a new series of Oracle tutorials, with the proposed schedule:   Tuesday 23 April Introduction to Oracle & Tools (30-7-018 - Kjell Johnsen Auditorium) Tuesday 30 April Database Design & Security (30-7-018 - Kjell Johnsen Auditorium) Wednesday 8 May SQL (40-S2-C01 - Salle Curie)   Tuesday 21 May PL/SQL (30-7-018 - Kjell Johnsen Auditorium)   Monday 27 May Troubleshooting Performance (40-S2-C01 - Salle Curie) Wednesday 5 June Troubleshooting Performance - Case Studies (40-S2-C01 - Salle Curie) There is no need to register in advance. For more information, see the Indico agenda.

  20. Tutorial on Reed-Solomon error correction coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisel, William A.

    1990-01-01

    This tutorial attempts to provide a frank, step-by-step approach to Reed-Solomon (RS) error correction coding. RS encoding and RS decoding both with and without erasing code symbols are emphasized. There is no need to present rigorous proofs and extreme mathematical detail. Rather, the simple concepts of groups and fields, specifically Galois fields, are presented with a minimum of complexity. Before RS codes are presented, other block codes are presented as a technical introduction into coding. A primitive (15, 9) RS coding example is then completely developed from start to finish, demonstrating the encoding and decoding calculations and a derivation of the famous error-locator polynomial. The objective is to present practical information about Reed-Solomon coding in a manner such that it can be easily understood.

  1. The SIKS/BiGGrid Big Data Tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Lammerts, Evert; de Vries, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The School for Information and Knowledge Systems SIKS and the Dutch e-science grid BiG Grid organized a new two-day tutorial on Big Data at the University of Twente on 30 November and 1 December 2011, just preceding the Dutch-Belgian Database Day. The tutorial is on top of some exciting new

  2. Developing and Testing a Video Tutorial for Software Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, van der Hans

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Video tutorials for software training are rapidly becoming popular. A set of dedicated guidelines for the construction of such tutorials was recently advanced in Technical Communication (Van der Meij & Van der Meij, 2013). The present study set out to assess the cognitive and motivational e

  3. The SIKS/BiGGrid Big Data Tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Lammerts, Evert; Vries, de Arjen P.

    2011-01-01

    The School for Information and Knowledge Systems SIKS and the Dutch e-science grid BiG Grid organized a new two-day tutorial on Big Data at the University of Twente on 30 November and 1 December 2011, just preceding the Dutch-Belgian Database Day. The tutorial is on top of some exciting new developm

  4. The SIKS/BiGGrid Big Data Tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Lammerts, Evert; de Vries, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The School for Information and Knowledge Systems SIKS and the Dutch e-science grid BiG Grid organized a new two-day tutorial on Big Data at the University of Twente on 30 November and 1 December 2011, just preceding the Dutch-Belgian Database Day. The tutorial is on top of some exciting new developm

  5. Evaluating Best Practices for Video Tutorials: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Thomas; Putnam Davis, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This article will explore one library's experience creating best practices for the creation of video tutorials. First, a literature review establishes the best practices other creators have used. Then, the authors apply these best practices to the creation of their first video tutorial. Finally, they evaluate the usefulness of each practice in…

  6. SPIN Tutorial: How to Become a SPIN Doctor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruys, T.C.; Bosnacki, D.; Leue, S.

    2002-01-01

    SPIN is a model checker for the verification of software systems. SPIN uses a high level language called PROMELA to specify systems descriptions. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce novice users to both PROMELA and SPIN. The tutorial itself is divided into two parts. The BASIC SPIN part is tar

  7. XACC 280 UOP Tutorial Course/Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    anemone222

    2015-01-01

    For More Course Tutorials Visit www.uoptutorial.com             1.      Assignment: Journalizing, Posting, and Preparing a Trial Balance   ·         Complete P2-2A on p. 81 of Financial Accounting, using the templates in Appendix C for your answers. Each part of the problem corresponds to one tab in Appendix C. Complete all three tabs of Appendix C. ...

  8. SOC 120 ASH Tutorial course/ Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Crichton

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uoptutorial.com     SOC 120 WEEK 1 DQ 1 RELATIVISM SOC 120 WEEK 1 DQ 2 EGOISM AND ALTRUISM SOC 120 WEEK 2 DQ 1 SCHOOL PRAYER SOC 120 WEEK 2 DQ 2 RESPONSIBILITY AND REWARD SOC 120 WEEK 2 RELATIVISM AND MORALITY SOC 120 WEEK 3 DQ 1 DEATH PENALTY SOC 120 WEEK 3 DQ 2 FUTURE GENERATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT SOC 120 WEEK 3 ROUGH DRAFT OF FINAL PAPER ON ETHICS THEORY SOC 120 WEEK 4 DQ 1 PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE ...

  9. MGT 401 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Strategic Management Process Paper (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 Class Activity Week 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Learning Team Business Model Comparison Example (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Class Activity (Ash) MGT 401 Week 3 Individual Assignment Business Plan Evaluation (Ash) ...

  10. MGT 330 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    alfoniz

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 330 Week 1 Individual Assignment Functions of Management Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 3 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Team Assignment External Internal Factors Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Individual Assignment Delegation (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 W...

  11. HIS 103 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 1

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 1 (Transition to Agriculture) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 2 (Early Complex Societies) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Assignment (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Assignment Greco Roman Influence Paper (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 1 Chinese Social and Political Order Systems (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 2 Caste System (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 3 Assignment Black Death Dra...

  12. MAT 126 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    stylia

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 126 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Written Assignment (Arithmetic and geometric sequence) (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Assignment Is It Fat Free (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Assignment Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126...

  13. Endnote Web tutorial for BJCVS/RBCCV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Aurélio Barboza de Oliveira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAt present, many useful tools for reference management are available for use. They can be either off-line softwares or accessible Websites to all users in the internet. Their target is to facilitate the production of scientific text. But, to accomplish that, the featured bibliographic style should be effectively inserted, and the program has to be free. Here in this tutorial, we present Endnote Web®, a bibliographic reference management program comprising these two requirements: it contains the Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery reference format and its use is free for charge after sign-in in IP registered terminal in Web of Science®.

  14. Endnote Web tutorial for BJCVS/RBCCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Santos, Carlos Alberto dos; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Sciarra, Adília Maria Pires; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    At present, many useful tools for reference management are available for use. They can be either off-line softwares or accessible Websites to all users in the internet. Their target is to facilitate the production of scientific text. But, to accomplish that, the featured bibliographic style should be effectively inserted, and the program has to be free. Here in this tutorial, we present Endnote Web®, a bibliographic reference management program comprising these two requirements: it contains the Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery reference format and its use is free for charge after sign-in in IP registered terminal in Web of Science®.

  15. Endnote Web tutorial for BJCVS/RBCCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Sciarra, Adília Maria Pires; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    At present, many useful tools for reference management are available for use. They can be either off-line softwares or accessible Websites to all users in the internet. Their target is to facilitate the production of scientific text. But, to accomplish that, the featured bibliographic style should be effectively inserted, and the program has to be free. Here in this tutorial, we present Endnote Web®, a bibliographic reference management program comprising these two requirements: it contains the Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery reference format and its use is free for charge after sign-in in IP registered terminal in Web of Science®. PMID:26107457

  16. BIS 220 Tutorials /bis220dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    ramya85

    2015-01-01

    BIS 220 Entire Course   For more course tutorials visit www.bis220.com   BIS 220 Week 1 Individual Assignment Information Technology Acts Paper BIS 220 Week 1 DQ 1 BIS 220 Week 1 DQ 2 BIS 220 Week 2 LT Reflection Summary BIS 220 Week 2 Individual Assignment Information Systems Proposal BIS 220 Week 2 DQ 1 BIS 220 Week 2 DQ 2 BIS 220 Week 3 Individual Assignment Types of Electronic Commerce Activity BIS 220 Week 3 LT Reflection Summ...

  17. CJS 220 Tutorials / cjs220dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    sunshine38

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.cjs220.com   CJS 220 Week 1 DQ 1 and DQ 2 CJS 220 Week 2 Checkpoint Structure of the Courts CJS 220 Week 2 Individual Law Opinion Paper CJS 220 Week 3 Checkpoint Due Process CJS 220 Week 3 Checkpoint Legal Defenses CJS 220 Week 3 DQ 1 and DQ 2 CJS 220 Week 4 Checkpoint Attorney Client Confidentiality   CJS 220 Week 4 Individual Assignment Prosecution Versus Defense Paper CJS 220 Week 5 Checkpoint Path to...

  18. BIS 220 Tutorials / bis220dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    rajitha82

    2015-01-01

    BIS 220 Entire Course   For more course tutorials visit www.bis220.com   BIS 220 Week 1 Individual Assignment Information Technology Acts Paper BIS 220 Week 1 DQ 1 BIS 220 Week 1 DQ 2 BIS 220 Week 2 LT Reflection Summary BIS 220 Week 2 Individual Assignment Information Systems Proposal BIS 220 Week 2 DQ 1 BIS 220 Week 2 DQ 2 BIS 220 Week 3 Individual Assignment Types of Electronic Commerce Activity BIS 220 Week 3 LT Reflection Summ...

  19. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bord, Sarah [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  20. 高校网站群建设与管理探讨%Discussion on University Website Group Construction and Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗南

    2015-01-01

    The construction and management of the University''s existing websites has brought a series of problems. The con-struction of the website group system, can avoid a group of websites bring about various drawbacks. This paper discusses the solutions of university website group construction and management.%高校现有网站的建设和管理带来了一系列问题,建设网站群系统,可以避免一群网站所带来的各种弊端.文章探讨了高校网站群建设与管理的解决方案.