WorldWideScience

Sample records for group deaf students

  1. Supporting Deaf Students--and All Students

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    Yuknis, Christina; Santini, Joseph; Appanah, Thangi

    2017-01-01

    Two faculty members and a Ph.D. student at Gallaudet University, the world's only university for the deaf, explain the concept of Deaf-Gain, which reframes the idea of hearing loss into one of gaining deafness and recognizes the contributions that deaf people make to society. This narrative assumes that deaf students and all students bring…

  2. Deafness, Teacher-of-the-Deaf Support and Self-Concept in Australian Deaf Students

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    Remine, Maria D.; Care, Esther; Grbic, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether self-concept scores of deaf students vary according to age at diagnosis of deafness, the degree of deafness and the number of visits students receive from a teacher of the deaf. Thirty-seven deaf students between the ages of 12 and 18 attending inclusive educational settings in Western Australia participated in the…

  3. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

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    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  4. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

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    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  5. Reading process and Language education Linguistic, educational and political aspects regarding two groups in Uruguay: Deaf students and University students

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    Juan Andrés Larrinaga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present some current issues in linguistic education within the public system of education in Uruguay. First I will review the situation of two groups that can be considered excluded: the mass of entering students at the Universidad de la República (UdelaR that drop out in large percentages in the different schools and the Deaf, who only recently have increased their participation in higher levels of formal education. Then, more specifically, I will relate the exclusion to some aspects of their linguistic education, focusing on their reading practices. Finally, some thought will be given to possible ways of improving or increasing the interventions of the formal system with regard to linguistic education. // Este trabajo tiene como objetivo presentar algunos asuntos relevantes sobre la formación lingüística de nuestros estudiantes en el sistema público de educación en Uruguay. Primero se presentarán dos grupos que se pueden considerar excluidos: el grupo de estudiantes que ingresa cada año a la Universidad de la República (UdelaR, de los que egresa un bajo porcentaje dado que muchos abandonan sus estudios en el primer año, y los Sordos, que tradicionalmente han tenido poca participación en el sistema educativo formal y sólo recientemente se los encuentra participando más en los niveles intermedio y superior del sistema educativo. Luego, más específicamente, relacionaremos la mencionada exclusión con la educación lingüística, enfocándonos en las prácticas de lectura. Finalmente, reflexionaremos sobre posibles formas de mejorar o incrementar las intervenciones del sistema educativo en la formación lingüística.

  6. Crossing the Communication Barrier: Facilitating Communication in Mixed Groups of Deaf and Hearing Students

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    Marchetti, Carol; Foster, Susan; Long, Gary; Stinson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of introductory technical courses such as statistics face numerous challenges in the classroom, including student motivation and mathematical background, and difficulties in interpreting numerical results in context. Cooperative learning through small groups addresses many such challenges, but students for whom spoken English is not their…

  7. A Phenomenological Study of Online Learning for Deaf Students in Postsecondary Education: A Deaf Perspective

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    Wooten, Patricia Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the effects of online learning for deaf college students as opposed to the mainstream classroom setting. This study specifically analyzed the writing and reading skills of deaf students in general and the development of English literacy of prelingually deaf students and those from non-English…

  8. Deaf college students' perspectives on literacy portfolios.

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    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    The study examined how literacy portfolios were used as tools in a college developmental English class in which deaf students assessed their reading comprehension as well as their writing processes and products. The students' reading and writing assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Immediate feedback was provided. The study was multidimensional, longitudinal, and ongoing. A variety of field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences of portfolios in regard to students' reading, writing, and reflective thinking. The results support the idea that the use of literacy portfolios can positively influence students who are deaf when they assess their reading and writing abilities.

  9. Deaf Students' Metacognitive Awareness during Language Comprehension

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    Morrison, Carolyn; Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Convertino, Carol M.; Borgna, Georgianna; Dirmyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This study explored deaf and hearing university students' metacognitive awareness with regard to comprehension difficulties during reading and classroom instruction. Utilising the Reading Awareness Inventory (Milholic, V. 1994. "An inventory to pique students' metacognitive awareness of reading strategies." "Journal of Reading"…

  10. Personal factors that influence deaf college students' academic success.

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    Albertini, John A; Kelly, Ronald R; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the Noel-Levitz College Student Inventory Form B and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, second edition (LASSI). Entering students in 3 successive cohorts (total n =437) participated in this study. Results show that in addition to entry measurements of reading and mathematic skills, personal factors contributed to the academic performance of students in their first quarter in college. The Noel-Levitz provided the comparatively better predictive value of academic performance: Motivation for Academic Study Scale (e.g., desire to finish college). The LASSI also showed statistically significant predictors, the Self-Regulation Component (e.g., time management) and Will Component (e.g., self-discipline), but accounted for relatively less variability in the students' initial grade point averages. For this group of underprepared students, results show that personal factors can play a significant role in academic success. Deaf students' personal factors are discussed as they relate to other first-year college students and to their subsequent academic performance and persistence.

  11. Deaf College Students' Perspectives on Literacy Portfolios.

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    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    This study examined use of literacy portfolios in a college developmental English class in which students who are deaf assessed their reading comprehension, writing processes, and products. Assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Various field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences…

  12. Effectiveness of psychodrama with pantomime on the social adjustment of deaf female students

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    Salar Faramarzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Deaf children face several compatibility issues because of their hearing impairment. The present study aims to investigate the effectiveness of psychodrama using pantomime on the social adjustment of 12-15-year-old deaf female students in Isfahan.Methods: For this study, an experimental design was used with a pre-test and post-test and a control group. Thirty deaf subjects (12-15-year-olds in Isfahan were selected randomly and allocated to experimental and control groups. To gather information, Rao’s Social Maturity Scale was used. The data were analyzed by the multivariate analysis of covariance s tatistical method (SPSS version 21.Results: Our findings revealed that there was a significant difference between the performances of deaf students of both the groups in the post-test on social adjustment (p=0.0001.Conclusion: The use of psychodrama increased the rate of social adjustment in deaf students.

  13. Respiratory behavior in groups of deaf and non-deaf GFF male mice.

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    Stupfel, M; Busnel, M C; Molin, D; Thierry, H; Gourlet, V

    1984-05-01

    Carbon dioxide emission (VCO2) of groups of 10 GFF mice, genetically deaf and non-deaf, were compared, in controlled conditions of temperature 20-21 degrees C, humidity 50-80% and light (LD12:12; L = 108 lux). A circadian rhythm of VCO2 was evidenced in both genotypes, with levels in D and in L significantly (0.001 less than p less than 0.01) greater in deaf than in non-deaf mice. Photic VCO2 variations were significantly (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) smaller at L----D and D----L in the deaf than in non-deaf genotype. Ultradian (tau greater than 20 minutes) rhythms were evidenced in both genotypes; Fourier periodic analysis showed several significant (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) differences between these 2 genotypes concerning mainly amplitudes, whilst spectral analysis showed slight frequency differences between them. Survival to an acute nitrogen hypoxia or to an acute carbon monoxide intoxication which was significantly (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.05) lower in deaf than in non-deaf individuals confirms the differences in respiratory behavior of groups of these two strains of mice.

  14. Learning via direct and mediated instruction by deaf students.

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    Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patricia; Convertino, Carol; Pelz, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments investigated classroom learning by deaf college students receiving lectures from instructors signing for themselves or using interpreters. Deaf students' prior content knowledge, scores on postlecture assessments of content learning, and gain scores were compared to those of hearing classmates. Consistent with prior research, deaf students, on average, came into and left the classroom with less content knowledge than hearing peers, and use of simultaneous communication (sign and speech together) and American Sign Language (ASL) apparently were equally effective for deaf students' learning of the material. Students' self-rated sign language skills were not significantly related to performance. Two new findings were of particular importance. First, direct and mediated instruction (via interpreting) were equally effective for deaf college students under the several conditions employed here. Second, despite coming into the classroom with the disadvantage of having less content knowledge, deaf students' gain scores generally did not differ from those of their hearing peers. Possible explanations for these findings are considered.

  15. Visual spatial representation in mathematical problem solving by deaf and hearing students.

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    Blatto-Vallee, Gary; Kelly, Ronald R; Gaustad, Martha G; Porter, Jeffrey; Fonzi, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the use of visual-spatial representation by deaf and hearing students while solving mathematical problems. The connection between spatial skills and success in mathematics performance has long been established in the literature. This study examined the distinction between visual-spatial "schematic" representations that encode the spatial relations described in a problem versus visual-spatial "pictorial" representations that encode only the visual appearance of the objects described in a problem. A total of 305 hearing (n = 156) and deaf (n = 149) participants from middle school, high school, and college participated in this study. At all educational levels, the hearing students performed significantly better in solving the mathematical problems compared to their deaf peers. Although the deaf baccalaureate students exhibited the highest performance of all the deaf participants, they only performed as well as the hearing middle school students who were the lowest scoring hearing group. Deaf students remained flat in their performance on the mathematical problem-solving task from middle school through the college associate degree level. The analysis of the students' problem representations showed that the hearing participants utilized visual-spatial schematic representation to a greater extent than did the deaf participants. However, the use of visual-spatial schematic representations was a stronger positive predictor of mathematical problem-solving performance for the deaf students. When deaf students' problem representation focused simply on the visual-spatial pictorial or iconic aspects of the mathematical problems, there was a negative predictive relationship with their problem-solving performance. On two measures of visual-spatial abilities, the hearing students in high school and college performed significantly better than their deaf peers.

  16. Ambiguity--A Tool or Obstacle for Joint Productive Dialogue Activity in Deaf and Hearing Students' Reasoning about Ecology

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    Molander, Bengt-Olov; Hallden, Ola; Lindahl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The ambiguity of words and signs as a resource or obstacle in group discussions is studied. How deaf and hearing students aged 13-15 years elaborate on ecological concepts through dialogue is described. Group interviews were conducted with 14 hearing and 18 deaf students. Probes were used to initiate discussion about the different meanings of…

  17. Access to English Language Acquisition in Ghana Schools for the Deaf: Are the Deaf Students Handicapped?

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    Obosu, Gideon Kwesi; Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia; Deku, Prosper

    2016-01-01

    This paper primarily discusses the challenges deaf students in Ghana are likely to grapple with as they access education provided for them in English language. The arguments discussed in this paper are supported by findings from a multiple site case study of five Schools for the Deaf purposively sampled from four regions of Ghana. Observations…

  18. Don't Assume Deaf Students are Visual Learners.

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    Marschark, Marc; Paivio, Allan; Spencer, Linda J; Durkin, Andreana; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Machmer, Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    In the education of deaf learners, from primary school to postsecondary settings, it frequently is suggested that deaf students are visual learners. That assumption appears to be based on the visual nature of signed languages-used by some but not all deaf individuals-and the fact that with greater hearing losses, deaf students will rely relatively more on vision than audition. However, the questions of whether individuals with hearing loss are more likely to be visual learners than verbal learners or more likely than hearing peers to be visual learners have not been empirically explored. Several recent studies, in fact, have indicated that hearing learners typically perform as well or better than deaf learners on a variety of visual-spatial tasks. The present study used two standardized instruments to examine learning styles among college deaf students who primarily rely on sign language or spoken language and their hearing peers. The visual-verbal dimension was of particular interest. Consistent with recent indirect findings, results indicated that deaf students are no more likely than hearing students to be visual learners and are no stronger in their visual skills and habits than their verbal skills and habits, nor are deaf students' visual orientations associated with sign language skills. The results clearly have specific implications for the educating of deaf learners.

  19. Inclusive instruction and learning for deaf students in postsecondary education.

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    Foster, S; Long, G; Snell, K

    1999-01-01

    This article explores how students who are deaf and their instructors experience mainstream college classes. Both quantitative and qualitative procedures were used to examine student access to information and their sense of belonging and engagement in learning. Instructors were asked to discuss their approach to teaching and any instructional modifications made to address the needs of deaf learners. Results indicate that deaf students viewed classroom communication and engagement in a similar manner as their hearing peers. Deaf students were more concerned about the pace of instruction and did not feel as much a part of the 'university family' as did their hearing peers. Faculty generally indicated that they made few if any modifications for deaf students and saw support service faculty as responsible for the success or failure of these students. We discuss results of these and additional findings with regard to barriers to equal access and strategies for overcoming these barriers.

  20. The Deaf Mentoring Survey: A Community Cultural Wealth Framework for Measuring Mentoring Effectiveness with Underrepresented Students

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    Braun, Derek C.; Gormally, Cara; Clark, M. Diane

    2017-01-01

    Disabled individuals, women, and individuals from cultural/ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Research has shown that mentoring improves retention for underrepresented individuals. However, existing mentoring surveys were developed to assess the majority population, not underrepresented individuals. We describe the development of a next-generation mentoring survey built upon capital theory and critical race theory. It emphasizes community cultural wealth, thought to be instrumental to the success of individuals from minority communities. Our survey targets relationships between deaf mentees and their research mentors and includes Deaf community cultural wealth. From our results, we identified four segregating factors: Being a Scientist, which incorporated the traditional capitals; Deaf Community Capital; Asking for Accommodations; and Communication Access. Being a Scientist scores did not vary among the mentor and mentee variables that we tested. However, Deaf Community Capital, Asking for Accommodations, and Communication Access were highest when a deaf mentee was paired with a mentor who was either deaf or familiar with the Deaf community, indicating that cultural competency training should improve these aspects of mentoring for deaf mentees. This theoretical framework and survey will be useful for assessing mentoring relationships with deaf students and could be adapted for other underrepresented groups. PMID:28188283

  1. Critical teaching incidents. Recollections of deaf college students.

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    Lang, H G; Dowaliby, F J; Anderson, H P

    1994-03-01

    In interviews with 56 deaf college students, we collected accounts of 839 "critical incidents" describing effective and ineffective teaching. From those incidents, 33 specific teaching characteristics were derived and were analyzed in relation to teacher, student, and course variables. Our primary goal was to identify the teaching characteristics underlying deaf students' recollections about their classroom learning experiences. The most frequently mentioned characteristics are similar to those found in studies of hearing college students, particularly within the domain of Teacher Affect. The teacher's ability to communicate clearly in sign language, however, was not only a characteristic unique to deaf college students but also the most frequently occurring characteristic of effective teaching in this study.

  2. Vocabulary Knowledge of Deaf and Hearing Postsecondary Students

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    Sarchet, Thomastine; Marschark, Marc; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Sapere, Patricia; Dirmyer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Deaf children generally are found to have smaller English vocabularies than hearing peers, although studies involving children with cochlear implants have suggested that the gap may decrease or disappear with age. Less is known about the vocabularies of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) postsecondary students or how their vocabulary knowledge relates…

  3. Text Revision in Deaf and Hearing Bilingual Students

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    Teruggi, Lilia A.; Gutiérrez-Cáceres, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    In this study we explored the revision process and strategies implemented by deaf and hearing students who attend the same bilingual school context (LIS and Italian). For that we analysed and compared the types and quality of revisions made by deaf and hearing participants to their first draft of a narrative text ("Frog, Where Are You?")…

  4. Guide to Working with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

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    PEPNet, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This handbook was created for professors, high school teachers and vocational teachers new to interacting with Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. Topics include a general understanding of deafness, classroom accommodations, and communication tips. Appendices include: (1) A Professor Shares His Experience; (2) A Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor…

  5. An analysis of the reading strategies used by adult and student deaf readers.

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    Banner, Alyssa; Wang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and examine effective reading strategies used by adult deaf readers compared with student deaf readers. There were a total of 11 participants: 5 deaf adults ranging from 27 to 36 years and 6 deaf students ranging from 16 to 20 years. Assessment methods included interview and think-aloud procedures in which individuals were interrupted 3 times during the reading of a text to answer questions about their internal cognitive processes. It was found that both student and adult groups had highly skilled readers who demonstrated higher level reading strategies and less skilled readers who demonstrated lower level strategies, and only the highest skilled reader demonstrated both breadth and depth of strategies in all three categories: "constructing meaning," "monitoring and improving comprehension," and "evaluating comprehension." The study contributes evidence toward two identified gaps in the existing body of research: (a) the lack of investigation into the reading strategies utilized by deaf readers in text comprehension and (b) the overemphasis of most research on studying less skilled deaf readers while overlooking highly proficient deaf readers.

  6. Investigating how high school deaf students spend their leisure time

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    Allahyar Arabmomeni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on deaf students' interests in spending their leisure times. We design a questionnaire and distribute among all deaf students who are enrolled in high schools in two provinces of Iran. The questionnaire consists of three parts, in the first part, we ask female and male deaf students about their interests in various entertainment activities in Likert scale. In terms of gender, we find out that walking inside or outside house is number one favorite exercise for female students while male students mostly prefer to walk on the streets. Although male students prefer to go biking or running activities, female students prefer to go for picnic or similar activities. This could be due to limitations on female for running or biking inside cities. While going to picnic with members of family or friends is the third popular activity for male students, stretching exercises is third most popular activity among female students. Breathing exercise is the fourth most popular activity among both male and female students. The second part of the survey is associated with the barriers for having no exercise among deaf students. According to our survey, while lack of good attention from public and ordinary people on exercising deaf students is believed to be number one barrier among male students, female students blame lack of transportation facilities as the most important barrier. However, both female and male students believe these two items are the most important factors preventing them to exercise. Lack of awareness for exercising deaf students and lack of good recreational facilities are the third most important barriers among male and female students. The last part of the survey attempted to detect important entertainment activities. Watching TV, entertaining with mobile devices, chatting with friends and watching DVD or movies were the most important items influencing deaf students' free times.DOI: 10.5267/j.msl.2012

  7. The role of music in deaf culture: deaf students' perception of emotion in music.

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    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Although emotional interpretation of music is an individual and variable experience, researchers have found that typical listeners are quite consistent in associating basic or primary emotions such as happiness, sadness, fear, and anger to musical compositions. It has been suggested that an individual with a sensorineural hearing loss, or any lesion in auditory perceptors in the brain may have trouble perceiving music emotionally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether students with a hearing loss who associate with the deaf culture, assign the same emotions to music as students without a hearing loss. Sixty-two elementary and junior high students at a Midwestern state school for the deaf and students at neighboring elementary and junior high schools served as participants. Participants at the state school for the deaf had hearing losses ranging from moderate to severe. Twelve film score excerpts, composed to depict the primary emotions-happiness, sadness, and fear, were used as the musical stimuli. Participants were asked to assign an emotion to each excerpt. Results indicated a significant difference between the Deaf and typical hearing participants' responses, with hearing participants' responses more in agreement with the composers' intent. No significant differences were found for age or gender. Analyses of the Deaf participants' responses indicate that timbre, texture, and rhythm are perhaps the musical elements most influential in transmitting emotion to persons with a hearing loss. Adaptive strategies are suggested for assisting children who are deaf in accessing the elements of music intended to portray emotion.

  8. Comprehension of Written Grammar Test: Reliability and Known-Groups Validity Study With Hearing and Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students.

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    Cannon, Joanna E; Hubley, Anita M; Millhoff, Courtney; Mazlouman, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to gather validation evidence for the Comprehension of Written Grammar (CWG; Easterbrooks, 2010) receptive test of 26 grammatical structures of English print for use with children who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH). Reliability and validity data were collected for 98 participants (49 DHH and 49 hearing) in Grades 2-6. The objectives were to: (a) examine 4-week test-retest reliability data; and (b) provide evidence of known-groups validity by examining expected differences between the groups on the CWG vocabulary pretest and main test, as well as selected structures. Results indicated excellent test-retest reliability estimates for CWG test scores. DHH participants performed statistically significantly lower on the CWG vocabulary pretest and main test than the hearing participants. Significantly lower performance by DHH participants on most expected grammatical structures (e.g., basic sentence patterns, auxiliary "be" singular/plural forms, tense, comparatives, and complementation) also provided known groups evidence. Overall, the findings of this study showed strong evidence of the reliability of scores and known group-based validity of inferences made from the CWG.

  9. Teaching strategies in inclusive classrooms with deaf students.

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    Cawthon, S W

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teacher speech and educational philosophies in inclusive classrooms with deaf and hearing students. Data were collected from language transcripts, classroom observations, and teacher interviews. Total speech output, Mean Length Utterance, proportion of questions to statements, and proportion of open to closed questions were calculated for each teacher. Teachers directed fewer utterances, on average, to deaf than to hearing students but showed different language patterns on the remaining measures. Inclusive philosophies focused on an individualized approach to teaching, attention to deaf culture, advocacy, smaller class sizes, and an openness to diversity in the classroom. The interpreters' role in the classroom included translating teacher speech, voicing student sign language, mediating communication between deaf students and their peers, and monitoring overall classroom behavior.

  10. The Effectiveness of Emotional Intelligence Training on the Mental Health of Male Deaf Students.

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    Masoume Pourmohamadreza-Tajrishi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deafness is a common neural-sensory impairment which leads to lower life quality, withdrawal, social activities reduction, and rejection feeling. So, it is important to plan suitable training programs for mental health promotion of deaf children. Emotional intelligence training is one of these programs. The present study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of emotional intelligence training on the mental health of deaf students.In this semi-experimental study with pretest and posttest design, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ was completed in 40 randomly selected boy deaf students with mean age of (12.48 years old before and after the intervention. The aim of the questionnaire was obtaining information of somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression as well as general health. The students were assigned in experimental and control group randomly and in equal. Experimental group participated in 12 sessions (each session lasts for 50 minutes; twice a week and were trained by emotional intelligence program, but control group did not. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA was used for analyzing the data.There was a significant difference (P<0.001 between experimental and control group according to somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and general health as a whole after participation in intervention sessions.There was a significant decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and increase in general health of experimental group. Our findings showed that emotional intelligence training program led to promote of general health of boy deaf students.

  11. Magic Finger Teaching Method in Learning Multiplication Facts among Deaf Students

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    Thai, Liong; Yasin, Mohd. Hanafi Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students face problems in mastering multiplication facts. This study aims to identify the effectiveness of Magic Finger Teaching Method (MFTM) and students' perception towards MFTM. The research employs a quasi experimental with non-equivalent pre-test and post-test control group design. Pre-test, post-test and questionnaires were used. As…

  12. Bullying and Cyberbullying among Deaf Students and Their Hearing Peers: An Exploratory Study

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    Bauman, Sheri; Pero, Heather

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire on bullying and cyberbullying was administered to 30 secondary students (Grades 7-12) in a charter school for the Deaf and hard of hearing and a matched group of 22 hearing students in a charter secondary school on the same campus. Because the sample size was small and distributions non-normal, results are primarily descriptive and…

  13. Understanding communication among deaf students who sign and speak: a trivial pursuit?

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    Marschark, Marc; Convertino, Carol M; Macias, Gayle; Monikowski, Christine M; Sapere, Patricia; Seewagen, Rosemarie

    2007-01-01

    Classroom communication between deaf students was modeled using a question-and-answer game. Participants consisted of student pairs that relied on spoken language, pairs that relied on American Sign Language (ASL), and mixed pairs in which one student used spoken language and one signed. Although the task encouraged students to request clarification of messages they did not understand, such requests were rare, and did not vary across groups. Face-to-face communication was relatively poor in all groups. Students in the ASL group understood questions more readily than students who relied on oral communication. Although comprehension was low for all groups, those using oral communication provided more correct free responses, although the numbers were low; no significant differences existed for multiple-choice responses. Results are discussed in terms of the possibility that many deaf students have developed lower criteria for comprehension, and related challenges for classroom communication access.

  14. GROUP OF HEARING MOTHERS OF DEAF CHILDREN: INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE REPORT

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    Rafaela Fava de Quevedo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This experience report describes a group phenomenon, based upon a case study of a group of hearing mothers of deaf children. The weekly group, in operation for over three years, provides support for families with deaf children. At first, observations were made in the group for a subsequent analysis of the data and act on interventions. Categories containing the main features that emerged in the group were created in order to discuss the content found. The categories addressed by mothers included: independence/autonomy of the child; adolescence and sexuality; discovery of deafness and reorganization of family dynamics; and matters beyond the group goal. As for the categories related to the group process there are: resistance; containing function of the coordinator; transfer; interventions in the group field. The results lead to understanding the group as a facilitator and as a necessary support for the participants. Before that, interventions were carried out to expand the space for reflection offered by the group, which provides adaptations to the different situations experienced by the participants.

  15. Text Composition by Deaf and Hearing Middle-School Students: The Role of Working Memory

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    Alamargot, Denis; Lambert, Eric; Thebault, Claire; Dansac, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the compositional performances of deaf and hearing students and to investigate the relationships between these performances and working memory capacities. Fifteen prelingually deaf, sign-using students and 15 hearing students composed a descriptive text and performed working memory tasks. The deaf students had…

  16. Minicourses for Deaf Students in the Intermediate Grades

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    Anderson, Peter E.; Shepard, Charlotte H.

    1977-01-01

    A minicourse program with students from grades four through eight at the Oregon State School for the Deaf has been rewarding for teachers and students by serving to develop skills in immediate practical areas of the student's experience as well as in developing recreational skills and interests in such activities as chess, mime, and karate, and…

  17. Welcoming Students Who Are Deaf-Blind into Typical Classrooms: Facilitating School Participation, Learning, and Friendships.

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    Haring, Norris G., Ed.; Romer, Lyle T., Ed.

    This collection of 18 papers focuses on the inclusion of students who are deaf-blind in regular classrooms. Papers include: (1) "Inclusion of Students Who Are Deaf-Blind: What Does the Future Hold?" (Lori Goetz); (2) "A History of Federal Support for Students with Deaf-Blindness" (R. Paul Thompson and Charles W. Freeman); (3)…

  18. Deaf Students' Metacognitive Awareness during Language Comprehension

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    Morrison, Carolyn; Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Convertino, Carol M.; Borgna, Georgianna; Dirmyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This study explored deaf and hearing university students' metacognitive awareness with regard to comprehension difficulties during reading and classroom instruction. Utilising the Reading Awareness Inventory (Milholic, V. 1994. "An inventory to pique students' metacognitive awareness of reading strategies." "Journal of…

  19. Rewriting: What Do Deaf Students Do When They Revise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Kathleen A.; Sarachan-Deily, Ann Beth

    The study investigated revision skills of 20 deaf secondary students (10 good writers and 10 poor writers). Students were asked to write and then revise their draft. Feature analytical rating was completed on each S's draft and revision, with scoring performed on content, linguistic considerations, and surface mechanics (spelling, punctuation,…

  20. Reading Comprehension of an Inferential Text by Deaf Students with Cochlear Implants Using Cued Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Santiago; Rodriguez, Jose-Miguel; Garcia-Orza, Javier; Calleja, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the ability of children who are profoundly deaf to reach high levels of reading proficiency on an inferential reading task. In an experimental narrative reading task, four children with prelingual hearing loss who used cued speech (MOC group) were compared with 58 students with typical hearing: 30 peers at the…

  1. Access to Communication for Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing and ESL Students in Blended Learning Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Long

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to better understand student perceptions of communication in blended (online and traditional learning courses, a 22 item questionnaire was developed and sent to all students registered for these courses at a large technology-focused college during three quarters of instruction. The respondents were divided into four groups: 1 hearing, 2 deaf, 3 hard-of-hearing (D/HH, and 3 English as a second language (ESL. Their perceptions of communication and the blended learning experience were examined. While the hearing and ESL students were positive about blended learning, the findings indicated that deaf and hard-of-hearing students reported that both the quality and quantity of their interactions with the professor and other students was greatly improved by the inclusion of an online component. ESL and hearing students were also positive about the blended experience; but the greatest benefit to communication access was observed by students with a hearing loss.

  2. Self-Esteem of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Regular and Special Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesar, Irena; Smrtnik Vitulic, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on the self-esteem of deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) students from Slovenia. A total of 80 D/HH students from regular and special primary schools (grades 6-9) and from regular and special secondary schools (grades 1-4) completed the Self-Esteem Questionnaire (Lamovec 1994). For the entire group of D/HH students, the results of…

  3. Self-Esteem of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Regular and Special Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesar, Irena; Smrtnik Vitulic, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on the self-esteem of deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) students from Slovenia. A total of 80 D/HH students from regular and special primary schools (grades 6-9) and from regular and special secondary schools (grades 1-4) completed the Self-Esteem Questionnaire (Lamovec 1994). For the entire group of D/HH students, the results of…

  4. Holocaust in the Classroom: Books--Variety and Convenience [and] Deaf Students, Reference Materials, and the Holocaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleper, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Suggested books and reference sources for deaf students studying the holocaust include picture books, beginning chapter books, chapter books, poems and comics, reference books, deaf-related Web sites, general holocaust Web sites, and deaf-related printed references. (DB)

  5. Representations of deaf students about inclusion in physical education classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tássia Pereira Alves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion is a social process in school aims to change attitudes and to build a position to cover everyone without distinction. Thus, the objective was to analyze the representations of deaf students on their inclusion in physical education classes. It is qualitative, descriptive and analytical, attended eight deaf students from 2 public schools in a city in the countryside of Bahia. For data production, it was used a semi -structured interview, through the aid of an interpreter of Brazilian Sign Language (Libras, at the same time, it was translated by the interpreter and transcribed by the researchers. Data analysis used the technique of categorical content analysis. The inclusion of deaf people in physical education classes still failed to materialize and in fact, even having found some teachers with pedagogical actions that proved to be inclusive, yet they still leave many gaps, regarding satisfactory learning of students because they simply just integrate deaf students in the classroom. It is necessary that the school and the teacher ensure that the curriculum is accessible to them, so that they can contribute to the construction of citizenship, motor development, cognitive and social-emotional student.

  6. ATM: Restructing Learning for Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Barbara; Stockford, David

    Governor Baxter School for the Deaf is one of six Maine pilot sites chosen by NYNEX to showcase asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology. ATM is a network connection that allows high bandwidth transmission of data, voice, and video. Its high speed capability allows for high quality two-way full-motion video, which is especially beneficial to a…

  7. Is Tobacco Use a Problem among Deaf College Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Barbara A.; Bernaards, Coen; Eckhardt, Elizabeth A.; Kleiger, Heidi B.; Maucere, Lauren; Streja, Leanne; Wong, Glenn; Barkin, Shari; Bastani, Roshan

    2006-01-01

    College students' tobacco use poses a significant public health problem. Effective intervention requires understanding of this behavior among race/ethnic, cultural, and linguistic collegiate subgroups, including deaf and hard of hearing collegians. Findings from a first-ever tobacco-related survey among this understudied population are reported.…

  8. Ambiguity as a Motor for Communication--Differences between Hearing and Deaf Students' Ways of Reasoning about Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molander, Bengt-Olov; Hallden, Ola; Lindahl, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    Ambiguity in group discussions as a resource for communication is studied. How students, aged 13-15 years, elaborate on the concept energy through dialogue is described. Group interviews were conducted with 15 hearing and 20 deaf students. Three probes were used to initiate discussions on different meanings of energy. The results show that the…

  9. Boosting Technology Literacy in Deaf Students

    OpenAIRE

    Herbold, Blake

    2014-01-01

    Technology in education is a global phenomenon (Knezek, 2007). In an increasingly digital world, technology is rapidly changing the way we live. The advances of technology in society has created a demand for foundational technology skills in educational systems. Schools across the nation fall in line to revamp traditional curriculums with technology. A plethora of digital learning resources for educational use have surfaced, albeit none of the resources address the needs of a bilingual Deaf s...

  10. (Meta)communication strategies in inclusive classes for deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Celeste Azulay; Branco, Angela Uchôa

    2009-01-01

    How can an inclusive classroom for deaf students be successful? The use of metacommunication strategies by teachers and hearing peers seems promising. Schools that promote this approach tend to improve deaf students' psychosocial development and academic achievement. However, this is not a general rule. The present study identifies the elements of success, with the investigators basing their analysis on extensive observation of 4 bilingual classes conducted by regular education and specialized teachers. The study was conducted in 3 public elementary schools in Brasilia, Brazil. Data were collected through direct observation (156 hours) and video recording (34 hours). Results were qualitatively analyzed from a microgenetic perspective. The investigators devised 14 categories of social interaction, e.g., visual contact and responsivity, multimodal communication, co-construction of meanings, flexible use of space, and sign language instruction for hearing students.

  11. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students' Perspectives on Bullying and School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Mary T.; Day, Stefanie J.; Galvan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Student perspectives reflect school climate. The study examined perspectives among deaf and hard of hearing students in residential and large day schools regarding bullying, and compared these perspectives with those of a national database of hearing students. The participants were 812 deaf and hard of hearing students in 11 U.S. schools. Data…

  12. Literacy Skills among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students and Students with Cochlear Implants in Bilingual/bicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that many deaf students do not develop age-appropriate reading and writing abilities. This study evaluates the literacy skills of deaf students, hard of hearing students, and students with cochlear implants in bilingual/bicultural schools in Denmark. The results show that 45 per cent of the students did not have any reading and…

  13. Problem-solving strategies for teaching mathematics to deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousley, K; Kelly, R R

    1998-10-01

    Three teaching and learning strategies for problem solving were implemented with first- and second-year deaf college students enrolled in mathematics courses at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), Rochester Institute of Technology. These strategies involved the students in (a) giving an explanation to a peer observer in sign language, after which they would put their understanding of a problem and its solution in writing; (b) visualizing the problem-solving process prior to starting to solve a problem; and (c) observing their teacher modeling the analytical process step by step for a sample problem prior to solving math word problems. The students were asked to solve two types of problems: typical word problems, and a visual/manipulative puzzle that would provide a problem-solving experience that would contrast with the experience of solving a problem presented in text format. The results showed that these kinds of instructional strategies can enhance the problem-solving performance of deaf and hard of hearing college students.

  14. OPHTHALMIC DISORDERS AMONG STUDENTS OF SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolase C O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed at determining the prevalence and pattern of ophthalmic disorders among students of School for the Deaf, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria.Methodology: This is a cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in October, 2011 as part of activities marking the Annual Physicians’ week of Nigerian Medical Association (NMA,Ondo State. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ethical Review Committee of Federal Medical Centre, Owo prior to commencement of this study. The permission of the School Authority was also obtained before the commencement of this study. The respondents were selected by simple random sampling technique. All enrolled participants were interviewed with the aid of the study instrument (questionnaire by the authors and interpreters (school teachers.Results: The respondents comprised of 91(56.9% Males and 69 Females (43.1%. Nearly all the respondents;158(98.8% were deaf and dumb. Most respondents; 116(72.5% had ocular examination in the past. Few respondents; 118(73.75% had ophthalmic disorder. The commonest ophthalmic disorder was refractive error which was found in 16 respondents (38.1%. Myopia was diagnosed in 9 respondents.CONCLUSION: Most of the respondents were deaf and dumb. Few respondents had ophthalmic disorder. The commonest ophthalmic disorder was refractive error. Myopia was the most predominant refractive error. There is need for periodic ocular screening and treatment atthe School for the Deaf.

  15. Accommodations quality for students who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W; Leppo, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Students who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing often receive accommodations that are intended to increase access to the educational environment. The authors provide the results of a large national study of accommodations use in secondary and postsecondary settings. The article focuses on three aspects of accommodations use: access, quality, and consistency. The participants were 1,350 professionals working with a diverse group of students who were d/Deaf or hard of hearing in a variety of roles, including educators, administrators, interpreters, vocational rehabilitation agency staff, and allied service providers. Data were collected from both a national survey and a series of focus groups conducted over a 1-year period. The authors discuss the results in light of the crucial nature of accommodations during the transition into a variety of educational, training, and employment options.

  16. Focus-on-form instructional methods promote deaf college students' improvement in English grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Gerald P; Kelly, Ronald R; Aldersley, Stephen; Schmitz, Kathryn L; Khalsa, Baldev Kaur; Panara, John; Keenan, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Focus-on-form English teaching methods are designed to facilitate second-language learners' noticing of target language input, where "noticing" is an acquisitional prerequisite for the comprehension, processing, and eventual integration of new grammatical knowledge. While primarily designed for teaching hearing second-language learners, many focus-on-form methods lend themselves to visual presentation. This article reports the results of classroom research on the visually based implementation of focus-on-form methods with deaf college students learning English. Two of 3 groups of deaf students received focus-on-form instruction during a 10-week remedial grammar course; a third control group received grammatical instruction that did not involve focus-on-form methods. The 2 experimental groups exhibited significantly greater improvement in English grammatical knowledge relative to the control group. These results validate the efficacy of visually based focus-on-form English instruction for deaf students of English and set the stage for the continual search for innovative and effective English teaching methodologies.

  17. How Deaf and Normally Hearing Students Convey Meaning within and between Written Sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The compositions of 49 students (ages 10-14) with deafness or hearing impairments and 49 typical students were compared to investigate the frequency and proportional distribution of written-language variables. Differences were found between the strategies chosen by the students with deafness or hearing impairments in both syntax and semantics and…

  18. Keeping the Purpose Before the Learner: A Notional-Functional Curriculum Framework for Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meath-Lang, Bonnie; Albertini, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Presents some suggestions for improving and expanding present curriculum frameworks for teaching English to deaf students. Of major importance to the deaf student is an understanding of the rationale for learning the language in the first place. In addition, a knowledge of the students' needs is stressed, in relation to understanding those…

  19. Examining Metacognition in Hearing and Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2001-01-01

    The metacognitive performance of 87 Arab typically developing adolescents and 20 Arab adolescents with deafness was examined. There was no significant difference between the students in metacognitive performance, nor were there gender-based differences among students with deafness. However, hearing female students scored significantly higher on…

  20. Print exposure, reading habits, and reading achievement among deaf and hearing college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Convertino, Carol M; Borgna, Georgianna; Morrison, Carolyn; Remelt, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study explored relations of print exposure, academic achievement, and reading habits among 100 deaf and 100 hearing college students. As in earlier studies, recognition tests for book titles and magazine titles were used as measures of print exposure, college entrance test scores were used as measures of academic achievement, and students provided self-reports of reading habits. Deaf students recognized fewer magazine titles and fewer book titles appropriate for reading levels from kindergarten through Grade 12 while reporting more weekly hours of reading. As in previous studies with hearing college students, the title recognition test proved a better predictor of deaf and hearing students' English achievement than how many hours they reported reading. The finding that the recognition tests were relatively more potent predictors of achievement for deaf students than hearing students may reflect the fact that deaf students often obtain less information through incidental learning and classroom presentations.

  1. Effectiveness of Group Training of Assertiveness on Social Anxiety among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Daramadi, Parviz Sharifi; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Givtaj, Hamed; Sani, Mohammad Reza Mahmoudian

    2017-06-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of assertiveness group training on social anxiety (SAD) between deaf and hearing impaired adolescents. Forty eight (24 deaf and 24 hearing impaired) people participated in this study. First, participants with SAD, i.e. attaining the scores above 40 for Connor's Social Inventory Scale 2000 (SPIN), were selected according to convenience sampling and randomly assigned to two groups, i.e. intervention and control. Then, assertiveness group training was conducted for intervention group within 10 sessions, and immediately after completion of the training sessions, SPIN was re-administered to the two groups. ANCOVA showed that the effectiveness of assertiveness group training on SAD is different between deaf and hearing impaired participants, i.e. assertiveness group training was effective on improvement of SAD in hearing impaired participants but not deaf ones. Therefore, it is recommended to incorporate assertiveness group training in the educational programs developed for adolescents with ear disorders especially hearing impairment.

  2. Attitudes of Deaf Adults Regarding Preferred Sign Language Systems Used in the Classroom with Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzky-Bowden, Sally M.; Gonzales, B. Robert

    1987-01-01

    A questionnaire survey assessing attitudes of 50 deaf adults toward sign language systems used in schools found the majority supported American Sign Language and Manually Coded English-Pidgin with some reservations. Respondents were also concerned about needs of individual deaf children and deaf adult involvement in educational decision making for…

  3. Didactic sequence for acquisition of Portuguese as a second language for deaf students: a proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Dias da Silva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper was developed through a qualitative study of an action research. We care to discuss and develop a didactic sequence for the acquisition of Portuguese as a second language for deaf students in a fun and meaningful way through the genre bibliographic description so that deaf students can develop skills to act socially both in academic situations or specific professional. Working with this genre directed pedagogically in class, making them deaf students create and reflect on upcoming issues of their reality, is presented as essential today. For today, we understand that quality education can only be achieved by deaf students, if teachers take them to reflect on situations that surround them in the real world. We understand that to achieve these goals in deaf students, teachers should make the class a laboratory room, always raising situations-problems that encourage students to think.

  4. Using Graphic Novels in the High School Classroom: Engaging Deaf Students with a New Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Linda; Odelson, Darah; Burns, Heidi; Grisham, Dana L.

    2009-01-01

    Two high school teachers of Deaf students and two teacher educators present this article about the use of graphic novels as an important genre for teaching literacy and academic skills in the high school classroom. During a summer session for failing Deaf students at a state-sponsored school, two English teachers taught and documented their…

  5. The Development and Implementation of a Model for Teaching Astronomy to Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolat, Mualla

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and assess a model aimed at teaching astronomy to deaf students. Thus, a 7 day-long project of indoor and outdoor activities was developed. Since the purpose of our study was to teach astronomy to deaf students, our sample was determined by using purposeful sampling technique. The sample of this study…

  6. Multimedia Storybooks: Supporting Vocabulary for Students Who Are Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, Vicki; Briley, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    A single case study examined the use of multimedia storybooks on the vocabulary acquisition of 7 preschool students who are deaf/hard of hearing in two classrooms at a school for the deaf in the U.S. Participants also included 3 speech-language pathologists. Students spent an average of 7.1 minutes daily working with the multimedia storybooks and…

  7. Investigating Deaf Students' Use of Visual Multimedia Resources in Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaraizi, Magda; Vekiri, Ioanna; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    A mixed research design was used to examine how deaf students used the visual resources of a multimedia software package that was designed to support reading comprehension. The viewing behavior of 8 deaf students, ages 8-12 years, was recorded during their interaction with multimedia software that included narrative texts enriched with Greek Sign…

  8. Voices from the Classroom: Experiences of Teachers of Deaf Students with Additional Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musyoka, Millicent Malinda; Gentry, Mary Anne; Bartlett, James Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate experiences of K-12 classroom teachers of deaf students with additional disabilities. Today, more deaf and hard of hearing students are identified as having additional disabilities (Bruce, DiNatale & Ford, 2008; Ewing, 2011; Gallaudet Research Institute, 2011; Jones, Jones & Ewing, 2006;…

  9. Making Decisions about Assessment Practices for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W.

    2011-01-01

    Students who are deaf or hard of hearing are a low-incidence population with diverse linguistic characteristics and levels of academic achievement. This article presents findings on teacher recommendations of assessment practices for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. A total of 372 educational professionals responded to a set of three…

  10. Web-Based Science Instruction for Deaf Students: What Research Says to the Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harry G.; Steely, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Web-based science instruction for deaf students and the need to be aware of factors such as reading ability, motivation, and the need for visual reinforcement of science content. Summarizes three empirical research studies related to earth science, chemistry, and physical science instruction for deaf students. (Author/LRW)

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life and Classroom Participation of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in General Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermair, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    A group of deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) students at mainstream schools (N = 212) was investigated in a questionnaire-based survey using the Inventory of Life Quality of Children and Youth (ILC) and the Classroom Participation Questionnaire. The ILC data for the D/HH sample are for the most part comparable with the data from a normative hearing…

  12. Bullying and cyberbullying among deaf students and their hearing peers: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Sheri; Pero, Heather

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire on bullying and cyberbullying was administered to 30 secondary students (Grades 7-12) in a charter school for the Deaf and hard of hearing and a matched group of 22 hearing students in a charter secondary school on the same campus. Because the sample size was small and distributions non-normal, results are primarily descriptive and correlational. No significant differences by hearing status were detected in rates of conventional or cyberbullying or both forms of victimization. Cyberbullying and cybervictimization were strongly correlated, as were conventional bullying and victimization. Moral disengagement was positively correlated only with conventional bullying. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  13. College and Career Readiness: Course Taking Of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Secondary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Katherine; Newman, Lynn A; Shaver, Debra M; Marschark, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students frequently enter college and the workplace relatively unprepared for success in math, science, and reading. Based on data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2), the present study focused on DHH students' college and career readiness by investigating their opportunities in secondary school to acquire college and career skills. DHH students earned more credits overall than hearing peers; both groups earned a similar number of credits in academic courses. However, DHH students took more vocational and nonacademic courses and fewer courses in science, social science, and foreign languages. There was evidence that DHH students' academic courses in math lacked the rigor of those taken by hearing peers, as DHH students earned more credits in basic math and fewer credits in midlevel math courses, and even fewer in advanced math courses, than hearing peers.

  14. Teacher quality: a comparison of National Board-certified and non-Board-certified teachers of deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheetz, Nanci A; Martin, David S

    2006-01-01

    THE STUDY was designed to identify specific components of teacher excellence, focusing initially on the characteristics of the small number of teachers of the deaf who are certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), then comparing those with the characteristics of other teachers identified as master teachers by university faculty in teacher preparation in deafness. Classroom observation, written lesson plans, teacher questionnaires on beliefs, and content analysis of interactive electronic focus groups were used to compare the two groups of teachers. Results indicated similarities between Board-certified and non-Board-certified master teachers in regard to teacher behaviors and commitment to well-founded pedagogical principles. Differences were found in classroom priorities and in the greater level of interconnectivity expressed by Board-certified teachers as the result of becoming Board certified. Recommendations are made for preparing teachers of deaf students.

  15. Longitudinal Receptive American Sign Language Skills Across a Diverse Deaf Student Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S

    2016-04-01

    This article presents results of a longitudinal study of receptive American Sign Language (ASL) skills for a large portion of the student body at a residential school for the deaf across four consecutive years. Scores were analyzed by age, gender, parental hearing status, years attending the residential school, and presence of a disability (i.e., deaf with a disability). Years 1 through 4 included the ASL Receptive Skills Test (ASL-RST); Years 2 through 4 also included the Receptive Test of ASL (RT-ASL). Student performance for both measures positively correlated with age; deaf students with deaf parents scored higher than their same-age peers with hearing parents in some instances but not others; and those with a documented disability tended to score lower than their peers without disabilities. These results provide longitudinal findings across a diverse segment of the deaf/hard of hearing residential school population.

  16. Reading against All Odds: A Pilot Study of Two Deaf Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte; Lafond, Lori Dustan

    2007-01-01

    Learning to read and write is a challenge for most deaf children due to their limited experiences with, and access to, spoken language. In the case of deaf students who have difficulty processing visual print, literacy becomes an even greater challenge. The study piloted an intervention procedure that incorporated the principles of automaticity,…

  17. Teaching Writing to Deaf Students: Does Research Offer Evidence for Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassman, Barbara K.; Schirmer, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review of the research on writing instruction with deaf students was to determine which findings offer evidence for effective practice. The authors used a framework of critical elements developed from research on hearing writers as a set of findings to which they compared the findings with deaf writers. They identified 16…

  18. Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Deaf/Blind Students Using a Team Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    As a teacher of the deaf as well as the classroom teacher, Kimberly Mockler works very closely with the teacher of the visually impaired. This involves sharing ideas, resources, and lesson plans for the deaf/blind students. Their lessons and goals are very similar and overlap in several areas. A major challenge for both of them is maintaining high…

  19. The Relationship between Drawing and Oral Language in Deaf Students Aged Three to Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuria; Cambra, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between drawing and oral language acquisition in deaf students aged three to five. The sample is made up of one hundred participants: fifty deaf and fifty hearing children. Goodenough's Human Figure Drawing Test and the WPPSI Scale of Intelligence geometric design subtest have been used to evaluate graphic…

  20. The Relationship between Drawing and Oral Language in Deaf Students Aged Three to Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuria; Cambra, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between drawing and oral language acquisition in deaf students aged three to five. The sample is made up of one hundred participants: fifty deaf and fifty hearing children. Goodenough's Human Figure Drawing Test and the WPPSI Scale of Intelligence geometric design subtest have been used to evaluate graphic…

  1. Genetics and Deafness: Implications for Education and Life Care of Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Jerome D.; Miller, Maurice H.

    2008-01-01

    The severity of deafness can obscure the presence of other disabilities that may accompany genetic anomalies, such as occur in Alport and Usher syndromes. Recent advances in genetics have heightened attention to various disabilities and dysfunctions that may coexist with deafness. Failure to recognize these additional disabilities when they occur…

  2. Assessing aspects of creativity in deaf and hearing high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzione, Christopher M; Perez, Susan M; Lederberg, Amy R

    2013-04-01

    To address the paucity of current research on the development of creativity in deaf students, and to extend existing research to adolescents, the present study investigated divergent thinking, a method of assessing creativity, in both deaf and hearing adolescents. We assessed divergent thinking in two domains, figural and verbal, while also adjusting the instructional method in written format, sign language, or spoken English. Deaf students' performance was equal to, or more creative than, hearing students on the figural assessment of divergent thinking, but less creative on the verbal assessment. Additional studies should be conducted to determine whether this was an anomalous finding or one that might contribute to hypotheses yielding effective interventions.

  3. Literacy development in deaf students: case studies in bilingual teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charlotte J

    2004-01-01

    A bilingual model has been applied to educating deaf students who are learning American Sign Language (ASL) as their first language and written English as a second. Although Cummins's (1984) theory of second-language learning articulates how learners draw on one language to acquire another, implementing teaching practices based on this theory, particularly with deaf students, is a complex, confusing process. The purposes of the present study were to narrow the gap between theory and practice and to describe the teaching and learning strategies used by the teachers and parents of three elementary school children within a bilingual/bicultural learning environment for deaf students. The findings suggest that strategies such as using ASL as the language of instruction and making translation conceptual rather than literal contribute to literacy learning. Findings further indicate that some inconsistencies persist in applying a bilingual approach with deaf students.

  4. American sign language and deaf culture competency of osteopathic medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Jessica; Colonna, Caitlin; Sexton, Patricia; Richard, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a workshop on Deaf culture and basic medical American Sign Language for increasing osteopathic student physicians' confidence and knowledge when interacting with ASL-using patients. Students completed a pretest in which they provided basic demographic information, rated their confidence levels, took a video quiz on basic medical signs, and experienced a practical standardized encounter with a Deaf patient. They then attended a 4-hour workshop and, 2 weeks later, completed a posttest. Thirty-three students completed the pretest; 29 attended the workshop; 26 completed the posttest. Video quiz scores increased significantly from pretest to posttest, as did scores for the standardized patient encounter after completion of the workshop. Students also reported increased levels of confidence in interactions with the Deaf community. The results suggest that a single workshop was effective in increasing both confidence and short-term knowledge in interactions with Deaf patients.

  5. Success with academic English: reflections of deaf college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Rose Marie; McKee, Barbara; Lepoutre, Dominique

    2002-03-01

    The study identified social, educational, and demographic characteristics of deaf postsecondary students who demonstrated strong reading and writing skills. Questionnaire information, information from institutional databases, and in-depth personal interviews were used to identify factors and characteristics that positively influenced the attainment of strong academic literacy skills. Among the areas investigated were school experiences, reading and writing experiences, study habits and attitudes, communication preferences, personality traits, and home and family background. Results of the study generally support previous work conducted with talented hearing youth. Several primary themes emerged from the study: heavy parental involvement in early education and educational decisions, differing modes of communication but extensive family communication, early exposure to and intensive experiences with reading and writing, an enjoyment of reading, a relatively limited social life, high parental and secondary school expectations, the importance of television, and positive self-image.

  6. Math in Motion: Origami Math for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaili

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to provide an overview of the use of origami in teaching mathematics to deaf and hard-of-hearing students. The author posits that in both the general and special education settings, origami can be very useful for students who are deaf and hard of hearing as many of them need to see and feel to learn and are likely to be concrete…

  7. Comparison of visual working memory in deaf and hearing-impaired students with normal counterparts: A research in people without sign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Tangestani Zadeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The hearing defects in deaf and hearing-impaired students also affect their cognitive skills such as memory in addition to communication skills. Hence, the aim of this study was to compare visual working memory in deaf and hearing-impaired students with that in normal counterparts.Method: In the present study, which was a causal-comparative study using the André Rey test, 30 deaf and 30 hearing-impaired students were compared with 30 students in a normal group, and they were matched based on gender, intelligence, educational grade, and socioeconomic status.Findings: Findings show that there is significant difference between the three groups’ subjects (p0.05.Conclusion: Function of deaf or hard-of-hearing students in the visual working memory task was weaker in comparison with the normal counterparts, while the two deaf and hard-of-hearing groups have similar functions. With a better identification and understanding of the factors that affect the development of this cognitive ability, we can offer new methods of teaching and reduce many of the disadvantages of this group of people in the different fields of cognitive science.

  8. Educative attention to diversity. Deaf students in the classroom of Portugal and Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente J. Llorent García

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this publication we intend to present some results of the innovative experience that we are realizing through Project SMILE. We have focused on the analysis of the relationships established around deaf students in schools and the role of sign language and its integration in the teaching-learning processes. This research is based on the perceptions of the authors of this article, teachers in schools where children are educated deaf children, hearing and deaf students, and university students who realized the practices on-site. Here we highlight the specific situation on the attention to diversity and equal opportunities, focusing on the situation of deaf learners in schools in Turkey and Portugal.

  9. School failure in students who are normal-hearing or deaf: with or without cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ivone; Santos, Cristina Costa; Rego, Guilhermina; Nunes, Rui

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of cochlear implants on the school failure of deaf who attend mainstream classes by comparing them to their normal-hearing peers as well as deaf without cochlear implants. This case-control study included participants aged 8-18 years. The number of school years failed was obtained from school records. The greatest differences in achievement levels were found between hearing students and those who were deaf without cochlear implants. Cochlear implants provide educational opportunities for hearing-impaired students, yet those without cochlear implants remain at a great disadvantage. These findings suggest that measures promoting greater equity and quality for all deaf students allow achievement levels closer to those of the not impaired.

  10. Executive functions and behavioral problems in deaf and hard-of-hearing students at general and special schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermair, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In this study, behavioral problems of deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) school-aged children are discussed in the context of executive functioning and communicative competence. Teachers assessed the executive functions of a sample of 214 D/HH students from general schools and schools for the deaf, using a German version of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions (BRIEF-D). This was complemented by a questionnaire that measured communicative competence and behavioral problems (German version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; SDQ-D). The results in nearly all the scales show a significantly higher problem rate for executive functions in the group of D/HH students compared with a normative sample of hearing children. In the D/HH group, students at general schools had better scores on most scales than students at schools for the deaf. Regression analysis reveals the importance of executive functions and communicative competence for behavioral problems. The relevance of the findings for pedagogical work is discussed. A specific focus on competencies such as self-efficacy or self-control in educational concepts for D/HH students seems to be necessary in addition to extending language competencies.

  11. Hierarchies in student groups

    OpenAIRE

    Güntert, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This is a research about hierarchies in student groups. It shows how they are built und what sense they have. The position of a student in his student peer group is evaluated. The influence of the look, the style, the behaviour of the other sex, the gender, the origin, the prehistory, the appearance, achievement and their effect on hierarchies is analysed and the impact of charisma and organisation are compared. The meaning of this research is to indicate how a student must be to get the lead...

  12. An investigation of two-way text messaging use with deaf students at the secondary level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, C Tane; Mayer, Connie; Farrelly, Shona

    2006-01-01

    Deaf and hard-of-hearing students are often delayed in developing their independent living skills because of parental restrictions on activities outside the home due to worries about their child's inability to communicate, their whereabouts, and their general safety. Recent accounts of the use of two-way text messagers suggests that, like electronic mail, distance communication problems that have long plagued deaf people may be ameliorated--by the use of such technology (M. R. Power & D. Power, 2004; S. S. Rhone & Cox News Service, 2002). This project was designed as an initial foray into investigating the use of two-way text messaging technology as a way of increasing the independence of deaf adolescents and reducing their parents' anxiety about their safety and responsibility. All the deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the deaf and hard-of-hearing programs at two urban high schools (ages 13-19), the staff of the deaf departments at these two schools, and the parents/guardians of the students participated in this study. Preuse surveys, postuse surveys, and monthly statistics on the number of times each pager was used enabled us to chart how often the participants used the technology. The data were used to identify concerns that parents have about student independence and safety, the extent to which deaf students engage in independent activities, and expectations surrounding how two-way text messaging use might increase independence and literacy skills. The data collected on this project to date confirm that two-way text messaging technology is indeed useful for deaf adolescents and helps alleviate some of the concerns that have kept them from developing independence as quickly or readily as their hearing peers. The potential policy implications for this research are discussed.

  13. Jogging Program for Deaf-Blind Students Improves Condition and Reduces Self-Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajajian, Lisa D.

    Four deaf-blind students at the Massachusetts Association for the Blind were involved in a pilot aerobic program consisting of jogging for 15-20 minutes three times a week. Students were chosen based on their enjoyment of this fast movement and they were given clearance for this activity by both a doctor and a physical therapist. The students'…

  14. Box-and-Whisker What?: Deaf Students Learn--and Write about--Descriptive Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Brenda; Strosnider, Roberta

    1997-01-01

    This article describes three math units that teach statistics to middle school students with deafness. Students learn about ratios, percentage, and graphing; sampling and descriptive statistics; and means and medians. Students discuss the statistical processes in sign language, and write about them in English. (CR)

  15. Box-and-Whisker What?: Deaf Students Learn--and Write about--Descriptive Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Brenda; Strosnider, Roberta

    1997-01-01

    This article describes three math units that teach statistics to middle school students with deafness. Students learn about ratios, percentage, and graphing; sampling and descriptive statistics; and means and medians. Students discuss the statistical processes in sign language, and write about them in English. (CR)

  16. Thinking Style Changes among Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-fang

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how university students' thinking styles changed over a single academic year by twice administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II to 256 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) students and 286 hearing students from art and design academic disciplines in China. Results showed that after having studied at the university for one…

  17. Undergraduate Research Involving Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Interdisciplinary Science Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Pagano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific undergraduate research in higher education often yields positive outcomes for student and faculty member participants alike, with underrepresented students often showing even more substantial gains (academic, professional, and personal as a result of the experience. Significant success can be realized when involving deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/hh undergraduate students, who are also vastly underrepresented in the sciences, in interdisciplinary research projects. Even d/hh Associate degree level students and those in the first two years of their postsecondary careers can contribute to, and benefit from, the research process when faculty mentors properly plan/design projects. We discuss strategies, including the dissemination/communication of research results, for involving these students in research groups with different communication dynamics and share both findings of our research program and examples of successful chemical and biological research projects that have involved d/hh undergraduate students. We hope to stimulate a renewed interest in encouraging diversity and involving students with disabilities into higher education research experiences globally and across multiple scientific disciplines, thus strengthening the education and career pipeline of these students.

  18. Marital Quality in Deaf-Deaf and Deaf-Hearing Marriages

    OpenAIRE

    Mosier, Anthony G.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess similarities and differences in marital adjustment between Deaf-Deaf and Deaf-hearing married couples. In examining marital adjustment, Spanier's Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS) was translated from English to American Sign Language (ASL) and administered to 30 Deaf-Deaf and 22 Deaf-hearing couple respondents. Although there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Deaf-Deaf couples tended to have higher marital adj...

  19. Effectiveness of communication strategies for deaf or hard of hearing workers in group settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In group settings, background noise and an obstructed view of the speaker are just a few of the issues that can make workplace communication difficult for an individual who is deaf or hard of hearing. Accommodation strategies such as amplification of the speaker's voice or the use of text-based alternatives exist to address these issues. However, recent studies have shown that there are still unmet needs related to workplace communication in group settings for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Identify the most common strategies used by individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to improve communication in group settings and gauge the perceived effectiveness of those strategies. An online survey was conducted with individuals who self-identified as deaf or hard of hearing. The survey presented specific communication strategies based on three functional approaches (aural/oral, text, visual). The strategies applied to both receptive and expressive communication in five different meeting types ranging in size and purpose. 161 adults (age 22-90 yrs.) with limited hearing ability completed the survey. Text-based strategies were typically the least frequently used strategies in group settings, yet they ranked high in perceived effectiveness for receptive and expressive communication. Those who used an interpreter demonstrated a strong preference for having a qualified interpreter present in the meeting rather than an interpreter acting remotely. For expressive communication, participants in general preferred to use their own voice or signing abilities and ranked those strategies as highly effective. A more accessible workplace for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing would incorporate more ubiquitous text-based strategy options. Also, qualified interpreters, when used, should be present in the meeting for maximum effectiveness.

  20. Pragmatic language in deaf and hard of hearing students: correlation with success in general education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thagard, Elaine Kirk; Hilsmier, Amanda Strong; Easterbrooks, Susan R

    2011-01-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing children have shown delays and difficulties in pragmatic behaviors due to insufficient exposure to common daily discourse and underlying impoverishment in all components of language development. In a study in a school district in a southeastern U.S. state, the researchers investigated the relationship between sociolinguistic pragmatic competence in 81 deaf and hard of hearing students and these students' degree of hearing loss, communication mode, and degree of success in general education. Two measures, one devised by the state's department of education and one developed within the local school system, were used: the Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (Georgia Department of Education, 2000) and the Socio-Pragmatic Skills Checklist for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students (Cobb County School District, 1997). The researchers found that whether the students used spoken language or signed language, socio-pragmatic language had a high, positive correlation with academic outcomes.

  1. MEASURING SELF-ESTEEM OF DEAF/HARD OF HEARING COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin ZHENG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines Deaf/hard of hearing college students' implicit and explicit self-esteem, with thirty-six 18 to 21 year old (Age ± SD, 19.4±0.9 subjects. Following are the results of this study: Just as hearing students, Deaf/hard of hearing students also have significant implicit self-esteem effect; none of the observed correlations with explicit esteem is significant for either attributive IAT or the affective IAT; Implicit self-esteem of males is higher than that of females; No significant correlation exists between implicit self-esteem and the level of depression. Social comparisons and negative evaluations and attitudes of others always tend to damage explicit self-esteem of Deaf/hard of hearing students. However, positive self-attitude characterizations still exist in their self-schema.

  2. Deaf students' receptive and expressive american sign language skills: comparisons and relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    This article presents receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills of 85 students, 6 through 22 years of age at a residential school for the deaf using the American Sign Language Receptive Skills Test and the Ozcaliskan Motion Stimuli. Results are presented by ages and indicate that students' receptive skills increased with age and were still developing across this age range. Students' expressive skills, specifically classifier production, increased with age but did not approach adult-like performance. On both measures, deaf children with deaf parents scored higher than their peers with hearing parents and many components of the measures significantly correlated. These results suggest that these two measures provide a well-rounded snapshot of individual students' American Sign Language skills.

  3. Benefits of sign language interpreting and text alternatives for deaf students' classroom learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Leigh, Greg; Sapere, Patricia; Burnham, Denis; Convertino, Carol; Stinson, Michael; Knoors, Harry; Vervloed, Mathijs P J; Noble, William

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments examined the utility of real-time text in supporting deaf students' learning from lectures in postsecondary (Experiments 1 and 2) and secondary classrooms (Experiments 3 and 4). Experiment 1 compared the effects on learning of sign language interpreting, real-time text (C-Print), and both. Real-time text alone led to significantly higher performance by deaf students than the other two conditions, but performance by deaf students in all conditions was significantly below that of hearing peers who saw lectures without any support services. Experiment 2 compared interpreting and two forms of real-time text, C-Print and Communication Access Real-Time Translation, at immediate testing and after a 1-week delay (with study notes). No significant differences among support services were obtained at either testing. Experiment 3 also failed to reveal significant effects at immediate or delayed testing in a comparison of real-time text, direct (signed) instruction, and both. Experiment 4 found no significant differences between interpreting and interpreting plus real-time text on the learning of either new words or the content of television programs. Alternative accounts of the observed pattern of results are considered, but it is concluded that neither sign language interpreting nor real-time text have any inherent, generalized advantage over the other in supporting deaf students in secondary or postsecondary settings. Providing deaf students with both services simultaneously does not appear to provide any generalized benefit, at least for the kinds of materials utilized here.

  4. Literacy Skills among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students and Students with Cochlear Implants in Bilingual/Bicultural Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that many deaf students do not develop age-appropriate reading and writing abilities. This study evaluates the literacy skills of deaf students, hard of hearing students, and students with cochlear implants in bilingual/bicultural schools in Denmark. The results show that 45 per...... cent of the students did not have any reading and writing difficulties (i.e. they were no more than 1 year behind in school). Regression analysis models show that language abilities (either aural-oral or signed) and additional disabilities were explaining factors. Neither the level of hearing loss nor...... cochlear implantation was found to be significantly related to literacy skills. The results are discussed in relation to the Danish bilingual/bicultural approach in deaf education, an approach which appears to improve literacy skills among students with hearing impairment but does not eliminate all...

  5. Academic attainment in deaf and hard-of-hearing students in distance education

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, John T E

    2015-01-01

    This study compared outcomes in deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students and nondisabled students taking courses by distance learning with the UK Open University in 2012. DHH students who had no additional disabilities were more likely to complete their courses than nondisabled students, and they were just as likely to pass the courses that they completed and to obtain good grades on the courses that they passed. DHH students who had additional disabilities were less likely to complete their c...

  6. The Effectiveness of Computerized Instructional Packages on Concept Acquisition and Improving Academic Achievement among Female Deaf Students in KSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagabas, Hanan Ali

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of computerized instructional packages on concept acquisition and improving academic achievement among deaf students in Saudi Arabia. The sample consisted of (16) third-grade female deaf students in prep stage for the first semester of the academic year 2013/2014, randomly selected from…

  7. English Teachers of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in French Schools: Needs, Barriers and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoin, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with English teachers who work with deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) students. In France deaf students are required to attend foreign language classes--mostly English classes. The purpose is not to teach them British sign language (BSL) or American sign language (ASL), but written and/or spoken English. Indeed, sign languages are…

  8. Engaging Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in the School Library: A Handbook for Teacher-Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Nadene

    2012-01-01

    Over seventy percent of students who are deaf or hard of hearing will attend a public school and enroll in a classroom with their hearing peers or in a self-contained classroom with other deaf and hard of hearing students. Teacher-librarians who work in these schools can improve their instruction by understanding not only what it means to be…

  9. Deaf Students' Receptive and Expressive American Sign Language Skills: Comparisons and Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills of 85 students, 6 through 22 years of age at a residential school for the deaf using the American Sign Language Receptive Skills Test and the Ozcaliskan Motion Stimuli. Results are presented by ages and indicate that students' receptive skills increased with age and…

  10. Visual Teaching Strategies for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckner, John; Bowen, Sandra; Carter, Kathy

    2001-01-01

    This article explains visual teaching strategies appropriate for use with students who are deaf or hard of hearing. It describes some general visual teaching strategies, discusses how to develop and use graphic organizers, provides a sample unit and lesson using graphic organizers, and offers examples of visual materials to use with all students.…

  11. Analyzing Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students' Written Metacognitive Strategies and Story-Grammar Propositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Downey, Doris M.

    1996-01-01

    This introduction to Section 1, Part 2 of the theme issue discusses a study that investigated the story-grammar propositions of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Results found that over 50% of the students could not produce the minimal components of a good story. The processes of story production are explained, including schemata…

  12. Thinking Styles and University Self-Efficacy among Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-Fang; Hu, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how students' thinking styles are related to their university self-efficacy, by administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II and the University Self-Efficacy Scale to 366 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) and 467 hearing university students in mainland China. Results showed that, among all participants, those with Type I…

  13. Deaf Students' Receptive and Expressive American Sign Language Skills: Comparisons and Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills of 85 students, 6 through 22 years of age at a residential school for the deaf using the American Sign Language Receptive Skills Test and the Ozcaliskan Motion Stimuli. Results are presented by ages and indicate that students' receptive skills increased with age and…

  14. American Sign Language and Deaf Culture Competency of Osteopathic Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinsky, Jessica; Colonna, Caitlin; Sexton, Patricia; Richard, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a workshop on Deaf culture and basic medical American Sign Language for increasing osteopathic student physicians' confidence and knowledge when interacting with ASL-using patients. Students completed a pretest in which they provided basic demographic information, rated their confidence levels, took a video…

  15. The Law and the IEP: Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Deaf Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Michael; Theoharis, Raschelle

    2014-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) have significant implications for students with and without disabilities. Despite extensive research, journal articles, editorials, media coverage, and litigation, deaf and hard of hearing students with additional disabilities continue to be…

  16. Instruction and Service Time Decisions: Itinerant Services to Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antia, Shirin D.; Rivera, M. Christina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) describe the specific kinds of services provided by itinerant teachers to deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students in general education settings, (b) examine the relationship between student academic performance and instructional support provided by the itinerant teacher, and (c) examine how service provision…

  17. Language and Play in Students with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairments or Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Lianna; Bruce, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the relationships between play and language development in students with multiple disabilities and visual impairments or deaf-blindness. The findings indicate that students with higher levels of communication demonstrate more advanced play skills and that the use of play-based assessment and exposure to symbolic play are…

  18. Evaluating Teachers' Preparedness to Work With Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing With Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardino, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    A national survey was conducted to determine the needs of teachers and service providers working with students who are deaf and hard of hearing with disabilities (DWD). Quantitative and qualitative questions were asked regarding knowledge of, training with, and strategies used with students who are DWD. Responses from 264 professionals working with this population are reported. Results are reviewed and tied to previous research before and after the 2008 revalidation of the Council on Education of the Deaf standards for teachers of the deaf. Final recommendations are made for (a) virtual learning opportunities, (b) hands-on field experiences and course work in teacher preparation programs, and (c) empirically based research. By understanding the needs of professionals who are currently working with students who are DWD, researchers can help improve teacher preparation programs as well as improve the educational systems currently in place for these learners.

  19. Vocabulary and Grammar Differences Between Deaf and Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noboru; Isaka, Yukio; Yamamoto, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Tomoyasu

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the development of literacy skills of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children in Japan. The three components of literacy, vocabulary, orthographic knowledge, and grammatical knowledge were assessed by using the subtests of the Adaptive Tests for Language Abilities (ATLAN), based on the item response theory developed by the authors). The participants consisted of 207 DHH children (first through twelfth grades) in Study 1, and 425 hearing children (first through sixth grades) in Study 2. The findings show that more than 80% of DHH children's vocabulary variance was explained by the other two componential skills, while the three tasks' difficulty was different. More specifically, their vocabulary and especially, their grammar lagged behind those of hearing children, whereas the difference between the two groups on kanji (one of the three orthographic systems in Japanese taught during the school years) was less. Although considerably delayed, their pattern of responses in grammar was similar to that predicted from normative data. Effective instruction for DHH children's literacy skills was generally discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The peculiar needs of deaf people: a study of selected members of the Lincolnshire deaf social group

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, K.

    1989-01-01

    In spite of the fact that services for deaf people have been provided since Victorian times, there is no "philosophy of deafness" and services are based upon the subjective observation of deaf people by "hearing" people. This study seeks to formulate such a philosophy, for those unable to hear spoken communication from birth or early childhood, based upon acceptance of the social limitations of being unable to hear in a society where the ready use of that sense is taken for granted. In or...

  1. Semantic and pragmatic factors influencing deaf and hearing students' comprehension of english sentences containing numeral quantifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald R; Berent, Gerald P

    2011-01-01

    This research contrasted deaf and hearing students' interpretive knowledge of English sentences containing numeral quantifier phrases and indefinite noun phrases. A multiple-interpretation picture task methodology was used to assess 305 participants' judgments of the compatibility of sentence meanings with depicted discourse contexts. Participants' performance was assessed on the basis of hearing level (deaf, hearing) and grade level (middle school, high school, college). The deaf students were predicted to have differential access to specific sentence interpretations in accordance with the relative derivational complexity of the targeted sentence types. Hypotheses based on the pressures of derivational economy on acquisition were largely supported. The results also revealed that the deaf participants tended to overactivate pragmatic processes that yielded principled, though non-target, sentence interpretations. Collectively, the results not only contribute to the understanding of English acquisition under conditions of restricted access to spoken language input, they also suggest that pragmatic factors may play a broad role in influencing, and compromising, deaf students' reading comprehension and written expression.

  2. Rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing: how electronic technology can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Frank P

    2004-01-01

    Electronic technology can be used to overcome many of the barriers and other factors that restrict delivery of services to rural schools; it can also expand the world of rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Online college and high school Web sites that offer courses are listed, as well as a Web site for tutoring and one offering help for teachers of rural gifted students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Recommendations are made for ways that legislatures and rural school districts can make Internet resources and assistive technology more widely available in rural educational settings.

  3. Impact of correcting visual impairment and low vision in deaf-mute students in Pune, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parikshit; Bhusan, Shashi; Ray, Shantanu; Shinde, Amit

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate visual acuity and vision function before and after providing spectacles and low vision devices (LVDs) in deaf-mute students. Schools for deaf-mute in West Maharashtra. Hearing-impaired children in all special schools in Pune district underwent detailed visual acuity testing (with teachers' help), refraction, external ocular examination, and fundoscopy. Students with refractive errors and low vision were provided with spectacles and LVD. The LV Prasad-Functional Vision Questionnaire consisting of twenty items was administered to each subject before and after providing spectacles, LVDs. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. 252/929 (27.1%) students had a refractive error. 794 (85.5%) were profound deaf. Two-hundred and fifty students were dispensed spectacles and LVDs. Mean LogMAR visual acuity before introduction of spectacles and LVDs were 0.33 ± 0.36 which improved to 0.058 (P blackboard (47.7%), and seeing whether somebody is waving hand from across the road (45.5%). In response to question number 20, 57.4% of students felt that their vision was much worse than their friend's vision, which was reduced to 17.6% after dispensing spectacles and LVDs. Spectacle and LVD reduced visual impairment and improved vision function in deaf-mute students, augmenting their ability to negotiate in and out of school.

  4. Using Open Captions to Revise Writing in Digital Stories Composed by d/Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassman, Barbara K.; O'Dell, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Using a nonexperimental design, the researchers explored the effect of captioning as part of the writing process of individuals who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing. Sixty-nine d/Deaf and hard of hearing middle school students composed responses to four writing-to-learn activities in a word processor. Two compositions were revised and published with…

  5. Modifying the Classroom Environment to Increase Engagement and Decrease Disruption with Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardino, Caroline; Antia, Shirind D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of physical modifications on the academic engagement and disruptive behavior of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing students in self-contained classrooms. Three classrooms at a school for the Deaf were modified after consultation with the classroom teachers. The modifications of the classroom environment…

  6. Teaching Math to Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) Children Using Mobile Games: Outcomes with Student and Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Brett E.; Parlin, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Leveraging the use of mobile devices for education, such as instructional games, is an area of increasing interest for targeted subpopulations of students including those who are deaf/hard-of-hearing (DHH). This paper outlines the perspectives of Deaf Education teachers and DHH children who participated in the GeePerS*Math project. Interviews and…

  7. Test Item Linguistic Complexity and Assessments for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Linguistic complexity of test items is one test format element that has been studied in the context of struggling readers and their participation in paper-and-pencil tests. The present article presents findings from an exploratory study on the potential relationship between linguistic complexity and test performance for deaf readers. A total of 64…

  8. Evaluating Deaf Students' Writing Fairly: Meaning over Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Kathryn L.; Keenan, Susan K.

    2004-01-01

    Competence in written English is essential for success at work in the United States. For deaf and hard-of-hearing people, especially for those who do not use spoken language, the ability to express themselves in writing with competence assures clear communication with hearing people. However, learning how to do so presents challenges for both deaf…

  9. Test Item Linguistic Complexity and Assessments for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Linguistic complexity of test items is one test format element that has been studied in the context of struggling readers and their participation in paper-and-pencil tests. The present article presents findings from an exploratory study on the potential relationship between linguistic complexity and test performance for deaf readers. A total of 64…

  10. An Analysis of Deaf Students' Spelling Skills during a Year-Long Instructional Writing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Lisa M.; Dostal, Hannah; McCarthy, Jillian H.; Schwarz, Ilsa; Wolbers, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that spelling presents unique challenges for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (d/hh), and most do not develop age appropriate spelling skills. Spelling errors from 29 middle school d/hh students were analyzed from writing samples that were gathered at the beginning, middle, and end of a year-long writing…

  11. Longitudinal Receptive American Sign Language Skills across a Diverse Deaf Student Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents results of a longitudinal study of receptive American Sign Language (ASL) skills for a large portion of the student body at a residential school for the deaf across four consecutive years. Scores were analyzed by age, gender, parental hearing status, years attending the residential school, and presence of a disability (i.e.,…

  12. Examining Reading Comprehension and Fluency in Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, Susan R.; Huston, Sandra G.

    This paper discusses various approaches educators can use to evaluate the reading skills of students who are deaf and hard of hearing, with special emphasis on reading fluency. Various assessment measures are described and examples of how mature users of American Sign Language read English are given. It highlights the use of a literacy portfolio,…

  13. Deaf Students' Reading and Writing in College: Fluency, Coherence, and Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A.; Marschark, Marc; Kincheloe, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Research in discourse reveals numerous cognitive connections between reading and writing. Rather than one being the inverse of the other, there are parallels and interactions between them. To understand the variables and possible connections in the reading and writing of adult deaf students, we manipulated writing conditions and reading texts.…

  14. Development of School-Aged Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Normally Hearing Students' Written Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Downey, Doris M.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the written language of students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing addressed, among other topics, level of reading skills, development of language skills after age 12, and evidence of a critical age for language learning. Data collection methods, research outcomes, and an overview of other articles in the theme issue are discussed. (CR)

  15. Deaf College Students' Comprehension of Relational Language in Arithmetic Compare Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald R.; Lang, Harry G.; Mousley, Keith; Davis, Stacey M.

    2003-01-01

    A study involving 80 undergraduates with deafness enrolled in first-year algebra courses found students were more likely to miscomprehend a relational statement and commit a reversal error when the required arithmetic operation was inconsistent with the statement's relational term. Reading ability influenced performance, and errors decreased as…

  16. Partnering, Collaborating, and Moving Ahead: Transition for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Elise; Cashman-Bakken, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Minnesota leaders have worked hard to provide educational opportunities and employment services for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. The timely formation of pepnet 2 helped shape Minnesota's State Transition Team to "better prepare teachers, families, and students for transition from high school to independent living, employment,…

  17. An Analysis of Deaf Students' Spelling Skills during a Year-Long Instructional Writing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Lisa M.; Dostal, Hannah; McCarthy, Jillian H.; Schwarz, Ilsa; Wolbers, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that spelling presents unique challenges for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (d/hh), and most do not develop age appropriate spelling skills. Spelling errors from 29 middle school d/hh students were analyzed from writing samples that were gathered at the beginning, middle, and end of a year-long writing…

  18. Needs Analysis for Graphic Design Learning Module Based on Technology & Learning Styles of Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Zainuddin; Alias, Norlidah; Nordin, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    The field of Information Communication Technology has offered a promising future for deaf students. Web design, animation, and multimedia application design are a branch of graphic design area, which aim to aid their learning visually. However, most of the technical terms cannot be interpreted in Malaysian sign language. Moreover, the development…

  19. Seeing the Deaf in "Deafness"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasi, Chijioke

    2008-01-01

    This article draws on some of the existing literature on the politics of identity and representation as related to minority group formation. It applies this to constructions of Deaf identity from a cultural and linguistic perspective and contrasts this with dominant constructions of Deaf people as disabled. It highlights a number of ways in which…

  20. Investigating deaf students' use of visual multimedia resources in reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaraizi, Magda; Vekiri, Ioanna; Easterbrooks, Susan R

    2013-01-01

    A mixed research design was used to examine how deaf students used the visual resources of a multimedia software package that was designed to support reading comprehension. The viewing behavior of 8 deaf students, ages 8-12 years, was recorded during their interaction with multimedia software that included narrative texts enriched with Greek Sign Language videos, pictures, and concept maps. Also, students' reading comprehension was assessed through reading comprehension questions and retelling. Analysis of the students' viewing behavior data, their answers to reading comprehension questions, their "think alouds," and their story retells indicated that they used visual resources, but they did not exploit them in a strategic manner to aid their reading comprehension. The study underscores the important role of mediated instruction in "visual literacy" skills that enable students to learn how to process visual aids in a way that supports their reading comprehension.

  1. Criterion-related validity of Raven's Progressive Matrices with deaf residential school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennerhassett, L; Strohmeier, S J; Hibbett, C

    1994-03-01

    Criterion-related validity of Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM) was investigated using a sample of 107 deaf residential adolescents. Data collection involved retrieval of psychoeducational test scores (RPM; WISC-R Performance IQ; VMI-R; Bender-Gestalt; and SAT-HI Reading Comprehension, Spelling, and Language) from student files. Concurrent validity between the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) and WISC-R PIQ was established, with significant (p .001) correlations of .598 (using WISC-R deaf norms) and .616 (using WISC-R hearing norms). Predictive validity was supported by significant correlations between the SPM and SAT-HI Reading Comprehension, Spelling, and Language scores.

  2. Cognitive behaviour modification: a technique for teaching subtraction skills to hearing and deaf/hard-of-hearing elementary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Y A

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of using the Cognitive Behaviour Modification (CBM) technique on the subtraction skills of third grade hearing and deaf/hard-of-hearing students. The results indicated that the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students and the CBM and non-CBM hearing students made more progress in solving the subtraction problems than the non-CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students. The results also showed that there were no significant differences between the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing and the non-CBM hearing students; and there were no significant differences between the CBM and non-CBM hearing students. The results revealed that the CBM hearing students achieved significantly higher post-test scores than the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students. However, the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students obtained a significantly higher gain score compared to the CBM and non-CBM hearing students. Implications for teachers and suggestions for future research are discussed in this paper.

  3. MULTI VARIABLE EVAULATION OF READING COMPREHENSION SKILLS DEAF STUDENTS AT SECONDARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necati Demir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate reading comprehension skills of deaf students at secondary schools according to some of variables (reading comprehension aim of critique objectives in the Turkish curriculum, gender, and grade level The research was done on 40 boarding and day students at Hatay Hurriyet Secondary School for the Deaf (5th grade (7 students, 6th grade (15 students, 7th grade (8 students and 8th grade (7 students. These students are heavily hearing impaired but they don’t use any hearing-aid or cochlear implant. In the research were two different data collection tools used: “5th Grade Reading Comprehension Test” and“6th – 8th Grades Reading Comprehension Test”. Scores from reading comprehension tests do not differentiate according to gender and grade level. As for the attainments, 5th-8th grade deaf students are most successful at these: “they make use of pictures for interpretation of what is read.” and “They interpret text-related pictures.”

  4. Classroom attributes and achievement test scores for deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, J

    1994-10-01

    This study examined reading comprehension and mathematics computation achievement of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in a variety of school settings. Data were collected by Gallaudet University's Center for Assessment and Demographic Studies during its 1990 standardization of the 8th Edition Stanford Achievement Test. Descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used to analyze the relationships among achievement scores, classroom attributes, and demographic factors associated with achievement. Based on the results of this study, inclusion with hearing students in regular classrooms is related to a variety of demographic factors. When reading comprehension and mathematics computation scores are adjusted for these factors, they are higher for the deaf and hard-of-hearing students in regular classrooms. However, it is not known whether the higher achievement is due to inclusion or whether students were selected for inclusion due to their higher achievement levels.

  5. The Educational Workshops Importance of Students in Teaching-learning Deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina Cristina de Oliveira Vons

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive educational workshops can be used as teaching strategies for deaf students to integrate into society, allowing who are beneficiaries of diversified teaching methods, encouraging them to become active citizens in their rights and duties according to their potential. In order to build knowledge collectively, inclusive educational workshops were developed as the project methodology "The Natural Science Museum Goes to School: a proposal for inclusive education", which aimed to raise awareness among deaf students of the School of Special Education Helen Keller Caxias do Sul / RS on the importance of environmental preservation. The workshops allowed autonomy in the construction of knowledge as related theory with practice, creating situations where students stopped being only learning receivers. Workshops were held as hanging garden, environmental commitment, sensory garden, animals in origami, green puppet, puppet fish and terrarium. Participated in these activities students from 1st to 9th grades of elementary school and adult education, covering 102 participants. During the workshops inquiries were carried out, encouraging students to share prior knowledge with colleagues and enabling these acquire new environmental information, making meaningful learning. Pedagogical workshops should be used as support tools in the classroom, and worked in continuous and interdisciplinary way. As a result, deaf students feel valued and producers of their knowledge and will experience different activities recognizing the importance of learning to their daily lives.

  6. Designing an American Sign Language Avatar for Learning Computer Science Concepts for Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students and Deaf Interpreters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Stefan; Osborne, Lawrence; Smith, Zanthia

    2013-01-01

    The current learning process of Deaf or Hard of Hearing (D/HH) students taking Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses needs, in general, a sign interpreter for the translation of English text into American Sign Language (ASL) signs. This method is at best impractical due to the lack of availability of a specialized sign…

  7. Mathematics reform in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, C M

    1998-03-01

    In response to increased demand for competent workers who possess skills in problem solving, cooperative work, and technology, education professionals have set out to reform mathematics education. The purpose of the present study was to determine the state of mathematics reform in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students. A national survey was sent to administrators and faculty at schools for the Deaf seeking information on mathematics programs and instruction. Data were analyzed by profession (i.e., administrator, teacher) and grade level (K-4, 5-8, 9-12). Results show that some aspects of reform (e.g., problem solving, use of concrete materials) have been incorporated into the deaf education mathematics curriculum but that many 'traditional' techniques (e.g., drill and practice, rote memorization) remain in use. Data support the need for increased attention to mathematics education reform within deaf education. Recommendations are provided to professionals in the field to better prepare students for the 21st century.

  8. Evaluating a Health Belief Model-Based Educational Program for School Injury Prevention among Hard-of-Hearing/Deaf High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Vejdani-Aram

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: While all students are vulnerable to injuries, such vulnerability may even be higher in the deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Therefore, this study evaluated a health belief model-based educational program to prevent school injuries among deaf and hard-of-hearing high school students. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on all deaf and hard-of-hearing students who attended two special schools in Hamadan (Iran during 2014. They were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n = 23 or the control group (n = 27. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire containing items on demographic characteristics, constructs of the health belief model, and knowledge and preventive behaviors. In both groups, the questionnaires were filled out through interviews before and two months after the intervention. The intervention included distributing booklets and holding five educational sessions. Data were analyzed with paired t, independent t, chi square, and Fisher’s exact tests in SPSS16. Results: After the educational intervention, the mean scores of knowledge (P=0.002, preventive behaviors (P=0.001, and constructs of the health belief model, i.e. perceived severity (P=0.001, perceived benefits (P=0.001, self-efficacy (P=0.001, and cues to action (P=0.001, were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Conclusion: According to our findings, an educational intervention based on the health belief model can promote behaviors to prevent school injuries among deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

  9. Resources ancillary services and classroom instruction: thoughts of a deaf-blind social work student and her teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Teresa V; Smith, Ashleigh

    2006-01-01

    This article is the story of a social work instructor and her deaf-blind student. The chapter includes: (a) an overview of Gallaudet University, focusing on the Social Work Program and the Office of Students with Disabilities program, (b) personal background information about the student and her professor, and (c) perspectives of the educational process by both the student and her instructor. The article concludes with recommendations to both students and instructors for addressing the needs of deaf-blind students in the classroom and university setting.

  10. Survey and Analysis of Dental Caries in Students at a Deaf-Mute High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling; Cong, Xiao-Na; Tang, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping-Min

    2012-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted to assess and compare the prevalence of dental caries of 229 deaf adolescents in a special senior high school and to identify factors related to dental caries, with a match group of 196 healthy adolescents in a normal senior high school, in Jiangsu province of East China. In this study the prevalence…

  11. Survey and Analysis of Dental Caries in Students at a Deaf-Mute High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling; Cong, Xiao-Na; Tang, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping-Min

    2012-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted to assess and compare the prevalence of dental caries of 229 deaf adolescents in a special senior high school and to identify factors related to dental caries, with a match group of 196 healthy adolescents in a normal senior high school, in Jiangsu province of East China. In this study the prevalence…

  12. Impact of correcting visual impairment and low vision in deaf-mute students in Pune, India

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    Parikshit Gogate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate visual acuity and vision function before and after providing spectacles and low vision devices (LVDs in deaf-mute students. Settings: Schools for deaf-mute in West Maharashtra. Methods: Hearing-impaired children in all special schools in Pune district underwent detailed visual acuity testing (with teachers' help, refraction, external ocular examination, and fundoscopy. Students with refractive errors and low vision were provided with spectacles and LVD. The LV Prasad-Functional Vision Questionnaire consisting of twenty items was administered to each subject before and after providing spectacles, LVDs. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: 252/929 (27.1% students had a refractive error. 794 (85.5% were profound deaf. Two-hundred and fifty students were dispensed spectacles and LVDs. Mean LogMAR visual acuity before introduction of spectacles and LVDs were 0.33 ± 0.36 which improved to 0.058 (P < 0.0001 after intervention. It was found that difference in functional vision pre- and post-intervention was statistically significant (P < 0.0001 for questions 1–19. The most commonly reported difficulties were for performing distance task like reading the bus destination (58.7%, making out the bus number (51.1%, copying from blackboard (47.7%, and seeing whether somebody is waving hand from across the road (45.5%. In response to question number 20, 57.4% of students felt that their vision was much worse than their friend's vision, which was reduced to 17.6% after dispensing spectacles and LVDs. Conclusion: Spectacle and LVD reduced visual impairment and improved vision function in deaf-mute students, augmenting their ability to negotiate in and out of school.

  13. Impact of correcting visual impairment and low vision in deaf-mute students in Pune, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parikshit; Bhusan, Shashi; Ray, Shantanu; Shinde, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate visual acuity and vision function before and after providing spectacles and low vision devices (LVDs) in deaf-mute students. Settings: Schools for deaf-mute in West Maharashtra. Methods: Hearing-impaired children in all special schools in Pune district underwent detailed visual acuity testing (with teachers' help), refraction, external ocular examination, and fundoscopy. Students with refractive errors and low vision were provided with spectacles and LVD. The LV Prasad-Functional Vision Questionnaire consisting of twenty items was administered to each subject before and after providing spectacles, LVDs. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: 252/929 (27.1%) students had a refractive error. 794 (85.5%) were profound deaf. Two-hundred and fifty students were dispensed spectacles and LVDs. Mean LogMAR visual acuity before introduction of spectacles and LVDs were 0.33 ± 0.36 which improved to 0.058 (P < 0.0001) after intervention. It was found that difference in functional vision pre- and post-intervention was statistically significant (P < 0.0001) for questions 1–19. The most commonly reported difficulties were for performing distance task like reading the bus destination (58.7%), making out the bus number (51.1%), copying from blackboard (47.7%), and seeing whether somebody is waving hand from across the road (45.5%). In response to question number 20, 57.4% of students felt that their vision was much worse than their friend's vision, which was reduced to 17.6% after dispensing spectacles and LVDs. Conclusion: Spectacle and LVD reduced visual impairment and improved vision function in deaf-mute students, augmenting their ability to negotiate in and out of school. PMID:28112130

  14. A inserção do aluno surdo no ensino regular: visão de um grupo de professores do Estado do Paraná Deaf student insertion in regular schools: deaf teachers from Parana State views

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    Ana Cristina Guarinello

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de debater a problemática que envolve a inclusão do aluno surdo no ensino regular, esse estudo se propõe a analisar aspectos envolvidos em tal problemática a partir da visão de um grupo de professores. Para tanto, foi aplicado questionário junto a 36 professores inseridos na Rede Pública do Ensino Fundamental e Médio do Estado do Paraná. A análise dos dados evidencia que as principais dificuldades citadas ora relacionam-se aos próprios professores - à falta de conhecimento acerca da surdez, à dificuldade de interação com o surdo, ao desconhecimento de LIBRAS -, ora aos sujeitos surdos - a própria surdez e a dificuldade de compreensão que tais sujeitos apresentam na ótica dos professores. Cabe ressaltar que os professores, sujeitos dessa pesquisa, não relacionam as suas dificuldades para ensinar com as dificuldades de seus alunos para aprender, como se o desconhecimento dos professores acerca da surdez, por exemplo, não tivesse implicações diretas na aprendizagem dos surdos. Conclui-se que a inclusão de surdos no ensino regular significa mais do que apenas criar vagas e proporcionar recursos materiais, é necessário que a escola e a sociedade sejam inclusivas, assegurando igualdade de oportunidades a todos os alunos e contando com professores capacitados e compromissados com a educação de todos.Since this study aims to discuss the placement of deaf students in regular schools, we intend to analyze various aspects pertaining to such issues from the perspective of a group of teachers of deaf students. We applied a questionnaire to 36 teachers working in public schools in elementary, middle and high school levels in the state of Paraná. The data analysis showed that the main difficulties mentioned were related either to the teachers themselves or to their students. Teacher related issues ranged from the teachers' lack of knowledge about deafness, or to problems concerning interaction with the deaf and lack

  15. An Internship Program for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Polymer-Based Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebe,P.; Cherdack, D.; Guertin, R.; Haas, T.; S. Ince, B.; Valluzzi, R.

    2006-01-01

    We report on our summer internship program in Polymer-Based Nanocomposites, for deaf and hard of hearing undergraduates who engage in classroom and laboratory research work in polymer physics. The unique attributes of this program are its emphasis on: 1. Teamwork; 2. Performance of a start-to-finish research project; 3. Physics of materials approach; and 4. Diversity. Students of all disability levels have participated in this program, including students who neither hear nor voice. The classroom and laboratory components address the materials chemistry and physics of polymer-based nanocomposites, crystallization and melting of polymers, the interaction of X-rays and light with polymers, mechanical properties of polymers, and the connection between thermal processing, structure, and ultimate properties of polymers. A set of Best Practices is developed for accommodating deaf and hard of hearing students into the laboratory setting. The goal is to bring deaf and hard of hearing students into the larger scientific community as professionals, by providing positive scientific experiences at a formative time in their educational lives.

  16. Polymer-Based Nanocomposites: An Internship Program for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Cherdack, Daniel; Seyhan Ince-Gunduz, B.; Guertin, Robert; Haas, Terry; Valluzzi, Regina

    2007-03-01

    We report on our summer internship program in Polymer-Based Nanocomposites, for deaf and hard of hearing undergraduates who engage in classroom and laboratory research work in polymer physics. The unique attributes of this program are its emphasis on: 1. Teamwork; 2. Performance of a start-to-finish research project; 3. Physics of materials approach; and 4. Diversity. Students of all disability levels have participated in this program, including students who neither hear nor voice. The classroom and laboratory components address the materials chemistry and physics of polymer-based nanocomposites, crystallization and melting of polymers, the interaction of X-rays and light with polymers, mechanical properties of polymers, and the connection between thermal processing, structure, and ultimate properties of polymers. A set of Best Practices is developed for accommodating deaf and hard of hearing students into the laboratory setting. The goal is to bring deaf and hard of hearing students into the larger scientific community as professionals, by providing positive scientific experiences at a formative time in their educational lives.

  17. Instruction and Service Time Decisions: Itinerant Services to Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antia, Shirin D; Rivera, M Christina

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) describe the specific kinds of services provided by itinerant teachers to deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students in general education settings, (b) examine the relationship between student academic performance and instructional support provided by the itinerant teacher, and (c) examine how service provision decisions are made by itinerant teachers. We used quantitative and qualitative data collected during a 5-year longitudinal study. Data were obtained from teacher questionnaires, standardized achievement tests, and interviews. Results indicated that itinerant teachers of DHH students provided direct academic instruction to 60% of students with the majority of students receiving instruction in reading and writing. They provided instruction in nonacademic areas to 80% of students with a majority of students receiving instruction in self-advocacy. Low-achieving students were the most likely to receive academic instruction from the itinerant teacher. Decisions regarding service time were influenced by student needs and performance, age, parental request, and transitions.

  18. Talking about Emotional Education to Adolescent Deaf and Dumb Students%浅析对青春期聋哑学生的情感教育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄俊美

    2012-01-01

    聋哑学生作为特殊的群体有着自身的特点,但聋生进入青春期后和正常的中学生一样,都有着对异性的好奇、对身体变化的惶恐。对于这些青春期特有的懵懂和困惑,老师和家长如果处理不好,同样会引发聋生早恋和身心方面的彷徨和焦虑,还会对他们的学习和未来的工作、生活造成负面影响。老师该如何做好聋哑学生青春期的思想教育呢?本文结合聋生自身的特点,提出让“爱”始终贯穿在聋生的情感教育中,为帮助聋哑学生平稳渡过青春期提供一些参考。%Deaf and dumb students have their own characteristics as a special group, but when deaf students enter puberty, they are the same as other normal high school students, have a curiosity of the opposite sex, fear of physical changes. Unique to these adolescent ignorant and confused, teachers and parents, if not handled well, the same will lead to Deaf puppy love and the physical and psychological aspects of loss and anxiety, but also for their learning and future work life have a negative impact. Teachers how to do good ideological education to deaf students' of the adolescent? In this paper, the deaf own characteristics, so that "love" runs through the emotional education of deaf students, provide some reference to help deaf students a smooth transition in adolescence.

  19. Assessing the writing of deaf college students: reevaluating a direct assessment of writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schley, Sara; Albertini, John

    2005-01-01

    The NTID Writing Test was developed to assess the writing ability of postsecondary deaf students entering the National Technical Institute for the Deaf and to determine their appropriate placement into developmental writing courses. While previous research (Albertini et al., 1986; Albertini et al., 1996; Bochner, Albertini, Samar, & Metz, 1992) has shown the test to be reliable between multiple test raters and as a valid measure of writing ability for placement into these courses, changes in curriculum and the rater pool necessitated a new look at interrater reliability and concurrent validity. We evaluated the rating scores for 236 samples from students who entered the college during the fall 2001. Using a multiprong approach, we confirmed the interrater reliability and the validity of this direct measure of assessment. The implications of continued use of this and similar tests in light of definitions of validity, local control, and the nature of writing are discussed.

  20. Roles and responsibilities of itinerant specialist teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Susan; Cue, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The roles and responsibilities of itinerant specialist teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students were examined. Data were collected through surveys of practicing teachers, interviews, and school observations. Questions focused on tasks itinerant teachers perform most often in their jobs, where they learned these tasks, and whether they would be interested in continuing education for a particular task. Tasks most frequently listed by respondents involved direct work with deaf and hard of hearing students followed by consultation with regular education teachers, developing individualized education plans, coordinating meetings and support services, providing information to parents, and managing equipment such as hearing aids and FM systems. Only 17% of the respondents said they learned these skills through teacher preparation programs, compared with 65% who learned on the job, and many expressed interestin taking workshops or courses in specific skill areas.

  1. Acoustics outreach program for the deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.

    2016-03-01

    The Hear and See methodology has often been used as a means of enhancing pedagogy by focusing on the two strongest learning senses, but this naturally does not apply to deaf or hard of hearing students. Because deaf students' prior nonaural experiences with sound will vary significantly from those of students with typical hearing, different methods must be used to build understanding. However, the sensory-focused pedagogical principle can be applied in a different way for the Deaf by utilizing the senses of touch and sight, called here the ``See and Feel'' method. This presentation will provide several examples of how acoustics demonstrations have been adapted to create an outreach program for a group of junior high students from a school for the Deaf and discuss challenges encountered.

  2. Conversational skills in a semistructured interview and self-concept in deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Núria; Ramspott, Anna; Pareto, Irenka D

    2007-01-01

    The starting point for this study is the importance of linguistic competence in deaf students as part of their process of socialization and the formation of their self-concept. With the 56 deaf students who participated in the research, we consider the following sociodemographic variables: age, sex and degree of hearing loss, and the educational factor with respect to the mode of mainstream schooling. Self-concept was explored using the Spanish version of the Self Development Questionnaire (SDQ; I. Elexpuru, 1992) and the TST-Who Am I? test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland (1954). To obtain the data for conversational competence, a conversation was held with a hearing adult. An explanation is given of the criteria for pragmatic analysis. The main results highlight the relationship between positive self-concept and most aspects of conversational competence. The study concludes with pedagogical procedures for integration, including specific strategies for teaching conversational skills to deaf pupils through nondeaf pupils and vice versa.

  3. Thinking style changes among deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-fang

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how university students' thinking styles changed over a single academic year by twice administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II to 256 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) students and 286 hearing students from art and design academic disciplines in China. Results showed that after having studied at the university for one academic year, hearing students showed increased use of Type I thinking styles (more creativity generated, less structured, and more complex) and less use of Type II thinking styles (more norm favoring, more structured, and more simplistic), whereas DHH students demonstrated increased use of both Type I and Type II thinking styles. Moreover, students' changes in thinking styles differed across university class levels. The contributions, limitations, and implications of the present research are discussed.

  4. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  5. Chinese Writing of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students and Normal-Hearing Peers from Complex Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiyuan; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals usually face a greater challenge to learn to write than their normal-hearing counterparts. Due to the limitations of traditional research methods focusing on microscopic linguistic features, a holistic characterization of the writing linguistic features of these language users is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by adopting the methodology of linguistic complex networks. Two syntactic dependency networks are built in order to compare the macroscopic linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students and those of their normal-hearing peers. One is transformed from a treebank of writing produced by Chinese deaf or hard-of-hearing students, and the other from a treebank of writing produced by their Chinese normal-hearing counterparts. Two major findings are obtained through comparison of the statistical features of the two networks. On the one hand, both linguistic networks display small-world and scale-free network structures, but the network of the normal-hearing students' exhibits a more power-law-like degree distribution. Relevant network measures show significant differences between the two linguistic networks. On the other hand, deaf or hard-of-hearing students tend to have a lower language proficiency level in both syntactic and lexical aspects. The rigid use of function words and a lower vocabulary richness of the deaf or hard-of-hearing students may partially account for the observed differences. PMID:27920733

  6. Large-scale academic achievement testing of deaf and hard-of-hearing students: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Sen; Mitchell, Ross E

    2012-01-01

    The first large-scale, nationwide academic achievement testing program using Stanford Achievement Test (Stanford) for deaf and hard-of-hearing children in the United States started in 1969. Over the past three decades, the Stanford has served as a benchmark in the field of deaf education for assessing student academic achievement. However, the validity and reliability of using the Stanford for this special student population still require extensive scrutiny. Recent shifts in educational policy environment, which require that schools enable all children to achieve proficiency through accountability testing, warrants a close examination of the adequacy and relevance of the current large-scale testing of deaf and hard-of-hearing students. This study has three objectives: (a) it will summarize the historical data over the last three decades to indicate trends in academic achievement for this special population, (b) it will analyze the current federal laws and regulations related to educational testing and special education, thereby identifying gaps between policy and practice in the field, especially identifying the limitations of current testing programs in assessing what deaf and hard-of-hearing students know, and (c) it will offer some insights and suggestions for future testing programs for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

  7. Evaluation of Educational Multimedia Support System for Students with Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poobrasert, Onintra; Cercone, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The use of a multimedia program as a teaching tool, especially for special needs students, offers sufficient and personal attention to the student using it, while allowing instruction to proceed at the student's pace and also supporting in motivation. The purposes of this proposal are (1) to examine the degree of effectiveness of a multimedia…

  8. Including deaf and hard-of-hearing students with co-occurring disabilities in the accommodations discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppo, Rachel H T; Cawthon, Stephanie W; Bond, Mark P

    2014-04-01

    Students who are deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH) are a low-incidence group of students; however, SDHH also have a high incidence of additional disabilities (SDHH+). Many SDHH and SDHH+ require accommodations for equal access to classroom instruction and assessment, particularly in mainstreamed educational settings where spoken English is the primary language. Accommodations for SDHH, overall, have increased under federal legislation including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act and the No Child Left Behind Act. Unfortunately, specific practice recommendations for SDHH+ and their unique needs are often lacking in the research literature. This article presents findings regarding accommodations use by SDHH and SDHH+ from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2. Initial logistic regression analysis found no differences in accommodations use of SDHH and SDHH+. However, logistic regression analysis that compared specific additional disability groups with the larger overall SDHH group did find differences in accommodations use for two SDHH+ groups: students who had a learning disability and students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This article includes a discussion of the implications of these findings for both research and practice.

  9. Academic status of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in public schools: student, home, and service facilitators and detractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Susanne; Antia, Shirin D; Kreimeyer, Kathryn H

    2008-01-01

    We examined facilitators and detractors of academic success of 25 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) students selected from a pool of 187 students attending general education classes and enrolled in a study of academic progress. Interviews with their teachers of DHH, general education teachers, principals, parents, interpreters, and students themselves were analyzed for child, family, and school facilitators and detractors of academic status. Facilitators included student self-advocacy and motivation, high family and school expectations, families' ability to help with homework, and good communication between professionals. Detractors included additional disabilities and poor family-school communication. A comparison of above- and below-average students revealed no single distinguishing facilitator or detractor. Each above-average student had many facilitators, whereas each below-average student had several significant detractors.

  10. Instruction in Metacognitive Strategies to Increase Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M.; Rivera, Maria C.; Antia, Shirin D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this intervention study was to examine the use of a metacognitive strategy--the Comprehension, Check, and Repair Strategy--on strategic reading behavior, nonstrategic reading behavior, and reading comprehension of students who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). A multiple baseline design was used across 3 teacher-student dyads.…

  11. A Critical Analysis of the Use of MCE Systems with Deaf Students: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasgow, Erik; Paul, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents a critical evaluation of the use of Pidgin Signed English (PSE) and three manually coded English (MCE) systems, signed English, Seeing Essential English, and Signing Exact English with deaf students. It concludes that the use of MCE systems is unlikely to result in English proficiency for many students with severe to profound…

  12. Behavior Change in a Student with a Dual Diagnosis of Deafness and Pervasive Development Disorder: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, S. R.; Handley, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    The broad term "pervasive developmental disorder" (PPD) describes a set of symptoms that occur along a continuum of severity; these symptoms are often referred to as "autism spectrum disorders" (ASDs). Little is known about the incidence and prevalence of ASDs among students who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH). Teachers of DHH students, who must…

  13. Effect of Peer Éducation on Deaf Secondary School

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sepamte teaching of deaf students using ... Prepost group differential scores for knowledge of the causes, modes of transmission and methods of prevention ..... three months preeeding data collection was exam» ..... AIDS and I don't want to hear.

  14. Relatos de alunos surdos acerca da Escola Especial = Reports of deaf students on the Special School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Balan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente recorte (adaptado apresenta uma análise das entrevistas feitas com três sujeitos surdos acerca das suas percepções sobre suas experiências educativas escolares no contexto das instituições especiais de ensino. Confirma-se, por meio do presente estudo, que os alunos estão cientes de algumas dificuldades das escolas especiais e sentem-se prejudicados por essas falhas. As análises das entrevistas realizadas, acerca das percepções dos alunos surdos sobre suas experiências educativas escolares nas escolas especiais, possibilitaram-nos reconhecer, por meio dos relatos dos próprios surdos, fatos recorrentes no espaço da escola especial, que influenciam ou mesmo delimitam a qualidade da educação destes estudantes.This excerpt (adapted presents an analysis of interviews performed with three (3 deaf students about their perceptions and educational experiences in the context of educational institutions and special education. Through this study it is confirmed that students are aware of some difficulties of special schools, besides feeling prejudiced because of these flaws. The analysis of the interviews about some perceptions of deaf students on their educational experiences in special schools allowed identifying, through their reports, recurring events within the special school, which nfluence or even limit the quality of education for these students.

  15. Mental health of deaf and hard-of-hearing adolescents: what the students say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P Margaret; Cornes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the mental health problems of 89 deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) adolescents in New South Wales, Tasmania, and Western Australia. Participants completed the written (for oral students) or signed version for competent Australian Sign Language (Auslan) users version of the Youth Self Report (YSR). Students were educated in a range of educational settings, had varying degrees of hearing loss, and used a range of communication modes. Results showed that, overall, DHH students reported increased levels of mental health problems compared with hearing peers. The broadband syndromes were more than 3 times more likely to be reported, while the narrowband syndromes were between 2 and 7 times more likely. A binary logistic regression analysis showed that the language used at home was a significant predictor of mental health problems. The implications of these findings for the social, emotional, and mental well-being of DHH students and the training of professionals are discussed.

  16. Sudden Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Sudden Deafness On this page: What is sudden deafness? What ... I find additional information about SSHL? What is sudden deafness? Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL), commonly known as ...

  17. Innovation in teaching deaf students physics and astronomy in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfirov, Milen; Saeva, Svetoslava; Popov, Tsviatko

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new strategy to be implemented in Bulgarian schools in teaching physics and astronomy to students with impaired hearing at grades 7 (13-year-old students) and 8 (14-year-old students). The strategy provides effective education for students with hearing disabilities in mainstream schools as well as for those attending specialized schools. A multimedia CD has been developed, which offers a large number of basic terms from the corresponding fields of physics and astronomy, accompanied by textual explanation and various illustrations. The terms are explained in Bulgarian, Bulgarian Sign Language and English. This multimedia product can be used by children with hearing disabilities, as well as by children without disorders.

  18. Deaf students and their classroom communication: an evaluation of higher order categorical interactions among school and background characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Thomas E; Anderson, Melissa L

    2010-01-01

    This article investigated to what extent age, use of a cochlear implant, parental hearing status, and use of sign in the home determine language of instruction for profoundly deaf children. Categorical data from 8,325 profoundly deaf students from the 2008 Annual Survey of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children and Youth were analyzed using chi-square automated interaction detector, a stepwise analytic procedure that allows the assessment of higher order interactions among categorical variables. Results indicated that all characteristics were significantly related to classroom communication modality. Although younger and older students demonstrated a different distribution of communication modality, for both younger and older students, cochlear implantation had the greatest effect on differentiating students into communication modalities, yielding greater gains in the speech-only category for implanted students. For all subgroups defined by age and implantation status, the use of sign at home further segregated the sample into communication modality subgroups, reducing the likelihood of speech only and increasing the placement of students into signing classroom settings. Implications for future research in the field of deaf education are discussed.

  19. Hands-on earth science with students at schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Earth science teachers at schools for the Deaf face a variety of challenges. This community of students has a wide range of language skills, teaching resources can be limited and often teachers are not trained in geosciences. An NSF CAREER grant provided an opportunity to make a difference to this community and foster earth science learning at 8 schools for the Deaf around the country. We designed hands-on deformational sandboxes for the teachers and provided accompanying curriculum materials. The sandbox is a physical model of crustal deformation that students can manipulate to test hypotheses. The visual nature of the sandbox was well-suited for the spatial grammar of American Sign Language used by these students. Furthermore, language skills were enhanced by scaffolded observation, sketch, annotation, discussion, interpretation assignments. Geoscience training of teachers was strengthened with workshops and three 5-day field trips for teachers and selected students to Utah, western New England and southern California. The field trips provided opportunity for students to work as geoscientists observing, interpreting, discussing and presenting their investigations. Between field trips, we set up videoconferences from the UMass experimental lab with the high school earth science classrooms. These sessions facilitated dialog between students and researchers at UMass. While the project set out to provide geoscience learning opportunities for students at Schools for the Deaf, the long lasting impact was the improved geoscience training of teachers, most of whom had limited post-secondary earth science training. The success of the project also rested on the dedication of the teachers to their students and their willingness to try new approaches and experiences. By tapping into a community of 6 teachers, who already shared curriculum and had fantastic leadership, the project was able to have significant impact and exceed the initial goals. The project has led to a

  20. Instruction in metacognitive strategies to increase deaf and hard-of-hearing students' reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M; Rivera, Maria C; Antia, Shirin D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this intervention study was to examine the use of a metacognitive strategy--the Comprehension, Check, and Repair Strategy--on strategic reading behavior, nonstrategic reading behavior, and reading comprehension of students who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). A multiple baseline design was used across 3 teacher-student dyads. Frequency data were collected on students' strategic reading behavior. Reading comprehension was assessed by counting the number of details the students retold after reading a content area passage. Results showed (a) an increase in strategic reading behavior for Students A, B, and C; and (b) an increase in reading comprehension for Student A, and possibly for Student B. Social validity data indicated high acceptability of the intervention. Teachers not only continued to use the strategy with their students after the study ended but also introduced it to other students with whom they worked. Instruction in metacognitive strategies to increase strategic reading behavior may be an effective means by which to increase reading comprehension for D/HH students. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Interactive Media to Support Language Acquisition for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Becky Sue; Hancock, Robert; Crain-Dorough, Mindy; Oescher, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Tangible computing combines digital feedback with physical interactions - an important link for young children. Through the use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, a real-world object (i.e. a chair) or a symbolic toy (i.e. a stuffed bear) can be tagged so that students can activate multimedia learning modules automatically. The…

  2. Thinking Styles and University Self-Efficacy Among Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-Fang; Hu, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how students' thinking styles are related to their university self-efficacy, by administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II and the University Self-Efficacy Scale to 366 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) and 467 hearing university students in mainland China. Results showed that, among all participants, those with Type I styles (i.e., more creativity-generating, less structured, and cognitively more complex) had higher levels of university self-efficacy. At the same time, DHH students with Type II styles (i.e., more norm-favoring, more structured, and cognitively more simplistic) had lower levels of university self-efficacy. The contributions, limitations, and implications of the present research are discussed.

  3. Explicitly teaching English through the air to students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jessica G; Gardner, Ralph; Leighner, Ross; Clancy, Shannon; Garner, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the Language for Learning curriculum (Engelmann & Osborne, 1999) on through-the-air (i.e., signed and/or spoken) English skills for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) were examined by means of a single-subject, concurrent-multiple-probes-across-participants design. Four 11-year-old participants varied in auditory access, IQ, and age at amplification and/or cochlear implantation. All students showed increased accuracy of through-the-air English skills after the intervention (i.e., 15-20 lessons) and maintained these skills when assessed 1 week and 1 month later. The findings yielded some promising results indicating that a Direct Instruction curriculum may be an efficacious way to teach morphology and syntax to DHH students.

  4. Phonological awareness and decoding in deaf/hard-of-hearing students who use visual phonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narr, Rachel F

    2008-01-01

    Visual phonics, a system of 45 hand and symbol cues that represent the phonemes of spoken English, has been used as a tool in literacy instruction with deaf/hard-of-hearing (DHH) students for over 20 years. Despite years of anecdotal support, there is relatively little published evidence of its impact on reading achievement. This study was designed to examine the relationship between performance on a phonological awareness task, performance on a decoding task, reading ability, and length of time in literacy instruction with visual phonics for 10 DHH kindergarten through Grade 3 students receiving academic instruction with sign-supported English and American Sign Language. Findings indicate that these students were able to use phonological information to make rhyme judgments and to decode; however, no relationship between performance on reading ability and length of time in literacy instruction with visual phonics was found.

  5. Successful Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Culturally and/or Linguistically Diverse in Inclusive Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayantoye, Catherine Adekemi; Luckner, John L

    2016-01-01

    The population of students who are deaf or hard of hearing is becoming more culturally and/or linguistically diverse. However, there is a paucity of practitioner literature and research available to professionals and families to guide decision making about daily practices with these students and their families. The study identified factors that contribute to the success of students who are deaf or hard of hearing and from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds who receive the majority of their education in inclusive settings. Students were recruited from two schools in two school districts in a western state. Students, educators, interpreters, and parents participated in individual in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Observations of the students were also done. Analysis of the data included coding the transcribed interviews and the field notes to identify common themes. Seven themes emerged and are reported. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  6. Considering the Sociolinguistic Impact of Instability of Educational Philosophy on Reading Achievement of Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sandra G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider the sociolinguistic impact of philosophical instability on reading comprehension achievement of students who are deaf and hard of hearing at a state school for the deaf. The research conducted examined the sociolinguistic impact by investigating the following: (1) what non-malleable factors influenced…

  7. Adapting Experiential Learning to Develop Problem-Solving Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Engineering Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Matthew M; Carrano, Andres L; Dannels, Wendy A

    2016-10-01

    Individuals who are deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professions, and this may be due in part to their level of preparation in the development and retention of mathematical and problem-solving skills. An approach was developed that incorporates experiential learning and best practices of STEM instruction to give first-year DHH students enrolled in a postsecondary STEM program the opportunity to develop problem-solving skills in real-world scenarios. Using an industrial engineering laboratory that provides manufacturing and warehousing environments, students were immersed in real-world scenarios in which they worked on teams to address prescribed problems encountered during the activities. The highly structured, Plan-Do-Check-Act approach commonly used in industry was adapted for the DHH student participants to document and communicate the problem-solving steps. Students who experienced the intervention realized a 14.6% improvement in problem-solving proficiency compared with a control group, and this gain was retained at 6 and 12 months, post-intervention. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing…

  9. Inquiry-Based Science Instruction and Performance Literacy for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing students, who cannot successfully access and utilize information in print, experience various difficulties in conventional science instruction, which heavily relies on lectures and textbooks. The purpose of the present review is threefold. First, an overview of inquiry-based science instruction reform, including the…

  10. General and Specific Characteristics of a University-School Partnership: Promoting Learning Opportunities for Students with Deafness or Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Joong; Park, Yong Joon; Cho, Jeong-IL; Kim, Daesang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify six key features involved in the development and enhancement of a university-school partnership and to share insights on how these features can be used to promote richer experiential learning opportunities of both university students and young children with deafness or hearing impairments, eventually…

  11. With Little Research out There It's a Matter of Learning What Works in Teaching Students with Deafness and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Lee Ann; Krakowski, Brandi; Thiessen, Ann

    2008-01-01

    The development of language and literacy is the foundation for all other learning. This statement is the guiding philosophy at the Iowa School for the Deaf (ISD). Teachers at ISD believe that intensive, highly structured early intervention and education work best to support cognitive and communication development in their students. However, little…

  12. Practice Brief: Accommodating Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Operating Room Environments--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Lisa M.; Laird-Metke, Elisa; Rollins, Mark; Gandhi, Seema; Stechert, Martin; Jain, Neera R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of deaf students in the health professions require accommodations in the clinical setting to ensure effective learning and accurate communication. Although classroom learning barriers have long been identified and addressed, barriers to clinical education have been far less analyzed. Operating room clerkships, which include many…

  13. Morphological Knowledge and Students Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, Jessica W.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    Students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) struggle to attain grade-equivalent literacy skills and require education interventions to improve. Recent literature reviews have revealed the need for high-quality intervention research for the following areas of reading: vocabulary development, reading comprehension, reading fluency, and…

  14. Hypertext comprehension of deaf and hard-of-hearing students and students with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Helen; Segers, Eliane; Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-02-01

    This paper provides insight into the reading comprehension of hierarchically structured hypertexts within D/HH students and students with SLI. To our knowledge, it is the first study on hypertext comprehension in D/HH students and students with SLI, and it also considers the role of working memory. We compared hypertext versus linear text comprehension in D/HH students and students with SLI versus younger students without language problems who had a similar level of decoding and vocabulary. The results demonstrated no difference in text comprehension between the hierarchically structured hypertext and the linear text. Text comprehension of D/HH students and students with SLI was comparable to that of the students without language problems. In addition, there was a similar positive predictive value of visuospatial and not verbal working memory on hypertext comprehension for all three groups. The findings implicate that educational settings can make use of hierarchically structured hypertexts as well as linear texts and that children can navigate in the digital world from young age on, even if language or working memory problems are present.

  15. From the Margins to the Spotlight: Diverse Deaf and Hard of Hearing Student Populations and Standardized Assessment Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Designing assessments and tests is one of the more challenging aspects of creating an accessible learning environment for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), particularly for deaf students with a disability (DWD). Standardized assessments are a key mechanism by which the educational system in the United States measures student progress, teacher effectiveness, and the impact of school reform. The diversity of student characteristics within DHH and DWD populations is only now becoming visible in the research literature relating to standardized assessments and their use in large-scale accountability reforms. The purpose of this article is to explore the theoretical frameworks surrounding assessment policy and practice, current research related to standardized assessment and students who are DHH and DWD, and potential implications for practice within both the assessment and instruction contexts.

  16. Deaf Students as a Linguistic and Cultural Minority: Shifting Perspectives and Implications for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Michael; Lieberman, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children have traditionally been perceived and educated as a special needs population. Over the past several decades, many factors have converged to enable a shift in perspective to one in which deaf children are viewed as a cultural and linguistic minority, and the education of deaf children is approached from a bilingual framework. This…

  17. Grammar structures and deaf and hard of hearing students: a review of past performance and a report of new findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Joanna E; Kirby, Susannah

    2013-01-01

    Results of a study are presented that suggest the grammatical structures of English some deaf and hard of hearing students struggle to acquire. A review of the literature from the past 40 years is presented, exploring particular lexical and morphosyntactic areas in which deaf and hard of hearing children have traditionally exhibited difficulty. Twenty-six participants from an urban day school for the deaf used the LanguageLinks software, produced by Laureate Learning Systems, for 10 minutes daily for 9 weeks. The descriptive analysis of the results expands on findings reported by Cannon, Easterbrooks, Gagne, and Beal-Alvarez (2011). The results indicated that many participants struggled with regular noun singular/plural; accusative first- and second-person singular; noun/verb agreement copular "be"; accusative third-person number/ gender; locative pronominals; auxiliary "be"/regular past "-ed;" and prenominal determiners plural.

  18. INSTITUTIONALIZATION AND PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF DEAF CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRISINA, D. ROBERT; QUIGLEY, STEPHEN

    THE OBJECTIVE WAS TO DETERMINE IF RESIDENTIAL STUDENTS IN INSTITUTIONS FOR THE DEAF PERFORM AT A LOWER LEVEL ON MEASURES OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, SOCIAL MATURITY, AND COMMUNICATION ABILITY THAN A SIMILAR GROUP OF STUDENTS WHO ARE DAY STUDENTS AT THE SAME INSTITUTIONS. SAMPLES OF RESIDENTIAL AND DAY STUDENTS AT 15 INSTITUTIONS EDUCATING DEAF…

  19. American Sign Language and Academic English: Factors Influencing the Reading of Bilingual Secondary School Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Hoffmeister, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    For many years, researchers have sought to understand the reading development of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students. Guided by prior research on DHH and hearing students, in this study we investigate the hypothesis that for secondary school DHH students enrolled in American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual schools for the deaf, academic English proficiency would be a significant predictor of reading comprehension alongside ASL proficiency. Using linear regression, we found statistically significant interaction effects between academic English knowledge and word reading fluency in predicting the reading comprehension scores of the participants. However, ASL remained the strongest and most consistent predictor of reading comprehension within the sample. Findings support a model in which socio-demographic factors, ASL proficiency, and word reading fluency are primary predictors of reading comprehension for secondary DHH students.

  20. Comprehension of texts by deaf elementary school students: The role of grammatical understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Carmen; González-Cuenca, Antonia M; Carrero, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze how the reading process of deaf Spanish elementary school students is affected both by those components that explain reading comprehension according to the Simple View of Reading model: decoding and linguistic comprehension (both lexical and grammatical) and by other variables that are external to the reading process: the type of assistive technology used, the age at which it is implanted or fitted, the participant's socioeconomic status and school stage. Forty-seven students aged between 6 and 13 years participated in the study; all presented with profound or severe prelingual bilateral deafness, and all used digital hearing aids or cochlear implants. Students' text comprehension skills, decoding skills and oral comprehension skills (both lexical and grammatical) were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis indicated that neither the type of assistive technology, age at time of fitting or activation, socioeconomic status, nor school stage could predict the presence or absence of difficulties in text comprehension. Furthermore, logistic regression analysis indicated that neither decoding skills, nor lexical age could predict competency in text comprehension; however, grammatical age could explain 41% of the variance. Probing deeper into the effect of grammatical understanding, logistic regression analysis indicated that a participant's understanding of reversible passive object-verb-subject sentences and reversible predicative subject-verb-object sentences accounted for 38% of the variance in text comprehension. Based on these results, we suggest that it might be beneficial to devise and evaluate interventions that focus specifically on grammatical comprehension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. NARRATIVE OF THE LITERARY EDUCATION IN BILINGUAL EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE WITH DEAF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodenir Becker Karnopp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present analysis of how to set up a teaching practice based on a proposal for bilingual literary education, held at a school for the deaf in Porto Alegre. The research is part of the field of Cultural Studies in Education and Deaf Studies, that carry out their investigations on the centrality that culture takes on global training processes and social change as well as the constitutive role in the formation of identities and subjectivities. This proposal is justified by the importance of analysis of narratives of teaching practices involving the teaching of school subjects, in culturally articulated manner, so that the main theme chosen permeates the language, experiences and content. The empirical data used in the analysis is based on the record of the activities conducted during the period of teaching practice, setting a total of sixteen videos. The analysis of materials enabled the construction of three categories developed from the peculiarities of the process of telling and retelling stories in a bilingual context surrounding the Brazilian Sign Language (Libras and Portuguese. The first category explains the experience of telling and retelling stories in a bilingual context, emphasizing the link between reading, writing and translation. The second category deals with the reading of images held by students, especially the perceptions, judgments and expressions produced; the third category reflects on the construction of the narrative by the student. From this research, it is possible to show that the articulated literature to the proposed bilingual education helps to establish connections between languages and cultures as well as between the proposed school subjects.

  2. Finding friends online: online activities by deaf students and their well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Blom

    Full Text Available Generally, deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH children have fewer friends than hearing peers and their friendships are of a lower quality. The research hypothesis was that using the computer to communicate with new online friends through social network sites or playing games with offline friends is associated with D/HH friendship qualities, because it removes certain communication barriers D/HH face in offline communication settings. With online questionnaires the relation between computer use and online, mixed (offline friend who you also speak in online settings, and offline friendship quality of D/HH and hearing students (18-25 years was compared in both the Netherlands (n = 100 and the United States (n = 122. In addition, the study examined whether the different friendship qualities were related to the participants' well-being. Results showed that, in general, D/HH students' friendship qualities and levels of well-being were similar to their hearing peers. The quality of the mixed friendships was positively related to well-being. Furthermore, the frequency of pc use with both online and offline friends was positively related to friendships qualities in both hearing and D/HH students. A combination of the online and offline friendship seems to be the most important friendship type for both hearing and D/HH students and it is worthwhile to encourage this friendship type.

  3. Finding friends online: online activities by deaf students and their well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Helen; Marschark, Marc; Vervloed, Mathijs P J; Knoors, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Generally, deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) children have fewer friends than hearing peers and their friendships are of a lower quality. The research hypothesis was that using the computer to communicate with new online friends through social network sites or playing games with offline friends is associated with D/HH friendship qualities, because it removes certain communication barriers D/HH face in offline communication settings. With online questionnaires the relation between computer use and online, mixed (offline friend who you also speak in online settings), and offline friendship quality of D/HH and hearing students (18-25 years) was compared in both the Netherlands (n = 100) and the United States (n = 122). In addition, the study examined whether the different friendship qualities were related to the participants' well-being. Results showed that, in general, D/HH students' friendship qualities and levels of well-being were similar to their hearing peers. The quality of the mixed friendships was positively related to well-being. Furthermore, the frequency of pc use with both online and offline friends was positively related to friendships qualities in both hearing and D/HH students. A combination of the online and offline friendship seems to be the most important friendship type for both hearing and D/HH students and it is worthwhile to encourage this friendship type.

  4. 聋哑学生休闲体育生活方式构建研究%Research on Constructing Leisure Sports Lifestyle for Deaf -mute Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林宝

    2015-01-01

    聋哑学生休闲体育生活方式构建是促进聋哑学生身心健康发展的重要途径,是基本人权的体现,是社会文明发展的需要。本文通过文献查阅和实地考察等对聋哑学生这一特殊群体的休闲体育生活方式内涵、构成及构建策略进行探究。认为,聋哑学生休闲体育生活方式构建有其特殊性。对聋哑学生休闲体育生活方式提出了针对性的构建策略。目的更好地为聋哑学生的健康成长服务。%Constructing leisure sports lifestyle is an important way of promoting physical and mental health of deaf-mute students as well as a display of basic human rights and the requirement of social civilization.The paper conducts an exploration of the connotation,components and constructing strategies of leisure sports lifestyle for deaf -mute students,the special group,with methods of literature and field visit.The paper concludes that such construction shows its uniqueness,so it puts forward corresponding constructing strategies of constructing leisure sports lifestyle for deaf -mute students to help them grow up more healthily.

  5. Social Maturity and Executive Function among Deaf Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Kronenberger, William G.; Rosica, Mark; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Durkin, Andreana; Machmer, Elizabeth; Schmitz, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments examined relations among social maturity, executive function, language, and cochlear implant (CI) use among deaf high school and college students. Experiment 1 revealed no differences between deaf CI users, deaf nonusers, and hearing college students in measures of social maturity. However, deaf students (both CI users and…

  6. States' reading outcomes of students who are d/deaf and hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, Susan R; Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S

    2012-01-01

    Historically, researchers have identified that reading outcomes for students in upper grades who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) have typically rested around the late 3rd to early 4th grade. In recent years, wide-scale state-level testing has called into question these prognostications. The authors conducted a descriptive, multiunit, embedded-designs case study of 7 states' data from multiyear annual assessments of reading of participants in grades 3, 5, and 8, and in high school. Participants, states' definitions of reading outcomes, and states' reported reading results are described. The authors, who found that many students are reading at levels above the perceived 3rd-to-4th-grade "glass ceiling," build the case for a more hopeful look at reading outcomes for these students than that of the past and recommend approaches for acquiring wide-scale data that will allow professionals in the field to better understand reading outcomes in this population.

  7. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  8. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  9. DIGITAL TEACHING MATERIAL: A NEW WAY FOR DEAF STUDENTS TO “READ” AND “INTERACT” WITH EDUCATIONAL CONTENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Garcia Miranda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing the elaboration of teaching materials accessible and/or adapted for deaf students, what is supported by the concept of the contemporary educational context as diverse and flexible and by the need to meet the different demands at linguistic, cultural, social and regional levels. In this sense, in order to consider the school as a “space for all”, we must apply the idea that inclusive educational actions are mainly based on socializing regardless of the differences, learning as a relational experience, and interacting as a meaning production mechanism, since this interaction contemplates students’ subjectivity. Thus, the intention of this work is to think about educational actions and material production for deaf students that are named didactic-pedagogical resources, what is theoretically based on the works of Batista (2009, Bunzen; Rojo (2005, Coscarelli (1996, Costa; Paes de Barros (2012, Lacerda; Lodi (2009, Natividade; Pimenta (2009 and Skliar (1999 and others.

  10. Who is where? Characteristics of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in regular and special schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Debra M; Marschark, Marc; Newman, Lynn; Marder, Camille

    2014-04-01

    To address the needs and abilities of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students in different educational settings, it is important to understand who is in which setting. A secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 database was conducted to examine differences in the characteristics of students who attended special schools, such as schools for the deaf, and those who attended regular schools serving a wide variety of students, such as neighborhood, alternative, and charter schools. The study included a nationally (U.S.) representative sample of about 870 DHH secondary school students. Findings from parent interviews and surveys revealed that students who attended only special secondary schools had greater levels of hearing loss, were more likely to use sign language, had more trouble speaking and conversing with others, and were more likely to have low functional mental scores than students who had attended only regular secondary schools. There were no differences in the presence of additional disabilities or cochlear implants between students in the different settings. In many ways, student characteristics did not vary by school type, suggesting that both types of secondary schools serve students with a wide range of needs and abilities.

  11. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2016-04-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students. Two subgroups, differing in ASL proficiency, were compared on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress and the reading comprehension subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition. Findings suggested that students highly proficient in ASL outperformed their less proficient peers in nationally standardized measures of reading comprehension, English language use, and mathematics. Moreover, a regression model consisting of 5 predictors including variables regarding education, hearing devices, and secondary disabilities as well as ASL proficiency and home language showed that ASL proficiency was the single variable significantly predicting results on all outcome measures. This study calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about deaf education by focusing on characteristics shared among successful deaf signing readers, specifically ASL fluency.

  12. Canine deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, George M

    2012-11-01

    Conductive deafness, caused by outer or middle ear obstruction, may be corrected, whereas sensorineural deafness cannot. Most deafness in dogs is congenital sensorineural hereditary deafness, associated with the genes for white pigment: piebald or merle. The genetic cause has not yet been identified. Dogs with blue eyes have a greater likelihood of hereditary deafness than brown-eyed dogs. Other common forms of sensorineural deafness include presbycusis, ototoxicity, noise-induced hearing loss, otitis interna, and anesthesia. Definitive diagnosis of deafness requires brainstem auditory evoked response testing.

  13. El mejorar del lenguaje y la aprendizaje de los estudiantes que son sordos. Hoja de consejos de PEPNet (Improving the Language and Learning of Students Who Are Deaf. PEPNet Tipsheet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This version of "Improving the Language and Learning of Students Who Are Deaf. PEPNet Tipsheet," written in Spanish, offers some suggestions on improving the language and learning of students who are deaf. The saying "Good teaching is good teaching" holds considerable truth when thinking about exemplary practices used in educating students who are…

  14. El mejorar del lenguaje y la aprendizaje de los estudiantes que son sordos. Hoja de consejos de PEPNet (Improving the Language and Learning of Students Who Are Deaf. PEPNet Tipsheet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This version of "Improving the Language and Learning of Students Who Are Deaf. PEPNet Tipsheet," written in Spanish, offers some suggestions on improving the language and learning of students who are deaf. The saying "Good teaching is good teaching" holds considerable truth when thinking about exemplary practices used in educating students who are…

  15. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Navneet

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the incidence and prevalence of suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe risk factors for suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe approaches to intervention and suicide prevention that have been used in deaf populations. Methods A number of electronic databases (e.g. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International, Web of Science, ComDisDome, ASSIA, Education Sage Full Text, Google Scholar, and the grey literature databases FADE and SIGLE were explored using a combination of key words and medical subject headings as search terms. Reference lists of papers were also searched. The Science and Social Sciences Citation Index electronic databases were used to identify studies that had cited key papers. We also contacted experts and organisations with an interest in the field. Results Very few studies focussed specifically on suicide in deaf populations. Those studies that were included (n = 13 generally involved small and unrepresentative samples. There were limited data on the rate of suicidal behaviour in deaf people. One study reported evidence of hearing impairment in 0.2% of all suicide deaths. Another found that individuals with tinnitus seen in specialist clinics had an elevated rate of suicide compared to the general population. The rates of attempted suicide in deaf school and college students during the previous year ranged from 1.7% to 18%, with lifetime rates as high as 30

  16. Deaf Students' Reading and Writing in College: Fluency, Coherence, and Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A; Marschark, Marc; Kincheloe, Pamela J

    2016-07-01

    Research in discourse reveals numerous cognitive connections between reading and writing. Rather than one being the inverse of the other, there are parallels and interactions between them. To understand the variables and possible connections in the reading and writing of adult deaf students, we manipulated writing conditions and reading texts. First, to test the hypothesis that a fluent writing process leads to richer content and a higher degree of coherence in a written summary, we interrupted the writing process with verbal and nonverbal intervening tasks. The negligible effect of the interference indicated that the stimuli texts were not equivalent in terms of coherence and revealed a relationship between coherence of the stimuli texts, amount of content recalled, and coherence of the written summaries. To test for a possible effect of coherence on reading comprehension, we manipulated the coherence of the texts. We found that students understood the more coherent versions of the passages better than the less coherent versions and were able to accurately distinguish between them. However, they were not able to judge comprehensibility. Implications for further research and classroom application are discussed.

  17. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  18. Deaf Epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C.; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf…

  19. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Baker; B. van den Bogaerde

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that th

  20. Prior knowledge of deaf students fluent in brazilian sign languages regarding the algebraic language in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Teresinha Frizzarini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There are few researches with deeper reflections on the study of algebra with deaf students. In order to validate and disseminate educational activities in that context, this article aims at highlighting the deaf students’ prior knowledge, fluent in Brazilian Sign Language, referring to the algebraic language used in high school. The theoretical framework used was Duval’s theory, with analysis of the changes, by treatment and conversion, of different registers of semiotic representation, in particular inequalities. The methodology used was the application of a diagnostic evaluation performed with deaf students, all fluent in Brazilian Sign Language, in a special school located in the north of Paraná State. We emphasize the need to work in both directions of conversion, in different languages, especially when the starting record is the graphic. Therefore, the conclusion reached was that one should not separate the algebraic representation from other records, due to the need of sign language perform not only the communication function, but also the functions of objectification and treatment, fundamental in cognitive development.

  1. Using open captions to revise writing in digital stories composed by d/Deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassman, Barbara K; O'Dell, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Using a nonexperimental design, the researchers explored the effect of captioning as part of the writing process of individuals who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing. Sixty-nine d/Deaf and hard of hearing middle school students composed responses to four writing-to-learn activities in a word processor. Two compositions were revised and published with software that displayed texts as captions to digital images; two compositions were revised with a word processor and published on paper. Analysis showed increases in content-area vocabulary, text length, and inclusion of main ideas and details for texts revised in the captioning software. Given the nonexperimental design, it is not possible to determine the extent to which the results could be attributed to captioned revisions. However, the findings do suggest that the images acted as procedural facilitators, triggering recall of vocabulary and details.

  2. Accommodations Use Patterns in High School and Postsecondary Settings for Students Who Are d/Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W; Leppo, Rachel; Ge, Jin Jin; Bond, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the second National Longitudinal Transition Study (Newman et al., 2011), the authors investigated longitudinal patterns of educational accommodations use in secondary and, later, postsecondary settings by students who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH). The study focused on language and communication (LC) accommodations used primarily by SDHH, plus non-LC accommodations typically used by a broad range of students. Both LC accommodations for standardized testing and instruction showed decreased use in postsecondary settings compared with high school. After student demographic characteristics were controlled for, no relationships were found between types of accommodations students used in high school and those they later used in postsecondary settings. Student accommodations use in postsecondary settings was not significantly predictive of retention or degree completion. However, several student- and parent-level demographic characteristics were predictive of accommodations use in postsecondary settings. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  3. Using balanced and interactive writing instruction to improve the higher order and lower order writing skills of deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Kimberly A

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the findings of balanced and interactive writing instruction used with 16 deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Although the instruction has been used previously, this was the first time it had been modified to suit the specific needs of deaf children and the first time it had been implemented with this subpopulation of students. The intervention took place in two elementary classrooms (N = 8) and one middle school classroom (N = 8) for a total of 21 days. A comparison of pre- and posttest scores on both writing and reading measures evidenced that students made significant gains with use of genre-specific traits, use of contextual language, editing/revising skills, and word identification. Students showed neither gains nor losses with conventions and total word count. In addition, a one-way multiple analysis of variance was used to detect any school-level effects. Elementary students made significantly greater gains with respect to conventions and word identification, and middle school students made significantly greater gains with editing and revising tasks.

  4. Theory, Research, and Practice for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing With Disabilities: Addressing the Challenges from Birth to Postsecondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardino, Caroline; Cannon, Joanna E

    2015-01-01

    Students who are deaf with a disability or disabilities (DWD) constitute nearly half of the population of K-12 learners who are deaf or hard of hearing. However, there is a dearth of information on theory, research, and practice related to these learners. The authors present an overview of (a) how the field of education of students who are D/deaf and hard of hearing might refer to this unique population in a way that represents the learner, not the disability; (b) the demographic data that further define these learners; (c) a theoretical framework within which to guide research and practice; (d) prevalence and frequency of the existing research; and (e) the practices and resources available to guide practitioners and the parents of students who are DWD. Questions are posed to the field on how to continue to improve the theory, research, and pedagogy used with these students.

  5. Hypertext comprehension of deaf and hard-of-hearing students and students with specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.C.; Segers, P.C.J.; Hermans, D.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the reading comprehension of hierarchically structured hypertexts within D/HH students and students with SLI. To our knowledge, it is the first study on hypertext comprehension in D/HH students and students with SLI, and it also considers the role of working memory.

  6. Assessing aspects of creativity in deaf and hearing high school students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanzione, Christopher M; Perez, Susan M; Lederberg, Amy R

    2013-01-01

    ..., a method of assessing creativity, in both deaf and hearing adolescents. We assessed divergent thinking in two domains, figural and verbal, while also adjusting the instructional method in written format, sign language, or spoken English...

  7. Black Deaf Individuals' Reading Skills: Influence of ASL, Culture, Family Characteristics, Reading Experience, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M. Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Gilbert, Gizelle L.; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family…

  8. Sensorineural deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve deafness; Hearing loss - sensorineural; Acquired hearing loss; SNHL; Noise-induced hearing loss; NIHL; Presbycusis ... that carries the signals to the brain. Sensorineural deafness that is present at birth (congenital) is most ...

  9. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablan Branka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children with visual impairments or in schools for children with hearing impairments (in accordance with the primary impairment. However, deaf-blind children cannot be trained by means of special programs for children with hearing impairment, visual impairment or other programs for students with developmental disabilities without specific attention required by such a combination of sensory impairments. Deaf-blindness must be observed as a multiple impairment that requires special work methods, especially in the field of communication, whose development is severely compromised. Communication skills in deaf-blind people can be developed by using the calendar systems. They are designed in such a manner that they can be easily attainable to children with various sensory impairments. Calendars can be used to encourage and develop communication between adult persons and a deaf-blind child.

  10. 聋校数学概念教学案例分析与思考%Some Thoughts on Teaching Deaf Students Mathematical Concepts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      本文阐述了数学概念的特点,分析了聋生数学概念的认知特征,探讨了改善聋生数学概念教学的策略。并理论、特点、案例相结合,诠释聋生数学概念教学的对策。%This paper describes the characteristics of the mathe-matical concepts, analyzes the cognitive characteristics of deaf students' mathematical concepts, explores strategies to improve the teaching of deaf students' mathematical concept. Combining with theory, characteristics, and case, it interprets the counter-measures for the teaching of deaf students' mathematical con-cepts.

  11. Visual Access in Interpreter-Mediated Learning Situations for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing High School Students Where an Artifact Is in Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Sigrid Slettebakk; Thomassen, Gøril

    2016-04-01

    This article highlights interpreter-mediated learning situations for deaf high school students where such mediated artifacts as technical machines, models, and computer graphics are used by the teacher to illustrate his or her teaching. In these situations, the teacher's situated gestures and utterances, and the artifacts will contribute independent pieces of information. However, the deaf student can only have his or her visual attention focused on one source at a time. The problem to be addressed is how the interpreter coordinates the mediation when it comes to deaf students' visual orientation. The presented discourse analysis is based on authentic video recordings from inclusive learning situations in Norway. The theoretical framework consists of concepts of role, footing, and face-work (Goffman, E. (1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. London, UK: Penguin Books). The findings point out dialogical impediments to visual access in interpreter-mediated learning situations, and the article discusses the roles and responsibilities of teachers and educational interpreters.

  12. Views from the field: program directors' perceptions of teacher education and the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Henry; Harney, Jillian

    Arandom sample of directors of programs for the deaf in North America were surveyed to get their views about the skills that teacher education programs need to be teaching future teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The directors were queried about literacy practices, classroom management strategies, and communication strategies used in their programs, and were encouraged to comment freely on the questionnaire items presented to them. Program directors predicted a need for more itinerant and resource teachers. The survey also revealed that programs for the deaf are highly behaviorist (i.e., You do this and you'll get that) in the way they induce students to learn and in how they manage student behavior.

  13. Student Perceptions of Small-Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Ida Rose; McCaslin, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Background/Context: Elementary school teachers regularly arrange students in small groups for learning activities. A rich literature discusses various types of small-group learning formats and how those formats affect achievement. Few studies, however, have examined students' perceptions of small-group learning experiences. Our work extends the…

  14. Student Facebook groups as a third space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Janus Holst; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines educational potentials of Facebook groups that are created and managed by students without any involvement from teachers. The objective is to study student-managed Facebook groups as a ‘third space' between the institutional space of teacher-managed Facebook groups and the non......-institutional, personal space of the Facebook network. The main study of the article examines six student-managed Facebook groups and provides an analysis of a total of 2247 posts and 12,217 comments. Furthermore, the study draws on group interviews with students from 17 Danish upper secondary schools and a survey...... answered by 932 students from 25 schools. Based on the survey and interviews, the paper concludes that Facebook is an important educational tool for students in Danish upper secondary schools to receive help on homework and assignments. Furthermore, on the basis of the analysis of Facebook groups...

  15. Signing Earth Science: Accommodations for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Whose First Language Is Sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesel, J.; Hurdich, J.

    2014-12-01

    TERC and Vcom3D used the SigningAvatar® accessibility software to research and develop a Signing Earth Science Dictionary (SESD) of approximately 750 standards-based Earth science terms for high school students who are deaf and hard of hearing and whose first language is sign. The partners also evaluated the extent to which use of the SESD furthers understanding of Earth science content, command of the language of Earth science, and the ability to study Earth science independently. Disseminated as a Web-based version and App, the SESD is intended to serve the ~36,000 grade 9-12 students who are deaf or hard of hearing and whose first language is sign, the majority of whom leave high school reading at the fifth grade or below. It is also intended for teachers and interpreters who interact with members of this population and professionals working with Earth science education programs during field trips, internships etc. The signed SESD terms have been incorporated into a Mobile Communication App (MCA). This App for Androids is intended to facilitate communication between English speakers and persons who communicate in American Sign Language (ASL) or Signed English. It can translate words, phrases, or whole sentences from written or spoken English to animated signing. It can also fingerspell proper names and other words for which there are no signs. For our presentation, we will demonstrate the interactive features of the SigningAvatar® accessibility software that support the three principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and have been incorporated into the SESD and MCA. Results from national field-tests will provide insight into the SESD's and MCA's potential applicability beyond grade 12 as accommodations that can be used for accessing the vocabulary deaf and hard of hearing students need for study of the geosciences and for facilitating communication about content. This work was funded in part by grants from NSF and the U.S. Department of Education.

  16. Deaf epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf individuals acquire knowledge and how they learn. Aspects of the Deaf episteme, not caused by deafness but by Deafhood, have a positive impact on how deaf individuals learn, resist audism, stay healthy, and navigate the world. Research on psychology, health, and education are reviewed to illustrate how visually oriented beings think and view the world differently from the majority. The article provides support to the theory of multiple epistemologies,and has implications for families, teachers, and researchers.

  17. Technical Standards and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Medical School Applicants and Students: Interrogating Sensory Capacity and Practice Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenyi, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Applicants to medical schools who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHoH) or who have other disabilities face significant barriers to medical school admission. One commonly cited barrier to admission is medical schools' technical standards (TS) for admission, advancement, and graduation. Ethical values of diversity and equity support altering the technical standards to be more inclusive of people with disabilities. Incorporating these values into admissions, advancement, and graduation considerations for DHoH and other students with disabilities can contribute to the physician workforce being more representative of the diverse patients it serves and better able to care for them.

  18. Access to Communication for Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing and ESL Students in Blended Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gary L.; Vignare, Karen; Rappold, Raychel P.; Mallory, Jim

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand student perceptions of communication in blended (online and traditional) learning courses, a 22 item questionnaire was developed and sent to all students registered for these courses at a large technology-focused college during three quarters of instruction. The respondents were divided into four groups: 1)…

  19. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  20. Without Boundaries: An Inquiry into Deaf Epistemologies through a Metaparadigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate on Deaf epistemologies reflects two major paradigms in deaf education: positivism and constructivism. The present article investigates Deaf epistemologies through a metaparadigm, which should blur the boundaries among different paradigms and connect the epistemological inquiry to instructional practice for d/Deaf students. The…

  1. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  2. CEC-CED Joint Knowledge and Skills statement for all becoming teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Joint Standards Committee of the National Council on Education of the Deaf and the Council for Exceptional Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    In 1992, the National Council on Education of the Deaf (CED) and the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) began a collaborative process in which new standards were jointly developed and approved by a representation of members from all organizations engaged in the preparation of teachers and in the delivery of services to deaf and hard of hearing learners, including educational, professional/administrative and consumer organizations. A Joint Standards Committee was appointed, and in 1992 enunciated mutually acceptable standards for the preparation of teachers of students who are deaf and hard of hearing. Fundamental to the entire standards development process was respect for the continuum of educational options available for children who are deaf and hard of hearing. The intent of this committee was to provide standards which were credible for all university and college teacher preparation programs and which could serve as a foundation for the development and maintenance of strong and viable programs according to the specific stated philosophy and practice of each. Information regarding the new standards and University/College Program Evaluation can be obtained from: Dr. Harold Johnson, Program Evaluation Chair, Kent State University, Room 405 White Hall, Kent, Ohio 44242.

  3. When Being Deaf Is Centered: d/Deaf Women of Color's Experiences with Racial/Ethnic and d/Deaf Identities in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Lissa

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30% of d/Deaf students are successfully completing college; the reasons for such a low graduation rate is unknown (Destler & Buckly, 2011). Most research on d/Deaf college students lack racial/ethnic diversity within the study; thus, it is unclear how d/Deaf Students of Color are faring in higher education or what experiences…

  4. Sports and the Deaf Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Ellis, M. Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    The increasingly sedentary American lifestyle has resulted in a growing number of overweight and out-of-shape school-age children. Deaf children are not exempt from this trend, yet there is little evidence that public school programs for these children are doing anything to counter it. Much can be done to assist deaf students, not only in becoming…

  5. Using online glossing lessons for accelerated instruction in ASL for preservice deaf education majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Gerald J

    2007-01-01

    Teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students must serve as language models for their students. However, preservice deaf education teachers typically have at most only four semesters of American Sign Language (ASL) training. How can their limited ASL instructional time be used to increase their proficiency? Studies involving deaf and hard of hearing students have revealed that glosses (written equivalents of ASL sentences) can serve as "bridges" between ASL and English. The study investigated whether glossing instruction can facilitate hearing students' learning of ASL. A Web site was developed in which ASL glossing rules were explained and glossing exercises provided. Posttest scores showed the experimental group improving from 39% to 71% on ASL grammar knowledge. These findings indicate that online glossing lessons may provide the means to obtain ASL skills more readily, thus preparing deaf education teachers to serve as ASL language models.

  6. Phonological awareness and short-term memory in hearing and deaf individuals of different communication backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Daniel; Crain, Kelly; LaSasso, Carol; Eden, Guinevere F

    2008-12-01

    Previous work in deaf populations on phonological coding and working memory, two skills thought to play an important role in the acquisition of written language skills, have focused primarily on signers or did not clearly identify the subjects' native language and communication mode. In the present study, we examined the effect of sensory experience, early language experience, and communication mode on the phonological awareness skills and serial recall of linguistic items in deaf and hearing individuals of different communicative and linguistic backgrounds: hearing nonsigning controls, hearing users of ASL, deaf users of ASL, deaf oral users of English, and deaf users of cued speech. Since many current measures of phonological awareness skills are inappropriate for deaf populations on account of the verbal demands in the stimuli or response, we devised a nonverbal phonological measure that addresses this limitation. The Phoneme Detection Test revealed that deaf cuers and oral users, but not deaf signers, performed as well as their hearing peers when detecting phonemes not transparent in the orthography. The second focus of the study examined short-term memory skills and found that in response to the traditional digit span as well as an experimental visual version, digit-span performance was similar across the three deaf groups, yet deaf subjects' retrieval was lower than that of hearing subjects. Our results support the claim (Bavelier et al., 2006) that lexical items processed in the visual-spatial modality are not as well retained as information processed in the auditory channel. Together these findings show that the relationship between working memory, phonological coding, and reading may not be as tightly interwoven in deaf students as would have been predicted from work conducted in hearing students.

  7. The Influence of Computer Games on Visual-Motor Integration in Profoundly Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the influence of specialised software on the visual-motor integration of profoundly deaf children. The research sample was made up of 70 students aged from seven to 10, 43 of whom formed the experimental group and 27 the control group. The students in the experimental group used computers once a week…

  8. Sexual and reproductive health needs assessment with deaf people in Ghana: Methodological challenges and ethical concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisdom K. Mprah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deafness is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. The different ways of perceiving and understanding deafness have practical implications for research with deaf people. Whilst the deaf community is not homogenous, it is generally distinct from the hearing population. Consequently, the appropriateness of applying research methods and informed concern processes designed for the hearing population in research with deaf people has been questioned.Objectives: This article reflected on some methodological challenges and ethical concerns arising from conducting a sexual and reproductive health needs assessment with deaf people in Ghana. The aim was to provide some perspectives on some of the challenges associated with doing research with deaf people.Method: The study was a two phase, sequential, mixed methods design, consisting of three focus groups to assist in the development of a survey and then the implementation of the survey for needs assessment data collection. The number of participants in the study was 179, consisting of 26 focus group participants: 7 executives of the Ghana National Association of the Deaf (GNAD, 10 male adults, and 9 female adults. There were 152 survey respondents (students, women and men and one key informant. All participants, except the key informant, were deaf people.Results: The application of traditional research methods to studies involving deaf participants presents numerous methodological and ethical dilemmas associated mainly with deaf people’s unique cultural and linguistic characteristics.Conclusion: Research methods should not be taken as universal guidelines for conducting research in all settings because of differences in settings.

  9. Pragmatic Language in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students: Correlation with Success in General Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thagard, Elaine Kirk; Hilsmier, Amanda Strong; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing children have shown delays and difficulties in pragmatic behaviors due to insufficient exposure to common daily discourse and underlying impoverishment in all components of language development. In a study in a school district in a southeastern U.S. state, the researchers investigated the relationship between…

  10. Numerical Estimation in Deaf and Hearing Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, Rebecca; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patty; Davidson, Wendy A.; Murphy, Derek; Nordmann, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Deaf students often lag behind hearing peers in numerical and mathematical abilities. Studies of hearing children with mathematical difficulties highlight the importance of estimation skills as the foundation for formal mathematical abilities, but research with adults is limited. Deaf and hearing college students were assessed on the Number-to-Position task as a measure of estimation, and completed standardised assessments of arithmetical and mathematical reasoning. Deaf students performed si...

  11. Gender and legitimacy in student project groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    Through empirical studies of project groups at university level, I have identified that there are a number of different forms of inclusion and exclusion processes in activity among the students. First, there are the processes that relate to the other students' skills. Here I found that the students....... The students who for some reason were categorized as stupid, lazy, dominant or antisocial had serious difficulties in finding a group to cooperate and write their project report with. In the worst case, this could mean that they had problems to complete their education. Even more surprising was the fact that I...

  12. The Effects of Theory of Mind Training on the False Belief Understanding of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Prekindergarten and Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Stacey L.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.; Lederberg, Amy R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from a growing number of research studies indicate that children with hearing loss are delayed in Theory of Mind (ToM) development when compared to their typically developing, hearing peers. While other researchers have studied the developmental trajectories of ToM in school-age students who are deaf, a limited number have addressed the need…

  13. Sirviendo a los estudiantes sordos que tienen Los implantes cocleares. Hoja de consejos de PEPNet (Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This version of "Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet," written in Spanish, describes how cochlear implants (CIs) work. CIs are complex electronic devices surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. These devices utilize electrodes placed in the inner ear (the cochlea) to stimulate the auditory nerve of…

  14. Visual Access in Interpreter-Mediated Learning Situations for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing High School Students Where an Artifact Is in Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Sigrid Slettebakk; Thomassen, Gøril

    2016-01-01

    This article highlights interpreter-mediated learning situations for deaf high school students where such mediated artifacts as technical machines, models, and computer graphics are used by the teacher to illustrate his or her teaching. In these situations, the teacher's situated gestures and utterances, and the artifacts will contribute…

  15. PERSONAL IDENTITY IN DEAF ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KOSSEWSKA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the identity deaf adolescents. The study involved 67 deaf adolescents (38 boys and 29 girls aged 16 to 19 students of secondary school. Ninety-three hearing children constituted a comparison group. The structure of identity was explored on the basis of identification references given by the subjects who were to reply in writing, 20 times running, to the question: „Who Am I?” the test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland by Martines and Silvestre (1995 given in written and signed mode.Results showed that the hearing status as well as mode of communication influence the description of personal identity. It was found that deaf adoles­cents used more descriptions especially in the fol­lowing categories: Civil Status, Body and Physical Appearance, Tastes and Activities, Friendship and Relationships, Personal and Social Situation, Negative Personal Traits, and Neutral Personality Traits. Although this study could demonstrate im­pact independent variables on identity, the data raise the need for further, preferably longitudinal, research. This complex phenomenon has to be examined more closely.Combined self-descriptive processes lead to the development of an organized, learned and dynamic identity, and subjective description of an individ­ual has strong emotional consequences for the in­dividual in question.

  16. Inattentional deafness in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Gula, Bartosz; Vitouch, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness have been widely neglected. We here present the first investigation of inattentional deafness in and with music under controlled experimental conditions. Inattentional deafness in music is defined as the inability to consciously perceive an unexpected musical stimulus when attention is focused on a certain facet of the piece. Participants listened to a modification of the first 1'50″ of Richard Strauss' Thus Spake Zarathustra; while the control group just listened, the experimental group had to count the number of timpani beats. An e-guitar solo served as the unexpected event. In Study 1, experimental data from n = 115 participants were analyzed. Non-musicians were compared with musicians to investigate the impact of expertise. In Study 2 (n = 47), the scope of the inattentional deafness effect was investigated with a more salient unexpected stimulus. Results demonstrate an inattentional deafness effect under dynamic musical conditions. Quite unexpectedly, the effect was structurally equivalent even for musicians. Our findings clearly show that sustained inattentional deafness exists in the musical realm, in close correspondence to inattentional blindness with dynamic visual stimuli.

  17. Computational solution for the auxiliary in the literacy of deaf

    OpenAIRE

    João Carlos Lopes Fernandes; Silvia Cristina Martini Rodrigues; Ovidio Lopes da Cruz Netto

    2016-01-01

    The learning of the deaf is a great challenge for educators, especially in Portuguese-speaking course. Brazilian schools are not prepared for suits with deaf, because they lack trained professionals. Current Brazilian educational policies, seeking socialize all deaf and not deaf students. The Brazilian deaf community uses LIBRAS, Brazilian sign language as their main form of communication between them. Integrating LBS and Portuguese is one of the main current challenges and the use of compute...

  18. Computational solution for the auxiliary in the literacy of deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Lopes Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The learning of the deaf is a great challenge for educators, especially in Portuguese-speaking course. Brazilian schools are not prepared for suits with deaf, because they lack trained professionals. Current Brazilian educational policies, seeking socialize all deaf and not deaf students. The Brazilian deaf community uses LIBRAS, Brazilian sign language as their main form of communication between them. Integrating LBS and Portuguese is one of the main current challenges and the use of computers has helped a lot.

  19. Gender and legitimacy in student project groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    also found that some of the positive and negative characteristics were linked to the students due to their gender. Through the argument that female students talk too much or are having difficulty in coping with criticism, male students refused to cooperate with the female students. Conversely, the male...... students, who were few in the educations I studied, were quite in demand. For me it was very surprising to find these stereotypical perceptions and reasoning among young people in contemporary (and quite progressive) Danish educations. And the question is what it means for the students’ possibilities...... of completing their education. In my presentation I will unfold and discuss the ways in which the students attributed and disclaimed legitimacy to each other qua gender and thus how gender was linked to the relationship between inclusion and exclusion in the student project groups....

  20. Effects of Ability Grouping on Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, James A.; Kulik, Chen-Lin C.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the effect of within-class and between-class ability groupings on the academic achievement of gifted elementary and secondary level students. Results showed that gifted students gained more academically than they would have if they had been taught in heterogeneous classes. (PS)

  1. 小组工作介入聋儿社会资本的重构%Group Work in Deaf Children's Social Capital Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵淑兰; 罗远良; 邓小玲

    2012-01-01

      Social capital plays a very important role in deaf children's development. Reconstructing deaf children's social capital has become equally important to medical rehabilitation and education rehabilitation. Owing to the lack of children's games group, the par-ents' awareness of bias and the shortage of their social capital, deaf children's social capital deficiency become a very serious problem in the process of hearing rehabilitation and language acquisition. This article, from the perspective of social group work, suggests recon-structing deaf children's social capital by helping them form chil-dren's game group and enhancing their parents' social capital.%  社会资本在聋儿成长中具有非常重要的作用。重构聋儿社会资本成为社会康复的核心内容。在聋儿听力康复过程中,由于聋儿游戏群体的缺失、家长的认识偏误以及家长社会资本的不足等原因,导致聋儿社会资本不足的问题非常突出。文章从小组工作视角出发,提出通过组建聋儿游戏群体,增进聋儿家长社会资本,重构聋儿社会资本的建议。

  2. Shaping at the point of utterance: an investigation of the composing processes of the deaf student writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, C

    1999-01-01

    All writers face the challenge of making meaning on a blank page. They struggle to make meaning for themselves and to communicate this meaning to the potential readers of their texts. Although, in this way, the act of writing can be perceived as a solitary endeavor, the activity of writing, as one aspect of literacy development, is embedded in a sociocultural framework and must be considered not only from the perspective of an individual's mental functioning but from the social context in which it exists. What follows is a preliminary report from a larger case study examining the composing processes of four deaf student writers. This broader study aspires to the goal of sociocultural research, which is to understand the relationship between human mental functioning, on one hand and cultural historical and institutional settings, on the other (Wertsch, 1995). From such a perspective, individual mental processes and sociocultural setting are understood in terms of this relationship, and human action is understood in the context of interrelated moments. I focus on one 'moment' of the writing process that I will term, to borrow a phrase from Stephen Krashen (1977) and James Britton (1978), 'shaping at the point of utterance.' In other words, I will explore what deaf writers do as they face the 'challenge of the blank page.'

  3. University Student Groups and Citizen Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUANITA HENAO-ESCOVAR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents some advances of the research project on Practices of the Youth as Citizen Expressions. From the analysis of three university student groups taken from the 20 groups of youths that participate in this mixed method combining ethnographic strategies with narrative and discursive analysis, the article describes the trajectory and the practices of these groups and shows how the students live experiences that ease the development of different citizen expressions and abilities. The conclusions state that the creation, support and agency of these groups in the universities represent a way to encourage the formation of citizens, and some suggestions are presented related to this topic.

  4. Metacognitive Performances of Hearing Students and of Students Who Are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing on Two Types of Measures: Visual-Voiced and Visual-Visual Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2008-01-01

    A small sample of 20 hearing students and 20 students who are deaf and hard-of-hearing participated in this study, which compared their performances on two measures of metacognition. The first measure required participants to visually analyse real-life pictures and then to choose a response from four options (voiced or signed) indicating which was…

  5. Deafness(3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    10.For many years,American Sign Language wasbanned in schools for the deaf in the United States.Educators feared that sign language would keep deafpeople from communicating with hearing people.Today,schools for the deaf have begun to acceptAmerican Sign Language.Few classes are taught

  6. Deaf education in China: history, current issues, and emerging deaf voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Richard R; Johnson, Kathryn E; Hui, Yang Jun

    An overview is provided of (a) deaf education in China, (b) views of deaf Chinese, and (c) recent empowering international collaborations. China's national policy focuses on oral/aural education and hearing rehabilitation. However, everyday practice in schools for deaf children includes various forms of Chinese Sign Language. Early childhood education focuses on speech and hearing. Elementary and secondary school curricula reflect low expectations for deaf students and lack the same academic content provided to hearing students. There are limited higher education opportunities. There are no support services such as note takers or interpreters for mainstreamed students. There are no deaf teacher preparation or interpreter training programs. Jobs are few; the vast majority of deaf adults are unemployed. Deaf people interviewed for the article describe their needs, their dreams, and the changes they are witnessing, which result in part from recent empowering international collaborations.

  7. STUDENT ABILITIES, GROUPING PATTERNS, AND CLASSROOM INTERACTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DREWS, ELIZABETH M.

    A STUDY WAS MADE TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF HETEROGENEOUS AND HOMOGENEOUS GROUPING IN NINTH-GRADE ENGLISH CLASSES. ON THE BASES OF IQ AND READING LANGUAGE SKILLS, STUDENTS WERE GROUPED AT THREE ABILITY LEVELS AND PLACE IN HETEROGENEOUS, HOMOGENEOUS SUPERIOR, HOMOGENEOUS SLOW, AND HOMOGENEOUS AVERAGE CLASSES. TEACHER VARIABLES WERE REDUCED BY…

  8. Productive Group Work for Students. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    There is clear evidence that students who are involved in productive collaborative groups outperform their peers. Cooperative group work also results in improved self-esteem, improved relationships and enhanced social and decision-making skills. Johnson and Johnson (1993) identified the elements of a successful collaborative activity. They include…

  9. Engaging and Informing Students through Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stella

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to explore the benefits of group work as a tool for engaging students with introductory material. It was the researcher's expectation that group work, would provide a means of reducing cognitive load (Kirschner, Sweller & Clark, 2006) and encouraging on task behaviour (Wentzel & Watkins, 2002). This would result…

  10. A construção de histórias por alunos surdos: aprendizagem coletiva/The stories construction by deaf students: collective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Cheffer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As pessoas surdas têm sido consideradas, recentemente, como parte de grupos lingüísticos bilíngües minoritários e o processo da aquisição do português, por esses grupos de estudantes, tem sido objeto de muita reflexão. Este estudo apresenta o trabalho realizado pelo Programa Escolaridade e Surdez do CEPRE/Unicamp, e tem como objetivo discutir o processo de construção de escrita coletiva de um livro por um grupo de adolescentes surdos, a partir do próprio interesse do grupo de fazerem uma história em conjunto. O trabalho com o grupo ocorreu em três estágios: no primeiro, ocorreu a discussão e escolha do tema; no segundo, iniciou-se a redação conjunta da história e os tópicos relativos a cada capítulo, para que os estudantes tivessem uma visão global do texto; e, no terceiro estágio, ocorreu a completa elaboração do livro incluindo o seu acabamento estrutural. No final do processo, foi verificado um aumento considerável do interesse dos alunos pela escrita, e os estudantes puderam vivenciar, de um modo significativo, os usos das convenções da linguagem e dos sentidos das palavras quando em diferentes contextos. Deaf people have recently been considered as part of bilingual linguistic minorities groups and the process of written Portuguese acquisition by these groups of students has been object of much reflection. This study presents the work accomplished by the Programa Escolaridade e Surdez do CEPRE/UNICAMP (Schooling and Deafness Program, which aims to show the process of joint construction of the writing of a book by a group of deaf teenagers which has started from the own interest of the group to put together a story. The present work was done in three stages: in the first one, the discussion to choose the theme which the book would be about took place, in the second one, the joint construction of the story and its developments, as well as the topics related to each chapter was initiated, so that the students would

  11. Psychodramatic Treatment for Deaf People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swink, David F.

    1985-01-01

    The article describes how psychodrama is used in group psychotherapy and in social skills groups with deaf persons. In addition, videotape replay is described as an adjunct to psychodramatic treatment. (Author/CL)

  12. Reaching the Summit: Deaf Adults as Essential Partners in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne-Firl, Bridgetta

    2016-01-01

    How do we reach the summit in terms of supporting the best transition possible for each young deaf or hard of hearing individual in the United States? Should professionals who are hearing work alone to succeed with deaf and hard of hearing students? No matter how good the intention, if we want deaf and hard of hearing students to transition from…

  13. Speech Experience Shapes the Speechreading Network and Subsequent Deafness Facilitates It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myung-Whan; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee; Oh, Seung-Ha

    2009-01-01

    Speechreading is a visual communicative skill for perceiving speech. In this study, we tested the effects of speech experience and deafness on the speechreading neural network in normal hearing controls and in two groups of deaf patients who became deaf either before (prelingual deafness) or after (postlingual deafness) auditory language…

  14. Students who are deaf and hard of hearing and use sign language: considerations and strategies for developing spoken language and literacy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Debra; Waddy-Smith, Bettie; Doyle, Jane

    2012-11-01

    There is a core body of knowledge, experience, and skills integral to facilitating auditory, speech, and spoken language development when working with the general population of students who are deaf and hard of hearing. There are additional issues, strategies, and challenges inherent in speech habilitation/rehabilitation practices essential to the population of deaf and hard of hearing students who also use sign language. This article will highlight philosophical and practical considerations related to practices used to facilitate spoken language development and associated literacy skills for children and adolescents who sign. It will discuss considerations for planning and implementing practices that acknowledge and utilize a student's abilities in sign language, and address how to link these skills to developing and using spoken language. Included will be considerations for children from early childhood through high school with a broad range of auditory access, language, and communication characteristics. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Alternate assessment use with students who are deaf or hard of hearing: an exploratory mixed-methods analysis of portfolio, checklists, and out-of-level test formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W; Wurtz, Keith A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present findings on alternate assessments for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH). Drawn from the results of the "Second National Survey of Assessments and Accommodations for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing," this study investigated three alternate assessment formats: portfolio, checklists, and out-of-level testing. Analysis includes descriptive data of alternate assessment use across all three formats, qualitative analyses of teacher perspectives, and an exploratory logistic regression analysis on predictors of alternate assessment use. This exploratory analysis looks at predictors such as state policy, educational setting, grades served, language of instruction, and participant perspectives. Results indicate that predictors at the student, teacher, and system level may influence alternate assessment use for SDHH.

  16. Comparative Study of Motor Performance of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Reaction Time, Visual-Motor Control and Upper Limb Speed and Dexterity Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkouvatzi, Anastasia N.; Mantis, Konstantinos; Kambas, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test the motor performance of 34 deaf--hard-of-hearing pupils, 6-14 year, was evaluated in reaction time, visual-motor control and upper limb speed and dexterity. The two-way ANOVA variance analysis for two independent variables, group, age, and the Post Hoc (Scheffe test) for multiple comparisons were used. The…

  17. Survey of residential and day schools for deaf students in the United States that identify themselves as bilingual-bicultural programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSasso, Carol; Lollis, Jana

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to determine how many residential and day schools for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the United States described themselves as bilingual-bicultural (BiBi) programs and to describe characteristics of those programs related to initial implementation, whether a single language (e.g., English or ASL) is promoted as the first language (L1) and the language of instruction for all deaf students, how English is conveyed conversationally to deaf students, the quality of ASL abilities of BiBi instructional and support staff; general characteristics of the curriculum and the specific reading and bicultural components of the curriculum; and characteristics of research being conducted to establish the efficacy of BiBi methods. Ninety-one percent (n = 71) of the 78 day and residential schools listed in the 1998 Directory of the American Annals of the Deaf participated in the survey, with 19 schools identifying themselves as BiBi. These included 16 residential schools and 3 day schools. Depending on the source for numbers of students in residential and day schools at the time of the survey, between 36% and 40% of students were in programs that identified themselves as BiBi. Sixteen of the programs reported becoming a BiBi program between 1989 and 1994 and only three after 1994. Of the 19 programs, 37% reported use of manually coded English (MCE) for conveying English to the students. Fluency in ASL of instructional and support staff varied, with 47% of the programs reporting that no more than half of the instructional staff were fluent in ASL and 68% of the programs reporting that no more than half of the support staff were fluent. Only 21% of the 19 programs reported having a formal BiBi curriculum with annual goals and suggested materials and procedures for teachers. Research implications of these data are discussed.

  18. Diversity of deaf identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Chava, Y

    2000-12-01

    Social Identity Theory (Tajfel, 1981) posits that members of minority groups achieve positive social identity by (a) attempting to gain access to the mainstream through individual mobility or (b) working with other group members to bring about social change. Some people may use a combination of both strategies. Through the use of cluster analysis, the existence of three identities associated with these strategies was discerned in a sample of 267 deaf adults: culturally hearing identity, culturally deaf identity, and bicultural identity, each comprising about a third of the sample. A subset of 56 people were interviewed in depth; excerpts are presented to illustrate the identity types. Qualified support was found for the prediction that people with culturally deaf and bicultural identities would have higher self-esteem.

  19. Goya's deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P E M; Chitty, C N; Williams, G; Stephens, D

    2008-12-01

    Francisco Goya (1746-1828), a major Spanish artist, became profoundly deaf aged 46 years, following an acute illness. Despite this, his success continued and he eventually died aged 82 years. His illness is sketchily documented in letters written during his convalescence, describing headache, deafness, tinnitus, unsteadiness and visual disturbance with recovery (apart from deafness) over three months. There was a milder similar illness two years before, suggesting a relapsing condition. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, although previously accepted as Goya's diagnosis, is not supported by the limited evidence. Susac's syndrome or Cogan's syndrome, although both rare, are more likely explanations.

  20. Science fair: Is it worth the work? A qualitative study on deaf students' perceptions and experiences regarding science fair in primary and secondary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vivian Lee

    Science fairs have a long history in American education. They play an important role for establishing inquiry-based experiences in a science classroom. Students may be more motivated to learn science content when they are allowed to choose their own science fair topics. The purpose of this study was to examine Deaf college students' perceptions and experiences regarding science fair participation during primary and/or secondary school and determine the influence of science fair involvement on the development of language skills, writing skills, and higher order thinking skills as well as its impact on choice of a STEM major. This study examined responses from Deaf students attending Gallaudet University and National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) majoring in a Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math (STEM) field. An electronic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview were used to collect data. The electronic questionnaire was divided into two strands: demographics and science fair experience. Twenty-one respondents participated in the questionnaire and ten participants were interviewed. A cross-case analysis revealed communication was the key to a successful science fair experience. Findings showed the educational background of participants influenced their perspective regarding the experience of a science fair. When communicating through American Sign Language, the science fair experience was more positive. When communicating through an interpreter or having no interpreter at all, the science fair experience was viewed in a negative light. The use of science fairs to enhance language development, writing skills, and higher order thinking skills was supported. Teachers and parents were strong influences for Deaf students participating in a science fair. Participation in a science fair did influence students to choose a STEM major but there were other considerations as well.

  1. Marketing Environment Group Project Stimulates Student Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastas, George, III

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Marketing Environment Group Project to be used by a marketing instructor. Indicates that through this teaching method, students have an increased interest in marketing and a greater understanding of how an organization's marketing strategy must adapt to its changing environment. (JOW)

  2. Epistemology and people who are deaf: deaf worldviews, views of the deaf world, or my parents are hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margery S

    2010-01-01

    Epistemology is examined from two different perspectives within the framework of a broader evolutionary epistemology. Within this framework, reality is not absolute, and truth is a relative concept. People construct individual or personal epistemologies through their experiences, and develop or receive group or socially constructed epistemologies through their interactions with others with shared or similar experiences. There is a common perception that Deaf culture and Deaf epistemologies have been transmitted primarily by Deaf children and Deaf adults who have Deaf parents and who have grown up in a linguistically rich signing environment. The author posits that the far more numerous deaf children of hearing parents may be an even greater force in transmitting some of the strongest views of Deaf epistemology.

  3. Hopwood, affirmative action, and deaf education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J F; Martin, G

    1998-10-01

    Minority-deaf students constitute 43.5% of the deaf school-age population, yet only 11.7% of teachers and administrators in programs serving deaf students are persons of color. The ruling in Hopwood v. State of Texas (1996) banned the use of race as a major determinant in admissions to colleges and universities in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This ruling, along with the current backlash against affirmative action policies, has hindered college administrators' efforts to recruit minorities in deaf education. We discuss Hopwood, affirmative action policies, and how both affect deaf education teacher training today. We also present an eight-step action plan for teacher-training colleges and universities to meet the need to increase the number of minority teachers and leaders and encourage state educational agencies and schools for the Deaf to do likewise.

  4. [Clinical analysis of short-term efficacy in senile sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jianyong; Tan, Guopeng; Jieyu, L V; Yan, Feipeng

    2013-11-01

    To analysis the short-term medicinal treating effects in senile sudden deafness. According the age. The sudden deafness patients were divided into to groups, older age-group (age > or = 60, a total of 70 cases), control group (age sudden deafness patients (disease time 7 days) was 38.89%. There was statistical difference (P sudden deafness patients was 49.9%; the senile sudden deafness patients which following moderate deafness (hearing threshold sudden deafness patients. As soon as possible to improve peripheral vascular microcirculation, the prognosis could be improve conspicuously the prognosis of the senile sudden deafness patients were worse than the young patients.

  5. Captioned Films for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Edmund Burke

    1981-01-01

    The history of Captioned Films for the Deaf, an agency now called Media for the Handicapped, is traced along with the contributions of individuals and groups which led to the eventual passage of legislation in 1959. (CL)

  6. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers.

  7. Deaf Epistemology: The Deaf Way of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The standard epistemology requires the use of hard science to gain knowledge and discover the truth. In contrast, Deaf epistemology relies heavily on personal testimonies, personal experiences, and personal accounts to document knowledge. In recent years, a number of deaf schools have adopted deaf-centric policies shaped by Deaf epistemology in an…

  8. Faculty needs, doctoral preparation, and the future of teacher preparation programs in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M; Johnson, Harold; Antia, Shirin D

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to obtain and analyze data on the need for, and desired characteristics of, faculty in deaf education at American institutions of higher education (IHEs), and to assess the present and projected status of doctoral-level teacher preparation programs in deaf education at American IHEs. Program directors and coordinators provided information on current and projected faculty openings, the number of active doctoral students, faculty research interests, program strengths, and needs in the field. Results indicated a pending shortage due to faculty retirements and a paucity of doctoral-level graduates. Most faculty listed literacy and language as a primary research interest as well as a program strength. The ability to generate new knowledge through research was found to be less desirable for future faculty than teaching ability. Suggestions for improving doctoral preparation and moving the field to evidence-based practices are provided.

  9. Prevalence of Overweight among Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dair, Jessica; Ellis, M. Kathleen; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2006-01-01

    The study examined the prevalence of overweight cases in a sample of 151 deaf children aged 6-11 years. Participants were deaf students attending six elementary schools, both regular and special, in four states. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated using height and weight, plotted on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) U.S.…

  10. The Efficacy of Utilizing a Phonics Treatment Package with Middle School Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beverly J. Trezek; Kimber W. Malmgren

    2005-01-01

    .... Numerous studies support the hypothesis that deaf and hard-of-hearing children are able to utilize alternative systems to develop phonological awareness that are not dependent on the ability to hear...

  11. O que dizem/sentem alunos participantes de uma experiência de inclusão escolar com aluno surdo What students say/feel about their experience of inclusion in school with a deaf student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Broglia Feitosa de Lacerda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A educação de surdos tem sido historicamente marcada por fracassos e, mais recentemente, a educação inclusiva tem se apresentado como adequada para a inserção de alunos surdos na escola. Para atender suas necessidades se criam alternativas como a presença da língua de sinais e de intérpretes. Foram realizadas entrevistas com dois alunos ouvintes e um aluno surdo integrantes de uma 5ª série do ensino fundamental, na qual foram inseridos um aluno surdo e sua intérprete. Os alunos referem à experiência vivenciada como positiva, prazer em terem um colega diferente e conhecer a língua de sinais. Porém, os ouvintes relatam dominar precariamente esta língua, gostariam que ela fosse mais fácil e referem saber pouco sobre a surdez. Tais fatos não são percebidos pelo aluno surdo, que vê como adequada sua relação com ouvintes. Há respeito pelas diferenças, mas as relações são superficiais, diversas das vivenciadas por alunos em geral. Conhecer o modo como os alunos significam esta experiência é fundamental para avaliar os efeitos dessa prática.Historically, the education of deaf people has been marked by failures and, recently, inclusive education has been defended as adequate for the insertion of deaf pupils in school. In order to attend to their specific needs, alternatives have been created, such as the presence of sign language and interpreters. This study aims to investigate this context by interviewing two hearing and one deaf student from a fifth grade elementary class in which there was a deaf student and a sign language interpreter. The students reported that the experience was positive; they enjoyed having a different colleague and coming to know sign language. However, the hearing students said that they had introductory levels of understanding of this language, they wished it was easier to learn, and they understood little about deafness. Such facts were not perceived by the deaf student, who felt his relation to

  12. A Hearer's Insight into Deaf Sign Language Folklore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liina Paales

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses Estonian deaf lore, which comprises all folklore genres including specific language creation or sign lore characteristic of the deaf. Estonian sign language lore contains material of local as well as of international origin. The latter group includes several humorous tales that have spread mostly through the cultural contacts of the younger generation of the deaf. Hearers’ lore has also exerted its influence on deaf lore. Local deaf lore includes memories of school years and family lore of members of the Estonian deaf community, sign lore based on Estonian sign language, etc. The main features of Estonian deaf lore are (i the specific communicative form, i.e. sign language performance; (ii the minority group of lore transmitters, i.e. the Estonian deaf community; (iii group-centred interpretation of hearing loss.

  13. The Effects of Theory of Mind Training on the False Belief Understanding of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Prekindergarten and Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Stacey L; Easterbrooks, Susan R; Lederberg, Amy R

    2016-07-01

    Data from a growing number of research studies indicate that children with hearing loss are delayed in Theory of Mind (ToM) development when compared to their typically developing, hearing peers. While other researchers have studied the developmental trajectories of ToM in school-age students who are deaf, a limited number have addressed the need for interventions for this population. The present study extends the current research on ToM interventions to the Prekindergarten and Kindergarten levels. This study used a single-case multiple baseline design to examine the effects of a ToM intervention on participants' false belief understanding as well as outcomes on a near generalization measure and a far generalization measure. A ToM thought bubble intervention (i.e., a visual representation of what people are thinking) developed by Wellman and Peterson (2013 Deafness, thought bubbles, and theory-of-mind development. Developmental Psychology, 49, 2357-2367) was modified in key areas. Results from the Single-Case Design portion of the study indicate a functional, or causal, relation between the ToM intervention and the participants' acquisition of the targeted skills in each stage although progress was not uniform. Results from the pre-post assessments indicate that the children did make progress up the scale. These results inform the field in regard to the efficacy and feasibility of a ToM intervention for young deaf children.

  14. Research and Survey on Sex Education of Deaf College Students%聋人大学生性教育现状的调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁

    2012-01-01

    Self questionnaire about deaf students knowledge,sources of knowledge,sexual attitudes,sex education and demand situation,Deaf level of knowledge into the next level of knowledge access reading materials relatively conservative sexual attitudes of the girls,the strong demand for sex education,support for up relevant courses,hoping to get knowledge about sex,sexual morality,health care self-protection,interpersonal exchanges education between the sexes.Sex education should be the implementation of a school-based positions,shaping the Deaf completely personality.%通过自编问卷了解聋人大学生的性知识、性知识来源、性态度、性教育需求等状况,发现聋生性知识水平成中下等水平,性知识的获取途径主要是课外读物,女生的性观念相对保守,对于性教育需求强烈,支持开设相关课程,希望得到性知识、卫生保健与自我保护、两性间人际关系交往教育的教育。应该以学校为主阵地实施性教育,塑造聋生完全人格。

  15. Knowledge and use of contraceptive methods amongst deaf people in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisdom K. Mprah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persons with disabilities in general face serious barriers to sexual and reproductive health (SRH information and services due to institutional and attitudinal barriers. However, because deaf people have unique communication and linguistic needs, which are often misunderstood or ignored, they face greater barriers than other persons with disabilities. Whilst available data indicated that there is a wide gap between knowledge and usage of contraceptive amongst Ghanaians, little is known about the level of contraceptive knowledge and usage amongst deaf people.Objectives: The objective of the study was to investigate the level of knowledge and use of contraceptive methods amongst deaf people in Ghana with the aim of understanding their contraceptive behaviour and to improve access.Method: The study was a participatory SRH needs assessment utilising a two-phase, sequential, mixed methods design. The study included 179 participants, consisting of focus groups with seven executives of Ghana National Association of the Deaf (GNAD, 10 male deaf adults, and 9 deaf female adults. A total of 152 deaf people, made up of students, women, and men participated in a survey, whilst one hearing person served as a key informant.Results: The findings of the study indicated that of the 13 methods shown in the survey, only three were known to about 70% of the adults and 60% of the students. Level of knowledge of the remaining nine methods was low.Conclusion: Clear and effective policies are needed to guide the provision of SRH information and services for deaf people in Ghana.

  16. Investigation of the A1555G mutation in mitochondrial DNA (MT-RNR1 in groups of Brazilian individuals with nonsyndromic deafness and normal-hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Bezerra Salomão

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: We can affirm that A1555G mutation is not prevalent, or it must be very rare in normal-hearing subjects in the State of Paranα, the south region of Brazil. The A1555G mutation frequency (1.3% found in individual with nonsyndromic deafness is similar to those found in other populations, with nonsyndromic deafness. Consequently, it should be examined in deafness diagnosis. The investigation of the A1555G mutation can contribute towards the determination of the nonsyndromic deafness etiology, hence, contributing to the correct genetic counseling process.

  17. Parents as Partners for Preparing Deaf Students for Bi-Bi Educational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSasso, Carol J.; Metzger, Melanie A.

    This paper describes Bilingual-Bicultural (BiBi) instructional programs for students with hearing impairments and proposes a model for BiBi instruction which uses parents as partners with instructors to develop the linguistic abilities of hearing-impaired students. In the model, traditionally spoken languages are conveyed via cued speech instead…

  18. Predictors of Assessment Accommodations Use for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Wurtz, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    Current accountability reform requires annual assessment for all students, including students with disabilities. Testing accommodations are one way to increase access to assessments while maintaining the validity of test scores. This paper provides findings from an exploratory logistic regression analysis of predictors of four accommodations used…

  19. Reduced procedural motor learning in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eLévesque

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the deaf suggest that cross-modal neuroplastic changes may vary across modalities. Only a handful of studies have examined motor capacities in the profoundly deaf. These studies suggest the presence of deficits in manual dexterity and delays in movement production. As of yet, the ability to learn complex sequential motor patterns has not been explored in deaf populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the procedural learning skills of deaf adults. A serial reaction-time task (SRTT was performed by 18 deaf subjects and 18 matched controls to investigate possible motor alteration subsequent to auditory deprivation. Deaf participants had various degrees of hearing loss. Half of the experimental group were early-deaf adults mostly using hearing aids, the remaining half were late-deaf adults using a cochlear implant. Participants carried out a repeating 12-item sequence of key presses along with random blocks containing no repeating sequence. Non-specific and sequence-specific learning was analyzed in relation to individual features related to the hearing loss. The results revealed significant differences between groups in sequence-specific learning, with deaf subjects being less efficient than controls in acquiring sequence-specific knowledge. We interpret the results in light of cross-modal plasticity and the auditory scaffolding hypothesis.

  20. The effect of cochlear implant use in postlingually deaf adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, P F; Hinderink, J B; van den Broek, P

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the use of cochlear implants (CI) on the health status of postlingually deaf adults. METHODS: Participants comprised 45 postlingually deaf adult multichannel CI users and 46 deaf candidates on the waiting list for a CI. The latter group acted as control subjects to

  1. The effect of cochlear implant use in postlingually deaf adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, P F; Hinderink, J B; van den Broek, P

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the use of cochlear implants (CI) on the health status of postlingually deaf adults. METHODS: Participants comprised 45 postlingually deaf adult multichannel CI users and 46 deaf candidates on the waiting list for a CI. The latter group acted as control subjects to

  2. The Importance of Early Sign Language Acquisition for Deaf Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. Diane; Hauser, Peter C.; Miller, Paul; Kargin, Tevhide; Rathmann, Christian; Guldenoglu, Birkan; Kubus, Okan; Spurgeon, Erin; Israel, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have used various theories to explain deaf individuals' reading skills, including the dual route reading theory, the orthographic depth theory, and the early language access theory. This study tested 4 groups of children--hearing with dyslexia, hearing without dyslexia, deaf early signers, and deaf late signers (N = 857)--from 4…

  3. The Importance of Early Sign Language Acquisition for Deaf Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. Diane; Hauser, Peter C.; Miller, Paul; Kargin, Tevhide; Rathmann, Christian; Guldenoglu, Birkan; Kubus, Okan; Spurgeon, Erin; Israel, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have used various theories to explain deaf individuals' reading skills, including the dual route reading theory, the orthographic depth theory, and the early language access theory. This study tested 4 groups of children--hearing with dyslexia, hearing without dyslexia, deaf early signers, and deaf late signers (N = 857)--from 4…

  4. The relationship of theory of mind and executive functions in normal, deaf and cochlear-implanted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Nazarzadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim : Theory of mind refers to the ability to understand the others have mental states that can be different from one's own mental states or facts. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of theory of mind and executive functions in normal hearing, deaf, and cochlear-implanted children.Methods: The study population consisted of normal, deaf and cochlear-implanted girl students in Mashhad city, Iran. Using random sampling, 30 children (10 normal, 10 deaf and 10 cochlear-implanted in age groups of 8-12 years old were selected. To measure the theoty of mind, theory of mind 38-item scale and to assess executive function, Coolidge neuropsychological and personality test was used. Research data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient, analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests.Results: There was a significant difference between the groups in the theory of mind and executive function subscales, organization, planning-decision-making, and inhibition. Between normal and deaf groups (p=0.01, as well as cochlear-implanted and deaf groups (p=0.01, there was significant difference in planning decision-making subscale. There was not any significant relationship between the theory of mind and executive functions generally or the theory of mind and executive function subscales in these three groups independently.Conclusion: Based on our findings, cochlear-implanted and deaf children have lower performance in theory of mind and executive function compared with normal hearing children.

  5. Mainstreaming from a School for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Conway, Sister

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-four students who had been in a school for the deaf (in grades 5-12), but were now mainstreamed, were interviewed to ascertain their academic and communication skills, and their psycho-social adjustment. (PHR)

  6. Visual Analyses and Discriminations: One Approach to Measuring Students' Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2006-01-01

    The metacognitive performance of four groups of students was examined. The students' processes of visual analysis and discrimination of real-life pictures were used to measure metacognition. There were 61 participants: 18 hearing students, 18 deaf and hard of hearing students, 16 students with mild mental disabilities, and 9 students with physical…

  7. Academic and Social Adjustment among Deaf and Hard of Hearing College Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-fen

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the factors that may influence the academic and social adjustment of college students with hearing loss in Taiwan. These factors included age, gender, degree of hearing loss, primary communication mode, amplification, high school educational experience, and family relationship. The instruments used to address…

  8. Teaching Dance to Deaf Students: A Case Study in Cape Coast, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Tarin T. D.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges and triumphs of teachers who guide students with visual and auditory impairments to learn about and experience African-based dance as part of a healthy, active lifestyle. The teachers share insights they have gained in developing best practices by capturing the inherent nature of dance as kinesthetic…

  9. The English-Language and Reading Achievement of a Cohort of Deaf Students Speaking and Signing Standard English: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Diane Corcoran; Luetke, Barbara; McLean, Meigan; Stryker, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that English-language proficiency is critical if students who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) are to read as their hearing peers. One explanation for the traditionally reported reading achievement plateau when students are D/HH is the inability to hear insalient English morphology. Signing Exact English can provide visual access to these features. The authors investigated the English morphological and syntactic abilities and reading achievement of elementary and middle school students at a school using simultaneously spoken and signed Standard American English facilitated by intentional listening, speech, and language strategies. A developmental trend (and no plateau) in language and reading achievement was detected; most participants demonstrated average or above-average English. Morphological awareness was prerequisite to high test scores; speech was not significantly correlated with achievement; language proficiency, measured by the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-4 (Semel, Wiig, & Secord, 2003), predicted reading achievement.

  10. Minnesota Brings Together Stakeholders to Develop a Plan for Children who are Deaf, Deafblind, and Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The Commission of Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Minnesotans (MNCDHH) and the Minnesota Department of Education co-sponsored remote participation in two National Summits on Deaf Education in 2009 and 2010. The summits were focused on improved outcomes for deaf, deafblind, and hard of hearing students, partnerships, and collaboration. Summit…

  11. THE CARTOGRAPHY IN STUDIES OF ENVIRONMENT: BILINGUAL PRACTICE AIMING INCLUSION OF DEAF STUDENTS A CARTOGRAFIA NOS ESTUDOS DO MEIO AMBIENTE: POR UMA PRÁTICA BILINGUE VISANDO A INCLUSÃO DOS ALUNOS SURDOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Salge Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding that teaching Geography to Deaf students through to the field visual-spatial and off course, the appreciation of their mother language, the Brazilian Sing Language, that study aiming to discuss and develop activities of Geography focusing on the characteristics of that language. Therefore, starting from the Cartography and all diverse applicability, this study sought to sharpen the student’s perception about the lived space. The conditions of urban neighborhood linked to the importance of space and interpret the various events that surround us. Finally, using games, images and fields works with a group of Deaf students, we compose a sequence teaching that we call: The Urban Environmental Problems: From the world to my school.Por entender que o ensino ao aluno Surdo perpassa pelo campo viso-gestual e, especialmente, pela valorização da sua língua materna, a Língua Brasileira de Sinais, é que este trabalho objetivou a discussão e elaboração de atividades de Geografia centradas nas características lingüísticas e didáticas destes alunos. Portanto, partindo-se da Cartografia e de suas diversas aplicabilidades, este trabalho procurou aguçar a percepção dos alunos acerca do espaço vivido. Considerando a área em que se localiza a escola, elegemos os problemas ambientais urbanos como eixo temático. Sendo assim, através de atividades, jogos, imagens e trabalho de campo com uma turma de alunos Surdos, arquitetaram-se as seqüências didáticas que chamamos de Os Problemas Ambientais Urbanos: Do mundo à minha escola.

  12. The Curious Case of the Deaf and Contested Landscapes of Bilingual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Joseph Michael; Boldt, Gail

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine deaf education as a "curious case" to prompt thinking about issues of language inequities. The authors argue that tying the fortunes of deaf students to those of other language minority students provides opportunities for new insights into policies and practices of deaf education as well the education…

  13. Deaf Education in a Planetarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Muxue; Hintz, E. G.; Jones, M.; Lawler, J.; Fisler, A.; Mumford, H.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years we have struggled with the difficulty of giving a planetarium show to a deaf audience. This is especially true for a younger audience with limited reading abilities. You must illuminate the ASL signer which causes light splash onto the dome. You must slow the presentation down to allow for time to interpret and then point. A slower presentation can have an adverse impact on the learning of the hearing students if the presentation is made to a mixed audience. To address these issues, we are currently working on methods to improve deaf education in a planetarium environment. We will present an overview of the current project along with efforts to establish baselines comprehension levels for both deaf and hearing children. This work is partially funded by an NSF IIS-1124548 grant and funding from the Sorenson Foundation.

  14. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  15. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  16. Dynamics of students' epistemological framing in group problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hai D; Sayre, Eleanor C

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated students' epistemological framing when solving physics problems. Framing supports students' problem solving as they decide what knowledge to employ and the necessary steps to solve the problem. Students may frame the same problem differently and take alternate paths to a correct solution. When students work in group settings, they share and discuss their framing to decide how to proceed in problem solving as a whole group. In this study, we investigate how groups of students negotiate their framing and frame shifts in group problem solving.

  17. Teacher Quality: A Comparison of National Board--Certified and Non--Board--Certified Teachers of Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheetz, Nanci A.; Martin, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The study was designed to identify specific components of teacher excellence, focusing initially on the characteristics of the small number of teachers of the deaf who are certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), then comparing those with the characteristics of other teachers identified as master teachers by…

  18. Adapting Experiential Learning to Develop Problem-Solving Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Matthew M.; Carrano, Andres L.; Dannels, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals who are deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professions, and this may be due in part to their level of preparation in the development and retention of mathematical and problem-solving skills. An approach was developed that incorporates experiential learning and…

  19. Development of Text Structure Knowledge as Assessed by Spoken and Signed Retellings of a Deaf Second-Grade Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetke-Stahlman, Barbara; Griffiths, Cindy; Montgomery, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    A study examined whether text structures were included in the "oral" videotaped retellings of a second grader with deafness across 28 texts. Improvements in the child's ability to include specific elements of text structures were documented over nine months. A 12-month increase in reading ability and narrative ability was also documented.…

  20. Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is able to offer a special opportunity for deaf and hard of hearing STEM students. June 29 - ... the infographic and spread the word about what deaf children can do! our community Support AG Bell ...

  1. High School Transfer Students: A Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.; Amos, Louise Cleary

    1973-01-01

    A counselor's awareness of many incidents of adjustment problems among new students in a large and impersonal high school prompted an effort to make changes in the situation; the resulting program, designed to help new students is described in this article. (Author)

  2. Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

  3. Group Psychodrama for Korean College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Soo Eun; Kim, Soo Jin

    2017-01-01

    Psychodrama was first introduced in the Korean literature in 1972, but its generalization to college students did not occur until the 1990s. Despite findings from psychodrama studies with Korean college students supporting psychodrama as effective for developing and maintaining good interpersonal relationships, as well as decreasing anxiety and…

  4. "I Hate Group Work!": Addressing Students' Concerns about Small-Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Elizabeth G.

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies the strategies used by architecture professors and their undergraduate students to mitigate common issues that students raise about group work. Based on participant-observation, interviews with students and faculty, and analysis of instructional materials and student work, this IRB-approved ethnographic case study…

  5. Use of Text Messaging by Deaf Adolescents in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Yoshiko; Iwai, Mariko

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses a survey study that drew on seventy-five high school students at a residential deaf school in Japan. The aim of the survey was to examine the various ways in which deaf adolescents use text messaging and to determine whether they use the technology differently from the hearing high school students surveyed in our previously…

  6. Deaf teacher candidates in hearing classrooms: a unique teacher preparation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D S; Lytle, R R

    2000-03-01

    An undergraduate teacher education program at Gallaudet University prepares deaf students in "regular" education. This includes a required full-time internship with hearing students (assisted by sign language interpreters). Graduates then continue in a master's degree program in deaf education, thus acquiring dual certification. Several studies indicate that these deaf candidates progress through the same developmental stages as hearing candidates and that they develop high expectations for deaf learners. Issues related to implementing such a program are discussed.

  7. Single-Case Design Research: Building the Evidence-Base in the Field of Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Joanna E; Guardino, Caroline; Antia, Shirin D; Luckner, John L

    2016-01-01

    The field of education of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students has a paucity of evidence-based practices (EBPs) to guide instruction. The authors discussed how the research methodology of single-case design (SCD) can be used to build EBPs through direct and systematic replication of studies. An overview of SCD research methods is presented, including an explanation of how internal and external validity issues are addressed, and why SCD is appropriate for intervention research with DHH children. The authors then examine the SCD research in the field according to quality indicators (QIs; at the individual level and as a body of evidence) to determine the existing evidence base. Finally, future replication areas are recommended to fill the gaps in SCD research with students who are DHH in order to add to the evidence base in the field.

  8. Group Work and Leadership: Perception of FCS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Susan W.; Gregoire, Mary B.

    2006-01-01

    No known studies have examined the perception of family and consumer science (FCS) students related to group work in the classroom and its relationship to leadership. In this qualitative study, two groups of FCS students--hospitality management and dietetics--viewed group projects as exercises in leadership skills that had many barriers.…

  9. Group Work and Leadership: Perception of FCS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Susan W.; Gregoire, Mary B.

    2006-01-01

    No known studies have examined the perception of family and consumer science (FCS) students related to group work in the classroom and its relationship to leadership. In this qualitative study, two groups of FCS students--hospitality management and dietetics--viewed group projects as exercises in leadership skills that had many barriers.…

  10. Strategies to Improve Student Reaction to Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriflik, Lynda; Mullan, Judy

    2007-01-01

    After receiving negative feedback from students and tutors about their group work experiences in a health subject, strategies to resolve these collaborative learning issues were considered. The objectives were to facilitate student ability to resolve group work issues, highlight group work as an important graduate attribute and to improve…

  11. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  12. BILINGUALISM: MULTICULTURALISM HOLOPRAXIOLOGY OF THE VENEZUELAN DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the child has been made regularly and without many prejudices or tbacks,  until this had some physical characteristic or perceptual, who twisted his attention.  To those who were born with the inability to listen or hear properly, excluded in all respects. At the end of the 20th century, the deaf began to defend their identity and differed between Deafness (lack of hearing of deafness, with "S", which is a socio-anthropological perspective, which includes the use of sign language and the learning of reading and writing of the Spanish (bilingualism in their training. This research had as general objective to unveil bilingualism from an intercultural intersubjectivity of the deaf in Venezuela by applying a qualitative related paradigm with methodology fenomenologica-hermeneutica of Max Van Manen. The information collected observing and interviewing in depth (12 deaf students, parents or representatives (6, (3 researchers and educational specialists deaf and listeners (12. To analyze and triangulate information, obtained the following conclusions about the bilingual deaf: their physical and intellectual abilities are exactly the same to the listeners;  they can achieve the necessary qualification for any job; is required the language of signs so that you can put into practice the language; those who have the organizational capacity to develop oral language, it should not hinder him this opportunity, without detriment to the learning of the language of signs and the systematic training of the deaf teachers and deaf family, educational managers, political and employer of the deaf is essentially required.

  13. Student Orientation to Grammatical Aspects of Interaction in Group Work

    OpenAIRE

    アリン, デビッド; 細田, 由利; Aline, David; Hosoda, Yuri

    2005-01-01

    Using the framework of Conversation Analysis, this paper examines the interaction found in task-based group work, and explores the effects of interaction on second language acquisition. For this study 26 hours of conversation by 23 small groups of Japanese university students were audio taped. A close analysis of the students' interaction in the group discussion revealed the students' competence in managing grammatical problems through self-repair and peer-assistance. The data show some of th...

  14. Educational Resources Recommendation System for a heterogeneous Student Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea RODRÍGUEZ MARÍN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a face-class, where the student group is heterogeneous, it is necessary to select the most appropriate educational resources that support learning for all. In this sense, multi-agent system (MAS can be used to simulate the features of the students in the group, including their learning style, in order to help the professor find the best resources for your class. In this paper, we present MAS to educational resources recommendation for group students, simulating their profiles and selecting resources that best fit. Obtained promising results show that proposed MAS is able to delivered educational resources for a student group.

  15. Group supervision and Japanese students' successful completion of undergraduate theses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of zemi or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing...

  16. 对聋人大学生眭教育的认识和思考%Sex education for deaf students the knowledge and thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁

    2011-01-01

    As China's growing career development education for the disabled, deaf education has made encouraging progress, but there is no sex education has been adequate attention. Education of deaf students through the status, and further analysis of its causes. I hope to attract attention to the school, and university education provides a new theoretical and practical basis.%随着我国残疾人教育事业发展日益壮大,聋人高等教育已经取得了可喜的进步,但是性教育目前没有得到充分的关注。通过探讨聋人大学生性教育现状,并进一步分析其原因。希望引起学校重视,并为高校的教育教学提供了一种新型的理论和实践的依据。

  17. What Makes a "Good Group"? Exploring the Characteristics and Performance of Undergraduate Student Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, S. B.; Davis, R. C.; Goode, N. T.; May, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Group work forms the foundation for much of student learning within higher education, and has many educational, social and professional benefits. This study aimed to explore the determinants of success or failure for undergraduate student teams and to define a "good group" through considering three aspects of group success: the task, the…

  18. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  19. Whose Deaf Genes Are They Anyway?: The Deaf Community's Challenge to Legislation on Embryo Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Steven D.; Middleton, Anna; Turner, Graham H.

    2010-01-01

    This article centers on the implications of genetic developments (as a scientific and technological discipline) for those Deaf people who identify as a cultural and linguistic minority group and are concerned with the preservation and development of sign language and Deaf culture. We explore the impact of one particular legislative initiative that…

  20. Deafness among the Negev Bedouin: an interdisciplinary dialogue on deafness, marginality and context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kisch

    2012-01-01

    Shifra Kisch analyses the social consequences of deafness and the sociolinguistic context of signing among the Negev Bedouin, the native Arab inhabitants of the southern arid region of present-day Israel. The consequences of deafness vary considerably between different Bedouin groups as well as alon

  1. Students' views of cooperative learning and group testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Today's radiologic technology students must learn to collaborate and communicate to function as part of the health care team. Innovative educational techniques such as cooperative learning (working collectively in small groups) and group testing (collaborating on tests) can foster these skills. Assess students' familiarity with and opinions about cooperative learning and group testing before and after participation in a semester-long course incorporating these methods. Twenty-eight students enrolled in a baccalaureate-level radiologic technology program in Louisiana were surveyed at the beginning and end of the semester. Results showed that students were more knowledgeable about and more accepting of cooperative learning and group testing after participating in the course. However, some students continued to prefer independent learning. Students are open to new learning methods such as cooperative learning and group testing. These techniques can help them develop the skills they will need to function collaboratively in the workplace.

  2. A Rural School Educator Builds Student Learners through Access to Curriculum, Self-Advocacy, and Connections to the Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathisen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    In this article Megan Mathisen, a teacher of deaf and hard of hearing children at St. Anne Grade School in St. Anne, Illinois, describes her work with two boys in second grade and one boy in fifth grade who at the beginning of the school year had reading and language delays. After working with them, her second grade boys are now on grade level and…

  3. Group work as an incentive for learning - students' experiences of group work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Group work is used as a means for learning at all levels in educational systems. There is strong scientific support for the benefits of having students learning and working in groups. Nevertheless, studies about what occurs in groups during group work and which factors actually influence the students' ability to learn is still lacking. Similarly, the question of why some group work is successful and other group work results in the opposite is still unsolved. The aim of this article is to add to the current level of knowledge and understandings regarding the essence behind successful group work in higher education. This research is focused on the students' experiences of group work and learning in groups, which is an almost non-existing aspect of research on group work prior to the beginning of the 21st century. A primary aim is to give university students a voice in the matter by elucidating the students' positive and negative points of view and how the students assess learning when working in groups. Furthermore, the students' explanations of why some group work ends up being a positive experience resulting in successful learning, while in other cases, the result is the reverse, are of interest. Data were collected through a study-specific questionnaire, with multiple choice and open-ended questions. The questionnaires were distributed to students in different study programs at two universities in Sweden. The present result is based on a reanalysis and qualitative analysis formed a key part of the study. The results indicate that most of the students' experiences involved group work that facilitated learning, especially in the area of academic knowledge. Three important prerequisites (learning, study-social function, and organization) for group work that served as an effective pedagogy and as an incentive for learning were identified and discussed. All three abstractions facilitate or hamper students' learning, as well as impact their experiences with group work.

  4. Extending Students' Mathematical Thinking during Whole-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Nesrin; Kline, Kate; Grant, Theresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that extending students' mathematical thinking during whole-group discussions is a challenging undertaking. To better understand what extending student thinking looks like and how teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) supports teachers in their efforts to extend student thinking, the teaching of six experienced…

  5. Extending Students' Mathematical Thinking during Whole-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Nesrin; Kline, Kate; Grant, Theresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that extending students' mathematical thinking during whole-group discussions is a challenging undertaking. To better understand what extending student thinking looks like and how teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) supports teachers in their efforts to extend student thinking, the teaching of six experienced…

  6. Understanding The Writing Conventions of Deaf Urban Latino Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Negrete, Mark Steven

    2015-01-01

    The thesis project analyzes the trajectory and components of English writing conventions of Deaf Urban Latino Youth. It is an analysis of writing features and strategies in punctuation, organization, paragraph writing, neatness and portions of English grammar. The lessons call for real world everyday experiences of communication for Deaf youth in conjunction with English writing. Deaf Latino students in particular undergo a contention of acquiring English writing skills while experiencing oth...

  7. Understanding The Writing Conventions of Deaf Urban Latino Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Negrete, Mark Steven

    2015-01-01

    The thesis project analyzes the trajectory and components of English writing conventions of Deaf Urban Latino Youth. It is an analysis of writing features and strategies in punctuation, organization, paragraph writing, neatness and portions of English grammar. The lessons call for real world everyday experiences of communication for Deaf youth in conjunction with English writing. Deaf Latino students in particular undergo a contention of acquiring English writing skills while experiencing oth...

  8. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impossible, to hear. They can often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. ... certain medicines, and surgery. NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  9. Effectiveness of Small Group Social Skills Lessons with Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, Amy I.; Boes, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    This action research study (ARS) describes the effectiveness of small group social skills lessons with elementary students, using "Too Good for Violence: A Curriculum for Non-violent Living" by the Mendez Foundation. The school counselor and school social worker taught the curriculum in a structured small group of 4th grade students in 8…

  10. Managing Student Behavior during Large Group Guidance: What Works Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Participants provided information pertaining to managing non-task-related behavior of students during large group guidance lessons. In particular, school counselors were asked often how often they provide large group guidance, the frequency of which students exhibit off-task and/or disruptive behavior during guidance lessons, and techniques they…

  11. Improving Student Group Marketing Presentations: A Modified Pecha Kucha Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jason; Kowalczyk, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Student presentations can often seem like a formality rather than a lesson in representing oneself or group in a professional manner. To improve the quality of group presentations, the authors modified the popular presentation style of Pecha Kucha (20 slides, 20 seconds per slide) for marketing courses to help students prepare and deliver…

  12. Improving Student Group Marketing Presentations: A Modified Pecha Kucha Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jason; Kowalczyk, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Student presentations can often seem like a formality rather than a lesson in representing oneself or group in a professional manner. To improve the quality of group presentations, the authors modified the popular presentation style of Pecha Kucha (20 slides, 20 seconds per slide) for marketing courses to help students prepare and deliver…

  13. The Perceptions of Five Years Old Group Students' about Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeynep Et, Sümeyra; Memis, Esra Kabatas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to reveal the perceptions of students of five years old group about scientists. The practice was implemented with 76 students having education in five-age group continuing to various nursery schools located in the center of Kastamonu province. Before starting the practice, the teacher asked the questions of…

  14. Relationship of biomedical science content acquisition performance to students' level of PBL group interaction: are students learning during PBL group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Laura M; Eckert, George J

    2011-05-01

    This study assessed biomedical science content acquisition from problem-based learning (PBL) and its relationship to students' level of group interaction. We hypothesized that learning in preparation for exams results primarily from individual study of post-case learning objectives and that outcomes would be unrelated to students' group involvement. During dental curricular years 1 and 2, student-generated biomedical learning issues (LIs) were identified from six randomly chosen PBL cases. Knowledge and application of case concepts were assessed with quizzes based on the identified LIs prior to dissemination of the learning objectives. Students and facilitators were surveyed on students' level of group involvement for the assessed LI topics. Year 1 students had significantly higher assessment scores (p=0.0001). For both student classes, means were significantly higher for the recall item (Q1) than for the application item (Q2). Q1 scores increased along with the student's reported role for Year 1 (p=0.04). However, there was no relationship between the student's reported role and Q1 for Year 2 (p=0.20). There was no relationship between the student's reported role and Q2 for Year 1 (p=0.09) or Year 2 (p=0.19). This suggests that students' level of group involvement on the biomedical learning issues did not significantly impact students' assessment performance.

  15. 武术教学对高校聋生身心健康的发展研究%On Wushu Teaching to the Physical and Mental Health Development of University Deaf Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡楠

    2015-01-01

    According to the theory and the studies of Wushu and sports-related disciplines, this paper focuses on the cultivation of overall quality of deaf students by using appropriate programs and curriculum learning Wushu, and practicing Wushu action and moral education in order to obtain an effective way to develop the deaf students’ good qualities and good health. Moral education is a new and important subject for the educators when it comes to how to improve the overall quality of the deaf students, especially the physiological development of the deaf.%文章根据武术以及体育相关学科的有关理论和研究成果,采用适宜聋生学习的武术项目及课程,通过武德教育和武术动作练习,有目标、分阶段地对聋生的综合素质进行培养,以期获得培养聋人大学生良好品质和健康体魄的有效方法。如何提高高校聋人的综合素质,特别是聋人的生理发育,思想品德教育是摆在教育工作者面前的新的重要课题。

  16. Deaf and Hearing Students Comparative Study of Emotion Understanding%听障学生与健听学生情绪理解的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟庆

    2014-01-01

    为深入地研究听障学生的情绪理解特点,研究分别选取了24名听障与健听初中学生进行实验研究,设计了情绪原因识别、情绪表情识别任务。研究结果发现:听障学生情绪理解水平显著低于健听学生;听障学生情绪理解能力随着年级升高不断发展,健听学生情绪理解各年级差异不显著;性别因素在听障学生及健听学生情绪理解上差异不显著;不同效价情绪因素在听障学生及健听学生情绪理解上差异不显著。%For the hearing-impaired students to study in depth understanding of the emotional characteristics of the 24 studies were selected hearing impaired and hearing middle school students in the experimental study was designed to identify emotional reasons ,emotional expression recognition task. The results showed that :Deaf students to understand the emotional level was sig-nificantly lower than hearing students ;hearing impaired ability to understand students ’emotional increased with grade continuous development of hearing students’emotional understanding all grades was not significant ;gender and health in the hearing-impaired students listen to the students to understand the emotional difference was not significant ;different potency of emotional factors in hearing-impaired students and hearing students understand the emotional difference was not significant.

  17. 聋校小学数学作业讲评的有效性%Making the Homework Comment Efficient for the Deaf Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆丽群

    2014-01-01

    数学作业是听障学生获取、巩固、应用数学知识的一种重要手段,是课堂教学的延续和补充,是向学生反馈学习情况的一种基本形式。有效的作业讲评,能巩固、深化教学内容,能激发学生学习热情和完善学生认知结构。%Math homework has its great role in helping the deaf to gain, reinforce, use math knowledge, and it is extension and supplement for classroom teaching. As math homework reflects students' learning, efficient homework comment will strengthen and deepen teaching content, stimulate learners'interest and improve their recongintion.

  18. Are we hammering square pegs into round holes? An investigation of the meta-analyses of reading research with students who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing and students who are hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Williams, Cheri

    2014-01-01

    In a qualitative meta-analysis, the researchers systematically reviewed qualitative and quantitative meta-analyses on reading research with PK-12 students published after the 2000 National Reading Panel (NRP) report. Eleven qualitative and 39 quantitative meta-analyses were reviewed examining reading research with typically developing hearing students, special education hearing students (including English Language Learners), and d/Deaf or hard of hearing (d/Dhh) students. Generally, the meta-analysis yielded findings similar to and corroborative of the NRP's. Contradictory results (e.g., regarding the role of rhyme awareness in reading outcomes) most often resulted from differing definitions of interventions and their measurements. The analysis provided evidence of several instructional approaches that support reading development. On the basis of the qualitative similarity hypothesis (Paul, 2010, 2012; Paul & Lee, 2010; Paul & Wang, 2012; Paul, Wang, & Williams, 2013), the researchers argue that these instructional strategies also should effectively support d/Dhh children's reading development.

  19. The Relationship on Self-concept and Subjective Well-being of Deaf and Dumb Students%聋生自我概念与主观幸福感关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娜

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship of Deaf and dumb students,self-concept and subjective well-being. Methods:Index of Well-being and TSCS were performed in 79 deaf and dumb students.Results:(1)There was significant difference in study result between deaf and dumb students' self-morals ethics and self-acts.(2)There was significant difference in grades between deaf and dumb students' worrying of health, deaf and dumb students' satisfying and interest of life and controlling of emotion and behavior.(3)Scores of the self-concept of deaf and dumb students were significantly correlated with the subjec-tive well-being of students.%目的:探讨聋生自我概念和主观幸福感状况及两者的关系,为特殊学生的心理健康教育以及我国特殊教育机制的健全提供一定的参考依据。方法:随机抽取79名聋生进行田纳西自我概念量表、总体幸福感量表的测试。结果:(1)不同学习成绩的聋生在自我概念的道德伦理自我维度及自我行动维度上存在显著差异;(2)不同年级的聋生在总体幸福感量表的对健康的担心维度上、对生活的满足和兴趣维度上、对情感和行为的控制维度上均存在显著差异;(3)聋生自我概念总分能够显著预测其主观幸福感。

  20. Customized Assessment Group Initiative: A Complementary Approach to Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akindayomi, Akinloye

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted in a US setting, examines the importance of group dynamics that emphasize cooperative team building through the proposed grouping strategy called Customized Assessment Group Initiative (CAGI). CAGI is a student grouping strategy designed to operationalize the mutual accountability concept central to the definition of teams by…

  1. International Group Heterogeneity and Students' Business Project Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Bosker, Roel J.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Rugers, Lucie; van Heugten, Petra PAM

    2015-01-01

    In business higher education, group project work plays an essential role. The purpose of the present study is to explore the relationship between the group heterogeneity of students' business project groups and their academic achievements at both group and individual levels. The sample consists of 536 freshmen from an International Business School…

  2. "I Hate Group Work!": Addressing Students' Concerns About Small-Group Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G. Allan, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies the strategies used by architecture professors and their undergraduate students to mitigate common issues that students raise about group work. Based on participant-observation, interviews with students and faculty, and analysis of instructional materials and student work, this IRB-approved ethnographic case study complicates the separation of collaborative, cooperative, and problem-based learning into distinct pedagogical models. Rather than viewing students’ concerns as a form of resistance that can be avoided with the right approach to small-group learning, this article explores how the hybrid model operating in design studio pedagogy confronts the problems inherent in any form of group work.

  3. Secondary endolymphatic hydrops after sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Tsung-Yi; Cheng, Po-Wen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2013-10-01

    Patients with sudden deafness who had abnormal ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP)/cervical VEMP (cVEMP) responses but retained caloric function may subsequently develop secondary hydrops with a mean interval of 8 years. This study applied the inner ear test battery in patients who had sudden deafness previously to elucidate how secondary endolymphatic hydrops occurs years after sudden deafness. Twenty patients who had experienced recent vertiginous attacks several years after sudden deafness (group A) and 20 patients without rotational vertiginous episode for at least 5 years following sudden deafness (group B) were enrolled. All patients underwent an inner ear test battery comprising audiometry, caloric test, and oVEMP and cVEMP tests. The mean interval from initial sudden deafness to vertiginous attack in group A was 8 years, with a mean hearing level of 66 ± 20 dB, which did not significantly differ from 61 ± 20 dB in group B. For the vestibular test results, the percentages of abnormal cVEMP, oVEMP, and caloric tests in group A were 65%, 70%, and 25%, respectively. Compared to the respective 70%, 60%, and 75% abnormalities in group B, only the caloric test differed significantly.

  4. Malaysian Students' Scientific Argumentation: Do groups perform better than individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Lee Ling; Surif, Johari; Hau Seng, Cher

    2015-02-01

    The practices of argumentation have recently been upheld as an important need to develop students' understanding of scientific concepts. However, the present education system in Malaysia is still largely examination-based and teacher-oriented. Thus, this study aims to examine the mastery level of scientific argumentation and its scheme among Malaysian secondary-level science students. A total of 120 students were randomly assigned to answer a Scientific Argumentation Test (SAT), either individually or in a group. Based on the answers, two groups of students, one who have answered with valid scientific concepts and another who have answered with invalid concepts, were identified and interviewed. Quantitative analysis was performed on the SAT results to determine students' mastery of scientific argumentation, and their argumentation schemes were assessed using content analysis performed on the interview transcripts. The results showed that students were weak in the construction of scientific arguments with valid concepts. Moreover, most of the constructed arguments consisted of misconceptions. The results also showed that students who were involved in group argumentation tended to have a more complex argumentation scheme, compared to individual students. As a group, students were able to argue with more scientific elements and showed their understanding of macro and submicro concepts. Hence, science teachers need to emphasize on the construction of scientific argumentation in their teaching, especially at the macro, submicro, and symbolic levels of representations, to ensure students' understanding of the concepts. This will therefore enhance their mastery of scientific argumentation and improve their content knowledge.

  5. Sudden deafness and right-to-left shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Tachi, Toshihiro; Aihara, Teruhito; Harada, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    One of the etiologies for idiopathic sudden deafness is considered to be ischemia of the inner ear. Cryptogenic stroke is caused by a right-to-left shunt (RLS). The present study investigated whether RLS is associated with the occurrence of sudden deafness. Contrast saline transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed to detect RLS. Subjects comprised 23 consecutive sudden deafness patients and 46 age- and gender-matched controls. Clinical characteristics, including vascular risk factors, were compared between sudden deafness and control groups. RLS was more frequent in the sudden deafness group than in controls (48 vs. 17%, p = 0.011). No significant differences in other clinical characteristics were seen between groups. RLS may be a potential cause of sudden deafness. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. INCLUSÃO DE ALUNA SURDA NO ENSINO PROFISSIONALIZANTE EM ESCOLA PÚBLICA DA CIDADE DE LONDRINA. INCLUSION OF A DEAF STUDENT IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN A PUBLIC SCHOOL IN THE CITY OF LONDRINA, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirza Cosmos dos Santos Hirata

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa retrata o processo de inclusão de uma aluna surda em um Curso Técnico Subsequente em Contabilidade em um colégio estadual da cidade de Londrina, Paraná, Brasil. Tem por objetivos compreender as dificuldades da aluna surda em um processo de inclusão escolar, o modo como seus colegas e professores se relaciona com ela, conhecer o que eles pensam da presença dela e do intérprete em sala de aula, verificar se os professores do curso técnico profissionalizante têm preparo para trabalhar a inclusão de uma aluna surda no contexto escolar e identificar se os docentes mudaram sua prática pedagógica com a presença de uma aluna surda em sala de aula. Para isso, realizou-se uma pesquisa de campo. A coleta de dados deu-se por meio da aplicação de questionários com questões objetivas e subjetivas. Os resultados mostram a falta de preparo de professores e equipe diretiva para trabalhar a inclusão na realidade escolar, bem como as dificuldades encontradas pela aluna no desenvolvimento das atividades em sala de aula. Espera-se que os resultados obtidos com este estudo permitam sinalizar o processo de inclusão de surdos no contexto de uma sociedade inclusiva. The research portrays the process of inclusion of a deaf student in the Technical Subsequent Accounting Course in a state school in the city of Londrina, and aims at: building the profile of a deaf student’s vocational technical course, understanding the difficulties of the deaf student in a process of school inclusion, verifying if the professional technical teachers have training to prepare the inclusion of a deaf student in the school context, identifying whether teachers changed their practice teaching with the presence of a deaf student in the classroom. Thus, we carried out a field research. The results showed a lack of preparation of teachers and management team to work for the inclusion in the school and the difficulties encountered by the student in developing

  7. Computer Professional Vocabulary Teaching Research Based on Deaf Students' Language Feature of Vocational College%基于高职聋生语言特点的计算机专业词汇教学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    There are many problems which make deaf student feel difficult in the learning of computer software, such as the absence of computer vocabulary sign language, the conversion of deaf stu-dents' local sign language to national sign language, and the com-plexity of computer software operation process. It also brings a challenge to teacher's teaching and communication skill. A teach-er needs to consider the deaf students' cognitive degree of sign language and the state of vocabulary memorization, and further to solve the matching problem of deaf students' vocabulary and sign language, and also to improve the deaf students' semantic under-standing. This paper referenced the normal teaching theory and special education theory. Combining with the deaf students' fea-ture in practical teaching, the popular problems and solutions of communications in computer teaching are emphasized.%  计算机词汇手语的缺失、学生地方手语和中国手语的转换以及计算机软件操作步骤繁琐等问题都使聋人学生在计算机软件的学习中存在很多的困难,也给教师的教学、沟通带来一定挑战。教师需要考虑到学生的手语认知程度、词汇识记状态进行操作,更要解决学生的词汇、手语匹配的问题并提高聋生语义理解力。本文参考了普通教学理论和特殊教育理论,结合聋人学生实际教学中表现出的特点,重点论述了计算机教学中沟通方面的常见问题和解决方法。

  8. INCLUSÃO DE ALUNOS COM SURDEZ NA EDUCAÇÃO FÍSICA ESCOLAR. INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH DEAFNESS IN SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves, Tássia Pereira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A educação inclusiva é um processo social que vem se desenvolvendo em todo o mundo e direciona os pensamentos para a reflexão sobre a educação e o papel da escola nos tempos atuais. Este estudo objetivou apreender as representações de alunos com surdez sobre sua inclusão nas aulas de Educação Física Escolar. Trata-se de uma pesquisa qualitativa, do tipo descritiva-exploratória e analítica, realizada em duas escolas públicas de um município do interior da Bahia, Brasil. Participaram da entrevista semiestruturada 8 alunos com surdez, sendo que a mesma foi aplicada mediante a presença de um intérprete da Língua de Sinais Brasileira (Libras. Os dados foram organizados, tratados, e analisados à luz da técnica de análise de conteúdo, sendo selecionados elementos como palavras e frases dotadas de significados, em seguida codificação das unidades de registro. Nesse sentido, a partir da análise dos conteúdos manifestos, emergiram 4 categorias: aprendizado durante as aulas de Educação Física; atendimento às necessidades nas aulas de Educação Física; estratégias inclusivas utilizadas nas aulas de Educação Física; e sugestões para modificações nas aulas de Educação Física. Foi relatado pela maioria dos informantes que seus professores eram preocupados com o aprendizado deles, e em contrapartida, identificou-se que a prática pedagógica de outros docentes não considerava as necessidades educacionais de seus alunos com surdez. Portanto, espera-se que esse estudo possa contribuir com o modus operandi na perspectiva da educação inclusiva e para novas reflexões sobre essa temática. Inclusive education is a social process that is evolving around the world and directs the thoughts for reflection about education and the role of school nowadays. This study aimed at understanding the representations of students with deafness about their inclusion in Physical Education classes. This is a qualitative, descriptive

  9. 浙江省249例聋校学生听力状况及病因学调查%An Etiological Study on Hearing Loss of 249 Deaf Students in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管锐瑞; 王晓艾; 王一鸣; 王永华

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨浙江省聋校学生听力损失的病因、听力状况以及语言交流能力。明确该地区不同致聋因素,为因地制宜的开展耳聋的预防、干预等措施奠定基础,从而为将来开展从分子水平上进行耳聋的基因诊断和遗传咨询提供临床依据。方法采用调查问卷,听力测试等方法对浙江省249名聋校学生进行听力状况及病因学调查,并对其中佩戴助听器且有语言能力的56人进行言语测试。结果聋儿均为感应神经性聋,极重度聋占79.12%(197/249),重度聋占17.27%(43/249),中重度聋占3.21%(8/249),中度聋占0.40%(1/249)。先天性聋儿中,家族遗传性聋占7.23%(18/249),后天性聋儿中,药物性聋占36.54%(91/249),其中庆大霉素所占比例最高(31.87%)。佩戴助听器且有语言能力的56例聋儿,单音节词的平均正确率为62.1%,双音节词平均正确率为58.7%。结论聋校学生听力损失以极度聋、重度聋为多数,使用耳毒性药物是导致耳聋的主要原因;对聋儿进行早期诊断、早期佩戴助昕器、早期进行听力语言训练是使聋儿能够正常交流,融入主流社会的关键。%Objective To study the etiology, the hearing status and languagecommunication skills of the deaf students in Zhejiang province and to get the different factors of the deafness in the area in order to lay the foundation for getting more information about gene diagnosis and genetic counseling from the molecular level. Methods A total number of the 249 deaf students in Zhejiang province were examined with audiometer、investigated through questionnaire and other ways. Among them, 56 people of wearing hearing AIDS also had speech audiometry. Results The defect of the students is generally sensorineural, most of them are nonsyndromic deafness. The degrees of deafness could be ascertained with 197 (79.12%) students of profound deafness, 43 (17.27%) students

  10. The deaf athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Trish; Weber, Kathleen M

    2006-12-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing athletes have few documented related medical problems. Hearing loss has multiple causes. A portion of those with a hearing loss consider themselves part of the Deaf community, a community with a unique language and culture. Athletes may have assistive devices to enhance their ability to perceive auditory cues, whereas in deaf sport competitions, common auditory cues may be made visible. There are athletic organizations whose missions are to provide a sport and social venue specific to the deaf population. Having a better understanding and appreciation of the Deaf community will help sports medicine physicians to work more effectively with this population.

  11. The Impact of Intensive Vocation-Related Course Taking on Employment Outcomes for Individuals Who Are Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Wendel, Erica M.; Bond, Mark P.; Garberoglio, Carrie Lou

    2016-01-01

    Individuals who are deaf have historically faced significant obstacles to equity in employment. This secondary analysis of data from the second National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS2) examined (a) intensive vocation-related courses taken by students who are deaf and (b) their impact on long-term employment outcomes. Deaf students in general…

  12. Is It Abuse? Deaf Female Undergraduates' Labeling of Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the labeling of abuse experiences in a sample of 97 Deaf female undergraduate students, exploring the following questions: What is the prevalence of violent behaviors experienced by Deaf female undergraduates in their past-year relationships, what proportion of these relationships are identified as "abuse," and what…

  13. Estudantes surdos no ensino superior: reflexões sobre a inclusão Deaf students in higher education: reflections on inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Alquati Bisol

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é compreender a vivência universitária de estudantes surdos que frequentaram escolas bilíngues e se identificam com a cultura surda. O ponto de partida foi uma pesquisa de campo com cinco jovens - três moças e dois rapazes, com idades entre 21 e 27 anos - matriculados em cursos de graduação por no mínimo três semestres. O trabalho consistiu em entrevistas individuais semiestruturadas, aplicadas por uma bolsista surda e gravadas em vídeo e, depois, traduzidas para a língua portuguesa e submetidas à análise de conteúdo. Os resultados descrevem o desafio da adaptação dos sujeitos surdos a um universo majoritariamente ouvinte, as dificuldades de transitar entre a língua de sinais e a língua portuguesa, a necessidade de manter referenciais identitários valorizados aos olhos dos ouvintes, além da importância de reorganizar as estratégias de ensino e de avaliar a participação do intérprete de língua de sinais.The objective of this study is to understand the experiences of deaf students who attended bilingual schools and identify with the deaf culture. The starting point was field research with three young women and two young men, between 21 and 27 years old, who were enrolled in undergraduate courses for at least three semesters. The work consisted in semi-structured individual interviews, conducted by a deaf female scholarship-holder and recorded on video, which were later translated into Portuguese and analyzed for their content. The results show how challenging it is to adapt to a world of people who for the most part have normal hearing, the difficulties of moving between sign language and Portuguese, the need to maintain identity's points of reference that are valued for those who hear normally, as well as the importance of reorganizing the teaching strategies and evaluating the involvement of the Libras [Brazilian sign language] interpreter.

  14. Deaf genetic testing and psychological well-being in deaf adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Christina G S; Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E; Fox, Michelle; Deignan, Joshua L; Kobayashi, Yoko; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2013-08-01

    Limited data suggest that enhanced self-knowledge from genetic information related to non-medical traits can have a positive impact on psychological well-being. Deaf individuals undertake genetic testing for deaf genes to increase self-knowledge. Because deafness is considered a non-medical trait by many individuals, we hypothesized that deaf individuals receiving a genetic explanation for why they are deaf will experience increased psychological well-being. We report results from a prospective, longitudinal study to determine the impact of genetic testing (GJB2, Cx26; GJB6, Cx30) on perceived personal control (PPC), anxiety, and depression in deaf adults (N = 209) assessed following pre-test genetic counseling as well as 1-month and 6-months following test result disclosure. Participants were classified as Cx positive (n = 82) or Cx negative/inconclusive (n = 127). There was significant evidence for Cx group differences in PPC and anxiety over time (PPC: Cx group*time interaction p = 0.0007; anxiety: Cx group*time interaction p = 0.002), where PPC scores were significantly higher, and anxiety scores were significantly lower for the Cx positive group relative to the negative/inconclusive group following test result disclosure. Compared to pre-test, PPC scores increased at 1-month (p = 0.07) and anxiety scores decreased at 6-months (p = 0.03) for the Cx positive group. In contrast, PPC scores decreased (p = 0.009, p test result disclosure. Genetic testing for deaf genes affects the psychological well-being of deaf individuals. Increasing deaf adults' access to genetic testing may potentially enhance self-knowledge and increase psychological well-being for those who receive a genetic explanation, which could offer downstream health benefits.

  15. Neural networks mediating sentence reading in the deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ann Hirshorn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work addresses the neural bases of sentence reading in deaf populations. To better understand the relative role of deafness and English knowledge in shaping the neural networks that mediate sentence reading, three populations with different degrees of English knowledge and depth of hearing loss were included – deaf signers, oral deaf and hearing individuals. The three groups were matched for reading comprehension and scanned while reading sentences. A similar neural network of left perisylvian areas was observed, supporting the view of a shared network of areas for reading despite differences in hearing and English knowledge. However, differences were observed, in particular in the auditory cortex, with deaf signers and oral deaf showing greatest bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG recruitment as compared to hearing individuals. Importantly, within deaf individuals, the same STG area in the left hemisphere showed greater recruitment as hearing loss increased. To further understand the functional role of such auditory cortex re-organization after deafness, connectivity analyses were performed from the STG regions identified above. Connectivity from the left STG toward areas typically associated with semantic processing (BA45 and thalami was greater in deaf signers and in oral deaf as compared to hearing. In contrast, connectivity from left STG toward areas identified with speech-based processing was greater in hearing and in oral deaf as compared to deaf signers. These results support the growing literature indicating recruitment of auditory areas after congenital deafness for visually-mediated language functions, and establish that both auditory deprivation and language experience shape its functional reorganization. Implications for differential reliance on semantic vs. phonological pathways during reading in the three groups is discussed.

  16. Group Project Support Agents for Helping Students Work Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Janice; Staniford, Geof; Beer, Martin; Scown, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Discusses group projects in distance learning, describes factors affecting the successful completion of group projects, and considers whether agent technology (self-contained, concurrently executing software processes that encapsulate the current state in terms of knowledge) is able to support students doing group projects. (LRW)

  17. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  18. [Sudden deafness as a presentation of acoustic neuroma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoszewicz, Robert; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej; Kowalska, Małgorzata

    2005-09-01

    Sudden deafness (SD) is thought to be a heterogenic group of disorders as to etiopathogenesis. Acoustic neuroma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis. The authors analysed symptoms occurring in the group of 89 patients, diagnosed with acoustic neuroma. A special attention was paid to the role of sudden deafness as a clinical manifestation of the VIIIth nerve pathology. Progressive hearing loss, tinnitus, headache and sudden deafness were the most common complaints. Sudden deafness was developed by approximately 1 of the investigated patients (24.7%). Progressive hearing loss, tinnitus and sudden deafness were also dominating initial signs. The sudden deafness onset was preceded by the period of progressive hearing loss in 3 patients. In one case episode of SD occurred twice.

  19. Students as Facilitators: An Evaluation of Student-Led Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a two year study evaluating student-led group work in the context of a clinical legal education module. The aim of the study was to shift the balance of control from tutor to student, by allowing students to take on the facilitator role in weekly meetings. The findings suggest that (a) students can successfully design and…

  20. Toward More Effective Conversations with Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dorothy

    1987-01-01

    The classroom teachers' style of conversing with deaf children is as important as the communication mode in the students' development of linguistic competence in English. Emphasis on a conversational style with low repair and low control should lead to increased student initiative and fewer misunderstandings of teachers' comments. (VW)

  1. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  2. Being a Deaf Role Model: Deaf People's Experiences of Working with Families and Deaf Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys M.

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of being a deaf role model have been little explored in the literature. This paper explores the role of the deaf role model as perceived by d/Deaf adults who carried out this role, when working with deaf young people, parents of deaf children, and professionals who work with them. The data were collected from part of the evaluation…

  3. A New Group-Formation Method for Student Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Jose; Dias, Teresa Galvao; Cunha, Joao Falcao E.

    2009-01-01

    In BSc/MSc engineering programmes at Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto (FEUP), the need to provide students with teamwork experiences close to a real world environment was identified as an important issue. A new group-formation method that aims to provide an enriching teamwork experience is proposed. Students are asked to answer a…

  4. Teaching English Pronunciation to Large Groups of Students: Some Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Veronika

    Problems in teaching English pronunciation to large groups of university students in Japan are discussed, and some solutions are offered. Pronunciation instruction requires close individual interaction between teacher and student, difficult if not impossible to achieve in a typical Japanese university classroom. However, it is possible to get…

  5. A New Group-Formation Method for Student Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Jose; Dias, Teresa Galvao; Cunha, Joao Falcao E.

    2009-01-01

    In BSc/MSc engineering programmes at Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto (FEUP), the need to provide students with teamwork experiences close to a real world environment was identified as an important issue. A new group-formation method that aims to provide an enriching teamwork experience is proposed. Students are asked to answer a…

  6. Engineering Students' Experiences from Physics Group Work in Learning Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential…

  7. Reaction Time of a Group of Physics Students

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Charu; Arun, P

    2007-01-01

    The reaction time of a group of students majoring in Physics is reported here. Strong co-relation between fatigue, reaction time and performance have been seen and may be useful for academicians and administrators responsible of working out time-tables, course structures, students counsellings etc.

  8. Using a Facebook Closed Group to Improve EFL Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodliyah, Rojab Siti

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how social media, in this case Facebook, can be incorporated in ELT through e-dialogue journal writing shared in a Facebook closed group. Fifteen EFL students participated in this case study. They were second, third, and fourth year students of English Education Department of a university in Bandung, who voluntarily joined…

  9. Negotiating Deaf Bodies and Corporeal Experiences: The Cybernetic Deaf Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas P. Horejes; Christopher J. Heuer

    2013-01-01

    Deaf people negotiate their embodiment through corporeal experiences to provide a perception of what it means to be human. Some deaf people search for a framework where being deaf is human, not a disability. Other deaf people experience their deafness as a disability and use technology as a means to negotiate their embodiment and experiences. The role of technology or cybernetics, particularly cochlear implants, for the deaf will be examined as a way to understand cultural identities and dive...

  10. Construction of Student Groups Using Belbin: Supporting Group Work in Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark; Polglase, Giles; Parry, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Belbin team role self and observer perceptions were applied to a large cohort (145) of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences undergraduates in a module assessed through two separate group projects. Students self-selected groups for the first project; for the second, groups were more "balanced." Results show slight improvement in…

  11. Republication of "Why Some Groups Fail: A Survey of Students' Experiences with Learning Groups"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechtner, Susan Brown; Davis, Elaine Actis

    2016-01-01

    The issue of group learning has become an even greater concern in recent years as more college and university professors have begun to incorporate specific group assignments (i.e., assignments which require that students meet as a group and equally contribute to a final product) into their class requirements. The purpose of the present descriptive…

  12. Postural Control in Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Abbas Ebrahimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the reliability of static control evaluation with Synapsys Posturography System (SPS, Marseille, France and to compare the static postural control of deaf children with typically developing children. This study was conducted in 2 phases on 81 children of 7 to 12 years old in Tehran schools. The first phase examined the reliability of static balance evaluation with SPS. In this phase, a total of 12 children with typical development were evaluated and then do a re-test 1 week later. In the second phase, 30 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL and high risk in their balance (selected from Baghcheban Schools for the Deaf as the experimental group, and 37 children with typical development (selected randomly from 2 primary schools for girls and boys in District 12 of Tehran Department of Education as control group were enrolled in the study. They were all placed under sensory organization test evaluation. Based on the results of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, the unilateral random effects model, test-retest reliability in different sensory conditions, the moderate to excellent results were obtained (ICC between 0.68 and 0.94. Also, the mean displacement of pressure center in all sensory conditions, the limits of stability (LOS area, the overall balance scores, and scores for balance sensory ratio (except the somatosensory ratio of children with typical development were better than the deaf peers (P˂0.05. The SPS has acceptable reliability to evaluate static posture in children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. Furthermore, deaf children as compared to children with typical development had a lower static postural control in all sensory conditions. This finding confirms the need to examine the postural control for identifying the extent of sensory deficit that has caused poor balance function, and also the need for early intervention to address the balance deficit in deaf

  13. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  14. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  15. Deafness, culture, and choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, N

    2002-10-01

    The recent controversy surrounding the choice, by a deaf lesbian couple, to have children who were themselves deaf, has focused attention on the ethics of choosing (apparent) disabilities for children. Deaf activists argue that deafness is not a disability, but instead the constitutive condition of access to a rich culture. Being deaf carries disadvantages with it, but these are a product of discrimination, not of the condition itself. It is, however, implausible to think that all the disadvantages which stem from deafness are social in origin. Moreover, though it may be true that being deaf carries with it the important compensation of access to a rich culture, no physical condition is required for such access. Cultures are simply the kind of things to which we are born, and therefore to which the children of deaf parents, hearing or deaf, normally belong. Thus these parents are making a mistake in choosing deafness for their children. Given their own experience of isolation as children, however, it is a mistake which is understandable, and our reaction to them ought to be compassion, not condemnation.

  16. Student Attitudes Towards Change From Ability Grouping To Heterogeneous Grouping At A University Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bahar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is ample research on student grouping at primary, middle and high school level but it is a controversial issue for universities educating the high and low achievers in the same classes, reflecting confusion about whether scholarship and tuition fee students should be taught together. This study aims to shed light on what the student population at university thinks about heterogeneous grouping after seeing effects of ability grouping, about which there is almost no evidence. Students in an undergraduate department who started the academic year at two different sections grouped according to their prior achievement took courses in mixed ability classes the following semesters. They were given a questionnaire in three intervals asking them about their expectations and opinions of grouping before and after mixing and then after one year of study. 45 students responded to any two questionnaires and 15 responded to all three questionnaires. For the repeated measures design, Friedman test was carried out to see the change of ideas from time1 to time3 and Mann-Witney U test was used to see the differences in ideas between scholarship students and tuition-fee students. MannWhitney U test was carried out to test whether there was a difference in the GPAs of scholarship and tuition-fee students between time1 and time3. Students expressed a change in their attitudes about achievement and how the other group influenced them. GPAs of high ability students increased after they started being in educated in mixed ability class, realizing the fears of low achievers.

  17. Reading motivation, reading amount, and text comprehension in deaf and hearing adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parault, Susan J; Williams, Heather M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the variables of reading motivation, reading amount, and text comprehension in deaf and hearing adults. Research has shown that less than 50% of deaf students leave high school reading at or above a fourth-grade level (Allen, 1994). Our question is, how does this affect the levels of reading motivation and amount of reading in which deaf adults engage? Assessments of 30 hearing and 24 deaf adults showed that deaf participants reported significantly higher levels of reading motivation despite having been found to read at less than a sixth-grade level. No significant difference in the amount of reading between hearing and deaf adults was found. Amount of reading for personal reasons was found to be the best predictor of text comprehension in the deaf participants, and intrinsic motivation was found to be the best predictor of amount of reading in the deaf participants.

  18. Preservice Teacher and Interpreter American Sign Language Abilities: Self-Evaluations and Evaluations of Deaf Students' Narrative Renditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S; Scheetz, Nanci A

    2015-01-01

    In deaf education , the sign language skills of teacher and interpreter candidates are infrequently assessed; when they are, formal measures are commonly used upon preparation program completion, as opposed to informal measures related to instructional tasks. Using an informal picture storybook task, the authors investigated the receptive and expressive narrative sign language skills of 10 teacher and interpreter candidates in a university preparation program. The candidates evaluated signed renditions of two signing children, as well as their own expressive renditions, using the Signed Reading Fluency Rubric (Easterbrooks & Huston, 2008) at the completion of their fifth sign language course. Candidates' evaluations were compared overall and across 12 sign language indicators to ratings of two university program professors. Some variation existed across ratings for individual indicators, but generally the candidates were aware of and could accurately rate their own abilities and those of two signing children.

  19. Empathy and Theory of Mind in Deaf and Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C

    2016-04-01

    Empathy (or sharing another's emotion) and theory of mind (ToM: the understanding that behavior is guided by true and false beliefs) are cornerstones of human social life and relationships. In contrast to ToM, there has been little study of empathy's development, especially in deaf children. Two studies of a total of 117 children (52 hearing; 65 deaf children of hearing parents) aged 4-13 years were therefore designed to (a) compare levels of empathy in deaf and hearing children, and (b) explore correlations of ToM with empathy in deaf and hearing groups. Results showed that (a) deaf children scored lower in empathy than their hearing peers and (b) empathy and ToM were significantly correlated for deaf children but not for the hearing. Possible reasons for these divergent developmental patterns were considered, along with implications for future research.

  20. Group-analytic training groups for psychology students: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, Vibeke Torpe; Poulsen, Stig

    2004-01-01

    This article presents results from an interview study of psychology students' experiences from group-analytic groups conducted at the University of Copenhagen. The primary foci are the significance of differences in themotivation participants'  personal aims of individual participantsfor...... participation in the group, the impact of the composition of participants on the group process, and the professional learning through the group experience. In general the interviews show a marked satisfaction with the group participation. In particular, learning about the importance of group boundaries...... and about being in the dual position of both helper and client is seen as important. However the fact that all group members are fellow students is challenging to the participants....

  1. Group Projects in Social Work Education: The Influence of Group Characteristics and Moderators on Undergraduate Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwait, Ariana E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of group size, group formation, group conflict, and division of labor on student outcomes in a group project for a sample of 112 BSW research seminar students at a large university in the Midwest. Students completed surveys on their experiences with the group project at the end of the semester. Multiple regression…

  2. 聋生心理健康与体育锻炼态度的调查研究%An Investigation into the Mental Health Status and Attitudes towards Physical Exercises among Deaf Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王疆娜; 兰继军; 李嫱

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解聋生心理健康状况和体育锻炼态度的现状,为特殊教育学校心理健康教育工作提供依据.方法 采用心理健康诊断测验(MHT)与锻炼态度量表,对85名中专学校聋生的心理健康状况、体育锻炼态度进行调查和分析.结果 聋生心理健康水平总体状况欠佳,且存在一定的恐怖、身体症状和自责倾向;聋生的体育锻炼态度消极,锻炼态度与心理健康有显著负相关,其中行为习惯、情感体验与行为控制感3个维度可以在一定程度上对聋生的心理问题进行反向预测.结论 聋生的心理健康水平总体状况欠佳,存在一定问题;聋生消极的体育锻炼态度对其心理健康有负面影响.%Objective To investigate the mental health status and attitudes towards physical exercises among deaf students and to provide reference for the education at special schools. Methods The Mental Health Test (MHT) and Attitude towards Physical Exercises Scale were applied to 85 deaf students at technical secondary schools. Results The deaf students were mentally healthy on the whole, but some of them had psychological problems such as fear, physical symptoms and guilt. The students were negative towards physical exercises, thus negatively affecting their mental health. The behavior habit, emotional experience and behavior control scores of deaf students can be used to inversely predict their psychological problems. Conclusion The deaf students are mentally healthy on the whole, but some problems still exist. Their passive attitudes towards physical exercises have an adverse effect on the mental health.

  3. Group Development for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Sylvia; Guetzloe, Eleanor

    1996-01-01

    This article addresses effective techniques for teaching students with emotional disturbances and/or behavior disorders in group settings. Three stages of group development are described with specific teaching strategies for each stage identified and related to Maslow's hierarchy of needs, including needs for safety and trust, belonging and…

  4. Are Heterogeneous or Homogeneous Groups More Beneficial to Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullery, Nancy M.; Schullery, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relative benefits to the student of working in homogeneous versus heterogeneous classroom groups. Correlation analysis of 18 desirable outcomes versus 8 personality-based heterogeneity variables reveals that heterogeneity associates with advantages as well as disadvantages. Ways in which group composition might be…

  5. Using Family Sculpting and Choreography in a Student Growth Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of family sculpting and choreography in helping a group of university students to achieve a healthy emotional and psychological separation from their families of origin. Presents a case example, along with suggestions for future groups using a similar focus and format. (Author/KS)

  6. Group Composition Affecting Student Interaction and Achievement: Instructors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Simon A.; Kuestermeyer, Bailey N.; Westmeyer, Kara A.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple research studies have been conducted that focus on various uses of collaborative learning in and out of the classroom in higher education institutions. The purpose of this article is to review previously published literature regarding group composition and how it affects student interaction and achievement. Group composition research has…

  7. Intelligent Agents To Support Students Working in Groups Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Janice; Staniford, Geof; Beer, Martin; Scown, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Describes initial investigations into the problems encountered when college students undertake online group projects and introduces a method for designing intelligent software agents capable of recognizing and alleviating problems concerned with the maintenance roles of group project work. Discusses computer mediated communication and user…

  8. Group Dynamics in the Interior Design Studio: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a study measuring the classroom climates in collegiate interior design studios and considers these findings within the group dynamics theory framework. Three groups of students completed the College Classroom Environment Scales (CCES) questionnaire. Five of the six CCES subscale F ratios were statistically…

  9. Group Development for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Sylvia; Guetzloe, Eleanor

    1996-01-01

    This article addresses effective techniques for teaching students with emotional disturbances and/or behavior disorders in group settings. Three stages of group development are described with specific teaching strategies for each stage identified and related to Maslow's hierarchy of needs, including needs for safety and trust, belonging and…

  10. Cooperative Study Groups: Give Your Students the Home Team Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Tony

    2007-01-01

    In this article I discuss the factors that led me to implement study groups in the teaching of mathematics. An important influence in this decision began with an experimental study conducted with two College Algebra classes in which students were randomly assigned to treatment groups. While there was no statistical difference between the study…

  11. Group Dynamics in the Interior Design Studio: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a study measuring the classroom climates in collegiate interior design studios and considers these findings within the group dynamics theory framework. Three groups of students completed the College Classroom Environment Scales (CCES) questionnaire. Five of the six CCES subscale F ratios were statistically…

  12. Treating student contributions as displays of understanding in group supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The analyses this paper reports come from ongoing research into the interactive establishment of local social order in an educational setting (Day & Kjærbeck 2008, Day & Kjærbeck, in preparation). In focus for this paper are a particular sort of activity in the setting, 'group supervision', whereby...... students working in 'project groups' are to meet with their 'supervisor' to discuss the group's ongoing project, and a particular set of interactive phenomena, namely students' displays of comprehension directed toward the supervisor following his or evaluation of their work. This work is in line...

  13. 聋生歧视知觉与社会适应:自尊的中介效应%Deaf Students Perceived Discrimination and Social Adjustment:The Mediating Effect of Self-Esteem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔月平; 石学云

    2016-01-01

    为了探讨自尊在聋生歧视知觉与社会适应关系中的中介作用。文章采用歧视知觉问卷、青少年社会适应量表( SA S-SSS)、R o sen b erg 自尊量表对陕西省114名聋生进行问卷调查。研究显示,歧视知觉、社会适应均与自尊呈显著正相关,歧视知觉对社会适应具有正向预测作用;自尊在聋生歧视知觉与社会适应间起中介作用。因此,聋生歧视知觉不仅对社会适应有具有直接的影响,还可以通过自尊间接影响社会适应。%Objective: To explore self-esteem mediated the relationship between perceived discrimination and social in deaf students. Methods: the discrimination perception questionnaire, adolescent social adaptation scale (SAS-SSS), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale of Shaanxi Province 114 deaf students conducted a questionnaire survey. Results: perceived discrimination, social adaptation had significant positive correlation with self-esteem, perceived discrimination on social adaptation, which has a positive predictive effect; self esteem between deaf students perceived discrimination and social adaptation play intermediary role. Conclusion: deaf students’perceived discrimination has a direct impact not only on social adaptation, but also by the indirect effects of self-esteem and social adaptation.

  14. Group Work as a Means of Getting Students to Participate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forero Tovar Luz Marina

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Three types of activities were worked on with a group of 15 shy and slow 10th grade students at the Centro Educativo Integral Colsubsidio to get them to participate and talk more often and fluently than they were doing. Activities selected for that purpose were : games, role-plays and interviews that had to be carried out in groups. Students’ difficulties expressing their ideas fluently rather than accurately were confirmed by means of a questionnaire, then the activities listed above were piloted and the results of their effectiveness were measured by a teacher observer, by my own field notes and by interviews as well as a final questionnaire applied during and at the end of the piloting stage. Results from these three sources were analysed and showed that some students benefited slightly from the activities while others just improved their pronunciation as a result of their work with different partners. Also, some students were not keen on working in groups because they preferred individual work. Speaking ability was not improved as much as expected but the kind of work (group work helped students to participate more in class. It is also interesting to point out that female students preferred role-plays to the other two activities while male students enjoyed games the most.

  15. Group counseling for medical students with drop-out experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Baek, Sunyong; Woo, Jae Seok; Im, Sun Ju; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung; Lee, Sang Yeoup; Yun, So Jung

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe our group counseling methods for medical students with drop-out experiences. Group counseling was offered to 11 medical students with drop-out experiences in their previous second semester. All subjects provided written informed consent before participating and completed a 2-day group counseling program using the Gestalt approach. The self-assertiveness training group counseling program consisted of 6 sessions, each of which lasted 90 minutes. Experience reports by participants after the program and data from semi-structured qualitative interviews were qualitatively analyzed. Program participants reported that they were moderately satisfied with the program regarding its usefulness and helpfulness on self-awareness, understanding, and reminding them of attempts to change behavior. Most students showed heightened levels of sincerity perceptions and positive attitudes in every session. The results demonstrated significant changes in experience in self-esteem, self-recognition, and interpersonal relationships. A group counseling program using the Gestalt approach could help medical students with drop-out experiences to adjust with 1 year their juniors, enhance their self-esteem, contribute to their psychological well-being, and prevent student re-failure through effective stress management and improved interpersonal relationships.

  16. Learning rights, participation and toleration in student group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Group work in the context of higher education is a teaching and learning method which has the aim to facilitate learning processes due to students learning by cooperation and mutual feedback. At the same time group work might offer various challenges on a social, moral and intellectual level....... This article offers a moral perspective on group work by introducing a concept of ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work. The aim of the paper is theoretically to offer a vocabulary concerning ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work by applying John Dewey’s metaphor ‘the spectator versus...

  17. An analysis of user engagement in student Facebook groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Lane

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysing the engagement of students in university-based Facebook groups can shed light on the nature of their learning experience and highlight leverage points to build on student success. While post-semester surveys and demographic participation data can highlight who was involved and how they subsequently felt about the experience, these techniques do not necessarily reflect real-time engagement. One way to gain insight into in-situ student experiences is by categorising the original posts and comments into predetermined frameworks of learning. This paper offers a systematic method of coding Facebook contributions within various engagement categories: motivation, discourse, cognition and emotive responses. 

  18. Deaf Sociality and the Deaf Lutheran Church in Adamorobe, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an ethnographic analysis of "deaf sociality" in Adamorobe, a village in Ghana, where the relatively high prevalence of hereditary deafness has led to dense social and spatial connections. Deaf people are part of their hearing environment particularly through family networks, and produce deaf sociality through many…

  19. South African Deaf Education and the Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storbeck, Claudine, Ed.; Martin, David, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    In a special section of the "American Annals of the Deaf", Deaf education and the Deaf community in South Africa are discussed. The special section is organized into 7 segments: a historical overview to establish context, the educational context, educators and learners, postgraduate education and employment, perspectives of Deaf children and their…

  20. Deaf Sociality and the Deaf Lutheran Church in Adamorobe, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an ethnographic analysis of "deaf sociality" in Adamorobe, a village in Ghana, where the relatively high prevalence of hereditary deafness has led to dense social and spatial connections. Deaf people are part of their hearing environment particularly through family networks, and produce deaf sociality through many…

  1. Semantic and syntactic reading comprehension strategies used by deaf children with early and late cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Carlos; Martín-Aragoneses, M Teresa; López-Higes, Ramón; Pisón, Guzmán

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students have traditionally exhibited reading comprehension difficulties. In recent years, these comprehension problems have been partially offset through cochlear implantation (CI), and the subsequent improvement in spoken language skills. However, the use of cochlear implants has not managed to fully bridge the gap in language and reading between normally hearing (NH) and deaf children, as its efficacy depends on variables such as the age at implant. This study compared the reading comprehension of sentences in 19 children who received a cochlear implant before 24 months of age (early-CI) and 19 who received it after 24 months (late-CI) with a control group of 19 NH children. The task involved completing sentences in which the last word had been omitted. To complete each sentence children had to choose a word from among several alternatives that included one syntactic and two semantic foils in addition to the target word. The results showed that deaf children with late-CI performed this task significantly worse than NH children, while those with early-CI exhibited no significant differences with NH children, except under more demanding processing conditions (long sentences with infrequent target words). Further, the error analysis revealed a preference of deaf students with early-CI for selecting the syntactic foil over a semantic one, which suggests that they draw upon syntactic cues during sentence processing in the same way as NH children do. In contrast, deaf children with late-CI do not appear to use a syntactic strategy, but neither a semantic strategy based on the use of key words, as the literature suggests. Rather, the numerous errors of both kinds that the late-CI group made seem to indicate an inconsistent and erratic response when faced with a lack of comprehension. These findings are discussed in relation to differences in receptive vocabulary and short-term memory and their implications for sentence reading comprehension. Copyright © 2015

  2. What We Can Learn from Hearing Parents of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Hearing parents of deaf children face stresses and demands related to parenting a deaf child, including difficult choices about language, technologies, education and identity for their children (Marschark, 1997). To date, few researchers have discussed the unique challenges faced by this group. Through a series of semistructured, in-depth…

  3. Phonological Awareness and Decoding Skills in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenstede, L.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the phonological awareness skills of a group of deaf adolescents and how these skills correlated with decoding skills (single word and non-word reading) and receptive vocabulary. Twenty, congenitally profoundly deaf adolescents with at least average nonverbal cognitive skills were tested on a range of phonological awareness…

  4. Negotiating Deaf Bodies and Corporeal Experiences: The Cybernetic Deaf Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P. Horejes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deaf people negotiate their embodiment through corporeal experiences to provide a perception of what it means to be human. Some deaf people search for a framework where being deaf is human, not a disability. Other deaf people experience their deafness as a disability and use technology as a means to negotiate their embodiment and experiences. The role of technology or cybernetics, particularly cochlear implants, for the deaf will be examined as a way to understand cultural identities and diverse ideological perspectives concerning what it means to be deaf and normal. Then, this paper focuses on social constructed ‘bodies’ for the deaf using embodied theory and action as a part of a theoretical framework to showcase theoretical ideas and actualities of some deaf people’s lives and experiences. These discussions are ways to open dialogues and collaborative inquiries on larger important issues such as what it means to be deaf and, in essence, human.

  5. The regional student group program of the ISCB student council: stories from the road.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Macintyre

    Full Text Available The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB Student Council was launched in 2004 to facilitate interaction between young scientists in the fields of bioinformatics and computational biology. Since then, the Student Council has successfully run events and programs to promote the development of the next generation of computational biologists. However, in its early years, the Student Council faced a major challenge, in that students from different geographical regions had different needs; no single activity or event could address the needs of all students. To overcome this challenge, the Student Council created the Regional Student Group (RSG program. The program consists of locally organised and run student groups that address the specific needs of students in their region. These groups usually encompass a given country, and, via affiliation with the international Student Council, are provided with financial support, organisational support, and the ability to share information with other RSGs. In the last five years, RSGs have been created all over the world and organised activities that have helped develop dynamic bioinformatics student communities. In this article series, we present common themes emerging from RSG initiatives, explain their goals, and highlight the challenges and rewards through specific examples. This article, the first in the series, introduces the Student Council and provides a high-level overview of RSG activities. Our hope is that the article series will be a valuable source of information and inspiration for initiating similar activities in other regions and scientific communities.

  6. Teaching sign language in gaucho schools for deaf people: a study of curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper, which provides partial results of a master’s dissertation, has sought to give contribute Sign Language curriculum in the deaf schooling. We began to understand the importance of sign languages for deaf people’s development and found out that a large part of the deaf are from hearing parents, which emphasises the significance of teaching LIBRAS (Brazilian Sign Language in schools for the deaf. We should also consider the importance of this study in building deaf identities and strengthening the deaf culture. We have obtained the theoretical basis in the so-called Deaf Studies and some experts in the curriculum theories. The main objective for this study has been to conduct an analysis of the LIBRAS curriculum at work in schools for the deaf in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The curriculum analysis has shown a degree of diversity: in some curricula, content from one year is repeated in the next one with no articulation. In others, one can find preoccupation for issues of deaf identity and culture, but some of them include contents that are not related to LIBRAS, or the deaf culture, but rather to discipline for the deaf in general. By providing positive and negative aspects, the analysis data may help in discussions about difficulties, progress and problems in LIBRAS teacher education for deaf students.

  7. Asian international students' barriers to joining group counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Yeon

    2014-10-01

    This cross-sectional study examined anticipated reactions to group participation among Asian international students (ISs). Structural equation modeling confirmed that Asian ISs' (n = 180) level of acculturation was associated with their attitude toward joining group counseling, which is partially mediated by their stigma toward help-seeking. The results of multiple regression analyses indicated that ISs who reported higher place dependence, stigma toward help-seeking, and fear of negative evaluation reported more fear about disclosing emotional parts of themselves to other group members in the presence of a group member from the same country of origin. The results showed that ISs' perceived difficulties in providing feedback to a group member in the presence of an IS from the same country of origin were predicted by low place identity, high place dependence, and more stigma. International students' willingness to disclose and provide feedback in a group counseling setting was compared in three different hypothetical situations based on other group members' demographics, and the results showed that ISs are more afraid of self-disclosure in the presence of an international student from the same country.

  8. Transformation to the evaluation instruments to little groups of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl López Fernández

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation is a non personological component in pedagogy, with multiple functions that can make flowing learning or to delay it. This investigation has the purpose to turn the instruments of evaluation of group work to achieve a less subjective measure of the evaluative process. This work is performed on the base of three instruments of common use in the evaluation of little group of students. The fundamental result is the transformation of the instruments of evaluation as well as those applied to evaluate the group independently. The transformation to evaluation methods to little groups can favor the understanding to perform the integration between the sumative and the formative evaluation.

  9. American Sign Language Syntax and Analogical Reasoning Skills Are Influenced by Early Acquisition and Age of Entry to Signing Schools for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henner, Jon; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L; Novogrodsky, Rama; Hoffmeister, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Failing to acquire language in early childhood because of language deprivation is a rare and exceptional event, except in one population. Deaf children who grow up without access to indirect language through listening, speech-reading, or sign language experience language deprivation. Studies of Deaf adults have revealed that late acquisition of sign language is associated with lasting deficits. However, much remains unknown about language deprivation in Deaf children, allowing myths and misunderstandings regarding sign language to flourish. To fill this gap, we examined signing ability in a large naturalistic sample of Deaf children attending schools for the Deaf where American Sign Language (ASL) is used by peers and teachers. Ability in ASL was measured using a syntactic judgment test and language-based analogical reasoning test, which are two sub-tests of the ASL Assessment Inventory. The influence of two age-related variables were examined: whether or not ASL was acquired from birth in the home from one or more Deaf parents, and the age of entry to the school for the Deaf. Note that for non-native signers, this latter variable is often the age of first systematic exposure to ASL. Both of these types of age-dependent language experiences influenced subsequent signing ability. Scores on the two tasks declined with increasing age of school entry. The influence of age of starting school was not linear. Test scores were generally lower for Deaf children who entered the school of assessment after the age of 12. The positive influence of signing from birth was found for students at all ages tested (7;6-18;5 years old) and for children of all age-of-entry groupings. Our results reflect a continuum of outcomes which show that experience with language is a continuous variable that is sensitive to maturational age.

  10. American Sign Language Syntax and Analogical Reasoning Skills Are Influenced by Early Acquisition and Age of Entry to Signing Schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henner, Jon; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L.; Novogrodsky, Rama; Hoffmeister, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Failing to acquire language in early childhood because of language deprivation is a rare and exceptional event, except in one population. Deaf children who grow up without access to indirect language through listening, speech-reading, or sign language experience language deprivation. Studies of Deaf adults have revealed that late acquisition of sign language is associated with lasting deficits. However, much remains unknown about language deprivation in Deaf children, allowing myths and misunderstandings regarding sign language to flourish. To fill this gap, we examined signing ability in a large naturalistic sample of Deaf children attending schools for the Deaf where American Sign Language (ASL) is used by peers and teachers. Ability in ASL was measured using a syntactic judgment test and language-based analogical reasoning test, which are two sub-tests of the ASL Assessment Inventory. The influence of two age-related variables were examined: whether or not ASL was acquired from birth in the home from one or more Deaf parents, and the age of entry to the school for the Deaf. Note that for non-native signers, this latter variable is often the age of first systematic exposure to ASL. Both of these types of age-dependent language experiences influenced subsequent signing ability. Scores on the two tasks declined with increasing age of school entry. The influence of age of starting school was not linear. Test scores were generally lower for Deaf children who entered the school of assessment after the age of 12. The positive influence of signing from birth was found for students at all ages tested (7;6–18;5 years old) and for children of all age-of-entry groupings. Our results reflect a continuum of outcomes which show that experience with language is a continuous variable that is sensitive to maturational age. PMID:28082932

  11. Deaf mobile application accessibility requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    Requirement for deaf mobile applications need to be analysed to ensure the disabilities need are instilled into the mobile applications developed for them. Universal design is understandable to comply every user needs, however specific disability is argued by the authors to have different need and requirements. These differences are among the reasons for these applications being developed to target for a specific group of people, however they are less usable and later abandoned. This study focuses on deriving requirements that are needed by the deaf in their mobile applications that are meant specifically for them. Studies on previous literature was conducted it can be concluded that graphic, text, multimedia and sign language interpreter are among mostly required features to be included in their mobile application to ensure the applications are usable for this community.

  12. Social Maturity and Executive Function Among Deaf Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Kronenberger, William G; Rosica, Mark; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Durkin, Andreana; Machmer, Elizabeth; Schmitz, Kathryn L

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments examined relations among social maturity, executive function, language, and cochlear implant (CI) use among deaf high school and college students. Experiment 1 revealed no differences between deaf CI users, deaf nonusers, and hearing college students in measures of social maturity. However, deaf students (both CI users and nonusers) reported significantly greater executive function (EF) difficulties in several domains, and EF was related to social maturity. Experiment 2 found that deaf CI users and nonusers in high school did not differ from each other in social maturity or EF, but individuals who relied on sign language reported significantly more immature behaviors than deaf peers who used spoken language. EF difficulties again were associated with social maturity. The present results indicate that EF and social maturity are interrelated, but those relations vary in different deaf subpopulations. As with academic achievement, CI use appears to have little long-term impact on EF or social maturity. Results are discussed in terms of their convergence with findings related to incidental learning and functioning in several domains.

  13. Group Supervision and Japanese Students' Successful Completion of Undergraduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of "zemi" or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the "zemi" contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the "zemi"…

  14. Group Supervision and Japanese Students' Successful Completion of Undergraduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of "zemi" or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the "zemi" contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the "zemi" provided contexts for teaching…

  15. What Do Students Really Do in Learning Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an activity in which upon completion of this semester-long project, students should be able to: analyze and reflect upon their own communication behaviors in a group setting, and explain the importance of examining actual communication practices as opposed to retrospective self-report of communication practices. This project…

  16. Group Supervision and Japanese Students' Successful Completion of Undergraduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of "zemi" or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the "zemi" contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the "zemi"…

  17. PARENT AND PEER GROUP PRESSURES TOWARD DEVIANT STUDENT BEHAVIOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILL, ROBERT B.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS PROJECT WAS TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE FOLLOWING FOUR FACTORS, SIMULTANEOUSLY AND SEPARATELY, AFFECT THE RATES OF CHEATING AMONG 10TH GRADE STUDENTS--(1) INDIVIDUAL ROLE ADAPTATIONS, (2) PEER GROUP INFLUENCE, (3) SOCIAL CONTEXT, AND (4) FAMILY INFLUENCE. A PARADIGM (MERTON'S) THAT RELATES INDIVIDUAL ANOMIA, SOCIAL…

  18. Enhancing Student Engagement: A Group Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Aakash

    2014-01-01

    Computing professionals work in groups and collaborate with individuals having diverse backgrounds and behaviors. The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) characterizes that a computing program must enable students to attain the ability to analyze a problem, design and evaluate a solution, and work effectively on teams to…

  19. Comparing Motor Development of Deaf Children of Deaf Parents and Deaf Children of Hearing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Volding, Lori; Winnick, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    Deaf children of Deaf parents perform better academically (Ritter-Brinton & Stewart, 1992), linguistically (Courtin, 2000; M. Harris, 2001; Vaccari & Marschark, 1997), and socially (Hadadian & Rose, 1991; M. Harris, 2001) than Deaf children of hearing parents. Twenty-nine Deaf children in residential schools were assessed to determine if a…

  20. What makes a 'good group'? Exploring the characteristics and performance of undergraduate student groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, S B; Davis, R C; Goode, N T; May, S A

    2017-03-01

    Group work forms the foundation for much of student learning within higher education, and has many educational, social and professional benefits. This study aimed to explore the determinants of success or failure for undergraduate student teams and to define a 'good group' through considering three aspects of group success: the task, the individuals, and the team. We employed a mixed methodology, combining demographic data with qualitative observations and task and peer evaluation scores. We determined associations between group dynamic and behaviour, demographic composition, member personalities and attitudes towards one another, and task success. We also employed a cluster analysis to create a model outlining the attributes of a good small group learning team in veterinary education. This model highlights that student groups differ in measures of their effectiveness as teams, independent of their task performance. On the basis of this, we suggest that groups who achieve high marks in tasks cannot be assumed to have acquired team working skills, and therefore if these are important as a learning outcome, they must be assessed directly alongside the task output.

  1. Differential impact of student behaviours on group interaction and collaborative learning: medical students' and tutors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Maha; Velan, Gary M; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Balasooriya, Chinthaka

    2016-08-22

    Collaboration is of increasing importance in medical education and medical practice. Students' and tutors' perceptions about small group learning are valuable to inform the development of strategies to promote group dynamics and collaborative learning. This study investigated medical students' and tutors' views on competencies and behaviours which promote effective learning and interaction in small group settings. This study was conducted at UNSW Australia. Five focus group discussions were conducted with first and second year medical students and eight small group tutors were interviewed. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. Students and tutors identified a range of behaviours that influenced collaborative learning. The main themes that emerged included: respectfulness; dominance, strong opinions and openness; constructiveness of feedback; active listening and contribution; goal orientation; acceptance of roles and responsibilities; engagement and enthusiasm; preparedness; self- awareness and positive personal attributes. An important finding was that some of these student behaviours were found to have a differential impact on group interaction compared with collaborative learning. This information could be used to promote higher quality learning in small groups. This study has identified medical students' and tutors' perceptions regarding interactional behaviours in small groups, as well as behaviours which lead to more effective learning in those settings. This information could be used to promote learning in small groups.

  2. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  3. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  4. Learning rights, participation and toleration in student group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Group work in the context of higher education is a teaching and learning method which has the aim to facilitate learning processes due to students learning by cooperation and mutual feedback. At the same time group work might offer various challenges on a social, moral and intellectual level....... This article offers a moral perspective on group work by introducing a concept of ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work. The aim of the paper is theoretically to offer a vocabulary concerning ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work by applying John Dewey’s metaphor ‘the spectator versus...... the participator’ to discuss attitudes concerning toleration in group work with respect to openness, demarcation and not indifferent attitudes to each other....

  5. Deafness and Diversity: Reflections and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardino, Caroline; Cannon, Joanna E

    2016-01-01

    Concluding a two-part American Annals of the Deaf special issue on deafness and diversity (DAD), the editors provide reflections and guidance to the field regarding d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) children with a disability (DWD; e.g., learning or intellectual disability, autism) and d/Dhh children from homes where parents use a language other than English or American Sign Language (d/Dhh Multilingual Learners; DMLs). Contributing authors addressed the application of theory, research, and practice to five topics: (a) early intervention, (b) communication/language, (c) assessment, (d) transition, (e) teacher preparation. An overview of the main recommendations of the contributors and editors is presented in an effort to advance research and pedagogy with these learners. In conclusion, the editors discuss the "Radical Middle" approach (Easterbrooks & Maiorana-Basas, 2015) to working with students who are DAD: providing learners with all options for academic, social, and emotional success.

  6. Promoting development with low achievement grouping students in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu, Tsu-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is hypothesized that students who are categorized in the C-level (low level Achievement Grouping (AG in English instruction classes did not necessarily performed at their peak potential in English language competence. Furthermore, it is assumed that the underlying concepts behind the low achievement levels may lies in two assumptions. First, Brophy (2004 addressed the situation with four categories of students based upon how expectancy-related motivational problems might cause students to develop low expectations for themselves. Second, the concept involving the use of AG, might have cause some of the more capable students to lower their achievement levels in English. In response, an action research was accomplished using a Cooperative Task-Based Learning (CTBL model, based on the concept of learning motivation for students with low achievement levels in an attempt to enhance the students’ English competencies. To evaluate the effectiveness of such teaching methodology, data were collected in the form of interview accounts, self-reflective logs, field notes, observations, and students’ work sheets. Results show that numerous positive outcomes from both the teachers’ and the students’ perspectives were noted from the use of the CTBL. In addition, results also show that cooperative group work has proven to be an effective learning strategy. Lastly, useful implications based on the findings were given to shed light on issues regarding the positive effects of skilled-based curriculum designs.

  7. DESARROLLO DE HABILIDADES EN EL ESPAÑOL ESCRITO EN PERSONAS SORDAS UNIVERSITARIAS: ESTUDIO DE CASO DEVELOPMENT OF WRITTEN SPANISH SKILLS IN DEAF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Flórez Romero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este estudio fue explorar el impacto de un programa de desarrollo de las habilidades en escritura en un estudiante sordo universitario. Los fundamentos teóricos del programa se basaron en el concepto de escritura como proceso. La investigación se desarrolló en tres fases: (1 caracterización inicial de la escritura del estudiante, (2 diseño y ejecución de un programa para afianzar las habilidades de escritura según lo observado en la primera fase y (3 valoración del texto final con los parámetros de la primera fase. A partir de la comparación entre texto inicial y final, se determinó el progreso que tuvo el estudiante. Dentro de los resultados se evidenció un mejoramiento de las habilidades de escritura en varios aspectos. En cuanto al nivel de conocimiento lingüístico sobre las categorías gramaticales del español que el estudiante empleó, se pudo observar que la manipulación y reflexión sobre estas no resultaron claras ni explícitas, es decir, que el estudiante llegó con dificultad a un nivel de redescripción. Este nivel se caracteriza por un dominio procedimental de dichas categorías y por la identificación de los usos irregulares de estas, sin poder llegar a explicar las razones de dichas irregularidades.The objective of this study was to explore the impact of a program aimed at developing writing skills in deaf university students. The theoretical foundation of the program was the concept of writing as a process. Research work was carried out in three stages: (1 initial characterization of the students' writing, (2 design and execution of a program aimed at strengthening writing skills on the basis of the first stage observations, and (3 assessment of the final text in relation to the parameters of the first stage. Student progress was determined on the basis of a comparison between the initial and final texts. Results showed improvement in several aspects of writing skills. Regarding the level of

  8. Intensive chemistry seminar, group ability composition, and students' achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhreddine, Fatima Hassan

    Intensive Chemistry Seminar (ICS) is an optional, supplemental, honors-level program for chemistry and biochemistry majors. The program emphasizes academic excellence in a challenging yet supportive chemistry rich learning environment that brings together a community of freshmen sharing the same interests. At the heart of ICS are intensive discussion sessions where students work in small groups on worksheets of carefully chosen problems that are direct application of the concepts covered in the main general chemistry course. Central to the success of such learning environment are interactions among students. A key element affecting the depth of such interactions is the relative ability levels of group members. The main focus of this study is to investigate the relationship between. group ability composition and chemistry knowledge acquisition within the ICS sessions. However, the study also compares the achievement of the ICS students with achievement of the non-ICS students. Our data analyses show that chemistry knowledge acquisition within the ICS sessions was significantly enhanced when group members' selection occurred from a Zone of Proximal Development perspective. Our analyses show that students' attitude toward the ICS is overwhelmingly positive and that the benefits of the program extend beyond academic achievement. In practice, our significant results have important applications in college level, cooperative learning practices with objectives similar to those of ICS. Our results show that Vygotsky's ZPD theory seems to be very appropriate for the design and application of cooperative learning environments. Finally, the significant beneficial outcomes of the ICS program should strongly support its integration into the general chemistry I and II majors' sections curriculums.

  9. Prior knowledge and reading comprehension ability of deaf adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D; Paul, P; Smith, J

    1997-01-01

    Fifty-one severely to profoundly deaf students (mean dB hearing loss = 89) were randomly assigned to two groups that differed by the type of probes (short or long) used to elicit prior knowledge (PK). PK scores were used to predict reading comprehension (RC), which was assessed by students' responses to three types of questions: test-explicit (TE), text-implicit (TI), and script-implicit (SI). Multiple regression models with PK scores and scores from a standardized achievement test (Stanford Achievement Test - Hearing Impaired Version, reading subtest) were also used to predict RC. The regression model showed that, for the group pretested with an in-depth, or long, probe of PK, the best predictor of RC was the ability to answer TE and SI questions. We present discussions of the observed differences in comprehension as a function of long and short knowledge probes and the use of three question types, together with implications for instruction.

  10. Are You Deaf or Hard of Hearing? Which Do You Go By: Perceptions of Students with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmery, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the self-identities of students with hearing loss and the perceptions of their caregivers/parents assist understanding of and affirming of one another and facilitate students' self-advocacy development. Caregivers/parents must be receptive to how the individual identifies him/herself (Cole & Edelmann, 1991; Jackson, Traub, &…

  11. Multicultural student group work in higher education: a study on challenges as perceived by students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Brinkman, B.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Mulder, M.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Noroozi, O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine challenges that are inherent in multicultural student group work (MCSG) in higher education and the differences between students from different cultural backgrounds in how they perceive the importance of challenges in MCSG. For this purpose, a 19-item survey was completed

  12. Comparison of the Perception of English Learning Between Ethnic Group Students and Han Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈映梅

    2013-01-01

    This paper has analyzed the discrepancies of the perception of English learning between ethnic students and Han studens in a trilingual language context. The research results will be expected to broaden our understanding of the ethnic group students in the minority regions, and to provide some empirical references and implications for teachers.

  13. Student Group Presentations: A Learning Instrument in Undergraduate Mathematics for Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagesten, Owe; Engelbrecht, Johann

    2007-01-01

    In this study we created an environment for peer learning, where students teach students by making oral presentations in groups about solving mathematical problems and explaining the theoretical background in mathematics, during the first year of an undergraduate engineering programme at the Norrkoping campus of the Linkoping University. In order…

  14. Students' perceptions of being graded as a group in the college classroom: relations among students' age, employment, and perceived group satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Rufus L

    2002-12-01

    This investigation compared and measured for different age groups of students, hours of employment, and previous grading experiences of one student cohort in relation to their perceived overall satisfaction with being graded as a group. A cohort of 230 students from a large southern metropolitan university enrolled in sections of two undergraduate classes. Group Interaction and Decision Making and Conflict Management, participated. Analysis indicated that (a) older students (28-47 years) were more likely to be dissatisfied with a group grade experience than middle (23-27 years) and younger (18-22 years) students. (b) Older students working part time were significantly more dissatisfied with the overall group experience than the younger part-time working students. (c) Older part-time working students were significantly more dissatisfied with the overall experience of working and being graded as a group than the middle part-time and middle full-time working students. Differences were noted between the older and younger students, which supported older students' overall dissatisfaction with their experience of being graded as a group. Common complaints by older students were that younger students were immature, irresponsible, lacked "real-life" experience, and had misplaced priorities. Common complaints by younger students were that older students were too serious and rigid. It is recommended that this work be extended to include other comparison groups, graduate students, and other disciplines.

  15. Brain Activations Associated with Sign Production Using Word and Picture Inputs in Deaf Signers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiguo; Wang, Wenjing; Liu, Hongyan; Peng, Danling; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Kuncheng; Zhang, John X.; Ding, Guosheng

    2011-01-01

    Effective literacy education in deaf students calls for psycholinguistic research revealing the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying their written language processing. When learning a written language, deaf students are often instructed to sign out printed text. The present fMRI study was intended to reveal the neural substrates associated…

  16. Examining the Relationship between Letter Processing and Word Processing Skills in Deaf and Hearing Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldenoglu, Birkan; Miller, Paul; Kargin, Tevhide

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the relationship between letter processing and word processing skills in deaf and hearing readers. The participants were 105 students (51 of them hearing, 54 of them deaf) who were evenly and randomly recruited from two levels of education (primary = 3rd-4th graders; middle = 6th-7th graders). The students were…

  17. Hyperlink Format, Categorization Abilities and Memory Span as Contributors to Deaf Users Hypertext Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjardo, Inmaculada; Arfe, Barbara; Benedetti, Patrizia; Altoe, Gianmarco

    2008-01-01

    Sixty deaf and hearing students were asked to search for goods in a Hypertext Supermarket with either graphical or textual links of high typicality, frequency, and familiarity. Additionally, they performed a picture and word categorization task and two working memory span tasks (spatial and verbal). Results showed that deaf students were faster in…

  18. Facilitating Active Engagement of the University Student in a Large-Group Setting Using Group Work Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Gemma K.; Mahon, Catherine; Lillis, Seamus

    2017-01-01

    It is envisaged that small-group exercises as part of a large-group session would facilitate not only group work exercises (a valuable employability skill), but also peer learning. In this article, such a strategy to facilitate the active engagement of the student in a large-group setting was explored. The production of student-led resources was…

  19. Student attitudes towards socially acceptable and unacceptable group working practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Jean D M

    2003-08-01

    While there is much support for co-operative learning among learning theorists, not all learners exhibit the same enthusiasm for groupwork. A number of factors such as sex, group size and ability mix, subject domain, task type and organization have been shown to influence the effectiveness of co-operative and collaborative learning. This study established learners' attitudes to various shared working scenarios. In this mixed design, 140 post-graduate teacher trainees were asked to imagine their responses to seven groupwork scenarios presented as a series of short vignettes. The vignettes varied on the degree of co-operation required; the sex of the prospective co-worker(s) including single and mixed-sex groups; type of assessment, including no assessment at all; and on academically acceptable and unacceptable 'shared' working practices. Anticipated attitudinal and behavioural responses of the students were assessed by questionnaire. On the whole, students were cautiously willing to be involved in groupwork. There were caveats, however. Factors such as the characteristics of the group members, the level and type of assessment procedures in operation, and individual differences, including sex and self-reported social deviance, also governed their responses. There was very limited agreement to be involved in socially undesirable collaborative group activities at a personal level or to condone such activities by others. Those students who showed a tendency towards mild anti-social behaviour were more willing to take direct punitive action against non-contributors than their peers. Female students were more willing to invoke the help of the tutor than their male counterparts, but only if the anti-social behaviour impacted on them personally.

  20. Deaf Individuals Show a Leftward Bias in Numerical Bisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Cecchetto, Carlo; Papagno, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence suggests that deaf individuals conceive of numerical magnitude as a left-to-right-oriented mental number line, as typically observed in hearing individuals. When accessing this spatial representation of numbers, normally hearing individuals typically show an attentional bias to the left (pseudoneglect), resembling the attentional bias they show in physical space. Deaf individuals do not show pseudoneglect in representing external space, as assessed by a visual line bisection task. However, whether deaf individuals show attentional biases in representing numerical space has never been investigated before. Here we instructed groups of deaf and hearing individuals to quickly estimate (without calculating) the midpoint of a series of numerical intervals presented in ascending and descending order. Both hearing and deaf individuals were significantly biased toward lower numbers (i.e., the leftward side of the mental number line) in their estimations. Nonetheless, the underestimation bias was smaller in deaf individuals than in the hearing when bisecting pairs of numbers given in descending order. This result may depend on the use of different strategies by deaf and hearing participants or a less pronounced lateralization of deaf individuals in the control of spatial attention.

  1. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  2. Prevalence of the GJB2 Mutations in Deafness Patients of Different Ethnic Origins in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate GJB2 mutation prevalences in the Uigur and Han ethnic groups in Xinjiang, China, and determine the relationship between ethnicity and GJB2 gene mutations. Methods Information regarding ethnicity of patients' families was obtained through medical records review and/or patient interview. Blood samples were collected from 61 Uigurs and 66 Hans for direct sequencing of the coding region and intron/exon boundaries of the GBJ2 gene. Results Carrier frequency of GJB2 mutations was similar between the Uigur and Han subjects. The GJB2 35delG mutation was seen only in Uigur patients with hearing loss, whereas the 235delC mutation was identified in both Uigur and Han patients. The allelic Frequency of 35delG mutation was 7.4% (9/122) in Uigur deaf students, but none in Han deaf students (0/128) and Uigur controls (0/196).The allelic frequency of GJB2 235delC mutation in Uigur and Han deaf students was 5.7% and 9.8%, and that of 299-300delAT mutation was 0.8% and 5.5%, respectively. V27I and E114G were the most frequent types of polymorphism. Conclusion We found an Asian-specific GJB2 diversity among Uigurs, and comparable GJB2 contribution to deafness in Uigur and Han patients. The high carrier frequency of 35delG in Uigurs (11.5%) is probably defined by gene drift/founder effect in a particular group. Even though GJB2 mutations have been widely reported in the literature, this discussion represents the first report of GJB2 mutations in Chinese multi-ethnic populations.

  3. An Expedient Study on Back-Propagation (BPN) Neural Networks for Modeling Automated Evaluation of the Answers and Progress of Deaf Students' That Possess Basic Knowledge of the English Language and Computer Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrettaros, John; Vouros, George; Drigas, Athanasios S.

    This article studies the expediency of using neural networks technology and the development of back-propagation networks (BPN) models for modeling automated evaluation of the answers and progress of deaf students' that possess basic knowledge of the English language and computer skills, within a virtual e-learning environment. The performance of the developed neural models is evaluated with the correlation factor between the neural networks' response values and the real value data as well as the percentage measurement of the error between the neural networks' estimate values and the real value data during its training process and afterwards with unknown data that weren't used in the training process.

  4. Metabolic disorders prevalence in sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiticica, Jeanne; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the frequency of metabolic disorders among patients with sudden deafness and to compare this frequency with data from population surveys. No consensus has been reached regarding the prevalence of metabolic disorders among sudden deafness patients or their influence as associated risk factors. This cross-sectional study enrolled all sudden deafness patients treated in the Otolaryngology Department of the University of São Paulo between January 1996 and December 2006. Patients were subjected to laboratory exams including glucose and cholesterol levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, triglycerides, free T4 and TSH. The sample comprised 166 patients. We observed normal glucose levels in 101 (81.5%) patients and hyperglycemia in 23 (18.5%) patients, which is significantly different (p sudden hearing loss patients and the Brazilian population. Normal levels of thyroid hormones were observed in 116 patients (78.4%), and abnormal levels were observed in 32 (21.6%) patients. Compared with the prevalence of thyroid disorders in the general population (10%), statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (p = 0.0132) between these two groups. Among sudden deafness patients, we observed frequencies of hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders that were more than twice those of the general population. Hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders are much more frequent in patients with sudden deafness than in the general population and should be considered as important associated risk factors.

  5. What hearing children think regarding the inclusion of deaf children in the regular classroom: a comparative study with Brazilian children in a public and a private school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vargas Dorneles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how hearing children relate to the presence of a deaf child in a classroom group. An analysis is made of the influence of social class in relation to the acceptance of the deaf child by the hearing children. The 144 children from the 3rd to 5th series that participated in the study were distributed thus: 76 from a private school and 68 from a public school, both from Porto Alegre, RS. The public school largely attended lower level socioeconomic classes, while the private school attended pupils from predominantly middle to upper social classes. All received the same task: Complete a story that describes the reaction of hearing students to the insertion of a new deaf colleague in the classroom group. The study demonstrates that pupils wish to attempt to communicate with the deaf child and would socialize with the child outside the classroom. They demonstrate a somewhat protective discourse in relation to the subject who they consider disabled but not incapable of communicating. Understanding how hearing children relate to, and include a deaf child within the classroom, raises the possibility of new forms of thinking regarding the preparation of hearing children to possible inclusion processes. Recognizing their ideas, feelings and forms of communication aids educational institutions to invest in inclusion policies.

  6. Deaf identities in a multicultural setting: The Ugandan context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony B. Mugeere

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Often located far apart from each other, deaf and hearing impaired persons face a multiplicity of challenges that evolve around isolation, neglect and the deprivation of essential social services that affect their welfare and survival. Although it is evident that the number of persons born with or acquire hearing impairments in later stages of their lives is increasing in many developing countries, there is limited research on this population. The main objective of this article is to explore the identities and experiences of living as a person who is deaf in Uganda. Using data from semi-structured interviews with 42 deaf persons (aged 19–41 and three focus group discussions, the study findings show that beneath the more pragmatic identities documented in the United States and European discourses there is a matrix of ambiguous, often competing and manifold forms in Uganda that are not necessarily based on the deaf and deaf constructions. The results further show that the country’s cultural, religious and ethnic diversity is more of a restraint than an enabler to the aspirations of the deaf community. The study concludes that researchers and policy makers need to be cognisant of the unique issues underlying deaf epistemologies whilst implementing policy and programme initiatives that directly affect them. The upper case ‘D’ in the term deaf is a convention that has been used since the early 1970s to connote a ‘socially constructed visual culture’ or a linguistic, social and cultural minority group who use sign language as primary means of communication and identify with the deaf community, whereas the lower case ‘d’ in deaf refers to ‘the audio logical condition of hearing impairment’. However, in this article the lower case has been used consistently.

  7. Slow change deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhoff, John G; Wayand, Joseph; Ndiaye, Mamoudou C; Berkow, Ann B; Bertacchi, Breanna R; Benton, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    In four experiments, we demonstrated a new phenomenon called "slow-change deafness." In Experiment 1 we presented listeners with continuous speech that changed three semitones in pitch over time, and we found that nearly 50 % failed to notice the change. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated the finding, demonstrated that the changes in the stimuli were well above threshold, and showed that when listeners were alerted to the possibility of a change, detection rates improved dramatically. Experiment 4 showed that increasing the magnitude of the change that occurred in the stimulus decreased the rate of change deafness. Our results are consistent with previous work that had shown that cueing listeners to potential auditory changes can significantly reduce change deafness. These findings support an account of change deafness that is dependent on both the magnitude of a stimulus change and listener expectations.

  8. Widespread auditory deficits in tune deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer L; Zalewski, Christopher; Brewer, Carmen; Lucker, Jay; Drayna, Dennis

    2009-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate auditory function in individuals with deficits in musical pitch perception. We hypothesized that such individuals have deficits in nonspeech areas of auditory processing. We screened 865 randomly selected individuals to identify those who scored poorly on the Distorted Tunes test (DTT), a measure of musical pitch recognition ability. Those who scored poorly were given a comprehensive audiologic examination, and those with hearing loss or other confounding audiologic factors were excluded from further testing. Thirty-five individuals with tune deafness constituted the experimental group. Thirty-four individuals with normal hearing and normal DTT scores, matched for age, gender, handedness, and education, and without overt or reported psychiatric disorders made up the normal control group. Individual and group performance for pure-tone frequency discrimination at 1000 Hz was determined by measuring the difference limen for frequency (DLF). Auditory processing abilities were assessed using tests of pitch pattern recognition, duration pattern recognition, and auditory gap detection. In addition, we evaluated both attention and short- and long-term memory as variables that might influence performance on our experimental measures. Differences between groups were evaluated statistically using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests and t-tests as appropriate. The DLF at 1000 Hz in the group with tune deafness was significantly larger than that of the normal control group. However, approximately one-third of participants with tune deafness had DLFs within the range of performance observed in the control group. Many individuals with tune deafness also displayed a high degree of variability in their intertrial frequency discrimination performance that could not be explained by deficits in memory or attention. Pitch and duration pattern discrimination and auditory gap-detection ability were significantly poorer in the group with tune deafness

  9. Going Green- an Environmental Studies Curriculum for Deaf Learners /

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, Megan McCarthy

    2014-01-01

    Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing students require a unique approach when it comes to their education. Research shows that the most effective way in educating Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing children is by using the bilingual approach - utilizing both American Sign Language and English in all aspects of the classroom. Based on this research and on other learning theories, such as Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (1978), scaffolding (Wood et al 1976), intrinsic motivation (Deci 2001) and comprehensible input (...

  10. Using Student Group Leaders to Motivate Students in Cooperative Learning Methods in Crowded Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Rifat; Efe, Hulya Aslan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of employing student group leaders on the motivation of group members during co-operative learning activities in a secondary school classroom in Turkey. The study was carried out in a period of eight weeks in biology classes during which "living things" and "ecology" topics were taught to a class…

  11. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  12. An Analysis of the Reading Strategies Used by Deaf and Hearing Adults: Similarities and Differences in Phonological Processing and Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    This study is a mixed methods analysis of reading processes and language experiences of deaf and hearing readers. The sample includes four groups each with fifteen adults--identified as: deaf/high-achieving readers, deaf/struggling/non-academic readers, hearing/high-achieving readers, and hearing/non-academic readers. The purpose of this study is…

  13. Classroom management programs for deaf children in state residential and large public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenkus, M; Rittenhouse, B; Dancer, J

    1999-12-01

    Personnel in 4 randomly selected state residential schools for the deaf and 3 randomly selected large public schools with programs for the deaf were surveyed to assess the types of management or disciplinary programs and strategies currently in use with deaf students and the rated effectiveness of such programs. Several behavioral management programs were identified by respondents, with Assertive Discipline most often listed. Ratings of program effectiveness were generally above average on a number of qualitative criteria.

  14. Current Trends in High School Graduation and College Enrollment of Hearing-Impaired Students Attending Residential Schools for Deaf Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corinne S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Results of a telephone survey of administrators at all 53 public residential high schools serving hearing impaired students indicated that the size of the graduating clases for 1983 through 1985 will be substantially larger than recent classes and that approximately 30 percent of the graduates in each year's class are expected to enter academic…

  15. Addressing intersections in HIV/AIDS and mental health: the role of organizations for d/Deaf and hard of hearing individuals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Sumaya; Swartz, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Like south africans generally, d/Deaf and hard of hearing South Africans are at risk of HIV/AIDS and mental disorders resulting from barriers to communication and care. In interviews and a focus group, members of South African organizations for d/Deaf and hard of hearing individuals all gave priority to HIV/AIDS education and prevention, citing risks resulting from language and communication barriers, inadequate schooling, and insufficient information in South African Sign Language. Participants gave varied descriptions of HIV/AIDS programs in schools for d/Deaf and hard of hearing students and described school initiatives they had directed. Some participants gave mental health problems lesser priority; others said susceptibility to mental disorders may result from communication difficulties and therefore warrants specialized services. Others, seeing a need to address mental health in HIV/AIDS prevention, had designed programs accordingly. Such prevention efforts merit support, as do activities to reduce communication barriers.

  16. Constructions of Deafness and Deaf Education: Exploring Normalcy and Deviance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejes, Thomas P., V

    2009-01-01

    Ideas and definitions of deafness are complicated and deeply contested, including the constraints over what ought to be normal, especially for a child. This research examines what it means to be deaf and disabled under the guise of normalcy and deviance. Social control institutions, such as schools, provide deaf children with a unique opportunity…

  17. Deaf/Hearing Research Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolsey, Ju-Lee A; Dunn, Kim Misener; Gentzke, Scott W; Joharchi, Hannah A; Clark, M Diane

    2017-01-01

    Deaf individuals typically are seen through the lens of the dominant hearing society's perception, i.e., that being deaf is an impairment. Today, a small but growing number of Deaf and hearing researchers are challenging this perception. The authors examined perceptions of what components are necessary for a successful Deaf/hearing research partnership, and propose that it is essential for Deaf and hearing researchers to embrace a Deaf epistemology. The authors found that a core category of equity is the key to effective teams. This equity is based in part on the mutual understanding that American Sign Language is the lingua franca of the team, as it provides full and easy access between Deaf and hearing team members. Additionally, a transformative paradigm, as a research frame, was found to be necessary to focus on leveling the playing field for Deaf researchers.

  18. Deaf children attending different school environments: sign language abilities and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasuolo, Elena; Valeri, Giovanni; Di Renzo, Alessio; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Volterra, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether full access to sign language as a medium for instruction could influence performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. Three groups of Italian participants (age range: 6-14 years) participated in the study: Two groups of deaf signing children and one group of hearing-speaking children. The two groups of deaf children differed only in their school environment: One group attended a school with a teaching assistant (TA; Sign Language is offered only by the TA to a single deaf child), and the other group attended a bilingual program (Italian Sign Language and Italian). Linguistic abilities and understanding of false belief were assessed using similar materials and procedures in spoken Italian with hearing children and in Italian Sign Language with deaf children. Deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than deaf children attending school with the TA in tasks assessing lexical comprehension and ToM, whereas the performance of hearing children was in between that of the two deaf groups. As for lexical production, deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than the two other groups. No significant differences were found between early and late signers or between children with deaf and hearing parents.

  19. Using consultation in student groups to improve development of team work skills amongst more reluctant students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    the students a very deep learning of the subjects they study and also very good problem solving skills and team work competencies both highly appreciated by the Danish companies. An important aspect of the first semester of the education is a course where the students get tools and tricks for good......Since Aalborg University (AAU) was founded it has been using an educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students work in groups using half of the study time to solve and document a real-world engineering problem. Working with problems gives...... showed less interest in the course than e.g. Software and Computer Science students. The consequences of this are that app. 1/3 of the BAIT students don’t develop their team work skills and competences to the level that is expected. The development of team work skills is closely connected to how...

  20. The Implementation of Group Investigation to Improve the Students' Speaking Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswardati

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to find out how group investigation improves the student's speaking skill of the second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, how group investigation improves the student's participation in speaking of second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, and what the obstacles are in the implementation of Group Investigation. The classroom…

  1. Group concept mapping: An approach to explore group knowledge organization and collaborative learning in senior medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Dario; Daley, Barbara J; Picho, Katherine; Durning, Steven J

    2017-10-01

    Group concept mapping may be used as a learning strategy that can potentially foster collaborative learning and assist instructors to assess the development of knowledge organization in medical students. Group concept maps were created by 39 medical students rotating through a fourth year medicine rotation. The group maps were developed based on a clinical vignette. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of students' evaluations were performed. Evaluations indicated that students enjoyed the collaborative nature of the exercise and the knowledge sharing activities associated with it. Group maps can demonstrate different knowledge organization Discussion: Group concept mapping can be used to explore students' organization and integration of knowledge structures in a collaborative setting. Additional research should focus on how group mapping and learning progresses over time and, whether group mapping can help identify curricular strengths and needs.

  2. 聋生书面语言简单复句逻辑关系问题探究%The Logic Study of the Written Simple Clauses by Deaf Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘卿

    2011-01-01

    本文采用案例研究方法,对收集到的聋生简单复句书面语料进行统计和分析,结果发现聋生简单复句逻辑关系存在大量缺失和错误.笔者对这些偏误产生的原因进行了探讨.并提出情境化教学、总结归纳关联词语等教学策略,以期为聋生简单复句教学提供参考和借鉴.%This case study analyzed the logic relationships of simple clauses written by deaf students. The results showed there were a lot of errors and absences of logic relationships in these clauses. The author offered the reasons for the errors and introduced relevant teaching strategies, such as situational teaching and summarizing conjunctions. It is desirable that these strategies will facilitate the teaching of simple clauses for deaf students.

  3. What could critical mathematics education mean for different groups of students?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsmose, Ole

    2016-01-01

    In this article I consider what critical mathematics education could mean for different groups of students. Much discussion and research has addressed students at social risk. My point, however, is that critical mathematics education concerns other groups as well: for example, students in comfort......In this article I consider what critical mathematics education could mean for different groups of students. Much discussion and research has addressed students at social risk. My point, however, is that critical mathematics education concerns other groups as well: for example, students...... in comfortable positions, blind students, elderly students, "other" students, university students, as well as engineering students. By considering such different groups of students, I will show that "reading and writing the world with mathematics" opens towards a range of different interpretations, which brings...

  4. 聋校双语教育常规外的尝试%Deaf Students School Bilingual Education outside the Regular Attempts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳梅

    2014-01-01

    手语的尽早使用有助于建立起聋儿与环境的正常交互,并将对聋儿的可持续发展产生积极的影响。为了让聋儿更好地适应双语教学,在聋校双语教学中,结合遵义的实际情况,坚持在实践中探索,除了常规的教学外,还进行了常规外的尝试。%The early use of sign language can help deaf children to establish normal interaction with the environment,and will have a positive impact on sustainable development in deaf children. To make better adapt to bilingual education for deaf children,deaf bilingual teaching in school,the combination of the actual situation in Zunyi,adhere to explore in practice,in addition to regular teaching,but also made regular attempts outside.

  5. The Relationship between the Use of the Accelerated Reader Program and Reading Comprehension Scores for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Dennis Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine demographic and educational variables as well as the variable of number of books read through a motivational reading program, Accelerated Reader, in a residential school for the deaf in the southeast and determine the relationship of these variables to reading comprehension as measured by the STAR Reading…

  6. Dental Students' Perceptions of Learning Value in PBL Groups with Medical and Dental Students Together versus Dental Students Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Maryam; Zulla, Rosslynn; Gaudet-Amigo, Gisele; Patterson, Steven; Murphy, Natalie; Ross, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    At a dental school in Canada, problem-based learning (PBL) sessions were restructured from an integrated dental-medical model to a separate dental model, resulting in three groups of students available for study: those who had participated in the two-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental alone, and the two-year dental alone. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the extent to which the PBL structure affected the dental students' perceptions of the learning value of PBL in the different models. A total of 34 first-, second-, and third-year dental students participated in six focus groups in May and June 2011 (34% of students in those total classes). Semistructured questions explored their experiences in the different PBL structures. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was employed. The results showed positive and negative perceptions for both the combined dental and medical settings and the settings with dental students alone. For students in the combined PBL groups, positive perceptions included gaining information from medical peers, motivation to learn, and interdisciplinary collaborations. The negative perceptions mainly related to irrelevant content, dominating medical students, and ineffective preceptors. Members of the separate dental groups were more positive about the content and felt a sense of belonging. They appreciated the dental preceptors but were concerned about the inadequacy of their medical knowledge. Overall, the dental students valued the combined PBL experience and appreciated the opportunity to learn with their medical colleagues. Close attention, however, must be paid to PBL content and the preceptor's role to optimize dental students' experience in combined medical and dental groups.

  7. Acoustics for the Deaf: Can You See Me Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette

    2016-09-01

    Although acoustics examples and demonstrations can be an effective tool for engaging students in introductory physics classes and outreach, teaching principles of sound and vibration to the deaf and hard of hearing needs to be approached carefully. The deaf and hard of hearing have less intuition with sound but are no strangers to some of the effects of pressure, vibrations, and other basic principles that are related to sound. We recently expanded our "Sounds to Astound" outreach program and developed an acoustics demonstration program for 80 visiting deaf students mostly between the ages of 13 and 18. Both this experience, which had a "See and Feel" approach, similar to what was proposed by Lang, and a specialized planetarium program helped reinforce for the students the opportunities that exist for them in higher education. This paper describes some of the pedagogical underpinnings, the demonstrations, their implementation and lessons learned, and student responses.

  8. How Speechreading Contributes to Reading in a Transparent Ortography: The Case of Spanish Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ortiz, Isabel R.; Saldaña, David; Moreno-Perez, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to describe the performance of deaf and hearing people while speechreading Spanish, a language with transparent orthography, and to relate this skill to reading efficiency. Three groups of 27 participants each were recruited: a group of deaf participants, a chronological age-matched hearing group and a reading age-matched…

  9. Gender aspects of status in teenage student groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachkova, Marianna E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical male and female roles and relationships can be observed at different social levels: intergroup, intragroup, interpersonal, intrapersonal. In adolescence, increased development of gender characteristics (gender identity, gender stereotypes, gender roles appears at all levels. Since the leading activity at this age is interpersonal communication, research into gender characteristics and their influence on relations in the student group is one of the most important tasks of modern psychology. One hundred and forty teenagers in grades 6-8 from secondary schools in Moscow, aged of 12–14, were involved in the research. Special social-psychological techniques were applied for assessment of status relations (sociometry, referentometry, methodology for defining the informal intragroup power structure and gender characteristics (Bem Sex Role Inventory in classical and modified versions, as well as correlation and cluster analyses. We found that representations about the group leader contained clear masculine features. We underline the discrepancy between the qualities attributed to the image of the leader and the qualities of the actual group leaders. Thus, the image of the leader includes predominantly masculine characteristics, while actual high-status group members describe themselves with both feminine and gender-neutral features. Finally gender-typed behavior and masculine traits are more typical of low-status teenagers.

  10. Metacognition and reading in children who are deaf: a review of the research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassman, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and synthesize the literature linking metacognition and reading in children who are deaf. Although this body of research is sparse, three issues emerge. First, the research implies that current instructional practices used to teach reading to deaf children might actually hinder their development of mature metacognitive knowledge and control. Second, the studies suggest that the low-level reading material typically given to deaf children might not provide the opportunity for them to develop, practice, or use metacognitive strategies. And third, the research shows that deaf students can benefit from metacognitive strategy instruction.

  11. Deaf studies alumni perceptions of the academic program and off-campus internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sheryl B; Emanuel, Diana C; Cripps, Jody H

    2012-01-01

    Alumni of an undergraduate Deaf studies program completed an online survey about their education and employment after graduation and their perceptions of their internship and undergraduate academic program. Demographically, this population of Deaf studies alumni represented a higher percentage of women and dual-major graduates than was present in the general university population. It was found that most of the alumni reported using the knowledge and skills from the Deaf studies program in their current job. Current employment among alumni was almost 100%, and most of the alumni had positive perceptions regarding their personal, academic, and professional growth as it related to their internship and undergraduate Deaf studies program. The study findings underscore the need for continued support of Deaf studies programs. Suggestions are provided for program directors regarding the development of internships and academic programs for students in Deaf studies.

  12. Enrollment trends in deaf education teacher preparation programs, 1973-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, David

    2010-01-01

    The number of deaf education teacher preparation programs and the number of program graduates were tabulated from reference issues of the American Annals of the Deaf beginning in 1973 and progressing every third year through 2009. Programs and graduates reached their highest levels from the mid-1970s through mid-1980s. In 2006 and 2009, only about one fourth as many students were majoring in deaf education in relation to the general U.S. college population as in 1973, 1976, and 1979. Yet because the population of children identified as deaf and hard of hearing has also declined, the ratio of program graduates to deaf children has stayed relatively balanced for the past 20 years. Current challenges faced by teacher preparation programs include increases in interpreter preparation programs and programs for teaching American Sign Language, as well as the changing nature of the role of teacher of the deaf.

  13. Coesão textual na escrita de um grupo de adultos surdos usuários da língua de sinais Brasileira Text cohesion in writing of a group of deaf adults users of Brazilian sign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Oliveira Crepaldi de Almeida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: investigar a coesão textual em produções escritas por quatro adultos surdos usuários da Língua de Sinais Brasileira alfabetizados, integrantes de um grupo de discussão nessa língua, sobre o tema violência, coordenado por uma intérprete fluente. Verificar a possível interferência da Libras na escrita em português. MÉTODOS: após terem participado de sessões de discussão sobre o tema violência, cada participante produziu um texto relacionado a algum tipo de violência. Seus textos foram analisados qualitativamente em termos de sua coesão. RESULTADOS: os textos produzidos faziam referência a situações de violência simbólica. O estudo dos textos evidenciou presença de coesão textual sequencial e referencial em todos os textos, embora comprometida. Houve interferência da Libras nas redações. Observou-se que os textos, por si sós, são difíceis de serem compreendidos sem a interação direta com o participante. Apesar da dificuldade na compreensão da língua escrita, que é diferente da estrutura da língua de sinais, o estudo evidenciou que esses surdos podem construir textos com sentido e coesão. CONCLUSÃO: a produção escrita dos surdos pesquisados apresenta coesão, porém com interferência da Libras, o que prejudica, em alguns casos, a compreensão por parte do leitor. Quanto menor a coesão textual, maior a necessidade de explicações do autor sobre o que quis dizer com seu texto.PURPOSE: to investigate text cohesion in written productions of four deaf male adults using Brazilian Sign Language (Libras and write in Portuguese. Participants integrate a discussion group on violence using that language coordinated by a fluent interpreter. The study also verifies possible interference of Libras on writing in Portuguese. METHODS: after a few sessions, a discussing the theme violence, each deaf participant wrote a text on a violence situation. These texts were analyzed qualitatively as for their cohesion

  14. Visuo-tactile interactions in the congenitally deaf: A behavioral and event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eHauthal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory deprivation is known to be accompanied by alterations in visual processing. Yet not much is known about tactile processing and the interplay of the intact sensory modalities in the deaf. We presented visual, tactile, and visuo-tactile stimuli to congenitally deaf and hearing individuals in a speeded detection task. Analyses of multisensory responses showed a redundant signals effect that was attributable to a coactivation mechanism in both groups, although the redundancy gain was less in the deaf. In hearing but not deaf participants, N200 latencies of somatosensory event-related potentials were modulated by simultaneous visual stimulation. In deaf but not hearing participants, however, there was a modulation of N200 latencies of visual event-related potentials due to simultaneous tactile stimulation. A comparison of unisensory responses between groups revealed larger N200 amplitudes for visual and shorter N200 latencies for tactile stimuli in the deaf. P300 amplitudes in response to both stimuli were larger in deaf participants. The differences in visual and tactile processing between deaf and hearing participants, however, were not reflected in behavior. The electroencephalography (EEG results suggest an asymmetry in visuo-tactile interactions between deaf and hearing individuals. Visuo-tactile enhancements could neither be fully explained by perceptual deficiency nor by inverse effectiveness. Instead, we suggest that results might be explained by a shift in the relative importance of touch and vision in deaf individuals.

  15. Deaf/hard-of-hearing and other postsecondary learners' retention of STEM content with tablet computer-based notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Michael S; Elliot, Lisa B; Easton, Donna

    2014-04-01

    Four groups of postsecondary students, 25 who were deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH), 25 with a learning disability, 25 who were English language learners (ELLs), and 25 without an identified disability studied notes that included text and graphical information based on a physics or a marine biology lecture. The latter 3 groups were normally hearing. All groups had higher scores on post- than on pretests for each lecture, with each group showing generally similar gains in amount of material learned from the pretest to the posttest. For each lecture, the D/HH students scored lower on the pre- and posttests than the other 3 groups of participants. Results indicated that students acquired measurable amounts of information from studying these types of notes for relatively short periods and that the notes have equal potential to support the acquisition of information by each of these groups of students.

  16. [To investigate the relation of sudden deafness with hearing loss level and auditory threshold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yikun; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Ya; Chen, Xiaoling; Yu, Xiaosong

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the relation of sudden deafness with hearing loss level and auditory threshold. A retrospective analysis was performed in 92 cases(97 years) of sudden deafness patients. In this group,the best hearing loss prognosis was the ascend type and the back type the total effective rate was both 100.0%. The second was the slow descend type. The total effective rate of this type was 70.0% (7/10). the total effective rate of full deaf is 66.7% (14/21), the sudden descend type is poor, the effective rate was 50% (4/8). although the full deaf groups total effective rate was high than sudden descend type, without one ear completely recovering, and only one ear from sudden descend type was completely cured. After treatment, there were 6 ears of fall deaf in full deaf group. There was one case rised 65 dBHL and one case rised 50 dBHL from the 21 cases full deaf sufferer. In this deaf level group, the light level and the middle level was one ear respectively. Although the total effective rate of this group was the highest, all the cases were not completely recovered. After treatment, the hearing rise 17 dBHL and 19 dBHL respectively. After chi2 text (chi2 = 1.459, P > 0.05), the total effective rate of the more heavier, heavy, and the heaviest to full deaf was no significant difference but after chi2 text (chi2 = 10.09, P deaf group was the lowest: 6.0% (2/33). It was considered that the deafness level was no obvious relation to the total effective rate, but there was significant difference in fully recover rate. The different auditory threshold figure of the sudden deafness was closely related to the hearings prognosis.

  17. Research on students and museums: Looking more closely at the students in school groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Janette

    2004-07-01

    This paper surveys research over the past decade on school group visits to museums. By shifting attention to students' views about field trips, to their socially negotiated learning behaviors during field trips and the interaction between learning in the classroom and in the museum, this research has afforded a deeper understanding of the nature of learning in these contexts. This paper explores these aspects through a look at what the literature tells us about the similarities and differences between how families and students learn in museums, then investigates this further through the voices of adults and students in museums. The impact of the valuing and definition of learning in museums by students and teachers leads to discussion of boundary crossings between museums and schools.

  18. The effects of different gender groupings on middle school students' performance in science lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drab, Deborah D.

    Grouping students for labs in science classes is a common practice. This mixed methods quasi-experimental action research study examines homogeneous and heterogeneous gender grouping strategies to determine what gender grouping strategy is the most effective in a coeducational science classroom setting. Sixth grade students were grouped in same-gender and mixed-gender groups, alternating each quarter. Over the course of an academic year, data were collected from four sources. The teacher-researcher observed groups working during hands-on activities to collect data on student behaviors. Students completed post-lab questionnaires and an end-of-course questionnaire about their preferences and experiences in the different grouping strategies. Student scores on written lab assignments were also utilized. Data analysis focused on four areas: active engagement, student achievement, student perceptions of success and cooperative teamwork. Findings suggest that teachers may consider grouping students of different ability levels according to different gender grouping strategies to optimize learning.

  19. Impaired learning of event frequencies in tone deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2012-04-01

    Musical knowledge is ubiquitous, effortless, and implicitly acquired all over the world via exposure to musical materials in one's culture. In contrast, one group of individuals who show insensitivity to music, specifically the inability to discriminate pitches and melodies, is the tone-deaf. In this study, we asked whether difficulties in pitch and melody discrimination among the tone-deaf could be related to learning difficulties, and, if so, what processes of learning might be affected in the tone-deaf. We investigated the learning of frequency information in a new musical system in tone-deaf individuals and matched controls. Results showed significantly impaired learning abilities in frequency matching in the tone-deaf. This impairment was positively correlated with the severity of tone deafness as assessed by the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusia. Taken together, the results suggest that tone deafness is characterized by an impaired ability to acquire frequency information from pitched materials in the sound environment. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. Creating the "History through Deaf Eyes" Documentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hott, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines how a documentary film about the history of deafness in the United States, inspired by the exhibition "History through Deaf Eyes," is going to be created. "History through Deaf Eyes" will have a dual focus. Part of its subject is deafness from the inside: the personal experiences of deaf people (and hearing…