WorldWideScience

Sample records for group covariant protocols

  1. General Covariance from the Quantum Renormalization Group

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    The Quantum renormalization group (QRG) is a realisation of holography through a coarse graining prescription that maps the beta functions of a quantum field theory thought to live on the `boundary' of some space to holographic actions in the `bulk' of this space. A consistency condition will be proposed that translates into general covariance of the gravitational theory in the $D + 1$ dimensional bulk. This emerges from the application of the QRG on a planar matrix field theory living on the $D$ dimensional boundary. This will be a particular form of the Wess--Zumino consistency condition that the generating functional of the boundary theory needs to satisfy. In the bulk, this condition forces the Poisson bracket algebra of the scalar and vector constraints of the dual gravitational theory to close in a very specific manner, namely, the manner in which the corresponding constraints of general relativity do. A number of features of the gravitational theory will be fixed as a consequence of this form of the Po...

  2. Group Lasso estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bigot, Jérémie; Loubes, Jean-Michel; Alvarez, Lilian Muniz

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Group Lasso estimator of the covariance matrix of a stochastic process corrupted by an additive noise. We propose to estimate the covariance matrix in a high-dimensional setting under the assumption that the process has a sparse representation in a large dictionary of basis functions. Using a matrix regression model, we propose a new methodology for high-dimensional covariance matrix estimation based on empirical contrast regularization by a group Lasso penalty. Using such a penalty, the method selects a sparse set of basis functions in the dictionary used to approximate the process, leading to an approximation of the covariance matrix into a low dimensional space. Consistency of the estimator is studied in Frobenius and operator norms and an application to sparse PCA is proposed.

  3. The impact of covariance misspecification in group-based trajectory models for longitudinal data with non-stationary covariance structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christopher E; Glonek, Gary Fv; Giles, Lynne C

    2017-08-01

    One purpose of a longitudinal study is to gain a better understanding of how an outcome of interest changes among a given population over time. In what follows, a trajectory will be taken to mean the series of measurements of the outcome variable for an individual. Group-based trajectory modelling methods seek to identify subgroups of trajectories within a population, such that trajectories that are grouped together are more similar to each other than to trajectories in distinct groups. Group-based trajectory models generally assume a certain structure in the covariances between measurements, for example conditional independence, homogeneous variance between groups or stationary variance over time. Violations of these assumptions could be expected to result in poor model performance. We used simulation to investigate the effect of covariance misspecification on misclassification of trajectories in commonly used models under a range of scenarios. To do this we defined a measure of performance relative to the ideal Bayesian correct classification rate. We found that the more complex models generally performed better over a range of scenarios. In particular, incorrectly specified covariance matrices could significantly bias the results but using models with a correct but more complicated than necessary covariance matrix incurred little cost.

  4. Cryptanalysis of the Quantum Group Signature Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke-Jia; Sun, Ying; Song, Ting-Ting; Zuo, Hui-Juan

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the researches of quantum group signature (QGS) have attracted a lot of attentions and some typical protocols have been designed for e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc. In this paper, we analyze the security of the quantum group signature with the example of two novel protocols. It can be seen that both of them cannot be implemented securely since the arbitrator cannot solve the disputes fairly. In order to show that, some possible attack strategies, which can be used by the malicious participants, are proposed. Moreover, the further discussions of QGS are presented finally, including some insecurity factors and improved ideas.

  5. Symmetry group and group representations associated with the thermodynamic covariance principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Evslin, Jarah; Sonnino, Alberto; Steinbrecher, György; Tirapegui, Enrique

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this work [previously appeared in literature, the thermodynamical field theory (TFT)] is to determine the nonlinear closure equations (i.e., the flux-force relations) valid for thermodynamic systems out of Onsager's region. The TFT rests upon the concept of equivalence between thermodynamic systems. More precisely, the equivalent character of two alternative descriptions of a thermodynamic system is ensured if, and only if, the two sets of thermodynamic forces are linked with each other by the so-called thermodynamic coordinate transformations (TCT). In this work, we describe the Lie group and the group representations associated to the TCT. The TCT guarantee the validity of the so-called thermodynamic covariance principle (TCP): The nonlinear closure equations, i.e., the flux-force relations, everywhere and in particular outside the Onsager region, must be covariant under TCT. In other terms, the fundamental laws of thermodynamics should be manifestly covariant under transformations between the admissible thermodynamic forces, i.e., under TCT. The TCP ensures the validity of the fundamental theorems for systems far from equilibrium. The symmetry properties of a physical system are intimately related to the conservation laws characterizing that system. Noether's theorem gives a precise description of this relation. We derive the conserved (thermodynamic) currents and, as an example of calculation, a system out of equilibrium (tokamak plasmas) where the validity of TCP imposed at the level of the kinetic equations is also analyzed.

  6. Symmetry group and group representations associated with the thermodynamic covariance principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Evslin, Jarah; Sonnino, Alberto; Steinbrecher, György; Tirapegui, Enrique

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this work [previously appeared in literature, the thermodynamical field theory (TFT)] is to determine the nonlinear closure equations (i.e., the flux-force relations) valid for thermodynamic systems out of Onsager's region. The TFT rests upon the concept of equivalence between thermodynamic systems. More precisely, the equivalent character of two alternative descriptions of a thermodynamic system is ensured if, and only if, the two sets of thermodynamic forces are linked with each other by the so-called thermodynamic coordinate transformations (TCT). In this work, we describe the Lie group and the group representations associated to the TCT. The TCT guarantee the validity of the so-called thermodynamic covariance principle (TCP): The nonlinear closure equations, i.e., the flux-force relations, everywhere and in particular outside the Onsager region, must be covariant under TCT. In other terms, the fundamental laws of thermodynamics should be manifestly covariant under transformations between the admissible thermodynamic forces, i.e., under TCT. The TCP ensures the validity of the fundamental theorems for systems far from equilibrium. The symmetry properties of a physical system are intimately related to the conservation laws characterizing that system. Noether's theorem gives a precise description of this relation. We derive the conserved (thermodynamic) currents and, as an example of calculation, a system out of equilibrium (tokamak plasmas) where the validity of TCP imposed at the level of the kinetic equations is also analyzed.

  7. Security Analysis of Broadcaster Group Key Exchange Protocols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; ZHANG Huanguo

    2006-01-01

    Group key exchange protocols are basic protocols to provide privacy and integrity in secure group communication. This paper discusses the security of one type of group key exchange protocols and defines the kind of protocols as broadcaster group protocols. It points out two attacks on this kind of protocols. The first attack can be avoided by using fresh values in each action during one session of the group protocol. The second attack should be related with concrete application. It also proposes a dynamic key agreement protocol as an example of solutions at the last part of the paper.

  8. Selecting groups of covariates in the elastic net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    . The preservation of relations gives increased interpretability. The method is based on the elastic net and adaptively selects highly correlated groups of variables and does therefore not waste time in grouping irrelevant variables for the problem at hand. The method is illustrated on a simulated data set...

  9. Few Group Collapsing of Covariance Matrix Data Based on a Conservation Principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Hiruta; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; R. Arcilla, Jr.; R. D. McKnight; G. Aliberti; P. Oblozinsky; W. S. Yang

    2008-12-01

    A new algorithm for a rigorous collapsing of covariance data is proposed, derived, implemented, and tested. The method is based on a conservation principle that allows the uncertainty calculated in a fine group energy structure for a specific integral parameter, using as weights the associated sensitivity coefficients, to be preserved at a broad energy group structure.

  10. Unsupervised clustering for logo images using singular values region covariance matrices on Lie groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuguang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Shengyong; Chen, Dan; Li, Xiaoli

    2012-04-01

    Toward the unsupervised clustering for color logo images corrupted by noise, we propose a novel framework in which the logo images are described by a model called singular values based region covariance matrices (SVRCM), and the mean shift algorithm is performed on Lie groups for clustering covariance matrices. To decrease the influence of noise, we choose the larger singular values, which can better represent the original image and discard the smaller singular values. Therefore, the chosen singular values are grouped and fused by a covariance matrix to form a SVRCM model that can represent the correlation and variance between different singular value features to enhance the discriminating ability of the model. In order to cluster covariance matrices, which do not lie on Euclidean space, the mean shift algorithm is performed on manifolds by iteratively transforming points between the Lie group and Lie algebra. Experimental results on 38 categories of logo images demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method whose clustering rate can be achieved at 88.55%.

  11. Covariances of the few-group homogenized cross-sections for diffusion calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Cervera, S.; Castro, S.; García-Herranz, N.

    2015-07-01

    In the context of the NEA/OECD benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM), Exercise I-3 consists of neutronic calculations to propagate uncertainties to core parameters such as k-effective or power distribution. In core simulators, the input uncertainties arise, among others, from few-group lattice-averaged cross-section uncertainties. In this paper, an analysis of those uncertainties due to nuclear data is performed. The core analyzed in Exercise I-3 is the initial loading of the PWR TMI-1, composed by 11 different types of fuel assemblies. By statistically sampling the nuclear data input, the sequence SAMPLER from SCALE system (using its NEWT lattice code) allows to obtain the few-group homogenized cross-sections and with a statistical analysis generates the covariance matrices. The correlations among different reactions and energy groups of the covariance matrices are analyzed. The impact of burnable poisons, control rods or the environment of the assembly is also assessed. It is shown the importance of the correlation between different assembly types. The global covariance matrix will permit to compute the uncertainties in k-eff in a core simulator, once sensitivity coefficients are known. Only if the complete covariance matrix is considered, similar uncertainties to the ones provided by other methodologies are obtained. (Author)

  12. Coping with threats of terrorism: a protocol for group intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenstein, Richard J

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a group protocol designed to assist people in coping with direct and ongoing threats of terrorism. The protocol is intended to enable participants to address the psychological issues necessary to cope during periods of extreme threat. A step-by-step description of the protocol is provided.

  13. Area group: an example of style and paste compositional covariation in Maya pottery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, R.L.; Reents, D.J.; Harbottle, G.; Sayre, E.V.; van Zelst, L.

    1983-06-12

    This paper has addressed aspects of ceramic style and iconography as found in Late Classic Maya ceramic art, including the supplemental perspective afforded by the analysis of ceramic paste. The chemical data provide a means to assess the extent of stylistic-paste compositional covariation. Depending upon the strength of that covariation various inferences may be drawn about craft specialization, exchange and information flow within Maya society. At the least, it provides an empirical means of comparing stylistically similar vessels; and when they are members of a chemically homogeneous group, it permits style to be addressed in terms of its variation. Additionally, compositionally defined site or region specific reference units provide a chemical background against which the non-provenienced vessels may be compared, allowing the whole vessels to be related to the archaelogically recovered fragmentary material. Finally, this multidisciplinary approach has been illustrated by preliminary findings concerning a specific group of polychrome vessels, The Area Group.

  14. Leakproof secret sharing protocols with applications to group identification scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG ChunMing; GAO ShuHong

    2012-01-01

    In a traditional (t,n)-threshold secret sharing scheme,t or more honest participants can reconstruct the secret K.In the reconstruction process,the individual shares and the secret key K are revealed,hence K is shared once only. In this paper,we firstly give the definition of leakproof secret sharing scheme which is composed of a distribution protocol and a proof protocol,then propose two leakproof secret sharing protocols,a computationally secure protocol and an information-theoretically secure protocol.In our protocols,t or more participants can jointly prove that they hold the secret K by using a multi-prover zero-knowledge argument of knowledge.As a result,the secret K will be shared for as many times as desired.Furthermore,each participant can detect the dealer in the distribution protocol from cheating,and any verifier can prevent non-qualified set of participants in proof protocol from cheating.As an example of the practical impact of our work we use our techniques to construct group identification schemes with zero-knowledge.

  15. A dynamic,secure,and efficient group key agreement protocol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shihui; WANG Shaohui; ZHANG Guoyan

    2007-01-01

    The key challenge of dynamic peer communication is how to realize secure and efficient group key management.A two rounds key agreement protocol for dynamic peer group (DPG) is proposed in this paper.The protocol,which was obtained by combining the E1Gamal encryption scheme with the E1Gamal signature scheme,is efficient and simple.The protocol is proven secure against passive attack by using indistinguishable method.Moreover,both perfect forward secrecy (PFS) and key independence (KI) were achieved.Because the protocol is based on the broadcast channel,it is also suitable for key agreement in wireless communications,especially in ad-hoc networks.

  16. The intergroup protocols: Scalable group communication for the internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berket, Karlo [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2000-12-04

    Reliable group ordered delivery of multicast messages in a distributed system is a useful service that simplifies the programming of distributed applications. Such a service helps to maintain the consistency of replicated information and to coordinate the activities of the various processes. With the increasing popularity of the Internet, there is an increasing interest in scaling the protocols that provide this service to the environment of the Internet. The InterGroup protocol suite, described in this dissertation, provides such a service, and is intended for the environment of the Internet with scalability to large numbers of nodes and high latency links. The InterGroup protocols approach the scalability problem from various directions. They redefine the meaning of group membership, allow voluntary membership changes, add a receiver-oriented selection of delivery guarantees that permits heterogeneity of the receiver set, and provide a scalable reliability service. The InterGroup system comprises several components, executing at various sites within the system. Each component provides part of the services necessary to implement a group communication system for the wide-area. The components can be categorized as: (1) control hierarchy, (2) reliable multicast, (3) message distribution and delivery, and (4) process group membership. We have implemented a prototype of the InterGroup protocols in Java, and have tested the system performance in both local-area and wide-area networks.

  17. The Multilevel Latent Covariate Model: A New, More Reliable Approach to Group-Level Effects in Contextual Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtke, Oliver; Marsh, Herbert W.; Robitzsch, Alexander; Trautwein, Ulrich; Asparouhov, Tihomir; Muthen, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    In multilevel modeling (MLM), group-level (L2) characteristics are often measured by aggregating individual-level (L1) characteristics within each group so as to assess contextual effects (e.g., group-average effects of socioeconomic status, achievement, climate). Most previous applications have used a multilevel manifest covariate (MMC) approach,…

  18. Applied Protocol for Appreciative Group Socialization [Protocol de aplicare a grupului de socializare apreciativ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio SANDU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we aim to outline a protocol for the implementation of favorable social group, aiming to highlight a number of specific factors such as number of persons, type of group, which features the most important steps such as introduction, conduct etc. group. It will also enhance the models and techniques for applying the basic methods appreciative of this group. To achieve this subchapter shall follow the defining characteristics of a group as they are presented in the literature. Besides theoretical directions emphasis will be placed on how to implement in practice by mixing methodological relizat appreciative group socialization.

  19. Manifestly covariant electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillion, P. [Institut Henri Poincare' , Le Vesinet (France)

    1999-03-01

    The conventional relativistic formulation of electromagnetism is covariant under the full Lorentz group. But relativity requires covariance only under the proper Lorentz group and the authors present here the formalism covariant under the complex rotation group isomorphic to the proper Lorentz group. The authors discuss successively Maxwell's equations, constitutive relations and potential functions. A comparison is made with the usual formulation.

  20. EFFECT OF SEVERAL STRUCTURES OF CONTEMPORARY GROUPS ON ESTIMATES OF (COVARIANCE AND GENETIC PARAMETERS FOR WEANING WEIGHT IN NELLORE CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Pascoa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We used actual and adjusted weights to 120 d and 210 d of age of 72,731 male and female Nellore calves born in 40 PMGRN - Nellore Brazil herds from 1985 to 2005 aiming to compare the effect of different definitions of contemporary groups on estimates of (covariance and genetic parameters. Four models, each one with a different structure of contemporary group (CG, were compared using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC, the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC, and the Consistent Akaike Information Criterion (CAIC. (Covariance estimates were obtained using a derivative-free restricted maximum likelihood procedure. Estimates of (covariances and genetic parameters were similar for the four models considered. However, the BIC and CAIC indicated that the most appropriate model for this Nellore population was the one that considered CG to be random, and sex of calf to be fixed and separate from CG, in which CG was defined as the group of calves born in the same herd, year, season of birth (trimester, and undergone the same management.

  1. Secure Group Formation Protocol for a Medical Sensor Network Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    wireless sensors to be both secure and usable by exploring different solutions on a fully functional prototype platform. In this paper, we present an Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) based protocol, which offers fully secure sensor set-up in a few seconds on standard (Telos) hardware. We evaluate...

  2. A Lightweight RFID Grouping-Proof Protocol Based on Parallel Mode and DHCP Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicai Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID grouping-proof protocol is to generate an evidence of the simultaneous existence of a group of tags and it has been applied to many different fields. For current grouping-proof protocols, there still exist some flaws such as low grouping-proof efficiency, being vulnerable to trace attack and information leakage. To improve the secure performance and efficiency, we propose a lightweight RFID grouping-proof protocol based on parallel mode and DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol mechanism. Our protocol involves multiple readers and multiple tag groups. During the grouping-proof period, one reader and one tag group are chosen by the verifier by means of DHCP mechanism. When only a part of the tags of the chosen group exist, the protocol can also give the evidence of their co-existence. Our protocol utilizes parallel communication mode between reader and tags so as to ensure its grouping-proof efficiency. It only uses Hash function to complete the mutual authentication among verifier, readers and tags. It can preserve the privacy of the RFID system and resist the attacks such as eavesdropping, replay, trace and impersonation. Therefore the protocol is secure, flexible and efficient. It only uses some lightweight operations such as Hash function and a pseudorandom number generator. Therefore it is very suitable to some low-cost RFID systems.

  3. A Framework for Group Key Management Protocol Assessment Independent of View Synchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Manz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: As group key management extended into the area of large dynamic networks, complex issues emerged involving the many operations that run over several network topologies. The issues that occurred due to multiple topologies were also compounded by differing views of the network, taken at different time slices or positions within the network. This was especially complex when figuring in mobile, ad-hoc networks. View synchrony is the current operational technique, or assumption, applied to group key exchange protocols. However, before this analysis view synchrony was just that, an assumption and the literature for group key exchange lacked an inquiry into what could happen when view synchrony was removed. Current group key management protocols rely on view synchrony and yet all protocols vary in requisite operational descriptions and performance measures. In this study, a framework for group key management protocol operations and performance measures was defined and examined how that framework could be used to compare and contrast existing protocols with and, more importantly, without view synchrony. Approach: Current literature lacked categories by which to quantify the performance metric of the protocols. This study first defined the dynamic key operations that all protocols share. By these definitions, group key management protocols were directly compared. Once definitions existed, this study assembled a list of costs that every protocol requires to establish and share keys across the dynamic group. These results provided an understanding of view synchrony's role and whether or not it should be solely relied on in these current protocols. Results: The prior conclusion that view synchrony was an integral part of all group key management protocols was shattered, when seen through the lens of communication costs and assumptions in wireless ad-hoc networks. View synchrony, as an assumed part of all group key management was

  4. Bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): protocol for multicentre parallel group randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, Miriam; Rumsby, Kate; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Chorozoglou, Maria; Wood, Wendy; Roberts, Amanda; Thomas, Kim S; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bath emollients are widely prescribed for childhood eczema, yet evidence of their benefits over direct application of emollients is lacking. Objectives To determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adding bath emollient to the standard management of eczema in children Methods and analysis Design: Pragmatic open 2-armed parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting: General practitioner (GP) practices in England and Wales. Participants: Children aged over 12 months and less than 12 years with eczema, excluding inactive or very mild eczema (5 or less on Nottingham Eczema Severity Scale). Interventions: Children will be randomised to either bath emollients plus standard eczema care or standard eczema care only. Outcome measures: Primary outcome is long-term eczema severity, measured by the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) repeated weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include: number of eczema exacerbations resulting in healthcare consultations over 1 year; eczema severity over 1 year; disease-specific and generic quality of life; medication use and healthcare resource use; cost-effectiveness. Aiming to detect a mean difference between groups of 2.0 (SD 7.0) in weekly POEM scores over 16 weeks (significance 0.05, power 0.9), allowing for 20% loss to follow-up, gives a total sample size of 423 children. We will use repeated measures analysis of covariance, or a mixed model, to analyse weekly POEM scores. We will control for possible confounders, including baseline eczema severity and child's age. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be carried out from a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by Newcastle and North Tyneside 1 NRES committee 14/NE/0098. Follow-up will be completed in 2017. Findings will be disseminated to participants and carers, the public, dermatology and primary care journals, guideline developers and decision-makers. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  5. From spin groups and modular P{sub 1}CT symmetry to covariant representations and the spin-statistics theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzen, R.

    2007-03-15

    Starting from the assumption of modular P{sub 1}CT symmetry in quantum field theory a representation of the universal covering of the Poincar'e group is constructed in terms of pairs of modular conjugations. The modular conjugations are associated with field algebras of unbounded operators localised in wedge regions. It turns out that an essential step consists in characterising the universal covering group of the Lorentz group by pairs of wedge regions, in conjunction with an analysis of its geometrical properties. In this thesis two approaches to this problem are developed in four spacetime dimensions. First a realisation of the universal covering as the quotient space over the set of pairs of wedge regions is presented. In spite of the intuitive definition, the necessary properties of a covering space are not straightforward to prove. But the geometrical properties are easy to handle. The second approach takes advantage of the well-known features of spin groups, given as subgroups of Clifford algebras. Characterising elements of spin groups by pairs of wedge regions is possible in an elegant manner. The geometrical analysis is performed by means of the results achieved in the first approach. These geometrical properties allow for constructing a representation of the universal cover of the Lorentz group in terms of pairs of modular conjugations. For this representation the derivation of the spin-statistics theorem is straightforward, and a PCT operator can be defined. Furthermore, it is possible to transfer the results to nets of field algebras in algebraic quantum field theory with ease. Many of the usual assumptions in quantum field theory like the spectrum condition or the existence of a covariant unitary representation, as well as the assumption on the quantum field to have only finitely many components, are not required. For the standard axioms, the crucial assumption of modular P{sub 1}CT symmetry constitutes no loss of generality because it is a

  6. Two-round contributory group key exchange protocol for wireless network environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tsu-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the popularity of group-oriented applications, secure group communication has recently received much attention from cryptographic researchers. A group key exchange (GKE protocol allows that participants cooperatively establish a group key that is used to encrypt and decrypt transmitted messages. Hence, GKE protocols can be used to provide secure group communication over a public network channel. However, most of the previously proposed GKE protocols deployed in wired networks are not fully suitable for wireless network environments with low-power computing devices. Subsequently, several GKE protocols suitable for mobile or wireless networks have been proposed. In this article, we will propose a more efficient group key exchange protocol with dynamic joining and leaving. Under the decision Diffie-Hellman (DDH, the computation Diffie-Hellman (CDH, and the hash function assumptions, we demonstrate that the proposed protocol is secure against passive attack and provides forward/backward secrecy for dynamic member joining/leaving. As compared with the recently proposed GKE protocols, our protocol provides better performance in terms of computational cost, round number, and communication cost.

  7. Constructing UC Secure and Constant-Round Group Key Exchange Protocols via Secret Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjae Moon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Group key exchange (GKE is one of the basic building blocks in securing group communication. A number of solutions to GKE problem have been proposed, but most of them are not scalable and require a number of rounds linear with the number of group members. We present a method of constructing constant-round and identity-based protocol via secret sharing for GKE within universally composability (UC framework. The resultant protocol focuses on round efficiency and three rounds of communication are required. The protocol allows the batch verification of messages signed by all other group participants. Moreover, compared with other identity-based protocols, the key generation center (KGC in our protocol is not always online.

  8. Constructing UC Secure and Constant-Round Group Key Exchange Protocols via Secret Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Sangjae

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Group key exchange (GKE is one of the basic building blocks in securing group communication. A number of solutions to GKE problem have been proposed, but most of them are not scalable and require a number of rounds linear with the number of group members. We present a method of constructing constant-round and identity-based protocol via secret sharing for GKE within universally composability (UC framework. The resultant protocol focuses on round efficiency and three rounds of communication are required. The protocol allows the batch verification of messages signed by all other group participants. Moreover, compared with other identity-based protocols, the key generation center (KGC in our protocol is not always online.

  9. Secure Group Formation Protocol for a Medical Sensor Network Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Designing security mechanisms such as privacy and access control for medical sensor networks is a challenging task; as such systems may be operated very frequently, at a quick pace, and at times in emergency situations. Understandably, clinicians hold extra unproductive tasks in low regard......, and experience from user workshops and observations of clinicians at work on a hospital ward show that if the security mechanisms are not well designed, the technology is either rejected altogether, or they are circumvented leaving the system wide open to attacks. Our work targets the problem of designing...... wireless sensors to be both secure and usable by exploring different solutions on a fully functional prototype platform. In this paper, we present an Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) based protocol, which offers fully secure sensor set-up in a few seconds on standard (Telos) hardware. We evaluate...

  10. Design of a decentralized asynchronous group membership protocol and an implementation of its communications layer

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Fernando Jorge.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. For development of group-oriented distributed applications, a group membership protocol provides the mechanisms to dynamically adapt to changes in the membership, ensuring consistent views among all members of the group. This is achieved, by executing a distributed script, that implements a protocol, at each member to maintain a sequence of identical views, in spite of continuous changes, either voluntary or due to failure, to the mem...

  11. Bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): protocol for multicentre parallel group randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, Miriam; Rumsby, Kate; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Chorozoglou, Maria; Wood, Wendy; Roberts, Amanda; Thomas, Kim S; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Bath emollients are widely prescribed for childhood eczema, yet evidence of their benefits over direct application of emollients is lacking. Objectives To determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adding bath emollient to the standard management of eczema in children Pragmatic open 2-armed parallel group randomised controlled trial. General practitioner (GP) practices in England and Wales. Children aged over 12 months and less than 12 years with eczema, excluding inactive or very mild eczema (5 or less on Nottingham Eczema Severity Scale). Children will be randomised to either bath emollients plus standard eczema care or standard eczema care only. Primary outcome is long-term eczema severity, measured by the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) repeated weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include: number of eczema exacerbations resulting in healthcare consultations over 1 year; eczema severity over 1 year; disease-specific and generic quality of life; medication use and healthcare resource use; cost-effectiveness. Aiming to detect a mean difference between groups of 2.0 (SD 7.0) in weekly POEM scores over 16 weeks (significance 0.05, power 0.9), allowing for 20% loss to follow-up, gives a total sample size of 423 children. We will use repeated measures analysis of covariance, or a mixed model, to analyse weekly POEM scores. We will control for possible confounders, including baseline eczema severity and child's age. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be carried out from a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. This protocol was approved by Newcastle and North Tyneside 1 NRES committee 14/NE/0098. Follow-up will be completed in 2017. Findings will be disseminated to participants and carers, the public, dermatology and primary care journals, guideline developers and decision-makers. ISRCTN84102309. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Comparison of an intermittent and continuous forearm muscles fatigue protocol with motorcycle riders and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, M; Torrado, P; Busquets, A; Ríos, J G; Angulo-Barroso, R

    2013-02-01

    Motorcycle races' long duration justify the study of forearm muscles fatigue, especially knowing the frequently associated forearm discomfort pathology. Moreover, while continuous fatigue protocols yield unequivocal results, EMG outcomes from an intermittent protocol are quite controversial. This study examined the forearm muscle fatigue patterns produced during these two protocols, comparing riders with a control group, and relating maximal voluntary contraction with EMG parameters (amplitude - NRMS and median frequency - NMF) of both protocols to the forearm discomfort among motorcycle riders. Twenty riders and 39 controls performed in separate days both protocols simulating the braking gesture and posture of a rider. EMG of flexor digitorum superficialis (FS) and carpi radialis (CR) were monitored. CR revealed more differences among protocols and groups compared to FS. The greater CR activation in riders could be interpreted as a neuromotor strategy to improve braking precision. When FS fatigue increased, the control group progressively shift toward a bigger CR activation, adopting an intermuscular activation pattern closer to riders. Despite the absence of NMF decrement throughout the intermittent protocol, which suggest that we should have shorten the recovery times from the actual 1 min, the superior number of rounds performed by the riders proved that this protocol discriminates better riders against controls and is more related to forearm discomfort.

  13. Periscope protocol for focus groups for adults and kindergarten children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caroli, Margherita

    2010-01-01

    The focus groups (FG) are a “carefully planned series of discussions designed to obtain perceptions on a defined area of interest in a permissive, non-threatening environment” (Krueger and Casey, 2000). The aim of the FG is to raise a discussion among the participants that makes the research to see...... a certain phenomenon from the participants’ perspective. In Periscope the Focus Group Methodology (FGM) will be used as a supplement to the quantitative methods in order to obtaining background information on health behavior in the institutions as well as in the family. In addition it will be used...

  14. An Efficient Causal Group Communication Protocol for Free Scale Peer-to-Peer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory Evropeytsev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In peer-to-peer (P2P overlay networks, a group of n (≥2 peer processes have to cooperate with each other. Each peer sends messages to every peer and receives messages from every peer in a group. In group communications, each message sent by a peer is required to be causally delivered to every peer. Most of the protocols designed to ensure causal message order are designed for networks with a plain architecture. These protocols can be adapted to use in free scale and hierarchical topologies; however, the amount of control information is O(n, where n is the number of peers in the system. Some protocols are designed for a free scale or hierarchical networks, but in general they force the whole system to accomplish the same order viewed by a super peer. In this paper, we present a protocol that is specifically designed to work with a free scale peer-to-peer network. By using the information about the network’s architecture and by representing message dependencies on a bit level, the proposed protocol ensures causal message ordering without enforcing super peers order. The designed protocol is simulated and compared with the Immediate Dependency Relation and the Dependency Sequences protocols to show its lower overhead.

  15. Protocol group education for family caregivers of elderly dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anguita Carpio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Family is the main care source for the dependent person. The act of looking after somebody, involves the development of multiple tasks, apart from spending a lot of time. This implies a series of requirements that would be able to damage the family caregivers’ quality of life, and definitively, their health. Objetive: training for family caregivers to provide quality care, in order to succeed in this project, we establish three specific aims: improving the information and training, increase self-care abilities and focus on resources and support services for informal caregivers. Methods: We are going to implement an educative intervention in a group of 12 informal caregivers of people over 65 years, dependent on chronic diseases and develop home care. The program will be composed of 10 sessions, each one of two-hour-long. The first session will consist of an introduction and the last session will be reserved to solve doubts and to deal with the assessment of the program. Throughout the rest of sessions, contents about training, self, resources and assistance services for caregivers will be proposed. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the program, a multiple choice questionnaire will be taken both al the beginning and at the end of the different sessions. In order to evaluate the human resources and the applied methodology, another questionnaire will be passed.

  16. A Provably Secure Revocable ID-Based Authenticated Group Key Exchange Protocol with Identifying Malicious Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu-Yang Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of malicious participants is a major threat for authenticated group key exchange (AGKE protocols. Typically, there are two detecting ways (passive and active to resist malicious participants in AGKE protocols. In 2012, the revocable identity- (ID- based public key system (R-IDPKS was proposed to solve the revocation problem in the ID-based public key system (IDPKS. Afterwards, based on the R-IDPKS, Wu et al. proposed a revocable ID-based AGKE (RID-AGKE protocol, which adopted a passive detecting way to resist malicious participants. However, it needs three rounds and cannot identify malicious participants. In this paper, we fuse a noninteractive confirmed computation technique to propose the first two-round RID-AGKE protocol with identifying malicious participants, which is an active detecting way. We demonstrate that our protocol is a provably secure AGKE protocol with forward secrecy and can identify malicious participants. When compared with the recently proposed ID/RID-AGKE protocols, our protocol possesses better performance and more robust security properties.

  17. Students' Attitudes toward a Group Coursework Protocol and Peer Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Caroline; Michaelidou, Nina; Canning, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a knowledge gap by presenting an empirical investigation of a group coursework protocol and peer assessment system (GCP&PAS) used in a UK university to support postgraduate marketing students in their assessed group activities. The aim of the research was to examine students' understanding of the GCP&PAS and their…

  18. GBP-WAHSN: A Group-Based Protocol for Large Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Lloret; Miguel Garcia; Jesus Tomás; Fernando Boronat

    2008-01-01

    Grouping nodes gives better performance to the whole network by diminishing the average network delay and avoiding unnecessary message for warding and additional overhead. Many routing protocols for ad-hoc and sensor network shave been designed but none of them are based on groups. In this paper, we will start defining group-based topologies,and then we will show how some wireless ad hoc sensor networks (WAHSN) routing protocols perform when the nodes are arranged in groups. In our proposal connections between groups are established as a function of the proximity of the nodes and the neighbor's available capacity (based on the node's energy). We describe the architecture proposal, the messages that are needed for the proper operation and its mathematical description. We have also simulated how much time is needed to propagate information between groups. Finally, we will show a comparison with other architectures.

  19. A survey of ring-building network protocols suitable for command and control group communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobeih, Ahmed; Yurcik, William

    2005-05-01

    Multicasting is the enabling technology for group communication. However, network-layer multicasting (e.g., IP multicast) has not been widely adopted more than 10 years of its invention due to the concerns related to deployment, scalability and network management. Application-layer multicast (ALM) has been proposed as an alternative for IP multicast. In ALM, group communications take place on an overlay network in which each edge corresponds to a direct unicast path between two group members. ALM protocols differ in, among other aspects, the topology of the underlying overlay network (e.g., tree, mesh or ring). Ring-based ALM protocols have the advantages of providing a constant node degree, and enabling the implementation of reliable and totally-ordered message delivery through the use of a ring with a token that contains ordering and flow control information. In addition, a ring overlay network topology is inherently reliable to single node failures. In this paper, we provide a survey and a taxonomy of several ring-building group communication protocols. Investigating the major characteristics of ring-building network protocols is an important step towards understanding which of them are suitable for command and control group communications.

  20. Joint working group compliance on the Kyoto protocol: an overview of suggestions on compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addink, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Annex II of Decision 8/CP.4 from COP4 on "Preparation for the first session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol" established a joint working group (JWG) on compliance under the SBI and SBSTA.3 Because of the relation between the legal and the

  1. Compliance With Protocols for Prevention of Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Sepsis: Practicalities and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyn L. Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare two protocols for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP against neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS sepsis, with respect to staff compliance, in a prospective cohort study in the obstetric units of a community hospital (A and a university teaching hospital (B.

  2. Comparison of real-time PCR protocols in detection and quantification of fruit tree 16SrX group phytoplasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss Tomas; Necas Tomas; Necasova Jana

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two real-time PCR protocols based on intercalating dye and two on hydrolysis probes were tested using field collected fruit tree samples infected by 16SrX group (AP, PD and ESFY) phytoplasmas. Specificity and sensitivity of protocols and amplification efficiency were the main testing parameters. Results of real-time PCR protocols were compared to nested PCR. All real-time PCR protocols confirmed their specificity of detection. All real-time PC...

  3. A New Scalable and Reliable Cost Effective Key Agreement Protocol for Secure Group Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Begum

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In a heterogeneous environment, for a secure multicast communication, the group members have to share a secret key which is used to encrypt/decrypt the secret messages among the members. The Secure Group Communication of large scale multicast group in a dynamic environment is more complex than securing one-to-one communication due to the inherent scalability issue of group key management. Since the group members are dynamic in nature such as joining or leaving the group, the key updating is performed among the valid members without interrupting the multicast session so that non group members can’t have access to the future renewed keys. Approach: The main aim is to develop a scheme which can reduce the cost of computational overhead, number of messages needed during the time of key refreshing and the number of keys stored in servers and members. The cost of establishing the key and renewal is proportionate to the size of the group and subsequently fetches a bottleneck performance in achieving scalability. By using a Cluster Based Hierarchical Key Distribution Protocol, the load of key management can be shared among dummy nodes of a cluster without revealing the group messages to them. Results: Especially, the existing model incurs a very less computational and communication overhead during renewal of keys. The proposed scheme yields better scalability because of the fact that the Key computational cost, the keys stored in key server and numbers of rekey-messages needed are very less. Conclusion: Our proposed protocol is based on Elliptic curve cryptography algorithm to form secure group key, even with smaller key size, it is capable of providing more security. This protocol can be used both in wired or wireless environments.

  4. Group hypnotherapy versus group relaxation for smoking cessation: an RCT study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson-Spillmann Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of smokers would like to stop smoking. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of pharmacological smoking cessation treatments, many smokers are unwilling to use them; however, they are inclined to try alternative methods. Hypnosis has a long-standing reputation in smoking cessation therapy, but its efficacy has not been scientifically proven. We designed this randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effects of group hypnosis as a method for smoking cessation, and we will compare the results of group hypnosis with group relaxation. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial (RCT to compare the efficacy of a single session of hypnosis with that of relaxation performed in groups of 8-15 smokers. We intend to include at least 220 participants in our trial. The inclusion criteria include smoking at least 5 cigarettes per day, not using other cessation methods and being willing to quit smoking. The intervention is performed by a trained hypnotist/relaxation therapist. Both groups first receive 40 min of mental preparation that is based on motivational interviewing. Then, a state of deep relaxation is induced in the hypnosis condition, and superficial relaxation is induced in the control condition. Suggestions are made in the hypnosis condition that aim to switch the mental self-image of the participants from that of smokers to that of non-smokers. Each intervention lasts for 40 min. The participants also complete questionnaires that assess their smoking status and symptoms of depression and anxiety at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 months post-intervention. In addition, saliva samples are collected to assess cotinine levels at baseline and at 6 months post-intervention. We also assess nicotine withdrawal symptoms at 2 weeks post-intervention. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this RCT is the first to test the efficacy of group hypnosis versus group relaxation. Issues requiring discussion in the outcome

  5. Earth Observing System Covariance Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of covariance realism is to properly size a primary object's covariance in order to add validity to the calculation of the probability of collision. The covariance realism technique in this paper consists of three parts: collection/calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics. An empirical cumulative distribution function (ECDF) Goodness-of-Fit (GOF) method is employed to determine if a covariance is properly sized by comparing the empirical distribution of Mahalanobis distance calculations to the hypothesized parent 3-DoF chi-squared distribution. To realistically size a covariance for collision probability calculations, this study uses a state noise compensation algorithm that adds process noise to the definitive epoch covariance to account for uncertainty in the force model. Process noise is added until the GOF tests pass a group significance level threshold. The results of this study indicate that when outliers attributed to persistently high or extreme levels of solar activity are removed, the aforementioned covariance realism compensation method produces a tuned covariance with up to 80 to 90% of the covariance propagation timespan passing (against a 60% minimum passing threshold) the GOF tests-a quite satisfactory and useful result.

  6. nPAKE+:A Tree-Based Group Password-Authenticated Key Exchange Protocol Using Different Passwords

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Wan; Robert H. Deng; Feng Bao; Bart Preneel; Ming Gu

    2009-01-01

    Although two-party password-authenticated key exchange (PAKE) protocols have been intensively studied in recent years, group PAKE protocols have received little attention. In this paper, we propose a tree-based group PAKE protocol -- nPAKE+ protocol under the setting where each party shares an independent password with a trusted server. The nPAKE+ protocol is a novel combination of the hierarchical key tree structure and the password-based Diffie-Hellman exchange, and hence it achieves substantial gain in computation efficiency. In particular, the computation cost for each client in our protocol is only O(log n). Additionally, the hierarchical feature of nPAKE+ enables every subgroup to obtain its own subgroup key in the end. We also prove the security of our protocol under the random oracle model and the ideal cipher model.

  7. Results of the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group XIV protocol for classical osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Smeland, Sigbj?rn; Bruland, ?yvind S.; Hjorth, Lars; Brosj?, Otte; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; ?sterlundh, Gustaf; Jakobson, ?ke; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Monge, Odd R; Bj?rk, Olle; Alvegaard, Thor A

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) XIV protocol is based on experience from previous SSG trials and other osteosarcoma intergroup trials, and has been considered the best standard of care for patients with extremity localized, non-metastatic osteosarcoma. We analyzed the outcome in 63 consecutive patients. Patients and methods From 2001 through 2005, 63 patients recruited from centers in Sweden, Norway, and Finland were included. They received preoperative chemotherap...

  8. Performance Evaluation of Two Reactive Routing Protocols of MANET using Group Mobility Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder S. Bindra

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile ad-hoc network is a collection of wireless mobile hosts forming a temporary network without the aid of any stand-alone infrastructure or centralized administration. Mobile ad-hoc network have the attributes such as wireless connection, continuously changing topology, distributed operation and ease of deployment. In this paper we have compared the performance of two reactive MANET routing protocol AODV and DSR by using Group mobility model. Both share similar On-Demand behavior, but the protocol's internal mechanism leads to significant performance difference. We have analyzed the performance of protocols by varying network load, mobility and type of traffic (CBR and TCP. Group Mobility model has been generated by IMPORTANT (Impact of Mobility Patterns on Routing in Ad-hoc NeTwork tool. A detailed simulation has been carried out in NS2. The metrics used for performance analysis are Packet Delivery Fraction, Average end-to-end Delay, Routing Overhead and Normalized Routing Load. It has been observed that AODV gives better performance in CBR traffic and real time delivery of packet. Where as DSR gives better results in TCP traffic and under restricted bandwidth condition.

  9. Covariance Applications with Kiwi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoon, C. M.; Brown, D.; Elliott, J. B.

    2012-05-01

    The Computational Nuclear Physics group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a new tool, named `Kiwi', that is intended as an interface between the covariance data increasingly available in major nuclear reaction libraries (including ENDF and ENDL) and large-scale Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies. Kiwi is designed to integrate smoothly into large UQ studies, using the covariance matrix to generate multiple variations of nuclear data. The code has been tested using critical assemblies as a test case, and is being integrated into LLNL's quality assurance and benchmarking for nuclear data.

  10. Covariance Applications with Kiwi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott J.B.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Computational Nuclear Physics group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is developing a new tool, named ‘Kiwi’, that is intended as an interface between the covariance data increasingly available in major nuclear reaction libraries (including ENDF and ENDL and large-scale Uncertainty Quantification (UQ studies. Kiwi is designed to integrate smoothly into large UQ studies, using the covariance matrix to generate multiple variations of nuclear data. The code has been tested using critical assemblies as a test case, and is being integrated into LLNL's quality assurance and benchmarking for nuclear data.

  11. A Semiautomated Assignment Protocol for Methyl Group Side Chains in Large Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonggul; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Geoffrey; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The developments of biosynthetic specific labeling strategies for side-chain methyl groups have allowed structural and dynamic characterization of very large proteins and protein complexes. However, the assignment of the methyl-group resonances remains an Achilles' heel for NMR, as the experiments designed to correlate side chains to the protein backbone become rather insensitive with the increase of the transverse relaxation rates. In this chapter, we outline a semiempirical approach to assign the resonances of methyl-group side chains in large proteins. This method requires a crystal structure or an NMR ensemble of conformers as an input, together with NMR data sets such as nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), to be implemented in a computational protocol that provides a probabilistic assignment of methyl-group resonances. As an example, we report the protocol used in our laboratory to assign the side chains of the 42-kDa catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Although we emphasize the labeling of isoleucine, leucine, and valine residues, this method is applicable to other methyl group side chains such as those of alanine, methionine, and threonine, as well as reductively methylated cysteine side chains.

  12. On the new member's subsecret distribution protocol in dynamic group secret-sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng; WANG Wei-nong

    2005-01-01

    Secret-sharing is a common method to protect important data, such as the private key of a public-key system. Dynamic Group Secret-sharing (DGS) is a system where all of the members in a group hold a subsecret of the key information and where the number of members in the group is variable. This kind of secret-sharing is broadly used in many special distribution systems, such as Self-secure Ad-hoc Network. Distributing this subsecret to a new member when he enters the group is the common method that ensures all the members participate in the same secret-sharing. However, no' atisfactory subsecret distribution scheme exists at present. This paper proposes a new protocol that tries to satisfy both security and efficiency.

  13. Public key cryptosystem and a key exchange protocol using tools of non-abelian group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Pathak,

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Public Key Cryptosystems assure privacy as well as integrity of the transactions between two parties. The sizes of the keys play an important role. The larger the key the harder is to crack a block ofencrypted data. We propose a new public key cryptosystem and a Key Exchange Protocol based on the generalization of discrete logarithm problem using Non-abelian group of block upper triangular matrices of higher order. The proposed cryptosystem is efficient in producing keys of large sizes without the need of large primes. The security of both the systems relies on the difficulty of discrete logarithms over finite fields.

  14. Recommended protocols for the liver micronucleus test: Report of the IWGT working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Morita, Takeshi; Luijten, Mirjam; Beevers, Carol; Hamada, Shuichi; Itoh, Satoru; Ohyama, Wakako; Takasawa, Hironao

    2015-05-01

    At the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT), the liver micronucleus test working group discussed practical aspects of the in vivo rodent liver micronucleus test (LMNT). The group members focused on the three methodologies currently used, i.e., a partial hepatectomy (PH) method, a juvenile/young rat (JR) method, and a repeated-dose (RD) method in adult rodents. Since the liver is the main organ that metabolizes chemicals, the LMNT is expected to detect clastogens, especially those that need metabolic activation in the liver, and aneugens. Based on current data the three methods seem to have a high sensitivity and specificity, but more data, especially on non-genotoxic but toxic substances, would be needed to fully evaluate the test performance. The three methods can be combined with the micronucleus test (MNT) using bone marrow (BM) and/or peripheral blood (PB). The ability of the PH method to detect both clastogens and aneugens has already been established, but the methodology is technically challenging. The JR method is relatively straightforward, but animal metabolism might not be fully comparable to adult animals, and data on aneugens are limited. These two methods also have the advantage of a short testing period. The RD method is also straightforward and can be integrated into repeated-dose (e.g. 2 or 4 weeks) toxicity studies, but again data on aneugens are limited. The working group concluded that the LMNT could be used as a second in vivo test when a relevant positive result in in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity tests is noted (especially under the condition of metabolic activation), and a negative result is observed in the in vivo BM/PB-MNT. The group members discussed LMNT protocols and reached consensus about many aspects of test procedures. However, data gaps as mentioned above remain, and further data are needed to fully establish the LMNT protocol.

  15. Estimating Cosmological Parameter Covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Andy

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the bias and error in estimates of the cosmological parameter covariance matrix, due to sampling or modelling the data covariance matrix, for likelihood width and peak scatter estimators. We show that these estimators do not coincide unless the data covariance is exactly known. For sampled data covariances, with Gaussian distributed data and parameters, the parameter covariance matrix estimated from the width of the likelihood has a Wishart distribution, from which we derive the mean and covariance. This mean is biased and we propose an unbiased estimator of the parameter covariance matrix. Comparing our analytic results to a numerical Wishart sampler of the data covariance matrix we find excellent agreement. An accurate ansatz for the mean parameter covariance for the peak scatter estimator is found, and we fit its covariance to our numerical analysis. The mean is again biased and we propose an unbiased estimator for the peak parameter covariance. For sampled data covariances the width estimat...

  16. Gender and age groups interactions in the quantification of bone marrow fat content in lumbar spine using 3T MR spectroscopy: A multivariate analysis of covariance (Mancova)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto, E-mail: ernest.roldan@usa.net [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Mexico City (Mexico); Piña-Jimenez, Carlos [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Mexico City (Mexico); Favila, Rafael [GE Healthcare, Mexico City (Mexico); Rios, Camilo [Neurochemistry Department, Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: There is an age-related conversion of red to yellow bone marrow in the axial skeleton, with a gender-related difference less well established. Our purpose was to clarify the variability of bone marrow fat fraction (FF) in the lumbar spine due to the interaction of gender and age groups. Methods: 44 healthy volunteers (20 males, 30–65 years old and 24 females, 30–69 years old) underwent 3T magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and conventional MRI examination of the lumbar spine; single-voxel spectrum was acquired for each vertebral body (VB). After controlling body mass index (BMI), a two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) assessed the gender and age group differences in FF quantification for each lumbar VB. Results: There was a significant interaction between gender and age group, p = .017, with a large effect size (partial η{sup 2} = .330). However the interaction explained only 33% of the observed variance. Main effects were not statistically significant. BMI was non-significantly related to FF quantification. Conclusions: Young males showed a high FF content, which declined in the 4th decade, then increased the next 3 decades to reach a FF content just below the initial FF means. Females’ FF were low in the 3rd decade, depicted an accelerated increase in the 4th decade, then a gradual increase the next 3 decades to reach a FF content similar to males’ values. Our findings suggest that quantification of bone marrow FF using MRS might be used as a surrogate biomarker of bone marrow activity in clinical settings.

  17. Design of IP Camera Access Control Protocol by Utilizing Hierarchical Group Key

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Kang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Unlike CCTV, security video surveillance devices, which we have generally known about, IP cameras which are connected to a network either with or without wire, provide monitoring services through a built-in web-server. Due to the fact that IP cameras can use a network such as the Internet, multiple IP cameras can be installed at a long distance and each IP camera can utilize the function of a web server individually. Even though IP cameras have this kind of advantage, it has difficulties in access control management and weakness in user certification, too. Particularly, because the market of IP cameras did not begin to be realized a long while ago, systems which are systematized from the perspective of security have not been built up yet. Additionally, it contains severe weaknesses in terms of access authority to the IP camera web server, certification of users, and certification of IP cameras which are newly installed within a network, etc. This research grouped IP cameras hierarchically to manage them systematically, and provided access control and data confidentiality between groups by utilizing group keys. In addition, IP cameras and users are certified by using PKI-based certification, and weak points of security such as confidentiality and integrity, etc., are improved by encrypting passwords. Thus, this research presents specific protocols of the entire process and proved through experiments that this method can be actually applied.

  18. A Video Recording and Viewing Protocol for Student Group Presentations: Assisting Self-Assessment through a Wiki Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Shane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to firstly develop a protocol for video recording student group oral presentations, for later viewing and self-assessment by student group members. Secondly, evaluations of students' experiences of this process were undertaken to determine if this self-assessment method was a positive experience for them in gaining…

  19. Group differences in physician responses to handheld presentation of clinical evidence: a verbal protocol analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlovic Nada J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify individual differences in physicians' needs for the presentation of evidence resources and preferences for mobile devices. Methods Within-groups analysis of responses to semi-structured interviews. Interviews consisted of using prototypes in response to task-based scenarios. The prototypes were implemented on two different form factors: a tablet style PC and a pocketPC. Participants were from three user groups: general internists, family physicians and medicine residents, and from two different settings: urban and semi-urban. Verbal protocol analysis, which consists of coding utterances, was conducted on the transcripts of the testing sessions. Statistical relationships were investigated between staff physicians' and residents' background variables, self-reported experiences with the interfaces, and verbal code frequencies. Results 47 physicians were recruited from general internal medicine, family practice clinics and a residency training program. The mean age of participants was 42.6 years. Physician specialty had a greater effect on device and information-presentation preferences than gender, age, setting or previous technical experience. Family physicians preferred the screen size of the tablet computer and were less concerned about its portability. Residents liked the screen size of the tablet, but preferred the portability of the pocketPC. Internists liked the portability of the pocketPC, but saw less advantage to the large screen of the tablet computer (F[2,44] = 4.94, p = .012. Conclusion Different types of physicians have different needs and preferences for evidence-based resources and handheld devices. This study shows how user testing can be incorporated into the process of design to inform group-based customization.

  20. Covariant Projective Extensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许天周; 梁洁

    2003-01-01

    @@ The theory of crossed products of C*-algebras by groups of automorphisms is a well-developed area of the theory of operator algebras. Given the importance and the success ofthat theory, it is natural to attempt to extend it to a more general situation by, for example,developing a theory of crossed products of C*-algebras by semigroups of automorphisms, or evenof endomorphisms. Indeed, in recent years a number of papers have appeared that are concernedwith such non-classicaltheories of covariance algebras, see, for instance [1-3].

  1. Exploring Treatment by Covariate Interactions Using Subgroup Analysis and Meta-Regression in Cochrane Reviews: A Review of Recent Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donegan, Sarah; Williams, Lisa; Tudur-Smith, Catrin

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment by covariate interactions can be explored in reviews using interaction analyses (e.g., subgroup analysis). Such analyses can provide information on how the covariate modifies the treatment effect and is an important methodological approach for personalising medicine. Guidance exists regarding how to apply such analyses but little is known about whether authors follow the guidance. Methods Using published recommendations, we developed criteria to assess how well interaction analyses were designed, applied, interpreted, and reported. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched (8th August 2013). We applied the criteria to the most recently published review, with an accessible protocol, for each Cochrane Review Group. We excluded review updates, diagnostic test accuracy reviews, withdrawn reviews, and overviews of reviews. Data were summarised regarding reviews, covariates, and analyses. Results Each of the 52 included reviews planned or did interaction analyses; 51 reviews (98%) planned analyses and 33 reviews (63%) applied analyses. The type of analysis planned and the type subsequently applied (e.g., sensitivity or subgroup analysis) was discrepant in 24 reviews (46%). No review reported how or why each covariate had been chosen; 22 reviews (42%) did state each covariate a priori in the protocol but no review identified each post-hoc covariate as such. Eleven reviews (21%) mentioned five covariates or less. One review reported planning to use a method to detect interactions (i.e., interaction test) for each covariate; another review reported applying the method for each covariate. Regarding interpretation, only one review reported whether an interaction was detected for each covariate and no review discussed the importance, or plausibility, of the results, or the possibility of confounding for each covariate. Conclusions Interaction analyses in Cochrane Reviews can be substantially improved. The proposed criteria can be used to

  2. Exploring treatment by covariate interactions using subgroup analysis and meta-regression in cochrane reviews: a review of recent practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Donegan

    Full Text Available Treatment by covariate interactions can be explored in reviews using interaction analyses (e.g., subgroup analysis. Such analyses can provide information on how the covariate modifies the treatment effect and is an important methodological approach for personalising medicine. Guidance exists regarding how to apply such analyses but little is known about whether authors follow the guidance.Using published recommendations, we developed criteria to assess how well interaction analyses were designed, applied, interpreted, and reported. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched (8th August 2013. We applied the criteria to the most recently published review, with an accessible protocol, for each Cochrane Review Group. We excluded review updates, diagnostic test accuracy reviews, withdrawn reviews, and overviews of reviews. Data were summarised regarding reviews, covariates, and analyses.Each of the 52 included reviews planned or did interaction analyses; 51 reviews (98% planned analyses and 33 reviews (63% applied analyses. The type of analysis planned and the type subsequently applied (e.g., sensitivity or subgroup analysis was discrepant in 24 reviews (46%. No review reported how or why each covariate had been chosen; 22 reviews (42% did state each covariate a priori in the protocol but no review identified each post-hoc covariate as such. Eleven reviews (21% mentioned five covariates or less. One review reported planning to use a method to detect interactions (i.e., interaction test for each covariate; another review reported applying the method for each covariate. Regarding interpretation, only one review reported whether an interaction was detected for each covariate and no review discussed the importance, or plausibility, of the results, or the possibility of confounding for each covariate.Interaction analyses in Cochrane Reviews can be substantially improved. The proposed criteria can be used to help guide the reporting and

  3. Multi-group covariance and mean structure modeling of the relationship between the WAIS-III common factors and sex and educational attainment in Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolan, C.V.; Colom, R.; Abad, F.J.; Wicherts, J.M.; Hessen, D.J.; van de Sluis, S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated sex effects and the effects of educational attainment (EA) on the covariance structure of the WAIS-III in a subsample of the Spanish standardization data. We fitted both first order common factor models and second order common factor models. The latter include general intelligence (g

  4. Distillation Protocols for Mixed States of Multilevel Qubits and the Quantum Renormalization Group

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Delgado, M A

    2003-01-01

    We study several properties of distillation protocols to purify multilevel qubit states (qudits) when applied to a certain family of initial mixed bipartite states. We find that it is possible to use qudits states to increase the stability region obtained with the flow equations to distill qubits. In particular, for qutrits we get the phase diagram of the distillation process with a rich structure of fixed points. We investigate the large-$D$ limit of qudits protocols and find an analytical solution in the continuum limit. The general solution of the distillation recursion relations is presented in an appendix. We stress the notion of weight amplification for distillation protocols as opposed to the quantum amplitude amplification that appears in the Grover algorithm. Likewise, we investigate the relations between quantum distillation and quantum renormalization processes.

  5. The protocols for the 10/66 dementia research group population-based research programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Martin; Ferri, Cleusa P; Acosta, Daisy; Albanese, Emiliano; Arizaga, Raul; Dewey, Michael; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, KS; Krishnamoorthy, ES; McKeigue, Paul; Rodriguez, Juan Llibre; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Sousa, Renata MM; Stewart, Robert; Uwakwe, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Latin America, China and India are experiencing unprecedentedly rapid demographic ageing with an increasing number of people with dementia. The 10/66 Dementia Research Group's title refers to the 66% of people with dementia that live in developing countries and the less than one tenth of population-based research carried out in those settings. This paper describes the protocols for the 10/66 population-based and intervention studies that aim to redress this imbalance. Methods/design Cross-sectional comprehensive one phase surveys have been conducted of all residents aged 65 and over of geographically defined catchment areas in ten low and middle income countries (India, China, Nigeria, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Brazil, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru and Argentina), with a sample size of between 1000 and 3000 (generally 2000). Each of the studies uses the same core minimum data set with cross-culturally validated assessments (dementia diagnosis and subtypes, mental disorders, physical health, anthropometry, demographics, extensive non communicable disease risk factor questionnaires, disability/functioning, health service utilisation, care arrangements and caregiver strain). Nested within the population based studies is a randomised controlled trial of a caregiver intervention for people with dementia and their families (ISRCTN41039907; ISRCTN41062011; ISRCTN95135433; ISRCTN66355402; ISRCTN93378627; ISRCTN94921815). A follow up of 2.5 to 3.5 years will be conducted in 7 countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru and Argentina) to assess risk factors for incident dementia, stroke and all cause and cause-specific mortality; verbal autopsy will be used to identify causes of death. Discussion The 10/66 DRG baseline population-based studies are nearly complete. The incidence phase will be completed in 2009. All investigators are committed to establish an anonymised file sharing archive with monitored public access. Our aim is to create an

  6. Enhancing the early home learning environment through a brief group parenting intervention: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The quality of the home learning environment has a significant influence on children’s language and communication skills during the early years with children from disadvantaged families disproportionately affected. This paper describes the protocol and participant baseline characteristics of a community-based effectiveness study. It evaluates the effects of ‘smalltalk’, a brief group parenting intervention (with or without home coaching) on the quality of the early childhood home l...

  7. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  8. Covariant Hamiltonian field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Giachetta, G; Sardanashvily, G

    1999-01-01

    We study the relationship between the equations of first order Lagrangian field theory on fiber bundles and the covariant Hamilton equations on the finite-dimensional polysymplectic phase space of covariant Hamiltonian field theory. The main peculiarity of these Hamilton equations lies in the fact that, for degenerate systems, they contain additional gauge fixing conditions. We develop the BRST extension of the covariant Hamiltonian formalism, characterized by a Lie superalgebra of BRST and anti-BRST symmetries.

  9. Stability of covariance matrix for generalized transmission control protocol flow control equations%推广形式传输控制协议流量控制方程的方差稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊华; 山秀明; 任勇; 袁坚

    2011-01-01

    给定计算机网络中的传输控制协议(transmission control protocol,TCP)流量控制算法,如何确定其稳定域,是网络设计中的一个重要问题.由于网络上控制算法受大量随机因素影响,这相当于对一个由随机微分/差分方程描述的控制系统进行稳定性分析.目前已有研究大多直接对系统方程取期望,转为讨论期望的稳定性,而简单忽略受控TCP流的随机震荡.本文意在指出这种随机震荡给稳定性带来的不可忽视的影响.本文以TCP/RED(含早期随机检测的TCP流)系统为例,首先,从系统的随机微分方程出发,通过在平衡点处线性化,将系统化为含加乘混合噪声的多维线性时不变系统.然后,给出了分别对应时间连续与离散情况的推广的TCP流量控制方程,即含多噪声源的一次时不变随机微分/差分方程组.接着,对此推广形式,推导了其协方差矩阵所满足的矩阵方程,并在此基础上,得到了协方差矩阵极限渐近稳定的充要条件以及此极限的计算公式.在工程设计中,此条件可以作为系统稳定与否的一个替代判据,方差极限公式可用来估计系统的运动范围.最后,将一般公式应用到具体例子上,展示了考虑方差稳定性后系统稳定域的变化.进一步,仿照确定性系统中的处理方法,本文结论还可推广到非线性系统及时变系统.%Given the Transmission Control Protocol(TCP) flow control algorithm in a computer network, how to calculate its stability range is an important problem in the design of computer network. Because the control algorithm is affected by many random factors in the network, solving this problem means doing stability analysis for the system described by stochastic differential/difference equations. Current studies mostly take the expectations on both sides of the system equation directly, and simplify this problem into the stability analysis for the expectation, which simply

  10. The EMCDDA/Pompidou Group treatment demand indicator protocol: a European core item set for treatment monitoring and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R; Donmall, M; Hartnoll, R; Kokkevi, A; Ouwehand, A W; Stauffacher, M; Vicente, J

    1999-12-01

    Over the last decades inside and outside of Europe, treatment-based data have been used in epidemiological research on drugs and drug abuse. They offer information on hidden populations and allow to follow socially stigmatised behaviour. As this type of research can be done on rather low budgets, there are long-term projects run in many countries. Experts from the national systems in several EU member states have been working together to develop a common standard on the basis of the Pompidou Group (PG) Definitive Protocol. The items and basic definitions of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA)/PG Treatment Demand Indicator Protocol are described, which plays an important role in the process of harmonisation of data collection for the EMCDDA. Implementation strategies are described, and future steps are discussed.

  11. A Group Key Management Protocol Based on Weight-Balanced 2-3 Tree for Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Lin; Xia, Feng; Wu, Guowei; Lin, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Multicast in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is an attractive mechanism for delivering data to multiple receivers as it saves bandwidth. To guarantee the security of multicast, the group key is used to encrypt and decrypt the packages. However, providing key management services in WSNs is complicated because sensor nodes possess limited resources of computing, storage and communication. To address the balance between security and limited resources, a multicast group key management protocol based on the weight-balanced 2-3 tree is proposed to generate, distribute, and update the group key securely and efficiently. The decentralized group key management method is employed. A weight-balanced 2-3 key tree is formed in every subgroup. Instead of using the conventional symmetric and non-symmetric encryption algorithms, the Maximum Distance Separable (MDS) code technique is used to distribute the multicast key dynamically. During the key updating, a series of adjustment rules are summarized to keep the tree weight-b...

  12. Covariant w∞ gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Pope, C.N.; Stelle, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the notion of higher-spin covariance in w∞ gravity. We show how a recently proposed covariant w∞ gravity action can be obtained from non-chiral w∞ gravity by making field redefinitions that introduce new gauge-field components with corresponding new gauge transformations.

  13. [Development of clinical trial education program for pharmaceutical science students through small group discussion and role-playing using protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imakyure, Osamu; Shuto, Hideki; Nishikawa, Fumi; Hagiwara, Yoshifuka; Inoue, Sachiko; Koyanagi, Taeko; Hirakawa, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2010-08-01

    The acquirement of basic knowledge of clinical trials and professional attitude in their practices is a general instructional objective in the Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education. Unfortunately, the previous program of clinical trial education was not effective in the acquirement of a professional attitude in their practices. Then, we developed the new clinical trial education program using protocol through small group discussion (SGD) and roll-playing. Our program consists of 7 steps of practical training. In step 1, the students find some problems after presentation of the protocol including case and prescription. In step 2, they analyse the extracted problems and share the information obtained in SGD. In steps 3 and 5, five clinical case scenarios are presented to the students and they discuss which case is suitable for entry to the clinical trial or which case corresponds to the discontinuance criteria in the present designed protocol. In steps 4 and 6, the roll-playing is performed by teachers and students as doctors and clinical research coordinators (CRC) respectively. Further, we conducted a trial practice based on this program for the students. In the student's self-evaluation into five grades, the average score of the skill acquisition level in each step was 3.8-4.7 grade. Our clinical trial education program could be effective in educating the candidates for CRC or clinical pharmacists.

  14. Effectiveness of group reminiscence for improving wellbeing of institutionalized elderly adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Scaratti, Chiara; Morganti, Luca; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Agostoni, Monica; Spatola, Chiara A M; Molinari, Enrico; Cipresso, Pietro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-10-25

    Group reminiscence therapy is a brief and structured intervention in which participants share personal past events with peers. This approach has been shown to be promising for improving wellbeing and reducing depressive symptoms among institutionalized older adults. However, despite the considerable interest in reminiscence group therapy, controlled studies to determine its specific benefits as compared to generic social interactions with peers (group conversations about everyday subjects) are still lacking. We have designed a randomized controlled trial aimed at comparing the effects of group reminiscence therapy with those of group recreational activity on the psychological wellbeing of an institutionalized sample of older adults. The study includes two groups of 20 hospitalized elderly participants: the experimental group and the control group. Participants included in the experimental group will receive six sessions of group reminiscence therapy, while the control group will participate in a recreational group discussion. A repeated-measures design will be used post-intervention and three months post-intervention to evaluate changes in self-reported outcome measures of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and quality of life from baseline. The protocol of a study aimed at examining the specific effects of group reminiscence therapy on psychological wellbeing, depression, and quality of life among institutionalized elderly people is described. It is expected that the outcomes of this trial will contribute to our knowledge about the process of group reminiscence, evaluate its effectiveness in improving psychological wellbeing of institutionalized individuals, and identify the best conditions for optimizing this approach. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (registration number: NCT02077153) on 31 January 2014.

  15. Efficiently Delivering Data Packets Using Distributed Protocol for Runtime Groups Formed In Peer-to-Peer Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasa Ramya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Peer-to-Peer streaming has been widely used over the internet, where a streaming system usually has multiple channels and peers may form multiple groups for content distribution. In this paper, we propose a distributed overlay framework called SMesh (subset-mesh for dynamic groups where users may frequently hop from one group to another. SMesh first builds a relatively stable mesh consisting of all hosts for control messaging. The mesh supports dynamic host joining and leaving, and construction of delivery trees. Using the Delaunay Triangulation protocol as an example, we show how to construct an efficient mesh with low maintenance cost. We also study about various tree constructions based on the mesh, including embedded, bypass, and intermediate trees.

  16. Earth Observing System Covariance Realism Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda Romero, Juan A.; Miguel, Fred

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will be given at the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meetings June 13-15, 2017 to discuss the Earth Observing System Covariance Realism updates.

  17. The effectiveness of a health promotion with group intervention by clinical trial. Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo Osaba Maria-Antonia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The promotion of health and the interventions in community health continue to be one of the pending subjects of our health system. The most prevalent health problems (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes... are for the most part related to life habits. We propose a holistic and integral approach as the best option for tackling behavior and its determinants. The research team has elaborated the necessary educational material to realize group teaching, which we call "Health Workshops". The goal of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of these Health Workshops in the following terms: Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL, incorporate and maintain a balanced diet, do physical activity regularly, maintain risk factors such as tension, weight, cholesterol within normal limits and diminish cardiovascular risk. Methods/Design Controlled and random clinical testing, comparing a group of persons who have participated in the Health Workshops with a control group of similar characteristics who have not participated in the Health Workshops. Field of study: the research is being done in Health Centers of the city of Barcelona, Spain. Population studied: The group is composed of 108 persons that are actually doing the Health Workshops, and 108 that are not and form the control group. They are assigned at random to one group or the other. Data Analysis: With Student's t-distribution test to compare the differences between numerical variables or their non parametric equivalent if the variable does not comply with the criteria of normality. (Kolmogorov-Smirnof test. Chi-square test to compare the differences between categorical variables and the Logistic Regression Model to analyze different meaningful variables by dichotomous analysis related to the intervention. Discussion The Health Workshop proposed in the present study constitutes an innovative approach in health promotion, placing the emphasis on the person's self

  18. A new two-round dynamic authenticated contributory group key agreement protocol using elliptic curve Diffie–Hellman with privacy preserving public key infrastructure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vankamamidi S Naresh; Nistala V E S Murthy

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new two-round authenticated contributory group key agreement based on Elliptic Curve Diffie–Hellman protocol with Privacy Preserving Public Key Infrastructure (PP-PKI) is introduced and is extended to a dynamic authenticated contributory group key agreement with join and leave protocols for dynamic groups. The proposed protocol provides such security attributes as forward secrecy, backward secrecy, and defense against man in the middle (MITM) and Unknown keyshare security attacks and also authentication along with privacy preserving attributes like anonymity, traceability and unlinkability. In the end, they are compared with other popular Diffie–Hellman and Elliptic Curve Diffie–Hellman based group key agreement protocols and the results are found to be satisfactory.

  19. Estimation of multi-group cross section covariances for {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Saint Jean, C.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Litaize, O.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Leray, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology used to estimate multi-group covariances for some major isotopes used in reactor physics. The starting point of this evaluation is the modelling of the neutron induced reactions based on nuclear reaction models with parameters. These latest are the vectors of uncertainties as they are absorbing uncertainties and correlation arising from the confrontation of nuclear reaction model to microscopic experiment. These uncertainties are then propagated towards multi-group cross sections. As major breakthroughs were then asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications, a solution is proposed by the use of integral experiment information at two different stages in the covariance estimation. In this paper, we will explain briefly the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) as well as those coming from validation of nuclear data on dedicated integral experiment (nuclear data oriented). We will illustrate the use of this methodology with various isotopes such as {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al. (authors)

  20. Palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busolo, David; Woodgate, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review is to synthesize the best available evidence on palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups.More specifically, this systematic review seeks to answer the following questions:1. What are the palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from diverse ethnocultural groups?2. What meanings do adult patients with cancer from diverse ethnocultural groups assign to their experiences with palliative care? Globally, over 20.4 million people need palliative care services annually. The majority of these people (19 million) are adults, with 34% of them being patients diagnosed with cancer. With the current increase in the aging population, especially in developed countries, the number of adults requiring palliative care is expected to rise. Furthermore, how palliative care is offered and received continues to be shaped by culture and ethnicity. Likewise, culture and ethnicity influence how palliative care patients experience diseases like cancer, and seek and utilize palliative care services. Also, healthcare providers sometimes find it challenging to address the palliative care needs of patients from different ethnocultural groups. Sometimes these challenges are believed to be due to cultural incompetence of the care provider. When palliative care patients and their providers differ in their perception of care needs and how to address them, negative palliative care experiences are likely to ensue. Therefore, as the demand for palliative care increases, and ethnocultural factors continue to affect palliation, it is important to gain a better understanding of palliative care experiences of patients from different ethnocultural groups.The terms culture and ethnicity have been defined and used differently in literature which sometimes lead to confusion. Ethnicity has been defined as distinctive shared origins or social backgrounds and traditions of a group of people that are maintained between generations and

  1. Covariance mapping techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  2. Covariant Bardeen perturbation formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitenti, S. D. P.; Falciano, F. T.; Pinto-Neto, N.

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work we obtained a set of necessary conditions for the linear approximation in cosmology. Here we discuss the relations of this approach with the so-called covariant perturbations. It is often argued in the literature that one of the main advantages of the covariant approach to describe cosmological perturbations is that the Bardeen formalism is coordinate dependent. In this paper we will reformulate the Bardeen approach in a completely covariant manner. For that, we introduce the notion of pure and mixed tensors, which yields an adequate language to treat both perturbative approaches in a common framework. We then stress that in the referred covariant approach, one necessarily introduces an additional hypersurface choice to the problem. Using our mixed and pure tensors approach, we are able to construct a one-to-one map relating the usual gauge dependence of the Bardeen formalism with the hypersurface dependence inherent to the covariant approach. Finally, through the use of this map, we define full nonlinear tensors that at first order correspond to the three known gauge invariant variables Φ, Ψ and Ξ, which are simultaneously foliation and gauge invariant. We then stress that the use of the proposed mixed tensors allows one to construct simultaneously gauge and hypersurface invariant variables at any order.

  3. OrthoSelect: a protocol for selecting orthologous groups in phylogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wörheide Gert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic studies using expressed sequence tags (EST are becoming a standard approach to answer evolutionary questions. Such studies are usually based on large sets of newly generated, unannotated, and error-prone EST sequences from different species. A first crucial step in EST-based phylogeny reconstruction is to identify groups of orthologous sequences. From these data sets, appropriate target genes are selected, and redundant sequences are eliminated to obtain suitable sequence sets as input data for tree-reconstruction software. Generating such data sets manually can be very time consuming. Thus, software tools are needed that carry out these steps automatically. Results We developed a flexible and user-friendly software pipeline, running on desktop machines or computer clusters, that constructs data sets for phylogenomic analyses. It automatically searches assembled EST sequences against databases of orthologous groups (OG, assigns ESTs to these predefined OGs, translates the sequences into proteins, eliminates redundant sequences assigned to the same OG, creates multiple sequence alignments of identified orthologous sequences and offers the possibility to further process this alignment in a last step by excluding potentially homoplastic sites and selecting sufficiently conserved parts. Our software pipeline can be used as it is, but it can also be adapted by integrating additional external programs. This makes the pipeline useful for non-bioinformaticians as well as to bioinformatic experts. The software pipeline is especially designed for ESTs, but it can also handle protein sequences. Conclusion OrthoSelect is a tool that produces orthologous gene alignments from assembled ESTs. Our tests show that OrthoSelect detects orthologs in EST libraries with high accuracy. In the absence of a gold standard for orthology prediction, we compared predictions by OrthoSelect to a manually created and published phylogenomic data

  4. Covariant canonical quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippel, G.M. von [University of Regina, Department of Physics, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Wohlfarth, M.N.R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    We present a manifestly covariant quantization procedure based on the de Donder-Weyl Hamiltonian formulation of classical field theory. This procedure agrees with conventional canonical quantization only if the parameter space is d=1 dimensional time. In d>1 quantization requires a fundamental length scale, and any bosonic field generates a spinorial wave function, leading to the purely quantum-theoretical emergence of spinors as a byproduct. We provide a probabilistic interpretation of the wave functions for the fields, and we apply the formalism to a number of simple examples. These show that covariant canonical quantization produces both the Klein-Gordon and the Dirac equation, while also predicting the existence of discrete towers of identically charged fermions with different masses. Covariant canonical quantization can thus be understood as a ''first'' or pre-quantization within the framework of conventional QFT. (orig.)

  5. Covariant canonical quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hippel, G M; Hippel, Georg M. von; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a manifestly covariant quantization procedure based on the de Donder-Weyl Hamiltonian formulation of classical field theory. Covariant canonical quantization agrees with conventional canonical quantization only if the parameter space is d=1 dimensional time. In d>1 quantization requires a fundamental length scale, and any bosonic field generates a spinorial wave function, leading to the purely quantum-theoretical emergence of spinors as a byproduct. We provide a probabilistic interpretation of the wave functions for the fields, and apply the formalism to a number of simple examples. These show that covariant canonical quantization produces both the Klein-Gordon and the Dirac equation, while also predicting the existence of discrete towers of identically charged fermions with different masses.

  6. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F. Landis

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents a comprehensive approach to filter modeling for generalized covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work that allowed for partitioning of the state space into solve-for'' and consider'' parameters, accounted for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and textita priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator's epoch time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the variance sandpile'' and the sensitivity mosaic,'' and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  7. Validation of a multi-modal treatment protocol for Ewing sarcoma--a report from the polish pediatric oncology group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciborska, Anna; Bilska, Katarzyna; Drabko, Katarzyna; Chaber, Radosław; Sobol, Grażyna; Pogorzała, Monika; Wyrobek, Elżbieta; Połczyńska, Katarzyna; Rogowska, Elżbieta; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Wożniak, Wojciech

    2014-12-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most common paediatric malignant bone tumor. Advances in multi-disciplinary care have resulted in significant improvement in cure rates over the last decades. However, the generalization of those results in countries traditionally excluded from large cooperative trials has yet to be demonstrated. We report the results of modern multi-disciplinary care for patients with ES in Poland. One hundred and thirty-two patients with ES were treated using modern multi-modal therapy during the period 2000-2009. Overall survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods and compared using long-rank test and Cox models. Factors predictive of outcome in our setting were analyzed to identify distinct risk groups that could help identify areas for improvement. The median age at the time of diagnosis was 12.3 years. With a median follow-up of 5.0 years, the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and OS estimates for localized disease were 54.88% and 68.29%, respectively. For patients with metastatic disease, 5-year EFS and OS estimates were 36% and 42%, respectively. There was no correlation between age and stage or site. Patients with localized, non-pelvic disease had better outcome than patients with axial tumors (71% vs. 44%, respectively, P = 0.00073). Treatment failure was associated with stage, pelvic primary, poor histological response, and type of local control. Successful treatment of ES requires optimal systemic and local therapy. We were able to replicate the results of modern multi-modal protocols. Validation of current treatment protocols in countries with more limited cancer treatment resources is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Progress on Nuclear Data Covariances: AFCI-1.2 Covariance Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblozinsky,P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Pigni,M.T.; Talou,P.; Hale,G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G

    2009-09-28

    Improved neutron cross section covariances were produced for 110 materials including 12 light nuclei (coolants and moderators), 78 structural materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Improved covariances were organized into AFCI-1.2 covariance library in 33-energy groups, from 10{sup -5} eV to 19.6 MeV. BNL contributed improved covariance data for the following materials: {sup 23}Na and {sup 55}Mn where more detailed evaluation was done; improvements in major structural materials {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Ni; improved estimates for remaining structural materials and fission products; improved covariances for 14 minor actinides, and estimates of mubar covariances for {sup 23}Na and {sup 56}Fe. LANL contributed improved covariance data for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu including prompt neutron fission spectra and completely new evaluation for {sup 240}Pu. New R-matrix evaluation for {sup 16}O including mubar covariances is under completion. BNL assembled the library and performed basic testing using improved procedures including inspection of uncertainty and correlation plots for each material. The AFCI-1.2 library was released to ANL and INL in August 2009.

  9. Covariantly Quantum Galileon

    CERN Document Server

    Saltas, Ippocratis D

    2016-01-01

    We derive the 1-loop effective action of the cubic Galileon coupled to quantum-gravitational fluctuations in a background and gauge-independent manner, employing the covariant framework of DeWitt and Vilkovisky. Although the bare action respects shift symmetry, the coupling to gravity induces an effective mass to the scalar, of the order of the cosmological constant, as a direct result of the non-flat field-space metric, the latter ensuring the field-reparametrization invariance of the formalism. Within a gauge-invariant regularization scheme, we discover novel, gravitationally induced non-Galileon higher-derivative interactions in the effective action. These terms, previously unnoticed within standard, non-covariant frameworks, are not Planck suppressed. Unless tuned to be sub-dominant, their presence could have important implications for the classical and quantum phenomenology of the theory.

  10. Covariant approximation averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shintani, Eigo; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte-Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in $N_f=2+1$ lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte-Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  11. Using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) with Fallible Covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Steven Andrew; Aguinis, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) is used widely in psychological research implementing nonexperimental designs. However, when covariates are fallible (i.e., measured with error), which is the norm, researchers must choose from among 3 inadequate courses of action: (a) know that the assumption that covariates are perfectly reliable is violated but…

  12. Using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) with Fallible Covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Steven Andrew; Aguinis, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) is used widely in psychological research implementing nonexperimental designs. However, when covariates are fallible (i.e., measured with error), which is the norm, researchers must choose from among 3 inadequate courses of action: (a) know that the assumption that covariates are perfectly reliable is violated but…

  13. 基于CBT组播路由协议的组密钥管理协议分析与改进%Analyses and Improvement on Group Key Management Protocol Based on CBT Multicast Routing Protocol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 邬江兴

    2001-01-01

    In RFC1949,A. Ballardie proposed a method of scalable multicast key distribution based on the Core Based Tree multicast protocol fitting for wide-area IP multicasting. This paper analyses the method deeply,points out that the model can't resist the key compromise of a single member effectively,and proposes two kinds of improvement. One is the distributed generating and distributing group data encryption key,the other one is partitioning the group into subgroups. These improvements can increase the security and lifetime of the group key,and decrease the loss of compromise of a single group key encryption key.

  14. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pradhan; S.A. Brinkman; A. Beatty; A. Maika; E. Satriawan; J. de Ree; A. Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program w

  15. Covariant Magnetic Connection Hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pegoraro, F

    2016-01-01

    In the single fluid, nonrelativistic, ideal-Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma description magnetic field lines play a fundamental role by defining dynamically preserved "magnetic connections" between plasma elements. Here we show how the concept of magnetic connection needs to be generalized in the case of a relativistic MHD description where we require covariance under arbitrary Lorentz transformations. This is performed by defining 2-D {\\it magnetic connection hypersurfaces} in the 4-D Minkowski space. This generalization accounts for the loss of simultaneity between spatially separated events in different frames and is expected to provide a powerful insight into the 4-D geometry of electromagnetic fields when ${\\bf E} \\cdot {\\bf B} = 0$.

  16. Universality of Covariance Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Pillai, Natesh S

    2011-01-01

    We prove the universality of covariance matrices of the form $H_{N \\times N} = {1 \\over N} \\tp{X}X$ where $[X]_{M \\times N}$ is a rectangular matrix with independent real valued entries $[x_{ij}]$ satisfying $\\E \\,x_{ij} = 0$ and $\\E \\,x^2_{ij} = {1 \\over M}$, $N, M\\to \\infty$. Furthermore it is assumed that these entries have sub-exponential tails. We will study the asymptotics in the regime $N/M = d_N \\in (0,\\infty), \\lim_{N\\to \\infty}d_N \

  17. The Covariant Stark Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Land, M C

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the Stark effect, as a first order perturbation of manifestly covariant hydrogen-like bound states. These bound states are solutions to a relativistic Schr\\"odinger equation with invariant evolution parameter, and represent mass eigenstates whose eigenvalues correspond to the well-known energy spectrum of the non-relativistic theory. In analogy to the nonrelativistic case, the off-diagonal perturbation leads to a lifting of the degeneracy in the mass spectrum. In the covariant case, not only do the spectral lines split, but they acquire an imaginary part which is lnear in the applied electric field, thus revealing induced bound state decay in first order perturbation theory. This imaginary part results from the coupling of the external field to the non-compact boost generator. In order to recover the conventional first order Stark splitting, we must include a scalar potential term. This term may be understood as a fifth gauge potential, which compensates for dependence of gauge transformat...

  18. Covariance of the selfdual vector model

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The Poisson algebra between the fields involved in the vectorial selfdual action is obtained by means of the reduced action. The conserved charges associated with the invariance under the inhomogeneous Lorentz group are obtained and its action on the fields. The covariance of the theory is proved using the Schwinger-Dirac algebra. The spin of the excitations is discussed.

  19. Covariant Residual Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Hubeny, Veronika E

    2014-01-01

    A recently explored interesting quantity in AdS/CFT, dubbed 'residual entropy', characterizes the amount of collective ignorance associated with either boundary observers restricted to finite time duration, or bulk observers who lack access to a certain spacetime region. However, the previously-proposed expression for this quantity involving variation of boundary entanglement entropy (subsequently renamed to 'differential entropy') works only in a severely restrictive context. We explain the key limitations, arguing that in general, differential entropy does not correspond to residual entropy. Given that the concept of residual entropy as collective ignorance transcends these limitations, we identify two correspondingly robust, covariantly-defined constructs: a 'strip wedge' associated with boundary observers and a 'rim wedge' associated with bulk observers. These causal sets are well-defined in arbitrary time-dependent asymptotically AdS spacetimes in any number of dimensions. We discuss their relation, spec...

  20. Deriving covariant holographic entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xi; Lewkowycz, Aitor; Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-11-01

    We provide a gravitational argument in favour of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy proposal. In general time-dependent states, the proposal asserts that the entanglement entropy of a region in the boundary field theory is given by a quarter of the area of a bulk extremal surface in Planck units. The main element of our discussion is an implementation of an appropriate Schwinger-Keldysh contour to obtain the reduced density matrix (and its powers) of a given region, as is relevant for the replica construction. We map this contour into the bulk gravitational theory, and argue that the saddle point solutions of these replica geometries lead to a consistent prescription for computing the field theory Rényi entropies. In the limiting case where the replica index is taken to unity, a local analysis suffices to show that these saddles lead to the extremal surfaces of interest. We also comment on various properties of holographic entanglement that follow from this construction.

  1. Deriving covariant holographic entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Xi; Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    We provide a gravitational argument in favour of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy proposal. In general time-dependent states, the proposal asserts that the entanglement entropy of a region in the boundary field theory is given by a quarter of the area of a bulk extremal surface in Planck units. The main element of our discussion is an implementation of an appropriate Schwinger-Keldysh contour to obtain the reduced density matrix (and its powers) of a given region, as is relevant for the replica construction. We map this contour into the bulk gravitational theory, and argue that the saddle point solutions of these replica geometries lead to a consistent prescription for computing the field theory Renyi entropies. In the limiting case where the replica index is taken to unity, a local analysis suffices to show that these saddles lead to the extremal surfaces of interest. We also comment on various properties of holographic entanglement that follow from this construction.

  2. Covariant Macroscopic Quantum Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Craig J

    2012-01-01

    A covariant noncommutative algebra of position operators is presented, and interpreted as the macroscopic limit of a geometry that describes a collective quantum behavior of the positions of massive bodies in a flat emergent space-time. The commutator defines a quantum-geometrical relationship between world lines that depends on their separation and relative velocity, but on no other property of the bodies, and leads to a transverse uncertainty of the geometrical wave function that increases with separation. The number of geometrical degrees of freedom in a space-time volume scales holographically, as the surface area in Planck units. Ongoing branching of the wave function causes fluctuations in transverse position, shared coherently among bodies with similar trajectories. The theory can be tested using appropriately configured Michelson interferometers.

  3. Covariantly quantum Galileon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Vitagliano, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    We derive the 1-loop effective action of the cubic Galileon coupled to quantum-gravitational fluctuations in a background and gauge-independent manner, employing the covariant framework of DeWitt and Vilkovisky. Although the bare action respects shift symmetry, the coupling to gravity induces an effective mass to the scalar, of the order of the cosmological constant, as a direct result of the nonflat field-space metric, the latter ensuring the field-reparametrization invariance of the formalism. Within a gauge-invariant regularization scheme, we discover novel, gravitationally induced non-Galileon higher-derivative interactions in the effective action. These terms, previously unnoticed within standard, noncovariant frameworks, are not Planck suppressed. Unless tuned to be subdominant, their presence could have important implications for the classical and quantum phenomenology of the theory.

  4. Covariant holographic entanglement negativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Sengupta, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    We conjecture a holographic prescription for the covariant entanglement negativity of $d$-dimensional conformal field theories dual to non static bulk $AdS_{d+1}$ gravitational configurations in the framework of the $AdS/CFT$ correspondence. Application of our conjecture to a $AdS_3/CFT_2$ scenario involving bulk rotating BTZ black holes exactly reproduces the entanglement negativity of the corresponding $(1+1)$ dimensional conformal field theories and precisely captures the distillable quantum entanglement. Interestingly our conjecture for the scenario involving dual bulk extremal rotating BTZ black holes also accurately leads to the entanglement negativity for the chiral half of the corresponding $(1+1)$ dimensional conformal field theory at zero temperature.

  5. Bayes linear covariance matrix adjustment

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Darren J

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, a Bayes linear methodology for the adjustment of covariance matrices is presented and discussed. A geometric framework for quantifying uncertainties about covariance matrices is set up, and an inner-product for spaces of random matrices is motivated and constructed. The inner-product on this space captures aspects of our beliefs about the relationship between covariance matrices of interest to us, providing a structure rich enough for us to adjust beliefs about unknown matrices in the light of data such as sample covariance matrices, exploiting second-order exchangeability and related specifications to obtain representations allowing analysis. Adjustment is associated with orthogonal projection, and illustrated with examples of adjustments for some common problems. The problem of adjusting the covariance matrices underlying exchangeable random vectors is tackled and discussed. Learning about the covariance matrices associated with multivariate time series dynamic linear models is shown to be a...

  6. A comparison of covariance structure in wild and laboratory muroid crania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamniczky, Heather A; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2009-06-01

    Mutations have the ability to produce dramatic changes to covariance structure by altering the variance of covariance-generating developmental processes. Several evolutionary mechanisms exist that may be acting interdependently to stabilize covariance structure, despite this developmental potential for variation within species. We explore covariance structure in the crania of laboratory mouse mutants exhibiting mild-to-significant developmental perturbations of the cranium, and contrast it with covariance structure in related wild muroid taxa. Phenotypic covariance structure is conserved among wild muroidea, but highly variable and mutation-dependent within the laboratory group. We show that covariance structures in natural populations of related species occupy a more restricted portion of covariance structure space than do the covariance structures resulting from single mutations of significant effect or the almost nonexistent genetic differences that separate inbred mouse strains. Our results suggest that developmental constraint is not the primary mechanism acting to stabilize covariance structure, and imply a more important role for other mechanisms.

  7. Covariant Quantum Gravity with Continuous Quantum Geometry I: Covariant Hamiltonian Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Pilc, Marián

    2016-01-01

    The first part of the series is devoted to the formulation of the Einstein-Cartan Theory within the covariant hamiltonian framework. In the first section the general multisymplectic approach is revised and the notion of the d-jet bundles is introduced. Since the whole Standard Model Lagrangian (including gravity) can be written as the functional of the forms, the structure of the d-jet bundles is more appropriate for the covariant hamiltonian analysis than the standard jet bundle approach. The definition of the local covariant Poisson bracket on the space of covariant observables is recalled. The main goal of the work is to show that the gauge group of the Einstein-Cartan theory is given by the semidirect product of the local Lorentz group and the group of spacetime diffeomorphisms. Vanishing of the integral generators of the gauge group is equivalent to equations of motion of the Einstein-Cartan theory and the local covariant algebra generated by Noether's currents is closed Lie algebra.

  8. Comparison of two different starting multiple dose gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocols in a selected group of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Ernesto; Bosch, Ernesto; Crespo, Juana; Simón, Carlos; Remohí, José; Pellicer, Antonio

    2004-03-01

    To compare the efficacy of two starting protocols of multiple dose GnRH antagonists (GnRH-a). Prospective randomized controlled study. In vitro fertilization-embryo transfer program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, Valencia, Spain. One hundred nine patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with recombinant gonadotropins and GnRH-a (0.25 mg/d). Patients started GnRH-a administration on stimulation day 6 (group 1) or when the leading follicle reached a mean diameter of 14 mm (group 2). Implantation and pregnancy rates; serum E(2) and LH levels during ovarian stimulation; days of stimulation and GnRH-a administration. Days needed for ovarian stimulation were similar in both groups but there was a significant difference when comparing days of GnRH-a administration. Serum E(2) and LH followed similar curves in both groups. Implantation and pregnancy rates were 23.7% and 44.4 % in group 1 and 28.6% and 50.9 % in group 2 (P=not significant [NS]). The efficacy of the two starting protocols of the multiple dose GnRH-a evaluated in this study is similar; however, this remark can only be drawn for a selected group of patients.

  9. Covariant electromagnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Y.; Cohen, E.; Kaminer, I.; Elitzur, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    Faraday introduced electric field lines as a powerful tool for understanding the electric force, and these field lines are still used today in classrooms and textbooks teaching the basics of electromagnetism within the electrostatic limit. However, despite attempts at generalizing this concept beyond the electrostatic limit, such a fully relativistic field line theory still appears to be missing. In this work, we propose such a theory and define covariant electromagnetic field lines that naturally extend electric field lines to relativistic systems and general electromagnetic fields. We derive a closed-form formula for the field lines curvature in the vicinity of a charge, and show that it is related to the world line of the charge. This demonstrates how the kinematics of a charge can be derived from the geometry of the electromagnetic field lines. Such a theory may also provide new tools in modeling and analyzing electromagnetic phenomena, and may entail new insights regarding long-standing problems such as radiation-reaction and self-force. In particular, the electromagnetic field lines curvature has the attractive property of being non-singular everywhere, thus eliminating all self-field singularities without using renormalization techniques.

  10. Covariant representations of subproduct systems

    CERN Document Server

    Viselter, Ami

    2010-01-01

    A celebrated theorem of Pimsner states that a covariant representation $T$ of a $C^*$-correspondence $E$ extends to a $C^*$-representation of the Toeplitz algebra of $E$ if and only if $T$ is isometric. This paper is mainly concerned with finding conditions for a covariant representation of a \\emph{subproduct system} to extend to a $C^*$-representation of the Toeplitz algebra. This framework is much more general than the former. We are able to find sufficient conditions, and show that in important special cases, they are also necessary. Further results include the universality of the tensor algebra, dilations of completely contractive covariant representations, Wold decompositions and von Neumann inequalities.

  11. General covariance in computational electrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shyroki, Dzmitry; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole;

    2007-01-01

    We advocate the generally covariant formulation of Maxwell equations as underpinning some recent advances in computational electrodynamics—in the dimensionality reduction for separable structures; in mesh truncation for finite-difference computations; and in adaptive coordinate mapping as opposed...

  12. Targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Claire; Bray, Emma P; Bryan, Stirling; Greenfield, Sheila M; Haque, M Sayeed; Hobbs, F D Richard; Jones, Miren I; Jowett, Sue; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Little, Paul; Mant, Jonathan; Penaloza, Cristina; Schwartz, Claire; Shackleford, Helen; Varghese, Jinu; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2013-03-23

    Self-monitoring of hypertension with self-titration of antihypertensives (self-management) results in lower systolic blood pressure for at least one year. However, few people in high risk groups have been evaluated to date and previous work suggests a smaller effect size in these groups. This trial therefore aims to assess the added value of self-management in high risk groups over and above usual care. The targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR) trial will be a pragmatic primary care based, unblinded, randomised controlled trial of self-management of blood pressure (BP) compared to usual care. Eligible patients will have a history of stroke, coronary heart disease, diabetes or chronic kidney disease and will be recruited from primary care. Participants will be individually randomised to either usual care or self-management. The primary outcome of the trial will be difference in office SBP between intervention and control groups at 12 months adjusted for baseline SBP and covariates. 540 patients will be sufficient to detect a difference in SBP between self-management and usual care of 5 mmHg with 90% power. Secondary outcomes will include self-efficacy, lifestyle behaviours, health-related quality of life and adverse events. An economic analysis will consider both within trial costs and a model extrapolating the results thereafter. A qualitative analysis will gain insights into patients' views, experiences and decision making processes. The results of the trial will be directly applicable to primary care in the UK. If successful, self-management of blood pressure in people with stroke and other high risk conditions would be applicable to many hundreds of thousands of individuals in the UK and beyond. ISRCTN87171227.

  13. Implementation and scientific evaluation of rehabilitative sports groups for prostate cancer patients: study protocol of the ProRehab Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zopf, Eva M; Braun, Moritz; Machtens, Stefan; Zumbé, Jürgen; Bloch, Wilhelm; Baumann, Freerk T

    2012-01-01

    ... rehabilitation or in the aftercare are still missing. The ProRehab Project aims to establish rehabilitative sports groups particularly for prostate cancer patients and to evaluate the effects of the offered exercise program...

  14. Linear transformations of variance/covariance matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parois, Pascal; Lutz, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Many applications in crystallography require the use of linear transformations on parameters and their standard uncertainties. While the transformation of the parameters is textbook knowledge, the transformation of the standard uncertainties is more complicated and needs the full variance/covariance matrix. For the transformation of second-rank tensors it is suggested that the 3 × 3 matrix is re-written into a 9 × 1 vector. The transformation of the corresponding variance/covariance matrix is then straightforward and easily implemented into computer software. This method is applied in the transformation of anisotropic displacement parameters, the calculation of equivalent isotropic displacement parameters, the comparison of refinements in different space-group settings and the calculation of standard uncertainties of eigenvalues.

  15. Implementation and scientific evaluation of rehabilitative sports groups for prostate cancer patients: study protocol of the ProRehab Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Eva M; Braun, Moritz; Machtens, Stefan; Zumbé, Jürgen; Bloch, Wilhelm; Baumann, Freerk T

    2012-07-24

    Although treatment regimen have improved in the last few years, prostate cancer patients following a radical prostatectomy still experience severe disease- and treatment-related side effects, including urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and psychological issues. Despite high incidence rates and the common adverse effects there is a lack of supportive measures for male patients and specific physical exercise recommendations for prostate cancer patients during rehabilitation or in the aftercare are still missing. The ProRehab Project aims to establish rehabilitative sports groups particularly for prostate cancer patients and to evaluate the effects of the offered exercise program. Starting 8-12 weeks after prostatectomy or combination therapy, prostate cancer patients will exercise for 15 months within a patient preference randomized controlled trial. One exercise session will be conducted within a pre-established rehabilitative sports group, while the other will be completed independently. Patients in the control group will not participate in the intervention. The main outcomes of the study include aerobic fitness, quality of life, incontinence and erectile dysfunction. By combining science, practice, and public relations the first rehabilitative sports groups for prostate cancer patients in Germany have been set up and thus contribute to the care structure for prostate cancer patients. By offering a 15-month physical exercise intervention that is conducted in supervised group sessions, long-term lifestyle changes and therefore improvements in quality of life in prostate cancer patients can be expected. German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00004184.

  16. Transformation rule for covariance matrices under Bell-like detections

    CERN Document Server

    Spedalieri, Gaetana; Pirandola, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the transformation rule of a covariance matrix under homodyne detections, we can easily derive a formula for the transformation of a covariance matrix of (n+2) bosonic modes under Bell-like detections, where the last two modes are combined in an arbitrary beam splitter (i.e., with arbitrary transmissivity) and then homodyned. This formula can be specialized to describe the standard Bell detection and the heterodyne measurement, which are exploited in many contexts, including protocols of quantum teleportation, entanglement swapping and quantum cryptography. Our general formula can be adopted to study these protocols in the presence of experimental imperfections or asymmetric setups, e.g., deriving from the use of unbalanced beam splitters.

  17. Calcul Stochastique Covariant à Sauts & Calcul Stochastique à Sauts Covariants

    OpenAIRE

    Maillard-Teyssier, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    We propose a stochastic covariant calculus forcàdlàg semimartingales in the tangent bundle $TM$ over a manifold $M$. A connection on $M$ allows us to define an intrinsic derivative ofa $C^1$ curve $(Y_t)$ in $TM$, the covariantderivative. More precisely, it is the derivative of$(Y_t)$ seen in a frame moving parallelly along its projection curve$(x_t)$ on $M$. With the transfer principle, Norris defined thestochastic covariant integration along a continuous semimartingale in$TM$. We describe t...

  18. Covariate-free and Covariate-dependent Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentler, Peter M

    2016-12-01

    Classical test theory reliability coefficients are said to be population specific. Reliability generalization, a meta-analysis method, is the main procedure for evaluating the stability of reliability coefficients across populations. A new approach is developed to evaluate the degree of invariance of reliability coefficients to population characteristics. Factor or common variance of a reliability measure is partitioned into parts that are, and are not, influenced by control variables, resulting in a partition of reliability into a covariate-dependent and a covariate-free part. The approach can be implemented in a single sample and can be applied to a variety of reliability coefficients.

  19. The meaningfulness of participating in Support Groups for informal caregives of older adults with dementia: A Systematic Review Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Jette; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Bjerrum, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Review question/objective The objective of this review is to identify the meaningfulness of participating in support groups for informal caregivers of older adults with dementia living in their own home. More specifically, the review question is: How do informal caregivers of older adults...... with dementia, living in urban and rural settings, perceive the meaningfulness of participating in support groups? Inclusion Criteria Types of participant(s) This review will consider studies that include informal caregivers of older adults aged 65 years and older with dementia, regardless of the severity...... that investigate how the informal caregivers of older adults with dementia, living in urban or rural settings perceive the meaningfulness of participating in support groups. The phenomenon of interest will consider studies that include informal caregivers, aged 18 years and older, who are caring for an older adult...

  20. Levy Matrices and Financial Covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Zdzislaw; Jurkiewicz, Jerzy; Nowak, Maciej A.; Papp, Gabor; Zahed, Ismail

    2003-10-01

    In a given market, financial covariances capture the intra-stock correlations and can be used to address statistically the bulk nature of the market as a complex system. We provide a statistical analysis of three SP500 covariances with evidence for raw tail distributions. We study the stability of these tails against reshuffling for the SP500 data and show that the covariance with the strongest tails is robust, with a spectral density in remarkable agreement with random Lévy matrix theory. We study the inverse participation ratio for the three covariances. The strong localization observed at both ends of the spectral density is analogous to the localization exhibited in the random Lévy matrix ensemble. We discuss two competitive mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of an extensive and delocalized eigenvalue at the edge of the spectrum: (a) the Lévy character of the entries of the correlation matrix and (b) a sort of off-diagonal order induced by underlying inter-stock correlations. (b) can be destroyed by reshuffling, while (a) cannot. We show that the stocks with the largest scattering are the least susceptible to correlations, and likely candidates for the localized states. We introduce a simple model for price fluctuations which captures behavior of the SP500 covariances. It may be of importance for assets diversification.

  1. Group schema therapy versus group cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder with comorbid avoidant personality disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baljé, Astrid; Greeven, Anja; van Giezen, Anne; Korrelboom, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud; Spinhoven, Philip

    2016-10-08

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) with comorbid avoidant personality disorder (APD) has a high prevalence and is associated with serious psychosocial problems and high societal costs. When patients suffer from both SAD and APD, the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for personality disorders advise offering prolonged cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recently there is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of schema therapy (ST) for personality disorders such as borderline personality disorder and cluster C personality disorders. Since ST addresses underlying personality characteristics and maladaptive coping strategies developed in childhood, this treatment might be particularly effective for patients with SAD and comorbid APD. To our knowledge, there are no studies comparing CBT with ST in this particular group of patients. This superiority trial aims at comparing the effectiveness of these treatments. As an additional goal, predictors and underlying mechanisms of change will be explored. The design of the study is a multicentre two-group randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the treatment effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) will be compared to that of group schema therapy (GST) in a semi-open group format. A total of 128 patients aged 18-65 years old will be enrolled. Patients will receive 30 sessions of GCBT or GST during a period of approximately 9 months. Primary outcome measures are the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report (LSAS-SR) for social anxiety disorder and the newly developed Avoidant Personality Disorder Severity Index (AVPDSI) for avoidant personality disorder. Secondary outcome measures are the MINI section SAD, the SCID-II section APD, the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI-2), the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the Acceptance and Action

  2. Implementation and scientific evaluation of rehabilitative sports groups for prostate cancer patients: study protocol of the ProRehab Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zopf Eva M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although treatment regimen have improved in the last few years, prostate cancer patients following a radical prostatectomy still experience severe disease- and treatment-related side effects, including urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and psychological issues. Despite high incidence rates and the common adverse effects there is a lack of supportive measures for male patients and specific physical exercise recommendations for prostate cancer patients during rehabilitation or in the aftercare are still missing. Methods/Design The ProRehab Project aims to establish rehabilitative sports groups particularly for prostate cancer patients and to evaluate the effects of the offered exercise program. Starting 8–12 weeks after prostatectomy or combination therapy, prostate cancer patients will exercise for 15 months within a patient preference randomized controlled trial. One exercise session will be conducted within a pre-established rehabilitative sports group, while the other will be completed independently. Patients in the control group will not participate in the intervention. The main outcomes of the study include aerobic fitness, quality of life, incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Discussion By combining science, practice, and public relations the first rehabilitative sports groups for prostate cancer patients in Germany have been set up and thus contribute to the care structure for prostate cancer patients. By offering a 15-month physical exercise intervention that is conducted in supervised group sessions, long-term lifestyle changes and therefore improvements in quality of life in prostate cancer patients can be expected. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00004184

  3. Szekeres models: a covariant approach

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolopoulos, Pantelis S

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the 1+1+2 formalism to covariantly describe the inhomogeneous and anisotropic Szekeres models. It is shown that an \\emph{average scale length} can be defined \\emph{covariantly} which satisfies a 2d equation of motion driven from the \\emph{effective gravitational mass} (EGM) contained in the dust cloud. The contributions to the EGM are encoded to the energy density of the dust fluid and the free gravitational field $E_{ab}$. In addition the notions of the Apparent and Absolute Apparent Horizons are briefly discussed and we give an alternative gauge-invariant form to define them in terms of the kinematical variables of the spacelike congruences. We argue that the proposed program can be used in order to express the Sachs optical equations in a covariant form and analyze the confrontation of a spatially inhomogeneous irrotational overdense fluid model with the observational data.

  4. Multivariate covariance generalized linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonat, W. H.; Jørgensen, Bent

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general framework for non-normal multivariate data analysis called multivariate covariance generalized linear models, designed to handle multivariate response variables, along with a wide range of temporal and spatial correlation structures defined in terms of a covariance link...... function combined with a matrix linear predictor involving known matrices. The method is motivated by three data examples that are not easily handled by existing methods. The first example concerns multivariate count data, the second involves response variables of mixed types, combined with repeated...... are fitted by using an efficient Newton scoring algorithm based on quasi-likelihood and Pearson estimating functions, using only second-moment assumptions. This provides a unified approach to a wide variety of types of response variables and covariance structures, including multivariate extensions...

  5. Covariance evaluation work at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Phillip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hale, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chadwick, M B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Little, R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos evaluates covariances for nuclear data library, mainly for actinides above the resonance regions and light elements in the enUre energy range. We also develop techniques to evaluate the covariance data, like Bayesian and least-squares fitting methods, which are important to explore the uncertainty information on different types of physical quantities such as elastic scattering angular distribution, or prompt neutron fission spectra. This paper summarizes our current activities of the covariance evaluation work at LANL, including the actinide and light element data mainly for the criticality safety study and transmutation technology. The Bayesian method based on the Kalman filter technique, which combines uncertainties in the theoretical model and experimental data, is discussed.

  6. The meaningfulness of participating in Support Groups for informal caregives of older adults with dementia: A Systematic Review Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Jette; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Bjerrum, Merete Bender

    2013-01-01

    of the disease and the duration of care. The informal caregiver is mainly seen as a family member and care must be performed at home. The review will not differentiate between studies involving subsets of informal caregivers (e.g. based on specific ethnicity, gender and/or specific morbidities of dementia among...... with dementia, aged 65 years and older, living in their own home. The setting will be all locations where support groups for informal caregivers have been held and studied. Types of outcomes The outcomes of interest include, but are not restricted to the following: 1. Subjective accounts of the informal......Review question/objective The objective of this review is to identify the meaningfulness of participating in support groups for informal caregivers of older adults with dementia living in their own home. More specifically, the review question is: How do informal caregivers of older adults...

  7. Generalized linear models with coarsened covariates: a practical Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy R; Wiest, Michelle M

    2014-06-01

    Coarsened covariates are a common and sometimes unavoidable phenomenon encountered in statistical modeling. Covariates are coarsened when their values or categories have been grouped. This may be done to protect privacy or to simplify data collection or analysis when researchers are not aware of their drawbacks. Analyses with coarsened covariates based on ad hoc methods can compromise the validity of inferences. One valid method for accounting for a coarsened covariate is to use a marginal likelihood derived by summing or integrating over the unknown realizations of the covariate. However, algorithms for estimation based on this approach can be tedious to program and can be computationally expensive. These are significant obstacles to their use in practice. To overcome these limitations, we show that when expressed as a Bayesian probability model, a generalized linear model with a coarsened covariate can be posed as a tractable missing data problem where the missing data are due to censoring. We also show that this model is amenable to widely available general-purpose software for simulation-based inference for Bayesian probability models, providing researchers a very practical approach for dealing with coarsened covariates.

  8. Cosmic Censorship Conjecture revisited: Covariantly

    CERN Document Server

    Hamid, Aymen I M; Maharaj, Sunil D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of the trapped region using a frame independent semi-tetrad covariant formalism for general Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS) class II spacetimes. We covariantly prove some important geometrical results for the apparent horizon, and state the necessary and sufficient conditions for a singularity to be locally naked. These conditions bring out, for the first time in a quantitative and transparent manner, the importance of the Weyl curvature in deforming and delaying the trapped region during continual gravitational collapse, making the central singularity locally visible.

  9. Group versus Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for procrastination: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rozental

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Procrastination is defined as a voluntarily delay of an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse-off for the delay, and is considered a persistent behavior pattern that can result in major psychological suffering. About one-fifth of the adult population and half of the student population are presumed having substantial difficulties due to recurrent procrastination in their everyday lives. However, chronic and severe procrastinators seldom receive adequate care due to preconceptions and the lack of understanding regarding procrastination and the treatment interventions that are assumed beneficial. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is often deemed a treatment of choice, although the evidence supporting its use is scarce, and only one randomized controlled trial has been performed. The primary aim of the proposed study is therefore to test the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy delivered as either a group intervention or via the Internet. Participants will consist of students recruited through the Student Health Centre at Karolinska Institutet. A randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 100 participants divided into blocks of thirty will be used, comparing an eight-week Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention, and an eight-week group cognitive-behavioral therapy based intervention. It is believed that the proposed study will result in two important findings. First, different treatment interventions in cognitive-behavioral therapy are assumed to be helpful for people suffering from problems caused by procrastination. Second, both an Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention and a group intervention are presumed suitable for administering treatment for procrastination, which is considered important as the availability of adequate care is limited, particularly among students. The proposed study will increase the knowledge regarding the efficacy of different treatments of procrastination, as well

  10. Implementing an acceptance and commitment therapy group protocol with veterans using VA's stepped care model of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosio, David; Schafer, Tracy

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend previous findings; further demonstrating the effectiveness of an ACT outpatient, group-based treatment for Veterans who suffer from mixed idiopathic, chronic, non-cancer pain. This course of treatment utilized the VA's Stepped Care Model of Pain Management as a framework. A sample of 50 Veterans who participated in an ACT for chronic pain group intervention was evaluated after completing a pain health education program at a Midwestern VA Medical Center between February 16, 2010 and November 9, 2010. All participants completed a standard set of pre- and post-intervention measures. Paired-samples t tests were conducted to evaluate the impact of the manualized intervention on Veterans' scores. The current study found a significant difference in measures of pain interference, illness-focused coping, and global distress upon completion of the intervention. Findings suggest that ACT is an effective treatment for Veterans with chronic pain as a secondary consultative service.

  11. REFLEX, a social-cognitive group treatment to improve insight in schizophrenia: study protocol of a multi-center RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pijnenborg GHM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insight is impaired in a majority of people with schizophrenia. Impaired insight is associated with poorer outcomes of the disorder. Based on existing literature, we developed a model that explains which processes may possibly play a role in impaired insight. This model was the starting point of the development of REFLEX: a brief psychosocial intervention to improve insight in schizophrenia. REFLEX is a 12-sessions group training, consisting of three modules of four sessions each. Modules in this intervention are: "coping with stigma", "you and your personal narrative", and "you in the present". Methods/Design REFLEX is currently evaluated in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Eight mental health institutions in the Netherlands participate in this evaluation. Patients are randomly assigned to either REFLEX or an active control condition, existing of cognitive remediation exercises in a group. In a subgroup of patients, fMRI scans are made before and after training in order to assess potential haemodynamic changes associated with the effects of the training. Discussion REFLEX is one of the few interventions aiming specifically to improving insight in schizophrenia and has potential value for improving insight. Targeting insight in schizophrenia is a complex task, that comes with several methodological issues. These issues are addressed in the discussion of this paper. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN50247539

  12. The effectiveness of introducing Group Prenatal Care (GPC) in selected health facilities in a district of Bangladesh: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Marufa; Mahumud, Rashidul Alam; Ali, Nausad; Ahmed, Sayem; Islam, Ziaul; Khan, Jahangir A M; Sarker, Abdur Razzaque

    2017-01-31

    Despite high rates of antenatal care and relatively good access to health facilities, maternal and neonatal mortality remain high in Bangladesh. There is an immediate need for implementation of evidence-based, cost-effective interventions to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of the intervention namely Group Prenatal Care (GPC) on utilization of standard number of antenatal care, post natal care including skilled birth attendance and institutional deliveries instead of usual care. The study is quasi-experimental in design. We aim to recruit 576 pregnant women (288 interventions and 288 comparisons) less than 20 weeks of gestational age. The intervention will be delivered over around 6 months. The outcome measure is the difference in maternal service coverage including ANC and PNC coverage, skilled birth attendance and institutional deliveries between the intervention and comparison group. Findings from the research will contribute to improve maternal and newborn outcome in our existing health system. Findings of the research can be used for planning a new strategy and improving the health outcome for Bangladeshi women. Finally addressing the maternal health goal, this study is able to contribute to strengthening health system.

  13. Covariant description of isothermic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tafel, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    We present a covariant formulation of the Gauss-Weingarten equations and the Gauss-Mainardi-Codazzi equations for surfaces in 3-dimensional curved spaces. We derive a coordinate invariant condition on the first and second fundamental form which is necessary and sufficient for the surface to be isothermic.

  14. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2013-06-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the "large p small n" setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required.

  15. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the “large p small n” setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required. PMID:23730197

  16. Covariation Neglect among Novice Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedesstrom, Ted Martin; Svedsater, Henrik; Garling, Tommy

    2006-01-01

    In 4 experiments, undergraduates made hypothetical investment choices. In Experiment 1, participants paid more attention to the volatility of individual assets than to the volatility of aggregated portfolios. The results of Experiment 2 show that most participants diversified even when this increased risk because of covariation between the returns…

  17. Covariant Formulations of Superstring Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikovic, Aleksandar Radomir

    1990-01-01

    Chapter 1 contains a brief introduction to the subject of string theory, and tries to motivate the study of superstrings and covariant formulations. Chapter 2 describes the Green-Schwarz formulation of the superstrings. The Hamiltonian and BRST structure of the theory is analysed in the case of the superparticle. Implications for the superstring case are discussed. Chapter 3 describes the Siegel's formulation of the superstring, which contains only the first class constraints. It is shown that the physical spectrum coincides with that of the Green-Schwarz formulation. In chapter 4 we analyse the BRST structure of the Siegel's formulation. We show that the BRST charge has the wrong cohomology, and propose a modification, called first ilk, which gives the right cohomology. We also propose another superparticle model, called second ilk, which has infinitely many coordinates and constraints. We construct the complete BRST charge for it, and show that it gives the correct cohomology. In chapter 5 we analyse the properties of the covariant vertex operators and the corresponding S-matrix elements by using the Siegel's formulation. We conclude that the knowledge of the ghosts is necessary, even at the tree level, in order to obtain the correct S-matrix. In chapter 6 we attempt to calculate the superstring loops, in a covariant gauge. We calculate the vacuum-to -vacuum amplitude, which is also the cosmological constant. We show that it vanishes to all loop orders, under the assumption that the free covariant gauge-fixed action exists. In chapter 7 we present our conclusions, and briefly discuss the random lattice approach to the string theory, as a possible way of resolving the problem of the covariant quantization and the nonperturbative definition of the superstrings.

  18. Causes of death after therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease entered on EORTC protocols. EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Amar, M; Hayat, M; Meerwaldt, J H; Burgers, M; Carde, P; Somers, R; Noordijk, E M; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; Cosset, J M

    1990-11-01

    The risk of dying from different causes after Hodgkin's disease (HD) therapy has been quantified from a series of 1,449 patients with early stages included in four successive clinical trials conducted by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Lymphoma Cooperative Group since 1963. Overall, 240 patients died and the 15-year survival rate was 69% whereas the expected rate was 95%. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) technique was used to quantify excess deaths as a function of time since first therapy. At each interval, SMR was significantly increased, giving: 0-3 year, 8.86 (p less than 0.001); 4-6 year, 9.25 (p less than 0.001); 7-9 year, 7.08 (p less than 0.001); 10-12 year, 9.53 (p less than 0.001); 13-15 year, 4.37 (p less than 0.01); and 16+ years, 3.80 (p less than 0.05). While the proportion of deaths as a consequence of HD progression, treatment side-effect, and intercurrent disease decreased with time, that of second cancer and cardiac failure peaked during the 10-12 year post-treatment interval. After 15 years of follow-up, the risk of dying from causes other than HD continued to increase. These findings indicate that although probably cured from HD, patients are at higher risk for death than expected, a risk that might be a consequence of therapy.

  19. Discrete Symmetries in Covariant LQG

    CERN Document Server

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    We study time-reversal and parity ---on the physical manifold and in internal space--- in covariant loop gravity. We consider a minor modification of the Holst action which makes it transform coherently under such transformations. The classical theory is not affected but the quantum theory is slightly different. In particular, the simplicity constraints are slightly modified and this restricts orientation flips in a spinfoam to occur only across degenerate regions, thus reducing the sources of potential divergences.

  20. Results of the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group XIV protocol for classical osteosarcoma: 63 patients with a minimum follow-up of 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeland, Sigbjørn; Bruland, Oyvind S; Hjorth, Lars; Brosjö, Otte; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Osterlundh, Gustaf; Jakobson, Ake; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Monge, Odd R; Björk, Olle; Alvegaard, Thor A

    2011-04-01

    The Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) XIV protocol is based on experience from previous SSG trials and other osteosarcoma intergroup trials, and has been considered the best standard of care for patients with extremity localized, non-metastatic osteosarcoma. We analyzed the outcome in 63 consecutive patients. Patients and methods From 2001 through 2005, 63 patients recruited from centers in Sweden, Norway, and Finland were included. They received preoperative chemotherapy consisting of 2 cycles of paired methotrexate (12 g/m²), cisplatin (90 mg/m²), and doxorubicin (75 mg/m²). 3 cycles were administered postoperatively, and poor histological responders were given 3 additional cycles of ifosfamide (10-12 g/m²) as a salvage strategy. With a median follow-up of 77 months for survivors, the estimated metastasis-free and sarcoma-related survival at 5 years was 70% and 76%, respectively. 53 patients were treated with limb salvage surgery or rotationplasty and 2 patients experienced a local recurrence. 3 toxic deaths were recorded, all related to acute toxicity from chemotherapy. The 5-year metastasis-free survival of poor histological responders receiving add-on treatment with ifosfamide was 47%, as compared to 89% for good histological responders. Outcome from the SSG XIV protocol compares favorably with the results of previous SSG trials and other published osteosarcoma trials. However, salvage therapy given to poor responders did not improve outcome to a similar degree as for good responders. In a multi-institutional setting, more than four-fifths of the patients were operated with limb salvage surgery or rotationplasty, with few local recurrences.

  1. Phenotypic covariance at species’ borders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the evolution of species limits is important in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. Despite its likely importance in the evolution of these limits, little is known about phenotypic covariance in geographically marginal populations, and the degree to which it constrains, or facilitates, responses to selection. We investigated phenotypic covariance in morphological traits at species’ borders by comparing phenotypic covariance matrices (P), including the degree of shared structure, the distribution of strengths of pair-wise correlations between traits, the degree of morphological integration of traits, and the ranks of matricies, between central and marginal populations of three species-pairs of coral reef fishes. Results Greater structural differences in P were observed between populations close to range margins and conspecific populations toward range centres, than between pairs of conspecific populations that were both more centrally located within their ranges. Approximately 80% of all pair-wise trait correlations within populations were greater in the north, but these differences were unrelated to the position of the sampled population with respect to the geographic range of the species. Conclusions Neither the degree of morphological integration, nor ranks of P, indicated greater evolutionary constraint at range edges. Characteristics of P observed here provide no support for constraint contributing to the formation of these species’ borders, but may instead reflect structural change in P caused by selection or drift, and their potential to evolve in the future. PMID:23714580

  2. Phenotype in combination with genotype improves outcome prediction in acute myeloid leukemia: a report from Children's Oncology Group protocol AAML0531.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Andrew P; Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Menssen, Andrew J; Wilson, Elisabeth R; Kahwash, Samir; Raimondi, Susana C; Hirsch, Betsy A; Gamis, Alan S; Meshinchi, Soheil; Wells, Denise A; Loken, Michael R

    2017-09-07

    Diagnostic biomarkers can be used to determine relapse risk in acute myeloid leukemia, and certain genetic aberrancies have prognostic relevance. A diagnostic immunophenotypic expression profile, which quantifies the amounts of distinct gene products, not just their presence or absence, was established to improve outcome prediction for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The immunophenotypic expression profile, which defines each patient's leukemia as a location in 15-dimensional space, was generated for 769 patients enrolled in the Children's Oncology Group AAML0531 protocol. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering grouped patients with similar immunophenotypic expression profiles into eleven patient cohorts, demonstrating high associations among phenotype, genotype, morphology, and outcome. Of 95 patients with inv(16), 79% segregated in Cluster A. Of 109 patients with t(8;21), 92% segregated in Clusters A and B. Of 152 patients with 11q23 alterations, 78% segregated in Clusters D, E, F, G, or H. For both inv(16) and 11q23 abnormalities, differential phenotypic expression identified patient groups with different survival characteristics (P<0.05). Clinical outcome analysis revealed that Cluster B (predominantly t(8;21)) was associated with favorable outcome (P<0.001) and Clusters E, G, H, and K were associated with adverse outcomes (P<0.05). Multivariable regression analysis revealed that Clusters E, G, H, and K were independently associated with worse survival (P range <0.001 to 0.008). The Children's Oncology Group AAML0531 trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00372593. Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. AFCI-2.0 Neutron Cross Section Covariance Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M.; Herman, M; Oblozinsky, P.; Mattoon, C.M.; Pigni, M.; Hoblit, S.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.; Talou, P.; Chadwick, M.B.; Hale, G.M.; Kahler, A.C.; Kawano, T.; Little, R.C.; Yount, P.G.

    2011-03-01

    materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Covariances are given in 33-energy groups, from 10?5 eV to 19.6 MeV, obtained by processing with LANL processing code NJOY using 1/E flux. In addition to these 110 files, the library contains 20 files with nu-bar covariances, 3 files with covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (238,239,240-Pu), and 2 files with mu-bar covariances (23-Na, 56-Fe). Over the period of three years several working versions of the library have been released and tested by ANL and INL reactor analysts. Useful feedback has been collected allowing gradual improvements of the library. In addition, QA system was developed to check basic properties and features of the whole library, allowing visual inspection of uncertainty and correlations plots, inspection of uncertainties of integral quantities with independent databases, and dispersion of cross sections between major evaluated libraries. The COMMARA-2.0 beta version of the library was released to ANL and INL reactor analysts in October 2010. The final version, described in the present report, was released in March 2011.

  4. AFCI-2.0 Neutron Cross Section Covariance Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M.; Herman, M; Oblozinsky, P.; Mattoon, C.M.; Pigni, M.; Hoblit, S.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.; Talou, P.; Chadwick, M.B.; Hale, G.M.; Kahler, A.C.; Kawano, T.; Little, R.C.; Yount, P.G.

    2011-03-01

    materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Covariances are given in 33-energy groups, from 10?5 eV to 19.6 MeV, obtained by processing with LANL processing code NJOY using 1/E flux. In addition to these 110 files, the library contains 20 files with nu-bar covariances, 3 files with covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (238,239,240-Pu), and 2 files with mu-bar covariances (23-Na, 56-Fe). Over the period of three years several working versions of the library have been released and tested by ANL and INL reactor analysts. Useful feedback has been collected allowing gradual improvements of the library. In addition, QA system was developed to check basic properties and features of the whole library, allowing visual inspection of uncertainty and correlations plots, inspection of uncertainties of integral quantities with independent databases, and dispersion of cross sections between major evaluated libraries. The COMMARA-2.0 beta version of the library was released to ANL and INL reactor analysts in October 2010. The final version, described in the present report, was released in March 2011.

  5. Competing risks and time-dependent covariates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Andersen, Per K

    2010-01-01

    Time-dependent covariates are frequently encountered in regression analysis for event history data and competing risks. They are often essential predictors, which cannot be substituted by time-fixed covariates. This study briefly recalls the different types of time-dependent covariates...

  6. Group based prenatal care in a low-and high risk population in the Netherlands: a study protocol for a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zwicht, Birgit S; Crone, Matty R; van Lith, Jan M M; Rijnders, Marlies E B

    2016-11-15

    CenteringPregnancy (CP) is a multifaceted group based care-model integrated in routine prenatal care, combining health assessment, education, and support. CP has shown some positive results on perinatal outcomes. However, the effects are less obvious when limited to the results of randomized controlled trials: as there are few trials and there is a variation in reported outcomes. Furthermore, former research was mostly conducted in the United States of America and in specific (often high risk) populations. Our study aims to evaluate the effects of CP in the Netherlands in a general population of pregnant women (low and high risk). Furthermore we aim to explore the mechanisms leading to the eventual effects by measuring potential mediating factors. We will perform a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial, in a Western region in the Netherlands. Inclusion criteria are control period will receive individual care, women in the intervention period (starting at the randomized time-point) will be offered the choice between individual care or CP. Primary outcomes are maternal and neonatal morbidity, retrieved from a national routine database. Secondary outcomes are health behavior, psychosocial outcomes, satisfaction, health care utilization and process outcomes, collected through self-administered questionnaires, group-evaluations and individual interviews. We will conduct intention-to-treat analyses. Also a per protocol analysis will be performed comparing the three subgroups: control group, CP-participants and non-CP-participants, using multilevel techniques to account for clustering effects. This study contributes to the evidence regarding the effect of CP and gives a first indication of the effect and implementation of CP in both low and high-risk pregnancies in a high-income Western society other than the USA. Also, measuring factors that are hypothesized to mediate the effect of CP will enable to explain the mechanisms that lead to effects on maternal and

  7. Long-term follow-up of Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group (DCLSG) protocols for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1984-1991

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, WA; Veerman, AJP; van Wering, ER; van Weerden, JF; Slater, R; van der Does-van den Berg, A

    2000-01-01

    Here we report the long-term results of the DCLSG protocols ALL-6 and -7 with special emphasis on the incidence of CNS relapse after treatment without cranial irradiation. In DCLSG protocol ALL-6 (1984-1988), designed for patients with ALL non-high risk (ALL-NHR) (WBC

  8. A security analysis of version 2 of the Network Time Protocol (NTP): A report to the privacy and security research group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Matt

    1991-01-01

    The Network Time Protocol is being used throughout the Internet to provide an accurate time service. The security requirements are examined of such a service, version 2 of the NTP protocol is analyzed to determine how well it meets these requirements, and improvements are suggested where appropriate.

  9. Tratamiento cognitivo-conductual protocolizado en grupo de las enfermedades inflamatorias intestinales Protocolized cognitive-behavioural group therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Díaz Sibaja

    2007-10-01

    features of inflammatory bowel disease. Method: the sample included 57 patients with inflammatory bowel disease from the Spanish Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Association. The sample was randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups -33 were assigned to the treatment group, and 24 were assigned to the waiting list control group. Results: the results reflected a significant clinical and statistical improvement in anxiety (p < 0.001 and depression (p < 0.001 variables when compared to the waiting list control group. Likewise, improvement was sustained at 3, 6, and 12 months during follow-up. Conclusion: the protocolized psychological treatment program, administered in group sessions, is effective in reducing emotional symptoms arising as a result of inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  11. Covariant and quasi-covariant quantum dynamics in Robertson-Walker space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Buchholz, D; Summers, S J; Buchholz, Detlev; Mund, Jens; Summers, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a canonical description of the dynamics of quantum systems on a class of Robertson-Walker space-times. We show that the worldline of an observer in such space-times determines a unique orbit in the local conformal group SO(4,1) of the space-time and that this orbit determines a unique transport on the space-time. For a quantum system on the space-time modeled by a net of local algebras, the associated dynamics is expressed via a suitable family of ``propagators''. In the best of situations, this dynamics is covariant, but more typically the dynamics will be ``quasi-covariant'' in a sense we make precise. We then show by using our technique of ``transplanting'' states and nets of local algebras from de Sitter space to Robertson-Walker space that there exist quantum systems on Robertson-Walker spaces with quasi-covariant dynamics. The transplanted state is locally passive, in an appropriate sense, with respect to this dynamics.

  12. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  13. Hierarchical multivariate covariance analysis of metabolic connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Felix; Charil, Arnaud; Zijdenbos, Alex P; Evans, Alan C; Bedell, Barry J

    2014-12-01

    Conventional brain connectivity analysis is typically based on the assessment of interregional correlations. Given that correlation coefficients are derived from both covariance and variance, group differences in covariance may be obscured by differences in the variance terms. To facilitate a comprehensive assessment of connectivity, we propose a unified statistical framework that interrogates the individual terms of the correlation coefficient. We have evaluated the utility of this method for metabolic connectivity analysis using [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. As an illustrative example of the utility of this approach, we examined metabolic connectivity in angular gyrus and precuneus seed regions of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects with low and high β-amyloid burdens. This new multivariate method allowed us to identify alterations in the metabolic connectome, which would not have been detected using classic seed-based correlation analysis. Ultimately, this novel approach should be extensible to brain network analysis and broadly applicable to other imaging modalities, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  14. Treating PTSD in patients with psychosis: a within-group controlled feasibility study examining the efficacy and safety of evidence-based PE and EMDR protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, Paul A J M; van Minnen, Agnes; de Jongh, Ad

    2013-12-01

    The present study uses a within-group controlled design to examine the efficacy and safety of two psychological approaches to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 10 patients with a concurrent psychotic disorder. Patients were randomly assigned either to prolonged exposure (PE; N=5) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR; N=5). Before, during, and after treatment, a total of 20 weekly assessments of PTSD symptoms, hallucinations, and delusions were carried out. Twelve weekly assessments of adverse events took place during the treatment phase. PTSD diagnosis, level of social functioning, psychosis-prone thinking, and general psychopathology were assessed pretreatment, posttreatment, and at three-month follow-up. Throughout the treatment, adverse events were monitored at each session. An intention-to-treat analysis of the 10 patients starting treatment showed that the PTSD treatment protocols of PE and EMDR significantly reduced PTSD symptom severity; PE and EMDR were equally effective and safe. Eight of the 10 patients completed the full intervention period. Seven of the 10 patients (70%) no longer met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD at follow-up. No serious adverse events occurred, nor did patients show any worsening of hallucinations, delusions, psychosis proneness, general psychopathology, or social functioning. The results of this feasibility trial suggest that PTSD patients with comorbid psychotic disorders benefit from trauma-focused treatment approaches such as PE and EMDR.

  15. Repeat prenatal corticosteroid prior to preterm birth: a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis for the PRECISE study group (prenatal repeat corticosteroid international IPD study group: assessing the effects using the best level of evidence - study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowther Caroline A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this individual participant data (IPD meta-analysis is to assess whether the effects of repeat prenatal corticosteroid treatment given to women at risk of preterm birth to benefit their babies are modified in a clinically meaningful way by factors related to the women or the trial protocol. Methods/Design The Prenatal Repeat Corticosteroid International IPD Study Group: assessing the effects using the best level of Evidence (PRECISE Group will conduct an IPD meta-analysis. The PRECISE International Collaborative Group was formed in 2010 and data collection commenced in 2011. Eleven trials with up to 5,000 women and 6,000 infants are eligible for the PRECISE IPD meta-analysis. The primary study outcomes for the infants will be serious neonatal outcome (defined by the PRECISE International IPD Study Group as one of death (foetal, neonatal or infant; severe respiratory disease; severe intraventricular haemorrhage (grade 3 and 4; chronic lung disease; necrotising enterocolitis; serious retinopathy of prematurity; and cystic periventricular leukomalacia; use of respiratory support (defined as mechanical ventilation or continuous positive airways pressure or other respiratory support; and birth weight (Z-scores. For the children, the primary study outcomes will be death or any neurological disability (however defined by trialists at childhood follow up and may include developmental delay or intellectual impairment (developmental quotient or intelligence quotient more than one standard deviation below the mean, cerebral palsy (abnormality of tone with motor dysfunction, blindness (for example, corrected visual acuity worse than 6/60 in the better eye or deafness (for example, hearing loss requiring amplification or worse. For the women, the primary outcome will be maternal sepsis (defined as chorioamnionitis; pyrexia after trial entry requiring the use of antibiotics; puerperal sepsis; intrapartum fever requiring the use

  16. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  17. Covariance and correlation estimation in electron-density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Angela; Cuocci, Corrado; Giacovazzo, Carmelo; Moliterni, Anna; Rizzi, Rosanna

    2012-03-01

    Quite recently two papers have been published [Giacovazzo & Mazzone (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 210-218; Giacovazzo et al. (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 368-382] which calculate the variance in any point of an electron-density map at any stage of the phasing process. The main aim of the papers was to associate a standard deviation to each pixel of the map, in order to obtain a better estimate of the map reliability. This paper deals with the covariance estimate between points of an electron-density map in any space group, centrosymmetric or non-centrosymmetric, no matter the correlation between the model and target structures. The aim is as follows: to verify if the electron density in one point of the map is amplified or depressed as an effect of the electron density in one or more other points of the map. High values of the covariances are usually connected with undesired features of the map. The phases are the primitive random variables of our probabilistic model; the covariance changes with the quality of the model and therefore with the quality of the phases. The conclusive formulas show that the covariance is also influenced by the Patterson map. Uncertainty on measurements may influence the covariance, particularly in the final stages of the structure refinement; a general formula is obtained taking into account both phase and measurement uncertainty, valid at any stage of the crystal structure solution.

  18. A randomized controlled study of 5 and 10 days treatment with phenoxymethylpenicillin for pharyngotonsillitis caused by streptococcus group A - a protocol study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Gunilla; Edlund, Charlotta; Giske, Christian G; Mölstad, Sigvard; Norman, Christer; Sundvall, Pär-Daniel; Hedin, Katarina

    2016-09-13

    In 2014 the Swedish government assigned to The Public Health Agency of Sweden to conduct studies to evaluate optimal use of existing antibiotic agents. The aim is to optimize drug use and dosing regimens to improve the clinical efficacy. The present study was selected following a structured prioritizing process by independent experts. This phase IV study is a randomized, open-label, multicenter study with non-inferiority design regarding the therapeutic use of penicillin V with two parallel groups. The overall aim is to study if the total exposure with penicillin V can be reduced from 1000 mg three times daily for 10 days to 800 mg four times daily for 5 days when treating Streptococcus pyogenes (Lancefield group A) pharyngotonsillitis. Patients will be recruited from 17 primary health care centers in Sweden. Adult men and women, youth and children ≥6 years of age who consult for sore throat and is judged to have a pharyngotonsillitis, with 3-4 Centor criteria and a positive rapid test for group A streptococci, will be included in the study. The primary outcome is clinical cure 5-7 days after discontinuation of antibiotic treatment. Follow-up controls will be done by telephone after 1 and 3 months. Throat symptoms, potential relapses and complications will be monitored, as well as adverse events. Patients (n = 432) will be included during 2 years. In the era of increasing antimicrobial resistance and the shortage of new antimicrobial agents it is necessary to revisit optimal usage of old antibiotics. Old antimicrobial drugs are often associated with inadequate knowledge on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and lack of optimized dosing regimens based on randomized controlled clinical trials. If a shorter and more potent treatment regimen is shown to be equivalent with the normal 10 day regimen this can imply great advantages for both patients (adherence, adverse events, resistance) and the community (resistance, drug costs). EudraCT number 2015

  19. Central corneal thickness changes in bevel-up versus bevel-down phacoemulsification cataract surgery: study protocol for a randomised, triple-blind, parallel group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Soujanya; Shivalli, Siddharudha; Ks, Divyalakshmi; Arunachalam, Cynthia; Varghese, Rejitha Chinnu

    2016-09-29

    Corneal endothelial damage following phacoemulsification is still one of the major concerns of modern day cataract surgery. Although many techniques have been proposed, the risks of posterior capsular rupture and corneal endothelium damage persist. In theory, damage to the corneal endothelium is minimised by delivering the lowest phaco energy only in the direction necessary to emulsify the lens nucleus. Hence, it is believed that the bevel of the needle should be turned towards the nucleus or the nuclear fragment (ie, bevel-down. However, there is a difference of opinion among ophthalmologists with reference to the phaco tip's position (bevel-up vs bevel-down) during phacoemulsification. This subject has not been extensively studied earlier. This is a prospective, triple-blinded (trial participant, outcome assessor and the data analyst), randomised controlled trial with 2 parallel groups and with an allocation ratio of 1:1. It will be conducted in a tertiary care hospital, Mangaluru, India. The objective is to compare the postoperative central corneal thickness changes between the bevel-up and bevel-down techniques of phacoemulsification. Patients aged >18 years with immature cataract undergoing phacoemulsification will be selected for the study. The important exclusion criteria are the history of previous significant ocular trauma or intraocular surgery, corneal pathology, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, intraocular inflammation, a preoperative fully dilated pupil 4. After randomisation, patients will undergo phacoemulsification surgery either by a bevel-up or bevel-down procedure. With an estimated power of 80%, the calculated sample size is 55 patients in each group. The recruitment will start from April 2016. Yenepoya University Ethics Committee, India has approved the study protocol (YUEC/148/2016 on 18 February 2016). It complies with the Declaration of Helsinki, local laws and the International Council for Harmonization-good clinical practices. CTRI/2016

  20. Treatment influencing down-staging in EORTC Melanoma Group sentinel node histological protocol compared with complete step-sectioning: A national multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Hastrup, Nina; Clemmensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis size in melanoma sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) is an emerging prognostic factor. Two European melanoma treatment trials include SLN metastasis diameters as inclusion criteria. Whilst diameter estimates are sensitive to the number of sections examined, the level of this bias is largely...... unknown. We performed a prospective multicentre study to compare the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommended protocol with a protocol of complete step-sectioning....

  1. Living with diabetes: a group-based self-management support programme for T2DM patients in the early phases of illness and their partners, study protocol of a randomised comtrolled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puffelen, A.L. van; Rijken, M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Nijpels, G.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present article presents the protocol for a randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a group-based self-management support programme for recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients (one to three years post-diagnosis) and their partners. The course aims

  2. Taxonomic revision of the Malagasy members of the Nesomyrmex angulatus species group using the automated morphological species delineation protocol NC-PART-clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Applying quantitative morphological approaches in systematics research is a promising way to discover cryptic biological diversity. Information obtained through twenty-first century science poses new challenges to taxonomy by offering the possibility of increased objectivity in independent and automated hypothesis formation. In recent years a number of promising new algorithmic approaches have been developed to recognize morphological diversity among insects based on multivariate morphometric analyses. These algorithms objectively delimit components in the data by automatically assigning objects into clusters. Method. In this paper, hypotheses on the diversity of the Malagasy Nesomyrmex angulatus group are formulated via a highly automated protocol involving a fusion of two algorithms, (1) Nest Centroid clustering (NC clustering) and (2) Partitioning Algorithm based on Recursive Thresholding (PART). Both algorithms assign samples into clusters, making the class assignment results of different algorithms readily inferable. The results were tested by confirmatory cross-validated Linear Discriminant Analysis (LOOCV-LDA). Results. Here we reveal the diversity of a unique and largely unexplored fragment of the Malagasy ant fauna using NC-PART-clustering on continuous morphological data, an approach that brings increased objectivity to taxonomy. We describe eight morphologically distinct species, including seven new species: Nesomyrmex angulatus (Mayr, 1862), N. bidentatus sp. n., N. clypeatus sp. n., N. devius sp. n., N. exiguus sp. n., N. fragilis sp. n., N. gracilis sp. n., and N. hirtellus sp. n.. An identification key for their worker castes using morphometric data is provided. Conclusions. Combining the dimensionality reduction feature of NC clustering with the assignment of samples into clusters by PART advances the automatization of morphometry-based alpha taxonomy. PMID:26989630

  3. A multicentre randomised, 1-year comparative effectiveness, parallel-group trial protocol of a physical therapy approach compared to corticosteroid injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyle, Gail D; Gill, Norman W; Rhon, Daniel I; Allen, Chris S; Allison, Stephen C; Hando, Ben R; Petersen, Evan J; Dusenberry, Douglas I; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are commonly used as an initial or a primary intervention for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Consistent evidence indicates CSIs offer symptom relief with conflicting reports regarding long-term efficacy. Physical therapy (PT) offers a non-invasive alternative. There is moderate evidence suggesting short-term and long-term symptom relief and functional improvement with PT interventions. Patients with knee OA are more commonly prescribed CSI than PT prior to total joint replacement. UnitedHealthcare and Military Health System data show substantially more total knee replacement patients receive preoperative CSI than PT. There are no studies comparing CSI to a PT approach in individuals with knee OA. The primary objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of CSI to PT in individuals with knee OA at 1, 2 and 12 months. Methods and analysis We plan to recruit 156 participants meeting established knee OA criteria. Following informed consent, participants will be randomised to receive either CSI or PT. All participants will receive instruction on recommended exercise and weight control strategies plus usual medical care. The CSI intervention consisting of 3 injections and the PT intervention consisting of 8–12 sessions will be spaced over 12 months. Measures of the dependent variables (DVs) will occur at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post enrolment. This pragmatic, randomised clinical trial will be a mixed-model 2×5 factorial design. The independent variables are treatment (CSI and PT) and time with five levels from baseline to 1 year. The primary DV is the Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). We will also compare healthcare utilisation between the 2 groups. Ethics and Dissemination The protocol was approved by the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The authors intend to publish the results in a peer-reviewed source. Trial Registration

  4. Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

  5. Taxonomic revision of the Malagasy members of the Nesomyrmex angulatus species group using the automated morphological species delineation protocol NC-PART-clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor Csősz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Applying quantitative morphological approaches in systematics research is a promising way to discover cryptic biological diversity. Information obtained through twenty-first century science poses new challenges to taxonomy by offering the possibility of increased objectivity in independent and automated hypothesis formation. In recent years a number of promising new algorithmic approaches have been developed to recognize morphological diversity among insects based on multivariate morphometric analyses. These algorithms objectively delimit components in the data by automatically assigning objects into clusters. Method. In this paper, hypotheses on the diversity of the Malagasy Nesomyrmex angulatus group are formulated via a highly automated protocol involving a fusion of two algorithms, (1 Nest Centroid clustering (NC clustering and (2 Partitioning Algorithm based on Recursive Thresholding (PART. Both algorithms assign samples into clusters, making the class assignment results of different algorithms readily inferable. The results were tested by confirmatory cross-validated Linear Discriminant Analysis (LOOCV-LDA. Results. Here we reveal the diversity of a unique and largely unexplored fragment of the Malagasy ant fauna using NC-PART-clustering on continuous morphological data, an approach that brings increased objectivity to taxonomy. We describe eight morphologically distinct species, including seven new species: Nesomyrmex angulatus (Mayr, 1862, N. bidentatus sp. n., N. clypeatus sp. n., N. devius sp. n., N. exiguus sp. n., N. fragilis sp. n., N. gracilis sp. n., and N. hirtellus sp. n.. An identification key for their worker castes using morphometric data is provided. Conclusions. Combining the dimensionality reduction feature of NC clustering with the assignment of samples into clusters by PART advances the automatization of morphometry-based alpha taxonomy.

  6. Protocol: the effect of 12 weeks of Tai Chi practice on anxiety in healthy but stressed people compared to exercise and wait-list comparison groups: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuai; Lal, Sara; Meier, Peter; Sibbritt, David; Zaslawski, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Stress is a major problem in today's fast-paced society and can lead to serious psychosomatic complications. The ancient Chinese mind-body exercise of Tai Chi may provide an alternative and self-sustaining option to pharmaceutical medication for stressed individuals to improve their coping mechanisms. The protocol of this study is designed to evaluate whether Tai Chi practice is equivalent to standard exercise and whether the Tai Chi group is superior to a wait-list control group in improving stress coping levels. This study is a 6-week, three-arm, parallel, randomized, clinical trial designed to evaluate Tai Chi practice against standard exercise and a Tai Chi group against a nonactive control group over a period of 6 weeks with a 6-week follow-up. A total of 72 healthy adult participants (aged 18-60 years) who are either Tai Chi naïve or have not practiced Tai Chi in the past 12 months will be randomized into a Tai Chi group (n = 24), an exercise group (n = 24) or a wait-list group (n = 24). The primary outcome measure will be the State Trait Anxiety Inventory with secondary outcome measures being the Perceived Stress Scale 14, heart rate variability, blood pressure, Short Form 36 and a visual analog scale. The protocol is reported using the appropriate Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) items.

  7. Covariant diagrams for one-loop matching

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-01-01

    We present a diagrammatic formulation of recently-revived covariant functional approaches to one-loop matching from an ultraviolet (UV) theory to a low-energy effective field theory. Various terms following from a covariant derivative expansion (CDE) are represented by diagrams which, unlike conventional Feynman diagrams, involve gauge-covariant quantities and are thus dubbed "covariant diagrams." The use of covariant diagrams helps organize and simplify one-loop matching calculations, which we illustrate with examples. Of particular interest is the derivation of UV model-independent universal results, which reduce matching calculations of specific UV models to applications of master formulas. We show how such derivation can be done in a more concise manner than the previous literature, and discuss how additional structures that are not directly captured by existing universal results, including mixed heavy-light loops, open covariant derivatives, and mixed statistics, can be easily accounted for.

  8. ISSUES IN NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattoon, C.M.; Oblozinsky,P.

    2010-04-30

    We review neutron cross section covariances in both the resonance and fast neutron regions with the goal to identify existing issues in evaluation methods and their impact on covariances. We also outline ideas for suitable covariance quality assurance procedures.We show that the topic of covariance data remains controversial, the evaluation methodologies are not fully established and covariances produced by different approaches have unacceptable spread. The main controversy is in very low uncertainties generated by rigorous evaluation methods and much larger uncertainties based on simple estimates from experimental data. Since the evaluators tend to trust the former, while the users tend to trust the latter, this controversy has considerable practical implications. Dedicated effort is needed to arrive at covariance evaluation methods that would resolve this issue and produce results accepted internationally both by evaluators and users.

  9. Parameter inference with estimated covariance matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Sellentin, Elena

    2015-01-01

    When inferring parameters from a Gaussian-distributed data set by computing a likelihood, a covariance matrix is needed that describes the data errors and their correlations. If the covariance matrix is not known a priori, it may be estimated and thereby becomes a random object with some intrinsic uncertainty itself. We show how to infer parameters in the presence of such an estimated covariance matrix, by marginalising over the true covariance matrix, conditioned on its estimated value. This leads to a likelihood function that is no longer Gaussian, but rather an adapted version of a multivariate $t$-distribution, which has the same numerical complexity as the multivariate Gaussian. As expected, marginalisation over the true covariance matrix improves inference when compared with Hartlap et al.'s method, which uses an unbiased estimate of the inverse covariance matrix but still assumes that the likelihood is Gaussian.

  10. ISSUES IN NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattoon, C.M.; Oblozinsky,P.

    2010-04-30

    We review neutron cross section covariances in both the resonance and fast neutron regions with the goal to identify existing issues in evaluation methods and their impact on covariances. We also outline ideas for suitable covariance quality assurance procedures.We show that the topic of covariance data remains controversial, the evaluation methodologies are not fully established and covariances produced by different approaches have unacceptable spread. The main controversy is in very low uncertainties generated by rigorous evaluation methods and much larger uncertainties based on simple estimates from experimental data. Since the evaluators tend to trust the former, while the users tend to trust the latter, this controversy has considerable practical implications. Dedicated effort is needed to arrive at covariance evaluation methods that would resolve this issue and produce results accepted internationally both by evaluators and users.

  11. Treatment Effects with Many Covariates and Heteroskedasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattaneo, Matias D.; Jansson, Michael; Newey, Whitney K.

    The linear regression model is widely used in empirical work in Economics. Researchers often include many covariates in their linear model specification in an attempt to control for confounders. We give inference methods that allow for many covariates and heteroskedasticity. Our results are obtai......The linear regression model is widely used in empirical work in Economics. Researchers often include many covariates in their linear model specification in an attempt to control for confounders. We give inference methods that allow for many covariates and heteroskedasticity. Our results...... then propose a new heteroskedasticity consistent standard error formula that is fully automatic and robust to both (conditional) heteroskedasticity of unknown form and the inclusion of possibly many covariates. We apply our findings to three settings: (i) parametric linear models with many covariates, (ii...

  12. Eigenvalue variance bounds for covariance matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Dallaporta, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with finite range bounds on the variance of individual eigenvalues of random covariance matrices, both in the bulk and at the edge of the spectrum. In a preceding paper, the author established analogous results for Wigner matrices and stated the results for covariance matrices. They are proved in the present paper. Relying on the LUE example, which needs to be investigated first, the main bounds are extended to complex covariance matrices by means of the Tao, Vu and Wan...

  13. Analysis of capture-recapture models with individual covariates using data augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    I consider the analysis of capture-recapture models with individual covariates that influence detection probability. Bayesian analysis of the joint likelihood is carried out using a flexible data augmentation scheme that facilitates analysis by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, and a simple and straightforward implementation in freely available software. This approach is applied to a study of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) in which auxiliary data on a continuous covariate (body mass) are recorded, and it is thought that detection probability is related to body mass. In a second example, the model is applied to an aerial waterfowl survey in which a double-observer protocol is used. The fundamental unit of observation is the cluster of individual birds, and the size of the cluster (a discrete covariate) is used as a covariate on detection probability.

  14. A comparison of two treatments for childhood apraxia of speech: methods and treatment protocol for a parallel group randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood Apraxia of Speech is an impairment of speech motor planning that manifests as difficulty producing the sounds (articulation and melody (prosody of speech. These difficulties may persist through life and are detrimental to academic, social, and vocational development. A number of published single subject and case series studies of speech treatments are available. There are currently no randomised control trials or other well designed group trials available to guide clinical practice. Methods/Design A parallel group, fixed size randomised control trial will be conducted in Sydney, Australia to determine the efficacy of two treatments for Childhood Apraxia of Speech: 1 Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the 2 Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme – Third edition. Eligible children will be English speaking, aged 4–12 years with a diagnosis of suspected CAS, normal or adjusted hearing and vision, and no comprehension difficulties or other developmental diagnoses. At least 20 children will be randomised to receive one of the two treatments in parallel. Treatments will be delivered by trained and supervised speech pathology clinicians using operationalised manuals. Treatment will be administered in 1-hour sessions, 4 times per week for 3 weeks. The primary outcomes are speech sound and prosodic accuracy on a customised 292 item probe and the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology inconsistency subtest administered prior to treatment and 1 week, 1 month and 4 months post-treatment. All post assessments will be completed by blinded assessors. Our hypotheses are: 1 treatment effects at 1 week post will be similar for both treatments, 2 maintenance of treatment effects at 1 and 4 months post will be greater for Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment than Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme treatment, and 3 generalisation of treatment effects to untrained related speech behaviours will be greater for Rapid

  15. Covariance matrices for use in criticality safety predictability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1997-09-01

    Criticality predictability applications require as input the best available information on fissile and other nuclides. In recent years important work has been performed in the analysis of neutron transmission and cross-section data for fissile nuclei in the resonance region by using the computer code SAMMY. The code uses Bayes method (a form of generalized least squares) for sequential analyses of several sets of experimental data. Values for Reich-Moore resonance parameters, their covariances, and the derivatives with respect to the adjusted parameters (data sensitivities) are obtained. In general, the parameter file contains several thousand values and the dimension of the covariance matrices is correspondingly large. These matrices are not reported in the current evaluated data files due to their large dimensions and to the inadequacy of the file formats. The present work has two goals: the first is to calculate the covariances of group-averaged cross sections from the covariance files generated by SAMMY, because these can be more readily utilized in criticality predictability calculations. The second goal is to propose a more practical interface between SAMMY and the evaluated files. Examples are given for {sup 235}U in the popular 199- and 238-group structures, using the latest ORNL evaluation of the {sup 235}U resonance parameters.

  16. Assessing spatial covariance among time series of abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Jeffrey C; Ward, Eric J; Scheuerell, Mark D; Zabel, Richard W

    2016-04-01

    For species of conservation concern, an essential part of the recovery planning process is identifying discrete population units and their location with respect to one another. A common feature among geographically proximate populations is that the number of organisms tends to covary through time as a consequence of similar responses to exogenous influences. In turn, high covariation among populations can threaten the persistence of the larger metapopulation. Historically, explorations of the covariance in population size of species with many (>10) time series have been computationally difficult. Here, we illustrate how dynamic factor analysis (DFA) can be used to characterize diversity among time series of population abundances and the degree to which all populations can be represented by a few common signals. Our application focuses on anadromous Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), a species listed under the US Endangered Species Act, that is impacted by a variety of natural and anthropogenic factors. Specifically, we fit DFA models to 24 time series of population abundance and used model selection to identify the minimum number of latent variables that explained the most temporal variation after accounting for the effects of environmental covariates. We found support for grouping the time series according to 5 common latent variables. The top model included two covariates: the Pacific Decadal Oscillation in spring and summer. The assignment of populations to the latent variables matched the currently established population structure at a broad spatial scale. At a finer scale, there was more population grouping complexity. Some relatively distant populations were grouped together, and some relatively close populations - considered to be more aligned with each other - were more associated with populations further away. These coarse- and fine-grained examinations of spatial structure are important because they reveal different structural patterns not evident

  17. Covariance structure models of expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M J; Goldman, M S; Coovert, M D; Carnevalla, N

    1994-05-01

    Antecedent variables under the broad categories of genetic, environmental and cultural influences have been linked to the risk for alcohol abuse. Such risk factors have not been shown to result in high correlations with alcohol consumption and leave unclear an understanding of the mechanism by which these variables lead to increased risk. This study employed covariance structure modeling to examine the mediational influence of stored information in memory about alcohol, alcohol expectancies in relation to two biologically and environmentally driven antecedent variables, family history of alcohol abuse and a sensation-seeking temperament in a college population. We also examined the effect of criterion contamination on the relationship between sensation-seeking and alcohol consumption. Results indicated that alcohol expectancy acts as a significant, partial mediator of the relationship between sensation-seeking and consumption, that family history of alcohol abuse is not related to drinking outcome and that overlap in items on sensation-seeking and alcohol consumption measures may falsely inflate their relationship.

  18. On the Origin of Gravitational Lorentz Covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin; Tolley, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    We provide evidence that general relativity is the unique spatially covariant effective field theory of the transverse, traceless graviton degrees of freedom. The Lorentz covariance of general relativity, having not been assumed in our analysis, is thus plausibly interpreted as an accidental or emergent symmetry of the gravitational sector.

  19. COVARIATION BIAS AND THE RETURN OF FEAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; VANDENHOUT, MA; MERCKELBACH, H

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that phobic fear is accompanied by a covariation bias, i.e. that phobic Ss tend to overassociate fear relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes. Such a covariation bias seems to be a fairly direct and powerful way to confirm danger expectations and enhance fear. Therefore

  20. Covariant derivative of fermions and all that

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Ilya L

    2016-01-01

    We present detailed pedagogical derivation of covariant derivative of fermions and some related expressions, including commutator of covariant derivatives and energy-momentum tensor of a free Dirac field. The text represents a part of the initial chapter of a one-semester course on semiclassical gravity.

  1. Multigroup covariance matrices for fast-reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.D. III; Broadhead, B.L.

    1981-04-01

    This report presents the multigroup covariance matrices based on the ENDF/B-V nuclear data evaluations. The materials and reactions have been chosen according to the specifications of ORNL-5517. Several cross section covariances, other than those specified by that report, are included due to the derived nature of the uncertainty files in ENDF/B-V. The materials represented are Ni, Cr, /sup 16/O, /sup 12/C, Fe, Na, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, and /sup 10/B (present due to its correlation to /sup 238/U). The data have been originally processed into a 52-group energy structure by PUFF-II and subsequently collapsed to smaller subgroup strutures. The results are illustrated in 52-group correlation matrix plots and tabulated into thirteen groups for convenience.

  2. Covariant diagrams for one-loop matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhengkang [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    We present a diagrammatic formulation of recently-revived covariant functional approaches to one-loop matching from an ultraviolet (UV) theory to a low-energy effective field theory. Various terms following from a covariant derivative expansion (CDE) are represented by diagrams which, unlike conventional Feynman diagrams, involve gaugecovariant quantities and are thus dubbed ''covariant diagrams.'' The use of covariant diagrams helps organize and simplify one-loop matching calculations, which we illustrate with examples. Of particular interest is the derivation of UV model-independent universal results, which reduce matching calculations of specific UV models to applications of master formulas. We show how such derivation can be done in a more concise manner than the previous literature, and discuss how additional structures that are not directly captured by existing universal results, including mixed heavy-light loops, open covariant derivatives, and mixed statistics, can be easily accounted for.

  3. (dtltt) protocol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Keywords: multi-access, multiservice, network, synchronous, asynchronous, traffic, timed-token. 1. ... 12, 13 ] SAFENET [14], Manufacturing Automation. Protocol (MAP) ...... ken circulation on mobile Ad Hoc Networks. 21th In-.

  4. The covariate-adjusted frequency plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holling, Heinz; Böhning, Walailuck; Böhning, Dankmar; Formann, Anton K

    2016-04-01

    Count data arise in numerous fields of interest. Analysis of these data frequently require distributional assumptions. Although the graphical display of a fitted model is straightforward in the univariate scenario, this becomes more complex if covariate information needs to be included into the model. Stratification is one way to proceed, but has its limitations if the covariate has many levels or the number of covariates is large. The article suggests a marginal method which works even in the case that all possible covariate combinations are different (i.e. no covariate combination occurs more than once). For each covariate combination the fitted model value is computed and then summed over the entire data set. The technique is quite general and works with all count distributional models as well as with all forms of covariate modelling. The article provides illustrations of the method for various situations and also shows that the proposed estimator as well as the empirical count frequency are consistent with respect to the same parameter.

  5. Universal Composable Grouping-Proof Protocol for RFID Tags in the Internet of Things%物联网环境下UC安全的组证明RFID协议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张忠; 徐秋亮

    2011-01-01

    Security and privacy block the development of the Internet of Things (IOT). How to design a RFID grouping-proof protocol with security and high efficiency is a key problem in the security of IOT. Firstly, we present an attack model and a interaction model, and give the analysis. Then, the ideal functionality Fvs and the grouping-proof ideal functionality FGp are formally defined with the UC framework. Finally, a grouping-proof protocol πgp is designed in the Fvs-hy-brid model. It is proved that the protocol πgp realizes the ideal functionality Fop securely for any adversary. According to the composition theorem in the UC framework, the proposed grouping-proof protocol for RFID tags is UC secure.%物联网的安全和隐私保护问题是制约其进一步发展的关键性问题,如何设计一个安全、高效的组证明RFID协议是物联网安全需要重点研究的一个问题.首先,文中对物联网环境下组证明RFID协议的交互模型和攻击模型做了分析和描述.然后,在通用可组合安全框架下,形式化定义了理想功能FvS和RFID组证明理想功能FGP.最后,在Fvs-混合模型下,设计了组证明RFID协议πGp,并证明对于任意的攻击者而言,协议πGP,能安全实现理想功能FGP.根据组合定理表明新的组证明RFID协议具有通用可组合安全性.

  6. Forecasting Covariance Matrices: A Mixed Frequency Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halbleib, Roxana; Voev, Valeri

    This paper proposes a new method for forecasting covariance matrices of financial returns. The model mixes volatility forecasts from a dynamic model of daily realized volatilities estimated with high-frequency data with correlation forecasts based on daily data. This new approach allows...... for flexible dependence patterns for volatilities and correlations, and can be applied to covariance matrices of large dimensions. The separate modeling of volatility and correlation forecasts considerably reduces the estimation and measurement error implied by the joint estimation and modeling of covariance...... matrix dynamics. Our empirical results show that the new mixing approach provides superior forecasts compared to multivariate volatility specifications using single sources of information....

  7. Estimation of Low-Rank Covariance Function

    OpenAIRE

    Koltchinskii, Vladimir; Lounici, Karim; Tsybakov, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating a low rank covariance function $K(t,u)$ of a Gaussian process $S(t), t\\in [0,1]$ based on $n$ i.i.d. copies of $S$ observed in a white noise. We suggest a new estimation procedure adapting simultaneously to the low rank structure and the smoothness of the covariance function. The new procedure is based on nuclear norm penalization and exhibits superior performances as compared to the sample covariance function by a polynomial factor in the sample size $n$...

  8. Bayesian model selection for a linear model with grouped covariates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Min, Xiaoyi; Sun, Dongchu

    2016-01-01

    .... The marginal likelihood function is derived under the proposed priors, and a simplified closed-form expression is given assuming the commutativity of the projection matrices from the design matrices...

  9. Treatment of Nuclear Data Covariance Information in Sample Generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Adams, Brian M.; Wieselquist, William (ORNL)

    2017-10-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on developing a sampling capability that can handle the challenges of generating samples from nuclear cross-section data. The covariance information between energy groups tends to be very ill-conditioned and thus poses a problem using traditional methods for generated correlated samples. This report outlines a method that addresses the sample generation from cross-section matrices.

  10. Dunkl Operators as Covariant Derivatives in a Quantum Principal Bundle

    OpenAIRE

    Micho Đurđevich; Stephen Bruce Sontz

    2011-01-01

    A quantum principal bundle is constructed for every Coxeter group acting on a finite-dimensional Euclidean space $E$, and then a connection is also defined on this bundle. The covariant derivatives associated to this connection are the Dunkl operators, originally introduced as part of a program to generalize harmonic analysis in Euclidean spaces. This gives us a new, geometric way of viewing the Dunkl operators. In particular, we present a new proof of the commutativity of these operators amo...

  11. Dysphonia risk screening protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Nemr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To propose and test the applicability of a dysphonia risk screening protocol with score calculation in individuals with and without dysphonia. METHOD: This descriptive cross-sectional study included 365 individuals (41 children, 142 adult women, 91 adult men and 91 seniors divided into a dysphonic group and a non-dysphonic group. The protocol consisted of 18 questions and a score was calculated using a 10-cm visual analog scale. The measured value on the visual analog scale was added to the overall score, along with other partial scores. Speech samples allowed for analysis/assessment of the overall degree of vocal deviation and initial definition of the respective groups and after six months, the separation of the groups was confirmed using an acoustic analysis. RESULTS: The mean total scores were different between the groups in all samples. Values ranged between 37.0 and 57.85 in the dysphonic group and between 12.95 and 19.28 in the non-dysphonic group, with overall means of 46.09 and 15.55, respectively. High sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated when discriminating between the groups with the following cut-off points: 22.50 (children, 29.25 (adult women, 22.75 (adult men, and 27.10 (seniors. CONCLUSION: The protocol demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating groups of individuals with and without dysphonia in different sample groups and is thus an effective instrument for use in voice clinics.

  12. A Provable Secure Group Key Agreement Protocol with Fault-Tolerant%一种故障容忍的可证安全组密钥协商协议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑明辉; 周慧华; 崔国华; 韩兰胜

    2009-01-01

    对Burmester等人提出的非认证组密钥协商协议的安全性进行了深入分析,指出该协议不能抵抗内部恶意节点发起的密钥协商阻断攻击和密钥控制攻击.提出了一种故障容忍的组密钥协商(FT-GKA)协议,FT-GKA协议在密钥协商过程中加入了消息正确性的认证机制,该机制利用数字签名技术检测组内恶意节点,并在驱逐恶意节点后保证组内诚实节点能计算出正确的会话密钥,解决了Burmester等人提出协议中存在的内部恶意节点攻击问题.并证明提出的协议在DDH假设下能抵抗敌手的被动攻击,在DL假设和随机预言模型下能够抵抗内部恶意节点发起的密钥协商阻断攻击和密钥控制攻击.理论分析与实验测试表明,提出的协议具有较高的通信轮效率和较低的计算开销.%This paper indicates that Burmester et al.'s group key agreement protocol which based on the authenticated broadcast channel is unable to withstand the disruption attack and key-control attack of malicious participants in group. These two attacks lead that other honest participants will compute different session key and other honest participants compute the fixed session key which is determined previously by malicious participants,respectively.In this paper,a fault-tolerant group key agreement (FT-GKA) protocol is proposed. Even if there are malicious participants trying to attack the establishment of a session key, all other honest participants following the proposed protocol are still able to compute the correct session key using the digital signature technology.Paper proves the protocol can withstand the passive attack of adversary under the DDH assumption, and the protocol can withstand the interrupted attack and key - control attack from malicious participants under the DL assumption and the random oracle model.Furthermore, the proposed protocol possesses both constant number of rounds and lower computation overhead.

  13. Covariance NMR spectroscopy by singular value decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbovic, Nikola; Smirnov, Serge; Zhang, Fengli; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2004-12-01

    Covariance NMR is demonstrated for homonuclear 2D NMR data collected using the hypercomplex and TPPI methods. Absorption mode 2D spectra are obtained by application of the square-root operation to the covariance matrices. The resulting spectra closely resemble the 2D Fourier transformation spectra, except that they are fully symmetric with the spectral resolution along both dimensions determined by the favorable resolution achievable along omega2. An efficient method is introduced for the calculation of the square root of the covariance spectrum by applying a singular value decomposition (SVD) directly to the mixed time-frequency domain data matrix. Applications are shown for 2D NOESY and 2QF-COSY data sets and computational benchmarks are given for data matrix dimensions typically encountered in practice. The SVD implementation makes covariance NMR amenable to routine applications.

  14. Covariant Quantization with Extended BRST Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Geyer, B; Lavrov, P M

    1999-01-01

    A short rewiev of covariant quantization methods based on BRST-antiBRST symmetry is given. In particular problems of correct definition of Sp(2) symmetric quantization scheme known as triplectic quantization are considered.

  15. Conformally covariant parametrizations for relativistic initial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Erwann

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the Lichnerowicz-York method, and an alternative method of York, in order to obtain some conformally covariant systems. This type of parametrization is certainly more natural for non constant mean curvature initial data.

  16. Hierarchical matrix approximation of large covariance matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2015-01-07

    We approximate large non-structured covariance matrices in the H-matrix format with a log-linear computational cost and storage O(n log n). We compute inverse, Cholesky decomposition and determinant in H-format. As an example we consider the class of Matern covariance functions, which are very popular in spatial statistics, geostatistics, machine learning and image analysis. Applications are: kriging and optimal design

  17. Hierarchical matrix approximation of large covariance matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2015-01-05

    We approximate large non-structured covariance matrices in the H-matrix format with a log-linear computational cost and storage O(nlogn). We compute inverse, Cholesky decomposition and determinant in H-format. As an example we consider the class of Matern covariance functions, which are very popular in spatial statistics, geostatistics, machine learning and image analysis. Applications are: kriging and op- timal design.

  18. Covariate analysis of bivariate survival data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    The methods developed are used to analyze the effects of covariates on bivariate survival data when censoring and ties are present. The proposed method provides models for bivariate survival data that include differential covariate effects and censored observations. The proposed models are based on an extension of the univariate Buckley-James estimators which replace censored data points by their expected values, conditional on the censoring time and the covariates. For the bivariate situation, it is necessary to determine the expectation of the failure times for one component conditional on the failure or censoring time of the other component. Two different methods have been developed to estimate these expectations. In the semiparametric approach these expectations are determined from a modification of Burke's estimate of the bivariate empirical survival function. In the parametric approach censored data points are also replaced by their conditional expected values where the expected values are determined from a specified parametric distribution. The model estimation will be based on the revised data set, comprised of uncensored components and expected values for the censored components. The variance-covariance matrix for the estimated covariate parameters has also been derived for both the semiparametric and parametric methods. Data from the Demographic and Health Survey was analyzed by these methods. The two outcome variables are post-partum amenorrhea and breastfeeding; education and parity were used as the covariates. Both the covariate parameter estimates and the variance-covariance estimates for the semiparametric and parametric models will be compared. In addition, a multivariate test statistic was used in the semiparametric model to examine contrasts. The significance of the statistic was determined from a bootstrap distribution of the test statistic.

  19. Covariant action for type IIB supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2016-07-01

    Taking clues from the recent construction of the covariant action for type II and heterotic string field theories, we construct a manifestly Lorentz covariant action for type IIB supergravity, and discuss its gauge fixing maintaining manifest Lorentz invariance. The action contains a (non-gravitating) free 4-form field besides the usual fields of type IIB supergravity. This free field, being completely decoupled from the interacting sector, has no physical consequence.

  20. Functional CLT for sample covariance matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Zhidong; Zhou, Wang; 10.3150/10-BEJ250

    2010-01-01

    Using Bernstein polynomial approximations, we prove the central limit theorem for linear spectral statistics of sample covariance matrices, indexed by a set of functions with continuous fourth order derivatives on an open interval including $[(1-\\sqrt{y})^2,(1+\\sqrt{y})^2]$, the support of the Mar\\u{c}enko--Pastur law. We also derive the explicit expressions for asymptotic mean and covariance functions.

  1. On the covariance of residual lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Unnikrishnan Nair

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Various properties of residual life such as mean, median, percentiles, variance etc have been discussed in literature on reliability and survival analysis. However a detailed study on covariance between residual lives in a two component system does not seem to have been undertaken. The present paper discusses various properties of product moment and covariance of residual lives. Relationships the product moment has with mean residual life and failure rate are studied and some characterizations are established.

  2. Covariant Hamilton equations for field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giachetta, Giovanni [Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Mangiarotti, Luigi [Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy)]. E-mail: mangiaro@camserv.unicam.it; Sardanashvily, Gennadi [Department of Theoretical Physics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: sard@grav.phys.msu.su

    1999-09-24

    We study the relations between the equations of first-order Lagrangian field theory on fibre bundles and the covariant Hamilton equations on the finite-dimensional polysymplectic phase space of covariant Hamiltonian field theory. If a Lagrangian is hyperregular, these equations are equivalent. A degenerate Lagrangian requires a set of associated Hamiltonian forms in order to exhaust all solutions of the Euler-Lagrange equations. The case of quadratic degenerate Lagrangians is studied in detail. (author)

  3. Economical Phase-Covariant Cloning of Qudits

    CERN Document Server

    Buscemi, F; Macchiavello, C; Buscemi, Francesco; Ariano, Giacomo Mauro D'; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2004-01-01

    We derive the optimal $N\\to M$ phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension $d$ with $M=kd+N$, $k$ integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an ``economical'' cloning machine, which works without ancilla. The connection between optimal phase-covariant cloning and optimal multi-phase estimation is finally established.

  4. Representations of Inverse Covariances by Differential Operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin XU

    2005-01-01

    In the cost function of three- or four-dimensional variational data assimilation, each term is weighted by the inverse of its associated error covariance matrix and the background error covariance matrix is usually much larger than the other covariance matrices. Although the background error covariances are traditionally normalized and parameterized by simple smooth homogeneous correlation functions, the covariance matrices constructed from these correlation functions are often too large to be inverted or even manipulated. It is thus desirable to find direct representations of the inverses of background errorcorrelations. This problem is studied in this paper. In particular, it is shown that the background term can be written into ∫ dx|Dv(x)|2, that is, a squared L2 norm of a vector differential operator D, called the D-operator, applied to the field of analysis increment v(x). For autoregressive correlation functions, the Doperators are of finite orders. For Gaussian correlation functions, the D-operators are of infinite order. For practical applications, the Gaussian D-operators must be truncated to finite orders. The truncation errors are found to be small even when the Gaussian D-operators are truncated to low orders. With a truncated D-operator, the background term can be easily constructed with neither inversion nor direct calculation of the covariance matrix. D-operators are also derived for non-Gaussian correlations and transformed into non-isotropic forms.

  5. Problems and Progress in Covariant High Spin Description

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchbach, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    A universal description of particles with spins j greater or equal one , transforming in (j,0)+(0,j), is developed by means of representation specific second order differential wave equations without auxiliary conditions and in covariant bases such as Lorentz tensors for bosons, Lorentz-tensors with Dirac spinor components for fermions, or, within the basis of the more fundamental Weyl-Van-der-Waerden sl(2,C) spinor-tensors. At the root of the method, which is free from the pathologies suffered by the traditional approaches, are projectors constructed from the Casimir invariants of the spin-Lorentz group, and the group of translations in the Minkowski space time.

  6. Problems and Progress in Covariant High Spin Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchbach, Mariana; Banda Guzmán, Víctor Miguel

    2016-10-01

    A universal description of particles with spins j > 1, transforming in (j, 0) ⊕ (0, j), is developed by means of representation specific second order differential wave equations without auxiliary conditions and in covariant bases such as Lorentz tensors for bosons, Lorentz-tensors with Dirac spinor components for fermions, or, within the basis of the more fundamental Weyl- Van-der-Waerden sl(2,C) spinor-tensors. At the root of the method, which is free from the pathologies suffered by the traditional approaches, are projectors constructed from the Casimir invariants of the spin-Lorentz group, and the group of translations in the Minkowski space time.

  7. Wishart distributions for decomposable covariance graph models

    CERN Document Server

    Khare, Kshitij; 10.1214/10-AOS841

    2011-01-01

    Gaussian covariance graph models encode marginal independence among the components of a multivariate random vector by means of a graph $G$. These models are distinctly different from the traditional concentration graph models (often also referred to as Gaussian graphical models or covariance selection models) since the zeros in the parameter are now reflected in the covariance matrix $\\Sigma$, as compared to the concentration matrix $\\Omega =\\Sigma^{-1}$. The parameter space of interest for covariance graph models is the cone $P_G$ of positive definite matrices with fixed zeros corresponding to the missing edges of $G$. As in Letac and Massam [Ann. Statist. 35 (2007) 1278--1323], we consider the case where $G$ is decomposable. In this paper, we construct on the cone $P_G$ a family of Wishart distributions which serve a similar purpose in the covariance graph setting as those constructed by Letac and Massam [Ann. Statist. 35 (2007) 1278--1323] and Dawid and Lauritzen [Ann. Statist. 21 (1993) 1272--1317] do in ...

  8. Cross-covariance functions for multivariate geostatistics

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2015-05-01

    Continuously indexed datasets with multiple variables have become ubiquitous in the geophysical, ecological, environmental and climate sciences, and pose substantial analysis challenges to scientists and statisticians. For many years, scientists developed models that aimed at capturing the spatial behavior for an individual process; only within the last few decades has it become commonplace to model multiple processes jointly. The key difficulty is in specifying the cross-covariance function, that is, the function responsible for the relationship between distinct variables. Indeed, these cross-covariance functions must be chosen to be consistent with marginal covariance functions in such a way that the second-order structure always yields a nonnegative definite covariance matrix. We review the main approaches to building cross-covariance models, including the linear model of coregionalization, convolution methods, the multivariate Matérn and nonstationary and space-time extensions of these among others. We additionally cover specialized constructions, including those designed for asymmetry, compact support and spherical domains, with a review of physics-constrained models. We illustrate select models on a bivariate regional climate model output example for temperature and pressure, along with a bivariate minimum and maximum temperature observational dataset; we compare models by likelihood value as well as via cross-validation co-kriging studies. The article closes with a discussion of unsolved problems. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2015.

  9. Lorentz covariance of loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The kinematics of loop gravity can be given a manifestly Lorentz-covariant formulation: the conventional SU(2)-spin-network Hilbert space can be mapped to a space K of SL(2,C) functions, where Lorentz covariance is manifest. K can be described in terms of a certain subset of the "projected" spin networks studied by Livine, Alexandrov and Dupuis. It is formed by SL(2,C) functions completely determined by their restriction on SU(2). These are square-integrable in the SU(2) scalar product, but not in the SL(2,C) one. Thus, SU(2)-spin-network states can be represented by Lorentz-covariant SL(2,C) functions, as two-component photons can be described in the Lorentz-covariant Gupta-Bleuler formalism. As shown by Wolfgang Wieland in a related paper, this manifestly Lorentz-covariant formulation can also be directly obtained from canonical quantization. We show that the spinfoam dynamics of loop quantum gravity is locally SL(2,C)-invariant in the bulk, and yields states that are preciseley in K on the boundary. This c...

  10. The DISC (Diabetes in Social Context Study-evaluation of a culturally sensitive social network intervention for diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vissenberg Charlotte

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups, diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups have less favourable metabolic control and experience more diabetes-related complications. They encounter specific barriers that hinder optimal diabetes self-management, including a lack of social support and other psychosocial mechanisms in their immediate social environments. Powerful Together with Diabetes is a culturally sensitive social network intervention specifically targeted to ethnic Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, and Surinamese diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups. For ten months, patients will participate in peer support groups in which they will share experiences, support each other in maintaining healthy lifestyles, and learn skills to resist social pressure. At the same time, their significant others will also receive an intervention, aimed at maximizing support for and minimizing the negative social influences on diabetes self-management. This study aims to test the effectiveness of Powerful Together with Diabetes. Methods/Design We will use a quasi-experimental design with an intervention group (Group 1 and two comparison groups (Groups 2 and 3, N = 128 in each group. Group 1 will receive Powerful Together with Diabetes. Group 2 will receive Know your Sugar, a six-week group intervention that does not focus on the participants' social environments. Group 3 receives standard care only. Participants in Groups 1 and 2 will be interviewed and physically examined at baseline, 3, 10, and 16 months. We will compare their haemoglobin A1C levels with the haemoglobin A1C levels of Group 3. Main outcome measures are haemoglobin A1C, diabetes-related quality of life, diabetes self-management, health-related, and intermediate outcome measures. We will conduct a process evaluation and a qualitative study to gain more insights into the intervention fidelity, feasibility, and changes in the psychosocial mechanism in the

  11. Covariate Adjustment in Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis for PSA in Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre DEMIR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Markers which are used for classification into two groups, such as patient / healthy, benign/malignant or prediction of optimal cut off value for diagnostic test and evaluating the performance of diagnostic tests is evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve in the diagnostic test researches. In classification accuracy research, some variables such as gender and age, commonly is not similar in groups. In these cases, covariates should be considered to estimate in the area under ROC and covariate adjustment for ROC should be performed. This study aims to introduce methods in the literature for the effect of covariate adjustment and to present an application with sample from the health field. Material and Methods: In the study, we introduced methods used in the literatüre for covariate adjustment and prediction of the area under ROC curves as well as an application with data from the field of urology. In this study, 105 PSA (prostate specific antigen measurements were taken in order to examine the covariate effect for the age variable and to assess the diagnostic performance of PSA measurements with regard to pathologic methods. Results: Covariate effect were found statistically significant with 0.733 parameter estimation of the age in ROC curves analysis with PSA data (p<0.001. According to the methods (Non-parametric (empirical, non-parametric (normal, semi-parametric (empirical, parametric (normal that estimates of the area under ROC curves which is obtained without covariate effect were found 0.708, 0.629, 0.709 and 0.628, respectively, by using PSA measurements. Area under the curve that obtained by covariate adjustment were significantly lower as compared to the traditional ROC with estimation 0.580, 0.577, 0.582 and 0.579. Conclusion: Area under the ROC curves should be estimated with adjustment according to the covariates that could affect the markers value of diagnostic tests performed in concert with matching

  12. Accurate covariance estimation of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing: limitations of jackknife covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Shirasaki, Masato; Miyatake, Hironao; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Hamana, Takashi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Murata, Ryoma

    2016-01-01

    We develop a method to simulate galaxy-galaxy weak lensing by utilizing all-sky, light-cone simulations. We populate a real catalog of source galaxies into a light-cone simulation realization, simulate the lensing effect on each galaxy, and then identify lensing halos that are considered to host galaxies or clusters of interest. We use the mock catalog to study the error covariance matrix of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing and find that the super-sample covariance (SSC), which arises from density fluctuations with length scales comparable with or greater than a size of survey area, gives a dominant source of the sample variance. We then compare the full covariance with the jackknife (JK) covariance, the method that estimates the covariance from the resamples of the data itself. We show that, although the JK method gives an unbiased estimator of the covariance in the shot noise or Gaussian regime, it always over-estimates the true covariance in the sample variance regime, because the JK covariance turns out to be a...

  13. Scheme to Implement Optimal Asymmetric Economical Phase-Covariant Quantum Cloning in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chun-Nuan; ZHANG Wen-Hai; HE Jin-Chun; DAI Jie-Lin; HUANG Nian-Ning; YE Liu

    2008-01-01

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to implement the optimal asymmetric economical 1 → 2 phase-covariant quantum cloning in two dimensions based on the cavity QED technique. The protocol is very simple and only two atoms are required. Our scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. During the processes, the cavity is only virtually excited and it thus greatly prolongs the efficient decoherent time. Therefore, it may be realized in experiment.

  14. A comparison of the performance and compatibility of protocols used by seven monitoring groups to measure stream habitat in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett B. Roper; John M. Buffington; Stephen Bennett; Steven H. Lanigan; Eric Archer; Scott T. Downie; John Faustini; Tracy W. Hillman; Shannon Hubler; Kim Jones; Chris Jordan; Philip R. Kaufmann; Glenn Merritt; Chris Moyer; Allen Pleus

    2010-01-01

    To comply with legal mandates, meet local management objectives, or both, many federal, state, and tribal organizations have monitoring groups that assess stream habitat at different scales. This myriad of groups has difficulty sharing data and scaling up stream habitat assessments to regional or national levels because of differences in their goals and data collection...

  15. Uncertainty in reactor lattice physics calculations. The effect of dilution on the covariance of multigroup cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwan, C.; Ball, M.; Novog, D., E-mail: mcewac2@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Simulation results are of little use if nothing is known about the uncertainty in the results. In order to assess the uncertainty in a set of output parameters due to uncertainty in a set of input parameters, knowledge of the covariance between input parameters is required. Current practice is to apply the covariance between multigroup cross sections at infinite dilution to all cross sections including those at non-infinite dilutions. In this work, the effect of dilution on multigroup cross section covariance is investigated as well as the effect on the covariance between the few group homogenized cross sections produced by lattice code DRAGON. (author)

  16. Covariant Lyapunov vectors for rigid disk systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, Hadrien; Posch, Harald A

    2010-10-05

    We carry out extensive computer simulations to study the Lyapunov instability of a two-dimensional hard-disk system in a rectangular box with periodic boundary conditions. The system is large enough to allow the formation of Lyapunov modes parallel to the x-axis of the box. The Oseledec splitting into covariant subspaces of the tangent space is considered by computing the full set of covariant perturbation vectors co-moving with the flow in tangent space. These vectors are shown to be transversal, but generally not orthogonal to each other. Only the angle between covariant vectors associated with immediate adjacent Lyapunov exponents in the Lyapunov spectrum may become small, but the probability of this angle to vanish approaches zero. The stable and unstable manifolds are transverse to each other and the system is hyperbolic.

  17. Manifest Covariant Hamiltonian Theory of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The problem of formulating a manifest covariant Hamiltonian theory of General Relativity in the presence of source fields is addressed, by extending the so-called "DeDonder-Weyl" formalism to the treatment of classical fields in curved space-time. The theory is based on a synchronous variational principle for the Einstein equation, formulated in terms of superabundant variables. The technique permits one to determine the continuum covariant Hamiltonian structure associated with the Einstein equation. The corresponding continuum Poisson bracket representation is also determined. The theory relies on first-principles, in the sense that the conclusions are reached in the framework of a non-perturbative covariant approach, which allows one to preserve both the 4-scalar nature of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian densities as well as the gauge invariance property of the theory.

  18. Structural damage detection based on covariance of covariance matrix with general white noise excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Yi; Law, Siu Seong; Ku, Chiu Jen

    2017-02-01

    Covariance of the auto/cross-covariance matrix based method is studied for the damage identification of a structure with illustrations on its advantages and limitations. The original method is extended for structures under direct white noise excitations. The auto/cross-covariance function of the measured acceleration and its corresponding derivatives are formulated analytically, and the method is modified in two new strategies to enable successful identification with much fewer sensors. Numerical examples are adopted to illustrate the improved method, and the effects of sampling frequency and sampling duration are discussed. Results show that the covariance of covariance calculated from responses of higher order modes of a structure play an important role to the accurate identification of local damage in a structure.

  19. Activities on covariance estimation in Japanese Nuclear Data Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Keiichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Described are activities on covariance estimation in the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. Covariances are obtained from measurements by using the least-squares methods. A simultaneous evaluation was performed to deduce covariances of fission cross sections of U and Pu isotopes. A code system, KALMAN, is used to estimate covariances of nuclear model calculations from uncertainties in model parameters. (author)

  20. Spatial implications of covariate adjustment on patterns of risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabel, Clive Eric; Wilson, Jeff Gaines; Kingham, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies that examine the relationship between environmental exposures and health often address other determinants of health that may influence the relationship being studied by adjusting for these factors as covariates. While disease surveillance methods routinely control for cova......Epidemiological studies that examine the relationship between environmental exposures and health often address other determinants of health that may influence the relationship being studied by adjusting for these factors as covariates. While disease surveillance methods routinely control......), then for a deprivation index, and finally for both PM10 and deprivation. Spatial patterns of risk, disease clusters and cold and hot spots were generated using a spatial scan statistic and a Getis-Ord Gi* statistic. In all disease groups tested (except the control disease), adjustment for chronic PM10 exposure...... area to a mixed residential/industrial area, possibly introducing new environmental exposures. Researchers should be aware of the potential spatial effects inherent in adjusting for covariates when considering study design and interpreting results. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. The effects of a mindfulness-based lifestyle programme for adults with Parkinson's disease: protocol for a mixed methods, randomised two-group control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advocat, Jenny; Russell, Grant; Enticott, Joanne; Hassed, Craig; Hester, Jennifer; Vandenberg, Brooke

    2013-10-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in developed countries. There is an increasing interest in the use of mindfulness-related interventions in the management of patients with a chronic disease. In addition, interventions that promote personal control, stress-management and other lifestyle factors, such as diet and exercise, assist in reducing disability and improving quality of life in people with chronic illnesses. There has been little research in this area for people with PD. A prospective mixed-method randomised clinical trial involving community living adults with PD aged benefits of, and barriers to, the uptake of the intervention. This protocol has received ethics approval from the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee project number CF11/2662-2011001553. This is the first research of its kind in Australia involving a comprehensive, lifestyle-based programme for people with PD and has the potential to involve a broader range of providers than standard care. The findings will be disseminated through peer reviewed journals, primary care conferences in Australia as well as abroad and through the Parkinson's community. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12612000440820.

  2. Abnormalities in Structural Covariance of Cortical Gyrification in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinping; Zhang, Jiuquan; Zhang, Jinlei; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Jian; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao; Zhang, Yuanchao

    2017-01-01

    Although abnormal cortical morphology and connectivity between brain regions (structural covariance) have been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD), the topological organizations of large-scale structural brain networks are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated large-scale structural brain networks in a sample of 37 PD patients and 34 healthy controls (HC) by assessing the structural covariance of cortical gyrification with local gyrification index (lGI). We demonstrated prominent small-world properties of the structural brain networks for both groups. Compared with the HC group, PD patients showed significantly increased integrated characteristic path length and integrated clustering coefficient, as well as decreased integrated global efficiency in structural brain networks. Distinct distributions of hub regions were identified between the two groups, showing more hub regions in the frontal cortex in PD patients. Moreover, the modular analyses revealed significantly decreased integrated regional efficiency in lateral Fronto-Insula-Temporal module, and increased integrated regional efficiency in Parieto-Temporal module in the PD group as compared to the HC group. In summary, our study demonstrated altered topological properties of structural networks at a global, regional and modular level in PD patients. These findings suggests that the structural networks of PD patients have a suboptimal topological organization, resulting in less effective integration of information between brain regions.

  3. Notes on Cosmic Censorship Conjecture revisited: Covariantly

    CERN Document Server

    Hamid, Aymen I M; Maharaj, Sunil D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of the trapped region using a frame independent semi-tetrad covariant formalism for general Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS) class II spacetimes. We covariantly prove some important geometrical results for the apparent horizon, and state the necessary and sufficient conditions for a singularity to be locally naked. These conditions bring out, for the first time in a quantitative and transparent manner, the importance of the Weyl curvature in deforming and delaying the trapped region during continual gravitational collapse, making the central singularity locally visible.

  4. A covariant formulation of classical spinning particle

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, J H; Kim, J K; Jin-Ho Cho; Seungjoon Hyun; Jae-Kwan Kim

    1994-01-01

    Covariantly we reformulate the description of a spinning particle in terms of the which entails all possible constraints explicitly; all constraints can be obtained just from the Lagrangian. Furthermore, in this covariant reformulation, the Lorentz element is to be considered to evolve the momentum or spin component from an arbitrary fixed frame and not just from the particle rest frame. In distinction with the usual formulation, our system is directly comparable with the pseudo-classical formulation. We get a peculiar symmetry which resembles the supersymmetry of the pseudo-classical formulation.

  5. A violation of the covariant entropy bound?

    CERN Document Server

    Masoumi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Several arguments suggest that the entropy density at high energy density $\\rho$ should be given by the expression $s=K\\sqrt{\\rho/G}$, where $K$ is a constant of order unity. On the other hand the covariant entropy bound requires that the entropy on a light sheet be bounded by $A/4G$, where $A$ is the area of the boundary of the sheet. We find that in a suitably chosen cosmological geometry, the above expression for $s$ violates the covariant entropy bound. We consider different possible explanations for this fact; in particular the possibility that entropy bounds should be defined in terms of volumes of regions rather than areas of surfaces.

  6. Scheme for the implementation of 1→3 optimal phase-covariant quantum cloning in ion-trap systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Rong-Can; Li Hong-Cai; Lin Xiu; Huang Zhi-Ping; Xie Hong

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for the implementation of 1 → 3 optimal phase-covariant quantum cloning with trapped ions. In the present protocol, the required time for the whole procedure is short due to the resonant interaction,which is important in view of decoherence. Furthermore, the scheme is feasible based on current technologies.

  7. Histology protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Tim D. Hewitson & Ian A. Darby (Eds Humana press, Totowa, New Jersey (USA Series: Springer Protocols Methods in Molecular Biology, Volume 611, 2010 Pages: 230; € 83.15 ISBN: 978-1-60327-344-2 Impressive as it can sounds in the era that Biology see a clear dominance of reductionism with the idea that complexity can be disentagled more and more thanks to the use of molecular tools, the reader will remain fascinated by this slim and agile volume devoted to bring together what apparently are two separeted words: molecular biology and histology. Simply remembering to the youngest scientists.....

  8. The Massless Spectrum of Covariant Superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, P A; van Nieuwenhuizen, P

    2002-01-01

    We obtain the correct cohomology at any ghost number for the open and closed covariant superstring, quantized by an approach which we recently developed. We define physical states by the usual condition of BRST invariance and a new condition involving a new current which is related to a grading of the underlying affine Lie algebra.

  9. EQUIVALENT MODELS IN COVARIANCE STRUCTURE-ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUIJBEN, TCW

    1991-01-01

    Defining equivalent models as those that reproduce the same set of covariance matrices, necessary and sufficient conditions are stated for the local equivalence of two expanded identified models M1 and M2 when fitting the more restricted model M0. Assuming several regularity conditions, the rank def

  10. Optimal covariate designs theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Premadhis; Mandal, Nripes Kumar; Sinha, Bikas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This book primarily addresses the optimality aspects of covariate designs. A covariate model is a combination of ANOVA and regression models. Optimal estimation of the parameters of the model using a suitable choice of designs is of great importance; as such choices allow experimenters to extract maximum information for the unknown model parameters. The main emphasis of this monograph is to start with an assumed covariate model in combination with some standard ANOVA set-ups such as CRD, RBD, BIBD, GDD, BTIBD, BPEBD, cross-over, multi-factor, split-plot and strip-plot designs, treatment control designs, etc. and discuss the nature and availability of optimal covariate designs. In some situations, optimal estimations of both ANOVA and the regression parameters are provided. Global optimality and D-optimality criteria are mainly used in selecting the design. The standard optimality results of both discrete and continuous set-ups have been adapted, and several novel combinatorial techniques have been applied for...

  11. Covariant formulation of pion-nucleon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiff, A. D.; Afnan, I. R.

    A covariant model of elastic pion-nucleon scattering based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation is presented. The kernel consists of s- and u-channel nucleon and delta poles, along with rho and sigma exchange in the t-channel. A good fit is obtained to the s- and p-wave phase shifts up to the two-pion production threshold.

  12. Approximate methods for derivation of covariance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesen, S. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik; Larson, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Several approaches for the derivation of covariance information for evaluated nuclear data files (EFF2 and ENDF/B-VI) have been developed and used at IRK and ORNL respectively. Considerations, governing the choice of a distinct method depending on the quantity and quality of available data are presented, advantages/disadvantages are discussed and examples of results are given.

  13. Covariance of noncommutative Grassmann star product

    OpenAIRE

    Daoud, M.

    2004-01-01

    Using the Coherent states of many fermionic degrees of freedom labeled by Gra\\ss mann variables, we introduce the noncommutative (precisely non anticommutative) Gra\\ss mann star product. The covariance of star product under unitary transformations, particularly canonical ones, is studied. The super star product, based on supercoherent states of supersymmetric harmonic oscillator, is also considered.

  14. Hierarchical matrix approximation of large covariance matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2015-11-30

    We approximate large non-structured Matérn covariance matrices of size n×n in the H-matrix format with a log-linear computational cost and storage O(kn log n), where rank k ≪ n is a small integer. Applications are: spatial statistics, machine learning and image analysis, kriging and optimal design.

  15. Linear transformations of variance/covariance matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parois, P.J.A.; Lutz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Many applications in crystallography require the use of linear transformations on parameters and their standard uncertainties. While the transformation of the parameters is textbook knowledge, the transformation of the standard uncertainties is more complicated and needs the full variance/covariance

  16. Covariant Photon Quantization in the SME

    CERN Document Server

    Colladay, Don

    2013-01-01

    The Gupta Bleuler quantization procedure is applied to the SME photon sector. A direct application of the method to the massless case fails due to an unavoidable incompleteness in the polarization states. A mass term can be included into the photon lagrangian to rescue the quantization procedure and maintain covariance.

  17. Covariant derivative expansion of the heat kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, L.L. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Granada (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    Using the technique of labeled operators, compact explicit expressions are given for all traced heat kernel coefficients containing zero, two, four and six covariant derivatives, and for diagonal coefficients with zero, two and four derivatives. The results apply to boundaryless flat space-times and arbitrary non-Abelian scalar and gauge background fields. (orig.)

  18. Econometric analysis of realized covariation: high frequency based covariance, regression, and correlation in financial economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses multivariate high frequency financial data using realized covariation. We provide a new asymptotic distribution theory for standard methods such as regression, correlation analysis, and covariance. It will be based on a fixed interval of time (e.g., a day or week), allowing...... the number of high frequency returns during this period to go to infinity. Our analysis allows us to study how high frequency correlations, regressions, and covariances change through time. In particular we provide confidence intervals for each of these quantities....

  19. Effectiveness of telemedicine and distance learning applications for patients with chronic heart failure. A protocol for prospective parallel group non-randomised open label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanagas, Giedrius; Umbrasiene, Jelena; Slapikas, Rimvydas

    2012-01-01

    Chronic heart failure in Baltic Sea Region is responsible for more hospitalisations than all forms of cancer combined and is one of the leading causes of hospitalisations in elderly patients. Frequent hospitalisations, along with other direct and indirect costs, place financial burden on healthcare systems. We aim to test the hypothesis that telemedicine and distance learning applications is superior to the current standard of home care. Prospective parallel group non-randomised open label study in patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) II-III chronic heart failure will be carried out in six Baltic Sea Region countries. The study is organised into two 6-month follow-up periods. The first 6-month period is based on active implementation of tele-education and/or telemedicine for patients in two groups (active run period) and one standard care group (passive run period). The second 6-month period of observation will be based on standard care model (passive run period) to all three groups. Our proposed practice change is based on translational research with empirically supported interventions brought to practice and aims to find the home care model that is most effective to patient needs. This study has been approved by National Bioethics Committee (2011-03-07; Registration No: BE-2-11). This study has been registered in Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) with registration number ACTRN12611000834954.

  20. "CAN Stop" - Implementation and evaluation of a secondary group prevention for adolescent and young adult cannabis users in various contexts - study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moré Kerstin

    2011-04-01

    seeking to reduce or quit their cannabis use. Moreover, we seek to gain knowledge about the programme's utility within different settings of the German help system for young cannabis users and information about the settings' specific clientele. The study protocol is discussed with regard to potential difficulties within the different settings. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57036983

  1. Reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family carers: pragmatic eight-centre randomised trial of joint reminiscence and maintenance versus usual treatment: a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orrell Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing number of people with dementia, and the increasing cost of care, provides a major incentive to develop and test methods of supporting them in the community for longer. Most attention has been given to pharmacological interventions, but there is increasing recognition that psychosocial interventions may be equally effective, even preferable where medication has negative side-effects. Reminiscence groups, run by professionals and volunteers, which use photographs, recordings and other objects to trigger personal memories are probably the most popular therapeutic approach to working with people with dementia, but there is little evidence for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The recent inclusion of family carers in groups with people with dementia, notably in our own pilot studies, has generated informal evidence that this joint approach improves relationships between people with dementia and their carers, and benefits both. Design and methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family care-givers has two parallel arms – an intervention group and a control group who receive care as usual. The intervention consists of joint reminiscence groups held weekly for twelve consecutive weeks, followed by monthly maintenance sessions for a further seven months. The primary outcome measures are the quality of life of people with dementia, as assessed by QoL-AD, and their care-givers' mental health as assessed by the GHQ-28. Secondary outcomes include: the autobiographical memories of people with dementia; the quality of the relationship between them and their care-givers; and the levels of depression and anxiety felt by them and their care-giver. Using a 5% significance level, comparison of 200 pairs attending joint reminiscence groups with 200 pairs receiving usual treatment

  2. Spatially Covariant Theories of a Transverse, Traceless Graviton, Part I: Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin; Tolley, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    General relativity is a covariant theory of two transverse, traceless graviton degrees of freedom. According to a theorem of Hojman, Kuchar, and Teitelboim, modifications of general relativity must either introduce new degrees of freedom or violate the principle of general covariance. In this paper, we explore modifications of general relativity that retain the same number of gravitational degrees of freedom, and therefore explicitly break general covariance. Motivated by cosmology, the modifications of interest maintain spatial covariance. Demanding consistency of the theory forces the physical Hamiltonian density to obey an analogue of the renormalization group equation. In this context, the equation encodes the invariance of the theory under flow through the space of conformally equivalent spatial metrics. This paper is dedicated to setting up the formalism of our approach and applying it to a realistic class of theories. Forthcoming work will apply the formalism more generally.

  3. Unravelling Lorentz Covariance and the Spacetime Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the discovery of an exact mapping from Galilean time and space coordinates to Minkowski spacetime coordinates, showing that Lorentz covariance and the space-time construct are consistent with the existence of a dynamical 3-space, and absolute motion. We illustrate this mapping first with the standard theory of sound, as vibrations of a medium, which itself may be undergoing fluid motion, and which is covariant under Galilean coordinate transformations. By introducing a different non-physical class of space and time coordinates it may be cast into a form that is covariant under Lorentz transformations wherein the speed of sound is now the invariant speed. If this latter formalism were taken as fundamental and complete we would be lead to the introduction of a pseudo-Riemannian spacetime description of sound, with a metric characterised by an invariant speed of sound. This analysis is an allegory for the development of 20th century physics, but where the Lorentz covariant Maxwell equations were constructed first, and the Galilean form was later constructed by Hertz, but ignored. It is shown that the Lorentz covariance of the Maxwell equations only occurs because of the use of non-physical space and time coordinates. The use of this class of coordinates has confounded 20th century physics, and resulted in the existence of a allowing dynamical 3-space being overlooked. The discovery of the dynamics of this 3-space has lead to the derivation of an extended gravity theory as a quantum effect, and confirmed by numerous experiments and observations

  4. Unravelling Lorentz Covariance and the Spacetime Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the discovery of an exact mapping from Galilean time and space coordinates to Minkowski spacetime coordinates, showing that Lorentz covariance and the space- time construct are consistent with the existence of a dynamical 3-space, and “absolute motion”. We illustrate this mapping first with the standard theory of sound, as vibra- tions of a medium, which itself may be undergoing fluid motion, and which is covari- ant under Galilean coordinate transformations. By introducing a different non-physical class of space and time coordinates it may be cast into a form that is covariant under “Lorentz transformations” wherein the speed of sound is now the “invariant speed”. If this latter formalism were taken as fundamental and complete we would be lead to the introduction of a pseudo-Riemannian “spacetime” description of sound, with a metric characterised by an “invariant speed of sound”. This analysis is an allegory for the development of 20th century physics, but where the Lorentz covariant Maxwell equa- tions were constructed first, and the Galilean form was later constructed by Hertz, but ignored. It is shown that the Lorentz covariance of the Maxwell equations only occurs because of the use of non-physical space and time coordinates. The use of this class of coordinates has confounded 20th century physics, and resulted in the existence of a “flowing” dynamical 3-space being overlooked. The discovery of the dynamics of this 3-space has lead to the derivation of an extended gravity theory as a quantum effect, and confirmed by numerous experiments and observations

  5. Second central extension in Galilean covariant field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, C R

    2002-01-01

    The second central extension of the planar Galilei group has been alleged to have its origin in the spin variable. This idea is explored here by considering local Galilean covariant field theory for free fields of arbitrary spin. It is shown that such systems generally display only a trivial realization of the second central extension. While it is possible to realize any desired value of the extension parameter by suitable redefinition of the boost operator, such an approach has no necessary connection to the spin of the basic underlying field.

  6. Dunkl Operators as Covariant Derivatives in a Quantum Principal Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdevich, Micho; Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2013-05-01

    A quantum principal bundle is constructed for every Coxeter group acting on a finite-dimensional Euclidean space E, and then a connection is also defined on this bundle. The covariant derivatives associated to this connection are the Dunkl operators, originally introduced as part of a program to generalize harmonic analysis in Euclidean spaces. This gives us a new, geometric way of viewing the Dunkl operators. In particular, we present a new proof of the commutativity of these operators among themselves as a consequence of a geometric property, namely, that the connection has curvature zero.

  7. Dunkl Operators as Covariant Derivatives in a Quantum Principal Bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micho Đurđevich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A quantum principal bundle is constructed for every Coxeter group acting on a finite-dimensional Euclidean space E, and then a connection is also defined on this bundle. The covariant derivatives associated to this connection are the Dunkl operators, originally introduced as part of a program to generalize harmonic analysis in Euclidean spaces. This gives us a new, geometric way of viewing the Dunkl operators. In particular, we present a new proof of the commutativity of these operators among themselves as a consequence of a geometric property, namely, that the connection has curvature zero.

  8. Dunkl Operators as Covariant Derivatives in a Quantum Principal Bundle

    CERN Document Server

    evich, Micho Đurđ

    2011-01-01

    A quantum principal bundle is constructed for every Coxeter group acting on a finite-dimensional Euclidean space E, and then a connection is also defined on this bundle. The covariant derivatives associated to this connection are the Dunkl operators, originally introduced as part of a program to generalize harmonic analysis in Euclidean spaces. This gives us a new, geometric way of viewing the Dunkl operators. In particular, we present a new proof of the commutivity of these operators among themselves as a consequence of a geometric property, namely, that the connection has curvature zero.

  9. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery

  10. Why We Belong - Exploring Membership of Healthcare Professionals in an Intensive Care Virtual Community Via Online Focus Groups: Rationale and Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Kaye; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2016-06-13

    Many current challenges of evidence-based practice are related to ineffective social networks among health care professionals. Opportunities exist for multidisciplinary virtual communities to transcend professional and organizational boundaries and facilitate important knowledge transfer. Although health care professionals have been using the Internet to form virtual communities for many years, little is known regarding "why" they join, as most research has focused on the perspective of "posters," who form a minority of members. Our aim was to develop a comprehensive understanding of why health care professionals belong to a virtual community (VC). A qualitative approach will be used to explore why health care professionals belong to an intensive care practice-based VC, established since 2003. Three asynchronous online focus groups will be convened using a closed secure discussion forum. Participants will be recruited directly by sending emails to the VC and a Google form used to collect consent and participant demographics. Participants will be stratified by their online posting behaviors between September 1, 2012, and August 31, 2014: (1) more than 5 posts, (2) 1-5 posts, or (3) no posts. A question guide will be used to guide participant discussion. A moderation approach based on the principles of focus group method and e-moderation has been developed. The main source of data will be discussion threads, supported by a research diary and field notes. Data analysis will be undertaken using a thematic approach and framed by the Diffusion of Innovation theory. NVivo software will be used to support analyses. At the time of writing, 29 participants agreed to participate (Focus Group 1: n=4; Focus Group 2: n=16; Focus Group 3: n=9) and data collection was complete. This study will contribute to a growing body of research on the use of social media in professional health care settings. Specifically, we hope results will demonstrate an enhancement of health care

  11. Pre-consultation educational group intervention to improve shared decision-making in postmastectomy breast reconstruction: study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pre-Consultation Educational Group Intervention pilot study seeks to assess the feasibility and inform the optimal design for a definitive randomized controlled trial that aims to improve the quality of decision-making in postmastectomy breast reconstruction patients. Methods/design This is a mixed-methods pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial that will follow a single-center, 1:1 allocation, two-arm parallel group superiority design. Setting: The University Health Network, a tertiary care cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants: Adult women referred to one of three plastic and reconstructive surgeons for delayed breast reconstruction or prophylactic mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction. Intervention: We designed a multi-disciplinary educational group workshop that incorporates the key components of shared decision-making, decision-support, and psychosocial support for cancer survivors prior to the initial surgical consult. The intervention consists of didactic lectures by a plastic surgeon and nurse specialist on breast reconstruction choices, pre- and postoperative care; a value-clarification exercise led by a social worker; and discussions with a breast reconstruction patient. Control: Usual care includes access to an informational booklet, website, and patient volunteer if desired. Outcomes: Expected pilot outcomes include feasibility, recruitment, and retention targets. Acceptability of intervention and full trial outcomes will be established through qualitative interviews. Trial outcomes will include decision-quality measures, patient-reported outcomes, and service outcomes, and the treatment effect estimate and variability will be used to inform the sample size calculation for a full trial. Discussion Our pilot study seeks to identify the (1) feasibility, acceptability, and design of a definitive RCT and (2) the optimal content and delivery of our proposed educational group intervention. Thirty patients have been

  12. The ICOS Ecosystem protocol for gas concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubinet, Marc; Papale, Dario

    2014-05-01

    This research was initiated in the frame of the ICOS Ecosystem Thematic Center. The aim of ICOS is to provide long term high precision observations required to understand the present state and to predict future behavior of the global carbon cycle and greenhouse gas emissions. Observations will be made through high precision network of stations measuring greenhouse gas fluxes from ecosystems and oceans and greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. In a long term monitoring infrastructure like the ICOS Ecosystem network, it is crucial to ensure maximum comparability between sites and, for this reason, it is strongly suggested to highly standardize methods and sensors where the knowledge about systematic and random differences between different approaches is not yet fully known, in particular in the medium-long term time range. Long term measurements of trace gas fluxes exchanged by ecosystem require the use of the eddy covariance technique for which gas analyzers are, similarly to sonic anemometers, key elements. However, neither an international standard nor a list of requisites for sensors does exist yet. This presentation focuses thus on the protocol for high frequency gas concentration using infrared gas analyzers. It results from discussions that were brought among the Working group on Eddy covariance fluxes and Storage measurements established by the ICOS Ecosystem Thematic Center and implied about 70 scientists and field workers. The protocol includes a definition of the variable and of the measurement method (infrared gas analyzer), instructions concerning the system conditioning (gas sampling system description including pump, tube, filter dimensioning), sensor calibration and maintenance and finally required data format.

  13. Adjusting for covariate effects on classification accuracy using the covariate-adjusted receiver operating characteristic curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Holly; Pepe, Margaret S

    2009-06-01

    Recent scientific and technological innovations have produced an abundance of potential markers that are being investigated for their use in disease screening and diagnosis. In evaluating these markers, it is often necessary to account for covariates associated with the marker of interest. Covariates may include subject characteristics, expertise of the test operator, test procedures or aspects of specimen handling. In this paper, we propose the covariate-adjusted receiver operating characteristic curve, a measure of covariate-adjusted classification accuracy. Nonparametric and semiparametric estimators are proposed, asymptotic distribution theory is provided and finite sample performance is investigated. For illustration we characterize the age-adjusted discriminatory accuracy of prostate-specific antigen as a biomarker for prostate cancer.

  14. Stochastic Lipschitz continuity for high dimensional Lasso with multiple linear covariate structures or hidden linear covariates

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, Zhiyi

    2010-01-01

    Two extensions of generalized linear models are considered. In the first one, response variables depend on multiple linear combinations of covariates. In the second one, only response variables are observed while the linear covariates are missing. We derive stochastic Lipschitz continuity results for the loss functions involved in the regression problems and apply them to get bounds on estimation error for Lasso. Multivariate comparison results on Rademacher complexity are obtained as tools to establish the stochastic Lipschitz continuity results.

  15. Asperger syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) treatment trial: a study protocol of a pilot, multicentre, single-blind, randomised crossover trial of group cognitive behavioural therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Peter E; Murphy, Glynis H; Wilson, Edward; Shepstone, Lee; Fowler, David; Heavens, David; Malovic, Aida; Russell, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A number of studies have established that children, adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism (HFA) have significant problems with anxiety. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for anxiety in a variety of clinical populations. There is a growing interest in exploring the effectiveness of CBT for people with AS who have mental health problems, but currently there are no known clinical trials involving adults with AS or HFA. Studies with children who have AS have reported some success. The current study aims to examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an AS population is likely to be efficacious. Methods and analysis This study is a randomised, single-blind crossover trial. At least 36 individuals will be recruited and randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. During treatment, individuals will receive 3 sessions of individual CBT, followed by 21 sessions of group CBT. Primary outcome measures focus on anxiety. Secondary outcome measures focus on everyday social and psychiatric functioning, additional measures of anxiety and fear, depression, health-related quality of life and treatment cost. Assessments will be administered at pregroup and postgroup and at follow-up by researchers who are blinded to group allocation. The trial aims to find out whether or not psychological treatments for anxiety can be adapted and used to successfully treat the anxiety experienced by people with AS. Furthermore, we aim to determine whether this intervention represents good value for money. Ethics and dissemination The trial received a favourable ethical opinion from a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee. All participants provided written informed consent. Findings will be shared with all trial participants, and the general public, as well as the scientific community. Trial Registration ISRCTN 30265294 (DOI: 10.1186/ISRCTN30265294), UKCRN

  16. Comparing group-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with enhanced usual care for adolescents with functional somatic syndromes: a study protocol for a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallesøe, Karen Hansen; Schröder, Andreas; Wicksell, Rikard K; Fink, Per; Ørnbøl, Eva; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are common in adolescents, characterised by severe disability and reduced quality of life. Behavioural treatments such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has shown promising results in children and adolescents with FSS, but has focused on specific syndromes such as functional pain. The current study will compare the efficacy of group-based ACT with that of enhanced usual care (EUC) in adolescents with a range of FSS operationalised by the unifying construct of multiorgan bodily distress syndrome (BDS). Methods and analysis A total of 120 adolescents aged 15–19 and diagnosed with multiorgan BDS, of at least 12 months duration, will be assessed and randomised to either: (1) EUC: a manualised consultation with a child and adolescent psychiatrist and individualised treatment plan or (2) manualised ACT-based group therapy plus EUC. The ACT programme consists of 9 modules (ie, 27 hours) and 1 follow-up meeting (3 hours). The primary outcome is physical health, assessed by an Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) aggregate score 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include self-reported symptom severity, symptom interference, depression and anxiety, illness worry, perceived stress and global improvement; as well as objective physical activity and bodily stress response measured by heart rate variability, hair cortisol and inflammatory biomarkers. Process measures are illness perception, illness-related behaviour and psychological flexibility. Ethics and dissemination The study is conducted in accordance with Helsinki Declaration II. Approval has been obtained from the Science Ethics Committee of the Central Denmark Region and the Danish Data Protection. The results will be sought to be published according to the CONSORT statement in peer-reviewed journals. Discussion This is one of the first larger randomised clinical trials evaluating the effect of a group-based intervention for adolescents with a

  17. A randomised controlled trial of an enhanced interdisciplinary community based group program for people with Parkinson’s disease: study rationale and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Peters

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive, chronic neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no known cure. Physical exercise programs may be used to assist with the physical management of PD. Several studies have demonstrated that community based physical therapy programs are effective in reducing physical aspects of disability among people with PD. While multidisciplinary therapy interventions may have the potential to reduce disability and improve the quality of life of people with PD, there is very limited clinical trial evidence to support or refute the use of a community based multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary programs for people with PD. A two group randomized trial is being undertaken within a community rehabilitation service in Brisbane, Australia. Community dwelling adults with a diagnosis of Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease are being recruited. Eligible participants are randomly allocated to a standard exercise rehabilitation group program or an intervention group which incorporates physical, cognitive and speech activities in a multi-tasking framework. Outcomes will be measured at 6-week intervals for a period of six months. Primary outcome measures are the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and the Timed Up and Go (TUG cognitive test. Secondary outcomes include changes in health related quality of life, communication, social participation, mobility, strength and balance, and carer burden measures. This study will determine the immediate and long-term effectiveness of a unique multifocal, interdisciplinary, dual-tasking approach to the management of PD as compared to an exercise only program. We anticipate that the results of this study will have implications for the development of cost effective evidence based best practice for the treatment of people with PD living in the community.

  18. Comparison of bias-corrected covariance estimators for MMRM analysis in longitudinal data with dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosho, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Noma, Hisashi; Maruo, Kazushi; Sato, Yasunori

    2015-08-11

    In longitudinal clinical trials, some subjects will drop out before completing the trial, so their measurements towards the end of the trial are not obtained. Mixed-effects models for repeated measures (MMRM) analysis with "unstructured" (UN) covariance structure are increasingly common as a primary analysis for group comparisons in these trials. Furthermore, model-based covariance estimators have been routinely used for testing the group difference and estimating confidence intervals of the difference in the MMRM analysis using the UN covariance. However, using the MMRM analysis with the UN covariance could lead to convergence problems for numerical optimization, especially in trials with a small-sample size. Although the so-called sandwich covariance estimator is robust to misspecification of the covariance structure, its performance deteriorates in settings with small-sample size. We investigated the performance of the sandwich covariance estimator and covariance estimators adjusted for small-sample bias proposed by Kauermann and Carroll (J Am Stat Assoc 2001; 96: 1387-1396) and Mancl and DeRouen (Biometrics 2001; 57: 126-134) fitting simpler covariance structures through a simulation study. In terms of the type 1 error rate and coverage probability of confidence intervals, Mancl and DeRouen's covariance estimator with compound symmetry, first-order autoregressive (AR(1)), heterogeneous AR(1), and antedependence structures performed better than the original sandwich estimator and Kauermann and Carroll's estimator with these structures in the scenarios where the variance increased across visits. The performance based on Mancl and DeRouen's estimator with these structures was nearly equivalent to that based on the Kenward-Roger method for adjusting the standard errors and degrees of freedom with the UN structure. The model-based covariance estimator with the UN structure under unadjustment of the degrees of freedom, which is frequently used in applications

  19. The Irish DAFNE study protocol: a cluster randomised trial of group versus individual follow-up after structured education for type 1 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinneen, Seán F

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structured education programmes for individuals with Type 1 diabetes have become a recognised means of delivering the knowledge and skills necessary for optimal self-management of the condition. The Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme has been shown to improve biomedical (HbA(1c) and rates of severe hypoglycaemia) and psychosocial outcomes for up to 12 months following course delivery. The optimal way to support DAFNE graduates and maintain the benefits of the programme has not been established. We aimed to compare 2 different methods of follow-up of DAFNE graduates in a pragmatic clinical trial delivered in busy diabetes clinics on the island of Ireland. METHODS: Six participating centres were cluster randomised to deliver either group follow-up or a return to traditional one-to-one clinic visits. In the intervention arm group follow-up was delivered at 6 and 12 months post DAFNE training according to a curriculum developed for the study. In the control arm patients were seen individually in diabetes clinics as part of routine care. Study outcomes included HbA(1c) levels, self-reported rates of severe hypoglycaemia, body weight and measures of diabetes wellbeing and quality of life. These were measured at 6, 12 and 18 months after recruitment. Generalisability (external validity) was maximised by recruiting study participants from existing DAFNE waiting lists in each centre, by using broad inclusion criteria (including HbA(1c) values less than 13 percent with no lower limit) and by using existing clinic staff to deliver the training and follow-up. Internal validity and treatment fidelity were maximised by quality assuring the training of all DAFNE educators, by external peer review of the group follow-up sessions and by striving for full attendance at follow-up visits. Assays of HbA(1c) were undertaken in a central laboratory. DISCUSSION: This pragmatic clinical trial evaluating group follow-up after a structured education programme has

  20. Post-discharge management following hip fracture - get you back to B4: A parallel group, randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Roy A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall-related hip fractures result in significant personal and societal consequences; importantly, up to half of older adults with hip fracture never regain their previous level of mobility. Strategies of follow-up care for older adults after fracture have improved investigation for osteoporosis; but managing bone health alone is not enough. Prevention of fractures requires management of both bone health and falls risk factors (including the contributing role of cognition, balance and continence to improve outcomes. Methods/Design This is a parallel group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a post-fracture clinic compared with usual care on mobility for older adults following their hospitalization for hip fracture. Participants randomized to the intervention will attend a fracture follow-up clinic where a geriatrician and physiotherapist will assess and manage their mobility and other health issues. Depending on needs identified at the clinical assessment, participants may receive individualized and group-based outpatient physiotherapy, and a home exercise program. Our primary objective is to assess the effectiveness of a novel post-discharge fracture management strategy on the mobility of older adults after hip fracture. We will enrol 130 older adults (65 years+ who have sustained a hip fracture in the previous three months, and were admitted to hospital from home and are expected to be discharged home. We will exclude older adults who prior to the fracture were: unable to walk 10 meters; diagnosed with dementia and/or significant comorbidities that would preclude their participation in the clinical service. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to the Intervention or Usual Care groups by remote allocation. Treatment allocation will be concealed; investigators, measurement team and primary data analysts will be blinded to group allocation. Our primary outcome is mobility

  1. The Irish DAFNE Study Protocol: A cluster randomised trial of group versus individual follow-up after structured education for Type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newell John

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structured education programmes for individuals with Type 1 diabetes have become a recognised means of delivering the knowledge and skills necessary for optimal self-management of the condition. The Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE programme has been shown to improve biomedical (HbA1c and rates of severe hypoglycaemia and psychosocial outcomes for up to 12 months following course delivery. The optimal way to support DAFNE graduates and maintain the benefits of the programme has not been established. We aimed to compare 2 different methods of follow-up of DAFNE graduates in a pragmatic clinical trial delivered in busy diabetes clinics on the island of Ireland. Methods Six participating centres were cluster randomised to deliver either group follow-up or a return to traditional one-to-one clinic visits. In the intervention arm group follow-up was delivered at 6 and 12 months post DAFNE training according to a curriculum developed for the study. In the control arm patients were seen individually in diabetes clinics as part of routine care. Study outcomes included HbA1c levels, self-reported rates of severe hypoglycaemia, body weight and measures of diabetes wellbeing and quality of life. These were measured at 6, 12 and 18 months after recruitment. Generalisability (external validity was maximised by recruiting study participants from existing DAFNE waiting lists in each centre, by using broad inclusion criteria (including HbA1c values less than 13 percent with no lower limit and by using existing clinic staff to deliver the training and follow-up. Internal validity and treatment fidelity were maximised by quality assuring the training of all DAFNE educators, by external peer review of the group follow-up sessions and by striving for full attendance at follow-up visits. Assays of HbA1c were undertaken in a central laboratory. Discussion This pragmatic clinical trial evaluating group follow-up after a structured education

  2. The effectiveness of a training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: protocol of a cognitive behavioral group training and randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passchier Jan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary care, up to 74% of physical symptoms is classified as unexplained. These symptoms can cause high levels of distress and healthcare utilization. Cognitive behavioral therapy has shown to be effective, but does not seem to be attractive to patients. An exception herein is a therapy based on the consequences model, which distinguishes itself by its labeling of psychosocial distress in terms of consequences rather than as causes of physical symptoms. In secondary care, 81% of the patients accepts this therapy, but in primary care the outcome is poor. We assume that positive outcome can also be reached in primary care, when the consequences model is modified and used bottom-up in an easily accessible group training, in which patients are relieved of being blamed for their symptoms. Our aim is to investigate the (cost-effectiveness of this training. Methods and design A randomized controlled trial is designed. One hundred patients are randomized to either the group training or the waiting list. Physicians in general practices and outpatients clinics of general hospitals refer patients. Referral leads to inclusion if patients are between 18 and 65 years old, understand Dutch, have no handicaps impeding participation and the principal DSM-IV-TR classification is undifferentiated somatoform disorder or chronic pain disorder. In contrast to other treatment effect studies, the co-morbidity of a personality disorder does not lead to exclusion. By this, we optimize the comparability between the study population and patients in daily practice enlarging the generalization possibilities. Also in contrast to other effect studies, we chose quality of life (SF-36 instead of physical symptoms as the primary outcome measure. The SF-6D is used to estimate Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs. Costs are measured with the Trimbos/iMTA Questionnaire for Costs associated with Psychiatric Illness. Measurements are scheduled at baseline, after

  3. Comparing group-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with enhanced usual care for adolescents with functional somatic syndromes: a study protocol for a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallesøe, Karen Hansen; Schröder, Andreas; Wicksell, Rikard K; Fink, Per; Ørnbøl, Eva; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    2016-09-15

    Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are common in adolescents, characterised by severe disability and reduced quality of life. Behavioural treatments such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has shown promising results in children and adolescents with FSS, but has focused on specific syndromes such as functional pain. The current study will compare the efficacy of group-based ACT with that of enhanced usual care (EUC) in adolescents with a range of FSS operationalised by the unifying construct of multiorgan bodily distress syndrome (BDS). A total of 120 adolescents aged 15-19 and diagnosed with multiorgan BDS, of at least 12 months duration, will be assessed and randomised to either: (1) EUC: a manualised consultation with a child and adolescent psychiatrist and individualised treatment plan or (2) manualised ACT-based group therapy plus EUC. The ACT programme consists of 9 modules (ie, 27 hours) and 1 follow-up meeting (3 hours). The primary outcome is physical health, assessed by an Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) aggregate score 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include self-reported symptom severity, symptom interference, depression and anxiety, illness worry, perceived stress and global improvement; as well as objective physical activity and bodily stress response measured by heart rate variability, hair cortisol and inflammatory biomarkers. Process measures are illness perception, illness-related behaviour and psychological flexibility. The study is conducted in accordance with Helsinki Declaration II. Approval has been obtained from the Science Ethics Committee of the Central Denmark Region and the Danish Data Protection. The results will be sought to be published according to the CONSORT statement in peer-reviewed journals. This is one of the first larger randomised clinical trials evaluating the effect of a group-based intervention for adolescents with a range of severe FSS. NCT02346071; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ

  4. Targeting young drinkers online: the effectiveness of a web-based brief alcohol intervention in reducing heavy drinking among college students: study protocol of a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemmers Lex ACJ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of heavy drinking among college students and its associated health related consequences highlights an urgent need for alcohol prevention programs targeting 18 to 24 year olds. Nevertheless, current alcohol prevention programs in the Netherlands pay surprisingly little attention to the drinking patterns of this specific age group. The study described in this protocol will test the effectiveness of a web-based brief alcohol intervention that is aimed at reducing alcohol use among heavy drinking college students aged 18 to 24 years old. Methods/Design The effectiveness of the What Do You Drink web-based brief alcohol intervention will be tested among 908 heavy drinking college students in a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial. Participants will be allocated at random to either the experimental (N = 454: web-based brief alcohol intervention or control condition (N = 454: no intervention. The primary outcome measure will be the percentage of participants who drink within the normative limits of the Dutch National Health Council for low-risk drinking. These limits specify that, for heavy alcohol use, the mean consumption cannot exceed 14 or 21 glasses of standard alcohol units per week for females and males, respectively, while for binge drinking, the consumption cannot exceed five or more glasses of standard alcohol units on one drinking occasion at least once per week within one month and six months after the intervention. Reductions in mean weekly alcohol consumption and frequency of binge drinking are also primary outcome measures. Weekly Ecological Momentary Assessment will measure alcohol-related cognitions, that is, attitudes, self-efficacy, subjective norms and alcohol expectancies, which will be included as the secondary outcome measures. Discussion This study protocol describes the two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial developed to evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based brief

  5. Structural covariance of neostriatal and limbic regions in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirà, Marta; Cano, Marta; de Wit, Stella J.; Alonso, Pino; Cardoner, Narcís; Hoexter, Marcelo Q.; Kwon, Jun Soo; Nakamae, Takashi; Lochner, Christine; Sato, João R.; Jung, Wi Hoon; Narumoto, Jin; Stein, Dan J.; Pujol, Jesus; Mataix-Cols, David; Veltman, Dick J.; Menchón, José M.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Background Frontostriatal and frontoamygdalar connectivity alterations in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have been typically described in functional neuroimaging studies. However, structural covariance, or volumetric correlations across distant brain regions, also provides network-level information. Altered structural covariance has been described in patients with different psychiatric disorders, including OCD, but to our knowledge, alterations within frontostriatal and frontoamygdalar circuits have not been explored. Methods We performed a mega-analysis pooling structural MRI scans from the Obsessive–compulsive Brain Imaging Consortium and assessed whole-brain voxel-wise structural covariance of 4 striatal regions (dorsal and ventral caudate nucleus, and dorsal-caudal and ventral-rostral putamen) and 2 amygdalar nuclei (basolateral and centromedial-superficial). Images were preprocessed with the standard pipeline of voxel-based morphometry studies using Statistical Parametric Mapping software. Results Our analyses involved 329 patients with OCD and 316 healthy controls. Patients showed increased structural covariance between the left ventral-rostral putamen and the left inferior frontal gyrus/frontal operculum region. This finding had a significant interaction with age; the association held only in the subgroup of older participants. Patients with OCD also showed increased structural covariance between the right centromedial-superficial amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Limitations This was a cross-sectional study. Because this is a multisite data set analysis, participant recruitment and image acquisition were performed in different centres. Most patients were taking medication, and treatment protocols differed across centres. Conclusion Our results provide evidence for structural network–level alterations in patients with OCD involving 2 frontosubcortical circuits of relevance for the disorder and indicate that structural

  6. Beyond silence: protocol for a randomized parallel-group trial comparing two approaches to workplace mental health education for healthcare employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Sandra; Patten, Scott Burton; Stuart, Heather; Kirsh, Bonnie; MacDermid, Joy Christine

    2015-04-16

    Mental illness is a significant and growing problem in Canadian healthcare organizations, leading to tremendous personal, social and financial costs for individuals, their colleagues, their employers and their patients. Early and appropriate intervention is needed, but unfortunately, few workers get the help that they need in a timely way due to barriers related to poor mental health literacy, stigma, and inadequate access to mental health services. Workplace education and training is one promising approach to early identification and support for workers who are struggling. Little is known, however, about what approach is most effective, particularly in the context of healthcare work. The purpose of this study is to compare the impact of a customized, contact-based education approach with standard mental health literacy training on the mental health knowledge, stigmatized beliefs and help-seeking/help-outreach behaviors of healthcare employees. A multi-centre, randomized, two-group parallel group trial design will be adopted. Two hundred healthcare employees will be randomly assigned to one of two educational interventions: Beyond Silence, a peer-led program customized to the healthcare workplace, and Mental Health First Aid, a standardized literacy based training program. Pre, post and 3-month follow-up surveys will track changes in knowledge (mental health literacy), attitudes towards mental illness, and help-seeking/help-outreach behavior. An intent-to-treat, repeated measures analysis will be conducted to compare changes in the two groups over time in terms of the primary outcome of behavior change. Linear regression modeling will be used to explore the extent to which knowledge, and attitudes predict behavior change. Qualitative interviews with participants and leaders will also be conducted to examine process and implementation of the programs. This is one of the first experimental studies to compare outcomes of standard mental health literacy training to an

  7. A community-based group-guided self-help intervention for low mood and stress: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Carrie-Anne; Morrison, Jill; McConnachie, Alex; Williams, Christopher

    2013-11-19

    Depression is a mental health condition which affects millions of people each year, with worldwide rates increasing. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is recommended in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the treatment of depression. However, waiting lists can cause delays for face-to-face therapy. Also a proportion of people decline to present for help through the health service - the so-called treatment gap. Self-referral to CBT using community-based group interventions delivered by a voluntary sector organization may serve to resolve this problem. The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to determine the efficacy of such a guided CBT self-help course, the 'Living Life to the Full' (LLTTF) classes delivered by the charity Action on Depression (AOD). The primary outcome is level of depression at 6 months assessed using the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ9) depression scale. Secondary measures include levels of anxiety and social functioning. Participants with symptoms of low mood will be recruited from the community through newspaper adverts and also via the AOD website. Participants will receive either immediate or delayed access to guided CBT self-help classes - the eight session LLTTF course. The primary endpoint will be at 6 months at which point the delayed group will be offered the intervention. Levels of depression, anxiety and social functioning will be assessed and an economic analysis will be carried out. This RCT will test whether the LLTTF intervention is effective and/or cost-effective. If the LLTTF community-based classes are found to be cost effective, they may be helpful as both an intervention for those already seeking care in the health service, as well as those seeking help outside that setting, widening access to psychological therapy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN86292664.

  8. Covariant Quantization of CPT-violating Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Colladay, D; Noordmans, J P; Potting, R

    2016-01-01

    We perform the covariant canonical quantization of the CPT- and Lorentz-symmetry-violating photon sector of the minimal Standard-Model Extension, which contains a general (timelike, lightlike, or spacelike) fixed background tensor $k_{AF}^\\mu$. Well-known stability issues, arising from complex-valued energy states, are solved by introducing a small photon mass, orders of magnitude below current experimental bounds. We explicitly construct a covariant basis of polarization vectors, in which the photon field can be expanded. We proceed to derive the Feynman propagator and show that the theory is microcausal. Despite the occurrence of negative energies and vacuum-Cherenkov radiation, we do not find any runaway stability issues, because the energy remains bounded from below. An important observation is that the ordering of the roots of the dispersion relations is the same in any observer frame, which allows for a frame-independent condition that selects the correct branch of the dispersion relation. This turns ou...

  9. On covariance structure in noisy, big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffenroth, Randy C.; Nong, Ryan; Du Toit, Philip C.

    2013-09-01

    Herein we describe theory and algorithms for detecting covariance structures in large, noisy data sets. Our work uses ideas from matrix completion and robust principal component analysis to detect the presence of low-rank covariance matrices, even when the data is noisy, distorted by large corruptions, and only partially observed. In fact, the ability to handle partial observations combined with ideas from randomized algorithms for matrix decomposition enables us to produce asymptotically fast algorithms. Herein we will provide numerical demonstrations of the methods and their convergence properties. While such methods have applicability to many problems, including mathematical finance, crime analysis, and other large-scale sensor fusion problems, our inspiration arises from applying these methods in the context of cyber network intrusion detection.

  10. Covariant holography of a tachyonic accelerating universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rozas-Fernández, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We apply the holographic principle to a flat dark energy dominated Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime filled with a tachyon scalar field with constant equation of state $w=p/\\rho$, both for $w>-1$ and $w<-1$. By using a geometrical covariant procedure, which allows the construction of holographic hypersurfaces, we have obtained for each case the position of the preferred screen and have then compared these with those obtained by using the holographic dark energy model with the future event horizon as the infrared cutoff. In the phantom scenario, one of the two obtained holographic screens is placed on the big rip hypersurface, both for the covariant holographic formalism and the holographic phantom model. It is also analysed whether the existence of these preferred screens allows a mathematically consistent formulation of fundamental theories based on the existence of a S matrix at infinite distances.

  11. Model selection for Poisson processes with covariates

    CERN Document Server

    Sart, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    We observe $n$ inhomogeneous Poisson processes with covariates and aim at estimating their intensities. To handle this problem, we assume that the intensity of each Poisson process is of the form $s (\\cdot, x)$ where $x$ is the covariate and where $s$ is an unknown function. We propose a model selection approach where the models are used to approximate the multivariate function $s$. We show that our estimator satisfies an oracle-type inequality under very weak assumptions both on the intensities and the models. By using an Hellinger-type loss, we establish non-asymptotic risk bounds and specify them under various kind of assumptions on the target function $s$ such as being smooth or composite. Besides, we show that our estimation procedure is robust with respect to these assumptions.

  12. Errors on errors - Estimating cosmological parameter covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Joachimi, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Current and forthcoming cosmological data analyses share the challenge of huge datasets alongside increasingly tight requirements on the precision and accuracy of extracted cosmological parameters. The community is becoming increasingly aware that these requirements not only apply to the central values of parameters but, equally important, also to the error bars. Due to non-linear effects in the astrophysics, the instrument, and the analysis pipeline, data covariance matrices are usually not well known a priori and need to be estimated from the data itself, or from suites of large simulations. In either case, the finite number of realisations available to determine data covariances introduces significant biases and additional variance in the errors on cosmological parameters in a standard likelihood analysis. Here, we review recent work on quantifying these biases and additional variances and discuss approaches to remedy these effects.

  13. Covariant holography of a tachyonic accelerating universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Madrid (Spain); University of Portsmouth, Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    We apply the holographic principle to a flat dark energy dominated Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime filled with a tachyon scalar field with constant equation of state w = p/ρ, both for w > -1 and w < -1. By using a geometrical covariant procedure, which allows the construction of holographic hypersurfaces, we have obtained for each case the position of the preferred screen and have then compared these with those obtained by using the holographic dark energy model with the future event horizon as the infrared cutoff. In the phantom scenario, one of the two obtained holographic screens is placed on the big rip hypersurface, both for the covariant holographic formalism and the holographic phantom model. It is also analyzed whether the existence of these preferred screens allows a mathematically consistent formulation of fundamental theories based on the existence of an S-matrix at infinite distances. (orig.)

  14. Chiral Four-Dimensional Heterotic Covariant Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Beye, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In the covariant lattice formalism, chiral four-dimensional heterotic string vacua are obtained from certain even self-dual lattices which completely decompose into a left-mover and a right-mover lattice. The main purpose of this work is to classify all right-mover lattices that can appear in such a chiral model, and to study the corresponding left-mover lattices using the theory of lattice genera. In particular, the Smith-Minkowski-Siegel mass formula is employed to calculate a lower bound on the number of left-mover lattices. Also, the known relationship between asymmetric orbifolds and covariant lattices is considered in the context of our classification.

  15. Protocols.io: Virtual Communities for Protocol Development and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teytelman, Leonid; Stoliartchouk, Alexei; Kindler, Lori; Hurwitz, Bonnie L

    2016-08-01

    The detailed know-how to implement research protocols frequently remains restricted to the research group that developed the method or technology. This knowledge often exists at a level that is too detailed for inclusion in the methods section of scientific articles. Consequently, methods are not easily reproduced, leading to a loss of time and effort by other researchers. The challenge is to develop a method-centered collaborative platform to connect with fellow researchers and discover state-of-the-art knowledge. Protocols.io is an open-access platform for detailing, sharing, and discussing molecular and computational protocols that can be useful before, during, and after publication of research results.

  16. Twisted Covariant Noncommutative Self-dual Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada-Jimenez, S; Obregón, O; Ramírez, C

    2008-01-01

    A twisted covariant formulation of noncommutative self-dual gravity is presented. The recent formulation introduced by J. Wess and coworkers for constructing twisted Yang-Mills fields is used. It is shown that the noncommutative torsion is solved at any order of the $\\theta$-expansion in terms of the tetrad and the extra fields of the theory. In the process the first order expansion in $\\theta$ for the Pleba\\'nski action is explicitly obtained.

  17. Covariant quantization of the CBS superparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, P.A. E-mail: pag5@nyu.edu; Policastro, G.; Porrati, M

    2001-07-09

    The quantization of the Casalbuoni-Brink-Schwarz superparticle is performed in an explicitly covariant way using the antibracket formalism. Since an infinite number of ghost fields are required, within a suitable off-shell twistor-like formalism, we are able to fix the gauge of each ghost sector without modifying the physical content of the theory. The computation reveals that the antibracket cohomology contains only the physical degrees of freedom.

  18. Adaptive Covariance Estimation with model selection

    CERN Document Server

    Biscay, Rolando; Loubes, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    We provide in this paper a fully adaptive penalized procedure to select a covariance among a collection of models observing i.i.d replications of the process at fixed observation points. For this we generalize previous results of Bigot and al. and propose to use a data driven penalty to obtain an oracle inequality for the estimator. We prove that this method is an extension to the matricial regression model of the work by Baraud.

  19. Economical phase-covariant cloning with multiclones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wen-Hai; Ye Liu

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a very simple method to derive the explicit transformations of the optimal economical to M phase-covariant cloning. The fidelity of clones reaches the theoretic bound [D'Ariano G M and Macchiavello C 2003 Phys. Rcv. A 67 042306]. The derived transformations cover the previous contributions [Delgado Y,Lamata L et al,2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 150502] in which M must be odd.

  20. Unbiased risk estimation method for covariance estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Lescornel, Hélène; Chabriac, Claudie

    2011-01-01

    We consider a model selection estimator of the covariance of a random process. Using the Unbiased Risk Estimation (URE) method, we build an estimator of the risk which allows to select an estimator in a collection of model. Then, we present an oracle inequality which ensures that the risk of the selected estimator is close to the risk of the oracle. Simulations show the efficiency of this methodology.

  1. Risk evaluation with enhaced covariance matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanowicz, K; Richmond, P; Holyst, Janusz A.; Richmond, Peter; Urbanowicz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    We propose a route for the evaluation of risk based on a transformation of the covariance matrix. The approach uses a `potential' or `objective' function. This allows us to rescale data from diferent assets (or sources) such that each set then has similar statistical properties in terms of their probability distributions. The method is tested using historical data from both the New York and Warsaw Stock Exchanges.

  2. Superfield quantization in Sp(2) covariant formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M

    2001-01-01

    The rules of the superfield Sp(2) covariant quantization of the arbitrary gauge theories for the case of the introduction of the gauging with the derivative equations for the gauge functional are generalized. The possibilities of realization of the expanded anti-brackets are considered and it is shown, that only one of the realizations is compatible with the transformations of the expanded BRST-symmetry in the form of super translations along the Grassmann superspace coordinates

  3. Covariant quantization of the CBS superparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, P. A.; Policastro, G.; Porrati, M.

    2001-07-01

    The quantization of the Casalbuoni-Brink-Schwarz superparticle is performed in an explicitly covariant way using the antibracket formalism. Since an infinite number of ghost fields are required, within a suitable off-shell twistor-like formalism, we are able to fix the gauge of each ghost sector without modifying the physical content of the theory. The computation reveals that the antibracket cohomology contains only the physical degrees of freedom.

  4. Torsion and geometrostasis in covariant superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachos, C.

    1985-01-01

    The covariant action for freely propagating heterotic superstrings consists of a metric and a torsion term with a special relative strength. It is shown that the strength for which torsion flattens the underlying 10-dimensional superspace geometry is precisely that which yields free oscillators on the light cone. This is in complete analogy with the geometrostasis of two-dimensional sigma-models with Wess-Zumino interactions. 13 refs.

  5. Linear Covariance Analysis for a Lunar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Bhatt, Sagar; Fritz, Matthew; Woffinden, David; May, Darryl; Braden, Ellen; Hannan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A next-generation lunar lander Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system, which includes a state-of-the-art optical sensor suite, is proposed in a concept design cycle. The design goal is to allow the lander to softly land within the prescribed landing precision. The achievement of this precision landing requirement depends on proper selection of the sensor suite. In this paper, a robust sensor selection procedure is demonstrated using a Linear Covariance (LinCov) analysis tool developed by Draper.

  6. ANL Critical Assembly Covariance Matrix Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Richard D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grimm, Karl N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This report discusses the generation of a covariance matrix for selected critical assemblies that were carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) using four critical facilities-all of which are now decommissioned. The four different ANL critical facilities are: ZPR-3 located at ANL-West (now Idaho National Laboratory- INL), ZPR-6 and ZPR-9 located at ANL-East (Illinois) and ZPPr located at ANL-West.

  7. Covariant Calculus for Effective String Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Dass, N. D. Hari; Matlock, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A covariant calculus for the construction of effective string theories is developed. Effective string theory, describing quantum string-like excitations in arbitrary dimension, has in the past been constructed using the principles of conformal field theory, but not in a systematic way. Using the freedom of choice of field definition, a particular field definition is made in a systematic way to allow an explicit construction of effective string theories with manifest exact conformal symmetry. ...

  8. Covariates of Craving in Actively Drinking Alcoholics

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravorty, Subhajit; Kuna, Samuel T.; Zaharakis, Nikola; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship of alcohol craving with biopsychosocial and addiction factors that are clinically pertinent to alcoholism treatment. Alcohol craving was assessed in 315 treatment-seeking, alcohol dependent subjects using the PACS questionnaire. Standard validated questionnaires were used to evaluate a variety of biological, addiction, psychological, psychiatric, and social factors. Individual covariates of craving included age, race, probl...

  9. Estimation of genetic connectedness diagnostics based on prediction errors without the prediction error variance-covariance matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, John B; Dodds, Ken G; Lee, Michael A

    2017-03-02

    An important issue in genetic evaluation is the comparability of random effects (breeding values), particularly between pairs of animals in different contemporary groups. This is usually referred to as genetic connectedness. While various measures of connectedness have been proposed in the literature, there is general agreement that the most appropriate measure is some function of the prediction error variance-covariance matrix. However, obtaining the prediction error variance-covariance matrix is computationally demanding for large-scale genetic evaluations. Many alternative statistics have been proposed that avoid the computational cost of obtaining the prediction error variance-covariance matrix, such as counts of genetic links between contemporary groups, gene flow matrices, and functions of the variance-covariance matrix of estimated contemporary group fixed effects. In this paper, we show that a correction to the variance-covariance matrix of estimated contemporary group fixed effects will produce the exact prediction error variance-covariance matrix averaged by contemporary group for univariate models in the presence of single or multiple fixed effects and one random effect. We demonstrate the correction for a series of models and show that approximations to the prediction error matrix based solely on the variance-covariance matrix of estimated contemporary group fixed effects are inappropriate in certain circumstances. Our method allows for the calculation of a connectedness measure based on the prediction error variance-covariance matrix by calculating only the variance-covariance matrix of estimated fixed effects. Since the number of fixed effects in genetic evaluation is usually orders of magnitudes smaller than the number of random effect levels, the computational requirements for our method should be reduced.

  10. GRIN: “GRoup versus INdividual physiotherapy following lower limb intra-muscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections for ambulant children with cerebral palsy: an assessor-masked randomised comparison trial”: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood. Spasticity is a significant contributor to the secondary impairments impacting functional performance and participation. The most common lower limb spasticity management is focal intramuscular injections of Botulinum Toxin-Type A accompanied by individually-delivered (one on one) physiotherapy rehabilitation. With increasing emphasis on improving goal-directed functional activity and participation within a family-centred framework, it is timely to explore whether physiotherapy provided in a group could achieve comparable outcomes, encouraging providers to offer flexible models of physiotherapy delivery. This study aims to compare individual to group-based physiotherapy following intramuscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections to the lower limbs for ambulant children with cerebral palsy aged four to fourteen years. Methods/Design An assessor-masked, block randomised comparison trial will be conducted with random allocation to either group-based or individual physiotherapy. A sample size of 30 (15 in each study arm) will be recruited. Both groups will receive six hours of direct therapy following Botulinum Toxin-A injections in either an individual or group format with additional home programme activities (three exercises to be performed three times a week). Study groups will be compared at baseline (T1), then at 10 weeks (T2, efficacy) and 26 weeks (T3, retention) post Botulinum Toxin-A injections. Primary outcomes will be caregiver/s perception of and satisfaction with their child’s occupational performance goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure) and quality of gait (Edinburgh Visual Gait Score) with a range of secondary outcomes across domains of the International Classification of Disability, Functioning and Health. Discussion This paper outlines the study protocol including theoretical basis, study hypotheses and outcome measures for this assessor-masked, randomised

  11. How covariant is the galaxy luminosity function?

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the error properties of certain galaxy luminosity function (GLF) estimators. Using a cluster expansion of the density field, we show how, for both volume and flux limited samples, the GLF estimates are covariant. The covariance matrix can be decomposed into three pieces: a diagonal term arising from Poisson noise; a sample variance term arising from large-scale structure in the survey volume; an occupancy covariance term arising due to galaxies of different luminosities inhabiting the same cluster. To evaluate the theory one needs: the mass function and bias of clusters, and the conditional luminosity function (CLF). We use a semi-analytic model (SAM) galaxy catalogue from the Millennium run N-body simulation and the CLF of Yang et al. (2003) to explore these effects. The GLF estimates from the SAM and the CLF qualitatively reproduce results from the 2dFGRS. We also measure the luminosity dependence of clustering in the SAM and find reasonable agreement with 2dFGRS results for bright galaxies. ...

  12. Development of covariance capabilities in EMPIRE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman,M.; Pigni, M.T.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Mattoon, C.M.; Capote, R.; Cho, Young-Sik; Trkov, A.

    2008-06-24

    The nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended to provide evaluation capabilities for neutron cross section covariances in the thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The Atlas of Neutron Resonances by Mughabghab is used as a primary source of information on uncertainties at low energies. Care is taken to ensure consistency among the resonance parameter uncertainties and those for thermal cross sections. The resulting resonance parameter covariances are formatted in the ENDF-6 File 32. In the fast neutron range our methodology is based on model calculations with the code EMPIRE combined with experimental data through several available approaches. The model-based covariances can be obtained using deterministic (Kalman) or stochastic (Monte Carlo) propagation of model parameter uncertainties. We show that these two procedures yield comparable results. The Kalman filter and/or the generalized least square fitting procedures are employed to incorporate experimental information. We compare the two approaches analyzing results for the major reaction channels on {sup 89}Y. We also discuss a long-standing issue of unreasonably low uncertainties and link it to the rigidity of the model.

  13. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ettinger, David S. [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Thoracic Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sause, William T. [Radiation Center, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  14. Use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin in HIV type 1-infected children (Pediatric AIDS clinical trials group protocol 273).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, E R; Fletcher, C V; Mofenson, L M; Palumbo, P E; Kang, M; Fenton, T; Sapan, C V; Meyer, W A; Shearer, W T; Hawkins, E; Fowler, M G; Bouquin, P; Purdue, L; Sloand, E M; Nemo, G J; Wara, D; Bryson, Y J; Starr, S E; Petru, A; Burchett, S

    2000-02-01

    The clinical, immunologic, and virologic effects and the pharmacokinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were assessed in 30 HIV-infected children aged 2-11 years. All had moderately advanced disease with an immune complex-dissociated (ICD) p24 antigen >70 pg/mL and were on stable antiviral therapy. Three groups of 10 children received 6 monthly infusions of 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg of HIVIG, and serial immunologic and virologic assays were performed. HIVIG doses as high as 800 mg/kg were safe and well tolerated. The half-life of HIVIG, determined by serial p24 antibody titers, was 13-16 days, the volume of distribution was 102-113 mL/kg, and clearance was 5.6-6.0 mL/kg/day. Plasma ICD p24 decreased during the infusions, but CD4 cell levels, plasma RNA copy number, cellular virus, immunoglobulin levels, and neutralizing antibody titers were minimally affected by the infusions. Clinical status did not change during the 6-month infusion and 3-month follow-up periods.

  15. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.

  16. Efficacy of zidovudine and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin for reducing perinatal HIV transmission from HIV-infected women with advanced disease: results of Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, E R; Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Bethel, J; Whitehouse, J; Nugent, R; Moye, J; Glenn Fowler, M; Mathieson, B J; Reichelderfer, P; Nemo, G J; Korelitz, J; Meyer, W A; Sapan, C V; Jimenez, E; Gandia, J; Scott, G; O'Sullivan, M J; Kovacs, A; Stek, A; Shearer, W T; Hammill, H

    1999-03-01

    Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185 evaluated whether zidovudine combined with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) infusions administered monthly during pregnancy and to the neonate at birth would significantly lower perinatal HIV transmission compared with treatment with zidovudine and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) without HIV antibody. Subjects had baseline CD4 cell counts /=200/microL) but not with time of zidovudine initiation (5.6% vs. 4.8% if started before vs. during pregnancy; P=. 75). The Kaplan-Meier transmission rate for HIVIG recipients was 4. 1% (95% confidence interval, 1.5%-6.7%) and for IVIG recipients was 6.0% (2.8%-9.1%) (P=.36). The unexpectedly low transmission confirmed that zidovudine prophylaxis is highly effective, even for women with advanced HIV disease and prior zidovudine therapy, although it limited the study's ability to address whether passive immunization diminishes perinatal transmission.

  17. Performance evaluation of sensor allocation algorithm based on covariance control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The covariance control capability of sensor allocation algorithms based on covariance control strategy is an important index to evaluate the performance of these algorithms. Owing to lack of standard performance metric indices to evaluate covariance control capability, sensor allocation ratio, etc, there are no guides to follow in the design procedure of sensor allocation algorithm in practical applications. To meet these demands, three quantified performance metric indices are presented, which are average covariance misadjustment quantity (ACMQ), average sensor allocation ratio (ASAR) and matrix metric influence factor (MMIF), where ACMQ, ASAR and MMIF quantify the covariance control capability, the usage of sensor resources and the robustness of sensor allocation algorithm, respectively. Meanwhile, a covariance adaptive sensor allocation algorithm based on a new objective function is proposed to improve the covariance control capability of the algorithm based on information gain. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm have the advantage over the preceding sensor allocation algorithm in covariance control capability and robustness.

  18. Covariant equations for the NN-πNN system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. R.; Afnan, I. R.

    1995-05-01

    We explain the deficiencies of the current NN-πNN equations, sketch the derivation of a set of covariant NN-πNN equations and describe the ways in which these equations differ from previous sets of covariant equations.

  19. Symmetry and Covariance of Non-relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Omote, Minoru; kamefuchi, Susumu

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of a 5-dimensional form of space-time transformations non-relativistic quantum mechanics is reformulated in a manifestly covariant manner. The resulting covariance resembles that of the conventional relativistic quantum mechanics.

  20. Exploring the economic and social effects of care dependence in later life: protocol for the 10/66 research group INDEP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayston, Rosie; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Uwakwe, Richard; Acosta, Isaac; Ezeah, Peter; Gallardo, Sara; de Oca, Veronica Montes; Wang, Hong; Guerchet, Maëlenn; Liu, Zhaorui; Sanchez, Maria; Lloyd-Sherlock, Peter; Prince, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    In low or middle income countries chronic diseases are rapidly becoming the main cause of disease burden. However, the main focus of health policymakers has been on preventing death from cancer and heart disease, with very little attention to the growing problem of long-term needs for care (dependence). Numbers of dependent older people are set to quadruple by 2050. The economic impact of providing long-term care is likely to be substantial. The study uses mixed methods and draws on and extends the population-based surveys conducted by the 10/66 Dementia Research Group. We focus on two countries in Latin America (Peru and Mexico), China and Nigeria. The surveys comprised baseline surveys of health, socioeconomic circumstances and care arrangements, repeated three to four years later. We are going back to these households to make a detailed assessment of the overall economic status and the use of health services by all family members. We will compare households where: a) an older resident became dependent between baseline and follow-up (incident care), b) one or more older people were dependent at both time points (chronic care), b) c) no older residents had needs for care (control households) for household income, consumption, healthcare expenditure and economic strain. In each of the four countries we are carrying out six detailed household 'case studies' to explore in more depth the economic impacts of dependence, and the social relations between household members and others in their network. The INDEP study will provide a detailed examination of the economic and social effects of care dependence in low and middle income settings. As the proportion of older people with needs for care rises rapidly in these countries, this neglected policy area is likely to become increasingly salient for families, communities and policymakers alike. Our detailed multilevel plans for dissemination will ensure that the study helps to put this important issue on the agenda for the

  1. [Comparison of 2 chemotherapy protocols in adult acute myeloblastic leukemia. Results of the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán cooperative group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato-Mendizábal, E; Ruiz-Argüelles, G J; Labardini-Méndez, J; Gómez-Almaguer, D; Ganci-Cerrud, G; Lozano-de-la-Vega, A

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, the best treatment for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the induction of bone marrow hypoplasia by ablative combined chemotherapy; the prototype of these schedules is the so-called 7 + 3 (seven days of continuous infusion of cytarabine and three days of one-hour infusion of any anthracycline); these schedules require the support of both platelet transfusions and antibiotics. Other non-ablative schedules have also been tried in the treatment of such patients. Here we analyze the results of the treatment of 76 adult patients with AML; 43 were treated with the classical 7 + 3 schedule, whereas 33 were treated with a combination of chemotherapy used in non-ablative doses (TADOP: thioguanine, arabinosyl-citosine, doxorrubicin, vincristine and prednisone). The results were as follows, respectively, for 7 + 3 and TADOP: complete remission (CR) was achieved in 60 and 48% of patients (p NS); the number of cycles to achieve CR had a median of 1 and 5 months (p less than 0.001); the median duration of the CR was 21 and 10 months (p less than 0.05); fatal myelotoxicity was 30 and 42% (p NS), one-year disease free survival (DFS) was 45 and 46% (p NS) and three-year survival was 22% and 15% (p NS). Additionally, patients treated with 7 + 3 were divided into two groups according to the type of platelet transfusion support; those supported with apheresis equipment and those with centrifugation-derived platelets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Short-term intensive psychodynamic group therapy versus cognitive-behavioral group therapy in day treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszek, Hubert; Holas, Paweł; Wyrzykowski, Tomasz; Lorentzen, Steinar; Kokoszka, Andrzej

    2015-07-29

    Psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral group therapies are frequently applied in day hospitals for the treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders in Poland and other Eastern European countries. Yet there is not enough evidence as to their effectiveness in this environment; this study addresses this gap. The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of these two kinds of day treatment care consisting of intensive, short-term group psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral therapy, for patients with anxiety disorders and/or comorbid depressive or personality disorders. Our objectives are to: 1) show the effectiveness of each treatment in a day-care setting relative to the wait-list control group; 2) demonstrate the relative short- and long-term effectiveness of the two active treatments; 3) carry out a preliminary examination of the predictors and moderators of treatment response; 4) carry out a preliminary examination of the mediators of therapeutic change; and 5) compare the impact of both methods of treatment on the outcome of the measures used in this study. In this randomized controlled trial, a total of 199 patients with anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive and/or personality disorders will be assigned to one of three conditions: 1) psychodynamic group therapy; 2) cognitive-behavioral group therapy; or 3) wait-list control group. The therapy will last 12 weeks. Both treatments will be manualized (the manuals will address comorbidity). Primary outcome measures will include self-reported symptoms of anxiety, observer-rated symptoms of anxiety, global improvement, and recovery rate. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of pathological personality traits, depression, self-esteem, defense mechanisms, beliefs about self and others, interpersonal problems, object relations, parental bonding, meta-cognition, and quality of life. Measures will be taken at baseline, post-treatment, and at six months following

  3. High-dimensional covariance estimation with high-dimensional data

    CERN Document Server

    Pourahmadi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Methods for estimating sparse and large covariance matrices Covariance and correlation matrices play fundamental roles in every aspect of the analysis of multivariate data collected from a variety of fields including business and economics, health care, engineering, and environmental and physical sciences. High-Dimensional Covariance Estimation provides accessible and comprehensive coverage of the classical and modern approaches for estimating covariance matrices as well as their applications to the rapidly developing areas lying at the intersection of statistics and mac

  4. The regular representation and regular covariant representation of crossed products of Woronowicz C*-algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xiaoxia; GUO; Maozheng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, it is shown that the regular representation and regular covariant representation of the crossed products A×α G correspond to the twisted multiplicative unitary operators, where A is a Woronowicz C*-algebra acted upon by a discrete group G. Meanwhile, it is also shown that the regular covariant C*-algebra is the Woronowicz C*-algebra which corresponds to a multiplicative unitary. Finally, an explicit description of the multiplicative unitary operator for C(SUq(2))×α Z is given in terms of those of the Woronowicz C*-algebra C(SUq(2)) and the discrete group G.

  5. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  6. Autism-specific covariation in perceptual performances: "g" or "p" factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrée-Anne S Meilleur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autistic perception is characterized by atypical and sometimes exceptional performance in several low- (e.g., discrimination and mid-level (e.g., pattern matching tasks in both visual and auditory domains. A factor that specifically affects perceptive abilities in autistic individuals should manifest as an autism-specific association between perceptual tasks. The first purpose of this study was to explore how perceptual performances are associated within or across processing levels and/or modalities. The second purpose was to determine if general intelligence, the major factor that accounts for covariation in task performances in non-autistic individuals, equally controls perceptual abilities in autistic individuals. METHODS: We asked 46 autistic individuals and 46 typically developing controls to perform four tasks measuring low- or mid-level visual or auditory processing. Intelligence was measured with the Wechsler's Intelligence Scale (FSIQ and Raven Progressive Matrices (RPM. We conducted linear regression models to compare task performances between groups and patterns of covariation between tasks. The addition of either Wechsler's FSIQ or RPM in the regression models controlled for the effects of intelligence. RESULTS: In typically developing individuals, most perceptual tasks were associated with intelligence measured either by RPM or Wechsler FSIQ. The residual covariation between unimodal tasks, i.e. covariation not explained by intelligence, could be explained by a modality-specific factor. In the autistic group, residual covariation revealed the presence of a plurimodal factor specific to autism. CONCLUSIONS: Autistic individuals show exceptional performance in some perceptual tasks. Here, we demonstrate the existence of specific, plurimodal covariation that does not dependent on general intelligence (or "g" factor. Instead, this residual covariation is accounted for by a common perceptual process (or "p" factor, which may

  7. A synthetic covariance matrix for monitoring by terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauker, Stephanie; Schwieger, Volker

    2017-06-01

    Modelling correlations within laser scanning point clouds can be achieved by using synthetic covariance matrices. These are based on the elementary error model which contains different groups of correlations: non-correlating, functional correlating and stochastic correlating. By applying the elementary error model on terrestrial laser scanning several groups of error sources should be considered: instrumental, atmospheric and object based. This contribution presents calculations for the Leica HDS 7000. The determined variances and the spatial correlations of the points are estimated and discussed. Hereby, the mean standard deviation of the point cloud is up to 0.6 mm and the mean correlation is about 0.6 with respect to 5 m scanning range. The change of these numerical values compared to previous publications as Kauker and Schwieger [17] is mainly caused by the complete consideration of the object related error sources.

  8. On the Covariant Quantization of Type II Superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Guttenberg, S; Kreuzer, M; Guttenberg, Sebastian; Knapp, Johanna; Kreuzer, Maximilian

    2004-01-01

    In a series of papers Grassi, Policastro, Porrati and van Nieuwenhuizen have introduced a new method to covariantly quantize the GS-superstring by constructing a resolution of the pure spinor constraint of Berkovits' approach. Their latest version is based on a gauged WZNW model and a definition of physical states in terms of relative cohomology groups. We first put the off-shell formulation of the type II version of their ideas into a chirally split form and directly construct the free action of the gauged WZNW model, thus circumventing some complications of the super group manifold approach to type II. Then we discuss the BRST charges that define the relative cohomology and the N=2 superconformal algebra. A surprising result is that nilpotency of the BRST charge requires the introduction of another quartet of ghosts.

  9. Symplectic Covariance Properties for Shubin and Born-Jordan Pseudo-Differential Operators

    CERN Document Server

    de Gosson, Maurice A

    2011-01-01

    Among all classes of pseudo-differential operators only the Weyl operators enjoy the property of symplectic covariance with respect to conjugation by elements of the metaplectic group. In this paper we show that there is, however, a weaker form of symplectic covariance for Shubin's {\\tau}-dependent operators, in which the intertwiners no longer are metaplectic, but still are invertible non-unitary operators. We also study the case of Born--Jordan operators, which are obtained by averaging the {\\tau}-operators over the interval [0,1] (such operators have recently been studied by Boggiatto and his collaborators). We show that metaplectic covariance still hold for these operators, with respect top a subgroup of the metaplectic group.

  10. A Student Teamwork Induction Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline; Spong, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Faulty group processes have harmful effects on performance but there is little research about intervention protocols to pre-empt them in higher education. This naturalistic experiment compared a control cohort with an inducted cohort. The inducted cohort attended a workshop, consultations, elected a leader and used tools (a group log and group…

  11. Quantum energy inequalities and local covariance II: categorical formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewster, Christopher J.

    2007-11-01

    We formulate quantum energy inequalities (QEIs) in the framework of locally covariant quantum field theory developed by Brunetti, Fredenhagen and Verch, which is based on notions taken from category theory. This leads to a new viewpoint on the QEIs, and also to the identification of a new structural property of locally covariant quantum field theory, which we call local physical equivalence. Covariant formulations of the numerical range and spectrum of locally covariant fields are given and investigated, and a new algebra of fields is identified, in which fields are treated independently of their realisation on particular spacetimes and manifestly covariant versions of the functional calculus may be formulated.

  12. Gallilei covariant quantum mechanics in electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Wilhelm

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A formulation of the quantum mechanics of charged particles in time-dependent electromagnetic fields is presented, in which both the Schroedinger equation and wave equations for the electromagnetic potentials are Galilei covariant, it is shown that the Galilean relativity principle leads to the introduction of the electromagnetic substratum in which the matter and electromagnetic waves propagate. The electromagnetic substratum effects are quantitatively significant for quantum mechanics in reference frames, in which the substratum velocity w is in magnitude comparable with the velocity of light c. The electromagnetic substratum velocity w occurs explicitly in the wave equations for the electromagnetic potentials but not in the Schroedinger equation.

  13. Inferring Meta-covariates in Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Keith; McMillan, Lisa; Girolami, Mark

    This paper develops an alternative method for gene selection that combines model based clustering and binary classification. By averaging the covariates within the clusters obtained from model based clustering, we define “meta-covariates” and use them to build a probit regression model, thereby selecting clusters of similarly behaving genes, aiding interpretation. This simultaneous learning task is accomplished by an EM algorithm that optimises a single likelihood function which rewards good performance at both classification and clustering. We explore the performance of our methodology on a well known leukaemia dataset and use the Gene Ontology to interpret our results.

  14. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmeli, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.carmeli@gmail.com [D.I.M.E., Università di Genova, Via Cadorna 2, I-17100 Savona (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku (Finland); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-09-02

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d−4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  15. Radiative Transfer in Special Relativity: Covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Duque, Mauricio; Duque, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose is to introduce in a clear and direct way the students of undergraduate courses in physics and/or astronomy to the subject of radiative transfer. A pedagogical revision is made in order to obtain the radiative transfer equation, its restrictions and the different types of interactions present between the radiation and the matter. Because in the classical literature about radiative transfer the covariance is not fully developed, we show in an explicit manner detail calculations and then we discuss the relativistic effects.

  16. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  17. REFINING GENETICALLY INFERRED RELATIONSHIPS USING TREELET COVARIANCE SMOOTHING1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossett, Andrew; Lee, Ann B.; Klei, Lambertus; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances coupled with large sample sets have uncovered many factors underlying the genetic basis of traits and the predisposition to complex disease, but much is left to discover. A common thread to most genetic investigations is familial relationships. Close relatives can be identified from family records, and more distant relatives can be inferred from large panels of genetic markers. Unfortunately these empirical estimates can be noisy, especially regarding distant relatives. We propose a new method for denoising genetically—inferred relationship matrices by exploiting the underlying structure due to hierarchical groupings of correlated individuals. The approach, which we call Treelet Covariance Smoothing, employs a multiscale decomposition of covariance matrices to improve estimates of pairwise relationships. On both simulated and real data, we show that smoothing leads to better estimates of the relatedness amongst distantly related individuals. We illustrate our method with a large genome-wide association study and estimate the “heritability” of body mass index quite accurately. Traditionally heritability, defined as the fraction of the total trait variance attributable to additive genetic effects, is estimated from samples of closely related individuals using random effects models. We show that by using smoothed relationship matrices we can estimate heritability using population-based samples. Finally, while our methods have been developed for refining genetic relationship matrices and improving estimates of heritability, they have much broader potential application in statistics. Most notably, for error-in-variables random effects models and settings that require regularization of matrices with block or hierarchical structure. PMID:24587841

  18. REFINING GENETICALLY INFERRED RELATIONSHIPS USING TREELET COVARIANCE SMOOTHING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossett, Andrew; Lee, Ann B; Klei, Lambertus; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2013-06-27

    Recent technological advances coupled with large sample sets have uncovered many factors underlying the genetic basis of traits and the predisposition to complex disease, but much is left to discover. A common thread to most genetic investigations is familial relationships. Close relatives can be identified from family records, and more distant relatives can be inferred from large panels of genetic markers. Unfortunately these empirical estimates can be noisy, especially regarding distant relatives. We propose a new method for denoising genetically-inferred relationship matrices by exploiting the underlying structure due to hierarchical groupings of correlated individuals. The approach, which we call Treelet Covariance Smoothing, employs a multiscale decomposition of covariance matrices to improve estimates of pairwise relationships. On both simulated and real data, we show that smoothing leads to better estimates of the relatedness amongst distantly related individuals. We illustrate our method with a large genome-wide association study and estimate the "heritability" of body mass index quite accurately. Traditionally heritability, defined as the fraction of the total trait variance attributable to additive genetic effects, is estimated from samples of closely related individuals using random effects models. We show that by using smoothed relationship matrices we can estimate heritability using population-based samples. Finally, while our methods have been developed for refining genetic relationship matrices and improving estimates of heritability, they have much broader potential application in statistics. Most notably, for error-in-variables random effects models and settings that require regularization of matrices with block or hierarchical structure.

  19. Maximum covariance analysis to identify intraseasonal oscillations over tropical Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Naurinete J. C.; Mesquita, Michel d. S.; Mendes, David; Spyrides, Maria H. C.; Pedra, George U.; Lucio, Paulo S.

    2017-09-01

    A reliable prognosis of extreme precipitation events in the tropics is arguably challenging to obtain due to the interaction of meteorological systems at various time scales. A pivotal component of the global climate variability is the so-called intraseasonal oscillations, phenomena that occur between 20 and 100 days. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), which is directly related to the modulation of convective precipitation in the equatorial belt, is considered the primary oscillation in the tropical region. The aim of this study is to diagnose the connection between the MJO signal and the regional intraseasonal rainfall variability over tropical Brazil. This is achieved through the development of an index called Multivariate Intraseasonal Index for Tropical Brazil (MITB). This index is based on Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) applied to the filtered daily anomalies of rainfall data over tropical Brazil against a group of covariates consisting of: outgoing longwave radiation and the zonal component u of the wind at 850 and 200 hPa. The first two MCA modes, which were used to create the { MITB}_1 and { MITB}_2 indices, represent 65 and 16 % of the explained variance, respectively. The combined multivariate index was able to satisfactorily represent the pattern of intraseasonal variability over tropical Brazil, showing that there are periods of activation and inhibition of precipitation connected with the pattern of MJO propagation. The MITB index could potentially be used as a diagnostic tool for intraseasonal forecasting.

  20. Danish Focus group protocol for children & adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, Michelle Nadia; Pedersen, Dorthe; Sansolios, Sanne

    2010-01-01

    the opportunity to explore the children’s knowledge and perception of a given subject. Thus recognizes the participants as experts of their world. FG’s have the additional advantages of minimize the possibility of the children responding to please the interviewer, and also remove the pressure from the individual...

  1. GROUP: A gossip based building community protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Baraglia R.; Dazzi P.; Mordacchini M.; Ricci L; Alessi L.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of communities of peers characterized by similar interests is currently a challenging research area. To ease the diffusion of relevant data to interested peers, similarity based overlays define links between similar peers by exploiting a similarity function. However, existing solutions neither give a clear definition of peer communities nor define a clear strategy to partition the peers into communities. As a consequence, the spread of the information cannot be confined within a...

  2. Periprocedural 3D imaging of the left atrium and esophagus: comparison of different protocols of 3D rotational angiography of the left atrium and esophagus in group of 547 consecutive patients undergoing catheter ablation of the complex atrial arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starek, Zdenek; Lehar, František; Jez, Jiri; Wolf, Jiri; Kulik, Tomas; Zbankova, Alena; Novak, Miroslav

    2016-07-01

    A new method in creating 3D models of the left atrium (LA) and esophagus before catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias is 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) of the LA. The purpose of this retrospective study was to test various acquisition protocols of the 3DRA and attempt to define the parameters influencing the success of the protocols. From August 2010 to November 2014, 3DRA of the LA using the Philips Allura FD 10 X-ray system was performed in 547 consecutive patients using right atrial and left atrial protocols. Visualization of the esophagus was performed after oral administration of a contrast agent. Patients were monitored for success (creation of a useful 3D models) and evaluated for a number of parameters affecting the success of 3DRA. The success of the RA protocol was 88.89 % with and 91.91 % without esophagus imaging. The success of the LA protocol was 97.42 % with and 94.54 % without esophagus imaging. The only factor reducing the success of the RA protocol was BMI; the LA protocol was not influenced by any factor. Ventricular fibrillation induced in two patients was successfully treated with defibrillation. 3DRA of the LA is a reliable method that supports catheter ablation of complex atrial arrhythmias. The LA protocol with esophagus imaging was significantly more reliable than the RA protocol; the other protocols were comparable. The RA protocol may be negatively affected by high BMI. Simultaneous imaging of the esophagus is safe and feasible, and the LA protocol can be recommended.

  3. Spatiotemporal noise covariance estimation from limited empirical magnetoencephalographic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Sung C [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Plis, Sergey M [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ranken, Doug M [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schmidt, David M [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-11-07

    The performance of parametric magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) source localization approaches can be degraded by the use of poor background noise covariance estimates. In general, estimation of the noise covariance for spatiotemporal analysis is difficult mainly due to the limited noise information available. Furthermore, its estimation requires a large amount of storage and a one-time but very large (and sometimes intractable) calculation or its inverse. To overcome these difficulties, noise covariance models consisting of one pair or a sum of multi-pairs of Kronecker products of spatial covariance and temporal covariance have been proposed. However, these approaches cannot be applied when the noise information is very limited, i.e., the amount of noise information is less than the degrees of freedom of the noise covariance models. A common example of this is when only averaged noise data are available for a limited prestimulus region (typically at most a few hundred milliseconds duration). For such cases, a diagonal spatiotemporal noise covariance model consisting of sensor variances with no spatial or temporal correlation has been the common choice for spatiotemporal analysis. In this work, we propose a different noise covariance model which consists of diagonal spatial noise covariance and Toeplitz temporal noise covariance. It can easily be estimated from limited noise information, and no time-consuming optimization and data-processing are required. Thus, it can be used as an alternative choice when one-pair or multi-pair noise covariance models cannot be estimated due to lack of noise information. To verify its capability we used Bayesian inference dipole analysis and a number of simulated and empirical datasets. We compared this covariance model with other existing covariance models such as conventional diagonal covariance, one-pair and multi-pair noise covariance models, when noise information is sufficient to estimate them. We

  4. Covariant Entropy Bound and Padmanabhan's Emergent Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Hadi, H; Darabi, F

    2016-01-01

    The covariant entropy conjecture is invariant under time reversal and consequently its origin must be statistical rather than thermodynamical. This may impose a fundamental constraint on the number of degrees of freedom in nature. Indeed, the covariant entropy bound imposes an upper entropy bound for any physical system. Considering a cosmological system, we show that Padmanabhan's emergent paradigm, which indicates that the emergence of cosmic space is due to the discrepancy between the surface and bulk degrees of freedom, leads to a lower entropy bound. The lower and upper entropy bounds may coincide on the apparent horizon for the radiation field and dark energy with the equations of state $\\omega=\\frac{1}{3}$ and $\\omega=-1$, respectively. Moreover, the maximal entropy inside the apparent horizon occurs when it is filled completely by the radiation field or dark energy. It turns out that for dark energy case (pure de Sitter space)\\ the holographic principle is satisfied in the sense that the number of deg...

  5. Stochastic precipitation generator with hidden state covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongku; Lee, GyuWon

    2017-08-01

    Time series of daily weather such as precipitation, minimum temperature and maximum temperature are commonly required for various fields. Stochastic weather generators constitute one of the techniques to produce synthetic daily weather. The recently introduced approach for stochastic weather generators is based on generalized linear modeling (GLM) with covariates to account for seasonality and teleconnections (e.g., with the El Niño). In general, stochastic weather generators tend to underestimate the observed interannual variance of seasonally aggregated variables. To reduce this overdispersion, we incorporated time series of seasonal dry/wet indicators in the GLM weather generator as covariates. These seasonal time series were local (or global) decodings obtained by a hidden Markov model of seasonal total precipitation and implemented in the weather generator. The proposed method is applied to time series of daily weather from Seoul, Korea and Pergamino, Argentina. This method provides a straightforward translation of the uncertainty of the seasonal forecast to the corresponding conditional daily weather statistics.

  6. Processing Neutron Cross Section Covariances using NJOY-99 and PUFF-IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcilla,R.; Kahler, A.C.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-06-24

    With the growing demand for multigroup covariances, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) has been experiencing an upsurge in its covariance data processing activities using the two US codes NJOY-99 (LANL) and PUFF-IV (ORNL). The code NJOY-99 was upgraded by incorporating the new module ERRORJ-2.3, while the NNDC served as the active user and provided feedback. The NNDC has been primarily processing neutron cross section covariances on its 64-bit Linux cluster in support of two DOE programs, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). For GNEP, the NNDC used NJOY-99.259 to generate multigroup covariance matrices of {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U from the JENDL-3.3 library using the 15-, 33-, and 230-energy group structures. These covariance matrices will be used to test a new collapsing algorithm which will subsequently be employed to calculate uncertainties on integral parameters in different fast neutron-based systems. For NCSP, we used PUFF-IV 1.0.4 to verify the processability of new evaluated covariance data of {sup 55}Mn, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U generated by a collaboration of ORNL and LANL. For the data end-users at large, the NNDC has made available a Web site which provides a static visualization interface for all materials with covariance data in the four major data libraries: ENDF/B-VI.8 (47 materials), ENDF/B-VII.0 (26 materials), JEFF-3.1 (37 materials) and JENDL-3.3 (20 materials).

  7. Testing the impact of a social skill training versus waiting list control group for the reduction of disruptive behaviors and stress among preschool children in child care: the study protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Sylvana M; Larose, Marie-Pier; Geoffroy, Marie Claude; Laurin, Julie; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E; Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle

    2017-08-07

    Most preschoolers growing up in western industrialized countries receive child care services (CCS) during the day, while their parents are at work. Meta-analytic data suggest that CCS represent a stressful experience for preschoolers. This may be because preschoolers have not yet developed the social skills necessary to cope with the new and rapidly fluctuating social contexts of CCS. We tested the effectiveness of a child care-based social skill training program aiming to improve children's social behaviors and reduce the stress they experience. We used a cluster randomized control trial (cRCT) to compare children's social behaviors and stress levels in pre- and post-intervention according to whether they received a social skill training intervention or not. Nineteen (n = 19) public CCS (n = 362, 3-years-old preschoolers) of underprivileged neighborhoods (Montreal, Canada) were randomized to one of two conditions: 1) social skills training (n = 10 CCS); or 2) waiting list control group (n = 9 CCS). Educators in the intervention group conducted bi-weekly social skills training sessions over a period of 8 months. The intervention covered four topics: making social contacts, problem solving, emotional self-regulation, as well as emotional expression and recognition. Main outcome measures included preschoolers' disruptive (e.g. aggression, opposition, conflicts) and prosocial behaviors (e.g. sharing toys, helping another child), and stress levels assessed by salivary cortisol sampling at pre and post intervention assessments. Educators' practices will be tested as potential mediators of the expected changes in behaviors and neuroendocrine stress. To our knowledge, this is the first cRCT to test the effectiveness of a child care based social skill training program on the reduction of disruptive behaviors and levels of stress. Significant challenges include the degree of adherence to the intervention protocol as well educators and preschoolers' turnover

  8. Comparing Propensity Score Methods in Balancing Covariates and Recovering Impact in Small Sample Educational Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Clement A.; Tang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score applications are often used to evaluate educational program impact. However, various options are available to estimate both propensity scores and construct comparison groups. This study used a student achievement dataset with commonly available covariates to compare different propensity scoring estimation methods (logistic…

  9. The Consequences of Ignoring Multilevel Data Structures in Nonhierarchical Covariance Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Marc W.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effects of ignoring multilevel data structures in nonhierarchical covariance modeling using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results suggest that when the magnitudes of intraclass correlations are less than 0.05 and the group size is small, the consequences of ignoring the data dependence within the multilevel data structures seem to be…

  10. Spin(p+1, p+1) covariant Dp-brane bound states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundell, P

    2001-01-01

    We construct Spin(p + 1, p + 1) covariant Dp-brane bound states by using the fact that the potentials in the RR sector of toroidically compactified type Ii supergravity transform as a chiral spinor of the T duality group. As an application, we show the invariance of the zero-force condition for a pr

  11. Estimating the power spectrum covariance matrix with fewer mock samples

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, David W

    2015-01-01

    The covariance matrices of power-spectrum (P(k)) measurements from galaxy surveys are difficult to compute theoretically. The current best practice is to estimate covariance matrices by computing a sample covariance of a large number of mock catalogues. The next generation of galaxy surveys will require thousands of large volume mocks to determine the covariance matrices to desired accuracy. The errors in the inverse covariance matrix are larger and scale with the number of P(k) bins, making the problem even more acute. We develop a method of estimating covariance matrices using a theoretically justified, few-parameter model, calibrated with mock catalogues. Using a set of 600 BOSS DR11 mock catalogues, we show that a seven parameter model is sufficient to fit the covariance matrix of BOSS DR11 P(k) measurements. The covariance computed with this method is better than the sample covariance at any number of mocks and only ~100 mocks are required for it to fully converge and the inverse covariance matrix conver...

  12. Study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Troels; Helms, Anne Sofie; Adamsen, Lis

    2013-01-01

    (n = 120). RESPECT includes Danish-speaking children diagnosed with cancer and treated at pediatric oncology units in Denmark. Primary endpoints are the level of educational achievement one year after the cessation of first-line cancer therapy, and the value of VO2max one year after the cessation......Background During cancer treatment children have reduced contact with their social network of friends, and have limited participation in education, sports, and leisure activities. During and following cancer treatment, children describe school related problems, reduced physical fitness......, and problems related to interaction with peers. Methods/design The RESPECT study is a nationwide population-based prospective, controlled, mixed-methods intervention study looking at children aged 6-18 years newly diagnosed with cancer in eastern Denmark (n = 120) and a matched control group in western Denmark...

  13. Study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Troels; Helms, Anne Sofie; Adamsen, Lis;

    2013-01-01

    in the intervention program. The physical and social intervention examines the effect of early, structured, individualized, and continuous physical activity from diagnosis throughout the treatment period. The patients are tested at diagnosis, at 3 and 6 months after diagnosis, and one year after the cessation...... to interaction with peers.Methods/design: The RESPECT study is a nationwide population-based prospective, controlled, mixed-methods intervention study looking at children aged 6-18 years newly diagnosed with cancer in eastern Denmark (n = 120) and a matched control group in western Denmark (n = 120). RESPECT....... Secondary endpoints are quality of life measured by validated questionnaires and interviews, and physical performance. RESPECT includes a multimodal intervention program, including ambassador-facilitated educational, physical, and social interventions. The educational intervention includes an educational...

  14. Berry Phase, Lorentz Covariance, and Anomalous Velocity for Dirac and Weyl Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Michael; Zhou, Tianci

    2014-01-01

    We consider the relation between spin and the Berry-phase contribution to the anomalous velocity of massive and massless Dirac particles. We extend the Berry connection that depends only on the spatial components of the particle momentum to one that depends on the the space and time components in a covariant manner. We show that this covariant Berry connection captures the Thomas-precession part of the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi spin evolution, and contrast it with the traditional (unitary, but not naturally covariant) Berry connection that describes spin-orbit coupling. We then consider how the covariant connection enters the classical relativistic dynamics of spinning particles due to Mathisson, Papapetrou and Dixon. We discuss the problems that arise with Lorentz covariance in the massless case, and trace them mathematically to a failure of the Wigner-translation part of the massless-particle little group to be an exact gauge symmetry in the presence of interactions, and physically to the fact that the measur...

  15. Evolutionary evidence for alternative structure in RNA sequence co-variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Ritz

    Full Text Available Sequence conservation and co-variation of base pairs are hallmarks of structured RNAs. For certain RNAs (e.g. riboswitches, a single sequence must adopt at least two alternative secondary structures to effectively regulate the message. If alternative secondary structures are important to the function of an RNA, we expect to observe evolutionary co-variation supporting multiple conformations. We set out to characterize the evolutionary co-variation supporting alternative conformations in riboswitches to determine the extent to which alternative secondary structures are conserved. We found strong co-variation support for the terminator, P1, and anti-terminator stems in the purine riboswitch by extending alignments to include terminator sequences. When we performed Boltzmann suboptimal sampling on purine riboswitch sequences with terminators we found that these sequences appear to have evolved to favor specific alternative conformations. We extended our analysis of co-variation to classic alignments of group I/II introns, tRNA, and other classes of riboswitches. In a majority of these RNAs, we found evolutionary evidence for alternative conformations that are compatible with the Boltzmann suboptimal ensemble. Our analyses suggest that alternative conformations are selected for and thus likely play functional roles in even the most structured of RNAs.

  16. An introduction to covariant quantum gravity and asymptotic safety

    CERN Document Server

    Percacci, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent developments in the covariant formulation of quantum gravity. Developed in the 1960s by Feynman and DeWitt, by the 1980s this approach seemed to lead nowhere due to perturbative non-renormalizability. The possibility of non-perturbative renormalizability or "asymptotic safety," originally suggested by Weinberg but largely ignored for two decades, was revived towards the end of the century by technical progress in the field of the renormalization group. It is now a very active field of research, providing an alternative to other approaches to quantum gravity. Written by one of the early contributors to this subject, this book provides a gentle introduction to the relevant ideas and calculational techniques. Several explicit calculations gradually bring the reader close to the current frontier of research. The main difficulties and present lines of development are also outlined.

  17. Time and Fermions: General Covariance vs. Ockham's Razor for Spinors

    CERN Document Server

    Pitts, J Brian

    2015-01-01

    It is a commonplace attributed to Kretschmann that any local physical theory can be represented in arbitrary coordinates using tensor calculus. But the literature also claims that spinors _as such_ cannot be represented in coordinates in a curved space-time. These commonplaces are inconsistent, so what is general covariance for fermions? In fact both commonplaces are wrong. Ogievetsky and Polubarinov (OP) constructed spinors in coordinates in 1965, enhancing the unity of physics and helping to spawn nonlinear group representations. Roughly and locally, OP spinors resemble the orthonormal basis or tetrad formalism in the symmetric gauge, but they are conceptually self-sufficient and more economical. The tetrad formalism is thus de-Ockhamized, with six extra components and six compensating gauge symmetries. As developed nonperturbatively by Bilyalov, OP spinors admit any coordinates at a point, but 'time' must be listed first; 'time' is defined by an eigenvalue problem involving the metric and diag(-1,1,1,1), t...

  18. The Pirate group intervention protocol: description and a case report of a modified constraint-induced movement therapy combined with bimanual training for young children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, P.B.M.; Hartingsveldt, M. van; Anderson, P.G.; Tillaar, I. van den; Burg, J. van der; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a child-friendly modified constraint-induced movement therapy protocol that is combined with goal-directed task-specific bimanual training (mCIMT-BiT). This detailed description elucidates the approach and supports various research reports. This protocol i

  19. Compilation of multigroup cross-section covariance matrices for several important reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drischler, J.D.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1977-10-01

    Multigroup cross-section covariance matrices are presented for fission in /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu; capture in /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu; fission neutron yield (anti nu) for /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 240/Pu; elastic scattering for Na and Fe; non-elastic reactions for Na and Fe; first-level inelastic scattering for /sup 238/U; and all reactions provided in the ENDF/B-IV covariance description of N, O, and C. Other data files generated are included for reference but have not yet been tested. The report presents the nultigroup data in six, ten, and fifteen energy group forms corresponding to weighting of the covariance data with fission (GODIVA), LMFBR (ZPR-6/7) and 1/E spectra, respectively.

  20. Exploring the use of Generalized Indirect Covariance to reconstruct pure shift NMR spectra: Current Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Martin, Gary E.; Parella, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    The current Pros and Cons of a processing protocol to generate pure chemical shift NMR spectra using Generalized Indirect Covariance are presented and discussed. The transformation of any standard 2D homonuclear and heteronuclear spectrum to its pure shift counterpart by using a reference DIAG spectrum is described. Reconstructed pure shift NMR spectra of NOESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY and HSQMBC experiments are reported for the target molecule strychnine.

  1. Exploring the use of Generalized Indirect Covariance to reconstruct pure shift NMR spectra: Current Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Martin, Gary E; Parella, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    The current Pros and Cons of a processing protocol to generate pure chemical shift NMR spectra using Generalized Indirect Covariance are presented and discussed. The transformation of any standard 2D homonuclear and heteronuclear spectrum to its pure shift counterpart by using a reference DIAG spectrum is described. Reconstructed pure shift NMR spectra of NOESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY and HSQMBC experiments are reported for the target molecule strychnine.

  2. Protocol Implementation Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho Quaresma, Jose Nuno; Probst, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    necessary tools. In this paper, we present the Protocol Implementation Generator (PiG), a framework that can be used to add protocol generation to protocol negotiation, or to easily share and implement new protocols throughout a network. PiG enables the sharing, verification, and translation...... of communication protocols. With it, partners can suggest a new protocol by sending its specification. After formally verifying the specification, each partner generates an implementation, which can then be used for establishing communication. We also present a practical realisation of the Protocol Implementation...... Generator framework based on the LySatool and a translator from the LySa language into C or Java....

  3. Holographic bound in covariant loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tamaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate puncture statistics based on the covariant area spectrum in loop quantum gravity. First, we consider Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics with a Gibbs factor for punctures. We establish formulae which relate physical quantities such as horizon area to the parameter characterizing holographic degrees of freedom. We also perform numerical calculations and obtain consistency with these formulae. These results tell us that the holographic bound is satisfied in the large area limit and correction term of the entropy-area law can be proportional to the logarithm of the horizon area. Second, we also consider Bose-Einstein statistics and show that the above formulae are also useful in this case. By applying the formulae, we can understand intrinsic features of Bose-Einstein condensate which corresponds to the case when the horizon area almost consists of punctures in the ground state. When this phenomena occurs, the area is approximately constant against the parameter characterizing the temperature. When this ...

  4. EMPIRE ULTIMATE EXPANSION: RESONANCES AND COVARIANCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERMAN,M.; MUGHABGHAB, S.F.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; PIGNI, M.T.; KAWANO, T.; CAPOTE, R.; ZERKIN, V.; TRKOV, A.; SIN, M.; CARSON, B.V.; WIENKE, H. CHO, Y.-S.

    2007-04-22

    The EMPIRE code system is being extended to cover the resolved and unresolved resonance region employing proven methodology used for the production of new evaluations in the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Another directions of Empire expansion are uncertainties and correlations among them. These include covariances for cross sections as well as for model parameters. In this presentation we concentrate on the KALMAN method that has been applied in EMPIRE to the fast neutron range as well as to the resonance region. We also summarize role of the EMPIRE code in the ENDF/B-VII.0 development. Finally, large scale calculations and their impact on nuclear model parameters are discussed along with the exciting perspectives offered by the parallel supercomputing.

  5. The covariance of GPS coordinates and frames

    CERN Document Server

    Lachièze-Rey, M

    2006-01-01

    We explore, in the general relativistic context, the properties of the recently introduced GPS coordinates, as well as those of the associated frames and coframes. We show that they are covariant, and completely independent of any observer. We show that standard spectroscopic and astrometric observations allow any observer to measure (i) the values of the GPS coordinates at his position, (ii) the components of his [four-]velocity and (iii) the components of the metric in the GPS frame. This provides to this system an unique value both for conceptual discussion (no frame dependence) and for practical use (involved quantities are directly measurable): localisation, motion monitoring, astrometry, cosmography, tests of gravitation theories. We show explicitly, in the general relativistic context, how an observer may estimate its position and motion, and reconstruct the components of the metric. This arises from two main results: the extension of the velocity fields of the probes to the whole (curved) spacetime; a...

  6. Covariant Hyperbolization of Force-free Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Force-Free Flectrodynamics (FFE) is a non-linear system of equations modeling the evolution of the electromagnetic field, in the presence of a magnetically dominated relativistic plasma. This configuration arises on several astrophysical scenarios, which represent exciting laboratories to understand physics in extreme regimes. We show that this system, when restricted to the correct constraint submanifold, is symmetric hyperbolic. In numerical applications is not feasible to keep the system in that submanifold, and so, it is necessary to analyze its structure first in the tangent space of that submanifold and then in a whole neighborhood of it. As already shown by Pfeiffer, a direct (or naive) formulation of this system (in the whole tangent space) results in a weakly hyperbolic system of evolution equations for which well-possednes for the initial value formulation does not follows. Using the generalized symmetric hyperbolic formalism due to Geroch, we introduce here a covariant hyperbolization for the FFE s...

  7. Supergeometry in locally covariant quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hack, Thomas-Paul; Schenkel, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze supergeometric locally covariant quantum field theories. We develop suitable categories SLoc of super-Cartan supermanifolds, which generalize Lorentz manifolds in ordinary quantum field theory, and show that, starting from a few representation theoretic and geometric data, one can construct a functor A : SLoc --> S*Alg to the category of super-*-algebras which can be interpreted as a non-interacting super-quantum field theory. This construction turns out to disregard supersymmetry transformations as the morphism sets in the above categories are too small. We then solve this problem by using techniques from enriched category theory, which allows us to replace the morphism sets by suitable morphism supersets that contain supersymmetry transformations as their higher superpoints. We construct super-quantum field theories in terms of enriched functors eA : eSLoc --> eS*Alg between the enriched categories and show that supersymmetry transformations are appropriately described within the en...

  8. Covariant non-commutative space–time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Heckman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a covariant non-commutative deformation of 3+1-dimensional conformal field theory. The deformation introduces a short-distance scale ℓp, and thus breaks scale invariance, but preserves all space–time isometries. The non-commutative algebra is defined on space–times with non-zero constant curvature, i.e. dS4 or AdS4. The construction makes essential use of the representation of CFT tensor operators as polynomials in an auxiliary polarization tensor. The polarization tensor takes active part in the non-commutative algebra, which for dS4 takes the form of so(5,1, while for AdS4 it assembles into so(4,2. The structure of the non-commutative correlation functions hints that the deformed theory contains gravitational interactions and a Regge-like trajectory of higher spin excitations.

  9. Variance and covariance of accumulated displacement estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Matthew; Hall, Timothy J

    2013-04-01

    Tracking large deformations in tissue using ultrasound can enable the reconstruction of nonlinear elastic parameters, but poses a challenge to displacement estimation algorithms. Such large deformations have to be broken up into steps, each of which contributes an estimation error to the final accumulated displacement map. The work reported here measured the error variance for single-step and accumulated displacement estimates using one-dimensional numerical simulations of ultrasound echo signals, subjected to tissue strain and electronic noise. The covariance between accumulation steps was also computed. These simulations show that errors due to electronic noise are negatively correlated between steps, and therefore accumulate slowly, whereas errors due to tissue deformation are positively correlated and accumulate quickly. For reasonably low electronic noise levels, the error variance in the accumulated displacement estimates is remarkably constant as a function of step size, but increases with the length of the tracking kernel.

  10. Baryon Spectrum Analysis using Covariant Constraint Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Joshua; Crater, Horace

    2012-03-01

    The energy spectrum of the baryons is determined by treating each of them as a three-body system with the interacting forces coming from a set of two-body potentials that depend on both the distance between the quarks and the spin and orbital angular momentum coupling terms. The Two Body Dirac equations of constraint dynamics derived by Crater and Van Alstine, matched with the quasipotential formalism of Todorov as the underlying two-body formalism are used, as well as the three-body constraint formalism of Sazdjian to integrate the three two-body equations into a single relativistically covariant three body equation for the bound state energies. The results are analyzed and compared to experiment using a best fit method and several different algorithms, including a gradient approach, and Monte Carlo method. Results for all well-known baryons are presented and compared to experiment, with good accuracy.

  11. Noncommutative Spacetime Symmetries from Covariant Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Moia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, noncommutative spacetimes and their deformed relativistic symmetries have usually been studied in the context of field theory, replacing the ordinary Minkowski background with an algebra of noncommutative coordinates. However, spacetime noncommutativity can also be introduced into single-particle covariant quantum mechanics, replacing the commuting operators representing the particle’s spacetime coordinates with noncommuting ones. In this paper, we provide a full characterization of a wide class of physically sensible single-particle noncommutative spacetime models and the associated deformed relativistic symmetries. In particular, we prove that they can all be obtained from the standard Minkowski model and the usual Poincaré transformations via a suitable change of variables. Contrary to previous studies, we find that spacetime noncommutativity does not affect the dispersion relation of a relativistic quantum particle, but only the transformation properties of its spacetime coordinates under translations and Lorentz transformations.

  12. Multisymplectic formalism and the covariant phase

    CERN Document Server

    Hélein, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of a relativistic dynamical problem as a system of Hamilton equations by respecting the principles of Relativity is a delicate task, because in their classical form the Hamilton equations require the use of a time coordinate, which of course contradicts the Relativity. Two interesting solutions have been proposed during the last century: the covariant phase space and the multisymplectic formalism. These two approaches were inspired at the beginning by different points of view. However, as shown by works by Kijowski-Szczyrba, Forger-Romero and Vitagliano, a synthetic vision of the two theories leads probably to the most satisfactory answer to the basic question of understanding the Hamiltonian structure of relativistic fields theory.

  13. Universal Gravitation as Lorentz-covariant Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Steven Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Einstein's equivalence principle implies that the acceleration of a particle in a "specified" gravitational field is independent of its mass. While this is certainly true to great accuracy for bodies we observe in the Earth's gravitational field, a hypothetical body of mass comparable to the Earth's would perceptibly cause the Earth to fall toward it, which would feed back into the strength as a function of time of the Earth's gravitational field affecting that body. In short, Einstein's equivalence principle isn't exact, but is an approximation that ignores recoil of the "specified" gravitational field, which sheds light on why general relativity has no clearly delineated native embodiment of conserved four-momentum. Einstein's 1905 relativity of course doesn't have the inexactitudes he unwittingly built into GR, so it is natural to explore a Lorentz-covariant gravitational theory patterned directly on electromagnetism, wherein a system's zero-divergence overall stress-energy, including all gravitational fee...

  14. Flavour Covariant Formalism for Resonant Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena and apply it to study the flavour-dynamics of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL). We show that this formalism provides a complete and unified description of RL, consistently accounting for three distinct physical phenomena: (i) resonant mixing and (ii) coherent oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours, as well as (iii) quantum decoherence effects in the charged-lepton sector. We describe the necessary emergence of higher-rank tensors in flavour space, arising from the unitarity cuts of partial self-energies. Finally, we illustrate the importance of this formalism within a minimal Resonant $\\tau$-Genesis model by showing that, with the inclusion of all flavour effects in a consistent way, the final lepton asymmetry can be enhanced by up to an order of magnitude, when compared to previous partially flavour-dependent treatments.

  15. What does best evidence tell us about the efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder? Protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozza, Andrea; Andersson, Gerhad; Dèttore, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) may be a cost-effective alternative modality for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the last decade, a great deal of research has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of GCBT for OCD. Despite promising results, studies have produced inconclusive evidence. The current paper will present a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of GCBT compared with control conditions or individual CBT at post-treatment and follow-up on OCD symptoms, anxiety, depression, obsessive beliefs, quality of life, and functioning. Another aim will be to compare the levels of early drop out from GCBT relative to control conditions or individual CBT. Finally, the study will investigate potential outcome moderators (age, sex, OCD severity, severity of concurrent depression, comorbid personality disorders, duration of OCD symptom onset, duration of treatment, intensity of treatment, generation cohort, methodological quality, and publication date). A systematic review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines will be conducted using random-effects meta-analyses. Online databases and trial registries will be searched, the corresponding authors will be contacted, and conference proceedings and relevant journals will be hand-searched to locate published and unpublished studies. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool.

  16. Metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Luke R

    2016-07-15

    Oceanic microbial diversity covaries with physicochemical parameters. Temperature, for example, explains approximately half of global variation in surface taxonomic abundance. It is unknown, however, whether covariation patterns hold over narrower parameter gradients and spatial scales, and extending to mesopelagic depths. We collected and sequenced 45 epipelagic and mesopelagic microbial metagenomes on a meridional transect through the eastern Red Sea. We asked which environmental parameters explain the most variation in relative abundances of taxonomic groups, gene ortholog groups, and pathways—at a spatial scale of <2000 km, along narrow but well-defined latitudinal and depth-dependent gradients. We also asked how microbes are adapted to gradients and extremes in irradiance, temperature, salinity, and nutrients, examining the responses of individual gene ortholog groups to these parameters. Functional and taxonomic metrics were equally well explained (75–79%) by environmental parameters. However, only functional and not taxonomic covariation patterns were conserved when comparing with an intruding water mass with different physicochemical properties. Temperature explained the most variation in each metric, followed by nitrate, chlorophyll, phosphate, and salinity. That nitrate explained more variation than phosphate suggested nitrogen limitation, consistent with low surface N:P ratios. Covariation of gene ortholog groups with environmental parameters revealed patterns of functional adaptation to the challenging Red Sea environment: high irradiance, temperature, salinity, and low nutrients. Nutrient-acquisition gene ortholog groups were anti-correlated with concentrations of their respective nutrient species, recapturing trends previously observed across much larger distances and environmental gradients. This dataset of metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients includes online data exploration supplements, serving as a community

  17. Constraining the symmetry energy content of nuclear matter from nuclear masses: a covariance analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, C; De, J N

    2015-01-01

    Elements of nuclear symmetry energy evaluated from different energy density functionals parametrized by fitting selective bulk properties of few representative nuclei are seen to vary widely. Those obtained from experimental data on nuclear masses across the periodic table, however, show that they are better constrained. A possible direction in reconciling this paradox may be gleaned from comparison of results obtained from use of the binding energies in the fitting protocol within a microscopic model with two sets of nuclei, one a representative standard set and another where very highly asymmetric nuclei are additionally included. A covariance analysis reveals that the additional fitting protocol reduces the uncertainties in the nuclear symmetry energy coefficient, its slope parameter as well as the neutron-skin thickness in $^{208}$Pb nucleus by $\\sim 50\\%$. The central values of these entities are also seen to be slightly reduced.

  18. What does best evidence tell us about the efficacy of group cognitive–behavioral therapy for obsessive–compulsive disorder? Protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozza A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Pozza,1,2 Gerhad Andersson,3 Davide Dèttore2,41Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Miller Institute of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, Genoa, Italy; 3Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Abstract: Group cognitive–behavioral therapy (GCBT may be a cost-effective alternative modality for the treatment of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD. In the last decade, a great deal of research has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of GCBT for OCD. Despite promising results, studies have produced inconclusive evidence. The current paper will present a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of GCBT compared with control conditions or individual CBT at post-treatment and follow-up on OCD symptoms, anxiety, depression, obsessive beliefs, quality of life, and functioning. Another aim will be to compare the levels of early drop out from GCBT relative to control conditions or individual CBT. Finally, the study will investigate potential outcome moderators (age, sex, OCD severity, severity of concurrent depression, comorbid personality disorders, duration of OCD symptom onset, duration of treatment, intensity of treatment, generation cohort, methodological quality, and publication date. A systematic review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines will be conducted using random-effects meta-analyses. Online databases and trial registries will be searched, the corresponding authors will be contacted, and conference proceedings and relevant journals will be hand-searched to locate published and unpublished studies. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. Keywords: obsessive–compulsive disorder

  19. Baryon Wave Functions in Covariant Relativistic Quark Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dillig, M

    2002-01-01

    We derive covariant baryon wave functions for arbitrary Lorentz boosts. Modeling baryons as quark-diquark systems, we reduce their manifestly covariant Bethe-Salpeter equation to a covariant 3-dimensional form by projecting on the relative quark-diquark energy. Guided by a phenomenological multigluon exchange representation of a covariant confining kernel, we derive for practical applications explicit solutions for harmonic confinement and for the MIT Bag Model. We briefly comment on the interplay of boosts and center-of-mass corrections in relativistic quark models.

  20. Kriging approach for the experimental cross-section covariances estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garlaud A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the classical use of a generalized χ2 to determine the evaluated cross section uncertainty, we need the covariance matrix of the experimental cross sections. The usual propagation error method to estimate the covariances is hardly usable and the lack of data prevents from using the direct empirical estimator. We propose in this paper to apply the kriging method which allows to estimate the covariances via the distances between the points and with some assumptions on the covariance matrix structure. All the results are illustrated with the 2555Mn nucleus measurements.

  1. On the Validity of Covariate Adjustment for Estimating Causal Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Shpitser, Ilya; Robins, James M

    2012-01-01

    Identifying effects of actions (treatments) on outcome variables from observational data and causal assumptions is a fundamental problem in causal inference. This identification is made difficult by the presence of confounders which can be related to both treatment and outcome variables. Confounders are often handled, both in theory and in practice, by adjusting for covariates, in other words considering outcomes conditioned on treatment and covariate values, weighed by probability of observing those covariate values. In this paper, we give a complete graphical criterion for covariate adjustment, which we term the adjustment criterion, and derive some interesting corollaries of the completeness of this criterion.

  2. Relativistic Covariance and Quark-Diquark Wave Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Dillig, M

    2006-01-01

    We derive covariant wave functions for hadrons composed of two constituents for arbitrary Lorentz boosts. Focussing explicitly on baryons as quark-diquark systems, we reduce their manifestly covariant Bethe-Salpeter equation to covariant 3-dimensional forms by projecting on the relative quark-diquark energy. Guided by a phenomenological multi gluon exchange representation of covariant confining kernels, we derive explicit solutions for harmonic confinement and for the MIT Bag Model. We briefly sketch implications of breaking the spherical symmetry of the ground state and the transition from the instant form to the light cone via the infinite momentum frame.

  3. Effectiveness and micro-costing of the KiVa school-based bullying prevention programme in Wales: study protocol for a pragmatic definitive parallel group cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Suzy; Axford, Nick; Berry, Vashti; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Bjornstad, Gretchen; Wrigley, Zoe; Charles, Joanna; Hoare, Zoe; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Matthews, Justin; Hutchings, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Bullying refers to verbal, physical or psychological aggression repeated over time that is intended to cause harm or distress to the victims who are unable to defend themselves. It is a key public health priority owing to its widespread prevalence in schools and harmful short- and long-term effects on victims' well-being. There is a need to strengthen the evidence base by testing innovative approaches to preventing bullying. KiVa is a school-based bullying prevention programme with universal and indicated elements and an emphasis on changing bystander behaviour. It achieved promising results in a large trial in Finland, and now requires testing in other countries. This paper describes the protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of KiVa in Wales. The study uses a two-arm waitlist control pragmatic definitive parallel group cluster RCT design with an embedded process evaluation and calculation of unit cost. Participating schools will be randomised a using a 1:1 ratio to KiVa plus usual provision (intervention group) or usual provision only (control group). The trial has one primary outcome, child self-reported victimisation from bullying, dichotomised as 'victimised' (bullied at least twice a month in the last couple of months) versus 'not victimised'. Secondary outcomes are: bullying perpetration; aspects of child social and emotional well-being (including emotional problems, conduct, peer relations, prosocial behaviour); and school attendance. Follow-up is at 12 months post-baseline. Implementation fidelity is measured through teacher-completed lesson records and independent school-wide observation. A micro-costing analysis will determine the costs of implementing KiVa, including recurrent and non-recurrent unit costs. Factors related to the scalability of the programme will be examined in interviews with head teachers and focus groups with key stakeholders in the implementation of school-based bullying interventions. The results from this trial

  4. On the role of covarying functions in stimulus class formation and transfer of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Rebecca G; Markham, Michael R

    2002-11-01

    This experiment investigated whether directly trained covarying functions are necessary for stimulus class formation and transfer of function in humans. Initial class training was designed to establish two respondent-based stimulus classes by pairing two visual stimuli with shock and two other visual stimuli with no shock. Next, two operant discrimination functions were trained to one stimulus of each putative class. The no-shock group received the same training and testing in all phases, except no stimuli were ever paired with shock. The data indicated that skin conductance response conditioning did not occur for the shock groups or for the no-shock group. Tests showed transfer of the established discriminative functions, however, only for the shock groups, indicating the formation of two stimulus classes only for those participants who received respondent class training. The results suggest that transfer of function does not depend on first covarying the stimulus class functions.

  5. Covariant Spectator Theory: Foundations and Applications A Mini-Review of the Covariant Spectator Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred Stadler, Franz Gross

    2010-10-01

    We provide a short overview of the Covariant Spectator Theory and its applications. The basic ideas are introduced through the example of a {phi}{sup 4}-type theory. High-precision models of the two-nucleon interaction are presented and the results of their use in calculations of properties of the two- and three-nucleon systems are discussed. A short summary of applications of this framework to other few-body systems is also presented.

  6. Methods for estimation of covariance matrices and covariance components for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, M.F.; Piepel, G.F.; Simpson, D.B.

    1996-03-01

    The high-level waste (HLW) vitrification plant at the Hanford Site was being designed to transuranic and high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate class. Each batch of plant feed material must meet certain requirements related to plant performance, and the resulting class must meet requirements imposed by the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications. Properties of a process batch and the resultlng glass are largely determined by the composition of the feed material. Empirical models are being developed to estimate some property values from data on feed composition. Methods for checking and documenting compliance with feed and glass requirements must account for various types of uncertainties. This document focuses on the estimation. manipulation, and consequences of composition uncertainty, i.e., the uncertainty inherent in estimates of feed or glass composition. Three components of composition uncertainty will play a role in estimating and checking feed and glass properties: batch-to-batch variability, within-batch uncertainty, and analytical uncertainty. In this document, composition uncertainty and its components are treated in terms of variances and variance components or univariate situations, covariance matrices and covariance components for multivariate situations. The importance of variance and covariance components stems from their crucial role in properly estimating uncertainty In values calculated from a set of observations on a process batch. Two general types of methods for estimating uncertainty are discussed: (1) methods based on data, and (2) methods based on knowledge, assumptions, and opinions about the vitrification process. Data-based methods for estimating variances and covariance matrices are well known. Several types of data-based methods exist for estimation of variance components; those based on the statistical method analysis of variance are discussed, as are the strengths and weaknesses of this approach.

  7. How General Relativity and Lorentz Covariance Arise from the Spatially Covariant Effective Field Theory of the Transverse, Traceless Graviton

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin; Tolley, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Traditional derivations of general relativity from the graviton degrees of freedom assume space-time Lorentz covariance as an axiom. In this essay, we survey recent evidence that general relativity is the unique spatially-covariant effective field theory of the transverse, traceless graviton degrees of freedom. The Lorentz covariance of general relativity, having not been assumed in our analysis, is thus plausibly interpreted as an accidental or emergent symmetry of the gravitational sector. From this point of view, Lorentz covariance is a necessary feature of low-energy graviton dynamics, not a property of space-time. This result has revolutionary implications for fundamental physics.

  8. PRELIMINARY CROSS SECTION AND NU-BAR COVARIANCES FOR WPEC SUBGROUP 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROCHMAN,D.

    2007-01-31

    We report preliminary cross section covariances developed for the WPEC Subgroup 26 for 45 out of 52 requested materials. The covariances were produced in 15- and 187-group representations as follows: (1) 36 isotopes ({sup 16}O, {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al, {sup 28}Si, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56,56}Fe, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 90,91,92,94}Zr, {sup 166,167,168,170}Er, {sup 206,207,208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am, {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) were evaluated using the BNL-LANL methodology. For the thermal region and the resolved and unresolved resonance regions, the methodology has been based on the Atlas-Kalman approach, in the fast neutron region the Empire-Kalman method has been used; (2) 6 isotopes ({sup 155,156,157,158,160}Gd and {sup 232}Th) were taken from ENDF/B-VII.0; and (3) 3 isotopes ({sup 1}H, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu) were taken from JENDL-3.3. For 6 light nuclei ({sup 4}He, {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 10}B, {sup 12}C), only partial cross section covariance results were obtained, additional work is needed and they do not report the results here. Likewise, the cross section covariances for {sup 235}U, which they recommend to take from JENDL-3.3, will be included once the multigroup processing is successfully completed. Covariances for the average number of neutrons per fission, total {nu}-bar, are provided for 10 actinides identified as priority by SG26. Further work is needed to resolve some of the issues and to produce covariances for the full set of 52 materials.

  9. Markedly improved outcomes and acceptable toxicity in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with a pediatric protocol: a phase II study by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, F; Sakura, T; Yujiri, T; Kondo, E; Fujimaki, K; Sasaki, O; Miyatake, J; Handa, H; Ueda, Y; Aoyama, Y; Takada, S; Tanaka, Y; Usui, N; Miyawaki, S; Suenobu, S; Horibe, K; Kiyoi, H; Ohnishi, K; Miyazaki, Y; Ohtake, S; Kobayashi, Y; Matsuo, K; Naoe, T

    2014-10-17

    The superiority of the pediatric protocol for adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has already been demonstrated, however, its efficacy in young adults remains unclear. The ALL202-U protocol was conducted to examine the efficacy and feasibility of a pediatric protocol in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with BCR-ABL-negative ALL. Patients aged 15-24 years (n=139) were treated with the same protocol used for pediatric B-ALL. The primary objective of this study was to assess the disease-free survival (DFS) rate and its secondary aims were to assess toxicity, the complete remission (CR) rate and the overall survival (OS) rate. The CR rate was 94%. The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 67% (95% confidence interval (CI) 58-75%) and 73% (95% CI 64-80%), respectively. Severe adverse events were observed at a frequency that was similar to or lower than that in children treated with the same protocol. Only insufficient maintenance therapy significantly worsened the DFS (hazard ratio 5.60, P<0.001). These results indicate that this protocol may be a feasible and highly effective treatment for AYA with BCR-ABL-negative ALL.

  10. Revised error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of the 40Ar/39Ar method over conventional K-Ar dating is that it does not depend on any absolute abundance or concentration measurements, but only uses the relative ratios between five isotopes of the same element -argon- which can be measured with great precision on a noble gas mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the argon isotopes are subject to a constant sum constraint, which imposes a covariant structure on the data: the relative amount of any of the five isotopes can always be obtained from that of the other four. Thus, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a classic example of a 'compositional data problem'. In addition to the constant sum constraint, covariances are introduced by a host of other processes, including data acquisition, blank correction, detector calibration, mass fractionation, decay correction, interference correction, atmospheric argon correction, interpolation of the irradiation parameter, and age calculation. The myriad of correlated errors arising during the data reduction are best handled by casting the 40Ar/39Ar data reduction protocol in a matrix form. The completely revised workflow presented in this paper is implemented in a new software platform, Ar-Ar_Redux, which takes raw mass spectrometer data as input and generates accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages and their (co-)variances as output. Ar-Ar_Redux accounts for all sources of analytical uncertainty, including those associated with decay constants and the air ratio. Knowing the covariance matrix of the ages removes the need to consider 'internal' and 'external' uncertainties separately when calculating (weighted) mean ages. Ar-Ar_Redux is built on the same principles as its sibling program in the U-Pb community (U-Pb_Redux), thus improving the intercomparability of the two methods with tangible benefits to the accuracy of the geologic time scale. The program can be downloaded free of charge from

  11. Genotype 1 hepatitis C virus envelope features that determine antiviral response assessed through optimal covariance networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Murray

    Full Text Available The poor response to the combined antiviral therapy of pegylated alfa-interferon and ribavarin for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection may be linked to mutations in the viral envelope gene E1E2 (env, which can result in escape from the immune response and higher efficacy of viral entry. Mutations that result in failure of therapy most likely require compensatory mutations to achieve sufficient change in envelope structure and function. Compensatory mutations were investigated by determining positions in the E1E2 gene where amino acids (aa covaried across groups of individuals. We assessed networks of covarying positions in E1E2 sequences that differentiated sustained virological response (SVR from non-response (NR in 43 genotype 1a (17 SVR, and 49 genotype 1b (25 SVR chronically HCV-infected individuals. Binary integer programming over covariance networks was used to extract aa combinations that differed between response groups. Genotype 1a E1E2 sequences exhibited higher degrees of covariance and clustered into 3 main groups while 1b sequences exhibited no clustering. Between 5 and 9 aa pairs were required to separate SVR from NR in each genotype. aa in hypervariable region 1 were 6 times more likely than chance to occur in the optimal networks. The pair 531-626 (EI appeared frequently in the optimal networks and was present in 6 of 9 NR in one of the 1a clusters. The most frequent pairs representing SVR were 431-481 (EE, 500-522 (QA in 1a, and 407-434 (AQ in 1b. Optimal networks based on covarying aa pairs in HCV envelope can indicate features that are associated with failure or success to antiviral therapy.

  12. Developmental plasticity in covariance structure of the skull: effects of prenatal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Paula N; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Oyhenart, Evelia E

    2011-02-01

    Environmental perturbations of many kinds influence growth and development. Little is known, however, about the influence of environmental factors on the patterns of phenotypic integration observed in complex morphological traits. We analyze the changes in phenotypic variance-covariance structure of the rat skull throughout the early postnatal ontogeny (from birth to weaning) and evaluate the effect of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) on this structure. Using 2D coordinates taken from lateral radiographs obtained every 4 days, from birth to 21 days old, we show that the pattern of covariance is temporally dynamic from birth to 21 days. The environmental perturbation provoked during pregnancy altered the skull growth, and reduced the mean size of the IUGR group. These environmental effects persisted throughout lactancy, when the mothers of both groups received a standard diet. More strikingly, the effect grew larger beyond this point. Altering environmental conditions did not affect all traits equally, as revealed by the low correlations between covariance matrices of treatments at the same age. Finally, we found that the IUGR treatment increased morphological integration as measured by the scaled variance of eigenvalues. This increase coincided and is likely related to an increase in morphological variance in this group. This result is expected if somatic growth is a major determinant of covariance structure of the skull. In summary, our findings suggest that environmental perturbations experienced in early ontogeny alter fundamental developmental processes and are an important factor in shaping the variance-covariance structure of complex phenotypic traits. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2010 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Into the Bulk: A Covariant Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    I propose a general, covariant way of defining when one region is "deeper in the bulk" than another. This definition is formulated outside of an event horizon (or in the absence thereof) in generic geometries; it may be applied to both points and surfaces, and may be used to compare the depth of bulk points or surfaces relative to a particular boundary subregion or relative to the entire boundary. Using the recently proposed "lightcone cut" formalism, the comparative depth between two bulk points can be determined from the singularity structure of Lorentzian correlators in the dual field theory. I prove that, by this definition, causal wedges of progressively larger regions probe monotonically deeper in the bulk. The definition furthermore matches expectations in pure AdS and in static AdS black holes with isotropic spatial slices, where a well-defined holographic coordinate exists. In terms of holographic RG flow, this new definition of bulk depth makes contact with coarse-graining over both large distances ...

  14. A fully covariant description of CMB anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsby, P K S

    1997-01-01

    Starting from the exact non-linear description of matter and radiation, a fully covariant and gauge-invariant formula for the observed temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CBR) radiation, expressed in terms of the electric ($E_{ab}$) and magnetic ($H_{ab}$) parts of the Weyl tensor, is obtained by integrating photon geodesics from last scattering to the point of observation today. This improves and extends earlier work by Russ et al where a similar formula was obtained by taking first order variations of the redshift. In the case of scalar (density) perturbations, $E_{ab}$ is related to the harmonic components of the gravitational potential $\\Phi_k$ and the usual dominant Sachs-Wolfe contribution $\\delta T_R/\\bar{T}_R\\sim\\Phi_k$ to the temperature anisotropy is recovered, together with contributions due to the time variation of the potential (Rees-Sciama effect), entropy and velocity perturbations at last scattering and a pressure suppression term important in low density universes. We a...

  15. New covariant Lagrange formulation for field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Ootsuka, T

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach for Lagrange formulation for field theories is proposed in terms of Kawaguchi geometry (areal metric space). On the extended configuration space M for classical field theory composed of spacetime and field configuration space, one can define a geometrical structure called Kawaguchi areal metric K from the field Lagrangian and (M,K) can be regarded as Kawaguchi manifold. The geometrical action functional is given by K and the dynamics of field is determined by covariant Euler-Lagrange equation derived from the variational principle of the action. The solution to the equation becomes a minimal hypersurface on (M,K) which has the same dimension as spacetime. We propose that this hypersurface is what we should regard as our real spacetime manifold, while the usual way to understand spacetime is to consider it as the parameter spacetime (base manifold) of a fibre bundle. In this way, the dynamics of field and spacetime structure is unified by Kawaguchi geometry. The theory has the property of stro...

  16. Historical Hamiltonian Dynamics: symplectic and covariant

    CERN Document Server

    Lachieze-Rey, M

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a "historical" formalism for dynamical systems, in its Hamiltonian version (Lagrangian version was presented in a previous paper). It is universal, in the sense that it applies equally well to time dynamics and to field theories on space-time. It is based on the notion of (Hamiltonian) histories, which are sections of the (extended) phase space bundle. It is developed in the space of sections, in contradistinction with the usual formalism which works in the bundle manifold. In field theories, the formalism remains covariant and does not require a spitting of space-time. It considers space-time exactly in the same manner than time in usual dynamics, both being particular cases of the evolution domain. It applies without modification when the histories (the fields) are forms rather than scalar functions, like in electromagnetism or in tetrad general relativity. We develop a differential calculus in the infinite dimensional space of histories. It admits a (generalized) symplectic form which d...

  17. The covariance of GPS coordinates and frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachieze-Rey, Marc [CNRS APC, UMR 7164 Service d' Astrophysique, CE Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-05-21

    We explore, in the general relativistic context, the properties of the recently introduced global positioning system (GPS) coordinates, as well as those of the associated frames and coframes that they define. We show that they are covariant and completely independent of any observer. We show that standard spectroscopic and astrometric observations allow any observer to measure (i) the values of the GPS coordinates at his position (ii) the components of his 4-velocity and (iii) the components of the metric in the GPS frame. This provides this system with a unique value both for conceptual discussion (no frame dependence) and for practical use (involved quantities are directly measurable): localization, motion monitoring, astrometry, cosmography and tests of gravitation theories. We show explicitly, in the general relativistic context, how an observer may estimate his position and motion, and reconstruct the components of the metric. This arises from two main results: the extension of the velocity fields of the probes to the whole (curved) spacetime, and the identification of the components of the observer's velocity in the GPS frame with the (inversed) observed redshifts of the probes. Specific cases (non-relativistic velocities, Minkowski and Friedmann-Lemaitre spacetimes, geodesic motions) are studied in detail.

  18. CMB lens sample covariance and consistency relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motloch, Pavel; Hu, Wayne; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien

    2017-02-01

    Gravitational lensing information from the two and higher point statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization fields are intrinsically correlated because they are lensed by the same realization of structure between last scattering and observation. Using an analytic model for lens sample covariance, we show that there is one mode, separately measurable in the lensed CMB power spectra and lensing reconstruction, that carries most of this correlation. Once these measurements become lens sample variance dominated, this mode should provide a useful consistency check between the observables that is largely free of sampling and cosmological parameter errors. Violations of consistency could indicate systematic errors in the data and lens reconstruction or new physics at last scattering, any of which could bias cosmological inferences and delensing for gravitational waves. A second mode provides a weaker consistency check for a spatially flat universe. Our analysis isolates the additional information supplied by lensing in a model-independent manner but is also useful for understanding and forecasting CMB cosmological parameter errors in the extended Λ cold dark matter parameter space of dark energy, curvature, and massive neutrinos. We introduce and test a simple but accurate forecasting technique for this purpose that neither double counts lensing information nor neglects lensing in the observables.

  19. Schwinger mechanism in linear covariant gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, A C; Papavassiliou, J

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore the applicability of a special gluon mass generating mechanism in the context of the linear covariant gauges. In particular, the implementation of the Schwinger mechanism in pure Yang-Mills theories hinges crucially on the inclusion of massless bound-state excitations in the fundamental nonperturbative vertices of the theory. The dynamical formation of such excitations is controlled by a homogeneous linear Bethe-Salpeter equation, whose nontrivial solutions have been studied only in the Landau gauge. Here, the form of this integral equation is derived for general values of the gauge-fixing parameter, under a number of simplifying assumptions that reduce the degree of technical complexity. The kernel of this equation consists of fully-dressed gluon propagators, for which recent lattice data are used as input, and of three-gluon vertices dressed by a single form factor, which is modelled by means of certain physically motivated Ans\\"atze. The gauge-dependent terms contributing to this ke...

  20. Comparison between covariant and orthogonal Lyapunov vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-liu; Radons, Günter

    2010-10-01

    Two sets of vectors, covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs) and orthogonal Lyapunov vectors (OLVs), are currently used to characterize the linear stability of chaotic systems. A comparison is made to show their similarity and difference, especially with respect to the influence on hydrodynamic Lyapunov modes (HLMs). Our numerical simulations show that in both Hamiltonian and dissipative systems HLMs formerly detected via OLVs survive if CLVs are used instead. Moreover, the previous classification of two universality classes works for CLVs as well, i.e., the dispersion relation is linear for Hamiltonian systems and quadratic for dissipative systems, respectively. The significance of HLMs changes in different ways for Hamiltonian and dissipative systems with the replacement of OLVs with CLVs. For general dissipative systems with nonhyperbolic dynamics the long-wavelength structure in Lyapunov vectors corresponding to near-zero Lyapunov exponents is strongly reduced if CLVs are used instead, whereas for highly hyperbolic dissipative systems the significance of HLMs is nearly identical for CLVs and OLVs. In contrast the HLM significance of Hamiltonian systems is always comparable for CLVs and OLVs irrespective of hyperbolicity. We also find that in Hamiltonian systems different symmetry relations between conjugate pairs are observed for CLVs and OLVs. Especially, CLVs in a conjugate pair are statistically indistinguishable in consequence of the microreversibility of Hamiltonian systems. Transformation properties of Lyapunov exponents, CLVs, and hyperbolicity under changes of coordinate are discussed in appendices.

  1. Covariance and objectivity in mechanics and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Frewer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Form-invariance (covariance) and frame-indifference (objectivity) are two notions in classical continuum mechanics which have attracted much attention and controversy over the past decades. Particularly in turbulence modelling it seems that there still is a need for clarification. The aim and purpose of this study is fourfold: (i) To achieve consensus in general on definitions and principles when trying to establish an invariant theory for modelling constitutive structures and dynamic processes in mechanics, where special focus is put on the principle of Material Frame-Indifference (MFI). (ii) To show that in constitutive modelling MFI can only be regarded as an approximation that needs to be reduced to a weaker statement when trying to advance it to an axiom of nature. (iii) To convince that in dynamical modelling, as in turbulence, MFI may not be utilized as a modelling guideline, not even in an approximative sense. Instead, its reduced form has to be supplemented by a second, independent axiom that include...

  2. Frame Indifferent (Truly Covariant) Formulation of Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Christo

    2010-10-01

    The Electromagnetic field is considered from the point of view of mechanics of continuum. It is shown that Maxwell's equations are mathematically strict corollaries form the equation of motions of an elastic incompressible liquid. If the concept of frame-indifference (material invariance) is applied to the model of elastic liquid, then the partial time derivatives have to be replaced by the convective time derivative in the momentum equations, and by the Oldroyd upper-convected derivative in the constitutive relation. The convective/convected terms involve the velocity at a point of the field, and as a result, when deriving the Maxwell form of the equations, one arrives at equations which contain both the terms of Maxwell's equation and the so-called laws of motional EMF: Faraday's, Oersted--Ampere's, and the Lorentz-force law. Thus a unification of the electromagnetism is achieved. Since the new model is frame indifferent, it is truly covariant in the sense that the governing system is invariant when changing to a coordinate frame that can accelerate or even deform in time.

  3. IMPROVED COVARIANCE DRIVEN BLIND SUBSPACE IDENTIFICATION METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhiyi; FAN Jiangling; HUA Hongxing

    2006-01-01

    An improved covariance driven subspace identification method is presented to identify the weakly excited modes. In this method, the traditional Hankel matrix is replaced by a reformed one to enhance the identifiability of weak characteristics. The robustness of eigenparameter estimation to noise contamination is reinforced by the improved Hankel matrix. In combination with component energy index (CEI) which indicates the vibration intensity of signal components, an alternative stabilization diagram is adopted to effectively separate spurious and physical modes. Simulation of a vibration system of multiple-degree-of-freedom and experiment of a frame structure subject to wind excitation are presented to demonstrate the improvement of the proposed blind method. The performance of this blind method is assessed in terms of its capability in extracting the weak modes as well as the accuracy of estimated parameters. The results have shown that the proposed blind method gives a better estimation of the weak modes from response signals of small signal to noise ratio (SNR)and gives a reliable separation of spurious and physical estimates.

  4. On the bilinear covariants associated to mass dimension one spinors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.M.H. da; Villalobos, C.H.C.; Rogerio, R.J.B. [DFQ, UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Scatena, E. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina-CEE, Blumenau, SC (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper we approach the issue of Clifford algebra basis deformation, allowing for bilinear covariants associated to Elko spinors which satisfy the Fierz-Pauli-Kofink identities. We present a complete analysis of covariance, taking into account the involved dual structure associated to Elko spinors. Moreover, the possible generalizations to the recently presented new dual structure are performed. (orig.)

  5. Validity of covariance models for the analysis of geographical variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillot, Gilles; Schilling, Rene L.; Porcu, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    1. Due to the availability of large molecular data-sets, covariance models are increasingly used to describe the structure of genetic variation as an alternative to more heavily parametrised biological models. 2. We focus here on a class of parametric covariance models that received sustained...

  6. Perturbative approach to covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Irshad [Fermilab; Seljak, Uros [UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.; Vlah, Zvonimir [Stanford U., ITP

    2016-06-30

    We evaluate the covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum using perturbation theory up to dominant terms at 1-loop order and compare it to numerical simulations. We decompose the covariance matrix into the disconnected (Gaussian) part, trispectrum from the modes outside the survey (beat coupling or super-sample variance), and trispectrum from the modes inside the survey, and show how the different components contribute to the overall covariance matrix. We find the agreement with the simulations is at a 10\\% level up to $k \\sim 1 h {\\rm Mpc^{-1}}$. We show that all the connected components are dominated by the large-scale modes ($k<0.1 h {\\rm Mpc^{-1}}$), regardless of the value of the wavevectors $k,\\, k'$ of the covariance matrix, suggesting that one must be careful in applying the jackknife or bootstrap methods to the covariance matrix. We perform an eigenmode decomposition of the connected part of the covariance matrix, showing that at higher $k$ it is dominated by a single eigenmode. The full covariance matrix can be approximated as the disconnected part only, with the connected part being treated as an external nuisance parameter with a known scale dependence, and a known prior on its variance for a given survey volume. Finally, we provide a prescription for how to evaluate the covariance matrix from small box simulations without the need to simulate large volumes.

  7. Validity of covariance models for the analysis of geographical variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillot, Gilles; Schilling, Rene L.; Porcu, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    attention lately and show that the conditions under which they are valid mathematical models have been overlooked so far. 3. We provide rigorous results for the construction of valid covariance models in this family. 4. We also outline how to construct alternative covariance models for the analysis...

  8. Covariation Is a Poor Measure of Molecular Coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, David; Lovell, Simon C; Whelan, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in the analysis of amino acid covariation are leading to breakthroughs in protein structure prediction, protein design, and prediction of the interactome. It is assumed that observed patterns of covariation are caused by molecular coevolution, where substitutions at one site affect the evolutionary forces acting at neighboring sites. Our theoretical and empirical results cast doubt on this assumption. We demonstrate that the strongest coevolutionary signal is a decrease in evolutionary rate and that unfeasibly long times are required to produce coordinated substitutions. We find that covarying substitutions are mostly found on different branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that they are independent events that may or may not be attributable to coevolution. These observations undermine the hypothesis that molecular coevolution is the primary cause of the covariation signal. In contrast, we find that the pairs of residues with the strongest covariation signal tend to have low evolutionary rates, and that it is this low rate that gives rise to the covariation signal. Slowly evolving residue pairs are disproportionately located in the protein's core, which explains covariation methods' ability to detect pairs of residues that are close in three dimensions. These observations lead us to propose the "coevolution paradox": The strength of coevolution required to cause coordinated changes means the evolutionary rate is so low that such changes are highly unlikely to occur. As modern covariation methods may lead to breakthroughs in structural genomics, it is critical to recognize their biases and limitations.

  9. A pure S-wave covariant model for the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, F; Peña, M T; Gross, Franz

    2006-01-01

    Using the manifestly covariant spectator theory, and modeling the nucleon as a system of three constituent quarks with their own electromagnetic structure, we show that all four nucleon electromagnetic form factors can be very well described by a manifestly covariant nucleon wave function with zero orbital angular momentum.

  10. On the bilinear covariants associated to mass dimension one spinors

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, J M Hoff; Rogerio, R J Bueno; Scatena, E

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we approach the issue of Clifford algebra basis deformation, allowing for bilinear covariants associated to Elko spinors which satisfy the Fierz-Pauli-Kofink identities. We present a complete analysis of covariance, taking into account the involved dual structure associated to Elko. Moreover, the possible generalizations to the recently presented new dual structure are performed.

  11. Perturbative approach to covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Irshad; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2017-04-01

    We evaluate the covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum using perturbation theory up to dominant terms at 1-loop order and compare it to numerical simulations. We decompose the covariance matrix into the disconnected (Gaussian) part, trispectrum from the modes outside the survey (supersample variance) and trispectrum from the modes inside the survey, and show how the different components contribute to the overall covariance matrix. We find the agreement with the simulations is at a 10 per cent level up to k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1. We show that all the connected components are dominated by the large-scale modes (k covariance matrix, suggesting that one must be careful in applying the jackknife or bootstrap methods to the covariance matrix. We perform an eigenmode decomposition of the connected part of the covariance matrix, showing that at higher k, it is dominated by a single eigenmode. The full covariance matrix can be approximated as the disconnected part only, with the connected part being treated as an external nuisance parameter with a known scale dependence, and a known prior on its variance for a given survey volume. Finally, we provide a prescription for how to evaluate the covariance matrix from small box simulations without the need to simulate large volumes.

  12. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalized...

  13. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continuous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalize...

  14. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalized...

  15. Research on Protocol Migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪芸; 顾冠群; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper elaborates the concept and model of protocol migration in network interconnection.Migration strategies and principles are discussed and several cases are studied in detail which show the basic procedure and techniques used in protocol migration.

  16. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Vecchia, Claudio dalla

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. In the era of precision cosmology, accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. For cases where only a limited set of simulations is available, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Also, relying on simulated realisations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these two points in mind, this work aims at presenting a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements f...

  17. HIGH DIMENSIONAL COVARIANCE MATRIX ESTIMATION IN APPROXIMATE FACTOR MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2011-01-01

    The variance covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu (2011), taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studied.

  18. High-dimensional covariance matrix estimation in approximate factor models

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Jianqing; Mincheva, Martina; 10.1214/11-AOS944

    2012-01-01

    The variance--covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high-dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu [J. Amer. Statist. Assoc. 106 (2011) 672--684], taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studi...

  19. Newton law in covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Oikonomou, V K

    2016-01-01

    We propose a covariant ghost-free unimodular $F(R)$ gravity theory, which contains a three-form field and study its structure using the analogy of the proposed theory with a quantum system which describes a charged particle in uniform magnetic field. Newton's law in non-covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity as well as in unimodular Einstein gravity is derived and it is shown to be just the same as in General Relativity. The derivation of Newton's law in covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity shows that it is modified precisely in the same way as in the ordinary $F(R)$ theory. We also demonstrate that the cosmology of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background, is equivalent in the non-covariant and covariant formulations of unimodular $F(R)$ theory.

  20. Topological Design of Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur; Wozniakowski, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We give a topological simulation for tensor networks that we call the two-string model. In this approach we give a new way to design protocols, and we discover a new multipartite quantum communication protocol. We introduce the notion of topologically compressed transformations. Our new protocol can implement multiple, non-local compressed transformations among multi-parties using one multipartite resource state.

  1. Vertical Protocol Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groß, Thomas; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The security of key exchange and secure channel protocols, such as TLS, has been studied intensively. However, only few works have considered what happens when the established keys are actually used—to run some protocol securely over the established “channel”. We call this a vertical protocol com...

  2. Treatment of Children with Multiple System Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis by Japan Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Study Group Protocol%JLSG方案治疗儿童多系统朗格汉斯细胞组织细胞增生症

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄俊彬; 薛红漫; 陈岩岩; 黄科

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of Japan Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Study Group (JLSG) Protocol in treatment of children suffering from multiple system langerhans cell histiocytosis (MS-LCH). The clinical features, therapeutic response and prognosis of 11 children who were diagnosed and treated by JLSG in our department during October 2004 through October 2011 were analyzed. Among all 11 cases, 8 males and 3 females, the age at diagnosis was from 3 month to 6.5 years old with a median age of 3 years old. There were 10 cases of LCH with multi-system involvement (MS-LCH) and 1 case of single-system involvement (SS-LCH). Among those MS-LCH patients, 5 patients had risk organ involvement, and the other 5 patients did not develop risk organ involvement. All patients had been treated with JLSG protocol. The results showed that 4 cases achieved good response after 6-week induction treatment and the time of drug discontinuation were 5-20 months without relapse; 3 cases achieved partial response after 6-week induction treatment, among them 1 case did not relapse after discontinuation of drugs for 19 months, 1 case was still receiving maintenance treatment, 1 case abandoned induction treatment; 4 patients got no response(NR) or progressive disease after 6-week of induction treatment and were switched to salvage therapy, among them, 2 patients had stopped treatment for 2-20 months without relapse, 1 patient was still receiving maintenance treatment, one had changed to another therapy. It is concluded that the most of childhood LCH can be effectively controlled by immunochemical therapy based on the JLSG protocol. For children with LCH who has a poor response after 6-week induction treatment, LCH can still be well controlled if switched to salvage treatment.%本研究观察以JLSG(Japan Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Study Group,JLSG)方案为基础治疗儿童多系统朗格汉斯细胞组织细胞增生症(MS-LCH)的疗效.

  3. Covariance among multiple health risk behaviors in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla de la Haye

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In a diverse group of early adolescents, this study explores the co-occurrence of a broad range of health risk behaviors: alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use; physical inactivity; sedentary computing/gaming; and the consumption of low-nutrient energy-dense food. We tested differences in the associations of unhealthy behaviors over time, and by gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. METHODS: Participants were 8360 students from 16 middle schools in California (50% female; 52% Hispanic, 17% Asian, 16% White, and 15% Black/multiethnic/other. Behaviors were measured with surveys in Spring 2010 and Spring 2011. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess if an underlying factor accounted for the covariance of multiple behaviors, and composite reliability methods were used to determine the degree to which behaviors were related. RESULTS: The measured behaviors were explained by two moderately correlated factors: a 'substance use risk factor' and an 'unhealthy eating and sedentary factor'. Physical inactivity did not reflect the latent factors as expected. There were few differences in the associations among these behaviors over time or by demographic characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Two distinct, yet related groups of health compromising behaviors were identified that could be jointly targeted in multiple health behavior change interventions among early adolescents of diverse backgrounds.

  4. Accurate Interatomic Force Fields via Machine Learning with Covariant Kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Glielmo, Aldo; De Vita, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel scheme to accurately predict atomic forces as vector quantities, rather than sets of scalar components, by Gaussian Process (GP) Regression. This is based on matrix-valued kernel functions, to which we impose that the predicted force rotates with the target configuration and is independent of any rotations applied to the configuration database entries. We show that such "covariant" GP kernels can be obtained by integration over the elements of the rotation group SO(d) for the relevant dimensionality d. Remarkably, in specific cases the integration can be carried out analytically and yields a conservative force field that can be recast into a pair interaction form. Finally, we show that restricting the integration to a summation over the elements of a finite point group relevant to the target system is sufficient to recover an accurate GP. The accuracy of our kernels in predicting quantum-mechanical forces in real materials is investigated by tests on pure and defective Ni and Fe crystalline...

  5. Accurate interatomic force fields via machine learning with covariant kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glielmo, Aldo; Sollich, Peter; De Vita, Alessandro

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel scheme to accurately predict atomic forces as vector quantities, rather than sets of scalar components, by Gaussian process (GP) regression. This is based on matrix-valued kernel functions, on which we impose the requirements that the predicted force rotates with the target configuration and is independent of any rotations applied to the configuration database entries. We show that such covariant GP kernels can be obtained by integration over the elements of the rotation group SO (d ) for the relevant dimensionality d . Remarkably, in specific cases the integration can be carried out analytically and yields a conservative force field that can be recast into a pair interaction form. Finally, we show that restricting the integration to a summation over the elements of a finite point group relevant to the target system is sufficient to recover an accurate GP. The accuracy of our kernels in predicting quantum-mechanical forces in real materials is investigated by tests on pure and defective Ni, Fe, and Si crystalline systems.

  6. Recurrence Analysis of Eddy Covariance Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Holger; Flach, Milan; Foken, Thomas; Hauhs, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is one key method to quantify fluxes in biogeochemical cycles in general, and carbon and energy transport across the vegetation-atmosphere boundary layer in particular. EC data from the worldwide net of flux towers (Fluxnet) have also been used to validate biogeochemical models. The high resolution data are usually obtained at 20 Hz sampling rate but are affected by missing values and other restrictions. In this contribution, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of EC fluxes using Recurrence Analysis (RA). High resolution data from the site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) and fluxes calculated at half-hourly resolution from eight locations (part of the La Thuile dataset) provide a set of very long time series to analyze. After careful quality assessment and Fluxnet standard gapfilling pretreatment, we calculate properties and indicators of the recurrent structure based both on Recurrence Plots as well as Recurrence Networks. Time series of RA measures obtained from windows moving along the time axis are presented. Their interpretation is guided by three different questions: (1) Is RA able to discern periods where the (atmospheric) conditions are particularly suitable to obtain reliable EC fluxes? (2) Is RA capable to detect dynamical transitions (different behavior) beyond those obvious from visual inspection? (3) Does RA contribute to an understanding of the nonlinear synchronization between EC fluxes and atmospheric parameters, which is crucial for both improving carbon flux models as well for reliable interpolation of gaps? (4) Is RA able to recommend an optimal time resolution for measuring EC data and for analyzing EC fluxes? (5) Is it possible to detect non-trivial periodicities with a global RA? We will demonstrate that the answers to all five questions is affirmative, and that RA provides insights into EC dynamics not easily obtained otherwise.

  7. Schwinger mechanism in linear covariant gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we explore the applicability of a special gluon mass generating mechanism in the context of the linear covariant gauges. In particular, the implementation of the Schwinger mechanism in pure Yang-Mills theories hinges crucially on the inclusion of massless bound-state excitations in the fundamental nonperturbative vertices of the theory. The dynamical formation of such excitations is controlled by a homogeneous linear Bethe-Salpeter equation, whose nontrivial solutions have been studied only in the Landau gauge. Here, the form of this integral equation is derived for general values of the gauge-fixing parameter, under a number of simplifying assumptions that reduce the degree of technical complexity. The kernel of this equation consists of fully dressed gluon propagators, for which recent lattice data are used as input, and of three-gluon vertices dressed by a single form factor, which is modeled by means of certain physically motivated Ansätze. The gauge-dependent terms contributing to this kernel impose considerable restrictions on the infrared behavior of the vertex form factor; specifically, only infrared finite Ansätze are compatible with the existence of nontrivial solutions. When such Ansätze are employed, the numerical study of the integral equation reveals a continuity in the type of solutions as one varies the gauge-fixing parameter, indicating a smooth departure from the Landau gauge. Instead, the logarithmically divergent form factor displaying the characteristic "zero crossing," while perfectly consistent in the Landau gauge, has to undergo a dramatic qualitative transformation away from it, in order to yield acceptable solutions. The possible implications of these results are briefly discussed.

  8. Generation of integral experiment covariance data and their impact on criticality safety validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuke, Maik; Peters, Elisabeth; Sommer, Fabian

    2016-11-15

    The quantification of statistical dependencies in data of critical experiments and how to account for them properly in validation procedures has been discussed in the literature by various groups. However, these subjects are still an active topic in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECDNEA Nuclear Science Committee. The latter compiles and publishes the freely available experimental data collection, the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, ICSBEP. Most of the experiments were performed as series and share parts of experimental setups, consequently leading to correlation effects in the results. The correct consideration of correlated data seems to be inevitable if the experimental data in a validation procedure is limited or one cannot rely on a sufficient number of uncorrelated data sets, e.g. from different laboratories using different setups. The general determination of correlations and the underlying covariance data as well as the consideration of them in a validation procedure is the focus of the following work. We discuss and demonstrate possible effects on calculated k{sub eff}'s, their uncertainties, and the corresponding covariance matrices due to interpretation of evaluated experimental data and its translation into calculation models. The work shows effects of various modeling approaches, varying distribution functions of parameters and compares and discusses results from the applied Monte-Carlo sampling method with available data on correlations. Our findings indicate that for the reliable determination of integral experimental covariance matrices or the correlation coefficients a detailed study of the underlying experimental data, the modeling approach and assumptions made, and the resulting sensitivity analysis seems to be inevitable. Further, a Bayesian method is discussed to include integral experimental covariance data when estimating an

  9. Blind Collective Signature Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Moldovyan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the digital signature (DS scheme specified by Belarusian DS standard there are designed the collective and blind collective DS protocols. Signature formation is performed simultaneously by all of the assigned signers, therefore the proposed protocols can be used also as protocols for simultaneous signing a contract. The proposed blind collective DS protocol represents a particular implementation of the blind multisignature schemes that is a novel type of the signature schemes. The proposed protocols are the first implementations of the multisignature schemes based on Belarusian signature standard.

  10. Conformal generally covariant quantum field theory. The scalar field and its Wick products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinamonti, N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-06-15

    In this paper we generalize the construction of generally covariant quantum theories given in [R. Brunetti, K. Fredenhagen, R. Verch, Commun. Math. Phys. 237, 31 (2003)] to encompass the conformal covariant case. After introducing the abstract framework, we discuss the massless conformally coupled Klein Gordon field theory, showing that its quantization corresponds to a functor between two certain categories. At the abstract level, the ordinary fields, could be thought as natural transformations in the sense of category theory. We show that, the Wick monomials without derivatives (Wick powers), can be interpreted as fields in this generalized sense, provided a non trivial choice of the renormalization constants is given. A careful analysis shows that the transformation law of Wick powers is characterized by a weight, and it turns out that the sum of fields with different weights breaks the conformal covariance. At this point there is a difference between the previously given picture due to the presence of a bigger group of covariance. It is furthermore shown that the construction does not depend upon the scale {mu} appearing in the Hadamard parametrix, used to regularize the fields. Finally, we briefly discuss some further examples of more involved fields. (orig.)

  11. Parallel ICA identifies sub-components of resting state networks that covary with behavioral indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy eMeier

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Parallel Independent Component Analysis (para-ICA is a multivariate method that can identify complex relationships between different data modalities by simultaneously performing Independent Component Analysis on each data set while finding mutual information between the two data sets. We use para-ICA to test the hypothesis that spatial sub-components of common resting state networks (RSNs covary with specific behavioral measures. Resting state scans and a battery of behavioral indices were collected from 24 younger adults. Group ICA was performed and common RSNs were identified by spatial correlation to publically available templates. Nine RSNs were identified and para-ICA was run on each network with a matrix of behavioral measures serving as the second data type. Five networks had spatial sub-components that significantly correlated with behavioral components. These included a sub-component of the temporo-parietal attention network that differentially covaried with different trial-types of a sustained attention task, sub-components of default mode networks that covaried with attention and working memory tasks, and a sub-component of the bilateral frontal network that split the left inferior frontal gyrus into three clusters according to its cytoarchitecture that differentially covaried with working memory performance. Additionally, we demonstrate the validity of para-ICA in cases with unbalanced dimensions using simulated data.

  12. Two new covariate adjustment methods for non-inferiority assessment of binary clinical trials data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yan; Ding, Victoria; Li, Kang; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In clinical trials, examining the adjusted treatment difference has become the preferred way to establish non-inferiority (NI) in cases involving a binary endpoint. However, current methods are inadequate in the area of covariate adjustment. In this paper, we introduce two new methods, nonparametric and parametric, of using the probability and probability (P-P) curve to address the issue of unadjusted categorical covariates in the traditional assessment of NI in clinical trials. We also show that the area under the P-P curve is a valid alternative for assessing NI using the adjusted treatment difference, and we compute this area using Mann-Whitney nonparametric statistics. Our simulation studies demonstrate that our proposed methods can not only control type I error at a predefined significance level but also achieve higher statistical power than those of traditional parametric and nonparametric methods that overlook covariate adjustment, especially when covariates are unbalanced in the two treatment groups. We illustrate the effectiveness of our methodology with data from clinical trials of a therapy for coronary heart disease.

  13. Object Tracking Using Adaptive Covariance Descriptor and Clustering-Based Model Updating for Visual Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Qin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel approach for tracking an arbitrary object in video sequences for visual surveillance. The first contribution of this work is an automatic feature extraction method that is able to extract compact discriminative features from a feature pool before computing the region covariance descriptor. As the feature extraction method is adaptive to a specific object of interest, we refer to the region covariance descriptor computed using the extracted features as the adaptive covariance descriptor. The second contribution is to propose a weakly supervised method for updating the object appearance model during tracking. The method performs a mean-shift clustering procedure among the tracking result samples accumulated during a period of time and selects a group of reliable samples for updating the object appearance model. As such, the object appearance model is kept up-to-date and is prevented from contamination even in case of tracking mistakes. We conducted comparing experiments on real-world video sequences, which confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. The tracking system that integrates the adaptive covariance descriptor and the clustering-based model updating method accomplished stable object tracking on challenging video sequences.

  14. Quantification of Covariance in Tropical Cyclone Activity across Teleconnected Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolwinski-Ward, S. E.; Wang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous statistical quantification of natural hazard covariance across regions has important implications for risk management, and is also of fundamental scientific interest. We present a multivariate Bayesian Poisson regression model for inferring the covariance in tropical cyclone (TC) counts across multiple ocean basins and across Saffir-Simpson intensity categories. Such covariability results from the influence of large-scale modes of climate variability on local environments that can alternately suppress or enhance TC genesis and intensification, and our model also simultaneously quantifies the covariance of TC counts with various climatic modes in order to deduce the source of inter-basin TC covariability. The model explicitly treats the time-dependent uncertainty in observed maximum sustained wind data, and hence the nominal intensity category of each TC. Differences in annual TC counts as measured by different agencies are also formally addressed. The probabilistic output of the model can be probed for probabilistic answers to such questions as: - Does the relationship between different categories of TCs differ statistically by basin? - Which climatic predictors have significant relationships with TC activity in each basin? - Are the relationships between counts in different basins conditionally independent given the climatic predictors, or are there other factors at play affecting inter-basin covariability? - How can a portfolio of insured property be optimized across space to minimize risk? Although we present results of our model applied to TCs, the framework is generalizable to covariance estimation between multivariate counts of natural hazards across regions and/or across peril types.

  15. Covariance of maximum likelihood evolutionary distances between sequences aligned pairwise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessimoz, Christophe; Gil, Manuel

    2008-06-23

    The estimation of a distance between two biological sequences is a fundamental process in molecular evolution. It is usually performed by maximum likelihood (ML) on characters aligned either pairwise or jointly in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA). Estimators for the covariance of pairs from an MSA are known, but we are not aware of any solution for cases of pairs aligned independently. In large-scale analyses, it may be too costly to compute MSAs every time distances must be compared, and therefore a covariance estimator for distances estimated from pairs aligned independently is desirable. Knowledge of covariances improves any process that compares or combines distances, such as in generalized least-squares phylogenetic tree building, orthology inference, or lateral gene transfer detection. In this paper, we introduce an estimator for the covariance of distances from sequences aligned pairwise. Its performance is analyzed through extensive Monte Carlo simulations, and compared to the well-known variance estimator of ML distances. Our covariance estimator can be used together with the ML variance estimator to form covariance matrices. The estimator performs similarly to the ML variance estimator. In particular, it shows no sign of bias when sequence divergence is below 150 PAM units (i.e. above ~29% expected sequence identity). Above that distance, the covariances tend to be underestimated, but then ML variances are also underestimated.

  16. Efficacy Endpoints of Radiation Therapy Group Protocol 0247: A Randomized, Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stuart J. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Meropol, Neal J., E-mail: Neal.Meropol@case.edu [University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rashid, Asif [Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Watson, James C. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitchell, Edith P. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pollock, Jondavid [The Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah (United States); Haddock, Michael [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Erickson, Beth A. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). Methods and Materials: A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m{sup 2}; leucovorin 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m{sup 2}) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local–regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. Results: A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an

  17. Incorporating ethical principles into clinical research protocols: a tool for protocol writers and ethics committees

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rebecca H.; Wacholtz, Mary C; Barnes, Mark; Boggs, Liam; Callery-D'Amico, Susan; Davis, Amy; Digilova, Alla; Forster, David; Heffernan, Kate; Luthin, Maeve; Lynch, Holly Fernandez; McNair, Lindsay; Miller, Jennifer E; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Van Campen, Luann

    2016-01-01

    A novel Protocol Ethics Tool Kit (‘Ethics Tool Kit’) has been developed by a multi-stakeholder group of the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard. The purpose of the Ethics Tool Kit is to facilitate effective recognition, consideration and deliberation of critical ethical issues in clinical trial protocols. The Ethics Tool Kit may be used by investigators and sponsors to develop a dedicated Ethics Section within a protocol to improve the consistency...

  18. Reality conditions for Ashtekar gravity from Lorentz-covariant formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, Sergei [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-03-21

    We study the limit of the Lorentz-covariant canonical formulation where the Immirzi parameter approaches {beta} = i. We show that, formulated in terms of a shifted spacetime connection, which also plays a crucial role in the covariant quantization, the limit is smooth and reproduces the canonical structure of the self-dual Ashtekar gravity. The reality conditions of Ashtekar gravity can be incorporated by means of the Dirac brackets derived from the covariant formulation and defined on an extended phase space which involves, besides the self-dual variables, also their anti-self-dual counterparts.

  19. Poincaré covariance of relativistic quantum position

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, S; Weiner, M D; Farkas, Sz.

    2002-01-01

    A great number of problems of relativistic position in quantum mechanics are due to the use of coordinates which are not inherent objects of spacetime, cause unnecessary complications and can lead to misconceptions. We apply a coordinate-free approach to rule out such problems. Thus it will be clear, for example, that the Lorentz covariance of position, required usually on the analogy of Lorentz covariance of spacetime coordinates, is not well posed and we show that in a right setting the Newton--Wigner position is Poincar\\'e covariant, in contradiction with the usual assertions.

  20. Bayes linear covariance matrix adjustment for multivariate dynamic linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Darren J

    2008-01-01

    A methodology is developed for the adjustment of the covariance matrices underlying a multivariate constant time series dynamic linear model. The covariance matrices are embedded in a distribution-free inner-product space of matrix objects which facilitates such adjustment. This approach helps to make the analysis simple, tractable and robust. To illustrate the methods, a simple model is developed for a time series representing sales of certain brands of a product from a cash-and-carry depot. The covariance structure underlying the model is revised, and the benefits of this revision on first order inferences are then examined.

  1. Covariate-adjusted measures of discrimination for survival data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Ian R; Rapsomaniki, Eleni; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Discrimination statistics describe the ability of a survival model to assign higher risks to individuals who experience earlier events: examples are Harrell's C-index and Royston and Sauerbrei's D, which we call the D-index. Prognostic covariates whose distributions are controlled...... by the study design (e.g. age and sex) influence discrimination and can make it difficult to compare model discrimination between studies. Although covariate adjustment is a standard procedure for quantifying disease-risk factor associations, there are no covariate adjustment methods for discrimination...

  2. A regularizing commutant duality for a kinematically covariant partial ordered net of observables

    CERN Document Server

    Rainer, M

    1997-01-01

    We consider a net of *-algebras, locally around any point of observation, equipped with a natural partial order related to the isotony property. Assuming the underlying manifold of the net to be a differentiable, this net shall be kinematically covariant under general diffeomorphisms. However, the dynamical relations, induced by the physical state defining the related net of (von Neumann) observables, are in general not covariant under all diffeomorphisms, but only under the subgroup of dynamical symmetries. We introduce algebraically both, IR and UV cutoffs, and assume that these are related by a commutant duality. The latter, having strong implications on the net, allows us to identify a 1-parameter group of the dynamical symmetries with the group of outer modular automorphisms. For thermal equilibrium states, the modular dilation parameter may be used locally to define the notions of both, time and a causal structure.

  3. On the influence of Gribov ambiguities in a class of nonlinear covariant gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Serreau, Julien; Tresmontant, Andréas

    2015-01-01

    We consider Yang-Mills theories in a recently proposed family of nonlinear covariant gauges that consistently deals with the issue of Gribov ambiguities. Such gauges provide a generalization of the Curci-Ferrari-Delbourgo-Jarvis gauges which can be formulated as an extremization procedure and might be implemented in numerical calculations. This would allow for nonperturbative studies of Yang-Mills correlators in a broad class of covariant gauges continuously connected to the well studied Landau gauge. We compute the ghost and gluon propagators in the continuum formulation at one-loop order in perturbation theory and we study their momentum dependence down to the deep infrared regime, with and without renormalization group improvement. In particular, we show that the theory admits infrared safe renormalization group trajectories with no Landau pole. Both the gluon and the ghost behave as massive fields at low energy, and the gluon propagator is transverse even away from the Landau gauge limit. We compare our r...

  4. Comparing large covariance matrices under weak conditions on the dependence structure and its application to gene clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinyuan; Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Wen-Xin; Wang, Lan

    2016-07-05

    Comparing large covariance matrices has important applications in modern genomics, where scientists are often interested in understanding whether relationships (e.g., dependencies or co-regulations) among a large number of genes vary between different biological states. We propose a computationally fast procedure for testing the equality of two large covariance matrices when the dimensions of the covariance matrices are much larger than the sample sizes. A distinguishing feature of the new procedure is that it imposes no structural assumptions on the unknown covariance matrices. Hence, the test is robust with respect to various complex dependence structures that frequently arise in genomics. We prove that the proposed procedure is asymptotically valid under weak moment conditions. As an interesting application, we derive a new gene clustering algorithm which shares the same nice property of avoiding restrictive structural assumptions for high-dimensional genomics data. Using an asthma gene expression dataset, we illustrate how the new test helps compare the covariance matrices of the genes across different gene sets/pathways between the disease group and the control group, and how the gene clustering algorithm provides new insights on the way gene clustering patterns differ between the two groups. The proposed methods have been implemented in an R-package HDtest and are available on CRAN.

  5. Strong subadditivity for log-determinant of covariance matrices and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    We prove that the log-determinant of the covariance matrix obeys the strong subadditivity inequality for arbitrary tripartite states of multimode continuous variable quantum systems. This establishes general limitations on the distribution of information encoded in the second moments of canonically conjugate operators. We show that such an inequality implies a strict monogamy-type relation for joint Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steerability of single modes by Gaussian measurements performed on multiple groups of modes.

  6. Global symplectic potentials on the Witten covariant phase space for bosonic extendons

    CERN Document Server

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, R

    2002-01-01

    It is proved that the projections of the deformation vector field, normal and tangential to the worldsheet manifold swept out by Dirac-Nambu-Goto bosonic extendons propagating in a curved background, play the role of {\\it global} symplectic potentials on the corresponding Witten covariant phase space. It is also proved that the {\\it presymplectic} structure obtained from such potentials by direct exterior derivation, has not components tangent to the action of the relevant diffeomorphisms group of the theory.

  7. The bispectrum covariance beyond Gaussianity: A log-normal approach

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Sandra; Simon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    To investigate and specify the statistical properties of cosmological fields with particular attention to possible non-Gaussian features, accurate formulae for the bispectrum and the bispectrum covariance are required. The bispectrum is the lowest-order statistic providing an estimate for non-Gaussianities of a distribution, and the bispectrum covariance depicts the errors of the bispectrum measurement and their correlation on different scales. Currently, there do exist fitting formulae for the bispectrum and an analytical expression for the bispectrum covariance, but the former is not very accurate and the latter contains several intricate terms and only one of them can be readily evaluated from the power spectrum of the studied field. Neglecting all higher-order terms results in the Gaussian approximation of the bispectrum covariance. We study the range of validity of this Gaussian approximation for two-dimensional non-Gaussian random fields. For this purpose, we simulate Gaussian and non-Gaussian random fi...

  8. Electron localization functions and local measures of the covariance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paul W Ayers

    2005-09-01

    The electron localization measure proposed by Becke and Edgecombe is shown to be related to the covariance of the electron pair distribution. Just as with the electron localization function, the local covariance does not seem to be, in and of itself, a useful quantity for elucidating shell structure. A function of the local covariance, however, is useful for this purpose. A different function, based on the hyperbolic tangent, is proposed to elucidate the shell structure encapsulated by the local covariance; this function also seems to work better for the electron localization measure of Becke and Edgecombe. In addition, we propose a different measure for the electron localization that incorporates both the electron localization measure of Becke and Edgecombe and the Laplacian of the electron density; preliminary indications are that this measure is especially good at elucidating the shell structure in valence regions. Methods for evaluating electron localization functions directly from the electron density, without recourse to the Kohn-Sham orbitals, are discussed.

  9. Progress of Covariance Evaluation at the China Nuclear Data Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, R., E-mail: xuruirui@ciae.ac.cn [China Nuclear Data Center, P.O. Box, 275(41), Beijing 102413 (China); Zhang, Q. [China Nuclear Data Center, P.O. Box, 275(41), Beijing 102413 (China); Shanxi Normal University, Linfen, Shanxi Province 041004 (China); Zhang, Y.; Liu, T.; Ge, Z.; Lu, H.; Sun, Z.; Yu, B. [China Nuclear Data Center, P.O. Box, 275(41), Beijing 102413 (China); Tang, G. [Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Covariance evaluations at the China Nuclear Data Center focus on the cross sections of structural materials and actinides in the fast neutron energy range. In addition to the well-known Least-squares approach, a method based on the analysis of the sources of experimental uncertainties is especially introduced to generate a covariance matrix for a particular reaction for which multiple measurements are available. The scheme of the covariance evaluation flow is presented, and an example of n+{sup 90}Zr is given to illuminate the whole procedure. It is proven that the accuracy of measurements can be properly incorporated into the covariance and the long-standing small uncertainty problem can be avoided.

  10. Lorentz Covariant Canonical Symplectic Algorithms for Dynamics of Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the Lorentz covariance of algorithms is introduced. Under Lorentz transformation, both the form and performance of a Lorentz covariant algorithm are invariant. To acquire the advantages of symplectic algorithms and Lorentz covariance, a general procedure for constructing Lorentz covariant canonical symplectic algorithms (LCCSA) is provided, based on which an explicit LCCSA for dynamics of relativistic charged particles is built. LCCSA possesses Lorentz invariance as well as long-term numerical accuracy and stability, due to the preservation of discrete symplectic structure and Lorentz symmetry of the system. For situations with time-dependent electromagnetic fields, which is difficult to handle in traditional construction procedures of symplectic algorithms, LCCSA provides a perfect explicit canonical symplectic solution by implementing the discretization in 4-spacetime. We also show that LCCSA has built-in energy-based adaptive time steps, which can optimize the computation performance when th...

  11. Trouble shooting for covariance fitting in highly correlated data

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Boram; Lee, Weonjong; Jung, Chulwoo

    2011-01-01

    We report a possible solution to the trouble that the covariance fitting fails when the data is highly correlated and the covariance matrix has small eigenvalues. As an example, we choose the data analysis of highly correlated $B_K$ data on the basis of the SU(2) staggered chiral perturbation theory. Basically, the essence of the problem is that we do not have an accurate fitting function so that we cannot fit the highly correlated and precise data. When some eigenvalues of the covariance matrix are small, even a tiny error of fitting function can produce large chi-square and spoil the fitting procedure. We have applied a number of prescriptions available in the market such as diagonal approximation and cutoff method. In addition, we present a new method, the eigenmode shift method which fine-tunes the fitting function while keeping the covariance matrix untouched.

  12. Covariance fitting of highly correlated $B_K$ data

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Boram; Jung, Chulwoo; Lee, Weonjong

    2011-01-01

    We present the reason why we use the diagonal approximation (uncorrelated fitting) when we perform the data analysis of highly correlated $B_K$ data on the basis of the SU(2) staggered chiral perturbation theory. Basically, the essence of the problem is that we do not have enough statistics to determine the small eigenvalues of the covariance matrix with a high precision. As a result, we have the smallest eigenvalue, which is smaller than the statistical error of the covariance matrix, corresponding to an unphysical eigenmode. We have applied a number of prescriptions available in the market such as the cutoff method and modified covariance matrix method. It turns out that the cutoff method is not a good prescription and the modified covariance matrix method is an even worse one. The diagonal approximation turns out to be a good prescription if the data points are somehow correlated and the statistics are relatively poor.

  13. A re-examination of Hebbian-covariance rules and spike timing-dependent plasticity in cat visual cortex in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Frégnac

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP is considered as an ubiquitous rule for associative plasticity in cortical networks in vitro. However, limited supporting evidence for its functional role has been provided in vivo. In particular, there are very few studies demonstrating the co-occurence of synaptic efficiency changes and alteration of sensory responses in adult cortex during Hebbian or STDP protocols. We addressed this issue by reviewing and comparing the functional effects of two types of cellular conditioning in cat visual cortex. The first one, referred to as the covariance protocol, obeys a generalized Hebbian framework, by imposing, for different stimuli, supervised positive and negative changes in covariance between postsynaptic and presynaptic activity rates. The second protocol, based on intracellular recordings, replicated in vivo variants of the theta-burst paradigm (TBS, proven successful in inducing long-term potentiation (LTP in vitro. Since it was shown to impose a precise correlation delay between the electrically activated thalamic input and the TBS-induced postsynaptic spike, this protocol can be seen as a probe of causal (pre-before-post STDP. By choosing a thalamic region where the visual field representation was in retinotopic overlap with the intracellularly recorded cortical receptive field as the afferent site for supervised electrical stimulation, this protocol allowed to look for possible correlates between STDP and functional reorganization of the conditioned cortical receptive field. The rate-based covariance protocol induced significant and large amplitude changes in receptive field properties, in both kitten and adult V1 cortex. The TBS STDP-like protocol produced in the adult significant changes in the synaptic gain of the electrically activated thalamic pathway, but the statistical significance of the functional correlates was detectable mostly at the population level. Comparison of our observations with the

  14. Covariance of metabolic and hemostatic risk indicators in men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H; Vrijkotte, TGM; Meijer, P; Kluft, C; de Geus, Eco J.

    2001-01-01

    Background and objective: Multivariate analyses on clusters of metabolic and hemostatic risk indicators implicitly assume good test-retest reliability of these variables, substantial covariance among the various indicators, stability of covariance structure over time, and comparable covariance struc

  15. Encryption Switching Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Couteau, Geoffroy; Peters, Thomas; Pointcheval, David

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We formally define the primitive of encryption switching protocol (ESP), allowing to switch between two encryption schemes. Intuitively, this two-party protocol converts given ciphertexts from one scheme into ciphertexts of the same messages under the other scheme, for any polynomial number of switches, in any direction. Although ESP is a special kind of two-party computation protocol, it turns out that ESP implies general two-party computation (2-PC) under natural con...

  16. Some covariance models based on normal scale mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Schlather, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Modelling spatio-temporal processes has become an important issue in current research. Since Gaussian processes are essentially determined by their second order structure, broad classes of covariance functions are of interest. Here, a new class is described that merges and generalizes various models presented in the literature, in particular models in Gneiting (J. Amer. Statist. Assoc. 97 (2002) 590--600) and Stein (Nonstationary spatial covariance functions (2005) Univ. Chicago). Furthermore, new models and a multivariate extension are introduced.

  17. Web Tool for Constructing a Covariance Matrix from EXFOR Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerkin V.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The experimental nuclear reaction database EXFOR contains almost no covariance data because most experimentalists provide experimental data only with uncertainties. With the tool described here a user can construct an experimental covariance matrix from uncertainties using general assumptions when uncertainty information given in EXFOR is poor (or even absent. The tool is publically available in the IAEA EXFOR Web retrieval system [1].

  18. A Generalized Autocovariance Least-Squares Method for Covariance Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkesson, Bernt Magnus; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad;

    2007-01-01

    A generalization of the autocovariance least- squares method for estimating noise covariances is presented. The method can estimate mutually correlated system and sensor noise and can be used with both the predicting and the filtering form of the Kalman filter.......A generalization of the autocovariance least- squares method for estimating noise covariances is presented. The method can estimate mutually correlated system and sensor noise and can be used with both the predicting and the filtering form of the Kalman filter....

  19. Comparison of Methods for Handling Missing Covariate Data

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Åsa M.; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-01-01

    Missing covariate data is a common problem in nonlinear mixed effects modelling of clinical data. The aim of this study was to implement and compare methods for handling missing covariate data in nonlinear mixed effects modelling under different missing data mechanisms. Simulations generated data for 200 individuals with a 50% difference in clearance between males and females. Three different types of missing data mechanisms were simulated and information about sex was missing for 50% of the ...

  20. High-dimensional covariance matrix estimation with missing observations

    OpenAIRE

    Lounici, Karim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of high-dimensional covariance matrix estimation with missing observations. We propose a simple procedure computationally tractable in high-dimension and that does not require imputation of the missing data. We establish non-asymptotic sparsity oracle inequalities for the estimation of the covariance matrix involving the Frobenius and the spectral norms which are valid for any setting of the sample size, probability of a missing observation and the dimensio...

  1. Multiparty Quantum Cryptographic Protocol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ramzan; M. K. Khan

    2008-01-01

    We propose a multiparty quantum cryptographic protocol. Unitary operators applied by Bob and Charlie, on their respective qubits of a tripartite entangled state encoding a classical symbol that can be decoded at Alice's end with the help of a decoding matrix. Eve's presence can be detected by the disturbance of the decoding matrix. Our protocol is secure against intercept-resend attacks. Furthermore, it is efficient and deterministic in the sense that two classical bits can be transferred per entangled pair of qubits. It is worth mentioning that in this protocol, the same symbol can be used for key distribution and Eve's detection that enhances the effciency of the protocol.

  2. Perturbative approach to covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammed, Irshad; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum using perturbation theory up to dominant terms at 1-loop order and compare it to numerical simulations. We decompose the covariance matrix into the disconnected (Gaussian) part, trispectrum from the modes outside the survey (beat coupling or super-sample variance), and trispectrum from the modes inside the survey, and show how the different components contribute to the overall covariance matrix. We find the agreement with the simulations is at a 10\\% level up to $k \\sim 1 h {\\rm Mpc^{-1}}$. We show that all the connected components are dominated by the large-scale modes ($k<0.1 h {\\rm Mpc^{-1}}$), regardless of the value of the wavevectors $k,\\, k'$ of the covariance matrix, suggesting that one must be careful in applying the jackknife or bootstrap methods to the covariance matrix. We perform an eigenmode decomposition of the connected part of the covariance matrix, showing that at higher $k$ it is dominated by a single eigenmode. The full cova...

  3. [Clinical research XIX. From clinical judgment to analysis of covariance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Marcela; Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Moreno, Jorge; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Talavera, Juan O

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) is based on the general linear models. This technique involves a regression model, often multiple, in which the outcome is presented as a continuous variable, the independent variables are qualitative or are introduced into the model as dummy or dichotomous variables, and factors for which adjustment is required (covariates) can be in any measurement level (i.e. nominal, ordinal or continuous). The maneuvers can be entered into the model as 1) fixed effects, or 2) random effects. The difference between fixed effects and random effects depends on the type of information we want from the analysis of the effects. ANCOVA effect separates the independent variables from the effect of co-variables, i.e., corrects the dependent variable eliminating the influence of covariates, given that these variables change in conjunction with maneuvers or treatments, affecting the outcome variable. ANCOVA should be done only if it meets three assumptions: 1) the relationship between the covariate and the outcome is linear, 2) there is homogeneity of slopes, and 3) the covariate and the independent variable are independent from each other.

  4. Computational protein design quantifies structural constraints on amino acid covariation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Amino acid covariation, where the identities of amino acids at different sequence positions are correlated, is a hallmark of naturally occurring proteins. This covariation can arise from multiple factors, including selective pressures for maintaining protein structure, requirements imposed by a specific function, or from phylogenetic sampling bias. Here we employed flexible backbone computational protein design to quantify the extent to which protein structure has constrained amino acid covariation for 40 diverse protein domains. We find significant similarities between the amino acid covariation in alignments of natural protein sequences and sequences optimized for their structures by computational protein design methods. These results indicate that the structural constraints imposed by protein architecture play a dominant role in shaping amino acid covariation and that computational protein design methods can capture these effects. We also find that the similarity between natural and designed covariation is sensitive to the magnitude and mechanism of backbone flexibility used in computational protein design. Our results thus highlight the necessity of including backbone flexibility to correctly model precise details of correlated amino acid changes and give insights into the pressures underlying these correlations.

  5. The Performance Analysis Based on SAR Sample Covariance Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Erten

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel systems appear in several fields of application in science. In the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR context, multi-channel systems may refer to different domains, as multi-polarization, multi-interferometric or multi-temporal data, or even a combination of them. Due to the inherent speckle phenomenon present in SAR images, the statistical description of the data is almost mandatory for its utilization. The complex images acquired over natural media present in general zero-mean circular Gaussian characteristics. In this case, second order statistics as the multi-channel covariance matrix fully describe the data. For practical situations however, the covariance matrix has to be estimated using a limited number of samples, and this sample covariance matrix follow the complex Wishart distribution. In this context, the eigendecomposition of the multi-channel covariance matrix has been shown in different areas of high relevance regarding the physical properties of the imaged scene. Specifically, the maximum eigenvalue of the covariance matrix has been frequently used in different applications as target or change detection, estimation of the dominant scattering mechanism in polarimetric data, moving target indication, etc. In this paper, the statistical behavior of the maximum eigenvalue derived from the eigendecomposition of the sample multi-channel covariance matrix in terms of multi-channel SAR images is simplified for SAR community. Validation is performed against simulated data and examples of estimation and detection problems using the analytical expressions are as well given.

  6. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. Accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. Usually, only a limited set of accurate N-body simulations is available. Thus, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Further, relying on simulated realizations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these points in mind, this work presents a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements for galaxy samples with a trivial geometry in the case of a Gaussian approximation of the clustering likelihood. As main result of this paper, we give the explicit formulae for Fourier and configuration space covariance matrices. To validate our model, we create synthetic halo occupation distribution galaxy catalogues by populating the haloes of an ensemble of large-volume N-body simulations. Using linear and non-linear input power spectra, we find very good agreement between the model predictions and the measurements on the synthetic catalogues in the quasi-linear regime.

  7. Covariance fitting of highly-correlated data in lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Boram; Jang, Yong-Chull; Jung, Chulwoo; Lee, Weonjong

    2013-07-01

    We address a frequently-asked question on the covariance fitting of highly-correlated data such as our B K data based on the SU(2) staggered chiral perturbation theory. Basically, the essence of the problem is that we do not have a fitting function accurate enough to fit extremely precise data. When eigenvalues of the covariance matrix are small, even a tiny error in the fitting function yields a large chi-square value and spoils the fitting procedure. We have applied a number of prescriptions available in the market, such as the cut-off method, modified covariance matrix method, and Bayesian method. We also propose a brand new method, the eigenmode shift (ES) method, which allows a full covariance fitting without modifying the covariance matrix at all. We provide a pedagogical example of data analysis in which the cut-off method manifestly fails in fitting, but the rest work well. In our case of the B K fitting, the diagonal approximation, the cut-off method, the ES method, and the Bayesian method work reasonably well in an engineering sense. However, interpreting the meaning of χ 2 is easier in the case of the ES method and the Bayesian method in a theoretical sense aesthetically. Hence, the ES method can be a useful alternative optional tool to check the systematic error caused by the covariance fitting procedure.

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Pain, Stress, Neuropeptide Y, ACTH, and Cortisol Levels Between a Conventional Postoperative Care Protocol and a Fast-Track Recovery Program in Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapritsou, Maria; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D; Bozas, Evangelos; Korkolis, Dimitrios P; Konstantinou, Evangelos A; Kaklamanos, Ioannis; Giannakopoulou, Margarita

    2017-03-01

    Fast-track (FT) postoperative protocol in oncological patients after major abdominal surgery reduces complications and length of postoperative stay compared to the conventional (CON) protocol. However, stress and pain responses have not been compared between the two protocols. To compare stress, pain, and related neuropeptidic responses (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], cortisol, and neuropeptide Y [NPY]) between FT and CON protocols. A clinical trial with repeated measurements was conducted (May 2012 to May 2014) with a sample of 63 hepatectomized or pancreatectomized patients randomized into two groups: FT ( n = 29) or CON ( n = 34). Demographic and clinical data were collected, and pain (Visual Analog Scale [VAS] and Behavioral Pain Scale [BPS]) and stress responses (3 self-report questions) assessed. NPY, ACTH, and cortisol plasma levels were measured at T1 = day of admission, T2 = day of surgery, and T3 = prior to discharge. ACTHT1 and ACTHT2 levels were positively correlated with self-reported stress levels (ρ = .43 and ρ = .45, respectively, p levels in the FT group were higher than those in the CON group at all time points ( p ≤ .004); this difference remained significant after adjusting for T1 levels through analysis of covariance for age, gender, and body mass index ( F = .003, F = .149, F = .015, respectively, p > .05). Neuropeptidic levels were higher in the FT group. Future research should evaluate this association further, as these biomarkers might serve as objective indicators of postoperative pain and stress.

  9. [Reactions to infliximab infusions in dermatologic patients: consensus statement and treatment protocol. Working Group of the Grupo Español de Psoriasis de la Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig Sanz, Lluís; Sáez, E; Lozano, M J; Bordas, X; Carrascosa, J M; Gallardo, F; Luelmo, J; Sánchez-Regaña, M; Alsina, M; García-Patos, V

    2009-03-01

    Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to and blocks tumor necrosis factor alpha and is the most effective biologic agent approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. It is administered by intravenous infusion, usually in day hospitals on an outpatient basis. The main problem with the administration of infliximab is the possibility of infusion reactions, which may be immediate or delayed; these reactions are related to the immunogenicity of this monoclonal antibody, leading to the production of anti-infliximab antibodies. Infusion reactions to infliximab are not usually anaphylactic (ie, they are not mediated by immunoglobulin E), and re-exposure of the patient using specific protocols to prevent and treat these reactions is therefore possible. The extensive experience in the use of infliximab for the treatment of rheumatic conditions and chronic inflammatory bowel disease has made it possible to develop infusion reaction management protocols; these can be applied to dermatologic patients, who constitute a growing proportion of patients treated with intravenous biological agents. The aim of this review is to draw up a consensus protocol for the treatment of infusion reactions in dermatologic patients treated with infliximab.

  10. Composing Interfering Abstract Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Fähndrich and K. R. M. Leino. Heap monotonic typestate. In IWACO 2003. [11] X. Feng. Local rely-guarantee reasoning . In POPL ’09. [12] T. Freeman...While protocol-based techniques to reason about interference abound, they do not address two practical concerns: the decidability of protocol...46 C Examples using Informal Extensions 48 C.1 Monotonic Counter

  11. Formalism for neutron cross section covariances in the resonance region using kernel approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblozinsky, P.; Cho,Y-S.; Matoon,C.M.; Mughabghab,S.F.

    2010-04-09

    We describe analytical formalism for estimating neutron radiative capture and elastic scattering cross section covariances in the resolved resonance region. We use capture and scattering kernels as the starting point and show how to get average cross sections in broader energy bins, derive analytical expressions for cross section sensitivities, and deduce cross section covariances from the resonance parameter uncertainties in the recently published Atlas of Neutron Resonances. The formalism elucidates the role of resonance parameter correlations which become important if several strong resonances are located in one energy group. Importance of potential scattering uncertainty as well as correlation between potential scattering and resonance scattering is also examined. Practical application of the formalism is illustrated on {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) and {sup 55}Mn(n,el).

  12. Gauge covariance of the fermion Schwinger-Dyson equation in QED

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Shaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Any practical application of the Schwinger-Dyson equations to the study of $n$-point Green's functions of a field theory requires truncations, the best known being finite order perturbation theory. Strong coupling studies require a different approach. In the case of QED, gauge covariance is a powerful constraint. By using a spectral representation for the massive fermion propagator in QED, we are able to show that the constraints imposed by the Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformations are linear operations on the spectral densities. Here we formally define these group operations and show with a couple of examples how in practice they provide a straightforward way to test the gauge covariance of any viable truncation of the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion 2-point function.

  13. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... instance is terminated prematurely and subsequently iterated. The combined set of leaves from all the tree instances can then be viewed as a graph code, which is decodable using belief propagation. The main design problem is determining the order of splitting, which enables successful decoding as early...... as possible. Evaluations show that the proposed protocol provides considerable gains over the standard tree splitting protocol applying SIC. The improvement comes at the expense of an increased feedback and receiver complexity....

  14. Structural covariance of the neostriatum with regional gray matter volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Mas, C; Harrison, B J; Pujol, J; López-Solà, M; Hernández-Ribas, R; Alonso, P; Contreras-Rodríguez, O; Giménez, M; Blanco-Hinojo, L; Ortiz, H; Deus, J; Menchón, J M; Cardoner, N

    2013-05-01

    The caudate and putamen nuclei have been traditionally divided into dorsal and ventral territories based on their segregated patterns of functional and anatomical connectivity with distributed cortical regions. Activity-dependent structural plasticity may potentially lead to the development of regional volume correlations, or structural covariance, between the different components of each cortico-striatal circuit. Here, we studied the whole-brain structural covariance patterns of four neostriatal regions belonging to distinct cortico-striatal circuits. We also assessed the potential modulating influence of laterality, age and gender. T1-weighted three-dimensional magnetic resonance images were obtained from ninety healthy participants (50 females). Following data pre-processing, the mean signal value per hemisphere was calculated for the 'seed' regions of interest, located in the dorsal and ventral caudate and the dorsal-caudal and ventral-rostral putamen. Statistical parametric mapping was used to estimate whole-brain voxel-wise structural covariance patterns for each striatal region, controlling for the shared anatomical variance between regions in order to obtain maximally specific structural covariance patterns. As predicted, segregated covariance patterns were observed. Age was found to be a relevant modulator of the covariance patterns of the right caudate regions, while laterality effects were observed for the dorsal-caudal putamen. Gender effects were only observed via an interaction with age. The different patterns of structural covariance are discussed in detail, as well as their similarities with the functional and anatomical connectivity patterns reported for the same striatal regions in other studies. Finally, the potential mechanisms underpinning the phenomenon of volume correlations between distant cortico-striatal structures are also discussed.

  15. Bayesian adjustment for covariate measurement errors: a flexible parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Shahadut; Gustafson, Paul

    2009-05-15

    In most epidemiological investigations, the study units are people, the outcome variable (or the response) is a health-related event, and the explanatory variables are usually environmental and/or socio-demographic factors. The fundamental task in such investigations is to quantify the association between the explanatory variables (covariates/exposures) and the outcome variable through a suitable regression model. The accuracy of such quantification depends on how precisely the relevant covariates are measured. In many instances, we cannot measure some of the covariates accurately. Rather, we can measure noisy (mismeasured) versions of them. In statistical terminology, mismeasurement in continuous covariates is known as measurement errors or errors-in-variables. Regression analyses based on mismeasured covariates lead to biased inference about the true underlying response-covariate associations. In this paper, we suggest a flexible parametric approach for avoiding this bias when estimating the response-covariate relationship through a logistic regression model. More specifically, we consider the flexible generalized skew-normal and the flexible generalized skew-t distributions for modeling the unobserved true exposure. For inference and computational purposes, we use Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. We investigate the performance of the proposed flexible parametric approach in comparison with a common flexible parametric approach through extensive simulation studies. We also compare the proposed method with the competing flexible parametric method on a real-life data set. Though emphasis is put on the logistic regression model, the proposed method is unified and is applicable to the other generalized linear models, and to other types of non-linear regression models as well. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Covariant basis induced by parity for the (j,0)⊕(0,j) representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ávila, Selim; Napsuciale, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we build a covariant basis for operators acting on the (j,0)⊕(0,j) Lorentz group representations. The construction is based on an analysis of the covariant properties of the parity operator, which for these representations transforms as the completely temporal component of a symmetrical tensor of rank 2j. The covariant properties of parity involve the Jordan algebra of anticommutators of the Lorentz group generators which unlike the Lie algebra is not universal. We make the construction explicit for j=1/2, 1 and 3/2, reproducing well-known results for the j=1/2 case. We provide an algorithm for the corresponding calculations for arbitrary j. This covariant basis provides an inventory of all the possible interaction terms for gauge and nongauge theories of fields for these representations. In particular, it supplies a single second-rank antisymmetric structure, which in the Poincaré projector formalism implies a single Pauli term arising from gauge interactions and a single (free) parameter g, the gyromagnetic factor. This simple structure predicts that for an elementary particle in this formalism all multipole moments, QEl and QMl, are dictated by the complete algebraic structure of the Lorentz generators and the value of g. We explicitly calculate the multipole moments, for arbitrary j up to l=8. Comparing with results in the literature we find that only the electric charge and magnetic moment of a spin j particle are independent of the Lorentz representation under which it transforms, all higher multipoles being representation dependent. Finally we show that the propagation of the corresponding spin j waves in an electromagnetic background is causal.

  17. Testing the equivalence of modern human cranial covariance structure: Implications for bioarchaeological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen; Schroeder, Lauren

    2016-10-01

    Estimation of the variance-covariance (V/CV) structure of fragmentary bioarchaeological populations requires the use of proxy extant V/CV parameters. However, it is currently unclear whether extant human populations exhibit equivalent V/CV structures. Random skewers (RS) and hierarchical analyses of common principal components (CPC) were applied to a modern human cranial dataset. Cranial V/CV similarity was assessed globally for samples of individual populations (jackknifed method) and for pairwise population sample contrasts. The results were examined in light of potential explanatory factors for covariance difference, such as geographic region, among-group distance, and sample size. RS analyses showed that population samples exhibited highly correlated multivariate responses to selection, and that differences in RS results were primarily a consequence of differences in sample size. The CPC method yielded mixed results, depending upon the statistical criterion used to evaluate the hierarchy. The hypothesis-testing (step-up) approach was deemed problematic due to sensitivity to low statistical power and elevated Type I errors. In contrast, the model-fitting (lowest AIC) approach suggested that V/CV matrices were proportional and/or shared a large number of CPCs. Pairwise population sample CPC results were correlated with cranial distance, suggesting that population history explains some of the variability in V/CV structure among groups. The results indicate that patterns of covariance in human craniometric samples are broadly similar but not identical. These findings have important implications for choosing extant covariance matrices to use as proxy V/CV parameters in evolutionary analyses of past populations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. An Empirical State Error Covariance Matrix for Batch State Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbee, Joseph H., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    State estimation techniques serve effectively to provide mean state estimates. However, the state error covariance matrices provided as part of these techniques suffer from some degree of lack of confidence in their ability to adequately describe the uncertainty in the estimated states. A specific problem with the traditional form of state error covariance matrices is that they represent only a mapping of the assumed observation error characteristics into the state space. Any errors that arise from other sources (environment modeling, precision, etc.) are not directly represented in a traditional, theoretical state error covariance matrix. Consider that an actual observation contains only measurement error and that an estimated observation contains all other errors, known and unknown. It then follows that a measurement residual (the difference between expected and observed measurements) contains all errors for that measurement. Therefore, a direct and appropriate inclusion of the actual measurement residuals in the state error covariance matrix will result in an empirical state error covariance matrix. This empirical state error covariance matrix will fully account for the error in the state estimate. By way of a literal reinterpretation of the equations involved in the weighted least squares estimation algorithm, it is possible to arrive at an appropriate, and formally correct, empirical state error covariance matrix. The first specific step of the method is to use the average form of the weighted measurement residual variance performance index rather than its usual total weighted residual form. Next it is helpful to interpret the solution to the normal equations as the average of a collection of sample vectors drawn from a hypothetical parent population. From here, using a standard statistical analysis approach, it directly follows as to how to determine the standard empirical state error covariance matrix. This matrix will contain the total uncertainty in the

  19. Fast Component Pursuit for Large-Scale Inverse Covariance Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tong

    2016-08-01

    The maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) for the Gaussian graphical model, which is also known as the inverse covariance estimation problem, has gained increasing interest recently. Most existing works assume that inverse covariance estimators contain sparse structure and then construct models with the ℓ1 regularization. In this paper, different from existing works, we study the inverse covariance estimation problem from another perspective by efficiently modeling the low-rank structure in the inverse covariance, which is assumed to be a combination of a low-rank part and a diagonal matrix. One motivation for this assumption is that the low-rank structure is common in many applications including the climate and financial analysis, and another one is that such assumption can reduce the computational complexity when computing its inverse. Specifically, we propose an efficient COmponent Pursuit (COP) method to obtain the low-rank part, where each component can be sparse. For optimization, the COP method greedily learns a rank-one component in each iteration by maximizing the log-likelihood. Moreover, the COP algorithm enjoys several appealing properties including the existence of an efficient solution in each iteration and the theoretical guarantee on the convergence of this greedy approach. Experiments on large-scale synthetic and real-world datasets including thousands of millions variables show that the COP method is faster than the state-of-the-art techniques for the inverse covariance estimation problem when achieving comparable log-likelihood on test data.

  20. Covariate-adjusted confidence interval for the intraclass correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoukri, Mohamed M; Donner, Allan; El-Dali, Abdelmoneim

    2013-09-01

    A crucial step in designing a new study is to estimate the required sample size. For a design involving cluster sampling, the appropriate sample size depends on the so-called design effect, which is a function of the average cluster size and the intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC). It is well-known that under the framework of hierarchical and generalized linear models, a reduction in residual error may be achieved by including risk factors as covariates. In this paper we show that the covariate design, indicating whether the covariates are measured at the cluster level or at the within-cluster subject level affects the estimation of the ICC, and hence the design effect. Therefore, the distinction between these two types of covariates should be made at the design stage. In this paper we use the nested-bootstrap method to assess the accuracy of the estimated ICC for continuous and binary response variables under different covariate structures. The codes of two SAS macros are made available by the authors for interested readers to facilitate the construction of confidence intervals for the ICC. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations we evaluate the relative efficiency of the estimators and evaluate the accuracy of the coverage probabilities of a 95% confidence interval on the population ICC. The methodology is illustrated using a published data set of blood pressure measurements taken on family members.

  1. Structural and Maturational Covariance in Early Childhood Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiujuan; Li, Gang; Lu, Zhaohua; Gao, Wei; Wang, Li; Shen, Dinggang; Zhu, Hongtu; Gilmore, John H

    2017-03-01

    Brain structural covariance networks (SCNs) composed of regions with correlated variation are altered in neuropsychiatric disease and change with age. Little is known about the development of SCNs in early childhood, a period of rapid cortical growth. We investigated the development of structural and maturational covariance networks, including default, dorsal attention, primary visual and sensorimotor networks in a longitudinal population of 118 children after birth to 2 years old and compared them with intrinsic functional connectivity networks. We found that structural covariance of all networks exhibit strong correlations mostly limited to their seed regions. By Age 2, default and dorsal attention structural networks are much less distributed compared with their functional maps. The maturational covariance maps, however, revealed significant couplings in rates of change between distributed regions, which partially recapitulate their functional networks. The structural and maturational covariance of the primary visual and sensorimotor networks shows similar patterns to the corresponding functional networks. Results indicate that functional networks are in place prior to structural networks, that correlated structural patterns in adult may arise in part from coordinated cortical maturation, and that regional co-activation in functional networks may guide and refine the maturation of SCNs over childhood development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Newton law in covariant unimodular F(R) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the Newton law in the unimodular F(R) gravity. In the standard F(R) gravity, due to the extra scalar mode, there often appear the large corrections to the Newton law and such models are excluded by the experiments and/or the observations. In the unimodular F(R) gravity, however, the extra scalar mode become not to be dynamical due to the unimodular constraint and there is not any correction to the Newton law. Even in the unimodular Einstein gravity, the Newton law is reproduced but the mechanism is a little bit different from that in the unimodular F(R) gravity. We also investigate the unimodular F(R) gravity in the covariant formulation. In the covariant formulation, we include the three-form field. We show that the three-form field could not have any unwanted property, like ghost nor correction to the Newton law. In the covariant formulation, however, the above extra scalar mode becomes dynamical and could give a correction to the Newton law. We also show that there are no difference in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) dynamics in the non-covariant and covariant formulation.

  3. A simple procedure for the comparison of covariance matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carlos

    2012-11-21

    Comparing the covariation patterns of populations or species is a basic step in the evolutionary analysis of quantitative traits. Here I propose a new, simple method to make this comparison in two population samples that is based on comparing the variance explained in each sample by the eigenvectors of its own covariance matrix with that explained by the covariance matrix eigenvectors of the other sample. The rationale of this procedure is that the matrix eigenvectors of two similar samples would explain similar amounts of variance in the two samples. I use computer simulation and morphological covariance matrices from the two morphs in a marine snail hybrid zone to show how the proposed procedure can be used to measure the contribution of the matrices orientation and shape to the overall differentiation. I show how this procedure can detect even modest differences between matrices calculated with moderately sized samples, and how it can be used as the basis for more detailed analyses of the nature of these differences. The new procedure constitutes a useful resource for the comparison of covariance matrices. It could fill the gap between procedures resulting in a single, overall measure of differentiation, and analytical methods based on multiple model comparison not providing such a measure.

  4. A simple procedure for the comparison of covariance matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Comparing the covariation patterns of populations or species is a basic step in the evolutionary analysis of quantitative traits. Here I propose a new, simple method to make this comparison in two population samples that is based on comparing the variance explained in each sample by the eigenvectors of its own covariance matrix with that explained by the covariance matrix eigenvectors of the other sample. The rationale of this procedure is that the matrix eigenvectors of two similar samples would explain similar amounts of variance in the two samples. I use computer simulation and morphological covariance matrices from the two morphs in a marine snail hybrid zone to show how the proposed procedure can be used to measure the contribution of the matrices orientation and shape to the overall differentiation. Results I show how this procedure can detect even modest differences between matrices calculated with moderately sized samples, and how it can be used as the basis for more detailed analyses of the nature of these differences. Conclusions The new procedure constitutes a useful resource for the comparison of covariance matrices. It could fill the gap between procedures resulting in a single, overall measure of differentiation, and analytical methods based on multiple model comparison not providing such a measure. PMID:23171139

  5. A simple procedure for the comparison of covariance matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparing the covariation patterns of populations or species is a basic step in the evolutionary analysis of quantitative traits. Here I propose a new, simple method to make this comparison in two population samples that is based on comparing the variance explained in each sample by the eigenvectors of its own covariance matrix with that explained by the covariance matrix eigenvectors of the other sample. The rationale of this procedure is that the matrix eigenvectors of two similar samples would explain similar amounts of variance in the two samples. I use computer simulation and morphological covariance matrices from the two morphs in a marine snail hybrid zone to show how the proposed procedure can be used to measure the contribution of the matrices orientation and shape to the overall differentiation. Results I show how this procedure can detect even modest differences between matrices calculated with moderately sized samples, and how it can be used as the basis for more detailed analyses of the nature of these differences. Conclusions The new procedure constitutes a useful resource for the comparison of covariance matrices. It could fill the gap between procedures resulting in a single, overall measure of differentiation, and analytical methods based on multiple model comparison not providing such a measure.

  6. Covariant Lyapunov vectors of chaotic Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M; Paul, M R

    2016-06-01

    We explore numerically the high-dimensional spatiotemporal chaos of Rayleigh-Bénard convection using covariant Lyapunov vectors. We integrate the three-dimensional and time-dependent Boussinesq equations for a convection layer in a shallow square box geometry with an aspect ratio of 16 for very long times and for a range of Rayleigh numbers. We simultaneously integrate many copies of the tangent space equations in order to compute the covariant Lyapunov vectors. The dynamics explored has fractal dimensions of 20≲D_{λ}≲50, and we compute on the order of 150 covariant Lyapunov vectors. We use the covariant Lyapunov vectors to quantify the degree of hyperbolicity of the dynamics and the degree of Oseledets splitting and to explore the temporal and spatial dynamics of the Lyapunov vectors. Our results indicate that the chaotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Bénard convection is nonhyperbolic for all of the Rayleigh numbers we have explored. Our results yield that the entire spectrum of covariant Lyapunov vectors that we have computed are tangled as indicated by near tangencies with neighboring vectors. A closer look at the spatiotemporal features of the Lyapunov vectors suggests contributions from structures at two different length scales with differing amounts of localization.

  7. Covariant methods for calculating the low-energy effective action in quantum field theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Avramidi, I G

    1994-01-01

    We continue the development of the effective covariant methods for calculating the heat kernel and the one-loop effective action in quantum field theory and quantum gravity. The status of the low-energy approximation in quantum gauge theories and quantum gravity is discussed in detail on the basis of analyzing the local Schwinger - De Witt expansion. It is argued that the low-energy limit, when defined in a covariant way, should be related to background fields with covariantly constant curvature, gauge field strength and potential. Some new approaches for calculating the low-energy heat kernel assuming a covariantly constant background are proposed. The one-loop low-energy effective action in Yang-Mills theory in flat space with arbitrary compact simple gauge group and arbitrary matter on a covariantly constant background is calculated. The stability problem of the chromomagnetic (Savvidy-type) vacuum is analyzed. It is shown, that this type of vacuum structure can be stable only in the case when more than on...

  8. NParCov3: A SAS/IML Macro for Nonparametric Randomization-Based Analysis of Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Zink

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of covariance serves two important purposes in a randomized clinical trial. First, there is a reduction of variance for the treatment effect which provides more powerful statistical tests and more precise confidence intervals. Second, it provides estimates of the treatment effect which are adjusted for random imbalances of covariates between the treatment groups. The nonparametric analysis of covariance method of Koch, Tangen, Jung, and Amara (1998 defines a very general methodology using weighted least-squares to generate covariate-adjusted treatment effects with minimal assumptions. This methodology is general in its applicability to a variety of outcomes, whether continuous, binary, ordinal, incidence density or time-to-event. Further, its use has been illustrated in many clinical trial settings, such as multi-center, dose-response and non-inferiority trials.NParCov3 is a SAS/IML macro written to conduct the nonparametric randomization-based covariance analyses of Koch et al. (1998. The software can analyze a variety of outcomes and can account for stratification. Data from multiple clinical trials will be used for illustration.

  9. IPv6 Protocol Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    With the emerging of next generation Intemet protocol (IPv6), it is expected to replace the current version of Internet protocol (IPv4) that will be exhausted in the near future. Besides providing adequate address space, some other new features are included into the new 128 bits of IP such as IP auto configuration, quality of service, simple routing capability, security, mobility and multicasting. The current protocol analyzer will not be able to handle IPv6 packets. This paper will focus on developing protocol analyzer that decodes IPv6 packet. IPv6 protocol analyzer is an application module,which is able to decode the IPv6 packet and provide detail breakdown of the construction of the packet. It has to understand the detail construction of the IPv6, and provide a high level abstraction of bits and bytes of the IPv6 packet.Thus it increases network administrators' understanding of a network protocol,helps he/she in solving protocol related problem in a IPv6 network environment.

  10. A neural circuit covarying with social hierarchy in macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryAnn P Noonan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite widespread interest in social dominance, little is known of its neural correlates in primates. We hypothesized that social status in primates might be related to individual variation in subcortical brain regions implicated in other aspects of social and emotional behavior in other mammals. To examine this possibility we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which affords the taking of quantitative measurements noninvasively, both of brain structure and of brain function, across many regions simultaneously. We carried out a series of tests of structural and functional MRI (fMRI data in 25 group-living macaques. First, a deformation-based morphometric (DBM approach was used to show that gray matter in the amygdala, brainstem in the vicinity of the raphe nucleus, and reticular formation, hypothalamus, and septum/striatum of the left hemisphere was correlated with social status. Second, similar correlations were found in the same areas in the other hemisphere. Third, similar correlations were found in a second data set acquired several months later from a subset of the same animals. Fourth, the strength of coupling between fMRI-measured activity in the same areas was correlated with social status. The network of subcortical areas, however, had no relationship with the sizes of individuals' social networks, suggesting the areas had a simple and direct relationship with social status. By contrast a second circuit in cortex, comprising the midsuperior temporal sulcus and anterior and dorsal prefrontal cortex, covaried with both individuals' social statuses and the social network sizes they experienced. This cortical circuit may be linked to the social cognitive processes that are taxed by life in more complex social networks and that must also be used if an animal is to achieve a high social status.

  11. ATM and Internet protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Bentall, M; Turton, B

    1998-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) is a protocol that allows data, sound and video being transferred between independent networks via ISDN links to be supplied to, and interpreted by, the various system protocols.ATM and Internet Protocol explains the working of the ATM and B-ISDN network for readers with a basic understanding of telecommunications. It provides a handy reference to everyone working with ATM who may not require the full standards in detail, but need a comprehensive guide to ATM. A substantial section is devoted to the problems of running IP over ATM and there is some discussion o

  12. Playing With Population Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Koegler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Population protocols have been introduced as a model of sensor networks consisting of very limited mobile agents with no control over their own movement: A collection of anonymous agents, modeled by finite automata, interact in pairs according to some rules. Predicates on the initial configurations that can be computed by such protocols have been characterized under several hypotheses. We discuss here whether and when the rules of interactions between agents can be seen as a game from game theory. We do so by discussing several basic protocols.

  13. Linear Logical Voting Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeYoung, Henry; Schürmann, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    . In response, we promote linear logic as a high-level language for both specifying and implementing voting protocols. Our linear logical specifications of the single-winner first-past-the-post (SW- FPTP) and single transferable vote (STV) protocols demonstrate that this approach leads to concise......Current approaches to electronic implementations of voting protocols involve translating legal text to source code of an imperative programming language. Because the gap between legal text and source code is very large, it is difficult to trust that the program meets its legal specification...... implementations that closely correspond to their legal specification, thereby increasing trust....

  14. Sparse reduced-rank regression with covariance estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lisha

    2014-12-08

    Improving the predicting performance of the multiple response regression compared with separate linear regressions is a challenging question. On the one hand, it is desirable to seek model parsimony when facing a large number of parameters. On the other hand, for certain applications it is necessary to take into account the general covariance structure for the errors of the regression model. We assume a reduced-rank regression model and work with the likelihood function with general error covariance to achieve both objectives. In addition we propose to select relevant variables for reduced-rank regression by using a sparsity-inducing penalty, and to estimate the error covariance matrix simultaneously by using a similar penalty on the precision matrix. We develop a numerical algorithm to solve the penalized regression problem. In a simulation study and real data analysis, the new method is compared with two recent methods for multivariate regression and exhibits competitive performance in prediction and variable selection.

  15. Full covariance of CMB and lensing reconstruction power spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Peloton, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Carron, Julien; Zahn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    CMB and lensing reconstruction power spectra are powerful probes of cosmology. However they are correlated, since the CMB power spectra are lensed and the lensing reconstruction is constructed using CMB multipoles. We perform a full analysis of the auto- and cross-covariances, including polarization power spectra and minimum variance lensing estimators, and compare with simulations of idealized future CMB-S4 observations. Covariances sourced by fluctuations in the unlensed CMB and instrumental noise can largely be removed by using a realization-dependent subtraction of lensing reconstruction noise, leaving a relatively simple covariance model that is dominated by lensing-induced terms and well described by a small number of principal components. The correlations between the CMB and lensing power spectra will be detectable at the level of $\\sim 5\\sigma$ for a CMB-S4 mission, and neglecting those could underestimate some parameter error bars by several tens of percent. However we found that the inclusion of ext...

  16. Femtosecond Studies Of Coulomb Explosion Utilizing Covariance Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Card, D A

    2000-01-01

    The studies presented herein elucidate details of the Coulomb explosion event initiated through the interaction of molecular clusters with an intense femtosecond laser beam (≥1 PW/cm2). Clusters studied include ammonia, titanium-hydrocarbon, pyridine, and 7-azaindole. Covariance analysis is presented as a general technique to study the dynamical processes in clusters and to discern whether the fragmentation channels are competitive. Positive covariance determinations identify concerted processes such as the concomitant explosion of protonated cluster ions of asymmetrical size. Anti- covariance mapping is exploited to distinguish competitive reaction channels such as the production of highly charged nitrogen atoms formed at the expense of the protonated members of a cluster ion ensemble. This technique is exemplified in each cluster system studied. Kinetic energy analyses, from experiment and simulation, are presented to fully understand the Coulomb explosion event. A cutoff study strongly suggests that...

  17. Extreme eigenvalues of sample covariance and correlation matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiny, Johannes

    This thesis is concerned with asymptotic properties of the eigenvalues of high-dimensional sample covariance and correlation matrices under an infinite fourth moment of the entries. In the first part, we study the joint distributional convergence of the largest eigenvalues of the sample covariance...... of the problem at hand. We develop a theory for the point process of the normalized eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix in the case where rows and columns of the data are linearly dependent. Based on the weak convergence of this point process we derive the limit laws of various functionals...... of the eigenvalues. In the second part, we show that the largest and smallest eigenvalues of a highdimensional sample correlation matrix possess almost sure non-random limits if the truncated variance of the entry distribution is “almost slowly varying”, a condition we describe via moment properties of self...

  18. Data Covariances from R-Matrix Analyses of Light Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, G.M., E-mail: ghale@lanl.gov; Paris, M.W.

    2015-01-15

    After first reviewing the parametric description of light-element reactions in multichannel systems using R-matrix theory and features of the general LANL R-matrix analysis code EDA, we describe how its chi-square minimization procedure gives parameter covariances. This information is used, together with analytically calculated sensitivity derivatives, to obtain cross section covariances for all reactions included in the analysis by first-order error propagation. Examples are given of the covariances obtained for systems with few resonances ({sup 5}He) and with many resonances ({sup 13}C ). We discuss the prevalent problem of this method leading to cross section uncertainty estimates that are unreasonably small for large data sets. The answer to this problem appears to be using parameter confidence intervals in place of standard errors.

  19. Residual noise covariance for Planck low-resolution data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Keskitalo, R; Cabella, P; Kisner, T; Poutanen, T; Stompor, R; Bartlett, J G; Borrill, J; Cantalupo, C; De Gasperis, G; De Rosa, A; de Troia, G; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hivon, E; Jaffe, A; Keihanen, E; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lawrence, C R; Natoli, P; Paci, F; Polenta, G; Rocha, G

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Develop and validate tools to estimate residual noise covariance in Planck frequency maps. Quantify signal error effects and compare different techniques to produce low-resolution maps. Methods: We derive analytical estimates of covariance of the residual noise contained in low-resolution maps produced using a number of map-making approaches. We test these analytical predictions using Monte Carlo simulations and their impact on angular power spectrum estimation. We use simulations to quantify the level of signal errors incurred in different resolution downgrading schemes considered in this work. Results: We find an excellent agreement between the optimal residual noise covariance matrices and Monte Carlo noise maps. For destriping map-makers, the extent of agreement is dictated by the knee frequency of the correlated noise component and the chosen baseline offset length. The significance of signal striping is shown to be insignificant when properly dealt with. In map resolution downgrading, we find that...

  20. Adaptive Covariance Inflation in a Multi-Resolution Assimilation Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmann, K. S.; Godinez, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    When forecasts are performed using modern data assimilation methods observation and model error can be scaledependent. During data assimilation the blending of error across scales can result in model divergence since largeerrors at one scale can be propagated across scales during the analysis step. Wavelet based multi-resolution analysiscan be used to separate scales in model and observations during the application of an ensemble Kalman filter. However,this separation is done at the cost of implementing an ensemble Kalman filter at each scale. This presents problemswhen tuning the covariance inflation parameter at each scale. We present a method to adaptively tune a scale dependentcovariance inflation vector based on balancing the covariance of the innovation and the covariance of observations ofthe ensemble. Our methods are demonstrated on a one dimensional Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (K-S) model known todemonstrate non-linear interactions between scales.

  1. Galaxy-galaxy lensing estimators and their covariance properties

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Seljak, Uroš; Slosar, Anže; Gonzalez, Jose Vazquez

    2016-01-01

    We study the covariance properties of real space correlation function estimators -- primarily galaxy-shear correlations, or galaxy-galaxy lensing -- using SDSS data for both shear catalogs and lenses (specifically the BOSS LOWZ sample). Using mock catalogs of lenses and sources, we disentangle the various contributions to the covariance matrix and compare them with a simple analytical model. We show that not subtracting the lensing measurement around random points from the measurement around the lens sample is equivalent to performing the measurement using the density field instead of the over-density field, and that this leads to a significant error increase due to an additional term in the covariance. Therefore, this subtraction should be performed regardless of its beneficial effects on systematics. Comparing the error estimates from data and mocks for estimators that involve the over-density, we find that the errors are dominated by the shape noise and lens clustering, that empirically estimated covarianc...

  2. Flavour Covariant Transport Equations: an Application to Resonant Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena, by deriving Markovian master equations that describe the time-evolution of particle number densities in a statistical ensemble with arbitrary flavour content. As an application of this general formalism, we study flavour effects in a scenario of resonant leptogenesis (RL) and obtain the flavour-covariant evolution equations for heavy-neutrino and lepton number densities. This provides a complete and unified description of RL, capturing three relevant physical phenomena: (i) the resonant mixing between the heavy-neutrino states, (ii) coherent oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours, and (iii) quantum decoherence effects in the charged-lepton sector. To illustrate the importance of this formalism, we numerically solve the flavour-covariant rate equations for a minimal RL model and show that the total lepton asymmetry can be enhanced up to one order of magnitude, as compared to that obtained from flavour-diagonal or partially ...

  3. Covariance measurement in the presence of non-synchronous trading and market microstructure noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffin, J.E.; Oomen, R.C.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of covariance estimation when prices are observed non-synchronously and contaminated by i.i.d. microstructure noise. We derive closed form expressions for the bias and variance of three popular covariance estimators, namely realised covariance, realised covariance plus

  4. Neutron Cross Section Covariances for Structural Materials and Fission Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoblit, S.; Cho, Y.-S.; Herman, M.; Mattoon, C. M.; Mughabghab, S. F.; Obložinský, P.; Pigni, M. T.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe neutron cross section covariances for 78 structural materials and fission products produced for the new US evaluated nuclear reaction library ENDF/B-VII.1. Neutron incident energies cover full range from 10 eV to 20 MeV and covariances are primarily provided for capture, elastic and inelastic scattering as well as (n,2n). The list of materials follows priorities defined by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, the major application being data adjustment for advanced fast reactor systems. Thus, in addition to 28 structural materials and 49 fission products, the list includes also 23Na which is important fast reactor coolant. Due to extensive amount of materials, we adopted a variety of methodologies depending on the priority of a specific material. In the resolved resonance region we primarily used resonance parameter uncertainties given in Atlas of Neutron Resonances and either applied the kernel approximation to propagate these uncertainties into cross section uncertainties or resorted to simplified estimates based on integral quantities. For several priority materials we adopted MF32 covariances produced by SAMMY at ORNL, modified by us by adding MF33 covariances to account for systematic uncertainties. In the fast neutron region we resorted to three methods. The most sophisticated was EMPIRE-KALMAN method which combines experimental data from EXFOR library with nuclear reaction modeling and least-squares fitting. The two other methods used simplified estimates, either based on the propagation of nuclear reaction model parameter uncertainties or on a dispersion analysis of central cross section values in recent evaluated data files. All covariances were subject to quality assurance procedures adopted recently by CSEWG. In addition, tools were developed to allow inspection of processed covariances and computed integral quantities, and for comparing these values to data from the Atlas and the astrophysics database KADoNiS.

  5. Neutron Cross Section Covariances for Structural Materials and Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoblit, S.; Hoblit,S.; Cho,Y.-S.; Herman,M.; Mattoon,C.M.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Oblozinsky,P.; Pigni,M.T.; Sonzogni,A.A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe neutron cross section covariances for 78 structural materials and fission products produced for the new US evaluated nuclear reaction library ENDF/B-VII.1. Neutron incident energies cover full range from 10{sup -5} eV to 20 MeV and covariances are primarily provided for capture, elastic and inelastic scattering as well as (n,2n). The list of materials follows priorities defined by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, the major application being data adjustment for advanced fast reactor systems. Thus, in addition to 28 structural materials and 49 fission products, the list includes also {sup 23}Na which is important fast reactor coolant. Due to extensive amount of materials, we adopted a variety of methodologies depending on the priority of a specific material. In the resolved resonance region we primarily used resonance parameter uncertainties given in Atlas of Neutron Resonances and either applied the kernel approximation to propagate these uncertainties into cross section uncertainties or resorted to simplified estimates based on integral quantities. For several priority materials we adopted MF32 covariances produced by SAMMY at ORNL, modified by us by adding MF33 covariances to account for systematic uncertainties. In the fast neutron region we resorted to three methods. The most sophisticated was EMPIRE-KALMAN method which combines experimental data from EXFOR library with nuclear reaction modeling and least-squares fitting. The two other methods used simplified estimates, either based on the propagation of nuclear reaction model parameter uncertainties or on a dispersion analysis of central cross section values in recent evaluated data files. All covariances were subject to quality assurance procedures adopted recently by CSEWG. In addition, tools were developed to allow inspection of processed covariances and computed integral quantities, and for comparing these values to data from the Atlas and the astrophysics database KADoNiS.

  6. Efficient multiparty protocols via log-depth threshold formulae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Gil; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Ishai, Yuval;

    2013-01-01

    We put forward a new approach for the design of efficient multiparty protocols: Design a protocol π for a small number of parties (say, 3 or 4) which achieves security against a single corrupted party. Such protocols are typically easy to construct, as they may employ techniques that do not scale...... of efficient protocols for Secure Multiparty Computation (MPC) in the presence of an honest majority, as well as broadcast protocols from point-to-point channels and a 2-cast primitive. We obtain new results on MPC over blackbox groups and other algebraic structures. The above results rely on the following...

  7. Positive semidefinite integrated covariance estimation, factorizations and asynchronicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauri, Orimar; Lunde, Asger; Laurent, Sébastien;

    2017-01-01

    An estimator of the ex-post covariation of log-prices under asynchronicity and microstructure noise is proposed. It uses the Cholesky factorization of the covariance matrix in order to exploit the heterogeneity in trading intensities to estimate the different parameters sequentially with as many...... observations as possible. The estimator is positive semidefinite by construction. We derive asymptotic results and confirm their good finite sample properties by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. In the application we forecast portfolio Value-at-Risk and sector risk exposures for a portfolio of 52 stocks. We...

  8. The covariant electromagnetic Casimir effect for real conducting spherical shells

    CERN Document Server

    Razmi, H

    2016-01-01

    Using the covariant electromagnetic Casimir effect (previously introduced for real conducting cylindrical shells [1]), the Casimir force experienced by a spherical shell, under Dirichlet boundary condition, is calculated. The renormalization procedure is based on the plasma cut-off frequency for real conductors. The real case of a gold (silver) sphere is considered and the corresponding electromagnetic Casimir force is computed. In the covariant approach, there isn't any decomposition of fields to TE and TM modes; thus, we do not need to consider the Neumann boundary condition in parallel to the Dirichlet problem and then add their corresponding results.

  9. Some Algorithms for the Conditional Mean Vector and Covariance Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Monahan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider here the problem of computing the mean vector and covariance matrix for a conditional normal distribution, considering especially a sequence of problems where the conditioning variables are changing. The sweep operator provides one simple general approach that is easy to implement and update. A second, more goal-oriented general method avoids explicit computation of the vector and matrix, while enabling easy evaluation of the conditional density for likelihood computation or easy generation from the conditional distribution. The covariance structure that arises from the special case of an ARMA(p, q time series can be exploited for substantial improvements in computational efficiency.

  10. A Blind Detection Algorithm Utilizing Statistical Covariance in Cognitive Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxue Li

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As the expression of performance parameters are obtained using asymptotic method in most blind covariance detection algorithm, the paper presented a new blind detection algorithm using cholesky factorization. Utilizing random matrix theory, we derived the performance parameters using non-asymptotic method. The proposed method overcomes the noise uncertainty problem and performs well without any information about the channel, primary user and noise. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the performance parameters expressions are correct and the new detector outperforms the other blind covariance detectors.

  11. On spectral distribution of high dimensional covariation matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Claudio; Podolskij, Mark

    In this paper we present the asymptotic theory for spectral distributions of high dimensional covariation matrices of Brownian diffusions. More specifically, we consider N-dimensional Itô integrals with time varying matrix-valued integrands. We observe n equidistant high frequency data points...... of the underlying Brownian diffusion and we assume that N/n -> c in (0,oo). We show that under a certain mixed spectral moment condition the spectral distribution of the empirical covariation matrix converges in distribution almost surely. Our proof relies on method of moments and applications of graph theory....

  12. A scale invariant covariance structure on jet space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Loog, Marco; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers scale invariance of statistical image models. We study statistical scale invariance of the covariance structure of jet space under scale space blurring and derive the necessary structure and conditions of the jet covariance matrix in order for it to be scale invariant. As part...... of the derivation, we introduce a blurring operator At that acts on jet space contrary to doing spatial filtering and a scaling operator Ss. The stochastic Brownian image model is an example of a class of functions which are scale invariant with respect to the operators At and Ss. This paper also includes empirical...

  13. Covariant Description of Transformation Optics in Linear and Nonlinear Media

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    The technique of transformation optics (TO) is an elegant method for the design of electromagnetic media with tailored optical properties. In this paper, we focus on the formal structure of TO theory. By using a complete covariant formalism, we present a general transformation law that holds for arbitrary materials including bianisotropic, magneto-optical, nonlinear and moving media. Due to the principle of general covariance, the formalism is applicable to arbitrary space-time coordinate transformations and automatically accounts for magneto-electric coupling terms. The formalism is demonstrated for the calculation of the second harmonic generation in a twisted TO concentrator.

  14. Fission yield covariances for JEFF: A Bayesian Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leray Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The JEFF library does not contain fission yield covariances, but simply best estimates and uncertainties. This situation is not unique as all libraries are facing this deficiency, firstly due to the lack of a defined format. An alternative approach is to provide a set of random fission yields, themselves reflecting covariance information. In this work, these random files are obtained combining the information from the JEFF library (fission yields and uncertainties and the theoretical knowledge from the GEF code. Examples of this method are presented for the main actinides together with their impacts on simple burn-up and decay heat calculations.

  15. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  16. High-dimensional covariance matrix estimation with missing observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lounici, Karim

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of high-dimensional approximately low-rank covariance matrix estimation with missing observations. We propose a simple procedure computationally tractable in high-dimension and that does not require imputation of the missing data. We establish non-asymptotic sparsity oracle inequalities for the estimation of the covariance matrix with the Frobenius and spectral norms, valid for any setting of the sample size and the dimension of the observations. We further establish minimax lower bounds showing that our rates are minimax optimal up to a logarithmic factor.

  17. Estimating surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical ogive optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, Søren Ejling;

    2015-01-01

    Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low-frequency con......Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low...

  18. On Variance and Covariance for Bounded Linear Operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia Shiang LIN

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we initiate a study of covariance and variance for two operators on a Hilbert space, proving that the c-v (covariance-variance) inequality holds, which is equivalent to the CauchySchwarz inequality. As for applications of the c-v inequality we prove uniformly the Bernstein-type incqualities and equalities, and show the generalized Heinz-Kato-Furuta-type inequalities and equalities,from which a generalization and sharpening of Reid's inequality is obtained. We show that every operator can be expressed as a p-hyponormal-type, and a hyponornal-type operator. Finally, some new characterizations of the Furuta inequality are given.

  19. 1996 : Track Count Protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge's Track Count Protocol is to provide an index to the population size of game animals inhabiting St. Vincent Island.

  20. Quantum deniable authentication protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Min; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Yang, Yu-Guang

    2014-07-01

    The proposed quantum identity authentication schemes only involved authentication between two communicators, but communications with deniability capability are often desired in electronic applications such as online negotiation and electronic voting. In this paper, we proposed a quantum deniable authentication protocol. According to the property of unitary transformation and quantum one-way function, this protocol can provide that only the specified receiver can identify the true source of a given message and the specified receiver cannot prove the source of the message to a third party by a transcript simulation algorithm. Moreover, the quantum key distribution and quantum encryption algorithm guarantee the unconditional security of this scheme. Security analysis results show that this protocol satisfies the basic security requirements of deniable authentication protocol such as completeness and deniability and can withstand the forgery attack, impersonation attack, inter-resend attack.